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TAKE A HIKE

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TOP 5 HIKING APPS @TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE

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TOP 5 UK HIKES DECEMBER 2013

FOR ALL WALKS OF LIFE

WWW.TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE.WORDPRESS.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE MONTH, TAKEN BY HIKERS, FOR HIKERS.

WHEN WALKING WENT WRONG

SAFETY IN YOUR BACKPACK

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HIKING HOLIDAY OF THE MONTH FEATURING: NETHER WASDALE, THE LAKE DISTRICT Photogrpah by Ken Lund


MEET THE TEAM Anja Swan

EDITOR -IN-CHIEF Helen Clarke

SUB EDITOR Photogrpah by Paul Beattie

Jenny Gibbon

FEATURE EDITOR Rachel Flynn

PICTURE EDITOR


HELLO HIKERS Welcome to the very first edition of Take a Hike magazine, written by keen enthusiasts for all walks of life. Is their anything more rewarding than returning home after a brisk walk in the midst of winter? With the new year fast approaching, our editors’ have prepared a month of can’t miss features, including the photography competition of the month and a hikers guide to mountain safety. So if you have a passion for walking, Take a Hike can show you the way to a hiking hobby step-by-step. With the world going digital all around us, Take a Hike values life outside the pixels, so shut down your screens, take-a-break and Take a Hike!

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CONTENTS...

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Photographs by Flikr users


FEATURES OF THE MONTH AND PHOTOGRAPHY P 8-9:

HOLIDAY OF THE MONTH

P 10-11:

HIKING ON WHEELS

P14-15:

A HIKE IN MOONLIGHT

P22-23:

CLICKING AWAY AT THE COUNTRYSIDE

P24-27:

PHOTO COMPETITION OF THE MONTH

P28-31:

PEEBLES A WEE BEAUTY

P40-41:

HIKING CLUB OF THE MONTH

EASY READS, TIPS AND TRICKS P 6-7: TOP 5 UK HIKES

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE. WORDPRESS.COM

P21: ARE WE LOSING TOUCH WITH NATURE? P42-43: COAST TO COAST P46-47: TOP 5 FOODS FOR HIKING P48-49: HIKING GOES DIGITAL

HEALTH AND DIET P13: WALKING YOUR WAY TO HEALH

FOLLOW US @TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE

P44-45: A HIKERS GUIDE TO A HEALTHY DIET

EQUIPMENT AND SAFETY P17:

SAFETY IN YOUR BACKPACK

P18-19:

WHEN WALKING WENT WRONG...

INTERNATIONAL P34-35: LIFE AS A SHERPA P36-37: CLIMBING KILI P38-39: ESCAPING TIBET

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Take A Hike


By Jenny Gibbon

TOP 5 HIKES

As every hiking enthusiast knows; you can’t beat a good view, stunning scenery, and the challenge of a few steep inclines. Here at Take A Hike Magazine we’ve been stamping our muddy boots and shaking our hiking sticks in an attempt to compile the top five hikes across the UK. It’s been tough, but in no particular order here they are:

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Ashford in the Water

Famed for it’s annual well-dressing event, the village of Ashford-in-the-Water is a charming destination from where to begin and end this circular walk. Seeped in history the five and a half miles hike passes Magpie Mine a historic lead mining fort, and edges the Great Shacklow Wood before arriving back into the village center, for a well-deserved cup of tea. The 300 year old Magpie Mine, is a point of interest for those fascinated by tales of haunted history as allegedly a curse was placed on the mine causing the deaths of several minors in 1833. A steady incline reveals extensive views up the valley and rocky paths runs along the Great Shacklow Woods following the river Wye, back to Ashford in the Water. “The walk is a great way to escape to and unwind in nature” says Vicky Horsforth, a resident of Ashford-in-the-Water.

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St Cuthbert’s Way

Crossing the border from England to Scotland this hike is 62.5 miles in length and takes an average of four to six days to complete. Often referred to as a pilgrimage, it retraces the final steps of one of the most important saints in England, St Cuthbert, ending on Holy Island in Lindisfame. Easy stretches along the River Tweed, farmland and eventually sandy beaches mean the walk suits novice and seasoned hikers alike. “The real magic is crossing the causeway at low tide particularly when the sun beams down,” said walking enthusiast Lorna Marshall, Hiking guide. “The coastal scenery and rugged landscape is one of the best in Britain, and a real highlight of the walk.”


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Photograph by Arild Nybø

Froggatt Edge

Following the River Dewent, through woods of bluebells and views across to Sir William Hill, Froggatt Edge in Derbyshire’s Peak district is a delight to hike. 5.5miles in length this is a gentle ramble for admiring the beautiful surroundings. Passing through a kissing gate you reach Froggatte Edge and views of Derwent Valley can be seen from a nearby rocky outcrop. The enchantment of the forests continue into the final few miles as the path enters a ‘Welsh Fairy Glen’ with a babbling stream running between the rocks. The route has fond memories for Angela Inguanta, café owner in Derwent, after her husband proposed to her here it holds a special place in her heart: “It’s a very romantic and special spot,” she says.

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Cat Bells

Short yet sweet, this hike is just less than 3.5 miles, perfect for all ages and abilities, a great one for novice hikers, and a family day out. Distinct in shape the conical grassy incline of Cat Bells provides stunning views from the summit. On a clear day Derwent water can be viewed to the South and the Dodds leading on to Helvellyn in the Easterly direction. The view from the peak commands attention and is a perfect spot to picnic. Hotel owner David Spencer said: “I recommend to all my customers they should complete this walk on their first day. It’s a great way to get a feel for what the Lake District and Keswick is all about.”

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Pembrokeshire Coast

186 miles in length, this hike winds through some of the most stunning coastal scenery on offer in the UK. Indeed the cliffs on the north uplands of Pembrokeshire reach over 330 feet in height providing extensive viewpoints from which to overlook the clear blue waters below. April to June, wild flowers litter the cliff tops, whilst sea birds hover in the bracing winds. Nature is a large part of the beauty along this undulating hike., which talks an average of twelve days to complete.

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A TAKE HIKE’S By Anja Swan

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HOLIDAY OF THE MONTH

This month’s holiday destination offers incredible scenery, interesting history and inviting accommodation.

THE WASTWATER SCREES, NETHER WASDALE, THE LAKE DISTRICT

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he quaint village of Nether Wasdale is a breath of fresh air for people living amongst the hustle and bustle of a busy city. The white stone cottages line the ancient roadside, and with less than a thousand residents, this little gem tucked away in the heart of the Cumbrian countryside offers tranquil walks and outdoor activities. Nether Wasdale is situated near the river Irt at the southern end of Wastwater, which at 260 foot, is the deepest lake in England. The views are spectacular, and with so many hiking routes available, it can be difficult for walkers to decide which one to explore first. The Wasdale Screes route gives hikers the chance to

experience the magnificent Cumbrian landscape. Voted as ‘Britain’s Best View’ in 2007, the views overlook the stunning Wastwater. The chosen route begins in a woody forest near Nether Wasdale, which is popular with locals walking their dogs. The first few kilometres will introduce a rather intimidating incline, but don’t worry; this only lasts for around twenty minutes. Once the strenuous slant has been tackled, a public footpath emerges and directs walkers to a number of routes, Wasdale Screes being one of them. The walk itself mostly consists of hills and fields, which doesn’t sound like a description of one of the most beautiful walks in the UK, but this walk is all about the spectacular view it grants you once you reach

Photograph by Tim Jones of Wastwater, Cumbria.

s ’ n i a it r B ‘ ” d . e 7 t 0 o 0 2 “V n i ’ iew V t s Be


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Photograph by Lesley Corr

e l b a l ai v a f s o e y k i t e h i “The huge var a r .” y e f r f e o scen the summit. The dramatic and inspiring outlook onto Wastwater is most certainly worth the walk. Amba Gobie, 23, who lives in the nearby village of Seascale in Cumbria, claims this walk provides one of the nicest views in England. “I like to do this trek a few times a month because the view is just so awe-inspiring. It really does take your breath away. The hike is slightly challenging for someone with less experience, but for an experienced hiker it is like a walk in the park. My advice would be to take a sandwich and a camera and spend at least an hour enjoying the panoramic views.” The trek takes around four hours, but if you want a more challenging route, you can always detour around the southern shore for a strenuous decline. Walking along the southern shore of Wastwater gives beautiful sights, however hikers must also tackle unpleasant terrain. Steve Ashall, 34, a hiking guide from Gosforth in the Lake District, stresses that walkers must watch out for certain routes. “Loose boulders are common this side of the lake and I have been witness to many people breaking their ankles on this rough ground.” Steve urges tourists to read hiking guides before attempting this walk. “It can be dangerous and

difficult to negotiate, but overall the entire walk is a real pleasure. Just make sure you have the right gear and have told someone your hiking plans if you are walking alone. Telephone signal is poor in Cumbria, so mobile phones can not be relied upon.” Once the summit has been reached and the views have been soaked up, start the decline down to Nether Wasdale, where there are a few local pubs offering great local food and ales. Lesley and Mark have been owners of the Strands Inn for over ten years and want to promote hiking in their area. “Most of our business in the summer months comes from holiday hikers. We offer an open fire to warm the walkers’ toes and a traditional menu offering steak pie and home-brewed ale. We also provide cosy accommodation and guided tours of our beautiful surroundings. The walks available are vast and offer a huge variety of scenery, catering to all fitness levels.” “There isn’t a more beautiful place in England to hike.” Said Howard Flynn, 62, a local at the Strands Inn and walking enthusiast. “It may not be the most publicised area of the Lake District, but I have lived in Cumbria for over fifty years and for me, it certainly is one of the most beautiful.”


By Helen Clarke

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ith 1 in 5 people in the UK living with a disability, it’s evident that disabled access is vital to improving our humble island.

While disabled access within built up areas like towns and cities has improved enormously in the last 10 years, once you look past the concrete jungle, Britain’s beautiful countryside is still largely off limits for those with disabilities. Cross-country access is extremely important and its finally gaining awareness with the population. Through the use of specially made mobility scooters designed for the more rugged terrain of the countryside, many handicapped individuals are able to enjoy the outdoors, without the common limitations they would face in a regular disabled transportation vehicle.

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO GET PEOPLE OUT THERE, DISABLED HIKING IS NOT PROMOTED ENOUGH AROUND THE UK AND PEOPLE NEED TO REALISE THAT ANYONE CAN ENJOY THE BRITISH OUTDOORS”

With associations aimed at disabled hiking beginning to emerge, disabled access is gradually being introduced on both footpaths and trails, and it seems that the issue of rural access is being steadily pursued. Hiker and outdoor enthusiast, Mark Newton, 45, suffered a life changing injury to his right leg whilst on holiday in Cyprus in 1991. Since the accident, Mark has been using a mobility scooter to get out and travel across the countryside. “My scooter enables me to do things I wouldn’t normally be able to do with my disability. It has made an amazing difference to my life.” Before his accident, Mark was a keen hiker and regularly trekked across British landscapes; however not wanting to settle for a life confined to concrete, he continues this passion with the aid of his scooter, which was specially created for his hiking needs. “The countryside is for everyone, a lot of problems occur with kissing gates and styles, great for able bodied but not for the likes of me. My scooter enables me to explore new areas of countryside, however I still have trouble getting through certain gateways.” In 2011, Mark set himself the remarkable chal-


lenge to travel the whole of the British coast in his mobility scooter, raising over £14,000 for charity. “I wanted to raise awareness that people with a physical disability can enjoy the same experiences and reach the same goals as everyone else.”

tating the needs of disabled ramblers, there is still scope to improve access. The ‘Get walking. Keep walking’ disabled section from the UK ramblers website raises concern that the number of accessible routes is limited by the shortage of information on terrain conditions along many paths.

Mark isn’t the only one who knows you can still experience that rewarding feeling after reaching the pinnacle of a hike, whilst in a scooter. There are many clubs and associations all over the UK that promote and encourage disabled walking and access for hikers.

Neil Pedley, hiking enthusiast and founder of the online site ‘access for everyone’ which promotes disabled access across the countryside, supports the on-going awareness of outdoor access, and advocates scooter friendly footpaths.

Hiking association ‘Disabled ramblers’ is a hospitable, community-driven club that encourage rambling for people with limited mobility. With support teams, guides and volunteers on board to help, the club are able to take weekly rambles and discover an assortment of areas across the UK. President of the association, Valerie Rawlings, states: “I believe it’s important to get people out there. Disabled hiking is not promoted enough around the UK and people need to realise that everyone has a right to enjoy the outdoors.” While there is a steady progression in facili-

“I would say that in recent years there has been more attention to ‘disabled access’ by many land owners and local authorities. However, there is a lot more that needs to be done in terms of catering to all disabilities.” Britain’s countryside is well on its way to becoming common ground for everyone, including those with limited mobility. Mark Newton adds: “The support from organisations across the UK is very promising. Hopefully, in the coming years, access will be provided throughout the country, allowing everyone to enjoy walks and hikes.”


RAMP UP THE RED On Friday 7 February we need everyone to Ramp up the Red to help fight the UK’s single biggest killer, coronary heart disease. You can organise a Ramp up the Red event at work, school or anywhere and make a donation to British Heart Foundation.

Visit bhf.org.uk/red or call 08000 316 316 to sign up

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Gretel, aged 4

British Heart Foundation 2013, registered charity in England and Wales (225971) and in Scotland (SC039426)


By Rachel Flynn

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reast cancer awareness month has been and gone for another year. Though breast cancer remains prevalent in many women’s lives, new studies have shown how walking can help to reduce the deadly disease. Many articles have arisen recently regarding how walking can help to reduce the risk of breast cancer. A study published in Cancer Epidemiology concluded those who walked for more than seven hours a week were much less at risk of the disease. As well as this, it appears walking can also help reduce the risk of other health implications. Researchers from the British Heart Foundation collected results from 13 different studies published in the American Heart Foundation. They found that people who exercised for more than four hours a week had a 19% lower risk of high blood pressure.

“WALKING CAN HAVE A RANGE OF POSITIVE BENEFITS FROM LESSENING ANXIETY AND REDUCING TIREDNESS” Doireann Maddock, Senior Cardiac Nurse at the British Heart Foundation, said: “Keeping active doesn’t necessarily have to mean joining a gym either. A brisk lunchtime walk with friends or getting off the bus a few stops earlier can make a difference too.” Walking can be a great way of exercising in a way that it doesn’t have to be strenuous to have an effect. Being active is recommended for everyone with heart problems, high blood pressure and people diagnosed with cancer as well as those who don’t have any health issues. Keeping active is healthy for everyone.

WALKING YOUR WAY TO HEALTH Leading support charity Breast Cancer Care, have recently launched walking campaign, ‘Best Foot Forward’ to urge local walkers to get walking in and around Halifax and Huddersfield. The campaign, aimed at those who have received a cancer diagnosis, encourages local people to get their walking boots. The walk, led by walk leaders starts from a location with easy accessibility and lasts for between 30 minutes and an hour. Walk leader, John Crosby said: “Walking can have a range of positive benefits from lessening anxiety and reducing tiredness, which can be common after treatment, to improving general heath and well-being as well as increasing energy levels.” Betty Spann, 78 was recently given the all clear of breast cancer. During her remission she was told by doctors to adapt at least an hour of walking into her daily routine. Betty said: “I was determined to do everything in order to stay healthy. I was diagnosed with osteoporosis three years ago so I find it difficult to walk for long periods of time. I did simple things like walking to my daughter’s house five minutes down the road, instead of her coming to me. Fingers crossed but things are going well at the moment.” Breast Cancer Care offers the chance to get involved in a range of walking expeditions to raise money for the charity such as climbing Ben Nevis, and also re-tracing the roman tracks of Hadrian’s Wall. It’s clear that walking a little bit more; even if it is only to buy a pint of milk from the shop, will be beneficial in helping to reduce the risks of such life threatening illness . Putting down the car keys and walking an hour each day will have practical impacts on your life. What better excuse is there to walk the paths of the glorious English countryside?

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By Jenny Gibbon

A HIKE IN MOONLIGHT

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raving the bitter elements of a cold November night, students from Sheffield University hiked across the Peak District in aid of charity. Preparing for the challenge, law student, Maria Inguanta, donned her pristine hiking boots, and hitched a backpack to her fluorescent pink coat.

ised what they’d let themselves in for. Plunged into the darkness of the Peak District hills, they struggled to see their way. “Our hand held torches were so feeble, and we gradually got colder so we tried to quicken our pace, but in the dark with limited views of where we were treading, it was difficult.”

The 13 mile moonlit walk is the pinnacle event in Sheffield University’s week long Raising and Giving program (RAG). Throughout the seven-day period, students hold fundraising events to finance local projects and charities around the South Yorkshire area.

Blinded by the night to many of the undulating hills, grassy slopes, and streams across the paths, the group relied heavily on sensing the route. “We could hear water running along close by, but couldn’t make out exactly which direction it was coming from. The dark was so disorientating that we formed a conga line to ensure none of us got lost” laughs Maria. To the hilarity of the group, they detected many of the inclines by tripping up on them.

“The walk is a big thing amongst the students here. I’ve had it on my student bucket list since first year, so I’m so glad, in my final semester I managed to complete it.” Said Maria.

The Three Merry Lad’s pub marked the seven-mile halfway point along Maria and five of her friends taking the route. Landlord, Gary Stephens, on the challenge nicknamed themsaid: “The three miles up to the half selves the Famous Five. Although way point seemed to be the hardest sporty, none had experience hiking: for many participants because people’s “We were pretty naive about the whole boots had begun to rub, and it was thing”, admitted Maria. Yet as they getting cold.” Under the twinkling joined the swarm of 482 other stulights of a fireworks display, steaming dents gathered outside the student’s bowls of chilli washed down with a union, excitement set in. The sound of pint, boosted the moral. a claxon marked the start of the hike at 7pm, and the Famous Five ambled Renewed of energy, the remaining sixthe initial two mile stretch to meet the mile loop back to base camp at Shefborder of the Peak District. field University’s student union, took little under two hours. It wasn’t until the mass of students dispersed and the group of five left “We were cold and tired but so happy the street-lit pavements, they realto have completed it. I felt a real sense

Photographs by @Doug88888, Turn off your computer and go to sleep


of accomplishment” beamed Maria. “Not only had we raised £676.75 pence, for charity, but I had achieved a personal goal in completing the hike.” Event coordinator Abbie Brown said: “The walk is always a great occasion. The students put a lot of effort in and we have a great response from the local public, who help marshal the route, supply food, and donate to the charities. It’s a fantastic community event.”

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By Rachel Flynn

SAFETY IN YOUR BACKPACK WHILE SAFETY OFTEN COMES IN NUMBERS, IT MAY SURPRISE YOU WHAT HELP COULD LAY IN THE BOTTOM OF YOUR BACKPACK.

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hile England offers some of the best views in the UK, these picturesque places can frequently become hazardous situations. Dangers on the fells are often unnoticeable when out completely in the open. Heading for the hills you should always hope for the best, but prepare for the worse. You may assume a waterproof and a sturdy pair of walking boots will set you in good stead to trekking the fells, but there is a list of equipment any walker, novice or amateur shouldn’t hesitate to pack when heading out. Of course there are the obvious items needed for walking such as food to last the day, a map, and an extra layer for when the weather drops. Foods high in protein are especially good as they release energy slowly. Carry food which is easy to pack, which will last all day and isn’t likely to weigh down your backpack. Water is a massive essential when walking, even more so in warmer weather. Without it you are not likely to make it past the first kissing-gate. Emergency items like a mobile phone are vital, although in a lot of places signal may be weak. Along with these items, try to pack a whistle, firstaid kit, Swiss-Army knife, torch and compass. You may think a whistle? However, in circumstances of thick low fog, as well as perhaps being injured and unable to walk this may be your saviour.

Photograph by Matt Stepping

Mountaineer and Great North Ambulance volunteer, Julian Carradice said: “Being fully prepared before a walk is the difference between getting home and being stranded on the hills for the night. We are often called out late night to search for people who have forgotten a torch. People don’t realise how quickly it gets dark once the sun goes down and this often creeps up on people when it is too late.” When it comes to clothing, items that allow your skin to breathe will be beneficial. Fleece jackets are great insulators as well as being incredibly cosy to wear. Waterproof jackets and trousers are an ingenious way to stay dry through the rain, but be sure to pack an extra pair of socks in case you don’t manage to spot that muddy bog. Some items are not always necessary but nonetheless will no doubt be of use on at least one occasion. Sunglasses, sun-cream, insect repellent and blister relief care will almost always be helpful along with tackle such as a magnifying glass and map case; you never can rely on the Great British weather. Ensuring you are fully kitted out before ambling into the unknown gives peace of mind that you aren’t going to be found the next day spooning the local sheep for warmth. Imagining the worst before you get going is a fool-proof way to guarantee you pack all those items you’d never think would come in handy.


By Anja Swan

WHEN WALKING WENT WRONG... Enjoying a hiking holiday in the Lake District can be a dream for some couples trying to have a romantic escape to the countryside, but the tranquillity of Michael and Claire’s romantic getaway was shattered when a wrong turn led to a fatal accident. Photography By David Ian Roberts of The Great North Air Ambulance.

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E S I V D A LD U O W E OF E “W R A W EA B O T .” E G N I K I PEOPL FH O S R E NG A D E H T


Photograph by El Brown.

C I L B PU O T P E .” E S K H “ T A P T O FO

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ichael, 46, and Claire, 41, from Solihull, Birmingham, met whilst lecturing at Birmingham University in 2004, and were married two years later. In May 2008, the newlyweds were visiting family in the Lake District when a peaceful hike led to a fatal accident. Susan Spann, sister of Michael, tries to explain what went wrong that day. “It was quite a nice day on the 30th May. There was no sign of fog or any bad weather approaching the Cumbrian valley.” Susan is not certain where the couple went but thinks it may have been called Sprinkling Tarn, which is near Wasdale Head in West-Cumbria. Susan recalls Michael and Claire had been climbing a footpath to get to the top of their planned route, but eventually came to a part of the footpath that looked to be another route. This is where they made their mistake as they decided to take an unknown route. The path became quite narrow with a long drop over the edge. “They both sat down for a while looking at the view, not knowing the danger they were in. Claire got up and jumped down onto a grassy verge. Whether she lost her footing and fell back or whether it actually gave way no one can be sure, but this eventually resulted in Claire falling more than a hundred feet onto rocks at the bottom of the terrain.

Photography by Eemon Curry

My brother tried to get down to her but also fell, not quite as far, and he broke his shoulder.” Susan remembered that Michael’s mobile had no signal, but fortunately there were other walkers nearby who went back to where there was signal and telephoned the emergency services. The air ambulance eventually came but Claire sadly died at the scene. “The whole family couldn’t believe what had happened. One minute Claire was a vision of health climbing the mountains and taking life in her stride, the next minute she had lost her life. It is deeply sad for all of us.” Susan feels that people need to become more aware of the dangers of hiking and always keep known footpaths. “Let others know exactly where you are going. If Michael had not seen any other walkers, it would have been impossible to contact the emergency services. Also, always check the weather forecast. If there was poor weather that day, the walkers may not have seen the couple and my brother could have suffered the same brutal fate as Claire.” The great North Air Ambulance has received over a thousand callouts this year and want to advise people to be aware of the dangers of hiking. Never try to explore unknown routes as many lead to dangerous verges. Always follow footpath signs and take essential supplies in case of an emergency.”

PLEASE VISIT TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE.WORDPRESS.COM

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By Anja Swan

ARE WE LOSING TOUCH WITH NATURE BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER?

VISIT TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE.WORDPRESS.COM FOR EQUIPTMENT GUIDES AND ADVICE.

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NOT O D IDE S E UK T H U T S IN TY O I T V L I U T F AD L AC O A C % I 3 S “6 HY T.” P R N O I P E OF S NGAG

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Photograph by Richard Carter

Photograph by David Waddington


Photograph by Mike S of Ammanford Walking Club

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his month the inevitable winter has engulfed our beautiful land once again. All hopes that summer will last a little longer has slipped away and all desires to explore the great outdoors are quashed when attempting a walk results in a gust of wind hitting your face like the Titanic hitting the iceberg. Consequently, blame can not be placed for choosing to take refuge indoors. However, recent figures from the British Heart Foundation show that 63% of adults in the UK do not engage in physical activity outside of sport, and only 29% of women and 39% of men in England meet the recommended levels of exercise. These low figures could well be the result of our struggle to adjust to England’s relentless climate. The cold truth is we live in a rather chilly country, but we must resist the comforts of our soft sofas and the entertainment of our touch-screen devices, and invest in nature. All that is needed is a little guidance. The most essential aspect of any enjoyable outing is wearing the correct attire. Clothing in the eyes of the majority is based around fashion trends and looking good and this is reflected in the weather resistance qualities. Prancing around in denim

jackets and those hot pants everybody seems to be wearing these days will result in running for shelter from the unforgiving weather conditions. Instead of designer brands and figure hugging garments, opt for a different type of quality. Devote yourself to finding a good pair of waterproof walking boots, a thick fleecy jumper and water and wind resistant jacket. Once these major items are attained, don’t forget a good quality hat, woolly socks, and gloves. Wrapping up the parts which release the most body heat will help to maintain a comfortable temperature in all weathers. Once you have the right clobber, the Yorkshire countryside will be your oyster. There is plenty to do for everyone. Become familiar with the varied landscapes, tours all over the UK are guided by eager experts who are enthusiastic to help explorers discover Britain’s unique and natural history. Investigate the flagship reserves, take a stroll on a nature route or go pond dipping. Wherever your interests may lie, now is the time to learn more about this amazing country and the nature it has to offer. Don’t let the cold overcome the natural urge to breathe in the fresh air and exercise the way nature intended.

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By Rachel Flynn

CLICKING AWAY AT THE

COUNTRYSIDE

Photographer Mark Gilligan (left) and wing man David Powell-Thompson (right)

The Lake District shows off miles of spectacular panoramic scenery. Each twist of the neck reveals another beautiful shot. Standing on top, Wastwater Lake mirrors the steeping scree which hangs heavily over the glassy water, while the footpath below makes walkers look like Lego pieces.

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or many, walking comes hand in hand with photography; but when you are spoilt for choice with so many eye-widening views, it only means it’s time to call in the professionals. Together, professional photographer Mark Gilligan, and mountaineer, David Powell-Thompson offer walkers the chance to trek some of the most famous footpaths in England whilst learning the wonders of photography by a world renowned landscape photographer. Mark said: “There are two definite areas we work in and have merged them in two entirely different ways. Firstly I run photographic workshops and these are bespoke one to one. Because of Dave’s expertise I offer David as part of the day’s package as his knowledge of the fells gives the workshop another dimension. We then created the idea of planned walks around specific locations led by David, where I offer photographic advice.” Photograph by Doctor Syntax

With agendas already set up till September next year, the two-man team are proving rather popular. The next walking-camera tour, White Moss Common and Alcock Tarn in Grasmere will take trekkers up to six hours to complete. However, with David’s emporium of hillside knowledge, the experience is to be anything but dry; same as the weather then. “I just enjoy being out in the fells and I get pleasure from telling people about the place. I am told that it is my enthusiasm in the work I do that makes it for the clients.” Being England’s largest national park, the magnitude of beauty surrounding the Lake District is often breath-taking. With each lake and valley holding its own distinct character, the extensive list of activities suits anyone from the hardened fell-walker to the complete novice out for a stroll. This gives Mark and Dave masses of areas to explore whilst capturing the essence of picturesque. Mark said: “This area is its own dramatic natural theatre; the terrain and light combining to produce photographic opportunities.”


Cited as one of the world’s top landscape photographers, multi-award winning photographer Mark has been photographing landscapes for over 37 years. Whilst creating images of Scafel, Great Gable and Lingmell, Mark runs landscape photography courses for those wishing to master the art. When asked what makes a photo for him, Mark said: “How long have we got? I love to see something and capture it as it is. Not over processed but real photography that reflects it as it was. It’s the joy of knowing you have created a special moment; literally a one off. Some people think that a beautiful view makes a beautiful picture. It doesn’t; it’s what and how you put elements into it that works.”

“SOME PEOPLE HAVE NEVER EVEN SEEN A MOUNTAIN BEFORE” With assistance of television broadcaster, and fell runner David Powell-Thompson who has contributed research to BBC Wainwrights Walks television series, Mark and Dave guide oblivious walkers through3000km of untouched countryside of the Lake District, uncovering ancient landscapes, foraging wildlife and forgotten fells. “The Lake District is unique in the UK in that it is compact. All the valleys seem to radiate from a central point. There are lakes

in all but a couple of valleys; with many tarns high in the mountains which have their own wonderful settings. Scotland, while having its own drama is so much bigger. North Wales is rather forbidding to the ordinary walker. The Lake District is softer, probably by being greener with so many more fields and forests.” On her 50th birthday Julie Knight from Shropshire treated herself to spending the day with Mark and David. “The day involved being in one of the most stunning places I have ever seen with a chance to learn from an award winning photographer. Wastwater views are some of the most beautiful I have ever seen and the hands on learning from Mark to capture so many stunning images, was a lesson I will never forget.” The carefully planned walks devised by the two are prepared with walkers abilities in mind. “We get all kinds of people on our walks; some people have never even seen a mountain before, which amazes me gasps Mark. “Mostly we attract people who are so passionate and in love with what the different areas of the lakes can offer. All our primary walking areas have their own specialisms but it literally comes down to heart and feeling. Memories and special occasions can cement in people or just an appreciation of beauty and nature makes it a great location for us to offer something we feel truly passionate about.” Photograph by Nick Bramhall

PLEASE VISIT TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE. WORDPRESS.COM

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A TAKE v

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VIEW OF TH

Taking to Twitter to advertise our competition, Take a Hik landscape photography competition. Below is our pic taken by hikers, for

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WINNER OF THIS MONTH’S TAKE A HIKE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION IS... MARK ALMOND, 27, FROM PERTH. THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAPTURES THE BEAUTY THE UK HAS TO OFFER. MARK TOOK THIS PHOTO ON TOP OF THE SUMMIT OF BEN NEVIS. CONGRATULATIONS MARK! SENSATIONAL SNAPSHOT.

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A HIKE’S

By Anja Swan and Rachel Flynn

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THE MONTH

e a Hike were inundated with entries for this months our pick of the very best landscape photographs rs, for hikers.

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Taken by Dan Yates, 27, on holiday in Yorkshire.

2 3 Taken by Nick Robson, 42. A peaceful day on the coast of Dorset.

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Taken by Amber Sky, 25. Picture taken on a sunny day in Northumberland.

4 5 Taken by Rebecca Moon, 34. Taken on the coast-to-coast route.

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By Jenny Gibbon

Photographs by Sergey Yeliseev, Joe Thomissen, Pete, comedy_nose, Whats the rush and Bob Marshall

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F

orty-five minutes drive from the Scottish capital Edinburgh, lies the Royal Burgh of Peebles. Dating back to eleven twenty four, yellowing Victorian buildings line the high street that hums with the hubbub of Scottish ‘town folk’. Unexploited by tourism and generic high street chains, the town feels like a hidden gem. Great firs contour the valleys like regimented soldiers, and fields of purple heather border the rugged pathways. This is a destination to be placed at the very top of every hiker’s ‘must do’ list. Hidden away at the foot of the Glentress Forest, Peebles attracts cyclists, and hikers alike. Whether it’s a leisurely stroll or a strenuous hike there are gradients to please all abilities. Earlier this year, Peebles officially saw the opening of the Tweed Valley Railway Path, a six-mile stretch, right across the hills with spectacular panoramas. The path starting in Peebles passes through Eshiels, and Cardrona before ending in

Innerleithen, following the way of the old Peebles to Galashiels railway line. The challenging terrain winds through four of the Border hamlets finally descending from the ridge of the hills into Innerleithen, the halfway point. One of the longest walks consists of a thirteen mile, mixed terrain hike, known as ‘The John Buchan Way’. Most famous for his novel The Thirty Nine Steps, Buchan’s connection with the Border region, lie in his early life having spent some of his formative years here. Beginning on the footpath along the river Tweed, this walk provides stunning views from as high as eight hundred meters and covers points of historic interest en route. Crossing the choppy River Tweed the valley dips down into Kirk Stobo. At this halfway point, stands one of the Border’s oldest churches dating back six centuries. A stained glass window depicts the legendary magician, Merlin, being baptised by St Mungo. The century’s old building provides a perfect place for a picnic stop, or a landmark from which the bus can rescue tired trekkers from the further 6 or so miles to the finish.


way to rare Scottish wildlife. It’s far stretching greenery attracts birds of prey including Kestrels and Osprey. Between the months of April and August, Osprey, Falcons, and white-tailed Sea Eagles breed in the Glentress Forest. During March and May the bleating chorus of newborn lambs can be heard, setting an idyllic country scene. Mike Isherwood, an Englishman was so captivated by a visit to the tranquil town, that he made the move north. “There is so much unspoiled beauty it is the perfect place to come for quiet contemplation. There is immediate access to wilderness and solitude but with such convenient links to Edinburgh I never feel cut off.”

The Scottish weather is somewhat of a national icon, be it wind, rain, or snow, temperatures are renowned for plummeting below zero. “Respect for the hills in the Scottish weather is a must, as are a compass and map. You can easily be disorientated because of rapid changes in conditions,” warns Mike. On a sunny day the lofty trees cut jagged shadows across the expanse of fields surrounding Peebles. From October’s flurry of orange glowing leaves to fishing in the sun-drenched tweed in June. Every month offers a new outlook on this Scottish idyll.

“There is s

o much un spoiled beauty its the perfect pl ace to com e for quiet cont emplation .”

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Photographs by Sergey Yeliseev, Joe Thomissen, Pete, comedy_nose, Whats the rush and Bob Marshall


Although historic in architecture there is a quiet vibe of cosmopolitan in the form of its café culture and high fashion stores. Cocoa Black, an award winning chocolatier and patisserie, is run by Ruth Hinks, a world and UK chocolate master. Encased behind a glass panel, her patisserie creations rival that of the view you leave behind on entering the snug eatery. Warming aromas of melted chocolate waft around the shop, the silky hot chocolate and sumptuous fresh strawberry tart are not to be missed. Who knows, you may even need a supply of hand crafted chocolates to accompany your next hike. Scotland is highly renowned for it’s salmon. Peeble’s coat of arms depicts three salmon with a motto below translating as “increase by swimming against the current.” Ninety-seven miles in length, the river Tweed forms the border between Scotland and England in its final stretch. Whilst Peebles is just one of the many scenic destinations on its winding path through to its resting place, it is a core destination for fishing fanatics. Ranked

amongst the top salmon rivers in the world, this year the Tweed was home to the largest fly caught salmon in Scotland since 1928. There is something terribly Monarch of the Glenn about standing next to the rapid flow of water in wades over looking the rugged Scottish landscape. But its not just salmon that can be found here, Sea Trout is another fish species native to this babbling river. The beauty of this pocket of the Scottish borders is not hard to find. Stunning panoramic views, hiking galore, and a wealth of history, all of which can be experienced no matter what the budget. From Wigwams and bunkhouses to Peebles Hydro and Spa hotel, this is a destination that couldn’t fail to delight a seasoned hiker. ‘A wee treasure.’

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LIFE AS ASHERPA

Photograph by Detlef Rooke

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just a n a h t e r is mo a p r e h S of life.” a y a g n w i e a B s “ e... it i d i u g g n walki

ue to lack of training, I was embarrassingly in last position on the third day of the tiring twelve-day trek to reach Everest Base Camp for charity. My walking boots were becoming increasingly uncomfortable and had started to give my ankles blisters. I knew I was in bad shape when a local Nepalese lady in flip-flops carrying produce for the village on her head, and a child in her arms, overtook me. With a smile on his face, my patient Sherpa Dawa told me that the lady who passed me was 82 years old and great grandmother to the child she was carrying. She treks every day for supplies for her family. I couldn’t believe what Dawa was telling me, my grandma is 74 and struggles to get up the stairs. I started to see that the people of the Himalayas are poles apart from the people of the UK. Dawa Ongchu Sherpa, 23, from the picturesque Himalayan village of Lukla, is a living example of what it means to be a Sherpa in the rural areas of Nepal. Dawa explains that being a Sherpa is far more than just a walking guide. “It is an ethnic group and a way of life. Being a Sherpa doesn’t mean being a guide for tourists, but the role works well within a Sherpa’s life and I am extremely thankful for my job.” When he is not guiding tourists through the Himalayas, Dawa usually spends time with his family and trains for future treks. Everyday he spends a minimum of three hours hiking

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By Anja Swan

in the Himalayas. “There is no other way of getting produce for the family or keeping in contact with friends. I must hike daily to keep in touch with my local people, visit my temple, and keep healthy.” Diet is important to Dawa as it gives him the energy to tackle such steep slopes on a daily basis: “I usually eat lots of rice and curry, as well as food which is made out of potato. No matter where I am in the Himalayas there is always someone who has prepared food for any Sherpa. I believe that eating local home-made food contributes to good health in our culture.” Dawa eats four times daily and sleeps around 9 hours each day. He explains: “I will go to bed around nine at night when it is dark and getting cold. I usually wake up around six in the morning to the sound of Yak bells. If we are trekking that day, the Sherpas’ will usually set off before the tourists. Each Sherpa will carry around 20kgs of trekking gear on their back.” When trekking through the mountains, many Sherpa’s will walk at a faster pace than the tourists, which shows incredible strength. Some will be carrying planks of wood or crates of bottled water. Proud of his culture, Dawa believes hard work leads to health and happiness. On the last day of the trek, fatigue had taken over and I had foolishly left my purse in a teahouse we had visited around four hours earlier. Devastated physically and emotionally, I asked Dawa if there was any way of getting the purse back. There was no way of contacting the Inn,


“I knew I was in bad sh ape when a local Nepalese lady in flip-f lops carr ying produce for the village on her hea d, and a child in her arm s, overtook me.”

so Dawa offered to go back and have a look. The team had just finished a strenuous eleven-hour trek from Namche-Bazaar to Lukla, and now Dawa was about to add another six hours of trekking on to that. I was inspired by his strength and his ability to keep going when my whole trekking team was annihilated with exhaustion. When he returned with my purse that evening, I offered him $40.00 to express my gratitude. Dawa shook his head and said he couldn’t accept such a kind offer. I was touched that he would decline an amount that was more than a whole days’ pay. For Dawa, he hadn’t done enough to warrant such a great amount, but for me, he wasn’t receiving enough. I quickly scrunched the money in his hand and made him take it. Dawa spends most of his summer working as a guide, greeting tourists in Kathmandu before traveling through the trails that lead to Base Camp. Each day usually consists of around six hours of trekking, and for this Dawa earns a daily wage of $20.00. Dawa says: “I am lucky to work for ChildReach International, a charity which focuses on providing better protection, healthcare and education to Nepalese children. Without this charity, I would not have this job and many children would go without food or education. This is close to my heart because I grew up experiencing poverty.” ChildReach international aim to unlock children’s

potential in countries affected by extreme poverty. Dawa expresses that this is not just a lack of money for communities, but also the lack of choice and possibilities for Nepalese people. “People struggle daily to earn enough to live. Many people work twelve-hour shifts for less money than English people would earn in an hour. Many workers will sleep at work on the floor to save money. Because of this, children do not have many opportunities.” By breaking down barriers that stop children from living as children should, ChildReach International provide thousands of children every year with a chance to transform their lives. Dawa believes that if more people can get involved, the next generation of Nepalese people will have much more opportunities. “I would love more people to get involved with the amazing events ChildReach offer. People can climb to base-camp with me to raise money for children. You can experience how we live and the struggles people face daily. I know in time, my work will help the Nepalese economy, but until then, I will continue to work hard and help children reach their potential.”

lieves e b d n a culture s i h iness. f p o p d a u h o d r p lth an a e h Dawa is o t s rk lead o w d r a h

Photograph of Dawa Ongchu Sherpa

Photograph by Josh

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By Helen Clarke

TACKLING SUMMIT CONDITIONS:

KILIMANJARO

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limbing a mountain can be a strenuous and daunting task for any hiker. And with Kilimanjaro being one of the tallest, freestanding mountains in the world, you can be putting your life at risk if you are not fully prepared for such a challenging expedition. Doing relevant training and preparation is a necessity to ensure you are physically and mentally able to reach the peak of a mountain. For many mountaineers, the summit climb is notorious for being the more gruelling and demanding part of the hike, requiring a great deal of endurance and determination. The severe side effects such as altitude sickness, hallucination, and physical pain are all things you may encounter; however, being equipped and doing relevant training can help subside those issues. 20-year-old Leeds university student, Asha Joshi, reached the peak of the African mountain, Kilimanjaro last summer. After tackling the strenuous and steep summit slant, the un-experienced hiker was able to relish the feeling of self-achievement and soak in the widespread views of the African landscape. However, this was not an accomplishment that came easy, after suffering with some threatening side effects and tackling hostile summit winds, Asha’s hike was very nearly hindered a few miles before reaching the peak. It takes around 6 days to hike up Kilimanjaro, 4 days up and 2 days down, a little different to tackling a British peak. “We took the Machame route which is

considered to be the risky course, for those who are confident in their hiking abilities. The summit climb was definitely the hardest part of the hike, and took a lot of willpower. At one point I thought I wouldn’t make it to the summit, but I was so near that I made myself push through the final few miles.” Kilimanjaro, based in Tanzania, is one of the most confronting mountain hikes in the world, predominantly because the sea level climate is typical African heat, which then plummets heavily the further up the mountain you go, dipping below zero degrees as you begin the summit incline. Asha explains, “The summit climb was so cold that it took us three times as long to reach the peak than the normal time. The stubborn winds were the hardest of the elements to brave as it was so icy.” Hostile weather conditions can be a significant hazard to your hike, not only affecting your physical and mental state, but also causing you major danger when tackling a particularly treacherous part. “I had to wear thermals and thick coats to keep myself warm, looking back I wish I had brought more clothing items with me, many walkers had balaclavas and thick hats and gloves- it really would have helped me to be fully prepared.” Mountaineering expert, Robert Johnson, touches on some of the crucial clothing items needed to adjust easily to the climate change. He mentions that being prepared to face the elements is imper-

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ASHA JOSHI, ROB JOHNSON, HTTP://WWW.EXPEDITIONGUIDE.COM, FLICKR,‘PINTAA’.


’.

ative to ensure you reach the top safely. “One word – layers. Have a thermal base layer and a fleece underneath, and make sure you have waterproofs. Listen to your guides, they are experienced and can probably give you good advice on tackling the weather conditions.”

typically known as acclimatization. Asha suffered with some disturbing paranoia and hallucinations whilst enduring altitude sickness, which is quite common with new climbers. “I was exhausted, cold and the altitude was making me so paranoid that I felt like I was being punished. I remember hating the fact it was dark as it made me think rocks were people and the ground was covered in skeleton remains.”

One of the more severe and relentless side effects every hiker will undoubtedly suffer when climbing a mountain of this magnitude, is altitude sickness. Every year, approximately 1,000 people are evacuated from Kilimanjaro, and approxi“I WAS EXHAUSTED, mately 10 deaths are reported COLD AND THE with the main cause of death ALTITUDE WAS being altitude sickness.

A handful of hikers on Ash’s trip suffered badly with diarrhoea and vomiting due to the severe altitude, leaving them with MAKING ME SO “We were encouraged to take PARANOID THAT I no choice but to leave pills to tackle altitude sickness, the mountain. Johnson FELT LIKE I WAS the guides also gave us ginger advices: “Everyone suffers nuts which were supposed to BEING PUNISHED.” differently to altitude help with circulation.” says sickness, it’s beneficial to Asha. With Kilimanjaro having an infamously be well prepared for it so you don’t end up havchallenging and steep summit climb, it is crucial ing to walk back down if you are affected badly.” to be prepared to face the illness. The expert elaborates on the procedures you Some people can be affected very differently by should take to deter your chances of suffering altitude sickness, however the most common with the relentless illness. He explains that symptoms are experiencing nausea, dizziness, drinking plenty of water can help to adjust your exhaustion, and hallucination. fluid levels, as well as taking short and shallow breaths on the summit to stop you from losing Expert, Robert Johnson explains how you will oxygen, which will worsen the altitude sickness. usually notice symptoms of altitude sickness about six to 12 hours after you have arrived at Whether your tackling a tame mountain in an area of high altitude, however symptoms can the Lakes, or embarking on Everest base camp, sometimes take up to 24 hours to develop. He reaching the peak of any mountain is a rewardgoes on to explain how hikers usually start to ing feat, and evidently something every hiker feel quite ill, but after a day or so at the same can experience through the right training and altitude, you should feel normal again, which is preparation. ROB’S 10 TOP TIPS FOR REACHING THE SUMMIT: 1. Positive mental attitude 2. Altitude preparation 3. Good equipment 4. Stay hydrated and nourished 5. Good training regime 6.Take your time 7. Acclimatise slowly 8. Have rest days 9. Train hard 10. Enjoy the experience

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ESCAPING TIBET By Jenny Gibbon

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t doesn’t get any more dramatic than hiking by night, dodging the police and hanging off a cliff by your backpack. Rather than a re-enactment of an Indiana Jones film it was documentary producer Hugo Smith’s experience capturing the extensive journey of Tibetan asylum seekers. In 1995 with just one colleague and a camera by his side, Smith embarked on a trip that would illustrate the harsh reality of a journey scaling the unforgiving landscape of the Himalayan Mountains. Seeking asylum from Chinese suppression, the Tibetans risked everything. “As documentary filmmakers it was our obligation to tell the story of those directly affected by the Chinese regime” Smith said. The documentary, Escape from Tibet, would see the men climb to the peak of glacial pass Nangpa-la. “We had planned to coincide our arrival at the mountain border between Nepal and Tibet with an auspicious day in the Buddhist calendar.” Explained Smith, “With the hope it would give us the best chance of meeting and documenting the Tibetans hike.” Documenting the journey, the men intended to remain as undetected by Nepalese police as possible. Namche Bazaar, the first of their destinations, and a final landmark for those continuing onto Everest, was crammed with expedition groups climbing

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Cho Oyu, a mountain 20km west of Mount Everest. “With so many tourists, police presence in the area was high. We hadn’t got a permit to climb the Thame valley leading to Nangpa-la,” admitted Smith. In danger of being spotted attempting the restricted route, the pair spent a week hiding out maintaining a low profile before embarking along the next phase. Their route wound up through Thame west of Namche Bazaar, 1189 meters above sea level, before reaching the Nangpa-la, glacial pass level with mount Cho-oyu 8,201 metres high. “Camping here was incredible but difficult”, said Smith, reminiscently. Pitching a tent in high winds and temperatures of minus 20 degrees, the men suffered sunburn, cracked lips, and altitude sickness. The highlight of the trip came with the breaking of dawn as a group of asylum seekers appeared over the Tibetan Nepalese border. “We had expected to be waiting at our camp for at least a week, but as if by appointment the following morning, a group of thirty-two Tibetens arrived across the border. I was ecstatic!” smiled Smith. Introducing themselves through gesticulations the thirty-strong group of travellers welcomed western company. “They wanted us to guide them as they knew they were safer with westerners, but there was an ethical question as to how much we influenced what they did.” Continued Smith. This was never

Photographs by Frank Kehren, Sirensongs and Doug888


felt so much as when the group used the cover of night to walk back through Namche Bazaar and out Sagarmatha National Park. A 36hour hike, most of it by night. “Standard tourists tracks would have put us all in danger from Nepalese police” informed Smith. Yet without torches, balancing on a narrow path between a vertical drop, and sheer mountain wall, the other option wasn’t much safer. “Light is so visible in areas plunged in darkness we would have been noticed”. “As we trod the rocky terrain virtually blindfolded, my heart was in my mouth. I’ll never forget the scream of the hiker who fell from the ridge, only just saved by the involuntary reaction of the hiker behind grabbing his backpack, pulling him to safety.” Having survived scaling the deadly tracks of the higher terrain, the “heart racing adventure” as Smith puts it, became a trudge. Continuing south to arrive at a Nepalese border town, the documentary

makers and now travelling companions came to a parting of the ways, as the Tibetans boarded a bus to the Nepalese Embassy. “It was amazing to see these courageous men achieve the goal they had come so far to accomplish.” Slowing his animated storytelling to a lull, but still beaming Smith summed his experience up in three words: “Beautiful, invigorating, exciting.”

“I’LL NEVER FORGET THE SCREAM OF THE HIKER WHO FELL FROM THE RIDGE”

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TAKEA HIKE’S By Helen Clarke

CLUB OF THE MONTH

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estled within the stunning region of the Yorkshire dales, is the Harrogate rambling club. This flourishing organisation has recently celebrated over 77 years of success, and continues to welcome new members of all age and ability. Their current president, Judith Cornfield, talks all things northern and rural with Take A Hike… Taking on an outdoor expedition with friends can be a fantastic way to explore new areas, soak in the stunning views and share one-off experiences along the way.

“YORKSHIRE IS A President of the organisation, BEAUTIFUL PART Judith Cornfield, has been OF THE UK, THE running the club for over 10 years, and still gets excited PERFECT AREA over new and unexplored routes. “Walking with others FOR very beneficial for ones EXPLORING NEW ishiking experience. You meet AND CHALLENGING people who share an interest in your hobby, as well as AREAS TO HIKE.” gaining lifelong friends. It’s

Hiking clubs and associations have become increasingly more popular over the past few years, with almost every UK town having their own community of passionate ramblers. With Great Britain home to some stunning scenic areas to explore its no wonder these clubs have sparked an interest with people of all ages, all over the country.

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The Harrogate rambling club, based in the heart of Yorkshire is a prime example of a friendly, community-driven organisation, which is open to members of all age and abilities. Founded in 1936 by a group of walking enthusiasts, the club currently consists of over 40 members and organises walks throughout the year to an assortment of areas within the exquisite Yorkshire countryside.

also a great way to be safe whilst hiking and to share transport.”

Offering 5-6 walks per week, organised by both the members and the committee, the Harrogate


S

ramblers are clearly passionate about both their club and community. Some of the more popular areas they tend to visit are: the Yorkshire Dales, North York Moors, Nidderdale, South Pennines and sometimes further afield such as, the Lakes, Wolds and the Peak District. “Yorkshire is a beautiful part of the UK, the perfect area for exploring new and challenging areas o hike,” says Judith. The members take pride in their clubs regular charity walks and events available all year round. One popular occasion is the coach ramble, where every four months the members take a group expedition to an unexplored and challenging route outside of Yorkshire. The association also arrange a yearly summer social, which is an eagerly anticipated event enjoyed by all. “Our summer socials are always great fun and allow our members to come together and spread the word to others about our club.”

Having already arranged walks for the upcoming winter months, the club are keen to keep their hiking legacy alive, even in this brisk winter weather. With visits to Ascot house hotel for Christmas lunch, as well as the annual Christmas coach ramble to Settle and Giggles-wick in North Yorkshire, this season is set to look very promising for the organisation. Judith adds: “We are a very welcoming society and would love to expand our club and perhaps influence younger hikers to get involved.” The Harrogate rambling club have a pleasant online website, allowing you to browse some of their upcoming events, as well as getting more information on joining.

WWW.HRC2.THEPECKETTS.CO.UK

39 PHOTOGRAPHY BY THE HARROGATE RAMBLING CLUB WEBSITE AND JAMIE FORRESTER.


By Jenny Gibbon

The Coast-to-Coast hike has become one of the most famous routes in the world, recognized for it’s stunning scenery, and challenging terrain. West to East, the walk begins at St Bees and ends in the east at Robin Hood’s Bay. Walkers pass through three of the UK’s national parks; the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors, covering 190 miles of rolling hills and beautiful scenery. Photograph by Devon D’Ewart

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“WHO KNEW I WOULD MAKE SO MANY FRIENDS STOOD AT THE TOP OF THE NINE STANDARDS IN THE RAIN.”

Photograph by Alex H


By Anja Swan

WHEN PREPARING FOR A STRENUOUS HIKE, GETTING ENOUGH CALORIES INTO YOUR SYSTEM IS CRUCIAL TO ENSURE A SUCCESSFUL TREK.

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hether you are a rookie rambler preparing for your first ever trek or an experienced backpacker with an itch to tackle another summit, getting enough calories into your system is crucial to ensure success. The body requires a huge amount of calories whilst trekking to keep it working efficiently and effectively, so identifying the correct foods can be the difference between reaching the summit and not being able to complete your challenge. According to the NHS, an average man needs around 2,500 calories a day. For an average woman, that figure is around 2,000 calories a day. These values can vary greatly depending on age and levels of fitness, among other factors. But, when hiking, it is important to remember that these figures do not apply to people doing such a great deal of exercise. Nutritionist Lucy-Ann Prideaux specialises in nutritional advice for the popular website Simply Nutrition and stresses the importance of the correct balance of foods when doing vigorous exercise. “In order to advise people on how to get the correct nutrition to maintain their weight and health, body weight, size, age and fitness levels must be assessed. My advice would be to seek expert advice if concerned about getting the right nutrients.” Jo Holden, a walking guide from Aberdeenshire, wants to promote trekking as a great way to lose weight. “It is difficult to maintain your weight if on a long trek, so if you are worried about losing weight contact your doctor before starting the trek.

However, if you want to lose a substantial amount of weight, trekking is an amazing way to kick-start a diet. I have helped many people lose more than a stone in less than two weeks.” The likelihood is that the food available on the trek will be lacking certain vitamins and minerals. A great tip for hikers is to supplement foods with multi-vitamins and mineral tablets. Usually when trekking (especially in a foreign country), your body will suffer nutritional deficiencies because of lack of fruit and vegetables. A simple vitimin pill can help your body revitalise energy and help with fatigue. Just make sure you get your five-a-day again once you reach a place that sells fruit and vegetables. “SEEK EXPERT ADVICE IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT GETTING THE RIGHT NUTRIENTS.” Also, along with nutritional value, hikers must think of foods that will store well in their backpack. If food can be squashed, melted or has a short sellby-date, the food will be spoilt by the time the trek is half way through. Try taking foods such as trail mixes, energy and cereal bars, raisins and other dried fruits. These are great sources of energy and easy to store. A great perk for hikers is embracing junk food. There is no better source of lightweight calories that are tasty at the same time. So, stock up on sugary sweets, Pringles and beef jerky, your body will love you for it and your taste buds will too!

EMBRACE THE JUNK FOOD. THERE IS NO BETTER SOURCE OF LIGHTWEIGHT CALORIES. Photograph by Susan von Struensee


TAKE A HIKE ASKED EXPERIENCED HIKERS FROM AROUND THE UK TO SHARE WHICH FOODS THEY ENJOY WHILST TREKKING. KATIE BROADHURST FROM WIGAN SAID: “HARD BOILED SWEETS ARE A GREAT TREKKING TREAT. THEY LAST A WHILE SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO KEEP STOPPING FOR A SWEET.”

NICKKI THWAITES FROM HORWICH SAID: “NEVER LEAVE FOR A TREK WITHOUT A BREAKFAST BAR IN YOUR BACKPACK. I ALWAYS FIND THEY COME IN HANDY EVERY TIME. ”

CRAIG SHAKLETON FROM LEEDS SAID: “I ALWAYS TAKE A PACKET OF GUMMY BEARS AND A TUBE OF PRINGLES WHEN I GO HIKING. MY TIP IS TO TAKE SOMETHING SWEET AND SOMETHING SAVOURY. ”


TOP FIVE FOODS FOR HIKERS

By Jenny Gibbon

WELSH CAKES: Somewhere between a scone and a pancake this round bake was a favorite of the minors as a sweet treat. Flour, sugar, milk , butter, and sultanas, make up the patty which was traditionally created by the woman of each household. Referred to by it’s welsh origins as ‘picau ar y maen’, meaning cakes on the stone, the formed pattys are griddled and served with melting butter. Over time variants of the recipe have included ingredients such as grated apple. Newport has even invented the so-called “Newport Lovely”, a variant made by men as a gift for their betrothed.. Photographs by foodspotting, Kate Hopkins, Texascookingniddler , Tim Jones and Calgary Reviews.


GRASMERE GINGERBREAD:

In 1850, a Mrs Sarah Kemp moved to ‘Gate Cottage’in Grasmere, which still stands today, and rapidly became renowned for her superb gingerbread. Sold in vegetable paper marked “non-genuine without the trade mark,” a reputation was quickly established for the little bakery as the place to buy gingerbread. Today, the home of Grasmere’s famous gingerbread remains largely unchanged but the stream of tourists filing through the small cottage gate, continue.

SHORTBREAD:

Traditional Scottish shortbread may date back to beyond the twelfth century. Originating in medieval times as left over dough was placed in ovens until it formed a hardened rusk. Biscuit meaning ‘twice cooked’ has evolved over time, as butter has replaced yeast. Mary Queen of Scots was said to be fond of the flour, sugar and butter mix. It’s traditional triangular shape creates a circle mirroring that of the fabric used to make the full gored petticoat during Elizabeth I’s reign.

BAKEWELL TART:

Named after the small Derbyshire town of Bakewell, the highly popular tart was created by Mrs Grevers in 1870. Made from short crust pastry, jam and ground almonds, the original and very closely guarded recipe, is served to thousands of customers each year from Bakewell’s original Bakewell Tart Shop and Café.

KENDAL MINT CAKE:

After taking his eyes off the pan when making glacier mints, Joseph Wiper created the first batch of, what is now widely recognised amongst hiking enthusiasts, as Kendal Mint Cake. Since (1869)the highly protected production that began in Wiper’s minute factory has continued to flourish. The family linehave continued it’s production for 78 years churning out a ton of mixture every day.


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A TAKE HIKE

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By Helen Clarke

GOES DIGITAL

If you’re a budding outdoor enthusiast, then you will be delighted to know that the essential navigational tools needed are now available in app form, catering to every inch of your hiking needs. With user-friendly systems and simple, easy to follow instructions,you certainly don’t have to be a digital whizz or smartphone fanatic to use them. Take A Hike’s sub editor has searched far and wide for some of the most useful phone applications that will really enhance your intrepid expeditions.

MAP MY HIKE-GPS HIKING This nifty little app is essential for the savvy, organisational hiker. Not only does it have a GPS tracker, it can draw you out specific routes depending on the intensity of your hike, give you the journey time and save your route for other expeditions. The app also features a handy nutrition section, where you can monitor your calorie in-take, see how many calories you’ve lost and build an online food journal.

MOUNTAIN STEPS UK Are you a mountaineering fanatic, who loves a good challenge? Then look no further than this highly advanced and visually appealing mountaineering app. If you’re a keen mountain newcomer, training for the 3-peak challenge, or even about tackle a peak abroad, this app will be sure to give you all the info you desire. Some of its features include: route guides, kit advice, tuition on how to navigate with maps or compasses, emergency awareness, essential first aid and current location finders.

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Photographs by dayjoybuy.com and App store.


SAS SURVIVAL GUIDES This app is a necessity for every hiker. Focussing more on safety and survival; SAS gives you the ultimate guide on endurance if you’re planning on taking on a more gruelling, challenging hike. Its key features include; survival checklist, climate survival, equipment to take, finding water, signals and codes.

SIMPLY HIKE If you’re in the market for some new hiking gear, Simply Hike is the app you want to download. You can shop for outdoor gear at your fingertips and have it delivered straight to your doorstep.Simply Hike also gives special discounts and offers to app users- bonus.

EVERY TRAIL Looking to explore a new, scenic area? Then Every Trail is the perfect app for you. Some of its features include, reviews, useful information, points of interest and videos. Every Trail has over 300,000 trails from around the world, and provides directions for each of the trails.

FOLLOW US @TAKEAHIKEMAGAZINE

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RAMP UP THE RED On Friday 7 February we need everyone to Ramp up the Red to help fight the UK’s single biggest killer, coronary heart disease. You can organise a Ramp up the Red event at work, school or anywhere and make a donation to British Heart Foundation.

Visit bhf.org.uk/red or call 08000 316 316 to sign up

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Gretel, aged 4

British Heart Foundation 2013, registered charity in England and Wales (225971) and in Scotland (SC039426)


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