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ANNUAL REPORT 2018-19 1


RAAus Value Statement Our mission is to facilitate accessible, safe aviation for all by being an industry leader in developing sport and recreational aviation for the fun and enjoyment of our members and the broader aviation community. RAAus achieves this through our passion for our values which drive change and identify opportunities for our future success. Our Values • Risk based: The right of people to take risks means having a measured mindset with respect to safety. Having a proportionate approach means assessing risks and and then applying a commensurate level of control to the activity. • Stability: RAAus will seek to provide stability for aviators, government bodies and other stakeholders. We will do this by being process driven and focussed on our long term strategic objectives which will be communicated to relevant parties. • Simplicity: Everything we do should be done with a view to making it easier for aviators to aviate. A rule, process, system, or any other artefact of RAAus will not be permitted if it does not simplify aviation. • Transparency: Being honest and open with members and other stakeholders is the centre of everything we do. We must act in an inclusive manner and our actions must always be viewed with integrity. • Accountability: In everything that RAAus does we must be accountable for our actions. This applies to directors and staff as well as members. We must be consistent with how we approach problems and be respectful of each other. • Innovation: We must always strive to be different and progressive. Accepting the status quo is not in our nature and we will be proactive in generating growth and change within the industry.


CONTENTS Chair Report................................................................ 2 CEO Report ................................................................. 4 Governance................................................................. 6 Stakeholder Engagement ........................................ 12 Strategic Plan 2019–2023 ......................................... 12 Bob Tait collaboration............................................... 14 CASR Part 149........................................................... 15 Safety Report ............................................................ 16 Professional Development Program....................... 17 RAAus Dashboard 2018–2019.................................. 18 Events........................................................................ 20 AirVenture Australia 2018 ........................................ 22 Avalon ....................................................................... 24 Celebrating first solos.............................................. 26 Pilot Certificates........................................................ 28 Statistics.................................................................... 34 Financial Statements................................................ 38

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chair report This contrasts with today where we are not only allowed into airports but we also get invited into board rooms around the country to assist with making decisions that affect our entire industry. I personally sit on a number of panels as an individual and use these roles to advance the cause of RAAus and other parts of the sector and many of the hardworking staff in the office formally represent us on a range of issues. It is this respect and recognition that allows us to do what we do and have conversations with key decision makers on a regular basis. It is also a testament to the actions of our members, both pilots and maintainers, and their safety record. Today we have a safety record that compares favourably to other parts of the industry with similar characteristics. Of course when I reflect back on the past and some of the experiences I have been lucky enough to have with some of the machines that played a key role in our formative years, I also think about how we must protect and remember our roots. We are well advanced in our efforts to increase the range of privileges available to recreational pilots in Australia and it is worth considering this in the broader context. In previous years when we gained something new we simply tacked it on to the existing rights and privileges that already existed. Some would argue that this approach has diluted our ability to engage in grass roots aviation and while this debate is best saved for another day, it is not an argument that has fallen on deaf ears.

Another year is now complete and in this annual report I am pleased to give an overview of the past 12 months. I am also happy to say that we are well into setting the pathway for the coming five-year period in terms of setting out our strategy and working towards developing an even better industry for all aviators. This past year has been busy on all fronts. Personally I have been involved in a number of initiatives to advance aviation policy and am proud to say that RAAus has played a key role in moving the industry forwards. We have had a range of opportunities to assist with and provide feedback on policy reform ranging from medicals through to fatigue regulations for commercial operations. These opportunities reflect not only how far we have come in the past (almost) 40 years but also the maturity that has been gained over this period.

Our new weight increase will be effectively quarantined from our existing activities if our proposal is accepted. Nothing that we have today will change, you will still be able to do whatever you do today with no change tomorrow if you don’t want to take advantage of the increase. Absolutely no change whatsoever. What this means is that more pilots will be able to do more things than ever before without affecting anyone else. This will open up choice to more aviators that were not previously available. For someone who, for whatever reason, wants to exit the formal government administered system and transition into the RAAus world, this choice will be available to more people.

A number of years back I had an opportunity to relive our history with the Australian Ultralight Aircraft Museum at Holbrook. I recall thinking as I taxied toward the runway in an old school original rag and tube machine that the fences look high from my perspective. Back in those days it was ironic, we were free to exercise our flying privileges as long as we didn’t go near airports. We were quite possibly the only aviation related cohort that was told to stay away from those places that were clearly the safest places to land!

This kind of sums up what RAAus is about – choice. Save for a very small number of aircraft administered by us, almost anyone is free to leave our system and switch to CASA. Our LSA aircraft can be moved across in a heartbeat, you can already register amateur built aircraft with CASA, and so it

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oversees the operation of around 18 per cent of all aircraft in Australia excluding international ops. Schools operating under the RAAus banner account for almost two thirds of all schools in the country.

goes. No one is forced to be a member but clearly around 10,000 people see value in what we do and we hope to extend this option to others over time. Going forward we have set ourselves the ambitious mantra of “A pilot in every home”. This is something bigger than RAAus and will require the will of industry as a whole to achieve. We are not talking about making someone in every home a member of our organisation. Rather we are seeking to normalise aviation such that it is not a mystery to anyone. This could be through giving experience to kids through drones or it may mean creating opportunities for them to fly for a career. The point is, if they are somehow engaged with aviation, either on the ground or in the air, then we will have made progress towards this goal.

The introduction of CASR Part 149 extends this opportunity for growth of recreational aviation in Australia as well as strengthening the pathway from aviation for enjoyment to aviation for income. Keeping in mind that RAAus has a safety record as good as other comparable parts of the sector and employs a less expensive model to get people engaged in aviation, it makes sense that those who wish to pursue a professional career explore their options and consider a self-administering body as a viable alternative. Putting this all into perspective and considering the benefits to the Australian economy that RAAus brings it is worth considering what the broader economy pays for this return. The answer is almost nothing.

Likewise with adults. Many of us dreamed of being a pilot when we were kids but life got in the way. RAAus and a range of other organisations working together can help to show that getting involved is not that hard, not that expensive and is imminently achievable. Whether it is model planes, gliders or through RAAus, the goal is to engage with people through aviation.

Currently CASA operates on a budget of about $180 million of which around 91 per cent comes from the public purse, predominantly through fuel excise. This means that the public is paying about $164 million for CASA. This contrasts with RAAus which operates on a budget of $2.7 million to oversee 18 per cent of pilots and aircraft and two thirds of the flying schools. Of this budget, only $140 thousand comes from CASA. That is, 0.09 per cent of the total funding from the public ($140k/$164m) is used to ensure that a fifth of the pilots and aircraft and two thirds of the flying schools are properly managed. And even though this is the case, we have a safety record that is admirable, contribute to the economy and assist in developing skills that can be transferred into other parts of the community.

Our past performance is an indicator of our success in this area but it is not enough to say that we booked a $180k surplus and our job is therefore done. Similarly, it is not enough that that we are just as safe as our government administered counter parts. And nor should we rest on our laurels when we look at the growth in our member numbers over the past few years. The figures demonstrate not only the enthusiasm for aviation, especially in our part of the sector, but it also demonstrates how self-administration can work to the advantage of the broader economy. It is important to recognise not only the work that is done in terms of developing the next set of aviation professionals in flying and maintaining aircraft as well as administering the sector but also to recognise the greater economic benefits that aviation offers to the wider community.

Even though RAAus is almost entirely self-funded, we see value in investing in the sector. We have invested more than $500k in youth over the past decade through our scholarship program with more than $90k coming this year alone and we continue invest in the industry and ensure the success of all our siblings in the sector. We have bigger brothers like Qantas and Virgin and we have some smaller kin in the other sport organisations. RAAus will continue to work with these different organisations and maintain our efforts to influence policy in a positive way will set the path for “A pilot in every home”.

RAAus currently has around 10,000 members, around 3500 aircraft and about 170 flying schools. The job creation and skills development that this offers is very broad. Our team has worked with a range of different agencies and organisations in the prior 12 months to highlight this and reinforce the role that RAAus plays. For example, it is worth considering that CASA issued almost 52,000 flight crew licences meaning that RAAus accounts for about 18 per cent of total pilots. Similarly, RAAus

Michael Monck Chairman

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CEO REPORT RAAus grew from humble beginnings to now boast some 10,000 members spread far and wide across our great land. When I visit our members across our network I am often reminded of the good old days. As I have just written about, we all have good old days and we cherish them, and rightly so. That is our legacy. Over 50,000 people have been involved with RAAus since day one. Some 11,000 are still attached today. Just as RAAus expanded its network, we ebbed and flowed. From times when we were not allowed to land at airports and not fly over 300 feet to times today where some 15 of our 165 schools operate within controlled airspace and many of our members fly at 10,000 feet. Instead of Scouts, Drifters and Thrusters, today now some 500 types make up our 3,500 strong fleet. I started here five years ago and I often say that if you think your best days are behind you, what have you got to look forward to?

And just like that the financial year is over. Where did the year go? Take yourself back to 1970, or 1980, where did they go?

I always look forward. I respect the past and learn from it.

Does time seem to go faster? It does for me. Even researchers have explored this phenomenon, see for instance: https://www. scientificamerican.com/article/why-does-timeseem-to-speed-up-with-age/

RAAus is on a journey and that journey will allow us to do some great things. Just as I peered into the sky, squinting under the hot sun as another silver bird passed me overhead all those years ago, RAAus is now peering into our future. It is bright, it is exciting and our best days lie ahead of us.

As our lives ebb and flow down the river of life, the river seems to flow a little faster, the stops a little shorter and the distant memories a little sweeter.

This report captures the last 12 months of this journey. Our desire to increase the MTOW of aircraft on our register, our hard work to prepare us for Part 149, our governance improvements, the fun and excitement of attending events and giving young aviators a leg up as they pursue their passion.

In 1980 I remember lying in my family backyard while a symphony played out above me as plane after plane landed at Mascot. At night, I’d lie there and feel the rumble as the four engines above me passed overhead. Coincidently at about that time RAAus, or as it was known the AUF, was starting to form and reach out farther and farther into rural and remote Australia. In essence, taking light sport aviation to the masses.

Everyone at RAAus puts in more than expected. Our volunteer board of seven directors spend five to six weekends per year wholly engaged in complex RAAus business, together with a number of mid week teleconferences throughout the year. This group of seven volunteers are a hard working and passionate bunch of people. This time doesn’t

And just as I grew up, so did RAAus.

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include the time each of our Directors gets out and greets members and listens to the issues effecting members across the country at events, training session and member forums. The good news on this front, is that the issues affecting members in Tasmania are the same as the ones affecting members in Busselton and Cairns. The even better news is that generally members are happy with our direction, our future plans and the level of engagement and communication.

with thousands of members and future members as we fly the flag for sport and recreational aviation. Our annual report offers more detail on each of the above topics and really examines the length and breadth of our movement. I’d like to thank each and every one of our team: our Directors, our volunteers and paid staff, our supporters and sponsors, our stakeholders and our business partners. And of course, our members, because without you, all 11,000 of you, RAAus would not exist.

Supporting the Board of Directors and our overall strategic plan is our staff team. Thirteen in total, eleven in Canberra and one each in Temora and Brisbane aid in processing over 10,000 member applications or renewals annually, process the registration of almost 3,500 aircraft, work with our CFIs, instructors and maintainers ensuring authorisations are up to date and that our school network is running smoothly. Our office team also responds to around 12,000 phone calls and 7,000 emails a year.

Thank you. Michael Linke CEO

On top of the routine processing, our team is involved in a range of other complex activities, including audit and surveillance, resolving member disputes, preparation for CASR Part 149 transition, working on our MTOW and CTA plans and striking the financial balance we need to ensure sustainability. Its not all hard work though, our team attended a number of events, presented at thirteen locations around our great country and met

Read more about RAAus and the new 2019–2023 Strategic Plan available on the RAAus website www.raaus.com.au

Some of the RAAus team

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GOVERNANCE Table of Interests of RAAus Directors and CEO Name

Declared interests

Trevor Bange

Convenor of SE Qld RAPAC; CFI, Lone Eagle Flying School; Airfield Owner; Aircraft Owner; Treasurer, Grants/Subsidies Office & CEO, Sport Aircraft Assn Inc

Luke Bayly

Aircraft owner

Rod Birrell

CFI and owner, Airsports Flying School; Member, RAPAC Aircraft owner (Aircraft/equipment sales)

Alan Middleton

Owner, MD Bluewater Airport SI/Owner, Swan Hill Flight School Member, various clubs; AOPA SAAA

Michael Monck

Eugene Reid

Annual Performance RAAus recorded a 3% increase in membership numbers during the financial year 2017-2018 as well as a 3% increase in the number of registered aircraft. The Board was particularly pleased with the overall improvement in our safety record, where we recorded our safest year in ten years. In all we recorded three fatal accidents during the financial year, the lowest since 2017. Our serious accident rate has also halved in the last four years. Our financial result was also a good one. RAAus recorded a surplus of $187,368 for the financial year ending 30 June 2018. Full audited financial records will be shared with members prior to this year’s AGM.

Owner, Lockr Life Pty Ltd – software services (and related activities) provider to the aviation sector. Aircraft sales and after sales services (and related activities), Member, Canberra Aero Club; Member, ASAP; Member, GAAN

Safety The Board approved the RAAus Head Office Safety Manual and RAAus Flight Training School Safety Manual. Over the coming months RAAus will continue to work with our flight training schools to ensure our safety performance continues to improve.

Owner and CFI, Freedom Flight; Member, Devonport and Wynyard Aero clubs; President, Georgetown Airport Association; Convenor Tasmania RAPAC; Aircraft owner; AOPA

Barry Windle

Member, Southern Districts Flying Club, SA; Councillor, Sport Aircraft Club of SA Inc; Member, Loxton Aero Club; Trike aircraft owner

Michael Linke

None declared

Audit and Assurance As part of our ongoing preparation for Part 149, the Board approved an overarching audit and assurance policy. This policy sees the continued commitment of RAAus to trust our members, schools and maintainers. It also maintains our pragmatic and sensible framework with regard to auditing the operations of our schools and maintainers.

MTOW and CTA

Board Communique September 2018

RAAus continues to make progress on these two proposals. A weight increase to 760kgs has been given in principle support from the regulator, as previously advised to members. In terms of CTA access, recent announcements made it clear that RAAus members who learn to fly in certain controlled airspace can continue to operate within that space based on the exemption certificate of the flight school they learned to fly at.

The RAAus Board met on Friday 31 August 2018 and Saturday 1 September 2018. The purpose of the meeting was three-fold. Firstly, the RAAus Board has engaged a specialist consultant to undertake a full performance evaluation of Directors and the Board as a whole with a view to assuring members that the Board operates at an optimum level.

RAAus continues to work with CASA on finalising further access to airspace and our weight proposal.

Secondly the Board and senior management met to discuss the future strategic plan of RAAus. Using feedback from the member’s survey, statistical data and the input of staff and managers, the Board has developed RAAus’ 2019-2023 draft Strategic Plan. The plan will be further reviewed in November and a draft plan presented to members at our AGM.

Other matters The board discussed a range of other matters, including the 2018 member survey (a summary of results will be shared with members shortly), commercial opportunities to add member benefits, AirVenture Australia 2018, changes to the office structure within RAAus, and landing fees and how

The outcomes of the Board meeting are detailed below. 6


implementation of a system of safety. The RAAus safety team stands ready to assist any schools wishing to adopt our manual. It is important to note that Flight Training Schools can implement an alternate system of safety suitable for their operations. The manual and a how-to guide are available on the CFI Portal.

best to ensure members meet their obligations when using airfields that charge fees.

Outcome of RAAus Election October 2018 RAAus Company Secretary, Michael Linke, today published the outcome of the RAAus Director election. Two directors positions required filling. The details of the ballot and votes are below.

The Board endorsed an organisation wide audit and observation policy. This policy is based on our existing audit framework and clarifies the role RAAus plays when auditing RAAus authority holders.The policy is available on our website here.

There were 969 members who cast a ballot. There were 908 valid ballots and 61 invalid ballots. The total valid votes from valid ballots was 1742. The count of the valid votes was:

The Board also discussed medical policy and met with CASA during the course of our meeting to discuss appropriate medical reform opportunities for RAAus. We look forward to sharing the outcomes of these discussions with members once they are finalised.

Election Results - tally of votes Birrell (elected)

430

Bayly (elected)

392

Windle

303

Bretland

193

Gouws

140

Flower

117

Schox

105

Yates

62

The Board made significant progress towards preparation for Part 149 certification. The Board was presented with a draft exposition and detailed plans regarding ensuring RAAus was ready for the transition. RAAus plans to apply for Part 149 certification before June 2019. Between now and then we will run a series of articles in Sport Pilot to fully brief members on what Part 149 means for them. RAAus does not plan, nor expect, to adjust membership fees as a result of the introduction of Part 149.

Both Rod Birrell and Luke Bayly will return for a three-year term. RAAus would like to thank our members for voting. With a strong and stable Board of Directors, RAAus is poised for the challenges ahead. The Board will be available at our forthcoming AGM, which will be held on 3 November at the RAAus head office in Canberra.

Board Communique February 2019 The Board of RAAus met on Friday and Saturday 8 and 9 of February 2019.

Board Communique November 2018

The meeting was largely focused on governance matters, with the following outcomes achieved:

The Board of RAAus met on Saturday 3 November and Sunday 4 November.

• •

The AGM was also conducted on the same weekend. For members who were not able to attend or view our live stream of our AGM, you can view the full video presentation after logging in to the member portal. The 2017–2018 RAAus annual report was also released at our AGM and is available to view online. During the Board meeting a number of key outcomes were achieved.

Michael Monck was re-elected as Chairman Barry Windle was formally appointed to the Board following the retirement of Tony King (out of session decision prior to face to face meeting) -- Barry recently stood for Board election and on the total number of votes he received was the next preferred candidate. The Board was committed to adopting the will of the members and had no hesitation in appointing Barry. Barry Windle was appointed Chair of the Risk and Audit Committee The Board approved the six month financial report (details below).

The Board endorsed our 2019–2023 Strategic Plan. Members are encouraged to view the Strategic Plan on our website.

The Board endorsed our Flight Training School Safety Manual. All of our flight training schools are encouraged to use this manual to assist with the

In addition to the above the Board undertook further work on the Board evaluation, with many of the recommendations being completed or adopted. This included: 7


GOVERNANCE (CONT.) •

The Board then considered a request from a member on operational matters. The request sought a change to our disciplinary framework. The change requested was to publish the outcomes of RAAus disciplinary panel inquiries. The Board felt that doing this would be counter productive to our open and fair reporting culture and as such did not make any change to current practice.

A formal Delegation Policy was finalised in November 2018 which clearly defines a range of financial, legal, operational, human resource, technical and communication protocols The Board calendar for 2019 includes four face to face meetings with key focus areas identified, including regular Director training The appointment of an independent company secretary

The Board also considered a formal expenditure schedule to ensure directors were appropriately reimbursed for their costs and trained. As our members know our Board are all volunteers and as such RAAus should meet relevant and appropriate out of pocket costs, together with investing in training to ensure directors are appropriately skilled to perform their duties.

The Board also discussed a range of procedural, cultural and communication matters to provide a more robust boardroom with its main focus on governing the business of RAAus and looking to the future as we continue to evolve, grow and improve. The Board will continue its work and looks forward to sharing more outcomes with members as they become available.

The CEO then presented a number of key project timelines to the Board for the forthcoming year and the Board endorsed these projects. Members are encouraged to refer to our strategic plan which is available online and carries some detail about where we will be focusing. The CEO and Board members will also attend a series of member forums throughout the year and discuss these projects, our strategic plan and any other topics of interest to members.

Board Communique March 2019 The Board of Directors of RAAus met on Sunday 17 and Monday 18 March 2019. As part of our overall governance improvement strategy, this Board Communique is more detailed than previous communiques as the Board wishes to provide members with more details around decisions and board meeting activities.

Monday 18 March

Sunday 17 March

Much of Monday’s meeting was spent discussing AirVenture. RAAus has been an active participant in the event since its inception in 2016 and as such a detailed review RAAus’ participation in the event was in order.

The main business of the Sunday meeting was to conclude business from the February Board meeting. The meeting held in February dealt with a range of complex governance matters and as such not all business was concluded. Governance matters raised at the February meeting were dealt with by obtaining external advice and a referral to the Risk and Audit Committee. These matters have now been resolved.

The 2019 event is set down for late September and will be held in Parkes, NSW. RAAus will attend and continue to sponsor the event. Members should keep a watch on the AirVenture Australia website (www.airventureaustralia.com.au). AirVenture is a separate company to RAAus and RAAus supports but is not responsible for organising AirVenture.

The first order of business was to appoint a Company Secretary following the departure of our existing Company Secretary. The Board appointed Simone Carton as our independent Company Secretary. Simone is a lawyer based in Canberra with a body of experience in commercial operations, governance and board secretarial duties. This appointment meets one of the recommendations from the Board Evaluation held in 2018.

RAAus also undertook a full review of its insurance coverage as part of our ongoing governance work. Our insurance brokers, PSB and insurers, QBE, attended the meeting and presented to the Board. The outcomes of these discussions were that RAAus continues to maintain the appropriate level of insurance for our attendance at events. Events such as AirVenture, Avalon and AusFly do not introduce any new risks or require RAAus to take out any additional insurance. The insurers confirmed that the level of coverage RAAus currently has is comprehensive and adequate.

The Board also undertook a review of its committee structure and agreed to form two committees covering finance, audit, risk, company performance metrics and CEO performance review. The driving force behind this review is to continually improve the governance of RAAus and provide members with an increased level of surety regarding RAAus’ performance. Work between meetings by a group of directors will enable these committees to be established at the May meeting.

The CEO presented the Board with a financial forecast for the forthcoming year plus two forward years. Our budget is structured in such as way so as to balance our strategic plan and initiatives whilst 8


managing cost pressures. Meeting our needs and managing costs is why the Board has reluctantly decided to raise membership fees and aircraft registration fees by $5 from 1 July this year. This change is in line with CPI and will ensure RAAus remains in a positive financial position.

Following the discussion on reports, the Board considered the financial forecast for the forthcoming financial year. The Board approved our financial plan for the 2019 – 2020 financial year, which includes major investments in youth education and enhancements to our online systems to improve the member experience. RAAus is committed to making access to our systems simpler and seamless for members. Over the coming 12 months a range of improvements will be evident in this space.

Overall the Board is pleased with the progress made in improving governance processes in recent months and looks forward to continuing to share information with members.

Decisions Board Communique June 2019

The Board approved:

The Board of RAAus met on Friday and Saturday 24 and 25 May 2019. During the meeting a range of decisions and actions were taken.

policies on sponsorship and supporter arrangements and a Style Guide for use of the RAAus logo. RAAus works with a number of external parties and to ensure consistency across our supporter base dedicated policies were introduced.

the Director induction policy and framework: a suite of tools aimed at ensuring new Directors who join the RAAus Board are inducted, briefed and have access to the necessary tools and resources.

Finance The Board received the nine month financial report, which reflected a surplus of $171,951 (after non cash items). The board expressed its thanks to the CEO and leadership team for the hard work that continued to be done in managing the finances.

Reports

Discussions

The Board received reports from the Chair, CEO, and Chair of the Risk and Audit Committee. These reports showed that RAAus continues to be busily engaged in enhancing external partnerships.

As part of our regular document review process the Board considered changes to our Complaints Handling framework and the Member Charter. Changes stemming from recent application of the frameworks are being considered by the Board to further improve the policies. Both documents continue to be reviewed, with expected finalisation by the end of the financial year.

The Chair reported on a raft of strategic meetings and forums he was engaged in, including TAAAF, ASAP and GAAN. The CEO report focused on major project work, with a range of member-centric achievements being noted. This included the rollout of our practical L1 training program, with an expected ten training sessions being offered in the next seven months across the country. Our Professional Development Program continues to roll out, with maintainers and instructors attending sessions in a range of venues. Member forums also remain popular, with further forums planned.

The Board also considered and reviewed a report on how member credit card details were managed. The board was satisfied with progress towards achieving the highest possible industry rating for the systems used to provide members with confidence on the security of online transactions with RAAus. Finally, the Board explored constitutional changes and encourages members to submit suggestions for improving our constitution. Any proposed changes by the Board or members will be circulated to members in time for the AGM. Members are encouraged to refer to Australian Sport Pilot and upcoming newsletters regarding director nominations, board elections, our AGM and constitutional changes.

Attending member forums and training sessions offered really gives members an opportunity to engage firsthand with RAAus. The Chair of the Risk and Audit Committee presented a report on committee structures for the Board to consider. As part of RAAus’ continued efforts to improve governance the formation of an additional board committee was approved. Two committees are now in place, one to focus on audit and finance, with a second committee with a focus on risk, governance and performance.

Each of these topics will be further developed and discussed again in August, at the next meeting. RAAus Directors meet four to five times per year and committees of the Board meet up to six times per year. Meetings are held both in a face to face format as well as by teleconference.

Financial Forecast

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2018 Board Evaluation Status Report No. Recommendation

Outcome/Report

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The board should: • finalise the board to CEO delegations of authority (financial and non-financial) as a matter of priority

Complete, March 2019

ensure potential directors are made aware of their duties and expectations of them in the call for nominations (including through a director position description)

Complete, through Director Induction Policy and Pack, May 2019

include in the board charter a short policy and checklist for director induction, and

Implemented, through Director Induction Policy and Pack, May 2019

include in the board charter protocols for communication between directors, the CEO, employees and members.

Implemented, through Director Induction Policy and Pack, May 2019

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The board should: • review the charter of the Audit and Risk Committee to ensure its currency

Complete, April 2019

review the skills on the committee with a view to one of the external members being a qualified accountant, and

Implemented

invite the RAAus Finance Manager to meetings of the committee.

Implemented

The board should discuss and agree to: • the type of culture it wants in RAAus •

how the board would like to be perceived by members and stakeholders, and

how it will lead by example by its own culture, conduct and leadership.

This matter has been discussed at Board level at three meetings and continues to be a topic of discussion as RAAus continues to evolve.

The board should discuss and agree to: • how the board will monitor progress in implementing the strategic plan once approved, and

In progress with formation of dedicated Risk and Performance Committee.

Still under development

the annual strategic planning process (and document this in the board charter).

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The board should ensure that the board to CEO delegations clearly state which policies are to be approved by the board.

Implemented as part of the Delegations Policy as well as the Board Induction Pack

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The board should: • discuss and agree what performance information it requires and the form and content of reports in this regard (eg CEO, finance, risk, WH&S etc)

Reports discussed and adjustments implemented following February 2019 meeting.

Complete and training delivered in February 2019

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revise the standard board briefing paper template, and hold a workshop for directors on finance to ensure all directors are able to read and understand RAAus’s financial statements.

The board should: • request the Audit and Risk Committee to report to the board regarding the status of RAAus’s risk and compliance management systems and anticipated areas for development together with timeframes, and

Complete via reforming of Audit and Risk Committee into a Risk and Performance Committee and creation of a second committee to focus on finance and audit.

Board Risk Appetite being reviewed and risk meeting held in July 2019

advise the CEO of its expectations regarding risk and compliance reporting.

The board should: • discuss and agree to the format of the CEO performance framework when the new strategic plan is approved

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In progress and part of the Risk and Performance Committee’s tasks.


affirm and document the CEO’s annual performance review process, and

In progress

at least annually, discuss key person succession planning.

Implemented

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The board should: • ensure that it is satisfied with the way in which RAAus engages with stakeholders and its overarching plan in this regard, and affirm its commitment to the board speaking publicly with a unified voice despite what individual views might have been expressed inside the board room.

There has been ongoing discussions at Board level, coupled with Director training on governance matters.

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The board should: • discuss and agree to an annual work plan outlining key matters to be discussed and resolved by the board each year

Implemented, for 2019 and following years

Implemented, four meetings scheduled from 2019 and following years.

meet four times per annum face to face, and explore other ways by which the board can meet by telecommunication.

11

The board should consider adding a ‘directors only’ session at the start of each meeting.

Implemented from March 2019 meeting.

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The board should: • agree to how directors are to communicate among each other in between meetings

Discussed

explore a new board software tool to assist in the board’s administration, and

Explored, but as yet no outcome, SharePoint has been implemented.

revise the form and content of board meeting minutes against good governance practice.

Implemented from February 2019 meeting.

13

The board should review who should most appropriately be the company secretary of RAAus.

The Board implemented a policy to appoint an independent Company Secretary. A Company Secretary was appointed in March 2019

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The board should: • continually maintain a board composition matrix aligned to RAAus’s strategic plan to inform, as appropriate, the director nominations process, and

Matrix has been developed and is reviewed prior to the AGM each year.

In progress and for discussion at the 2019 AGM and will be determined by members

consider amending the constitution to allow for the appointment of a small number of skills based directors to meet identified skills and diversity gaps.

15

The board should consider whether it wishes to advocate to members that directors be remunerated.

Discussed, no appetite at Board level.

16

Each director should reflect on their own performance and ability to meet requisite standards of conduct as well as time and other expectations of them.

This matter has been discussed, but largely left to individual directors to determine.

17

The board should: • review the provisions of the board charter regarding performance evaluations in light of our feedback, and

Director performance has been discussed and will occur annually as part of the function of the Risk and Performance Committee. Specific details are sill being finalised.

• 18

specifically consider instituting a process of annual director performance appraisal

The board should: • develop a board and director professional development policy with supporting annual budget, and

This was implemented and budget allocated in the 2018/2019 and forward years.

Implemented from February 2019

consider agreeing to a couple of topics at the beginning of each year for board professional development.

11


STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT As part of improvements in industry and stakeholder engagement, RAAus continues to foster relationships through meaningful collaboration with government and industry at large to support the safety of air navigation.

take proactive measures regarding management of potential or perceived opportunities and challenges, and fostering a greater understanding of RAAus objectives within the aviation industry and relevant government departments.

RAAus is an active participant in key decision-making groups such as Regional Airspace and Procedures Advisory Committee (RAPAC), National Runway Safety Group, The Australian Aviation Associations’ Forum (TAAAF) and Aviation Safety Advisory Panel.

It is important to note at these meetings RAAus is the only private administration, training and aircraft registration organisation invited to attend, with other industry attendance by groups generally including special interest organisations. A demonstration of our ongoing commitment to aviation safety and industry development.

RAAus also participates in a number of ICAO mandated committees, including the Australian Strategic Air Traffic Management Group (ASTRA), the Joint Agency Aviation Safety Analysis Coordination Group (JAASACG), which is an initiative of the Australian State Aviation safety program under the Department of Infrastructure and a number of the Strategic Working Groups of ASTRA, including the Future ATM (Air Traffic Management) Requirements Working Group (FARWG) and Safety and Efficiency Technology Working Group (SETWG).

Ongoing development and engagement with key industry bodies, including other ASAOs has also resulted in opportunities to foster open communications with broader industry (commercial RPT, airports etc.) These opportunities have provided RAAus with an unprecedented opportunity to provide greater understanding of RAAus key objectives, including training and standardisation, maintenance and pilot integration into future Defence and commercial careers.

The specific objective of RAAus attending these meetings has been to strengthen communications,

STRATEGIC PLAN 2019–2023 RAAus is committed not only to the growth and advancement of our membership, but also to the growth and sustainability of the overall aviation and aerospace sector in Australia. In order to facilitate this commitment, RAAus has set an aspirational vision of A Pilot in Every Home as part of the 20192023 Strategic Plan. The vision to normalise aviation across the Australian community is born out of an organisational ethos that the skills practised in aviation (situational awareness, decision making and perseverance) are paramount to skills pursuant to a prosperous life.

communication between RAAus and our members, our instructors and our maintainers, however also looks at the way RAAus can provide tools to ensure our members engage with each other, as well as the greater aviation community and general public. Flight schools play a large role within the RAAus engagement network as a touch point for students and members. Engagement also involves the work RAAus does with other industry participants including CASA, Airservices Australia, ATSB, CASA and other aviation organisations. The organization and the aviation community become stronger with more involvement from member engagement – more input and opinion, more action and activity, more influence.

The Plan is underpinned by four key pillars that enable the organisation to focus and deliver through initiatives, programs and strategies that provide maximum benefit to the membership whilst cultivating the next generation of aviation participants and professionals.

Training Training involves multiple levels of information transfer to maintain the highest levels of aviation training available. RAAus has a role to ensure we maintain standards of flight training which starts with the training of our higher approval holders including ROCs, CFIs, Instructors and Maintainers. Through this, we can ensure a high standard of training is offered to our students. Training

Engagement Engagement looks at the way RAAus enables communication and the transfer of information amongst the aviation community. This involves 12


and attitude towards utilising the latest technology to enhance safe aviation operations.

and standardisation will have a direct correlation with improvements in safety statistics and safe operations. Ensuring out members, maintainers, instructors and flight training schools have access to the most current and comprehensive training tools and resources, education campaigns and competently qualified trainers in the flight training and maintenance space will safeguard our organisation well into the future.

Growth Growth can be broken down into two key elements; the growth of RAAus as an organisation, as well as the growth of the Aviation Industry within Australia as a whole. When looking at RAAus we can focus on the growth of our membership base, flight school footprint, aircraft register, and financial growth and stability. We can also look at the total proportion of Aviation movements, Instructors and Maintainers that RAAus contributes to within Australia. Growth of RAAus also includes the addition of the services and privileges we are able to offer our membership.

Innovation Innovation is a multi-faceted area which refers to the improvement in services, processes, systems, and offerings to all stakeholders of RAAus. Innovation does not only refer to the improvement of IT technology to assist RAAus and our members, but also the ability for RAAus to provide benefits and solutions to our members as a world class leader in aviation privileges. Innovation is also about continuous improvement of current systems and procedures to improve the RAAus experience for all members. Not only do we need to update tangible technology (hardware, software), we also need to assist in our members’ adaption of a new mindset

In relation to industry, growth can be measured by the impact RAAus has on Aviation participation with Australia, as key player within general aviation and the overall goal to support growth of industry, regardless of whether people are involved in RAAus or other sectors of the Aviation community.

13


BOB TAIT COLLABORATION RAAus announced a collaboration with respected training provider, Bob Tait Theory. This development is part of the ongoing development of RAAus training services in pilot training and education. We are now offering for sale in our RAAus Online shop both the Bob Tait RAA BAK and RAA Cross Country texts for recreational pilots. Members and RAAus Flight schools are encouraged to purchase and use these reference texts as we work with Bob Tait theory to integrate a further suite of online training initiatives including training tutorials, practice exams and online exams through RAAus as part of our continuing development of our Learning Management System (LMS).

ROC TRAINING Training was delivered at RAAus HQ for new ROC approval holders with the intention of having these approval holders conduct physical audits of FTS and maintenance facilities. 11 new ROC approvals were issued, with new ROC approval holders to receive mentoring from RAAus staff during the conduct of the first FTS audits by the ROC.

14


CASR PART 149 What will change for RAAus and our members?

For many years Part 149 has been mooted by the regulator. The part represents a fundamental shift in how the regulator will engage with and regulate ASAOs (Approved Self Administering Organisations), currently known as RAAOs (Recreational Aviation Administration Organisations).

In terms of our day to day activities and functions, not a lot. The new Part will: • Define aviation functions (new functions can be added easily in the future) -- Currently RAAus registers aircraft, issues authorisations, administers pilot training and administers continuing airworthiness of registered aircraft. • Define ASAO specific key personnel • Require a Safety Management System • Require an audit and surveillance system

RAAus has been actively engaged with the regulator since 2014 as Part 149 has gathered momentum. This engagement has included attendance as public forums, attendance at invitation only meetings and forums, as audience members at CASA forums where 149 has been discussed, direct engagement with the regulator at a variety of levels from the DAS through to senior policy development staff.

Each of the above requirements will appear in a document known as an exposition and can be defined in a way we want them defined.

Additionally RAAus has developed documentation that is Part 149 ready. Largely this documentation has been in the safety portfolio, however other key documents have been developed to ensure Part 149 readiness.

RAAus expects to apply for a Part 149 certificate during the 2019–2020 financial year and members will be kept informed of our progress.

CASR Part 149 will specify the requirements for the certification and operation of aviation administration organisations. Part 149 is a Regulation that will facilitate approval of self administration of any aviation function. It will allow CASA to have a Regulation that will require and enable good ASAO safety governance. It will also enhance the safety culture of ASAOs and their members.

15

Photo by Ty Dekker


Safety Report Another key focus of the RAAus Safety Team has been the implementation of an Aviation Safety Management System (ASMS) at RAAus Flight Training Schools. Safety Management Systems offer schools a systematic approach to managing safety within their organisations and have been proven to improve safety and efficiency when adopted within flight training. The implementation of ASMS at our Flight Training Schools will continue to manage risk identification and improve the safety culture across our organisation.

RAAus is pleased to report that our safety statistics continue to improve, with a reduction in serious accidents and incidents during the 2018-2019 financial year. This improvement in safety can not only be attributed to the maturity of RAAus as an organisation, but also the success of our membership at large, including our network of Flight Training Schools, maintainers and pilots. Delving deeper into these statistics, we can see that our top three accident and incident types are reported to be engine failure or malfunction, loss of separation and runway loss of control. This data demonstrates the need for ensuring the organisation continues to provide training for maintainers, as well as a reminder for pilots to maintain a high level of situational awareness and to ensure they maintain a stable approach and landing – if in doubt, go around!

Top 10 Accident & Incident Occurrence Types

RAAus would like to stress the importance of members reporting accidents and incidents within our Occurrence Management System (OMS). Your experiences have the ability to assist the focus of the RAAus Safety Team in order to minimise the risk of these events reoccurring, however without occurrences being submitted in the OMS, RAAus is unable to generate valuable data on events taking place within our community. RAAus uses occurrence data to assist in communication and monitor safety trends to improve aviation safety for all members, and adopts an open and fair reporting culture to ensure members can comfortably submit reports without fear of unnecessary retribution. You can also report a known defect, hazard, or make a confidential complaint through our OMS. To submit a report, go to www.oms.raa.asn.

1

Engine failure or malfunction

2

Loss of separation or near miss

3

Runway loss of control

4

Landing gear issues

5

Hard landing

6

Airspace infringement

7

Runway incursion

8

Flight controls

9

Loss of control

10

As part of our ongoing safety promotion and training, RAAus has continued to implement a number of safety initiatives throughout the year including L1 training workshops which will continue throughout the 2019-2020 financial year. Members are encouraged to partake in L1 training to refresh their practical maintenance skills and requirements. We have also been successful in hosting Professional Development Programs (PDPs) and member forums at a number of locations around Australia. The ongoing professional development of our instructors remains a key focus in improving training and standardisation, while member forums offer the ability for RAAus to engage with our members and answer any questions they may have.

16

Aircraft preparation


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The 2019 Professional Development Program for CFIs, Instructors and Maintainers commenced in March in Launceston with the schedule to follow including Lilydale, Bendigo, Canberra, Bunbury, Gawler, Mildura, Bathurst, Cessnock, Armidale, Caboolture, Rockhampton, and Heck Field. A member forum was also held in each location with additional member forums held in Wedderburn, Bindoon, and Jandakot.

The one-day PDP seminars were based on Back to Basics: Re-exploring first principles and the fundamentals of flight training delivery and maintenance completion. The workshops are divided into sections which include presentations and organisational updates on the Operational, Technical, Safety and Innovation & Improvement departments and their respective functions within RAAus.

17


RAAUS DASHBOARD 2018–19 900+ L1 Maintenance

11,000 who participate

Authority holders

in the RAAus movement

400+ L2 Maintenance

50

LAMEs who carry out maintenance on RAAus aircraft

Authority holders

12,500+

Facebook Likes

Average member age

49

3,297

Jabiru

registered aircraft

Most popular aircraft

18


PAGE TITLE 1,000+

550 Junior Members

average enquiries per week

raaus.com.au unique page views

282,000

13

Professional Development seminars delivered Australia-wide

$1.1M

in the bank

3% Membership growth 153

9,573

Flight Training Schools

Members 19


Events The team at RAAus attended many fly-ins and airshows during the last financial year. At every event we get the opportunity to talk with members face-to-face, and talk with avaition enthusiasts about the joys of recreational aviation. RAAus attended: -- AirVenture Australia September 2018 -- Warbirds Downunder Temora October 2018 -- AusFly October 2018 -- Lilydale Air Show November 2018 -- Avalon International Airshow February 2019 -- Holbrook Fly-in April 2019 -- Wedderburn Fly-in April 2019 -- Wings Over Illawarra May 2019 -- Rylstone Airpark Celebration of Aviation May 2019 Did you know? RAAus offers a free temporary membership for anyone interested in beginning their flying journey. For more information, visit raaus.com.au

20


21


AIRVENTURE AUSTRALIA 2018 AirVenture Australia 2018 took to the skies at Cessnock Aerdrome in the beautiful Hunter Valley. Visitors to the airshow and fly-in were treated to a fantastic air display and static display, seminars, joyflights and adventure flights, and dozens of vendors and exhibitors. Jabiru Aircraft celebrated 30 years, Teen Around Oz, 16-year-old pilot Liam Morey, stopped by during his world record circumnavigation of Australia, scores of youngsters took part in educational STEM activities, and past and present scholarship winners were celebrated at a gala dinner at the conclusion of the event. Congratulations to the AirVenture Australia team on a fantastic event!

22


23


AVALON RAAus was once again pleased to attend the Australian International Airshow at Avalon Airport in February 2019. As Australia’s largest airshow, Avalon provides RAAus with the opportunity to engage with aviation enthusiasts from all backgrounds, ranging from youth through to experienced commercial and military aviators. This year, we had a strong display of 24 RAAus aircraft and were able to offer members complimentary tickets to the trade show days of the event. RAAus carried out wing rib building activities for kids and also held a Scholarship Award evening presenting certificates to RAAus Scholarship recipients. Recipients were

also awarded a free lightspeed headset sponsored by Lightspeed Aviation. RAAus looks forward to attending the next Australian International Airshow at Avalon in 2021.

24


PAGE TITLE

25


CELEBRATING FIRST SOLOS

AARON

ANDREW

ANDREW

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

BEN

BLAKE

CAITLYN

CHAIS

CHARLES

ELLIOTT

GAVIN

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

BAILEY

MERIT AVIATION

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

JASON

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

MERIT AVIATION

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

STRIKE AVIATION TRAINING

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

JIMMY

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

ARRAN

TASMANIAN AERO CLUB

KB’S FLYING SCHOOL

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

AYLA

BOB

BRETT

COLIN

DOMINIC

TOPFUN AVIATION

INSPIRE AVIATION

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

TASMANIAN AERO CLUB

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

GRETTA

SKYFLYTE ULA

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

HAYDEN

JOEL

JOHN

KERRI

HARRY

TOPFUN AVIATION

26

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

MERIT AVIATION

MERIT AVIATION

MERIT AVIATION


KIARA

LAETITIA

LAUREN

LUKE

MICHAEL

MICHAEL

MICHAEL

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

NATHAN

NEIVE

RILEY

ROD

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

MATTHEW

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

MITCH

INSPIRE AVIATION

SHAUN

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

SOAR AVIATION BANKSTOWN

ADELAIDE SOARING CLUB

INSPIRE AVIATION

MERIT AVIATION

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

NICK

INSPIRE AVIATION

SAM

MATT

INSPIRE AVIATION

MIKE

YARRA VALLEY FLIGHT TRAINING

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

PAUL

INSPIRE AVIATION

MERIT AVIATION

CABOOLTURE RECREATIONAL AVIATION

SAM

SCOTT

SHAYDEN

SIMON

STU

TAMMY

SOAR AVIATION BANKSTOWN

AEROCHUTE INDUSTRIES

27

LONE EAGLE FLYING SCHOOL

MERIT AVIATION

STRIKE AVIATION TRAINING

SKYFLYTE ULA


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Abadiyan

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Butler

9/04/2019

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Abell

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Blacket

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Butt

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Coulter

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Adams

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Blacklock

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Cahill

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Coux

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Adams

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Blair

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Cai

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Cowie

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Addington

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Cox

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Ahmed

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Allie

1/09/2018

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Bowen

28/10/2018

FSK Al-Zuhairi

16/05/2019

AC

Bowyer

16/11/2018 27/12/2018

SAK Amin Zada

9/04/2019

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S

2/02/2019

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Boyle

Amjad

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LJ

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Annetta

12/09/2018

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Bradley

26/11/2018

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Anson

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Bradley

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Antoniou

12/07/2018

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Bradshaw

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Archer

20/11/2018

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Bramley

13/07/2018

SB

Arkwright

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Brampton

10/10/2018

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Arslan

25/11/2018

RB

Brandon

26/10/2018

R

Askary

28/02/2019

R

Brennan

6/06/2019

L

Aspinall

30/09/2019

R

Breslin

25/07/2018

L

Aspland

25/08/2018

JK

Bridger

18/09/2018

AA

Ataria

24/04/2019

M

Briggs

18/05/2019

DB

Aungles

18/05/2019

MC

Bright

23/06/2019

S

Baalcke

26/01/2019

JW

Brimblecombe

19/01/2019

PJ

Britten

J

Broad

9/06/2019

H

Babu

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Bainbridge

A

Baker

18/05/2019

JK

Broadbent

31/03/2019

J

Bakhshayesh

17/09/2018

MC

Broadway

19/05/2019

AS

Bal

19/02/2019

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Brodie

2/10/2018

KL

Ball

17/06/2019

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Banh

1/09/2019

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Brooks

7/04/2019

LJ

Barber

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15/08/2018

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11/07/2018

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Brown

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Browning

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Brullo

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Beaton

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Buckley

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Benson

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Burrell

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Berlage

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Burson

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Carey

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Carr

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Carr

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Carter

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Cassar

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Castle

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Cavanough

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Chan

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Chapman

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Chapman

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Cheng

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Chester

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Chow

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Christall

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Christie

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Chuong

30/10/2018

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Clarke

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Clarke

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Como

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Connell

22/02/2019

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Connellan

24/07/2018

GL

Connolly

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Cook

19/07/2018

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Cook

3/01/2019

8/04/2019

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Cooke

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Cooper

30/09/2018

7/10/2018

BJ

Cooper

22/03/2019

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Cooper

12/04/2019

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Corbett

30/11/2018

PA

Cossio

3/01/2019

JF

Cottrell

29/05/2019

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Couchman

16/06/2019

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15/03/2019

SWA Dekker

27/07/2018

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DeMarchi

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26/11/2018

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25/05/2019

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Dickson

20/09/2019

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Din

25/09/2018

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Dippelsmann

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Divjakoski

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JB

Dollie

26/07/2019

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Dollin

23/07/2019

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Donald

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Duffin

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Dundas

23/03/2019

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Dunn

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Dutton

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Gao

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Harris

3/07/2019

MMB Ishak

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Easter

19/05/2019

CM

Gardiner

3/07/2019

RM

Harrison

3/09/2018

S

Issell

31/08/2019

6/08/2018

SJ

Edmunds

10/08/2019

J

Garside

12/04/2019

MI

Hart

20/02/2019

L

Iva

27/08/2018

W

Edmunds

1/09/2019

L

Gaston

10/12/2018

SA

Harvey

13/09/2018

M

Iversen

11/11/2018

H

Edwards

28/11/2018

SM

Gates

9/02/2019

A

Hassan

26/11/2018

S

Izett

AP

Edwards

13/02/2019

J

Gatt

27/03/2019

D

Hatcher

17/05/2019

MP

Jackman

AP

Egan

27/09/2018

A

Gaukroger

28/10/2018

P

Hatfield

15/09/2019

A

Jackson

J

Egel

17/11/2018

RJ

Gaunt

26/09/2019

A

Hatton

15/05/2019

M

Jafarnejad

GD

Ehlers

21/07/2019

A

Geerlings

1/04/2019

QH

Hawker

26/01/2019

E

Jahani

26/01/2019

FC

Eickhoff

11/08/2019

J

Geerlings

1/04/2019

J

Hayden

17/01/2019

MP

Jak

31/07/2018

E

Ejembi

24/07/2018

MP

Gerdes

23/07/2018

M

Hazelwood

M

El Hourani

28/03/2019

H

Ghafary

18/05/2019

B

Hedges

RD

Elder

29/09/2019

S

Ghosh

18/04/2019

R

Heffernan

G

Element

27/07/2019

JP

Gibb

28/03/2019

RA

Hegyesi

11/01/2019

KK

Emery

16/04/2019

T

Gibson

19/01/2019

DB

Heinrich

16/04/2019

A

Emir

20/08/2018

VA

Giles

22/12/2018

TC

Heinrich

30/04/2019

T

English

17/08/2018

TJD

Gillis

14/02/2019

M

Heinrich

14/09/2019

1/08/2019

ND

James

29/12/2018

BJ

James

24/03/2019

4/08/2018

B

Jamou

29/08/2019

T

Enright

5/11/2018

MI

Gilmour

17/07/2019

NJD Helwani

23/06/2019

Ereb

10/04/2019

KI

Glasgow

18/05/2019

GA

13/04/2019

J

Esdaile

17/02/2019

TB

Glazbrook

12/02/2019

KGB Herron

23/03/2019

8/08/2019

GP

Gleeson

11/11/2018

MDJ Esmond

16/04/2019

DW Hewett

SJC Gloury

17/02/2019

CA

Hewitt

K

Godfrey

13/07/2018

AJ

Hey

RW

Goode

17/12/2018

C

Higgins

2/02/2019

4/09/2018

L

Hill

1/07/2018

KD

Evans

21/07/2018

TH

Evans

9/10/2018

GD

Evans

13/04/2019

JA

Fagan

3/07/2018

MW Goodley

C

Faint

CL

Fairservice

CO

Farrar

J

Farrugia

J

Faulkner

A B J

Ferguson

R H

2/09/2018 17/07/2019

1/06/2019

S

Goodrick

14/09/2018

JD

Hill

26/05/2019

24/04/2019

CJ

Gorton

22/12/2018

BI

Hill

26/08/2019

3/09/2018

D

Gowty

1/08/2019

CZ

Hill

13/09/2019

17/07/2018

H

Goyal

13/08/2019

I

Hillhouse

26/09/2019

SP

Graham

17/11/2018

J

Hills

22/06/2019

Fawcett

22/04/2019

B

Graham

22/07/2019

BW

Hiscox

31/05/2019

Fealy

12/01/2019

N

Grande

19/12/2018

MEU Hitosis

4/02/2019

LH

Gray

4/07/2018

DJ

Hobbs

22/05/2019

Ferguson

5/05/2019

SW

Gray

20/10/2018

M

Hodge

24/09/2019

Fernandes

14/04/2019

JJ

Gray

14/12/2018

MJ

Hodges

E

Ferri

27/07/2019

AJ

Gray

18/09/2019

AW

Hoffensetz

23/06/2019

KB

Fielder

12/06/2019

MJ

Green

19/01/2019

R

Holdsworth

29/07/2018

LM

Findley

26/01/2019

DC

Greene

11/12/2018

SA

Holland

L

Findley

6/06/2019

A

Greentree

18/03/2019

NR

Holloway

14/12/2018

SD

Finney

23/02/2019

CB

Gregory

20/09/2019

D

Holmes

26/04/2019

D

Fish

20/09/2019

DG

Greig

3/09/2019

J

Holness

7/06/2019

GW Fisher

19/09/2019

SR

Grenfell

17/10/2018

B

Horne

24/07/2019

C

Fittler

19/05/2019

D

Gribble

25/07/2019

JK

Horne

1/08/2019

SJ

Fitzgerald

29/09/2018

DH

Griffiths

16/04/2019

DK

Horne

1/08/2019

K

Fitzsimmons

4/09/2018

S

Grimes

31/07/2018

TB

Horneman

26/07/2019

AG

Flanagan

2/01/2019

P

Grimes

13/02/2019

J

Horvath

24/03/2019

B

Fleming

20/12/2018

N

Grubb

26/08/2018

D

Hosking

28/07/2018

MJ

Fleming

10/01/2019

S

Grzebiniak

25/10/2018

JW

House

31/08/2018

S

Flood

19/12/2018

LG

Guinan

19/07/2019

TO

House

2/10/2018

JA

Flood

15/03/2019

W

Gunson

27/07/2019

M

Houssaye

NR

Follett

21/08/2019

C

Gunther

12/06/2019

DMK Houston

11/07/2018

M

Forati

2/10/2019

JS

Ha

4/02/2019

DA

Howson

14/09/2018

KS

Forsyth

11/05/2019

PJ

Haby

1/04/2019

H

Huang

3/09/2018

J

Haigh

25/06/2019

B

Huang

13/03/2019

9/08/2018

PT

Hudson

15/06/2019 18/10/2018

GW Fortey

7/04/2019

4/09/2019

9/09/2018

4/09/2019

3/12/2018

15/09/2019

DS

Fossey

22/08/2018

WD Hall

DJ

Foster

25/07/2018

B

Halls

13/07/2018

DM

Hughes

MA

Foster

20/01/2019

JK

Hamdorf

13/03/2019

PA

Hughes

5/01/2019

RJ

Foster

25/06/2019

IR

Hammerton

2/09/2018

ET

Huisman

5/05/2019

N

Fotheringham

29/01/2019

NJ

Hammond

29/07/2018

GJ

Humphreys

5/07/2018

D

Foxx

17/02/2019

B

Hammond

12/09/2019

C

Humphreys

12/11/2018

R

Francis

5/08/2018

C

Hamori

20/06/2019

D

Humphreys

30/01/2019

W

Francis

15/09/2018

B

Han

5/01/2019

G

Humphries

30/10/2018

J

French

8/06/2019

L

Hanlon

27/08/2019

HT

Hung

6/07/2019

CNP Fuentes

17/01/2019

JP

Hann

22/10/2018

GW Hunt

27/09/2018

WD Fullerton

7/02/2019

SMS Haque

31/12/2018

LR

Hunt

20/07/2019

CL

Furphy

29/06/2019

CJ

Harcourt

27/07/2019

J

Hunter

30/03/2019

L

Gadd

15/11/2018

SR

Hardy

18/11/2018

R

Huseby

17/01/2019

DK

Gadza

29/12/2018

M

Harnetty

27/03/2019

JM

Hutson

11/08/2018

RW

Gair

13/07/2019

J

Harper

20/07/2018

J

Ings

RJ

Gajjar

25/07/2019

EP

Harris

2/07/2018

TLT

Ip

DR

Gannon

9/10/2018

JA

Harris

28/12/2018

TJ

Ireland

M

Gant

2/02/2019

CP

Harris

7/02/2019

MJ

Irvin

29

8/07/2018 20/07/2019

14/08/2018

RE

Herbert

2/07/2019 16/08/2019

1/10/2018 18/12/2018 9/05/2019 19/07/2018

MM Janse Van Rensburg

27/08/2019

J

Jansse

15/05/2019

LK

Jarvis

31/10/2018

TJ

Jay

MJ

Jeffery

11/07/2019

MP

Jennings

16/07/2019

TC

Jessen

13/04/2019

B

Jogiya

ML

Johnson

NE

Johnson

9/12/2018

K

Johnson

11/01/2019

JD

Johnson

21/01/2019

IE

Johnson

26/01/2019

JP

Johnson

25/04/2019

M

Johnson

27/04/2019

BA

Johnson

30/09/2019

BK

Johnston

25/08/2018

AL

Johnston

15/09/2018

MR

Johnstone

15/06/2019

K

Jolly

15/08/2018

K

Jones

5/07/2018

CT

Jones

25/07/2018

DA

Jones

10/10/2018

C

Jones

1/02/2019

CA

Jones

1/03/2019

MA

Jordaan

2/03/2019

TR

Jordan

7/08/2018

JC

Joubert

29/09/2018

JR

Kajewski

17/08/2019

S

Kalajdzic

9/03/2019

NM

Kangethe

28/03/2019

L

Kaplan

17/01/2019

N

Karazisis

A

Karim

AD

Karkaloutsos

16/08/2018

P

Kavanagh

15/06/2019

JF

Keane

12/11/2018

A

Keifari

17/05/2019

BJ

Kelynack

24/06/2019

N

Kemp

25/06/2019

KC

Kemp

15/09/2019

R

Kendall

29/07/2019

6/09/2019

4/07/2019 13/10/2018

7/09/2018 2/07/2019

A

Kendrick

10/07/2018

J

Kennedy

26/07/2018

TJ

Kennedy

6/03/2019

HJ

Kennedy

BL

Kent

12/12/2018

A

Keulen

17/05/2019

B

Khadka

S

Khan

B

Khatiwada

HR

Kidman

7/12/2018

AG

Kinsman

21/07/2019

GJ

Kirchhofer

19/09/2018

T

Kirjakovski

29/08/2018

CM

Kirkman

S

Kiruthiga Ilango

14/07/2018

S

Klaproth

26/08/2018

6/04/2019

1/10/2019 30/04/2019 6/12/2018

2/09/2018


PILOT CERTIFICATES (CONT.) W

Klein

12/09/2018

H

Majidpour

4/05/2019

IA

Mooney

21/11/2018

BE

Palmer

21/03/2019

D

Knabel

26/08/2019

SM

Mani

4/07/2019

J

Mooney

20/12/2018

AFI

Pandion

20/06/2019

JE

Knispel

21/03/2019

R

Mann

31/10/2018

SH

Moosawi

1/08/2018

JL

Parker

4/07/2019

F

Koeber

30/07/2018

Z

Mansfield

13/08/2019

TA

Morabito

12/03/2019

G

Parker

29/07/2019

V

Kour

NL

Marais

2/02/2019

TA

Morrell

7/05/2019

C

Parry

26/10/2018

PB

Kreegher

15/07/2019

A

Markonis

4/01/2019

TJ

Morris

23/07/2018

M

Parvez

21/07/2019

RW

Kroemer

24/05/2019

T

Markou

26/08/2019

A

Morris

22/02/2019

A

Pearson

15/03/2019

A

Kroiter

30/07/2019

KC

Marrier Dunienville

11/03/2019

J

Morrison

10/09/2018

C

Pearson

27/09/2019

B

Kuiper

15/02/2019

R

Martin

12/07/2018

JW

Mortimer

12/02/2019

DT

Peauril

19/07/2018

U

Kulafrone

5/09/2019

C

Mason

4/08/2018

LJ

Moss

14/08/2018

E

Peddie

19/10/2018

R

Lacey

16/06/2019

C

Mason

14/11/2018

SR

Mossin

19/03/2019

D

Peek

30/07/2018

ID

Lake

7/07/2018

TA

Massey

27/01/2019

I

Moti

5/09/2019

D

Peek

30/07/2018

S

Lakey

3/07/2018

S

Matthews

23/07/2018

J

Mott

1/08/2018

WJ

Pereira

11/04/2019

MG

Lam

1/07/2018

JC

Matthison

6/06/2019

WH Mountford

23/12/2018

MC

Perera

29/03/2019

CHB Lam

13/08/2018

GA

Maudsley

9/09/2018

M

Mousa

29/09/2018

MC

Peters

23/07/2019

YLE Lam

30/08/2018

RJ

May

3/02/2019

R

Muller

18/01/2019

LR

Petrie

2/08/2019

JT

Langford

15/02/2019

S

Mayall

26/11/2018

RG

Muller

26/07/2019

JB

Pettit

3/09/2019

S

Lanot

5/08/2018

A

Mayled

29/11/2018

J

Mulligan

12/03/2019

DE

Petty

17/04/2019 28/07/2018

1/09/2018

GD

Lapham

6/11/2018

SD

McBurnie

24/02/2019

JWM Munckton

2/06/2019

P

Pham

JE

Larrea Esteva

20/01/2019

TA

Mcclelland

20/09/2018

AA

Munro

24/01/2019

AJ

Phillips

TC

Lau

12/09/2018

B

McClelland

15/04/2019

O

Murray

9/07/2019

LJ

Piko

15/12/2018 21/03/2019

8/07/2019

JH

Launder

10/05/2019

CJ

Mcclintock

10/08/2019

F

Musa

28/09/2019

M

Piromalli

TKJ

Laurence

16/05/2019

L

McCormick

20/04/2019

MT

Myhal

28/08/2018

H

Ponder

19/01/2019

G

Law

26/03/2019

JM

McCosker

16/09/2019

KW

Myint

26/11/2018

JL

Porter

19/06/2019

M

le Gras

17/02/2019

LS

Mccullough

14/07/2018

NW Myint

26/11/2018

JJD Potts

P

Leckie

3/08/2019

S

Mccusker

19/11/2018

S

Na

1/11/2018

S

Mcdonald

22/05/2019

A

Naritsuka-Hayler

WTH Lee

4/10/2018

RA

Potts

11/01/2019

P

Poussart

10/04/2019 6/06/2019 20/05/2019

RY

Lee

16/01/2019

SCM Mcelhinney

5/02/2019

Y

Nath

11/09/2019

A

Prater

11/07/2019

TJ

Lee

2/03/2019

DH

Mcfarlane

7/07/2018

AM

Nayeb

11/01/2019

MJ

Pretnar

24/11/2018

RJ

Lee

7/04/2019

JH

McGill

29/07/2018

M

Nazligul

19/07/2018

P

Price

4/01/2019

CM

Leith

16/12/2018

RR

Mcgrath

1/07/2018

D

Needham

22/12/2018

G

Priest

16/11/2018

K

Lennox

25/05/2019

D

Mcgrath

6/01/2019

M

Leung

11/09/2019

PA

Mcgregor

HS

Leverington

14/02/2019

LA

LN

Lewis

13/07/2018

S

A

Liddell

22/09/2019

CA

Liddle

23/05/2019

R

Lill

BF

Nel

6/07/2018

MA

Priestly

19/08/2018

12/09/2018

J

Nitschke

15/11/2018

BS

Prieto

22/09/2018

Mcguinness

25/10/2018

DO

Nolder

30/09/2018

B

Prince

25/10/2018

Mchardy

24/10/2018

MJ

Norris

19/07/2018

Z

Prosser

29/09/2018

AA

Mcintosh

25/10/2018

J

Norris

7/09/2018

G

Psaltakis

24/01/2019

T

Mcintosh

24/11/2018

AH

Norton

11/08/2018

S

Pupilli

15/10/2018

24/09/2018

M

Mckechnie

20/12/2018

LI

Notley

17/08/2019

M

Purdie

11/07/2018

SCL Lin

21/08/2018

A

McKern

26/10/2018

A

Nye

10/02/2019

GHM Putker

19/01/2019

M

Lindsay

15/05/2019

CJ

Mckernan

1/08/2018

M

Nykanen

M

Putland

27/09/2019

CG

Lines

5/06/2019

T

Mckie

18/07/2019

PJ

O'Brien

26/11/2018

ZUA Qureshi

4/08/2018

B

Ling

25/01/2019

CM

Mclaren

15/07/2018

VJ

O'Brien

26/12/2018

CB

Raddon

3/02/2019

HD

Linton

28/10/2018

CJ

McLennan

8/07/2018

MP

O'Brien

27/03/2019

C

Raggett

15/01/2019

P

Lister

24/06/2019

LJ

McLeod

26/08/2018

MW O'Byrne

BA

Lo

23/11/2018

T

McMah

4/08/2018

5/12/2018

15/09/2018

R

Ranty

CM

O'Grady

9/12/2018

V

Rasmussen

20/01/2019 26/09/2019

5/06/2019

JA

Loch

15/11/2018

A

Mcmahon

31/08/2019

M

O'Hare

27/01/2019

S

Rathod

K

Logan

24/09/2019

LJ

McMilan

30/09/2019

R

O'Neill

11/11/2018

J

Rau

BD

Lohman

10/11/2018

A

Mcmillan

12/04/2019

KR

Offner

23/09/2018

GH

Raubeheimer

11/06/2019

AF

Long

14/09/2019

CL

Mcpherson

2/04/2019

MJ

Ohis

13/02/2019

C

Rautenbach

17/02/2019

DS

Longmire

16/11/2018

RM

Mcphie

5/08/2018

D

Oke

11/07/2018

DA

Rea

MG

Longstaff

18/07/2018

A

Meechan

11/09/2018

CL

O'Keefe

H

Read-Spinks

4/10/2018

A

Love

13/12/2018

GR

Meldrum

4/09/2019

S

O'Mahony

26/09/2019

JM

Reid

3/08/2018

MI

Lowe

8/03/2019

8/12/2018

8/09/2018

18/06/2019

MO Melmoth

4/05/2019

K

Opray

17/09/2019

KT

Reid

20/08/2019

JMC Lual

16/09/2019

S

Merhi

12/08/2019

S

Ord

10/04/2019

TC

Reid

26/09/2019

P

Lucas

20/09/2018

JJ

Mesilane

28/02/2019

K

Ormond

23/07/2019

TD

Retallick

21/05/2019

R

Lucas

7/05/2019

JA

Michael

16/05/2019

JB

Orr

3/02/2019

W

Reynolds

B

Lucas

29/07/2019

K

Middleton

27/10/2018

G

Osborne

30/04/2019

B

Rezawi

19/09/2019

K

Ludlow

30/08/2018

B

Milgate

11/08/2019

KB

Osbourne

9/06/2019

AE

Rhodes-Anderson

14/07/2018

MJ

Luyten

7/10/2018

LJ

Miller

18/11/2018

SV

Osmond

3/07/2018

DJ

Richards

13/07/2018

EG

Lynch

19/10/2018

P

Miller

9/06/2019

DB

Ostler

11/10/2018

AR

Richards

11/04/2019

MA

Maas

7/10/2018

RD

Miller

15/06/2019

ML

OSullivan

10/02/2019

AP

Richards

14/08/2019

LT

Macaulay

14/08/2019

BA

Mills

17/11/2018

JA

Owen

29/08/2018

TC

Ridgeway

14/05/2019

A

Macaw

23/05/2019

DW Mitchell

6/06/2019

SJ

Oxley

4/11/2018

MA

Rizzacasa

25/08/2019

H

Macdonald

27/07/2019

H

Mitchell

6/08/2019

J

Ozone

5/09/2019

J

Roberts

28/10/2018

DG

Mackey

5/07/2019

G

Moczynski

ZGE Packard-Hair

12/07/2018

E

Roberts

17/12/2018

C

Maclean

6/10/2018

MS

Mohamad Isa

5/07/2019

J

Robertson

28/06/2019

22/04/2019 1/08/2019

T

Packer

1/10/2018

8/03/2019

A

Mahamud

20/01/2019

HV

Molluso

27/06/2019

A

Pais

10/11/2018

MH

Roberts-Thomson

S

Maher

22/11/2018

LD

Moloney

15/07/2018

K

Pajak

25/11/2018

TJ

Robinson

19/09/2018

CR

Maher

1/06/2019

H

Montgomery

21/06/2019

AM

Palfrey

7/04/2019

J

Robinson

1/10/2019

30


I

Roddie

DJ

Rodziewicz

13/02/2019

M

Singh

12/03/2019

J

Thompson

21/02/2019

R

Wells

24/08/2019

3/06/2019

K

Skepper

25/07/2019

B

Thompson

7/05/2019

T

Weston

PJ

26/06/2019

Roffe

20/09/2018

M

Skinner

26/01/2019

C

Thorn

27/10/2018

FCN Weston

C

Rogers

24/12/2018

C

Slater

24/08/2018

F

Thurm

28/02/2019

JJ

Whaling-Laurens

J

Rolston

7/06/2019

PJ

Slevin

4/07/2019

JC

Ticllia

27/10/2018

A

Wheeler

30/12/2018

GN

Rootes

28/04/2019

T

Smalldon

4/03/2019

S

Tikhonov

11/09/2018

B

Whitby

21/07/2018

SJ

Ross

IH

Rossetto

1/07/2019 12/10/2018

5/12/2018

M

Smith

7/10/2018

M

Tiller

2/10/2019

RK

White

19/10/2018

25/04/2019

A

Smith

20/11/2018

D

Timperio

12/05/2019

MD

White

23/11/2018

A

Roughley

17/02/2019

DJ

Smith

23/12/2018

R

Timperley

26/08/2019

A

White

17/04/2019

JR

Rovers

12/05/2019

C

Smith

16/01/2019

SS

Todhunter

22/04/2019

TL

White

18/04/2019

M

Rowles

7/06/2019

M

Smith

6/03/2019

A

Tolic

31/07/2018

AJ

White

3/06/2019

DJ

Rowley

12/08/2019

J

Smith

28/04/2019

JA

Tomlinson

11/10/2018

N

White

3/08/2019

TA

Rowling

20/01/2019

ER

Smith

16/05/2019

TH

Tong

1/10/2018

F

White

28/08/2019 27/02/2019

E

Roxburgh

30/10/2018

DJ

Smith

16/07/2019

B

Topping

22/09/2018

A

Whitehead

JB

Rubidge

5/07/2018

DL

Smith

30/07/2019

R

Topping

3/01/2019

M

Whitelaw

B

Rundle

30/09/2018

KJ

Smithwell

18/01/2019

JP

Townsend

23/11/2018

B

Whittingham

17/10/2018

G

Rundle

20/06/2019

R

Smits

6/09/2018

R

Townsend

18/05/2019

B

Whitty

18/09/2018

MJ

Russell

16/10/2018

H

Smyth

6/09/2018

T

Tran

31/07/2019

J

Wiatkowski

1/06/2019

A

Russell

26/02/2019

B

So

20/12/2018

L

Traverso

31/01/2019

W

Wieske

8/04/2019

W

Russell-Smith

15/03/2019

YC

Soille

7/02/2019

C

Tsai

8/06/2019

J

Wigley

S

Ruttley

9/05/2019

N

Sommerfeld

10/09/2018

YC

Tseng

14/02/2019

A

Wild

27/03/2019 24/04/2019

9/06/2019

9/06/2019

5/10/2018

S

Song

27/08/2018

D

Tsikopoulos

16/09/2018

P

Wiley

26/01/2019

M

Sonmez

5/07/2018

S

Tucker

10/12/2018

K

Willems

13/07/2018

3/05/2019

T

Soutter

30/07/2018

JR

Turnbull

23/11/2018

G

Willey

31/08/2019

25/08/2018

NJ

Spencer Scarr

26/09/2018

IG

Turner

21/07/2018

DM

Williams

12/07/2018

10/04/2019

S

Spicer

9/07/2019

KJ

Turner

19/04/2019

JR

Williams

4/09/2018

2/10/2019

OJ

Spivey

22/12/2018

M

Tutic

15/11/2018

R

Williams

5/01/2019

Sansom

3/09/2018

RE

Squire

19/03/2019

S

Tweed

29/08/2019

TD

Williams

27/07/2019

L

Santos

26/06/2019

SJ

Squires

25/10/2018

MH

Underwood

13/02/2019

18/11/2018

Z

Sarfaraz

31/07/2019

NJ

Stace

9/02/2019

K

Vagg

I

Schacht

26/02/2019

RB

Stafford

1/11/2018

M

Van Der Sluis

RJ

Schaumburg

13/06/2019

A

Stafford

22/12/2018

TF

Van Doore

MG

Scheepers

20/08/2019

D

Stalker

12/08/2019

R

Van Haren

J

Stanaway

29/03/2019

D

Van Oosterom

SCE Winter

17/05/2019

BE

Stanmore

17/04/2019

M

Van Praag

16/12/2018

WC

Wolfe-Rackemann

14/07/2018

25/09/2019

B

Steffensen

22/09/2019

BM

Van Tonder

21/09/2019

J

Won

20/08/2018

1/06/2019

JA

Steiner

18/06/2019

M

Veenstra

19/09/2018

WK

Wong

16/04/2019

Woodhead

TC

Ryan-Knight

H

Sabondo

M

Safadi

H

Salemeh

IW

Salmon

RL

Sanders

CJ

D

Willoughby

9/09/2019

MA

Wilson

11/10/2018

17/10/2018

SL

Wilson

11/12/2018

2/08/2018

I

Wilson

25/08/2019

26/08/2019

S

Winney

21/09/2018

A

Scheiffers

19/10/2018

JJ

Schembri

8/10/2018

D

Schiller

K

Schneider

IN

Scholes-Robertson

16/08/2018

JI

Stephens

20/04/2019

HR

Veivers

31/05/2019

JD

S

Schweikert

24/10/2018

D

Stephens

20/07/2019

JP

Vella

14/04/2019

CFE Woods

LJ

Scott

24/06/2019

AC

Stephenson

11/09/2018

DPJ Vemer

19/07/2019

G

Woods

7/05/2019

T

Scott

30/06/2019

H

Stephenson

2/07/2019

T

Verhoef

4/10/2018

D

Woods

18/06/2019

LR

Scott

2/07/2019

G

Stephenson

2/07/2019

AD

Vernam

1/02/2019

V

Woodward

22/11/2018

L

Scott

9/08/2019

L

Stevens

28/01/2019

TN

Vevers

3/10/2018

IS

Worsfold

H

Scullion

24/10/2018

JA

Stevens

17/02/2019

GR

Vick

28/08/2018

DM

Wright

J

Sealey

26/09/2019

WJ

Stevens

25/05/2019

B

Viel

16/07/2019

M

Wu

31/07/2019

JM

Seaton

9/02/2019

H

Stewart

17/07/2018

R

Vigder

28/03/2019

N

Wulff

25/07/2018

PC

Sebire

23/09/2018

JA

Stobie

24/04/2019

NLM Vinall

25/04/2019

YM

Wynn

16/08/2019

JA

Serrano

24/08/2018

J

Stokkel

31/08/2019

JB

Vincent

13/08/2019

Z

Xia

25/07/2018

RE

Seymour

11/09/2018

FG

Stone

12/06/2019

JC

Vine

21/06/2019

A

Yoong

19/09/2018

P

Seymour

21/01/2019

J

Storer

8/12/2018

GF

Visser

15/09/2018

GP

Young

6/09/2018

W

Sha

15/12/2018

J

Stuckey

K

Vogler

20/01/2019

K

Young

26/03/2019

AJJG Shafto

15/09/2019

T

Sumner

3/10/2018

JP

Voglsinger

2/02/2019

J

Young

21/06/2019

A

Shams

17/12/2018

MJ

Sutherland

6/07/2019

G

Volf

14/12/2018

ST

Zacher

17/02/2019

V

Shanmugam

11/07/2018

PM

Sveinsson

27/10/2018

JM

Vonhoff

30/08/2018

CW

Zangari

25/07/2018

S

Sharma

3/04/2019

G

Svensen

4/04/2019

A

Vuilleumier

1/07/2019

A

Zappia

20/10/2018

OJ

Sharp

25/08/2018

SR

Swann

9/03/2019

C

Wagemakers

8/05/2019

BT

Zeederberg

C

Sharpe

18/03/2019

K

Swash

5/02/2019

K

Walker

19/07/2019

J

Zegzula

A

Shea

25/06/2019

TA

Zenner

4/09/2018

AJ

Shearer-Smith

7/10/2018

TS

Zhang

30/03/2019

30/08/2018

6/05/2019

O

Syamando

7/08/2019

A

Wall

10/02/2019

P

Talma Stheeman

1/08/2019

DM

Waller

9/08/2018

B

Shepherd

25/10/2018

R

Tanger

1/07/2019

B

Waller

14/10/2018

CR

Sherwood

19/07/2019

N

Tarapun

29/08/2018

W

Walsh

24/09/2018

19/11/2018

M

Shih

SG

Shuck

MP

Sibley

A

Sich

M

Sidoti

SM

Tauber

2/02/2019

P

Warburton

7/06/2019

A

Taylor

31/07/2018

RJ

Warhurst

19/07/2018

2/08/2018

EJ

Taylor

1/02/2019

DS

Warren

23/09/2019

10/08/2019

C

Teng

30/08/2019

JW

Watson

25/11/2018

27/09/2019

ZA

Teo

3/04/2019

JWA Watson

25/04/2019

7/01/2019

M

Silver

13/01/2019

N

Tessede

10/05/2019

SM

Watson

20/07/2019

J

Sim

15/02/2019

AI

Thampy

3/02/2019

A

Watts

18/12/2018

R

Simmons

22/06/2019

B

Thavarajah

28/12/2018

JS

Watts

11/09/2019

CWF Simons

17/08/2019

D

Thom

6/12/2018

JJ

Webber

D

Sinclair

15/02/2019

JE

Thompson

15/09/2018

RS

Wee

S

Singamsetti

7/09/2018

TJA

Thompson

16/01/2019

P

Weeden

31

2/08/2018 7/06/2019 27/09/2018

20/11/2018 17/04/2019

8/09/2018 26/06/2019

9/10/2018 14/10/2018


Photo by Bryan McGrath

32


PAGE TITLE

A PILOT IN EVERY HOME 33


STATISTICS OCCURRENCES Fatals (per quarter ending 30 June 2019) 30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

TOTAL

2018–2019

0

1

0

1

2

2017–2018

1

0

2

0

3

2016–2017

1

1

2

1

5

2015–2016

2

1

3

1

7

2014–2015

1

2

2

4

9

Four period weighted moving average (WMA) for RAAus fatal accidents 8

Number of fatal accidents

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Year and end of quarter Fatalities

WMA

ACCIDENT DATA Accidents

Incidents 30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

11

11

9

17

2018–2019

38

41

45

45

2017–2018

16

11

17

5

2017–2018

36

49

55

52

2016–2017

13

15

20

9

2016–2017

40

54

37

39

2015–2016

18

15

10

9

2015–2016

18

15

46

43

2014–2015

23

22

29

26

2014–2015

33

26

15

25

34


Defects

Hazards 30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

2

8

3

9

2018–2019

1

2

2

1

2017–2018

9

6

11

2

2017–2018

0

2

4

0

2016–2017

5

7

2

10

2016–2017

3

4

2

1

2015–2016

9

19

13

8

2015–2016

9

19

5

2

2014–2015

12

8

8

6

2014–2015

0

1

1

3

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

Fatal

0

2

0

1

Aircraft Damage 2018–2019

Injury to Persons 2018–2019

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

Destroyed

0

1

2

4

Substantial

8

6

13

12

Serious

0

2

0

1

Minor

10

16

12

20

Minor

2

0

4

5

Nil

34

38

27

45

None

126

137

140

145

4

5

6

3

0

1

0

0

56

66

60

84

Unknown TOTAL

Unknown

ATSB Breakdown of Occurrences 2015

2016

2017

2018 Part 2019

Technical

39

64

93

53

50

Operational

46

108

136

62

65

Environmental

3

23

12

10

8

Airspace

5

30

37

29

16

Unclassified

0

7

0

0

0

35


STATISTICS (CONT.) MEMBERS New students

Membership numbers at points in time 30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

9479

9476

9692

9573

2017–2018

9211

9324

9448

9346

2016–2017

8541

8610

8944

9049

2015–2016

8963

8565

8678

8594

2014–2015

9367

9154

9183

9117

Members by State

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

465

403

543

399

2017–2018

429

423

481

476

2016–2017

203

491

478

466

2015–2016

174

206

207

191

2014–2015

390

310

261

344

Gender comparison

(as at 30 June 2019)

%

Financial Year

Males

Females

ACT

163

1.7%

2018–2019

8955

618

NSW

2591

27.07%

2017–2018

8759

587

NT

120

1.3%

2016–2017

8474

575

QLD

2538

26.51%

2015–2016

8107

487

SA

925

9.7%

2014–2015

8957

618

TAS

212

2.21%

2013–2014

9362

597

VIC

2363

24.7%

WA

596

6.23%

9508

99.90%

65

0.10%

9573

100.00%

Overseas TOTAL

SCHOOLS AND CLUBS Schools

Clubs 30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

158

156

153

153

2018–2019

21

16

14

11

2017–2018

165

164

161

160

2017–2018

37

33

29

26

2016–2017

165

163

163

164

2016–2017

44

41

40

41

2015–2016

168

166

164

163

2015–2016

44

45

43

46

2014–2015

171

169

169

171

2014–2015

41

41

42

43

36


AIRCRAFT 3 Axis (A)

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

2932

2943

2950

2922

2017–2018

2852

2886

2897

2016–2017

2827

2842

2015–2016

2795

2014–2015

2756

Weight Shift (B)

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

2018–2019

208

204

203

195

2920

2017–2018

208

206

211

214

2831

2839

2016–2017

201

215

212

210

2827

2875

2833

2015–2016

242

246

246

222

2785

2808

2822

2014–2015

226

227

236

241

30-Sep

31-Dec

31-Mar

30-Jun

Powered Parachute (D) 30-Sep 31-Dec 31-Mar 30-Jun

Total

2018–2019

188

183

182

180

2018–2019

3328

3330

3335

3297

2017–2018

204

197

196

195

2017–2018

3264

3289

3304

3329

2016–2017

221

200

201

206

2016–2017

3249

3257

3244

3255

2015–2016

227

229

232

212

2015–2016

3264

3302

3352

3267

2014–2015

211

214

222

220

2014–2015

3193

3226

3266

3283

AIRCRAFT TYPES Make

3 Axis

Make

Weight Shift

Jabiru

884

Airborne

Thruster Aircraft

221

Solar Wings

33

Tecnam

196

Air Creation

14

ICP

188

Designer Built

11

Aeroprakt

162

Aeros

6

Austflight ULA

160

Dta Sarl France

6

Skyfox Aviation

130

P & M Aviation

Howard Hughes Engineering

130

Zenith Aircraft Rand

Make

PPC

Aerochute Industries

361

Summit Aerosports

15

Home Built

14 12

5

Powerchutes System International

Evolution Trikes

4

AAA Fasterway

5

113

Flylight

4

Fresh Breeze

5

103

Ramphos

4

376

37


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Recreational Aviation Australia Limited ABN 40 070 931 645 Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2019

Contents 30 June 2019 Financial Statements Director’s Report Statement of Comprehensive income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Financial Statements Directors’ Declaration Auditor’s Independence Declaration Independent Auditor’s Report

39 41 42 43 44 45 54 55 56

38


PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 DIRECTORS’ REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

Directors' report The Directors present their report on Recreational Aviation Australia Limited (formerly Recreational Aviation Australia Incorporated) for the financial year ended 30 June 2019. Directors The following persons held office as directors of Recreational Aviation Australia Limited during the financial year: Michael Monck (Chair) Barry Windle – Commenced 8 Feb 2019 Luke Bayly Trevor Bange Eugene Reid Rodney Birrell Alan Middleton Tony King - Resigned 29 Jan 2019 Principal activities The principal activity of the Company during the year was to control all ultralight aircraft activities in Australia. The Company has delegated functions from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority for the control and management of ultralight aircraft registrations and pilot training and certification. The Company is responsible for setting standards for ultralight aircraft maintenance and the training of pilots. Review of operations There were no significant changes to the operations of the Company during the year ended 30 June 2018. Significant changes in the state of affairs No significant changes in the nature of these activities occurred during the year. Matters subsequent to the end of the financial year No matter or circumstance has arisen since 30 June 2019 that has significantly affected, or may significantly affect: (a) the Company's operations in future financial years, or (b) the results of those operations in future financial years, or (c) the Company's state of affairs in future financial years. Likely developments and expected results of operations The Company will continue the same operations as described in the principal activity section in future years. The Company is seeking certification as a CASR Part 149 Self Administering Sport Organisation (SASO). Certification will not change the activities of the Company. Mission statement Accessible, safe aviation for all by being an industry leader in developing sport and recreational aviation for the fun and enjoyment of our members.

39

2


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 DIRECTORS’ REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 Meetings of directors The following table sets out the number of meetings of the directors attended by each director. Board, eligible to attend

Board attended

Risk and Audit Committee eligible to attend

Risk and Audit Committee attended

Michael Monck

5

5

Barry Windle

3

3

2

2

5

Luke Bayly

5

5

2

2

7

Trevor Bange

5

5

5

Eugene Reid

5

5

5

Rodney Birrell

5

5

5

Alan Middleton

5

5

5

Tony King

2

2

2

Total

5

Contributions on winding up In the event of the Company being wound up, ordinary members are required to contribute a maximum of $1 each. Honorary members are not required to contribute. The total amount that members of the company are liable to contribute if the company is wound up is $9,573, based on 9,573 current ordinary members. Operating result The surplus for the year amounted to $179 175 (2018: surplus of $187 368). Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board.

………………………….. Michael Monck Director Dated: 12 October 2019

………………………….. Alan Middleton Director Dated: 12 October 2019

40

3


PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

Revenue Expenses Employee benefits expense Depreciation and amortisation expense Printing, publications and merchandise Insurance Other expenses Total expenses

Note

2019 $

2

3,009,543

2,861,103

1,360,701 91,301 260,705 398,104 719,556 2,830,368

1,290,218 94,424 332,440 435,471 550,209 2,702,762

179,175 179,175 179,175

158,341 158,341 29,027 187,368

3

Surplus/(deficit) before income tax expense Income tax expense Surplus/(deficit) for the year Other comprehensive income - revaluation Total comprehensive surplus for the year

2018 $

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements

41

4


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 30 JUNE 2019 2019 $

2018 $

1,221,099 42,814 60,260 72,119 1,396,291

958,525 4,920 35,020 51,777 1,050,242

7 8

855,279 282,169 1,137,448 2,533,739

866,107 311,418 1,177,525 2,227,767

9 10 11

148,375 240,663 288,095 677,133

131,014 194,371 205,469 530,854

10

16,980 16,980 694,113

36,461 36,461 567,315

NET ASSETS

1,839,626

1,660,452

EQUITY Reserves Retained Earnings TOTAL EQUITY

347,248 1,492,378 1,839,626

347,248 1,313,204 1,660,452

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Inventories Other current assets TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

Note 4 5 6

NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment Intangible assets TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables Short-term provisions Income in advance TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Long-term provisions TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements

42

5


PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

$ 1,154,862

Asset revaluation reserve $ 318,221

$ 1,473,083

158,341

29,027

187,368

1,313,203

347,248

1,660,451

179,175

-

179,175

1,492,378

347,248

1,839,626

Retained earnings Balance at 30 June 2017 Surplus attributable to members Balance at 30 June 2018 Surplus attributable to members Balance at 30 June 2019

Total

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements

43

6


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from members and others Interest received Payments to suppliers and employees Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

Note

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Purchase of property, plant and equipment Purchase of intangibles Net cash provided used in investing activities Net increase in cash and cash equivalents held Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

4

2019 $

2018 $

3,338,646 14,685 (3,039,533) 313,798

3,195,911 13,913 (2,865,354) 344,470

(33,076) (18,148) (51,224)

(21,364) (22,652) (44,016)

262,574 958,525 1,221,099

300,454 658,071 958,525

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements

44

7


PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

The financial statements cover Recreational Aviation Australia Limited as an individual entity. Recreational Aviation Australia Limited is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory under the Corporations Act 2001. Note 1. Significant accounting policies The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. New or amended Accounting Standards and Interpretations adopted The entity has adopted all of the new or amended Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board ('AASB') that are mandatory for the current reporting period. Any new or amended Accounting Standards or Interpretations that are not yet mandatory have not been early adopted. The following Accounting Standards and Interpretations are most relevant to the company: AASB 9 Financial Instruments The company has adopted AASB 9 from 1 July 2018. The standard introduced new classification and measurement models for financial assets. A financial asset shall be measured at amortised cost if it is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows which arise on specified dates and that are solely principal and interest. A debt investment shall be measured at fair value through other comprehensive income if it is held within a business model whose objective is to both hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows which arise on specified dates that are solely principal and interest as well as selling the asset on the basis of its fair value. All other financial assets are classified and measured at fair value through profit or loss unless the entity makes an irrevocable election on initial recognition to present gains and losses on equity instruments (that are not held-for-trading or contingent consideration recognised in a business combination) in other comprehensive income ('OCI'). Despite these requirements, a financial asset may be irrevocably designated as measured at fair value through profit or loss to reduce the effect of, or eliminate, an accounting mismatch. For financial liabilities designated at fair value through profit or loss, the standard requires the portion of the change in fair value that relates to the entity's own credit risk to be presented in OCI (unless it would create an accounting mismatch). New simpler hedge accounting requirements are intended to more closely align the accounting treatment with the risk management activities of the entity. New impairment requirements use an 'expected credit loss' ('ECL') model to recognise an allowance. Impairment is measured using a 12-month ECL method unless the credit risk on a financial instrument has increased significantly since initial recognition in which case the lifetime ECL method is adopted. For receivables, a simplified approach to measuring expected credit losses using a lifetime expected loss allowance is available. Impact of adoption AASB 9 was adopted using the modified retrospective approach and as such comparatives have not been restated. There was no impact on opening retained profits as at 1 July 2018 or current financial year. Basis of preparation These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board ('AASB'), and the Corporations Act 2001, as appropriate for not-for-profit oriented entities. Historical cost convention The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. 8

45


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 Note 1. Significant accounting policies (continued) Critical accounting estimates The preparation of the financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the company's accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements, are disclosed below. Key judgement - Estimation of useful lives of assets The Company determines the estimated useful lives and related depreciation and amortisation charges for its property, plant and equipment and finite life intangible assets. The useful lives could change significantly as a result of technical innovations or some other event. The depreciation and amortisation charge will increase where the useful lives are less than previously estimated lives, or technically obsolete or non-strategic assets that have been abandoned or sold will be written off or written down. Key judgement - Impairment The Company assesses impairment at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the company that may lead to impairment of assets. Should an impairment indicator exist, the determination of the recoverable amount of the asset may require incorporation of a number of key estimates. No impairment indicators were present at 30 June 2019. Key judgement- Employee benefits provision The liability for employee benefits expected to be settled more than 12 months from the reporting date are recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account. (a) Income tax The Company is exempt from income tax under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. (b) Fair value measurement When an asset or liability, financial or non-financial, is measured at fair value for recognition or disclosure purposes, the fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date; and assumes that the transaction will take place either: in the principal market; or in the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market. Fair value is measured using the assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, assuming they act in their economic best interests. For non-financial assets, the fair value measurement is based on its highest and best use. Valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, are used, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs. (c) Goods and Services Tax ('GST') and other similar taxes Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the tax authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of the acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense. Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority is included in other receivables or other payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the tax authority, are presented as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority. 9

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PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

Note 1. Significant accounting policies (continued) (d) Comparative figures When required by Accounting Standards, comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation for the current financial year. Where the Company has retrospectively applied an accounting policy, made a retrospective restatement or reclassifies items in its financial statements, an additional statement of financial position as at the beginning of the earliest comparative period will be disclosed.

Note 2: Revenue Member receipts Advertising Aircraft registration ASIC fees Operating grant Other Sale of magazines and other merchandises Interest income

2019 $

2018 $

2,137,361 32,585 542,194 4,300 171,362 23,501 83,555 14,685 3,009,543

1,883,999 24,642 482,488 29,210 140,262 105,728 180,861 13,913 2,861,103

Accounting policy Revenue is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefit will flow to the company and the revenue can be reliably measured. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Sales revenue Revenue from sale of goods is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers. Grants Grants are recognised at their fair value where there is a reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attached conditions will be complied with. Interest Interest revenue is recognised as interest accrues using the effective interest method. This is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and allocating the interest income over the relevant period using the effective interest rate, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to the net carrying amount of the financial asset. Membership and magazine subscriptions The Company’s membership subscription year runs for a 12 month period. All monies received for 12 month memberships are recorded as revenue in the year the subscription relates to. The first 12 months of a multi year subscription is recorded as revenue in the year the subscription relates. The remaining portion of the subscription is recognised in the year it relates to. Other revenue Other revenue is recognised when it is received or when the right to receive payment is established.

10

47


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

Note 3: Other expenses Accommodation, meetings and travel Advertising and promotions ASIC fees Bank charges Computer system Legal expenses Office expenses Other professional fees Postage and PO Box Scholarships and donations

2019 $

2018 $

226,684 67,016 1,159 30,287 93,108 4,270 107,425 75,825 22,665 91,117 719,556

164,123 14,987 16,096 27,111 96,017 7,562 114,685 19,041 28,820 61,767 550,209

(387) 1,221,486 1,221,099

500 958,025 958,525

Note 4: Cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand Cash at bank

Accounting policy Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. Note 5: Inventories 60,260

Merchandise

35,020

Accounting policy Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost of inventory is determined using the weighted average costs basis and is net of any rebates and discounts received. Note 6: Other assets 72,119

Prepayments

48

51,777

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PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 2019 $

Note 7: Property, plant and equipment

2018 $

Building - at fair value Accumulated depreciation

820,000 (28,386) 791,614

820,000 (5,979) 814,021

Furniture and fittings - at cost Accumulated depreciation

82,025 (70,702) 11,323

91,794 (77,649) 14,145

Office equipment - at cost Accumulated depreciation

123,926 (91,665) 32,261

97,686 (83,496) 14,190

Computer equipment - at cost Accumulated depreciation

71,712 (51,631) 20,081

127,342 (103,591) 23,751

Total Property, plant and equipment

855,279

866,107

Movements in Carrying Amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Buildings Balance at 30 June 2017 Additions Revaluation increase Depreciation expense Balance at 30 June 2018 Additions Disposals Depreciation expense Balance at 30 June 2019

$

Furniture and Fittings $

Office Equipment $

Computer Equipment $

Total $

806,846

17,580

14,362

25,674

864,462

29,027 (21,852)

(3,435)

8,841 (9,013)

12,523 (14,446)

21,364 29,027 (48,746)

814,021

14,145

14,190

23,751

866,107

(22,407)

(2,822)

26,240 (8,169)

6,836 (10,506)

33,076 (43,904)

791,614

11,323

32,261

20,081

855,279

The building was revalued based on a valuation by Egan National Valuers as at 15 March 2018. The valuation has been determined on the basis current market value assuming vacant possession. Market value was determined by reference to comparable sales.

49

12


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 Note 7: Property, plant and equipment (continued) Accounting policy Plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items. Buildings are recorded at fair value and subject to periodical independent valuations. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis to write off the net cost of each item of property, plant and equipment (excluding land) over their expected useful lives as follows: Class of fixed asset Useful life Depreciation rate Buildings 40 years 2.5% Furniture and fittings 5 to 10 years 10% - 20% Office equipment 3 to 10 years 10% - 33% Computer equipment 3 years 33% The residual values, useful lives and depreciation methods are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each reporting date. An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when there is no future economic benefit to the company. Gains and losses between the carrying amount and the disposal proceeds are taken to profit or loss.

Note 8: Intangibles Modernisation project - software Accumulated amortisation Net carrying value

2019 $

2018 $

449,286 (167,117) 282,169

431,138 (119,720) 311,418

Accounting policy Intangible assets relate to developed software used in the provision of services to members. The costs capitalised relate to development costs only and exclude the costs of research. Developed software is amortised on a straight line basis over 10 years. Amortisation methods, assets’ useful lives and residual values are reviewed at each reporting date and adjusted if appropriate. Note 9: Trade and other payables Trade payables Accrued expenses GST and PAYG liabilities Other payables

54,148 39,251 30,567 24,409 148,375

38,721 45,333 29,157 17,803 131,014

Accounting policy These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the company prior to the end of the financial year and which are unpaid. Due to their short-term nature they are measured at amortised cost and are not discounted. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition.

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PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019

Note 10: Provisions CURRENT Provision for annual leave Provision for long service leave Provision for time-in-lieu NON-CURRENT Provision for long service leave Total provisions

2019 $

2018 $

140,152 100,511 240,663

123,694 56,519 14,158 194,371

16,980 16,980 257,643

36,461 36,461 230,832

Accounting policy Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and long service leave expected to be settled wholly within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Other long-term employee benefits The liability for annual leave and long service leave not expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. Defined contribution superannuation expense Contributions to defined contribution superannuation plans are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. Provisions Provisions are recognised when the Company has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured.

Note 11: Income in advance Unearned income

288,095

205,469

Unearned income increased as a result of increases in multi year subscriptions. Multi year subscriptions are recognised in accordance with the policy detailed in Note 2.

Note 12: Government funding

51

14


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 The Company receives financial assistance from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority on an annual basis. The assistance is provided pursuant to a Memorandum of Agreement. There is a separate Memorandum of Agreement each financial year and assistance is provided only on a basis of certain functions being performed by the Company. Note 13: Related Party Transactions The Directors and their related entities transact with the Company from time to time on normal terms and conditions that are no more favourable than those available to others. The types of transactions involved include those that are provided by the Company as part of its normal operations. The transactions are settled at the time of the transaction, and no amounts are owing to the Company at year end in respect of these transactions. The total value of these transactions is low and is considered by the Company to be immaterial. With the exception of compensation of key management personnel, which is separately disclosed in these statements, there were no other related party transaction during the financial year. Note 14: Key Management Personnel Compensation Compensation The aggregate compensation made to directors and other members of key management personnel of the company is set out below: 2019 2018 $ $ Key management personnel compensation 621,318 592,578 Note 15: Contingent Liabilities The company had no contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2019. Note 16: Commitments The company had no commitments for expenditure as at 30 June 2019. Note 17: Events After The Reporting Period No matter or circumstance has arisen since 30 June 2019 that has significantly affected, or may significantly affect the company's operations, the results of those operations, or the company's state of affairs in future financial years.

Note 18: Company Details The registered office and principal places of business of the Company is:

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PAGE TITLE

RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2019 Recreational Aviation Australia Limited Unit 3, 1 Pirie Street Fyshwick ACT 2609

53

16


RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED ABN: 40 070 931 645 DIRECTORS’ DECLARATION

The directors of the Company declare that: a) the financial statements and notes for the year ended 30 June 2019 are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and: b) comply with Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Corporations Regulations 2001 and other mandatory professional reporting requirements; and c) give a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 30 June 2019 and of its performance, as represented by the results of its operations and its cash flow, for the financial year ended on that date.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director……………………………………………………………………………………..

Director…………………………………………………………………………………….. Dated: 12 October 2019

17

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PAGE TITLE RSM Australia Partners Equinox Building 4, Level 2, 70 Kent Street Deakin ACT 2600 GPO Box 200 Canberra ACT 2601 T +61 (0) 2 6217 0300 F +61 (0) 2 6217 0401 www.rsm.com.au

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION As lead auditor for the audit of the financial report of Recreational Aviation Australia Limited for the year ended 30 June 2019, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been no contraventions of: (i)

the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and

(ii)

any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

RSM AUSTRALIA PARTNERS

Rodney Miller Partner Canberra, Australian Capital Territory Dated: 16 October 2019

THE POWER OF BEING UNDERSTOOD AUDIT | TAX | CONSULTING RSM Australia Partners is a member of the RSM network and trades as RSM. RSM is the trading name used by the members of the RSM network. Each member of the RSM network is an independent accounting and consulting firm which practices in its own right. The RSM network is not itself a separate legal entity in any jurisdiction. RSM Australia Partners ABN 36 965 185 036

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

55

18


RSM Australia Partners Equinox Building 4, Level 2, 70 Kent Street Deakin ACT 2600 GPO Box 200 Canberra ACT 2601 T +61 (0) 2 6217 0300 F +61 (0) 2 6217 0401

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To the Members of Recreational Aviation Australia Limited

www.rsm.com.au

Opinion We have audited the financial report of Recreational Aviation Australia Limited (the Company), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2019, the statement of comprehensive income, the statement of changes in equity and the statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the directors' declaration. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report of the Company is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (i) giving a true and fair view of the Company's financial position as at 30 June 2019 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and (ii) complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor's Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Company in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board's APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of the Company, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor's report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Other Information The directors are responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the information included in the Company's annual report for the year ended 30 June 2019, but does not include the financial report and the auditor's report thereon. Our opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial report, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated.

THE POWER OF BEING UNDERSTOOD AUDIT | TAX | CONSULTING RSM Australia Partners is a member of the RSM network and trades as RSM. RSM is the trading name used by the members of the RSM network. Each member of the RSM network is an independent accounting and consulting firm which practices in its own right. The RSM network is not itself a separate legal entity in any jurisdiction. RSM Australia Partners ABN 36 965 185 036

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

56

19


PAGE TITLE

If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard. Responsibilities of the Directors for the Financial Report The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the Company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. Auditor's Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor's report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. A further description of our responsibilities for the audit of the financial report is located at the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board website at: http://www.auasb.gov.au/auditors_responsibilities/ar4.pdf. This description forms part of our auditor's report.

RSM Australia Partners

Rodney Miller Canberra, Australian Capital Territory Date: 16 October 2019

20

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Recreational Aviation Australia ACN 070 931 645 3/1 Pirie Street PO Box 1265 FYSHWICK ACT 2609 02 6280 4700 members@raaus.com.au raaus.com.au

INSIDE REAR COVER

Cover images by Mark Smith, 1963–2019. A great friend and passionate supporter of the Australian aviation community.

Profile for Recreational Aviation Australia

Recreational Aviation Australia Annual Report 2018-19  

RAAus Annual Report 2018-19

Recreational Aviation Australia Annual Report 2018-19  

RAAus Annual Report 2018-19

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