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Relish Whisky Canada|Issuu 07

Gooderham & Worts Four Grain Whisky Connoisseur Whisky of the Year

Plus Kentucky Bourbon Affair

Whisky options for your Irish Coffee


Sunsets and sea air: unofficial ingredients in every bottle.

view from shelter point distillery, vancouver island, canada

Introducing Shelter Point Single Malt Whisky Paradise isn’t necessarily a geographical requirement for making great whisky, but we managed to find it at Shelter Point. It’s here that we handcraft our 100% Single Malt Whisky, distilled batch-by-batch in traditional copper pot stills from two-row barley, and aged in American oak casks in our oceanfront warehouse. When it comes to artisanal whisky, every element matters — and in our unique, temperate rainforest climate, even the sunsets and sea air become integral.

There’s a Point to making beautiful whisky. Find out more at shelterpoint.ca


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Editor’s Thoughts The past year has brought me some adventures that I enjoyed extremely. Among other memorable moments, tasting those rare bottles that are brought out at a whisky show still makes me giddy. On a personal level, to be able to talk with the brand ambassadors at these shows is a fulfilling opportunity. In my experience, brand ambassadors are generally authentic and real in nature. They pass on their wealth of knowledge that’s been accumulated over time, and share that ever appreciated wee, small, tiny, ever so short, couple of tasty drips and drops at the bottom of a whisky glass. This is the tasting. Well, after a few, maybe more, I begin to learn and experience the wonderful life they are wrapped up in. While I have been fortunate at Relish and Whisky to have already been involved in this world now for a couple of years, this issue being our seventh,

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it is a great privilege to be able to see and share a story with others in person. Some experiences of which, open up new doors and others, new thoughts. I had the privilege to meet one such person at a whisky show in Toronto, named Spencer Gooderham. I was taken aback by his incredible passion and knowledge of the industry, and how down to earth and real he was. As we talked, there was no sales talk or “best of the world” product push, but a real conversation about whisky and why he is involved in it. The stories that go into each bottle are part of the warmth of the spirit. The love of the time that the drink takes, the history behind it, and the age honoured practices that go into each glass, is something I hope the pages of Relish and Whisky bring to your next savouring moment. Sláinte, Robert


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I n t e r e s t s


QC

Relish Whisky

20 Canadian Whisky Round Up

Davin de Kergommeaux

28 The Cask Makes the Whisky Johanne McInnis

33 Thoughts From Uniformed Quality Labels Fred Minnick

38 Irish Whiskey The Unsung Hero of Whiskey Cocktails Ray Daniels

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Mr. Spencer Gooderham a Sip and a Story

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Spring 2017 Issue 07 06 Editor’s Thoughts

Interests

17 Esteemed Writers 24 Glendalough Distillery Seven Year Old Single Malt Irish Whisky

30 Tasting Notes

Bunnahabhain 12 Year Single Malt Scotch Whisky

34 Whisky Explorers

The Demand for Whisky Today

40 The Bourbon Affair

45

Green & Black’s Cocoa Chili Flank Steak with Chocolate Almond Pesto

Enjoy the Daytime Events and Louisville’s Famous Urban Bourbon Trail at Night

44 The Botanist Islay Dry Gin

A Rare Explosion of Flavour Complexity

45 Green & Black’s Chocolate Chili Steak, Tahini Mousse and Chocolate Chili Covered Almonds

Bunnahabhain 12 Year Old Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky

Detoxifying and Delicious

52 Runamok Maple

Braised Pork with a Maple Mustard and Fennal Sauce Plus a Bourbon Confidential

54 Mr. Spencer Gooderham A Sip and a Story with a descendant of a Canadian Whisky Baron

59 The Auld Irish Coffee

Glendalough Distillery Warm Classic Comfort Anytime

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49 Hulk Pancakes and Hemp Burgers

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Bruichladdich Classic Laddie Unpeated

B UC L L

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C LL

C C

L BL

U


The Glencairn Whisky Glass The Glencairn Whisky Glass

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of fine whisky. These are great to use for any of your "The Glencairn Whisky Glass is a revolutionary Single Malt Whisky's, Irish Whiskey's, and also your whisky glass that bourbons. really lets With one savor the tastemouth, and complexity single barrel the tapered you finetowhisky. These great to usethe forwhisky any of your areofable really smell allare of the nuances Malt Whisky's, Irish Whiskey's, and also your hasSingle to offer. Any malt advocate will love this glass! single barrel bourbons. With the tapered mouth, you are able to really all of the nuances whisky History Of The Glass:smell Champagne, Brandy, the Wine... malt willworld’s love thismost glass! eachhas hastoitsoffer. ownAny glass. Yetadvocate whisky, the

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In 2001 Glencairn Crystal solved the problem of anythingthe from hiball Paris goblets. identifying ideal glasstumblers for whisky.toDesigned by Raymond Davidson nearly 25 years earlier, its In 2001 Glencairn Crystal solved the problem of development involved pulling together the master blenders identifying the ideal glass for whisky. by from the five largest whisky companies andDesigned asking them Raymond Davidson nearly 25 years earlier, its to perfect his initial design.Today the Glencairn Glass

involved pulling together the master blenders candevelopment be found at every distillery in Scotland,

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Relish Whisky

Davin De Kergommeaux is the author of Canadian Whisky: The Portable Expert, the definitive guide to Canadian whisky. An independent whisky expert, de Kergommeaux has been writing about, talking about, and teaching about whisky for more than fifteen years. He is the founder, and head judge for the Canadian Whisky Awards, and publishes comprehensive notes about Canadian whiskies on canadianwhisky.org. His writing and tasting notes appear regularly in Whisky Magazine, Whisky Advocate magazine, and various lifestyle publictions. De Kergommeaux has also contributed to or co-authored three other books about whisky, and spirits and cocktails. Follow him on twitter and instagram@Davindek.

Johanne McInnis, aka Whisylassie, is an international spirits freelance writer who has a deep passion for whisky. She has been a judge, panelist as well as a presenter at Spirits Festivals around the world. Johanne loves to write about her adventures, distillery visits or help people discover the world of whisky.

Ray Daniel brings with him nearly two decades of experience behind the bar from Europe to Canada and is currently the Chief Mixologist at Char No.5 Whisky Bar - Toronto. Hailing from Ireland he has a huge range of knowledge of whisky as a category and whisky cocktails specifically and has performed at whisky masterclasses, festivals and cocktail competitions in both the US and Canada.

W R I T E R S

Fred Minnick is the author of four books: Whiskey Women, Bourbon Curious, Camera Boy and the Certified Angus Beef history. Whiskey Women earned a Gold Medal at the ForeWord Reviews Book Awards and a Silver at the Indie Publisher Awards. Camera Boy became a Wall Street Journalbestselling eBook in May 2012. Fred Minnick is the “Bourbon Authority” for the Kentucky Derby Museum. Since October 2013, Minnick has taught bourbon classes at the museum and hosted private bourbon tastings for convention groups. Louisville.com named Minnick’s popular “Legend’s Series” one of the top events in all of Bourbon Country.

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Deanston Distillery, Scotland


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Editorial Director | Editor Artistic Director | Photographer National Advertising Sales Director Robert Windover | QC Magazine Publisher QuintessentiallyCanadian4Group Toronto Canada QC Magazines are published quarterly Enjoy all our publications online at issuu.com Advertising Inquires please contact quintessentiallycanadian@hotmail.ca

Special Thanks to our Contributors: Brilynn Ferguson http://brilynnferguson.com Jessica Blaine Smith http://jbsmithphotography.com Mike Brisebois Amandalin Ryan Kentucky Bourbon Trail Harpercollins Ltd. Laura Sorkin The Distillery District Toronto D i s c l a i m e r Quintessentially Canadian Magazine makes no warranties of any kind, written or implied, regarding the contents of this magazine and expressly disclaims any warranty regarding the accuracy or reliability of information contained herein. The view contained in this magazine are those of the writters and advertisers; they do not necessarly reflect the views of Quintessentially Canadian magazine and it’s publisher. Quintessentially Canadian assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Quintessentially Canadian assumes no responsibility for content of or reply to any ad. The advertiser assumes complete liability for the content of and all replies to any advertisement and for any claims made thereof.

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Davin de Kergommeaux

The news came late in 2015: Crown Royal Northern Harvest Rye had been named the best whisky in the world. While Scotch drinkers sneered and bloggers launched emotional tirades, whisky lovers around the world quietly lined up to buy a bottle – or two. The result? In no time the Manitoba-made whisky was sold out, (though available on the grey market for six times its original price.) Suddenly, Canadian whisky was on everyone’s want list. Better than that, once they had tasted it, people came back in droves in search of more. After decades of slow decline, Canadian whisky has seen a turn-around in the past three or four years. It is no surprise then that in 2016 sales of Canadian whisky rose 5 per cent. Has Northern Harvest Rye pushed it past the tipping point? It has certainly helped, but Crown Royal is not the only Canadian distillery bottling worldclass whiskies. Each of Canada’s traditional Big Eight distillers is expanding the breadth and depth of options available to discerning imbibers. The range of whiskies sitting in distillery warehouses across the country ensures that Canadian whisky makers are uniquely well placed to do that – quickly.

Canadian Whisky Round-up

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Validation from abroad Make no mistake; when the American rye craze took off about five years ago, US-based whisky companies looked to Alberta warehouses for whisky. Take Masterson’s for example. This is one of America’s best selling brands of rye whisky. Today, robust, flavoursome whiskies are in high demand right across North America and beyond. Connoisseurs who first experienced Canada’s best via Forty Creek, Collingwood, and Crown Royal, are now embracing Lot No. 40, Pike Creek and the fourgrain beauty, Gooderham and Worts from the Hiram Walker distillery in Windsor, Ontario. And there’s more. A 20-year old release called Ninety, from Highwood Distillers in High River has aficionados’ tongues wagging – in a good way. Alberta Distillers in Calgary has introduced Alberta Premium Dark Horse and the head-turning Canadian Club 100% Rye. Together, these whiskies have seized the attention of bartenders who are excited to put a whole new twist on high-end cocktails by using Canadian whiskies as their base.


Barrel Rye, a single malt, and two blends flying off store shelves in Canada and the US. In 2016, the Great One, entered the whisky game and his first release is a doozie. Wayne Gretzky No. 99 from Wayne Gretzky Distillery is much more than a celebrity endorsement.

A Renaissance in micro-distilling It is easy to forget that like Forty Creek, many of today’s powerhouse distilleries began as small artisan operations, often barely making ends meet. So it is heartening to see history repeating itself as micro-distilling takes off again in every region of the country. Distillerie Fils du Roy, for example, on New Brunswick’s Acadian Peninsula provides a remarkable array of spirits, each with an Acadian connection. And they are, as they say in l’Acadie: “spectaculaire!” Clear on the other side of the country, Vancouver has emerged as a hotbed for Canadian whisky distilleries with nearly a dozen gearing up for production. And from north of 60, in 2016, Yukon Brewers in Whitehorse burst onto the whisky scene with a wonderful single malt that had been quietly aging in their sub-Arctic warehouse for over seven years. Turner Valley’s Eau Claire Distillery is turning out whisky – single malt and bourbon-style – and tastings of their maturing spirit predict great things to come. Here in Toronto, Still Waters distillery is poised to go viral with their Stalk &

Canada’s hockey icon has skin in the game, having joined Peller Estates Winery in building a new distillery in Niagara, Ontario. Recently, at a Scotch tasting in Calgary, whisky enthusiasts were delighted by the beautifully integrated fruity flavours that come from the Peller red wine barrels that Gretzky used to mature his first release. And of course, it’s Canadian whisky, not Scotch! No, Gretzky did not distill it himself. “I have always enjoyed a good whisky and was thrilled to work with master distiller Joshua Beach to create a new fabulous Canadian whisky.”

“What’s truly exciting is we are using oak barrels from our red wines to finish the whisky for a really smooth and refined taste,” said the Great One. Yes, Canadian whisky is finally scoring goals again. After decades on the bench it is back with renewed vigour. And best of all, some of the most flavourful whiskies yet are making their way to liquor store shelves in celebration of Canada 150. Davin de Kergommeaux’ new book Canadian Whisky: The New Portable Expert will be published in the fall of 2017. Social media @davindek. Autumn | 2016

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In 2017 Canadians celebrate 150 years as a nation and there are plenty of reasons to enthuse about the resurging interest in our homegrown whiskies. Perhaps the greatest endorsement of the high quality of Canada’s native spirit came in 2014, when John K. Hall sold his family-owned Forty Creek Distillery to Italy’s Gruppo Campari for a cool $180 million. Hall stayed on as Chairman of the Forty Creek board and continues to craft Forty Creek’s much-sought-after annual releases.

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


Treasure enough for any pirate!

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12

Rum’s from Around the World

- Ship in a Bottle

- Tasting Skull Glass - Treasure Map

- Piece of Eight Lapel Pin - 2000 Happy Pirates

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PART 3 – The cask makes the whisky Johanne McInnis In part 1 of our series we read about the importance of the grain, and part 2 followed up with the distillation process. In part 3, the clear spirit is now ready to be aged and turned into whisky. Although every step toward the creation is important, none is more complicated as the maturation process. So why is wood so important? Let’s face it, if we didn’t have wooden casks we simply would not have whisky. The interaction that takes place between new make spirit and the inside of a cask is the most fundamental part of the a our pro les that each one of us en oys about whisky. Let us start at the beginning – the tree. The most common type of casks found in the maturation process are American white oak “Quercus Alba” and European oak “Quercus Robur”. According to Gordon & MacPhail, a long standing and highly respected independent bottler in Scotland, approximately 97% of all new casks used to mature Scotch whisky are currently made from Quercus Alba. This type of wood contains a high amount of a compound called oak lactones. The American white oak is a slower growing species and has a tighter grain which allows the spirit to interact and results in sweeter a ours that e reco ni e as anilla citrus and coconut notes. On the other hand, European Oak grows faster and has a wider grain. It contains up to three times the amount of tannin levels which lends to a dry and more astringent spirit in the early stages of maturation, but as the spirit is left for longer periods of time more intense notes of spices and toffee like a ours are created European oak is traditionally used to make sherry casks. Moulds, spores and sticky stuff


Types of whisky casks Courtesy of the malt Institute

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When staves arrives at the cooperage, the coopers e ins to make the speci ed cask si es eat and re are instrumental in the preparation of each cask. The process of heating up the inside of the cask serves two purposes: Not only does it become more easily shaped but it also changes the cellular biochemistry of the wood. Depending how long and what temperature the cask is red ill help determine hat type of compounds the whisky will eventually extract durin maturation The different le els of rin ran e from a li ht toastin which takes place for about 15-30 minutes at 100-200 degrees Celsius, all the way to

something called “Alligator” char which happens between 250-300 degrees Celsius, but only lasts about 45-50 seconds. Once the barrel has been completed, it is examined and tested for leaks. If it passes, it moves onto the next phase of its life: to the distillery and or llin station if the cooper is in-house). Three things take place once the new make spirit is added to the cask: subtraction, addition and evaporation. In the subtraction process the active layer of carbon, which depends on the level of toasting or char, begins to absorb unwanted characteristics and compounds that are often described as harsh or lightly metallic in nature. In the addition phase, the natural compounds such as toasting or char, begins to absorb unwanted characteristics and compounds that are often described as harsh or lightly metallic in nature. In the addition phase, the natural compounds such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin begin to break down and shape the a ours the distiller is lookin for in the maturing spirit and of course the other phase called evaporation, or as many have come to know it, the angels’ share, is also taking place simultaneously. In slightly colder climates such as Scotland, the rate is about 2% every year. As water vapour evaporates, some of the compounds begin to intensify. From the malted and fermented grain, the shape and si e of the still ein used the precise cut of the hearts, new make spirit produced to the type of cask and si e being used to mature it, this is where the alchemy and mystery of whisky truly takes place. Once the spirit is in the cask and it’s carted off to a arehouse it silently evolves, changes, and morphs into the

Canadian Distillery Palletized barrels lovely spirit we call whisky. It is during the maturation period where the constant monitoring leads to the discovery of casks that may not be performing well or casks that have stellar spirit because every whisky de elops differently t is often explained on distillery tours, that you can take the exact same new make spirit and place it in two exact same barrels side by side in the warehouse and upon sampling over the course of many years one barrel might be perfect at 8 years of age where the second cask might only reach its potential 4 years later. Maturation is the coming together of all the extremely complex variables. Chan e ust one and you chan e hat hisky ends up in your glass. Distillers may certainly make it look like the whisky making process is somewhat simple but that is as a result of many generations efore them reali in that uality of spirit and great cask management leads to a stellar whisky, so the next time you visit a distillery and see a sign in the warehouse that says: “Quiet please whisky sleeping”, you’ll know that the reality is, it’s actually the most interesting and mysterious part of the whisky making process that is taking place on a macro-level deep within the con nes of all those casks and if you really listen intently it’s the noisiest little party going on.

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The next thing that lends to the maturation process as ell as a our pro le of hisky is the si e of the cask that is used Althou h there are se eral different si es and names for many of the barrels available to mature hisky the three most common si es used are utt litres o shead litres and American standard arrel litres Each has its merits and are used speci cally to create a certain type of whisky. The Butt is almost always ex-Sherry, it has the smallest surface area per litre and slowest maturation. This results in the spirit breaking down the compounds over a longer period of time which means more complex a ours emer e such as to acco dried fruits and spices. Most people don’t know there are actually t o types of o shead The sherry hogshead is a smaller version of a utt and produces similar a ours The other is called a remade o shead A cooper creates this by adding staves to barrels in order to increase the surface area. This often results in sweeter vanilla compounds. The last of the casks is generally ex-American bourbon, has the fastest maturation, as well as largest surface area per litre and mostly yields s eet fruity a ours


Bunnahabhain 12 year old Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky

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Tasting Notes This whisky is the stuff tales are made of and inside the new bottle, the whisky speaks for itself. The nose offering a fresh and aromatic experience with a subtle whiff of smoke floating through the air. The taste starts with a light fruit and nut appeal that leads to a spectacular malty sweetness, finishing into a beautifully rich full-bodied, lingering experience. Natural colour and unchill-filtered at 46.3%

bunnahabhain.com


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Thoughts From: Fred Minnick Inside a locked room and surrounded by Prohibition-era whiskey bottles, I was researching my next book, Bourbon Curious: A Simple Guide for the Savvy Drinker (Quarto, 2015), and stumbled upon an interesting letter that made me question modern distillers. Dated December 2, 1941, and addressed to Miss Marcella McKenna, secretary of the McKenna Distillery in Fairfield, entucky, the U.S. Treasury Agency’s deputy commissioner wrote: “The analysis of the samples of the whiskey taken from the barrels set aside in your warehouse and from barrels set aside in a number of other warehouses throughout the country were not made for the purpose of grading the whiskey with respect to quality. The study made on your whiskey and the whiskey produced by other distillers was for the purpose of determining the chemical changes that take place in whiskey during the time it is stored in wooden packages. ... Quality, in many cases, is a matter of personal opinion and sub ect to controversy. It is not the policy of this office to make any statements with respect to the quality of whiskey....this office is concerned with the collection of taxes levied on distilled spirits.... After the government required aged samples to determine how to appropriately tax them, the McKenna Distillery essentially wanted to know if its whiskey was better than its fellow distillers. It’s a fair uestion, if you ask me, and a uniformed government whiskey-grading system may not be as farfetched as it sounds. The United States Department of Agriculture grades everything from cotton to meat products and offers financial premiums to farmers. The higher a product grades, the more money the farmer receives. For example, in American beef, the USDA’s three main grades Select, Choice and Prime —give consumers a clear understanding of the hierarchy of quality, while the farmer earns more money.

If a steer is graded Prime, the cattleman will earn 20 per cent to 30 per cent more than if graded Select. What if American whiskey had a government grading system? In some respects, the industry has a trade-grading system they’re called competitions. But some competitions give medals out like candy; a Bronze or Silver simply means the company paid an entry fee and the whiskey didn’t kill the udge. The medal sticker is slapped on the bottle and consumers everywhere think it’s something uni ue. A modern American whiskey label is mostly marketing, manufacturing techniques, regulated terms that indicate age and a few tasting notes. But how does the consumer know if it’s any good? Will they take the time to research before buying? Well, they need to taste it, obviously. But imagine if you had a strong independent panel that rated every American whiskey bottling to verify quality and the distillers were required to place the rating on the bottle. Without knowing the common terms—such as Straight Bourbon Whiskey or Bottled-inBond—consumers could decipher the quality of the bourbon or rye ust as they do with Select, Choice and Prime steaks. I’m essentially suggesting another layer of government for the already highest taxed industry in the United States. The mere suggestion of this might land me at the bottom of the Ohio River with a nice pair of 50-pound concrete boots. So, distillers, before you call your hit men, please know I ust want what’s best for new American whiskey consumers. Right now, new consumers are entering the category at unprecedented rates. While I hope they pick up this magazine, devour whiskey books and taste all the whiskeys they can (responsibly, of course), many newbies may taste a single bourbon and base their opinion off that one drink. Let’s help them buy the right bottle of bourbon. Whether it comes from the government or an accrediting body, wouldn’t a uniformed hierarchy of good, great and exceptional bourbon labels be good for new consumers? Maybe not.

As the 1940s American taxman said in his letter, whiskey uality is sub ect to controversy. Even if we developed a panel of 10 sophisticated palates, there’s no way our results could represent a new 21-year-old American consumer’s taste preference. And why try to change something that’s en oying its greatest comeback since Prohibition? So, even after all that talk about a uniformed label quality system, I will agree with the Treasury Agency in 1941. The government assessing whiskey quality is a bad idea. Then again, the sudden change of heart could be the future concrete boots talking.....

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Uniformed Quality Labels


Whisky Explorers

The Demand For Whisky Today

The demand for whisky is really at an all-time high from across the world, however, I have noticed quite recently that whisky connoisseurs are always on the lookout for that one spirit they have yet to try but is also at a value and not at a premium price. Non-age statement whiskies are popping up everywhere but have yet to really come out as a value per say. They are focused more on the story of the history of the distillery or environment and are sold mostly at a premium price. What are whisky explorers looking for?

When conducting master classes, attending whisky shows and being a source to many for information in the whisky industry, I have noticed that the whisky explorers are looking for somethin different And ith that the industry is pro idin that difference We are seein difference cask nishes ein released hi her A in bottlings and higher regard for the spirit being of natural colour. I love representing a whisky portfolio that offers this exact product to explorers unnaha hain Deanston and the To ermory Distilleries for its entire core chan e it is unchill ltered

natural colour and bottled at 46.3%. It gives the explorer the opportunity to have fun with the whisky, as we do in the master classes I conduct, by sampling it as is, or with a touch of water to see the whisky open right up! The demand for somethin different is really there and we can see it and of course the industry is for sure keeping up with it. Let’s enjoy this time where we get to see master blenders bring forward many unique whiskies to satisfy the explorers’ palate! ike rise ois Canadian rand Am assador Distell Malts

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©2014 BRUICHLADDICH DISTILLERY CO. LIMITED.,BRUICHLADDICH® SCOTCH WHISKY 49.2-64% vol. WWW.BRUICHLADDICH.COM | ! " #

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY


BRUICHLADDICH PROGRESSIVE HEBRIDEAN DISTILLERS

WE BELIEVE TERROIR MATTERS.


Irish Whiskey – “

The unsung hero of whiskey cocktails”

With St.Patricks Day right around the corner and everyone gearing up for what I’m sure will be a weekend of partying and good times for all, I figured why not use this issue to show you a couple of my recipes for some great Irish whiskey cocktails. Now when you think of whisk(e)y cocktails, you will generally go straight for bourbon or rye with scotch and Japanese coming in somewhere in the distance behind. Irish whiskey usually isn’t the first thing that will jump into your mind. Bartenders across the world have kind of shyed away from Irish whiskey because it has a tendency to be a little soft and light and isn’t exactly known for bringing a lot of body to the conversation. I like to approach a cocktail with the idea that any spirit can give something to a cocktail; it’s all just about knowing the spirit well enough to know its strengths and weaknesses. What flavours already exist within the liquid? What flavours could I possibly coax out of the liquid? What flavours will be accentuated by the liquid? I am going to walk you through four fantastic cocktails that you can wow your friends with this St. Paddy’s weekend which can all be made using Irish whiskey.

The Auld Triangle – 2 Gingers Ray Daniels

Coming from the Kilbeggan Distillery in Kilbeggan, Co. Westmeath (Ireland’s oldest continually licensed Distillery), 2 Gingers is a little bit of a wild card when it comes to cocktailing. So far in Canada it hasn’t really taken off and taken the hearts of bartenders, however that isn’t too surprising considering it came into a market where it was directly competing with the likes of Jameson, Bushmills Original and Tullamore Dew, all brands which have been long established on back bars worldwide. It seemed like the initial marketing for this brand was, “mix it with pop or shoot it back.” Personally I like the kind of rough around the edges feel that comes along with this deep honey coloured liquid. There is plenty of honey and citrus on the palate with some oak, vanilla and caramel on the finish which lends very well to the cocktail below.

1.5 oz 2 Gingers Irish whiskey 1 oz Calvados .5 oz Sweet Vermouth .5 oz Maple Syrup

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Combine all ingredients in large stirring glass with ice and stir until the side of the glass starts to frost up and the ice falls below the liquid line. Strain into a fresh glass over 3 medium sized ice cubes and garnish with an orange zest.


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Irish Coffee – Power’s Gold Label

This cocktail is a personal favourite of mine (he says patting himself on the back). It uses one of my favourite Irish whiskies for cocktailing but is also named after the town where I come from, Clane, Co. Kildare. Claonadh, pronounced clay-ah-nah, is Gaelic for “the bend in the river”, directly pointing to the bend in the River Liffey where Clane was first settled. The Kilbeggan Distillery creates some of the most beautiful whiskies to ever come out of Ireland and I really like playing around with this one in cocktails. Side note: if you ever happen to find a bottle of Kilbeggan 8 Year Old or Kilbeggan 21 Year Old on your travels, do yourself a huge favour and pick them up. Not only are they incredibly affordable, they may be the most gentle and pleasing whiskies to ever come out of the Emerald Isle. Unlike most Irish whiskies, this one is double distilled so it still carries a little more of the grit, and isn’t as neutral and soft as most of us are used to with Irish whiskey. This one may take a little more time to prep but it is well worth it.

1.5 oz Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey .75 oz Ruby Port .75 oz Guinness & Wild Berry Syrup .25 oz Fresh Lemon Juice 1 dash of Plum Bitters Combine all ingredients in a shaker filled with ice and shake hard for about 30 seconds. Strain into a chilled coupe/cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. To make the Guinness & Wild Berry Syrup; soak 150g of strawberry, blackberry, raspberry and blueberry in Guinness overnight and keep refrigerated. Next day, remove from the fridge and place in a small saucepan with 1 cup of raw sugar and ¼ cup of water. Bring to boil and let simmer for 20 minutes. Strain into a mason jar and allow to stand until room temperature. Refrigerate and use.

2 oz Power’s Gold Label .25 oz Grand Marnier 2 brown sugar cubes Fresh whipping cream Fresh brewed dark roast coffee In a large specialty coffee glass, combine sugar, Power’s and Grand Marnier and add fresh coffee. Top with whipped cream and garnish with roast coffee beans and shaved dark chocolate.

Bow St. Summer – Jameson Crested This winter saw a beautiful moment in the world of Irish whiskey lovers Canada wide. Jameson Crested hit the shelves. This new incarnation of the Crested 10 expression, we all knew and loved, Jameson Crested is a breath of fresh air. It does carry that signature Jameson mouthfeel and finish, but brings with it some new molasses and Sherry notes which lend very nicely to this cocktail. So, when you think of Irish whiskey cocktails you wouldn’t exactly think of going tropical, but we will need something to keep our minds in the sun should the snow start this March 17th so why not get stuck into a few Bow St. Summers??!! 1.5 oz Jameson Crested 1 oz Aperol 1 oz Passion Tea Syrup 1.5 oz Ruby Grapefruit Juice 1 large egg white 1 dash Cherry Bitters In a shaker combine Syrup, egg white, juice and Bitters and dry shake for about 20 seconds. Add ice, Jameson Crested and Aperol and shake again for another 30 seconds. Garnish with lemon zest and mint sprig. To make Passion Tea Syrup; in a small saucepan add 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of water and 3 Passion fruit tea bags. Bring to boil and allow to simmer for 20 minutes. Strain, bring to room temperature and refrigerate. So there you have it folks, some great cocktails and great Irish whiskies to get you through another St. Patricks Day here in beautiful Canada. Please remember, the world will be here tomorrow so drink responsibly, have fun and be safe!! Lá fhéile Pádraig shona daoibh!!!!! Autumn | 2016

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Claonadh – Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey

OK, OK, I get it. Including an Irish coffee in this list may seem like cheating in a way. But trust me, a lot of folks out there have not had one made with this recipe, and even worse, may not have ever tried Power’s Gold Label before. Hailing from the glorious Middleton Distillery in Midleton, Co. Cork THIS IS IRISH WHISKEY!!!! If Jameson is the whiskey the Irish drink around the world, then Power’s Gold Label is what the Irish drink in Ireland. Big, bold, nutty and packed full of baking spices this is the ultimate whiskey for an Irish Coffee. If you don’t believe me try out my recipe below.

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


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The Bourbon Affair

Summer in Kentucky is guaranteed to be hot and humid. The air is thick and the horizon is masked in haze. It’s a stark contrast to the harsh, grey, icy winters that scrape the landscape bare until the sweet relief of Spring. This contradiction in climate is favorable for the state’s hearty bluegrass, and it is revered for its capacity to age the 6.5 million barrels of Kentucky Bourbon quietly resting in rickhouses across the Commonwealth. Bourbon Whiskey is a distinctive product of the United States, and 95 per cent of it is made in Kentucky. The American distilling industry is as old as the country itself, and Kentucky’s distinguished Bourbon heritage is woven into the very fabric of the state. From the abundance of corn indigenous to the region to the limestone-filtered water, Kentucky is uniquely situated to be the birthplace of Bourbon. Another advantage the state enjoys is prime access to waterways. Kentucky is bordered by two main commercial rivers: The Ohio River to the north, and the Mississippi River to the west. In the late 1700s, Kentucky was the wild west, the last American frontier before the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 claimed the Mississippi for the U.S., and Kentucky whiskey could be shipped down river to New Orleans. As Kentucky Bourbon’s availability increased, so did its popularity.

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Today the demand for Bourbon is higher than ever. Distilling is an $8.5 billion industry for Kentucky, and its iconic distilleries hosted over 1,000,000 visits last year alone. “It’s incredible,” says Adam Johnson, Director of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail ® tour which guides Bourbon lovers to distillery destinations across the state.

“People don’t just want what’s in the bottle. They want to experience Kentucky’s Bourbon Culture.” This “culture” seems to pull from Kentucky’s Bourbon heritage, family roots, a tradition of working hard and doing things right, and some good old-fashioned Southern hospitality. That Bourbon Culture is on full display every June when the legendary Kentucky distillers invite Bourbon lovers, friends, and enthusiasts to spend some quality time with them during The Kentucky Bourbon Affair. This ultimate Bourbon fantasy camp is prized for the intimate one-of-a-kind experience it offers. Events include behind-thescenes access, private barrel selections, rare tastings and exclusive nightcap events with the Master Distillers and Bourbon Barons of Kentucky’s signature industry. “Seventeen brands are hosting events,” Johnson marvels. “For some events, the distillers are literally inviting guests into their homes.” These personal touches are what have built The Bourbon Affair’s loyal following, with a core group of fans that return every year. Mandy Ryan, with the Bourbon Affair’s concierge team, loves seeing guests come back year after year. “It’s like a family reunion for all of us. We catch up, we hang out at the hotel at the end of the day. We even keep in touch throughout the year.” Around 3000 visitors are expected to attend events at this year’s Kentucky Bourbon Affair. June promises to provide a warm welcome to Kentucky, so pack accordingly, and enjoy the Bourbon.


Louisville info Bourbon isn’t just a drink – it’s a distinctive part of our Bluegrass culture, a way of life. And there’s no better host than Louisville for the fourth annual Kentucky Bourbon Affair™. Today’s urban Bourbon lifestyle means whiskey-fueled food, decadent desserts, inspired hotels and themed accommodations, and classic bars with walls full of bottles and acclaimed cocktail mixologists. Kentucky Bourbon Affair™ attendees will once again have the opportunity to explore Louisville and all of its eclectic offerings through special evening events and getaways. While enjoying the Kentucky Bourbon Affair’s™ events by day, know that Louisville’s famous Urban Bourbon Trail awaits you at night with some of the best dining on the national scene. As Louisville says, “Stamp collecting has never been so much fun. When you’re traveling along the Urban Bourbon Trail, you’re in for cocktails classic and modern, live music, and the Bourbon-inspired creativity of Louisville’s best bartenders and chefs. Each stop is well stocked with anywhere from 50 to 150 varieties of Kentucky’s signature spirit.” It’s also why we love the Marriott Louisville East--not only is it Kentucky’s only Bourbon-themed hotel, it’s also a proud member of the Urban Bourbon Trail. The Marriott Louisville East is our preferred hotel for guests attending the Kentucky Bourbon Affair™, with easy access to downtown Louisville, I-64, and I-65. The Kentucky Bourbon Affair™ will have events throughout Louisville and the surrounding distilleries of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail® tour. If you choose to not take advantage of our free transportation and want some help getting around the Derby City and the distilleries, our friends at R&R Limo and Mint Julep Tours and are your first calls. They have some options for you to make your travels stress-free. Louisville has gained international attention for its culinary excellence and Bourbon innovation. The stylish urban atmosphere is the perfect ending to your day’s journey.


T H E B OTA N I S T. I S L AY DRY G I N .

T H E B OTA N I S T I S A G I N OF L AY E R E D C O M P L E X I T Y. A P RO G R E S S I V E E X P LOR AT ION OF T H E B OTA N IC A L H E R I TAG E OF O U R I S L E OF I S L AY. 2 2 H A N D - F OR AG E D LO C A L B OTA N IC A L S DE L IC AT E LY AU G M E N T N I N E B E R R I E S , BA R K S , S E E D S A N D P E E L S D U R I NG A N AC H I NG LY S LOW DI S T I L L AT ION . T H I S F I R S T A N D ON LY I S L AY DRY G I N I S A R A R E E X P R E S S ION OF T H E H E A RT A N D S O U L OF O U R R E M OT E S C OT T I S H I S L A N D HO M E ; O U R P H I LO S OP H Y A N D O U R PA S S ION .

WILD.

W I L D I S L AY. T H E H E B R I DE A N I S L A N D HO M E OF T H E B OTA N I S T C L I NG S TO T H E E D G E OF T H E O C E A N I N T H E T E E T H OF AT L A N T IC W E AT H E R S Y S T E M S .

F OR AG E D .

2 2 F OR AG E D I S L A N D B OTA N IC A L S . H A N D - P IC K E D LO C A L LY A N D S U S TA I N A B LY H E R E ON I S L AY BY O U R OW N B OTA N IC A L S C I E N T I S T S .

DI S T I L L E D .

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P RO G R E S S I V E H E B R I DE A N DI S T I L L E R S . T H E B OTA N I S T I S T H E E S S E NC E OF O U R P H I LO S OP H Y, O U R A RT A N D O U R P ION E E R I NG S P I R I T.


This sweet treat is decadently exotic, paired with antioxidant-rich pomegranates and heart-healthy pistachios for a unique take one a classic chocolate mousse.

Ingredients 1 14 oz can Full fat coconut milk 2 tbsp Coconut sugar 1 1⁄2 tsp Pomegranate molasses 1 tsp Pure vanilla extract 1⁄4 tsp Sea salt 50 g Green & Black’s 70% Dark Chocolate, finely chopped 2 tbsp Tahini Garnish: 1⁄4 cup Pistachios, chopped 1⁄4 cup Pomegranate arils (seeds) 2 tbsp Green & Black’s 70% Dark Chocolate, curled or shaved for garnish Directions Place the coconut milk in the fridge overnight to separate the solids from the liquid. Remove from the fridge, flip over and open up the bottom of the can (the solids will have solidified on the top). Discard the liquid, and place the coconut cream in a bowl. Using electric beaters, beat the cream until fluffy and light. Add in the coconut sugar, pomegranate molasses, vanilla, and salt, and beat until well combined. Fill a medium pot an inch high with water. Place the pot on the burner over medium heat and bring the water to a gentle simmer. Place the Green & Black’s chocolate and tahini in a large heat-proof bowl and set over a pot. Let the chocolate melt, stirring often until smooth and melted. Use a spatula or hand whisk to mix the chocolate into the mousse until well combined. Divide between four small serving dishes and top with pistachios, pomegranate and chocolate curls. Enjoy!

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Dark Chocolate Tahini Mousse with Pomegranates & Pistachios

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G

Green & Black’s Cocoa Chili Flank Steak with Chocolate Almond Pesto Chocolate is best known for its ability to increase serotonin (the feel good hormone) levels in the brain. This delectable dish combines the best of both worlds: succulent skirt steak with a sweet chocolate almond and savory pesto rub.

Ingredients Steak: 1 tsp Green & Black’s cocoa powder 1 tsp Instant espresso powder 1 tsp Coconut sugar 2 tsp Chili powder 1⁄2 tsp Garlic powder 1⁄2 tsp Dried oregano 1 tsp Sea salt 1⁄2 tsp Cracked black pepper 1 1⁄2 lb Flank steak 1 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil Pesto 1⁄2 cup Raw almonds, toasted and roughly chopped 1 cup Parsley leaves 3 tbsp Green & Black’s 85% Dark Chocolate, finely grated 1⁄4 cup Parmigiano reggiano cheese, finely grated 2 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste Relish Q C Whisky

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Chocolate Chili Covered Almonds with Hemp Hearts Garnish: Lemon zest Pinch of fleur de sel

In a bowl, mix together the Green & Black’s cocoa powder, espresso, coconut sugar, chili, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper. Score both sides of the steak by making a diamond pattern of shallow cuts. Rub the steak generously with the spice mix and set aside. Heat the oil in a large cast iron skillet over high heat until super hot. Add the steak and cook for about 4 minutes per side for rare. Once cooked, allow it to rest on the cutting board, tented, for at least 5-10 minutes. Meanwhile, pulse the almonds and parsley in a food processor until they reach a coarse ground up consistency. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the Green & Black’s chocolate, cheese, oil and salt and pepper, to taste. To serve, slice the steak thinly against the grain and top with a sprinkle of fleur de sel. Serve with the pesto garnished with a shaving of lemon zest. Enjoy! Serves 4-6

Chili peppers are the perfect feelgood ingredient known to produce endorphins. Presented on a cheese board, these decadent chocolate chili almonds are dipped in premium organic chocolate and lightly dusted with dash of heat to optimize flavour.

Ingredients 100 g Green & Black’s Maya Gold Dark Chocolate, finely chopped 1 1⁄2 Raw almonds cups 1⁄4 tsp Chili powder 1⁄4 tsp Fleur de sel 1 tbsp Hemp hearts

Directions

Prepare a large baking sheet lined with a silpat or parchment paper.

Add the almonds and toss until fully coated and spread out onto the baking sheet.

Fill a medium pot with an inch of water. Place the pot on the burner over medium heat and bring the water to a gentle simmer. Place the Green & Blacks chocolate in a large heat-proof bowl and set over pot. Let the chocolate melt, stirring often until smooth.

Sprinkle with chili powder, fleur de sel and hemp hearts. Allow the chocolate to cool and set completely or transfer to the fridge to quicken the process. Separate the nuts and serve on a cheese board or in a bowl for easy snacking. Serves 8-10

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Directions

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


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Hulk

Flourless Pancakes

These pancakes are as healthy as a salad! They are bright green inside and packed with detoxifying B vitamins. Spirulina is optional, but note that it contains all the essential amino acids, which assist the liver with detoxification and is 55 to 70 percent protein — ounce for ounce, spirulina contains 12 times the digestible protein of beef. Coconut is naturally antifungal and helps to balance your digestive flora. These pancakes can be whipped together quickly and are a perfect high-protein weekend treat.

large organic eggs

1/3 cup

organic coconut milk

2 Tbsp

coconut nectar

1 Tbsp

pure vanilla extract

1 tsp

raw apple cider vinegar

1 cup

almond flour

1 tsp

ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp

baking soda

1/4 tsp

pink rock or gray sea salt

2 cups

baby spinach

1 Tbsp

coconut oil (for coating the skillet)

optional booster 1 tsp

Hawaiian spirulina powder

blueberry sauce (optional) 2 cups

wild blueberries, fresh or frozen

2 Tbsp

coconut nectar

2 Blend on medium speed for 30 seconds, until well combined. 3 Use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the blender. Add the spinach, and blend on high speed until the spinach leaves are completely incorporated and the batter is smooth. Set aside. 4 Make the blueberry sauce, if desired. In a saucepan over medium heat, combine the blueberries and coconut nectar and cook, stirring frequently as the berries heat up and start to break down. Using the backside of a spoon, gently squash some of the blueberries. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes or until the sauce has become syruplike, with a few berries still intact. Remove from the heat and set aside.

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3

1 Place the eggs, coconut milk, coconut nectar, vanilla and vinegar in a blender (preferably a high-powered one). Then add the almond flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt, and spirulina powder if using.

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


Hemp Burgers These vegan burgers are perfect travel companions that pack up easily. The balance of protein, fiber and superdetox nutrients will keep you full for hours! Cashews and Hemp Hearts are excellent sources of magnesium. Every single cell in the human body needs magnesium to function. Strong bones and teeth, balanced hormones, relaxed muscles, a healthy nervous system and, most important in the Hot Detox, well-functioning detoxification pathways!

1 Cup raw cashews 2 Cups ground flaxseeds (freshley ground if possible) 1/4cup filtered water, for soaking the flaxseeds 1/4cup chopped red onion 1cup

hemp hearts

1/2cup raw sunflower seeds 3 Tbsp coconut aminos 1Tbsp dried basil 1tsp

pink rock or gray sea salt

1 1/2cups kasha(toasted buckweat groats) 2cups grated carrots or unpeeled weet potatoes (using a food processor) Optional Booster 1/2cup dried cranberries (sweetened with apple juice)

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Runamok Maple Braised Pork with a Maple, Mustard and Fennel Sauce Maple and pork were meant for each other. Here I have taken a nice, marbled cut of pork and braised it for hours in a tangy cider and fennel broth. Once the pork is done, the broth is used to make a sauce, adding mustard and maple syrup for the perfect sweet-salty finish. There is nothing refined about the sauce, just leave in the bits of garlic and fennel for a chunky, delicious compliment to the meat. Serve over polenta or potatoes Braised Pork with Maple, Mustard and Fennel Sauce

1 Tbsp vegetable oil 3-4 lb pork shoulder Salt and pepper 1 yellow onion, sliced ½ bulb fresh fennel, trimmed, cored and sliced 4 cloves garlic, chopped 1 cup apple cider 1 cup chicken stock 1 tsp fennel seed 1 bay leaf 1/3 cup Runamok Maple Sugarmaker’s Cut maple syrup 1 Tbsp whole grain Dijon mustard Preheat oven to 375.

In an oven proof pot large enough to hold the roast, heat the oil over a stove, season the pork, and add it to the pot. Brown on all sides and remove. Add the onion, fennel and garlic and sauté a few minutes more. Pour the cider and chicken stock into the pot, deglazing the brown bits on the bottom of the pot. Add the fennel seed and bay leaf. Return the pork to the pot. The broth should come 1/3 the way up the roast so if there is not enough, add some water. Put a lid on it and place the pot in the oven, lowering the heat to 325. Check on the roast every half hour to make sure there is still liquid in it and if it gets too dry, add some water. Braise for 2 ½ to 3 hours or until tender. Gently remove the pork from the pot. If a large amount of fat has accumulated, skim some off the surface. Put the pot on the stove and add the maple syrup and mustard. Gently simmer the liquid and vegetables until it has reduced to a moderately thick sauce.

Recipes The Bourbon Confidential

I know a guy. I can’t say how I know him or what he knows but let’s just say he knows things that most of us aren’t supposed to know. To be clear, I don’t know what those things are either. I do know, however, that he knows good bourbon and how to make a good bourbon cocktail. When I introduced him to our infusions, he quickly came up with a most excellent cocktail involving the Hibiscus Maple. Luckily, I have authorization to release it to the public. How he knew this combination would be so delicious, I’ll never know.

Slice the pork and serve with sauce on the side.

2 oz bourbon ¼ lemon ½ oz Hibiscus Infused Maple Syrup Put some ice in a glass and squeeze the lemon over it until all of the juice is rendered. Add the bourbon and Hibiscus Infused Maple and stir gently. by Laura Sorkin runamokmaple.com

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Relish C Whisky Q A Sip and a Story

Spencer Gooderham, yes, of Gooderham and Worts the whisky Barons of Canada - takes time for Relish and Whisky, to share the history of the Gooderham name and his story in it .


A Sip and a Story

with Spencer Gooderham 1. What is the background on the history of the Gooderham family in the whisky industry? How did their involvement come about, and when? The Gooderham story is without a doubt one of the most important stories in Canadian whisky history, and one that is sadly forgotten by many us. The story begins in 1832, when James Worts, a business partner of William Gooderham, travelled from Suffolk England to York, which is now Toronto. James Worts came to North America to explore business opportunities for himself and the already wealthy William Gooderham. James found a budding colony in York, and shortly thereafter William arrived with his family and 11 orphans he had generously adopted on the trip. Quickly they went to work establishing a grist mill at the mouth of the Don Valley River, which unknowingly would one day be the site of the largest distillery in the world. William Gooderham and James Worts never intended on becoming distillers. At this point in time, Canada was no more than a colony, and these businessmen were looking to capitalize on the new frontier. Their mill was a huge success, and with a savvy deal for farmers to leave behind 10% of their milled grain, Gooderham & Worts began to stockpile a huge amount of flour. But there was one problem, they had too much of it. They couldn’t sell it fast enough, and it would soon start to go bad. The solution? Distillation. Like so many notable entrepreneurs, their success came from innovation and problem solving. The Gooderham & Worts whisky empire was born. Over many years and three generations, the Gooderham & Worts distillery would grow to become one of the driving economic forces behind early Canada. Leading up to the Confeder

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ation of Canada in 1832, the Gooderham & Worts distillery provided more tax revenue than any other enterprise in the nation. By 1877, it was the largest distillery in the world, producing more than 2.5 million gallons of whisky each year. The stories are seemingly endless. The patent of the Riley still in 1846 would change the course of distillation forever. The money from whisky sales would contribute to the railways, roads, schools, libraries, hospitals and churches. TD bank, Manulife, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Canadian Yacht club…I know I am missing so much more, but my point is that so many of the incredible things we take for granted as Canadians today, were supported by the Gooderham family. There are seven generations between William Gooderham and myself. It is a true honour to be a part of this historic family, and something I strive to pay tribute to every day of my life.

2. At present, what has happened to the Gooderham name in the industry? The Gooderham & Worts distillery was sold in 1923 to Harry Hatch, the man who consolidated the major Canadian Distilleries during prohibition and after. Also a fascinating story, but we’ll save that for another day. After the distillery was sold, the Gooderham family expanded into other industries, but sadly, their involvement in the whisky world came to an end. Over the years and generations, the Gooderham whisky legacy was slowly lost in time. The distillery was shut down and became

an abandoned area of Toronto used occasionally for movie sets. In the 90’s however, the distillery district was purchased in it’s entirety and slowly refurbished into what we have today. An incredibly vibrant part of Toronto, filled with high end shops, restaurants, cafes, art studios, and a theatre. The distillery district is classified as a Canadian Heritage Site and the businesses that operate within it must maintain the historical aspects of the buildings. I am so happy to see what the district has become today. It is beautiful, artistic, and most importantly respects and accentuates the rich history that exists in those walls. While the whisky has stopped running and many of the stories have been lost in time, the district will forever remain a landmark of this great industry and a tribute to the Gooderham legacy. Every time I walk those wonderfully uneven cobblestone streets I close my eyes and travel to a time that once was. My underlying goal in life is to educate Canadians on this captivating history, and the incredible people that once walked those streets.

3. How did the idea for the Gooderham & Worts Four Grain Whisky come about? The company I work for, Corby Spirit and Wine, is one of the results of the consolidation of the Canadian Whisky industry. Think Henry Corby, another Canadian Whisky Baron. Having owned the trademark to the Gooderham & Worts name for many years, and with the recent popularity of the Distillery District in Toronto, the timing seemed right to release a whisky


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4. Where have you “been” for the last 5-10 years? Tell us a little about your story and how you became a Canadian Whisky Ambassador. Good question (laughs)! I suppose my personal whisky story begins when I was a young child. I grew up surrounded by the whisky world. Long before I ever had a sip, my Father would tell me old Gooderham stories with as much awe and wonder as I tell them now. My Dad is a total history buff and he instilled a lot of that curiosity and interest in the family legacy in me. We have old artifacts, bottles, letters and papers from the original distillery, and I grew up knowing that my great (x4) grandfather was one of the most important businessmen in Canadian history. Ever since I can remember I wanted to continue that legacy and work in the whisky industry. However, it’s not exactly something your guidance counselor helps you with in high school. I went to university like all my friends. I studied mostly health studies and biology, and completed both a Bachelor and Master of Science degrees. During grad school I really developed an “itch” to pursue the whisky industry. However, in the interest of trying to salvage my then-current career, after finishing grad school I took a great job at a management consulting firm in Toronto. I thought I had made it, good pay, benefits, downtown office…all of which, I learned, lose their luster rather quickly if you are not happy. I went to bed every single night knowing that I was going down the wrong path in life. I knew I had to take a chance in the whisky industry then, or I feared I never would. So, I

woke up one morning after a sleepless night and that was it. I didn’t go to work. Instead, I packed up my car and drove across the country. I drove through the states, visiting over 25 distilleries, and countless cocktail bars. On the other side of the continent I attended the Artisan Craft Distilling Institute, in Washington State. I learned about the business, the science and the art of making whisky. I had the chance to operate the stills, monitor fermentations, and how to clean a mash cooker. It was an incredible course to give me the background I needed, but more importantly to give me confidence I made the right decision. After driving back to Ontario I started bartending and have never looked back. I love to bartend, truly, it is one of the most rewarding experiences crafting a beautiful and delicious cocktail that someone enjoys. Seeing a smile after a first sip is one of those moments I will never stop enjoying. For several years I poured my heart and soul into bartending, and despite moving to the corporate side, it is something I will never stop doing. Taking the ambassador role was a natural transition for me. I met a Corby executive at a networking event and told them my story. The company just so happened to be launching the new role, so my timing was very lucky. This role is perfect for me. I am a very passionate person, particularly when it comes to Canadian Whisky. This job allows me to travel all over Canada, telling the story of Canadian Whisky, of my ancestors, and of all the great whisky barons that built this country. Our portfolio of whiskies is amazing at Corby…and it doesn’t hurt that I get to pour Gooderham & Worts Four Grain every single day.

5. Are there more collaborations or other releases that would involve you, or the Gooderham family? Short answer: yes. Unfortunately I can’t say exactly what will be coming down the pipeline... but I will say that the Four Grain will not be the only whisky you’ll ever see that bears the Gooderham name. You can look forward to seeing some incredible whisky releases in Fall 2017. Stay tuned.

6. What’s next for you? Will we see you involved with the brand or at other whisky shows in the future? Oh yes, of course! Expect to see me at most of the key whisky shows in Canada this year. In fact I’m writing this on a plane flying home from the NSLC Festival of Whisky in Halifax. Close to home I’ve got the Spirit of Toronto in early May followed by Invasion Cocktail in Montreal the following week. I’m constantly on the road experiencing all this great country has to offer, so look for me in a bar enjoying some Canadian Whisky, I’m always happy to share. As for what’s next for me? Again, good question! Honestly, I don’t know exactly what is next for me…and I love that. I wake up each day excited about life and excited about the future. I’ve never felt so alive. I am living my childhood dream of working in the whisky industry, educating people on this incredible liquid and the stories behind it. I know I am headed in the right direction even if I don’t have a clear destination. It’s cliché to say, but when you genuinely love what you do, it’s not work.

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that would pay homage to William Gooderham and James Worts. The idea is simple, recall that these gentlemen were first millers before they ever distilled a drop of whisky. This whisky is a masterful blend of the four grains that would have been milled by the G&W mill and used in the 1800’s to make whisky in Canada. The whisky is complex, multi-layered, and smooth all the way through. I am truly honoured to represent, as an ambassador, a whisky that was created as a tribute to my ancestor. Every time I sip it I can’t help but sit back and dream of sharing a dram with William himself.

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


Established in 1991 in England, Green & Blacks Organic has grown to become a world leader in organic and Fair Trade chocolate and is committed too the creation of chocolate products that provide a taste experience like no other. Using only organically grown cocoa, sourced Principally from the Dominican Republic, Green & Blacks Organic believes its possible to respect our earth while Indulging in the best things it has to offer. To find out more about Green & Blacks Organic products and values, visit www.greenandblacks.co.uk and www.facebook.com/GreenandBlacksCanada


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A RARE AULD IRISH COFFEE

Glass: Irish Coffee Glass Ingredients: 50ml of Glendalough Poitín Rich black coffee to reflect the dark history of poitín. Honey to enhance the malted barley sugars and Irish sugar beet. Cream to compliment the smooth, oakaged finish. Cinnamon to bring out the spicey notes of Ireland ’s original and oldest spirit, poitín. Method: Firstly, place a metal spoon in the glass and pour in some hot water to warm. Prepare your coffee, for best results use freshly ground coffee beans and a french press. When the coffee is ready, pour out hot water from your glass and add in the honey and coffee. Stir, and once the honey has dissolved add the poitín. Top with cream by pouring it over the back of a spoon to make sure it settles and finally, spinkle with a pinch of cinnamon. Enjoy.

Relish Q C Whisky 59

and

Autumn | 2016

Local Gastronomic to the Angels’ Share


T H E B E ST OF THE BEST

It’s hard to say one whiskey is “better” than another. It’s a matter of taste. But when your whiskeys have received accolades like this from the world’s most prestigious spirits awards, it’s hard not to.

san francisco world spirits competition · irish whiskey awards · global spirits masters · icons of whisky

QC Relish and Whisky Spring 2017  

Local Gastronomic to the Angels' Share

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