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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E WINTER ISSUE 2014 > $5.00

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WINTER CLASSICS

BRITT EKLAND WEARING A WHITE FUR COAT, 1966


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46 LIVING LEGEND Our intrepid chronicler Liz Smith takes a look as only she can at another Living Legend this issue with an examination of Lauren Hutton’s spellbinding career. Hutton, an American original, skyrocketed to fame and onto the cover of fashion magazines, and found herself in one of fashion’s favorite films, American Gigolo. Here, Smith goes behind the famous gap-tooth smile to tap into the heart of Hutton. 58 GOING ALL IN Shoshanna Gruss, the favorite designer of many full-figured women, sits down with Lily Hoagland to dish on her lucrative career, her family, and everything else she crams into a single day. Ben Fink Shapiro photographs the petite beauty among her latest creations in her showroom.

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62 FASHION ROUNDUP Elizabeth Meigher and Alex R. Travers hit the runways and report back on the trends. Follow along as Meigher and Travers pick up on a comprehensive compendium of colors and Spring 2014’s fascination with scuba, which made a big splash on the runways this season. 74 GIVING THANKS AT 583 PARK As turkeys were going into ovens around the city, Alexandra Lind Rose and Louis Rose hosted an annual pre-Thanksgiving bash at 583 Park Avenue.

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78 JEWELRY’S MEATIER SIDE Elizabeth Quinn Brown weighs in on the articulate surfaces, wearability, and subtle details of Verameat, a cutting-edge jewelry line by Vera Balyura. 80 NOW TAKE NOTE Daniel Cappello delves into a new book of memos by one of Vogue’s (and fashion’s) greatest visionaries, former editor-in-chief Diana Vreeland—and discovers a delightful, immersive view of her idiosyncratic intelligence. 84 FASHION REVIEW From New York City to Paris, London to Milan, Alex R. Travers reviews some of the most talked-about shows for Spring 2014, including Ralph Lauren, Louis Vuitton, Prada, and Tom Ford.

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C O V E R The Swedish-born singer, actress, and model Britt Ekland wearing a white fur coat, circa 1966. © Bettmann/CORBIS


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31 NOSTALGIA From hitting the slopes to hailing in the snow, a look at some dreamy scenes from winters past. 34 JEWELRY Bulgari’s “Memories” fit for a diva, Asprey’s luxurious Lotus earrings, woven gold bracelets from Ralph Lauren Fine Jewelry...and that’s just a few of our favorite jewelry finds. 36 COATS While we can only wish for a white Christmas, we can be sure to count on cold weather this winter. Luckily, we’ve picked out some stylish coats to keep you toasty.

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38 SHOES Like the shoe-loving version of Santa, we checked the showrooms and runways twice before compiling this list of our favorite footwear to keep you on trend. 40 HANDBAGS Hermès has the Kelly (after Grace Kelly) and Ralph Lauren has the Ricky (after Ricky Lauren)—now see how our pick of this season’s best handbags stack up. 44 MEN’S APPAREL With the forecast calling for one of our coldest winters to date, Q takes a cue from John F. Kennedy, Jr., and adds a little splash to getting bundled up.

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94 Q FOCUS A look at fall parties—from the Cinema Society’s fêtes in New York to Bombay Sapphire’s Artisan Series dinner in Miami Beach—as PYTs everywhere prepare for winter. 104 BEAUTY Keep the winter blues at bay and your skin glowingly fresh with our roundup of the latest beauty products. 106 EVENING LOOKS Princess Diana was the queen of making an entrance; now, with the help of our favorite and most glamorous designers, you, too, can be queen of the night. 110 SHOPPING INDEX To help you on your fashion journey, a listing of where to buy the looks featured in our pages.

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112 HOROSCOPES It’s the season of Sagittarius and Capricorn, but the question is whether Mercury is in retrograde...


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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EDITOR

JAMES STOFFEL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LILY HOAGLAND EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN A SSOCIATE EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS A SSI STANT EDITOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO FA SHION DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX ART DIRECTOR

HILARY GEARY SOCIET Y EDITOR

JOANNA BAKER CO-FOUNDING EDITOR

Quest Media, LLC. S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III CHAIRMAN AND C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

ARLENE LEFKOE ACCOUNTING MANAGER BOARD OF ADVISORS

BRUCIE BOALT EDWARD LEE CAVE BARBARA CORCORAN JED H. GARFIELD CLARK HALSTEAD HOWARD LORBER PAMELA LIEBMAN ELIZABETH STRIBLING ROGER W. TUCKERMAN PETER TURINO WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF SARAH BETH SHRAGER 917.576.1217 NEW YORK

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

BARBARA BANCROFT LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS MICHAEL THOMAS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON BILLY FARRELL PATRICK MCMULLAN CLINT SPAULDING BEN FINK SHAPIRO LINDA LANE SOPER 612.308.4159 PALM BEACH

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© QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2014. All rights reserved. Vol. 10, No. 1. Q–Quintessential Style is published quarterly, 4 times a year. Yearly subscription rate $32.00. Two-year rate $50.00. Q, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. For address changes, please call: 646.840.3404. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Q–Quintessential Style, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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EDITOR’S LETTER

I was recently inspired by a fun, compelling evening I spent at the Neue Galerie’s Viennese Café Sabarsky, eating goulash and strudel while listening to Sandra Weigl’s program of rustic gypsy tunes and songs from Paris, Vienna, and Berlin. It reminded me of how many treasures this city has to offer, from its array of remarkable museums and theaters to its quiet gardens and parks. Just last weekend I visited a bench near Central Park’s Carrousel that my father dedicated to my younger sister and me. As little girls, we spent many hours on that famous carrousel, and it was sweet of our dad to memorialize our time there with this gift. I hadn’t visited our dad’s bench in years and was happy when I returned to it. December is a time of rushing to complete Christmas shopping and dashing between the season’s festivities—which is why, even though it’s so cold outside, January and February might be a nice time to remember all of this city’s treasures and to simply take them in and enjoy them. In this issue of Q, we offer a number of treasures ourselves. Fashion director of both Q and Quest, Daniel Cappello profiles the newly released Diana Vreeland Memos: The Vogue Years (Rizzoli), original memos compiled by Vreeland’s grandson, Alexander Vreeland. Marked by Vreeland’s signature sauciness, her original notes and letters shed light on her insatiable appetite for ingenuity and beauty—and her innate skills that transformed a glossy society magazine into Vogue, as we know it today. Alex Travers, who also covers style for Q and Quest, delivers an insightful look at Fashion Week in New York, London, Milan, and Paris, for the Spring 2014 shows. Be sure to check out Carolina Herrera’s organza and trompe-l’oeil gowns, as well as Prada’s bold, fiery creations. And associate editor Elizabeth Quinn Brown travels to the East Village to check out Verameat, a jewelry line crafted by Vera Balyura, who thrives on expressing the “meatier” side of jewelry. Another bright spot in this winter edition comes from executive editor Lily Hoagland’s sit-down with fashion designer, mother, and A-list citizen Shoshanna Gruss, whose dresses began with an idea to solve a problem and morphed into a burgeoning fashion empire. Ben Fink Shapiro photographed Shoshanna both at her office and in the garden of her townhouse, where her two adorable one-year-old twins watched their mother in action. And our Living Legend column, penned by a legend herself, Liz Smith, focuses on American model and actress Lauren Hutton. Born in Charleston, South Carolina, Hutton moved to New York in 1964 after graduating from Tulane. She became a top fashion model, cover girl, and commercial spokesperson. She was often advised to correct the slight gap in her teeth and tried using a cap or morticians’ wax to cover the gap, but, in the end, she kept this “imperfection,” which Counterclockwise, from top right: Dress by Peter Pilotto; Lauren lent her on-camera persona a down-home sensibility that more Hutton by Richard Avedon, 1968; Ralph Lauren Fine Jewelry delicate models lacked. In her day, Hutton was known as the Woven 7-line 18-kt. gold bracelet; red crocodile evening clutch by “fresh American face of fashion.” Marchesa; Ralph Lauren leather-trim quilted jacket; Stuart WeitzAs Q magazine enters its ninth year, we thank you all for man Highland knee-high boot in taupe; Tiffany & Co. Tiffany Fifth being such loyal and supportive readers. We strive to deliver Avenue Box, in bone china; Catherine Deneuve; Bottega Veneta timeless, effortless fashion with modern flair—and we thank waxed-leather and gold-metal bracelet; Alex Lind Rose and Louis you for appreciating that “classic look” as much as we do! u Rose at their annual Pre-Thanksgiving Party at 583 Park Avenue.

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EDITOR


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CONTRIBUTORS

Liz Smith > Liz calls herself the 2,000-year-old gossip columnist. These days she’s been having fun with her website, which features 20 famous women: WowOWow.com (aimed at the largest demographic coming on the web—women who weren’t born yesterday!). In her latest Living Legend column for Q, Liz looks at the life of Lauren Hutton (whose given name was actually Mary), the South Carolina–born model and spokeswoman who graced glossy magazine covers with her patented gap-tooth smile. Hutton, the “fresh American face of fashion,” also starred in one of fashion’s favorite films, American Gigolo.

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> Lily Hoagland is the executive editor of Quest and Q, and was previously the associate research editor at Vanity Fair. In this issue, she interviews the dynamic designer Shoshanna Gruss and manages not to mention the subject’s relationship with Jerry Seinfeld when she was 17 (and he was in his late 30s), because we all have that one relationship we’d rather not be asked about. Lily has translated books between English and French, including a collection of Napoleon’s letters to his first wife, Josephine—another woman who was probably sick of being asked about her ex.

78 > Daniel Cappello is the fashion director of Quest and Q. For this issue, he takes a look at the new book Diana Vreeland Memos: The Vogue Years (Rizzoli). Marked by her signature irreverence and legendary over-the-top pronouncements, Vreeland’s letters prove to be a delightful, immersive view into her “idiosyncratic intelligence,” as Daniel puts it, as well as her management style at the helm of Vogue magazine, from 1963–1971. “Reading these memos brings us closer to Vreeland’s scimitar-sharp wit,” he says. “She had one of the most discerning visual senses, but she was also a master of the written word.”

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46 < Ben Fink Shapiro is a New York City–based photographer who first began shooting as a teenager in his hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. After graduating from Vassar College with a B.A. in Media/Film Studies, he assisted fashion photographers Miles Aldridge and Kenneth Willardt. His portrait work has been published in American Vogue, British Vogue, and Korean Vogue. He has contributed to both Q and Quest, shooting both fashion and lifestyle, and in this issue, in “Going All In,” captures the fashion designer Shoshanna Gruss in her Garment District showroom.

58 Elizabeth Quinn Brown < Elizabeth serves as the associate editor of Q and Quest, where she writes the “Young and the Guest List” column. For this issue, she ventured to the East Village to cover Verameat, a hot and unique jewelry line crafted by Vera Balyura, who likes to express the “meatier” side of jewelry. As Q’s beauty editor, Elizabeth collected the most nourishing products for winter, sure to keep your skin healthy and safe amid the season’s arctic winds. Elizabeth resides in the East Village, where she enjoys eating People’s Pops and wearing graphic T-shirts.

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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W IN T E R AC T IVIT I E S Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall with their son,

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Stephen, on Christmas Eve at their Beverly Hills home.

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This page: 1. Grace Kelly and Princess Caroline, après ski; 2. Elizabeth Taylor with two of her children in Gstaad, Switzerland, 1962; 3. Mick and Bianca Jagger, 1973; 4. Anjelica Huston and her father, Bob Houston, in Ireland, 1967; 5. Julie Christie, Ursula Andress, and Catherine Deneuve attend a Royal Film Performance of Born Free at the Odeon, Leicester Square, 1966. > Opposite page: 1. Berlin Wall, Christmas 1961, by LÊon Herschtritt; 2. Martha Stewart modeling in the 1960s; 3. John F. Kennedy, Jr., on the slopes at a Massachusetts ski resort, 1975; 4. Gloria Vanderbilt and Truman Capote, 1965; 5. Guests relax atop a mountain in Verbier, Switzerland.

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1. ASPREY Lotus ruby earrings with pavé diamonds in yellow gold; $40,200. 2. TAMSEN Z Yellow- and white-diamond bracelet in yellow gold; $253,000. 3. MARINA B Cardan bead necklace with red chalcedony and black jade ($18,500); Cardan perles necklace with green chalcedony, black jade, and pearls ($18,500). 4. BULGARI Persian Memories ring, from Bulgari’s Diva High Jewelry Collection, in white gold, emerald, rubies, and diamonds; price upon request. 5. KARA ROSS Resin line cuff in gold with resin and clear crystals; $165. 6. TIFFANY & CO. Tiffany medallion pendant in pink enamel, diamonds, and yellow gold; $12,000. 7. MISH Lexington earrings in morganite and rose gold with brown diamond pavé; $36,000.

Ca r lt on D a v i s ( Ti f f an y & C o.)

Jennifer O’Neill was born in Brazil but moved to New York City during her teenage years, when she was discovered by the Ford modeling agency. By the age of 15, she was landing on the cover of fashion magazines like Cosmopolitan and Vogue. An accomplished equestrienne, her posture served her well not only in fashion spreads but on the big screen as well: she’d eventually go on to act, in such films as Summer of ’42 and Lady Ice. She would also go on to marry—famously—nine times to eight husbands. Still, to build a jewelry collection, you needn’t marry nine times; just start slowly with some of the fabulous pieces on offer here.


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5 6 Edie Sedgwick (née Edith Minturn Sedgwick), the American heiress, socialite, and fashion model, was probably best known as one of Andy Warhol’s muses and the star of several of his ’60s short films. She was an instantaneous “It” girl and was even bestowed the title of “Youthquaker” by Vogue magazine. Edie was named after her father’s aunt, Edith Minturn, who had eminently been painted with her husband, Isaac Newton Phelps-Stokes, by John Singer Sargent. This season, string on some statement jewelry and make a Sedgwick-worthy (not to mention a Sargent-worthy) entrance when hitting the holiday party circuit.

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1. MADEWELL Sparklecluster rings; $32. 2. IVANKA TRUMP FINE JEWELRY Metropolis ring in yellow gold and diamonds; $2,700. 3. MARCO BICEGO Oneof-a-kind necklace in yellow gold, sapphires, and diamonds; $56,270. 4. E.A. BURNS Origins necklace in Rhodoïd and gold; $89. 5. WEMPE Helioro XS BY KIM white-gold ($938) pendant on leather bracelet ($65); Blu XS BY KIM rose-gold pendant ($598) on leather bracelet ($65). 6. LALIQUE Muguet ring in rose gold, pearls, cabochons, and rose quartz; $8,500. 7. BOTTEGA VENETA The Quetsche waxed-leather gold-metal bracelet; price upon request. 8. RALPH LAUREN FINE JEWELRY Woven 7-Line ($15,000) and 5-Line ($12,000) 18-kt. gold bracelets. 9. RONI BLANSHAY Swarovski crystal earrings; $548.

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1. YVES SALOMON FOR OPENING CEREMONY Yves Salomon’s director, Thomas Salomon, got together with Opening Ceremony to offer up an army jacket in three fun-colored furs; $2,088 at Opening Ceremony boutiques. 2. MM6 MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA MM6’s fur-printed coat is a sure standout this season; $755 at barneys.com 3. RALPH LAUREN Always a classic: the leather trim quilted jacket by Ralph Lauren; $145 at lordandtaylor.com. 4. RACHEL ZOE For when it’s not freezing: Rachel Zoe’s 100-percent cotton Mena coat; $525. 5. CÉLINE Turn heads in this luxurious leather coat by Céline;

Winter’s Wondercoats Marianne Faithfull’s character in 1968 film The Girl On a Motorcycle loved two things (besides bikes, of course): fur and leather. After all, what fashion-forward woman doesn’t share Faithfull’s fancies? This winter, we’ve found a great selection of jackets and coats, in all types of fabrics and materials, to keep you looking cool and confident (and feeling warm) this season. Get ready to rev up your wardrobe!

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price upon request. 6. PRADA The embellished natte silk coat made a big statement on the runway; $5,820 at select Prada boutiques or prada.com.

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Best Foot Forward Isabella Rossellini, daughter of Ingrid Bergman and Roberto Rossellini, defined her own rich vocabulary of style. As an actress, her roles could be both tasteful and toned-down or kitschy and curious. That said, she was never afraid to articulate allure when it came to her films or fashions. To honor the woman as diverse as Rossellini, here’s a mix of shoes to kick winter off on the right foot.

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1. MICHAEL KORS Strap into Michael Kors’ Vienna wedge and turn the world into your own personal runway; $650 at select Michael Kors stores. 2. PRADA Mystery meets mode in Prada’s mint green and red sandal with lug sole; price upon request. 3. CARMEN MARC VALVO Simple elegance: The Luann pump in black and gold; price upon request. 4. ISOLÁ Going somewhere warm this winter? Be sure to pack Isolá’s Delanna shoe in leather with adjustable buckle and raffia-wrapped heel; $199.95. 5. TOD’S The metallic silver leather pump; $645. 6. CARLO PAZOLINI Pure Pazolini: The copper pump; $345 at Carlo Pazolini SoHo. 7. OSCAR DE LA RENTA Polka dots, practically an Oscar de la Renta patent, always add a sprinkle of playfulness to any outfit. And with the Mimi pump you can spike any formal look with a dash of fun; $625.

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S T Y L E BOOTS

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Jane Fonda: There’s no denying that Jane Fonda, especially in her role as the blonde bombshell Barbarella in the 1968 film of the same title, knew how to boot it up. In fact, it was Fonda’s sci-fi character that sparked our inspiration this season. The result? The best Barbarella-esque boots, mined from the chicest collections, to suit your unique style this winter. “Hello, pretty pretties!”

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6 1. FENDI Fuzzy fun: Fendi’s fur-trimmed calf-hair shoe boots are sure to delight this winter; $1,700 at barneys.com. 2. STUART WEITZMAN Stuart Weitzman’s Highland boot in black suede speaks sexy fluently, but these thigh-high wonders are also quite comfortable; $750. 3. KORK-EASE The Shawana boot by Kork-Ease in full-grain leather combines a trendy Western boot with a modern kinked wedge; $295. 4. ALTUZARRA Dress to kill in the black nappa and patent leather thigh-high boot by Gianvito Rossi for Altuzarra; $3,090. 5. BORN CROWN The Krissa bootie in mulberry has a chic, rugged edge; price upon request. 6. J.CREW Practical, smart, and stylish: J.Crew’s leather ankle boot with side strap; available at jcrew.com.

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Carrying It With Grace

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Grace Kelly led a model life, from pristine beauty of the silver screen to Her Serene Highness, the Princess of Monaco. Kelly’s natural calm and poise were only accentuated by her steady fashion sense. Besides Hermès scarves, one of her favorite accessories was an Hermès bag known as the sac à dépêches, which she carried so frequently that the luxury house eventually rechristened it the Kelly bag. This season, choose wisely; your handbag may just be your saving grace.

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1. ASPREY The Darcy Square with faded jade croc side panels and raffia weave front panel; $11,400. 2. NANCY GONZALEZ This blue crocodile tote is available by custom order at Bergdorf Goodman; $3,750. 3. MILLY The Mercer Watersnake satchel in black and white; $465. 4. J.CREW Sleek and architectural with custom-developed leather, gold hardware, and suede trim inside, the Claremont Tote in brigade blue is current yet classic; $298. 5. RALPH LAUREN Insipred by a vintage English Cooper saddle carrier, the iconic Ricky 33 now comes in a soft shade of sage; $3,500. 6. ROGER VIVIER The U Look Shopper Small in white leather; $3,050. 7. CH CAROLINA HERRERA Take a minute and check out CH’s Minueto bag in leather; $895. 8. EMPORIO ARMANI This season, Emporio Armani offers bags in luxurious leathers and skins; at armani.com.

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To Clutch & To Hold Diana, Princess of Wales, seemed to develop before our very eyes from a shy little bird into an unapologetically radiant swan; as her hairstyles grew shorter by the year, so did her hemlines. She could beguile in just about anything, from a tiara and tulle ball gown to a cocktail dress and cutting-edge heels. One accessory she never abandoned—and which she pulled off so well—was the clutch. We, like Diana, believe a little clutch can go a long way...

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1. JIMMY CHOO The Cloud in black lace printed over gold-mirror leather; $1,695. 2. RALPH LAUREN Made in Italy, this exotic lizard RL logo clutch, with a luxurious satin lining and naval-inspired “RL” filigree, will hold your essential items in opulent style; $2,950. 3. VBH This shiny black crocodile clutch with black satin ribbon from VBH is a real show-stopper; $4,250. 4. BOTTEGA VENETA The walnut Intreccio Impero Ayers Stretch Knot, a timeless classic of artisanal craftsmanship; $1,750. 5. J.CREW Slim and sleek, the Mirror Metallic Bar Clutch comes with removable wrist strap and key ring; $148. 6. MARNI This silver bag with flap closure is the perfect accoutrement to make any ensemble sparkle and shine; $780.

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Keep Your Cool Humphrey Bogart played the private investigator Sam Spade in John Huston’s The Maltese Falcon, a 1941 Warner Brothers film noir based on the novel of the same title by Dashiell Hammett. The story follows the San Francisco–based private detective and his dealings with three underhanded schemers, all of whom are vying for a jewel-encrusted falcon statuette. Though we didn’t find any jewel-encrusted falcons this time of year, we did find some very smart accessories for him that are worth keeping an eye on.

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2 1. BURTON Hit the slopes with a Burton Barracuda snowboard; $499.95. 2. ASPREY The Tech attaché in oxblood luxe calf; $4,000. 3. GHURKA Get a grip with Ghurka’s driver gloves in walnut leather; $195. 4. SMYTHSON It promises to be a good year with Smythson’s navy Mara Portobello 2014 diary; $355. 5. BOTTEGA VENETA Walk this way in these espresso calf-suede shoes; $940. 6. JAMES PERSE Luxury at its softest: cashmere double-stripe knit blanket; $995. 7. CHRISTOFLE Croco d’Argent sterling-silver business card holder; $710. 8. PRATESI You’ll want to lounge forever in Pratesi’s Three-Lines cotton robe; $790. 9. TIFFANY & CO. The Century ice bucket with Paloma Picasso’s sterling-silver ice tongs (price upon request) and plaid square decanter in crystal ($180). 10. DRAKE’S LONDON Stripe and polka-dot scarf; $275.

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D av i d La w re n ce (Ti f f an y & C o. )

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At Every Step, A Lady

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Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis was a woman of impeccable taste:

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whether hosting official state dinners for foreign dignitaries or merely out on the town for a little shopping and strolling, the former first lady earned icon status for style. We think Mrs. Onassis would have been happy taking home a few of these new must-haves on the market, from a Cartier clock to gold-leafed crystal glasses by Aerin Lauder.

1. ERDEM Lloyd’s lace silk gauze scarf; $510. 2. CARTIER A one-of-ten limited-edition blue enamel clock from Cartier with sterling silver and guilloché décor; price upon request. 3. MULBERRY Bayswater Clutch Wallet; $850. 4. TIFFANY & CO. Every girl’s room deserves the Tiffany Fifth Avenue Box, in bone china; $100. 5. AERIN Crystal glasses with 24-kt. gold-leaf base; $280 for set of 4. 6. LADURÉE Makes sense that Ladurée should make such delicious scents: Licorice ($62) and Ispahan ($69) candles. 7. KATE SPADE Liven up

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cocktail hour with the Pierrepont Place bar set; $50. 8. MADEWELL Charge up in style with the Triple C iBoost backup battery; $39.50. 9. BARTON PERREIRA Talk about hot pink: Barton Perreira’s Feldon glasses in coral; $395.

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M E N ’ S A P PA R E L

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Time To Bundle Up John F. Kennedy, Jr. inhereted all the extroverted charm and charisma of his father with a sense of style from his mother—albeit more modern and sometimes daring. He could be found biking shirtless throughout New York City in the warmer months (why not accessorize with six-pack abs if you’ve got them?), or layered during chillier times in a classic coat set off by colorful accents (like a statement scarf and cap). This winter, take some time to bundle up in a striking style all your own.

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1. GANT Stay warm in this down parka ($425), herringbone peak-lapel blazer ($575), and knit cap ($45) by GANT Rugger. 2. BILLY REID Multi-tone shawl-collar cardigan in chunky merino wool; $350. 3. RALPH LAUREN Get the look: brown oil-cloth coat ($695), navy Fair Isle sweater ($265), and gray wool trousers ($198) by Polo Ralph Lauren. 4. DIESEL BLACK GOLD The Ki-Antony sweater, a long wool cardigan coat; $555. 5. GUCCI Autumn-caramello vintage shearling jacket with calf details ($7,100) and gray wool-and-alpaca turtleneck sweater ($545). 6. TOMMY HILFIGER From color-blocking to plaid, and all prints in between, Tommy Hilfiger has the coat for you; visit usa.tommy.com. 7. MICHAEL BASTIAN This Italian Military Blanket Toggle jacket offers a modern twist on the classic prep staple; $995. 8. BURBERRY PRORSUM Keep it bright in this bright red reversible stripe jacket ($2,195) and animal-print Chelsea boots ($950). 9. VALENTINO Abstract houndstooth belted coat; $4,280.

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F O R R E S E R VAT I O N S P L E A S E C A L L 1. 8 8 8.5.C H AT WA L • T H E C H AT WA L N Y.C O M T H E C H AT WA L N E W Y O R K • T H E L A M B S C L U B • R E D D O O R S PA 13 0 W E S T 4 4T H S T R E E T, N E W Y O R K , N Y 10 036


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This page: Jim Carrey and Lauren Hutton star in Once Bitten (1985). > Opposite page: Lauren Hutton in Little Fauss and Big Halsy, a 1970 film directed by Sidney J. Furie.

“I don’t think I’ll ever cut my face. Because once I cut it I’ll never know where I’ve been.” So said super-model-actress-make-up mogul Lauren Hutton, back in the day. To this day, I believe Hutton has stayed true to this mantra. She remains a beautiful woman, but a real woman—lines and creases and the passage of life on that fabulous face. Born in South Carolina, schooled at the University of Tampa and then Tulane University (graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree), Hutton, born Mary Laurence Hutton, arrived in New York City and was almost instantly snapped up by Ford Models. This had not been Hutton’s dream, but few

by

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Liz Smith

turn down the opportunity offered by a top modeling agency. Problem? Miss Hutton’s nose (a bit crooked) and her smile (she had an obvious gap between her two front teeth). Solution? None was necessary, as far as Hutton was concerned. She stared down the fearsome Eileen Ford and declared her nose stayed crooked and her gap was there for the world to see. (When given caps to conceal the gap, she often swallowed them!) She became a fresh-faced new look in beauty and modeling. Wiry, athletic, and golden-hued, she graced the cover of Vogue a record 26 times! Along with movie stars such as Barbra Streisand, Hutton re-defined what was “beautiful” in the new world of women’s images. You could be this, or you could be that. And “that” didn’t have to be anything we’d

Pa ram o un t P i ctu re s

Living Legend Lauren Hutton


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

This page: Lauren Hutton and Burt Reynolds in Gator (1976). > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Four photos of Lauren Hutton photographed by Richard Avedon for U.S. Vogue in 1968; Lauren Hutton by Gianni Penati, 1968; Mary-Kate Olsen with Lauren Hutton at The Standard Hotel in New York, 2008; Lauren Hutton and James Caan in The Gambler (1974); Lauren Hutton photographed by Fred Seidman in Zihuatanejo, Mexico, 1968; Marisa Berenson, Andy Warhol, Lauren Hutton, and Mikhail Baryshnikov at a fashion show in New York City, 1982 (as photographed by Christopher Makos); Lauren Hutton and Richard Gere star in American Gigolo (1980); Hutton photographed by Fred Seidman in Mexico, 1968.

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Above: Lauren Hutton for Ultima II. Inset, right: Hutton in an ad for Revlon, featured in Seventeen, October, 1967. > Opposite page: Lauren Hutton and Michael Pollard in a scene from Little Fauss and Big Halsy (1970).

seen before. (“When she walks into a room, you know you’re looking at a star,” said Eileen Ford.) Naturally, Hutton’s looks and fame tempted Hollywood. She debuted in Paper Lion in 1968 and received positive (“she’s not just a model!”) notices for her turn in The Gambler in 1974. Had her fame as a “face” not been so pervasive, Hutton’s movie career might have progressed with more vigor. She had a good, raw talent; tremendous likeability; and a husky, distinctive voice. She is actually best remembered for her witty turn as an anxious vampire in 1985’s Once Bitten (co-starring a young Jim Carrey). Of course many recall her fondly in what was once a racy film, American Gigolo. (They also recall Richard Gere’s then-startling frontal nudity; it was shadowy and from a distance, but there it was!) At age 61, she was still an iconic beauty, posing nude for Big magazine. She explained this decision as an effort to make women “not ashamed of themselves when they are in bed.” (One assumes she meant in bed with somebody other than themselves.) Hutton always maintained an air of reticence and reserve. She never married, and did not make a spectacle of whatever romances she might have had. Her most significant relationship was with Bob Williamson, her manager. Together they traveled the world, had many adventures. And for all her independent

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This page: Lauren Hutton was featured in Sidney J. Furieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Fauss and Big Halsy (1970), which starred Robert Redford and Michael J. Pollard in a comedy-drama about the exploits of two motorcycle riders. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Lauren Hutton for EstĂŠe Lauder, 1973; Richard Gere and Lauren Hutton in a scene from American Gigolo (1980); James Caan and Lauren Hutton at a craps table in The Gambler (1974); Lauren Hutton photographed by Gianni Penati, 1967; Lauren Hutton in Big magazine, 2005; Hutton for Chanel No. 5, 1968; Lauren Hutton in New York, 1970; Hutton wrestling an alligator, photographed by Helmut Newton for Vanity Fair, 1989; Hutton as model; Lauren Hutton and Richard Gere at the premiere of American Gigolo (1980); Lauren Hutton and Karen Graham photographed by Richard Avedon for U.S. Vogue, July 1973.

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nature, he ruled her choices—her clothes, her work, her money. When they parted, after 26 years, Hutton was stunned to learn he had frittered away $13 million of her money! (Trust is a wonderful quality—until it’s not.) Hutton launched a successful make-up line in 2000 (this after a fearful motorcycle accident.) She actually once appeared at my apartment door, bearing samples of her beauty line! We’d written about it, and she was grateful and wanted to offer some to me as a gift. (I believe the doorman was so stunned he forgot to call up and announce her!) Lauren was utterly charming— but then, I already knew that. Still, my small staff were just blown away. And even more so when, the next day, she sent more make-up kits for them. Hutton continues to be active and a face of—having a face! A real face. Despite her own disappointment in the matter of

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a relationship, Lauren Hutton remains a bracing image of a woman leading her own life. There is nothing coy or cloying about her. That she was a symbol of the most superficial and unsatisfying of all professions seems absurd, to meet her now— or at any time. Her handshake is firm. Her gaze un-shifting. You feel comforted (or wary) that she will tell you exactly what she thinks of you. Her vibe is electric and human and forwardthinking. She is one of the best people to run into at an event: refreshingly normal, and she always has some new and exciting adventure she just came from, or is about to embark upon. But she rarely talks directly about herself—it’s always where she’s been, what it was like. She’s a “big picture” kind of gal. Even if you know her a little bit (perhaps you’ve only spoken to her on the phone), five words by the late photographer Francesco Scavullo sum her up: “She is not a phony.” u


Opposite page, left to right: Lauren Hutton in Mexico in the mid-â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, photographed by Fred Seidman; Hutton modeling for Vogue, 1967; Hutton starring as Kate Morgan in Viva Knievel! (1977). > This page, clockwise from top left: Lauren Hutton by Arnaud de Rosnay for Paris Vogue, 1970; Lauren Hutton during the 52nd Annual Academy Awards, 1980; Lauren Hutton by Richard Avedon for Vogue, 1973; Lauren Hutton by Richard Avedon for Vogue, 1973; Lauren Hutton by Gianni Penati for Vogue, 1968; autographed photo of the actress; Hutton at the 47th Annual Academy Awards, 1975; Hutton in a chiffon caftan by Halston, photographed by Richard Avedon for U.S. Vogue, 1973.


This page, clockwise from top left: Lauren Hutton plays Fiona McNeil in the television drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nip/Tuckâ&#x20AC;?; Hutton even makes buying pens seem sexy in this ad for Bic; Hutton modeling a Halston evening gown; Hutton smiles for the camera in the August 1975 Vogue; Hutton in the 1985 American horror-comedy film Once Bitten. > Opposite page: Lauren Hutton and Burt Reynolds in Gator.


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Shoshanna Gruss, in the showroom of her eponymous line, displaying the Spring 2014 and Resort 2014 collections.


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Going All In by photographed by

L i ly H o a g l a n d

Ben Fink Shapiro

Shoshanna Gruss is a classic example of a woman turning her problem inside out and transforming it into her major asset. Growing up as a short and buxom young woman, she had trouble finding dresses and swimsuits that fit both her figure and her youthful sense of self. She trained to join the world of finance but, right before she was due to begin going down that road, she changed course. She decided what she really wanted to do was fill a void in fashion and create clothes for women like herself. She asked her father, Zach Lonstein, the CEO of Infocrossing, what he thought about her idea to create her own line. “You don’t even know what you don’t know about this business and what you’re doing,” he said, but then gave her full support for her sharp turn into the unknown. “I don’t think I’ve ever had anything in my life like that, where I was so totally driven forward. It did not matter if I WINTER 2014/

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This page: After 15 years in the business, Shoshanna is now one of the favorite designers for women who like something flattering with attention to detail. > Opposite: A model wearing Shoshanna’s Sierra Gown, with a scalloped V-neckline and hem, at the Garment District showroom.

hit a wall, hit a wall, hit a wall—I just kept going forward. I was going to make this happen.” She began her eponymous fashion line, Shoshanna, by making her own samples and shopping them around town until she sold pieces to Bloomingdale’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Barneys. The demand was immediate. Her flattering designs for female figures were picked up by Manhattan’s social set and Hollywood celebrities, sparking more than a few “Who Wore It Better?” side-by-side comparisons. Her showroom in the Garment District, which began as two closets, is now a large warren of offices that keeps expanding. On the day of our shoot, the place was buzzing with young women tossing around pieces of fabric, PR people answering phones, and opinions voiced by all corners. Slipping around the commotion, I could see signs of the exponential growth that had taken over the past 15 years: the place is, forgive the pun, bursting at the seams. And, in the middle of it all, is Shoshanna herself. “I enjoy it,” she says. “I thrive from the chaos.” She bounces around the showroom, as involved in the endeavor as when she first started. Racks of rose shift

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dresses and kelly green bikinis cover the walls, alongside little one-pieces from her children’s line, which Shoshanna started after the birth of her now eight-year-old daughter, Sienna. (Shoshanna says her daughter is more rock-and-roll than she is. A drummer in a band, Sienna had asked her mom to find a chain wallet to wear for an upcoming show.) As a fashion designer, mother, and philanthropist, she throws herself into non-stop days. Even at an early-morning interview, she is going full tilt. “Oh, I’ve already had four cups of coffee,” she says with a broad smile, and raising a well-sculpted but skeptical eyebrow at my pot of decaf. Besides her career and family, Shoshanna makes room for her philanthropy work. She is chair of the associates committee of The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), organizing the society’s fundraising events and charity drives. At their Winter Ball, many of her fellow Society members told me how much time and effort Shoshanna puts into her volunteer work and how she also expects the same back from them. She makes it clear that the Society is not for women who thought this was just an entrée into social life, but a cause to really work for. As she swans around the room in a Carolina Herrera dress, she is greeted with smiles from the people she will convince to donate tens of thousands of dollars for MSKCC’s pediatrics department that night. Her ability to shine in different scenarios echoes the philosophy behind her designs. Her dresses are made with an eye for beauty but also for what will make a woman feel good. “We try to be inclusive of all body types and be celebratory,” she explains. “Because I was very shapely, sometimes people would make me feel uncomfortable, and I don’t think that’s fair to do to any kind of woman. We want women to feel sexy and confident. That’s my goal.” Luckily for the women wearing her dresses, goals are those things that Shoshanna accomplishes at least five of before breakfast. u For more information, visit www.shoshanna.com.


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Fashion Springs Ahead A l e x R . T ra v e r s

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Elizabeth Meigher

C ou r te sy o f re sp e cti ve de si gn e r s

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J a s o n Wu

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N a r c i s o Ro d r i g u e z Lacoste

3.1 Phillip Lim

White While white will always be winsome, it’s also crisp and elegant. This season, it resembled effortless glamour—and what could be better for

somewhere warm? Grace Kelly, with all her charming, w from Hollyw ell, grace... ood star to escalated true royalty . And in our she’ll alway minds, s personify loveliness.

Ra l p h L a u re n

Dennis Basso

A l e x a n d e r Wa n g

Damir Doma

a winter getaway


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Saint Laurent

Lacoste

wn r ly k n o p o p u la re o s. 0 m n, g in g ’6 Lawso e s w in e s le y th L f l o e l d o b h mo . ex sym E n g li s in b lu e u te d s n n in g fu l B r it u n d is p ti n T h e s tu u a a s e b wa o f th is ig g y,” e h e re a s “ Tw e im a g th re o We a d


Fe l i p e O l i ve i ra B a p t i s t a

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Blue It’s the color that

G i o rg i o A r m a n i

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Chloé

Nina Ricci

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always pops: elegantly on model Vanessa Axente in a DvF column (directly above), and playfully on Prabal’s

Prabal Gurung

B o t t e g a Ve n e t a

Fe n d i

dulterated fun (below).

Ke n z o

M a x M a ra

Misha Nonoo

spring parable on una-

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Red Red was red hot for spring: a new portrait of power spiked

P h ot 0 C re di t

Marni Sacai

sporty or soignĂŠ.

D i a n e vo n Fu r s t e n b e rg

Elie Saab

Miu Miu

sexy, whether

J. Mendel

with a whole lot of


Bibhu Mohapatra

Ve ra Wa n g

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El iz ab et h Ta yl or w as a m us e fo w ho st ar re r m an y, a fi er y ho t ac d in st ud io fi lm s su ch tr es s an d G ia nt as Cl eo pa . H er eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to tr a, Th e Bi an ot he r pl g Co un tr y, ac e in th e su n, Li z!

To d â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Proenza Schouler

C ou r te sy o f re sp e cti ve de si gn e r s

To m m y H i l f i g e r

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Fra n c e s c o S c o g n a m i g l i o

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Stella McCartney

Blumarine

Mulberry

A . P. C .

J. Mendel

Naeem Khan

Adeam

Lanvin

Katie Ermilio

Bl us h w it h en vy : Ti pp i H ed re n, by Ed it h H dr es se d ea d, de sc en ds a st ai rc in Al fr ed H as e it ch co ck â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 19 64 fi lm M ar in e.


Blush Marked by its smart subtlety, this skin-toned color was wildly

Giorgio Armani even

collection to it. Bravo!

Ra l p h L a u r e n

dedicated an entire Armani PrivĂŠ

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popular on the runways.


Marchesa

Ra l p h L a u re n

Haider Ackermann

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Black We’ll let the fabrics and textures do the talking here: French laces, lovely leathers, plissé pleating—this season, as always,

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J a s o n Wu

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Christian Dior

it’s all back in black.


We s G o r d o n Va l e n t i n o

C ou r te sy o f re sp e cti ve de si gn e r s

B o t t e g a Ve n e t a

no ir, Li ke fi lm da rk ne ss : su ch as , Sh ad ow s, ic at m ci ne n al so be ca s he il da . ot cl w or th in G on R it a H ay th is dr es s


Scuba These zippered, lasercut, and body-hugging neoprenes came at us with a get-’em urgency that put the stylish “scuba” look front and center in this season’s

To m m y H i l f i g e r

3.1 Phillip Lim

athletic pool. Dive in!

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k e th is c h ic ” li r in “s c u b a s ll e Auge a in c d u g re e s s C la N o th in . tr c ll a a h rb c Thunde o f F re n im a g e n d fi lm mes Bo Ja 4 6 9 th e 1


Mary Katrantzou

Emilio Pucci

Hervé Léger by Max Azria

Ve ro n i c a B e a r d

C o u r te sy o f re sp e ctive de sign e rs

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Giving Thanks At 583 Park

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by

Elizabeth Meigher

photographed by

P at r i c k M c M u ll a n

A Rosy Thanksgiving Husband and wife team Alex Lind Rose and Louis Rose hosted a pre-Thanksgiving celebration at Mr. Rose’s renowned private event space, 583 Park Avenue, to celebrate the season and thank friends and family who supported them throughout the year. The landmarked buiding, host to some of New York’s biggest charity galas, weddings, and cocktail parties—not to mention a number of prominent New York Fashion Week shows (Oscar de la Renta, Jason Wu, and Naeem Khan, to name a few)—was in full swing the night of November 22nd. New York State Assemblyman Dan Quart spoke, as did the evening’s host, Louis Rose; Vince Giordano & the Nighthawks played, while chef John Stevenson prepared delicious bites for all to enjoy. It’s safe to say that all went home happy and excited for the holidays to begin. u


This page, clockwise from top left: Paula Del Rio; Jeep Post, Jessica Post, Marietta Rose, and Andrew Silverman; Nicole Hanley Mellon, Alexandra Lind Rose, and Amy Raiter Dwek; David and Claire Maxwell; Lisa Anastos; Andrew and Shannon Smith; Anna Silverman and Marietta Rose; Michael Quinn and Elizabeth Belfer; Alex Lind Rose and Louis Rose. > Opposite page: Emily Parker and Danny Dinella.


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This page, clockwise from top left: Darren and Lisa Friedman; Kiliaen Van Rensselaer; Bo Dietl; Aria and Richard Neuman; Gal and Michael Jurick; Georgina Schaeffer and Reed McIlvaine; Agnes Bielska and Dana Auslander; N.Y. State Assemblyman Dan Quart; Amy Raiter Dwek and Dana Auslander; John Rose embracing a friend.

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This page, clockwise from top left: Marietta and Bert Rose; Kris Connell, George Plamondon, Julia Goodman, Jennifer Plamondon, Alex Norton, and Ashley Norton; Jennifer Creel and Hilary Dick; Loulie Walker and Marc Rice; Bill Spinner and Jana Rosencran; Graceann Bennett, Kristina Stewart Ward, and Adelina Wong Ettelson; Jon and Elizabeth Kurpis; Nicole and Matthew Mellon; Roberto and Isabel Mendoza.


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This page: The Goldfish Wrapper ($150). > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The Spine Bracelet in sterling silver ($178); the Cut Above Scissor Love pendant in gold brass ($100); Feather ring in gold brass ($48); the Vampire Luck gold-brass charm ($90).

Jewelry’s Meatier Side by

The East Village is viewed, to an extent, as a port of creativity, given the tides of cultures that have washed the area throughout its history—and the streets are decked with such evidence. Verameat, located on East 9th Street between First and Second avenues, is an example, echoing the very essence of the East Village with its jewelry, which is as inspired and spunky as its surroundings. “I have lived in the East Village for several years and I love it,” says Vera Balyura, the designer, who was born in the Ukraine

Elizabeth Quinn Brown

before pursuing a career as a model. “The area has a history of allowing artistic expression so it’s perfect for Verameat.” Verameat is, of course, derived from Vera’s name, but “it’s the ‘meatier’ side of jewelry,” she explains, riffing on the number of animals featured throughout the collection: the Ibsen’s Buck earrings, for starters, are a couple of deer with antlers, and the Animal Farm necklace is a pendant designed with a sheep, a goat, and a cow. “We also have really wild animal combinations like the Hipshark [a hybrid of a hippopotamus and a shark] and


Co u r te sy o f Ve ra m e at

dinosaurs that appeal to edgy kids.” Animals may be the meat of the endeavor, but the cheekiness of the brand extends beyond. “Currently, we have a new ear cuff called Metal Petal and it just looks so badass when you wear it,” explains Vera. “One of my favorite pieces of all time is an early design of mine with two Sumo wrestlers who look like they’re fighting, but they’re actually kissing.” And while the company has expanded to stores in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, the DNA is decidedly East Village. “I

am inspired by everything New York has to offer, culturally. I love going to museums and seeing films—or even just taking my dog, Fred, for a walk and seeing people walk by,” says Vera of the process. “If an object or idea inspires me, I just think about whether or not it will work as jewelry and sketch it and make it.” Perhaps that is the key to why the pieces resonate with people—they are tokens of the city, a city bathed in irreverence and quirkiness and, sometimes, a delightful bit of darkness. u WINTER 2014/

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Examples of Vreeland’s memos, including one to Countess Consuelo Crespi in Rome and one detailing what she means by a “flat sole.”

Now Take Note by

Diana Vreeland: Arbiter elegantiarum. Tastemaker. Grande dame. Une originale. Neologist. Jolie laide. “The all-seeing.” “The most hideous thing in the world” (according to herself). “The Divine Mrs. V” (according to the press). To put it mildly, Diana Vreeland was many things, but she has been remembered most—immortalized even—as the ne plus ultra editor of the ultimate fashion magazine. Vreeland, whose publishing career began in 1936 as a columnist for Harper’s Bazaar, reigned as editor-in-chief of Vogue from 1963 until 1971. She transformed the publication from a glossy society magazine

Daniel Cappello

into a daring, fresh, and utterly contemporary U.S. fashion staple. She sought out the finest photographers, pored over every detail of every page, and single-handedly masterminded the look, tone, and impact of the magazine. In short, she took a magazine with a longstanding title and turned it into Vogue. And now, to shed light on her voracious appetite for ingenuity and beauty, Vreeland’s grandson, Alexander Vreeland, has compiled a book of her original memos, Diana Vreeland Memos: The Vogue Years (Rizzoli). Marked by her signature irreverence and legendary over-the-top pronouncements, her letters are a


Ed i te d b y Ale xa n de r Vre el an d, R i z zo li , N e w Yo rk , 2 013

© Ja m e s Ka ra le s; © D i a n a Vre e l an d Me m o s: T h e Vo gue Ye ar s

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This page: Vogue editor

at a drawing with Cecil

Diana Vreeland looks

Beaton in 1965.

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Above: The writer and Vogue contributor Truman Capote discusses a project with Diana Vreeland in 1965. > Opposite page: Examples of Vreeland’s memos, including one about the so-called gypsy look, one to Richard Avedon, and one to Cecil Beaton; the cover of Alexander Vreeland’s new book, Diana Vreeland Memos: The Vogue Years (Rizzoli).

think this title—‘the greatest living’ isn’t a bit much? ‘George Balanchine, the Great Choreographer’ to me suffices…”). Memos offers an extraordinary compilation of more than 250 pieces of Vreeland’s canny correspondence. Her vibrant letters to photographers like Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Horst P. Horst, and Norman Parkinson explain the genesis of some of Vogue’s most celebrated stories, while her memos and letters to and about designers like Cristóbal Balenciaga, Oscar de la Renta, Valentino Garavani, Guccio Gucci, and Yves Saint Laurent provide so much more than an education in fashion—they document the mind of one of its most formidable figures. u

Ed i te d b y Ale xa n de r Vre el an d, R i z zo li , N e w Yo rk , 2 013

delightful, immersive view into her idiosyncratic intelligence. “What these magazines gave was a point of view,” she once said of fashion titles. “Most people haven’t got a point of view; they need to have it given to them—and what’s more, they expect it from you.” And, as her memos illustrate, she certainly and wholeheartedly used Vogue as a way of bestowing her singular point of view. She adamantly reminded staff of worthy trends (“I think that we can consider that the gypsy look has now gotten into the bloodstream of most people who are interested in fashion…. Let us keep at this gypsy theme and carry it on into 1970.”), chided them for glaring omissions (“I am extremely disappointed to see that we have used practically no pearls at all in the past few issues…. I speak of this very often—and as soon as I stop speaking the pearls disappear. Nothing gives the luxury of pearls. Please keep them in mind.”), and displayed a true editor’s eye for diction and language (“On page 2—would you consider changing the word ‘messy’ to ‘well worn’? Also, though I do not know of a great choreographer, don’t you really

© Ja m e s Ka ra le s; © D i a n a Vre e l an d Me m o s: T h e Vo gue Ye ar s

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New York This page: Editors, buyers, and fashion fans all take in Carolina Herrera’s Spring 2014 runway show at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week; the author’s invitation to Avenue. Opposite page: A sheer, sexy look from the designer Carmen Marc Valvo at his Spring 2014 show (above); it was mod, mod world at Ralph Lauren when model Anna Selezneva strutted down the runway in this black-and-white look (below).

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Wes Gordon’s first runway show, which took place at 269 11th


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So much about fashion these days focuses on the fleeting image of beauty. Certainly, this transience is part of any catwalk’s charm, and each city managed to capture that splendor of beauty in its own way: There was practical glamour in New York, vibrancy in London, sex appeal in Milan, and bright narratives in Paris. This season was a sure standout, filled with new and exciting ideas that both embraced and challenged fashion’s archetypal attitude. Here, we invite you to take a closer look at some of the Spring 2014 shows in each city. > Ralph Lauren is one of the most successful designers alive. He takes a practical and sophisticated approach to his collections, and then spikes them, enticingly, with rich elements of his experiences and observations. There’s no trying to turn back the clock to the glory days here. This season, a very sassy Sasha Luss opened the show with all the confidence of Monica Vitti in Modesty Blasie. The subsequent models had the same swinging-Sixties glow. Then came the first bold statement: a ribbed shift in limiest of greens. That notion gave way to a Mary Quantian sense of modishness. But it did, in fact, dovetail quite nicely with Lauren’s statements on simplicity. The first look—a black shift with a wide, white collar, knee-high socks, and patent leather Mary Janes—was witty and clever. Throughout the show, hems were high. So were necklines. Nevertheless, these details added up to some very smart pieces, particularly those sleeveless midthigh dresses in Optical art patterns. And while the silhouettes remained mostly straightforward and streamlined, movement was certainly conveyed through the prints. After the first 25 looks—all black and white or some variation of the two—Lauren developed his collection in Technicolor. (Bye-bye, Bridget Riley; Hello Josef Albers.) Then came the boisterous blues, lurid yellows, candy-colored greens. They


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New York This page, clockwise from top left: An off-duty model takes a look at the ordered stage plan, which presents the lineup for Carolina Herrera’s Spring 2014 runway show; one of Dennis Basso’s Art Deco–like furs in black and white; Ralph Lauren is met with applause after his bright Spring 2014 collection; a look from Carolina Herrera’s collection, which the designer called a “visual experience”; Sasha Luss walks out on the Michael Kors runway in a hemp raffia hand-embroidered linen dance dress; a languid skirt and V-neck top from BCBG Max Azria, always one of the season’s first shows at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week.

were best, again, in those short dresses, which stood out with unexpected clarity. But it was Lauren’s bold finale—a stunning red silk off-the-shoulder dress with a flouncy elongated cape attached—that spoke a special kind of glamour. > Dennis Basso’s show was an elegant expression of the designer’s focus on dresses this season. Naturally, there were a few furs and crocodile skins sprinkled in, many with zigzagging Art Deco–like patterns that had all the action and movement of a Baz Luhrmann film. But it was, again, the dresses that made this collection really stand out. They came, at first, in only black and white. (His textured white shift with black piping was something special.) Then, after a dozen or so looks, out came the cotton-candy colors. Two pleated, flouncy floral numbers stood out in that portion of the show. Following these, there were some artistic appliqués as well as fur vests and boleros in even kookier colors that will surely appeal to the younger generation of Basso women. Meanwhile, the final look—a full-sized gown with a veiny, tropical floral print—had a personality as large as Norma Desmond’s. For the famous Basso bow, the designer walked out to the tune of Steve Allen, a little foreshadowing of what this collection could mean for spring: “This Could be the Start of Something Big.” > Carolina Herrera described her Spring 2014 collection as a “visual experience.” It was, allegedly, in a sense that the clothes presented an impression of movement as the position of the

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New York This page, counterclockwise from top right: New York, New York; a model takes a selfie backstage with her iPhone; a view from the runway captures smiles from the audience at Dennis Basso’s Spring 2014 show at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week; a look from J. Mendel’s Spring 2014 runway show, which featured fresh and sporty fabric blends like “silk-scuba”; a look from Jason Wu’s rather refined Spring 2014 show at 82 Mercer Street in SoHo; Veronica Bread channeled Claudine Auger in the James Bond film Thunderball for their sexy Spring 2014 presentation; Wes Gordon crafts with unparalleled ease;

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a seating assignment for Wes Gordon’s first runway show (inset).


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London This page: Alexandra Martynova in one of Tom Ford’s opening looks; a look from Mary Katrantzou’s Spring 2014 runway show (inset). > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: London at night; Peter Pilotto uses crinoline, a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair, in his Spring 2014 collection; a skirt with a sheer window at Erdem; Mary Katrantzou’s Spring 2014 runway; another look from Edrem; a model sticks out her tongue (inset).

viewer changed. Perhaps that was why she referenced South American Optical artists Carlos Cruz-Diez and Jesús Rafael Soto as inspiration. Herrera’s composition here—like Soto, Cruz-Diaz, and even the Pointillist Georges Seurat—allowed the viewer’s eye to fuse colors and patterns optically. Take, for example, Lindsey Wixson’s gorgeously gauzy, ankle-length dress. The aquamarine and white don’t ever bleed into each other but rather create that buzzing kinetic illusion through layers of organza and strategic line perspective. In case that piece wasn’t enough of a retina-bending ride, out came a high-collar column in burnt orange that bore an eerie resemblance to Saul Bass’ Vertigo poster. (The Kim Novak buns on the models didn’t go unnoticed either.) But whether you fell into that Duchamp-ian hypnosis—albeit lessened— or not didn’t matter. Certainly, it wasn’t just Hitchcock’s camera techniques that made Vertigo one of his best films. As for Herrera, it wasn’t simply her expert execution of these optical illusions. It was, rather, her interpretation of art and aesthetic. She also paired those punch-drunk images down with top-notch tailoring and refined silhouettes to create a rather sophisticated, cinematic collection. And Karlie Kloss’ trompe-l’œil mock-shoulder evening gown was the standout where all the threads came together. > Tom Ford seems to imagine reality to be rather different than it is. But with his collections, he sluices away any lines between fantasy and actuality, eliminating the rote and crafting a dreamy universe dripping with excess and glamour. In short, his clothes are bold, fierce, sexy, and alive. Fittingly, Ford himself is all of these things, and out for spring came the closest thing to a full-blown portrayal of superfluous beauty. Opening the show was a stunning wide-shoulder leather blazer, so thick it looked like armor. Later the looks turned to glass: Josephine Skriver’s sparkling tesserae micro sheath conjured a Tiffany mosaic. Then came a fetishistic use of lace in the form of thigh-high lace-ups and sheer sheaths. Too busy? Absolutely not. After all, we’re the ones living inside Ford’s world, and the filigree here was symphonic. In fact, when you look at an outfit like that, you can’t help but wonder if the designer’s brain is wired in a similar manner. > Prada What makes a Prada show so compelling—aside from, of course, the clothes—is its vibrant ability to tell a story. For quite some time, Miuccia Prada has expertly braided together


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art, film, and her various passions to create a world all her own. Her sui generis sense of inventiveness remains unmatched: She shows us fashion as ritual, experience, and necessity. And, no doubt, it was all there again for Spring ’14. Before the show even started, the audience was connected to one of her ideas. Looming over the set were large-scale figurative murals, which the designer commissioned with only loose instructions for the artists: “They should focus on femininity, representation, power, and multiplicity.” Many of those images on the walls were replicated on the clothes and handbags. Prada’s world went from being fabricated to being familiar. Throughout the fiery blaze of the collection, there was a sporty feel: those varsity leg warmers and skirts—sure hits— oozed athleticism. Shapley shifts and classic coats were robust, some flashing West Side Story–esque symbols where each model, based on the color of a feather she carried, was assigned to some sort of strata. But even if the models were rebels, members of dulling gangs, the whole of the show somehow came together perfectly. After all, it’s not like Miuccia Prada to present some hackneyed image of a hot-button issue. In the finale, Amanda Murphy showed us just how provoking her animated parabolic-cut sheath could be. Mark this down as one of this season’s best.

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> Giorgio Armani Airiness? Armani? Certainly, this collection was not something you’d only want to see on the hangers. Too much dynamism, especially in those sheer, languid fabrics that spoke dissentingly to the rigid tailoring we’ve witnessed in the past. And this time around, the collection’s gentle qualities worked wonders. There were other pacific touches throughout. The hairstyles, for instance, looked like Marcel waves at the mercy of the open road’s wind—an image as delightfully carefree as it was stylish. Additionally, the collection’s color palette was tasteful and toned-down. There were meditative blues and pinks, and they were entirely inviting. But before that blast of James Turrell-ian hues, Armani focused on his practically patented greige. His herringbone blazer-and-shorts combo was quite pleasant. Ditto for the buttery soft leather blazer with narrow shawl lapel. Then, Armani did something we rarely see at contemporary shows anymore. He crowded his catwalk with two or three models walking out side by side, their outfits often in similar compositions. It had the effect of one of Warhol’s multiple “Marilyns” in the sense that we do, in fact, all idolize the star, but maybe you like her more in pink, and I like her best in blue. You had your pick when Pauline Hoarau, Ophelie Guillermand, and Katlin Aas strutted out in those billowy wraps—one blue, one white, one


Milan This page, clockwise from top left: Versace’s sporty Spring 2014 runway show; a look from Armani’s Spring 2014 runway show; Lindsey Wixson modeling for DSQUARED, which echoed Las Vegas in the 1960s; Prada Spring 2014; another Giorgio Armani look. > Opposite page: The city of Milan; a Prada bag from Spring 2014, which highlighted “femininity, representation, power, and multiplicity” (inset).


Paris This page: clockwise from top left: Louis Vuitton designer Marc Jacobs takes cue from the Rolling Stones and paints his collection black; another look from Jacobsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; last show for Louis Vuitton; Edie Campbell leads the Vuitton army of models out on the runway. > Opposite page, from left: The Eiffel Tower; Edie Campbell modeling for Saint Laurent; a look from Diorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring 2014 runway show.

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pink—and oversized, razor-thin hats. Some entrance. Like the Art Nouveau movement, Armani seemed to have combined the fine and applied arts with this collection, which echoed those oxblood-glazed ceramics of the time. After all, the Art Nouveau movement claimed, “Art should be a way of life.” Surely, wearing this collection could help personify that statement. > Louis Vuitton Marc Jacbos has spent 16 years transforming the once “luggage-and-leather-luxury-goods-only” line, Louis Vuitton into the all-encompassing lifestyle brand it is today. His style is smart and bold, imaginative and fantastical: It usually incorporates a What Ever Happened to Baby Jane–like

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sense of showmanship, often evocative of other times and places that may or may not even exist; a Lynchian hotel; a glowing merry-go-round; the “Jacobs Express.” So, for his final collection for Louis Vuitton, Jacobs rounded up all those old sets and painted them black. And his laconic dedication— “To the showgirl in all of us”—reminded the audience why we’re all so fascinated with the designer: His cerebral creations translate into magnificent and daring styles. In a sense, this show was quite theatrical. Take, for instance, Edie Campbell’s unforgettable entrance: a woman chained and tagged, wearing nothing but Stephen Sprouse’s graffitied Vuitton logo. In this work you felt the spirit of rebellion, the pleasure of moments at the edge of fashion. But there were also subtler finds to delight in, like a moto jacket with appliquéd ostrich or those clever jeans with sheer organza windows. Since his start, Jacobs has been unsystematically finding his way, etching a wild path in fashion’s history books with a vengeance. And in a month filled with multipart surprises— some absolutely marvelous—at that moment, Jacobs ruled the roost. u


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Friends of Finn—a committee within the Humane Society of the United States that was founded by Amanda Hearst to stop the inhumane treatment of dogs in puppy mills— hosted “To the Rescue!” at the Bowery Hotel on November 15. The event was organized by Amanda Hearst with friends Georgina Bloomberg and Kimberly Ovitz, and raised funds for rescue efforts as well as educational and public awareness initiatives. At the end of the evening, guests could agree on a barking good time—one that raised $1.6 million for the Humane Society of the United States!

1. John Glatt, Alex Bal, Gina Torry, Alex Gannes, Savina Voyadjieva, and Roni Elchahal 2. Dena Lewittes and Eric Kroll 3. Wendy Dubbeld, Christina van Hengel, and Christine Coverford 4. Huga Linares, Philip Cortina, and Alonso Aznar 5. Hannah Bronfman and Genevieve Bahrenburg 6. Hannah Bibb, Shana O’Rourke, and John Lehman 7. Polly Franklinson, Tripp Callan, and Mallane Stanbury 8. Amanda Hearst with friends

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To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Neapolitan Collection, the ultra-luxe boutique in Chicago’s suburbs, Meredith Wood-Prince opened up her gorgeous home to some of the store’s designers and a few of her friends. And what a party it was! She toasted the young women’s wear designer, Wes Godron, on his first runway show by decorating her home in lilacs, a color Gordon used a lot of in his most recent collection. One of Wood-Prince’s favorite jewelry designers, Irene Neuwirt, was also celebrating a decade in business. To say cheers, Wood-Prince served Neuwirth’s favorite drink: tequila.

1. Kelly Golden 2. Sherman Wood-Prince 3. Jennifer McKinney 4. Jacky Ferro, Elizabeth Cole, and Jennifer Kasten 5. Wes Gordon and Meredith Wood-Prince 6. Irene Neuwirth 7. The sketches of an aspiring fashion designer 8. Lisa Cotten and Britt Tanner 9. Woju Kim

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ARTWALK NY, the Coalition for the Homelessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s auction of art, took place on October 29 at 82 Mercer Street. The event raised over $1 million to support the organization, which continues to serve 3,500 men, women, and children in the city. The co-chairs were Alec and Hilaria Baldwin, Carey Lowell, and Coco Rocha and the honorary chair was Richard Gere. Roxy Paine, the artist, was honored, as were Kim and Michael McCarty. Dolce & Gabbana acted as sponsor of the evening, which celebrated the cause as well as the accomplishments of a variety of artists whose talents were on show.

1. Kristian Laliberte, Hannah Bronfman, and Brendan Fallis 2. Genevieve Bahrenburg and Chuck Close 3. Vincent Fremont and Bettina Prentice 4. Kai Dugan and Jennifer Connelly 5. Jamie Prentice and Maggie Betts 6. Alexandra Chemla and Sarah Hoover 7. Donna Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cruz 8. Kyle DeWoody and Waris Ahluwalia

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Miami Beach On December 6, Rush Philanthropic’s Russell

and Danny Simmons hosted Bombay Sapphire’s Artisan Series Finale Dinner at the Soho Beach House in Miami Beach. The event was a celebration for the winners of the art competition. “Top Chef” impresario, Tom Colicchio, showcased all 12 winners of the Artisan Series Finale by creating an “edible art” pairing menu inspired the fourth annual competition, which continues to discover the nation’s top emerging visual artists. Celebrity attendees who showed their support: Paris and Nicky Hilton, Tommy Hilfiger and Lizzy Somerby, Fairey, and, DJ Cassidy.

1. Artist Gerald Griffin 2. Steven Dorff 3. China Chow and Danny Simmons 4. Designer Tommy Hilfiger and Lizzy Somerby 5. Paris Hilton, Russell Simmons, and Nicky Nilton 6.The Soho Beach House tent 7. Angela Martini

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The Cinema Society—founded by Andrew Saffir—is the reason that there are bright lights in the big city. This season, the series of Cinema Society screenings (and afterparties) included Delivery Man; Diana, hosted by Linda Wells and Allure; Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, supported by DeLéon Tequila, Mercedes-Benz, and South African Airways; Oldboy, hosted by Grey Goose; and Thor: The Dark World, hosted by Dior Beauty. Take it from us: each and every film was a must-see—and each and every event was a must-be-seen-at.

1. Andrew Saffir celebrating his birthday 2. Cory Kennedy and Katerina Stavereva 3. Cobie Smulders 4. Kelly Bensimon 5. Daniel Benedict and Edward Chapman 6. Donna D’Cruz and Johannes Huebl 7. Naomie Harris and Rosario Dawson 8. Samuel L. Jackson and Spike Lee 9. Paul von Ravenstein, Pat Cleveland and Haleigh Breest

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1. BRITT EKLAND was a looker, having played a Bond girl in The Man with the Golden Gun. 2. DAVINES The OI/All In One Milk is a leave-in treatment, enriched with roucou oil to deliver nourishment and more; $28. 3. CLARINS Slim your silhouette with the Super Restorative Redefining Body Care for abdomen and waist; $92. 4. LOLITA LEMPICKA The Elle L’aime fragrance delivers on its name, which translates as “she loves it” from French; $100. 5. LUSH The Happy Happy Joy Joy conditioning hair perfume will freshen up the worst of hair days; available at LUSH spas, opening January 2014 in New York and Philadelphia. 6. BUMBLE AND BUMBLE The Full Form Mousse for a ’do that’s a “do”; $29. 7. TOM FORD Oud Fleur—a woody fragrance with a rose dimension and notes of ginger and more—is enticing when worn by either sex; $520. 8. KIEHL’S SINCE 1851 The brand’s Creme de Corps, available in a new whipped grapefruit as part of a collaboration with Share Our Strength; $38. 9. ORIBE For locks to love, Crème for Style; $35.


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starred in Belle De Jour— knows a thing or two about beauty. 2. LA ROCHE-POSAY The Redermic R Eyes delivers a shot of retinol as well as ingredients like caffeine to rejuvenate your eyes; $47. 3. GOODSKIN The pairing of products in the Circleplex-2 Dark Circle Specialist for eyes—one for day, one for night—works with the rhythm of your skin to address under-eye bags; $44.50. 4. MAKE UP FOR EVER The glitter in Gun Metal may be applied to the face, body, or hair for a sparkling good time; $14. 5. TATA HARPER The sheer antioxidant and moisturizing lip treatments from It-brand Tata Harper will make you feel adored, fierce, and true; $28 at Henri Bendel. 6. SHISEIDO The Lacquer Gloss—pictured in “In the Flesh” and “Debut”—offers a triple-layer formula for color, moisture, and shine; $25. 7. CLARINS The Essentials Eye Make-up Palette includes ten shadows to create a variety of looks; $45. 8. CHANEL Experience Le Lift Crème, the result of 12 years of anti-aging research in a jar; $165.

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Evening is a time of moonlight, mystery, and, come winter, often a midnight snowfall. This season, when dressing up for the most important of occasions, stir a little mystery of your own by taking a cue from some of these classic style icons—and also these latest trends. 1. CATHERINE DENEUVE was known for her highvolume, bow-tied hairdos as well as an appropriate dose of high glamour. Look to Deneuve, and accessorize what you’ve got! 2. BULGARI Be queen of the night in Bulgari’s Diva High Jewelry necklace in white gold, emeralds, and diamonds. Price upon request. 3. LANVIN This green one-shoulder ruffle gown from Lanvin is embellished with flounce and infused with flair. $5,850. 4. STUART WEITZMAN You’ll have nothing but fun holding the Gemma clutch by Stuart Weitzman, which comes encrusted in jade gems. $695.

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1 4 was discovered in Europe in 1955 by Vogue photographer Norman Parkinson. Eileen Ford urged her to move to New York to model, and she arrived in a snowstorm in 1958, on board the Queen Mary. This winter, you’ll arrive in equally dramatic fashion with any of these looks. 2. STUART WEITZMAN Take flight in the Feathery heel in ruby satin. $498. 3. CHLOÉ With side pockets and dramatic flounce detailing, Chloé’s double silk satin gown in popping pink makes a statement. $5,595. 4. RALPH LAUREN Long black silk evening gown from Ralph Lauren Collection. $5,998. 5. HARRY WINSTON It’s worth investing in these jaw-dropping rubellite and diamond drop earrings set in platinum. Price upon request. 1. NENA VON SCHLEBRÜGGE

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1. DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES, couldn’t help but make an entrance. With her svelte silhouette, fashion-forward styles, and princess-perfect appeal, she was a designer’s dream come true. But access to the crown jewels wasn’t necessarily what bestowed upon her a glam appeal; Diana also carried herself like a lady, which is something worthy of emulation—now more than ever. 2. TIFFANY & CO. The Thistle bracelet in red enamel, 18-kt. gold, and diamonds, set in platinum, by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co. Price upon request. 3. MARCHESA It’s hard not to notice Marchesa’s fishtail gown with sweetheart neckline and all-over ruched and textured floral embroidery. $8,950. 4. VALENTINO For delicate sophistication, try on this pink beaded gown by Valentino. $25,000. 5. FABERGÉ The Dentelle de Perles bracelet by Fabergé features round pearls, round white diamonds, and sapphires, set in 18-kt. white gold. $248,000.

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1 knew that simplicity often works best—but she never fell short on glamour, which she often achieved by offsetting her understated, natural beauty with formidable fashions and accessories. 2. LALIQUE Get wrapped around Lalique’s serpent diamond ring in 18-kt. white gold with emeralds, brilliant-cut and princess-cut diamonds, and oval-cut chromiferous tourmaline center stone. $34,000. 3. ROGER VIVIER Keep your edge in Roger Vivier’s black leather Slingback Studs, a pointed-toe pump with silver beading. $1,675. 4. PRABAL GURUNG The favorite of every “It” girl, Prabal Gurung impresses with this black and white kaleidoscopic pansy-printed silk chiffon halter gown with picot-edged cascading ruffles ($4,950) and oversized leather belt ($395). 5. ASPREY Go sensuously sleek with Asprey’s Cigarette clutch in black crocodile with Asprey hallmarked sterling silver. $13,400.

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SHOPPING INDEX

> Billy Reid: billyreid.com or 212.598.9355. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Born Crown: borncrown.com. > Bottega Veneta: 212.371.5511 or bottegaveneta.com. > Bulgari: 800.BVLGARI or bulgari.com. > Burberry Prorsum: 877.217.4085 or burberry.com. > Burton: burton.com.

C > Calvin Klein: 866.513.0513 or calvinklein.com. > Carlo Pazolini: carlopazolini.com. > Carmen Marc Valvo: carmenmarcvalvo.com. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Cartier: 212.446.3400 or cartier.com. > Céline: 212.535.3703 or celine.com. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Chloé: chloe.com. > Christian Dior: 212.249.5822 or dior.com. > Christofle: christofle.com. > Coach: 800.444.3611 or coach.com.

D > David Webb: 942 Madison Ave., 212.421.3030. > David Yurman: 877.908.1177 or davidyurman.com.

Audrey Hepburn: No matter what’s on your wish list this winter, we believe that there’s no need to “go lightly” when it comes a shopping adventure. To help you on the journey toward a fashion sense of your own, we’ve compiled a listing of all the vendors featured in this issue, along with some of our go-to favorites. In between shopping, be sure to keep up with Quest and Q online for the latest fashion news: visit questmag.com and follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @questmag.

Q110

/ WINTER 2014

SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP! A

> de Grisogono: 212.439.4220 or degrisogono.com. > Diane von Furstenberg: dvf.com. > Diesel Black Gold: dieselblackgold.com. > diptyque: 971 Madison Ave., 212.879.3330.

> AERIN: aerin.com.

> Dolce & Gabbana: 212.249.4100 or

> Altuzarra: altuzarra.com.

dolceandgabbana.com.

> Asprey: 212.688.1811 or asprey.com.

> Drake’s London: At Bloomingdale’s, 212.705.2000.

B

E

> Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com.

> E.A. Burns: eaburns.com.

> Barton Perreira: bartonperreira.com.

> Elie Saab: eliesaab.com.

> Belstaff: 814 Madison Ave., 212.897.1880.

> Elie Tahari: elietahari.com.

> Bergdorf Goodman: bergdorfgoodman.com.

> Emilio Pucci: emiliopucci.com.


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

SHOPPING INDEX

> Erdem: erdem.com.

> Lela Rose: 212.947.9204 or lelarose.com.

R

> Etro: 212.317.9096 or www.etro.it.

> Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

> Rachel Zoe: rachelzoe.com. > rag & bone: 866.509.3695 or rag-bone.com.

F

M

> Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave., 646.559.8848.

> Madewell: madewell.com.

> Reem Acra: 730 Fifth Ave., Suite 205, 212.319.1800.

> Fendi: 677 Fifth Ave., 212.759.4646.

> Maison Martin Margiela: maisonmartinmargiela.com.

> Roberto Coin: At Neiman Marcus or Roberto Coin,

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or

800.853.5958 and us.robertocoin.com.

manoloblahnik.com.

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or rogervivier.com.

> GANT: 646.367.5416 or us.gant.com.

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue,

> Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX or rolex.com.

> Ghurka: ghurka.com.

and marchesa.com.

> Roni Blanshay: At Bloomingdale’s, 212.705.2000.

> Giorgio Armani: 877.361.1176 or armani.com.

> Marco Bicego: marcobicego.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

> Marina B: marinab.com.

S

> Marni: 212.343.3912 or marni.com.

> Saint Laurent Paris: 212.832.7100 or ysl.com.

> Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman, Barneys New

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> Harry Winston: harrywinston.com.

York, or michaelbastiannyc.com.

saksfifthavenue.com.

> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

> Michael Kors: 800.908.1157 or michaelkors.com.

> Salvatore Ferragamo: ferragamo.com.

> MILLY: millyny.com.

> Shoshanna: At Saks Fifth Avenue, saks.com.

> MISH: mishnewyork.com.

> Smythson: 212.265.4573 or smythson.com.

> Indian Bazaar: shoplatitude.com.

> Mikimoto: 800.223.4008 or mikimotoamerica.com.

> Stella McCartney: stellamccartney.com.

> Irene Neuwirth: At Jeffrey New York,

> Miu Miu: miumiu.com.

> Stuart Weitzman: 212.823.9560 or

212.206.1272.

> Monique Lhuillier: moniquelhuillier.com.

www.stuartweitzman.com.

> Isolá: isolashoes.com.

> Mulberry: mulberry.com.

G

H

I

> Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry: ivankatrump.com.

J

N

> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or ralphlauren.com.

T > Tamsen Z: tamsenz.com.

> Nancy Gonzalez: At Neiman Marcus or ancygonzalez.

> Tiffany & Co.: 561.659.6090 or tiffany.com.

> J.Crew: 800.562.0258 or jcrew.com.

com.

> Tod’s: tods.com.

> James Perse: jamesperse.com.

> Neiman Marcus: 800.533.1312 or

> Tom Ford: 212.359.0300 or tomford.com.

> Jimmy Choo: 866.JCHOO.US

neimanmarcus.com.

> Tommy Hilfiger: usa.tommy.com.

or jimmychoo.com. > Judith Ripka: judithripka.com.

O

> Tory Burch: toryburch.com.

> Opening Ceremony: 35 Howard St., 212.219.2688,

V

or openingceremony.us.

> Valentino: 212.772.6969 or valentino.com.

> Kara Ross: kararossny.com.

> Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or

> VBH Luxury: 940 Madison Ave., 212.717.9800.

> Kate Spade: katespade.com.

oscardelarenta.com.

> Versace: 888.721.7219 or versace.com.

P

W

> Prabal Gurung: prabalgurung.com.

> Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

K > Kork-Ease: korkease.com.

L > Ladurée: laduree.com.

> Prada: 724 Fifth Ave., 212.664.0010, or prada.com.

> Lalique: 888.488.2580 or lalique.com.

> Pratesi: 829 Madison Ave., 212.288.2315,

Y

> Lanvin: 646.439.0380 or lanvin.com.

or pratesi.com.

> Yigal Azrouël: yigal-azrouel.com.

WINTER 2014/

Q111


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

WINTER HOROSCOPES

Q112

Capricorn Dec. 22 to Jan. 19 So, you think everything is “la vie en rose” because, well, it has been. However, what goes up must come down; and your test will be how you navigate the peaks and valleys of time... You know, it’s all about grace under pressure and diamonds and such. > Garnet earrings from David Yurman

Cancer June 21 to July 22

Aquarius Jan. 20 to Feb. 18 As an Aquarius, water is your friend. So, in months when water is frozen—like in the winter—your being may respond. The stars are telling you to be cold in a situation that involves a lover, and their reasoning for your iciness will be revealed once spring has sprung... > Amethyst ring from David Yurman

Leo July 23 to Aug. 23 You’re a predator, dear Leo, and you’ve marked your prey. Maybe you’ve been eyeing a mate, or maybe you’ve been hunting a job? Whatever you’re after, get ready to pounce. You’ve prepped the situation for success—it’s time to go in for the kill. May the odds be ever in your favor! > Peridot brooch from Tiffany & Co.

Pisces Feb. 19 to Mar. 20 You are ahead of the game. Rather than making resolutions to address in 2014, you resolved to prepare yourself for a new year—and a new you!—before January 1 so that you could hit the ground running. Take advantage as others continue to catch their breath... > Aquamarine earrings from Asprey

Virgo Aug. 24 to Sept. 22 You committed to improving yourself as you made your resolutions for the new year and you don’t know how to quit you. Perhaps the change you seek in yourself can be spurred by a change in environment. Join a new gym and go—if only to see who else is there. > Sapphire ring from Asprey

Aries Mar. 21 to Apr. 19 There was no place like home for the holidays, which means that leaving it behind doesn’t seem as merry or bright. Stay connected, which means more than Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Call your parents or schedule a visit with a sibling. Trust us. > Diamond brooch from Tiffany & Co.

Libra Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 To everything there is a season (turn, turn, turn) and, for you, this season isn’t a time to embrace but a time to refrain from embracing. Concentrate on your efforts, like enhancing your career, and do you! You’ll reap the rewards for your focus in the spring. > Opal earrings from Tiffany & Co.

Taurus Apr. 20 to May 20 The market—well, the “meet” market—is bullish for you, dear Taurus. Now is not the time to cozy up in your apartment, whatever the weather. So, march yourself to a bar with a buddy... Say hello to whomever catches your eye, and hello to a year of love! > Emerald necklace from Tiffany & Co.

Scorpio Oct. 23 to Nov. 21 This is your year! You have some new changes coming your way, and well-deserved rewards. New adventures yield exciting new opportunities so don’t overthink—act. Your partner in crime (a.k.a. your significant other) will teach you that there is a fun way to do everything. > Topaz necklace from David Yurman

Gemini May 21 to June 20

Sagittarius Nov. 22 to Dec. 21

You have a problem with choosing, dear Gemini. Always have, always will. And you have made a couple of choices when it comes to love—choices that will prove to have been wrong. Your search for Mister or Miss Right? Not even close to complete! > Pearl brooch from Tiffany & Co.

Like LeBron James, when he “took his talents to South Beach,” you are making decisions that are causing your fans to resent you. Remember: the people who put you on your pedestal can knock you from your pedestal and burning bridges, at this point in the game, will haunt you... > Tanzanite necklace from Tiffany & Co.

/ WINTER 2014

Keep making plans for the weekend that you don’t intend to keep? Thought so. The stars are telling you to replace your flannel PJ wishes with caviar dreams in the hopes that you’ll meet someone while enjoying a night on the town. And if not? Champers, baby. > Ruby bracelet from David Yurman


A nEW ClASSIC ShInglE STylE hOuSE In nEW CAnAAn, CT DESIgnED AnD buIlT by WADIA ASSOCIATES

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN ~ INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION ~ CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (203) 966-0048 ~ WADIAASSOCIATES.COM

SCAn TO SEE MOrE phOTOS Of ThIS AnD OThEr CuSTOM DESIgnED hOMES


Q Winter 2014  

Winter Classics

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