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$5.00 OCTOBER 2012

ARTS

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CULTURE ISSUE questmag.com

ANDY WARHOL, PHOTOGRAPHED BY HARRY BENSON IN 1983

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LRwWBFP,DR,paneledlibrary&powdrrm.5BRs&bths, EIK,laundryrm,maid’srm&bth.Co-excl.$12.5M.Web# 3224930.J.Merrill212-434-7082/E.Paul212-452-4419

New. 25' wide. Bassman photographed & Frankenthaler paintedhere.Gar,41'studio,13'ceils&5BRs.Sepaptw3BRs. $14.9M.Web#3436349.KirkHenckels212-452-4402

6BRswensuitebaths;pristineprewardetails,2WBFPs;LR &DRwPark&EastRiverviews.$8.75M.Web#1294317. A.Lambert212-452-4408/M.Achilles212-452-4396

New.4story,18'wide,single-famTH.6BRs,4bths,pwdr rm, chef's EIK w fplc, grdn. $6.995M. Web #3376956. L.Melnick 212-452-4425/T.Desmond 212-452-4380

Exquisite 9 into 8 Prewar Co-op on E 79th

Sensational Space Arrives at 340 East 72nd

Gracie Square Hi Floor 4BR, 3.5 Bth Duplex

Sunny Prwr 8 in Wonderful E 72nd FS Co-op

New. Feel likes Paris in NY. LR, library with terrace & DR face south, 3 MBRs with ensuite bath, chef's kitchen. $6.65M. Web #3332257. L.Maloney 212-585-4527

Almost 800' LR w 2 WBFPs. 4BR, 4 bth prwr co-op. DR w bar, chef's kit. Lndry/offc, thru-wall AC. 2 stor bins, sep maid's.$4.6M.Web#3428232.V.Ghilaga212-452-4392

OverlooksCarlSchurzPark&E.River.LRwWBFP,libr,EIK. W/D, CAC. FS prwr co-op. $4.395M. Web #3341831. M.Gregoire212-452-4416/M.McCarron212-570-2440

New. This lovely possible 4 bedroom apartment has open views from every room. $4.2M. Web #3152777. M.Kaiser 212-585-4554/L.Silverman 212-585-4553

Grand Park Avenue Classic 6

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Grand Millennium Perfection + 2 Terraces

Spectacular 3BR Triplex PH with Terrace

BaronialLRwithWBFP,formalDR,2MBRs,2baths,EIK, maid’srm&bath,estatecond.$3.15M.Web#1280645. B.Evans-Butler 212-452-4391/C.Kurtin 212-452-4406

New.PerchedhiabvParkAvewextraordlight,hiendfinishes,2-3BR,2.5bth,LRwfplc,DR/FR,chef'skitwpntry. $2.895M. Web #3428219. Inez Wade 212-452-4439

New. 32nd flr PH condo w CP & Hudson vus. 4-5BRs, 6 bths,LRwWBFP,libr,FDR,EIK,lndryrm,mrblflrs.FSbldg. $13.55M. Web #3404830. C.B.Whyte 212-452-4446

New.LenoxAve.11footceilings,421-ataxabatement& lowCCs,fireplace,Californiaclosets,24-hourdoorman. $1.725M.Web#3350823.LeilaYusuf646-613-2640

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Spacious 2 Bedroom in Carnegie Hill New. Classic six in Park Avenue Emery Roth cooperative. Large gallery, elegant formal dining room, large living room with wood-burning fireplace, and office. Bedrooms have ensuite baths. $2.3M. Web # 3246368. Cornelia Zagat Eland 212-452-4384

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Gramercy Park Loft at 112 East 19th

Doublecrnr3BR,2.5bth.LR/DRwWBFP&Crestronsys, MBR w bth & WIC, laundry. Exposed brick, columns & steeldr.$5.7M.Web#1294551.S.Wires646-613-2653

New.3BR/2.5bath,doubleLR,oversizedkitchen&great closets. Full service bldg with gym, roofdeck & storage. $4.995M. Web #3388507. J.Stockwell 646-613-2615

Hiflr,hmoffc,iconicvus.N/Sexpos,renovEIK/bths,WBFP, AVsys,CAC.Whiteglove.$3,497,500.Web#3442620. C.VanAmburg646-613-2683/K.Wallison646-613-2658

Grand & sunny w high ceilings & huge windows. Great layout. Tons of storage. W/D in apartment. $2.225M. Web #1303892. Lee Ann Jaffee 646-613-2739

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East 50s/Fifth Avenue. Meticulously restored into a 21st Century headquarters, 25’ wide, commercially zoned, elevators, trading rooms, gym, original details throughout. Exquisite. $65M. WEB# 1756112. Paula Del Nunzio 212-906-9207

East 80s/Fifth Avenue. 13 rooms, 4BR, 4.5 bath, 2 staff rooms, CP views, chef-sized kit, beautiful flrs, CAC, private flr, intimate FS P/W Co-op, storage rooms. $21.5M. WEB# 3337782. Nancy Candib 212-906-9302 Dominic R. Paolillo 212-906-9307

East 60s. Magnificent 40’, 4-story home built circa 1919. Approximately 11,00SF,16 rooms, 8BR, elevator, 7 wood burning fireplace. 4 terraces. 35’ ballroom, chef’s eat-in kitchen. South garden. $20M. WEB# 1754256. John Burger 212-906-9274

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TriBeCa. Massive entertaining space with wonderful terrace and original mushroom columns. Private parking space and storage room in top doorman building. $6.93M. WEB# 1039207. Filipacchi Foussard Team 212-452-4468

Fifth Avenue. 5 rooms, 2 BR, 2.5 baths, 33’ long LR. English paneling. Marble foyer/gallery with antique Gracie wallpaper. High ceils, renov EIK. TWAC, pets ok. $5.595M. WEB# 3300689. Burt Savitsky 212-906-9337 Carl B. Adams 212-906-9389

UWS. Rosario Candela classic 6. 3BR, 3 bath, en suite. Living room with wood burning fireplace, dining room with views, eat-in kitchen. Central air conditioning, W/D, pets ok. $4.75M. WEB# 3235802. Susan Greenfield 212-906-9214

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UES. Sun-filled PW apt w/3 expos & multiple corner rms. 3MBR, LR w/wbfp, FDR & EIK. Semi-private landing, tons of PW detail w/high ceils, pets & W/D ok. $2.9M. WEB# 3306330. Steven V. Parrino 212-906-9322 William Blind 212-317-7717

FiDi. Bright and beautifully renovated masterpiece. Poggen Pohl kitchen with top appliances, 2.5 custom baths, 13’ ceilings, laundry, North/West huge windows. $2M. WEB# 3167994. Penny Toepfer 212-906-9250

Murray Hill. Gracious 3BR luxury condo on high floor with 3 exposures and 2 balconies. 10’ ceilings with expansive layout. Windowed kitchen, W/D. Doorman, gym, garage. $1.725M. WEB# 3110369. Daniel Ruiz 212-906-9231

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NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

PA L M B E A C H

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.

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THE DUPLEX AT 1 CPW

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CPW. Only duplex in 1 CPW. Sitting on the 49th and 50th flrs with 4,266SF and 4 BR, 4.5 baths. Gorgeous Western exposure of the river. Triple mint. 5-star service. $16.4M. WEB# 1557703. Kyle Blackmon 212-588-5648

UES. Palatial full floor prewar Co-op on Park Ave with private elev landing, CP & city views, 4BR, 4.5 baths, LR, libr, FDR, EIK w/breakfast room, LR, 2 wbfp. $12.975M. WEB# 3368386. Cathy Franklin 212-906-9236 Alexis Bodenheimer 212-906-9230

UWS. Newly renovated 4-story single family townhouse with the most fabulous garden enclave. Premier eat-in kitchen, butler’s kitchen, 3-4BR, 4.5 baths. Tree-lined block. $7.65M. WEB# 1757493. Wolf Jakubowski 212-588-5630

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DIRECT VIEWS TO FREEDOM TOWER

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Fifth Avenue. Spectacular SW views from expansive corner living rm, dining area. 2BR, 2.5 bath. En suite MBR with dressing area. 16 flrto-ceil windows with 9’ ceils. Large wndwd eatin kit, corp welcome. $3.9M. WEB# 3352176. Daniela Rivoir 212-906-9276

East 70s. Exquisite residence in one of NY’s finest bldgs. Traditionally renov on a high floor w/lovely light. 2BR, 3 bath, lib, FDR, 2 wbfp & W/D. No financing. $3.85M. WEB# 3386307. Mary Rutherfurd 212-906-9211 Leslie Coleman 212-906-9387

East 64th Street/Madison Avenue. Renovated prewar 3BR, 3 full bath. Updated kitchen, lots of light, working fireplace, excellent storage space, W/D, pet friendly. $2.975M. WEB# 3242744. Guida De Carvalhosa 212-906-9271

Maria Elena Scotto

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1BR MASTERPIECE WITH BALCONY

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JUNIOR 4 WITH PARKING SPOT

Midtown East. Custom designed home, 1BR, 2 full baths, spectacular city and river views, raised ceilings, high-end open kitchen, wet bar and more. Full-service building. $1.35M. WEB# 3379200. Elaine Clayman 212-906-9353

UWS. Spacious 1BR apartment with 1.5 baths and walk-in closet. Building amenities include a roof deck, laundry on every floor and gym. $760K. WEB# 3214177. Maria Torresy 212-906-9317

Lincoln Center. Brilliantly re-designed Jr. 4 with open gourmet kitchen, separate office, renovated bath, terrace with view, huge closets, private parking space. Maintenance includes electric. $749K. WEB# 3141971. Brian Farrell 212-588-5621

NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

PA L M B E A C H

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.

Lynn Sullivan

Jen Wening

98

86

CONTENTS A RTS & C ULTURE ISSUE 86

THEY'VE GOT THE BEAT

A lively look back at the famous foursome, as captured

through the lens of photographer Harry Benson in his new book Harry Benson: The Beatles (Taschen).

92

BY

E LIZABETH Q UINN B ROWN

FEARLESS FINE ART FEMALES

with Charlie Adamski and Charlotte Perrottey at the helm.

98

GRACE IS IN THE DETAILS

BY

THOMASVILLE: A TRADIONAL WAY OF SPORTING LIFE RENEWED

SOUTHERN CHARM AND COMFORTS

GIRL POWER

BY

J AMES

The plantations

MACQUIRE

Alex Hitz blends down-home Southern cooking

with French flair, with delactable results.

116

LILY HOAGLAND

MEGAN M ALLOY

of Southern Georgia are a blissful retreat into the past.

110

BY

Architect Horace Trumbauer designed some of the most splendid

homes and estates at the height of the Gilded Age.

104

92

Christie’s First Open sale spotlights women atrtists,

BY

DANIEL C APPELLO

Ralph Lauren’s Girls Fahion Show features 46 looks from the 2012 Fall

and Holiday collections, showcasing couture by way of cute. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

98

64

68

CONTENTS 72

C OLUMNS 22

SOCIAL DIARY

56

SOCIAL CALENDAR

60

HARRY BENSON

Talking pop art and photography with the ever-fascinating Andy Warhol.

62

OBSERVATIONS

Some great novelists that have yet to be matched.

64

FRESH FINDS

68

SPORT

72

ART

74

SERVICE

78

FASHION

120

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR

122

APPEARANCES

124

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

128

SNAPSHOT

Tales and chronicles of the social scene, as we see it.

BY

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA BIA

Our monthly guide informs of the best benefits, events, and charity happenings.

The amber light of Autumn.

BY

D ANIEL CAPPELLO

BY

AND

The Far Hills Race Meeting—a favorite October event.

BY

Analyzing the intricate relationship between art and taxes.

TAKI THEODORACOPULOS OPULOS

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

E LIZABETH Q UINN B ROWN

BY

J UDITH L. P EARSON

Celebrating the work of the Family Justice Centers of New York. BY CHRIS MEIGHER Angelo Galasso's brings a line of bespoke menswear to The Plaza. Getting all dolled up for New York After Dark.

BY

BY

ALEX TRAVERS

KAREN KLOPP

Our columnist at the U.S. Open and opening day for the Jets. Our intrepid reporter is on the scene.

BY

BY

H ILARY GEARY ARY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Brooke Astor’s legacy lives on through her works and passions.

BY

L ILY H OAGLAND AND

64

questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

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HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

STEFAN DOYNO INTERNS

JIHAD HARKEEM ALEX TRAVERS MEGAN MALLOY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KAREN KLOPP JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY JEANNE CHISHOLM MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD JACK DEUTSCH BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN JULIE SKARRATT JOE SCHILDHORN BEN FINK SHAPIRO ANN WATT

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Painting by Agnes Martin, an abstract expressionist female artist (left); George, Ringo, Paul, and John enjoy some outdoor shenanigans in 1964 (right).

“Without culture, and the relative freedom it implies, society, even when perfect, is but a jungle. This is why any authentic creation is a gift to the future.”—Albert Camus AT ANY MOMENT, society can offer a range of art and culture so wide, it’s breathtaking. As an example, I haphazardly chose the year 1907. This period reveals Picasso painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, Frank Stanley composing “Auld Lang Syne,” and Joseph Conrad penning The Secret Agent. Today we enjoy Marina Abramovic performing The Artist Is Present, Adele belting out “Someone Like You,” and Chad Harbach authoring The Art Of Fielding. For this year’s Arts & Culture Issue, we pulled together a range of topics we’re attracted to in our society. Because looking at what interests our society can give us a glimpse of something like a unified soul. Unsurprising, that soul enjoys food. And Alex Hitz is here to feed it, with hearty Southern cooking with a refined French flair. Daniel Cappello dines with the chef over delicious fare, making my breakfast pumpernickel bagel with schmear seem spiritually unfulfilling. One needs a beautiful backdrop to enjoy one’s meal, so we turn our attention to two sweeping settings. The first is the graceful architecture of Horace Trumbauer. Megan Malloy gives a tour of his most opulent domestic homes. Then we take a trip down South, where Jamse MacGuire fiddle-dee-dees around the plantations of Georgia, where nostalgia proclaims tomorrow to be another yesterday instead. What would culture be without music? Soothing savage beasts, being the food of love, the speech of angels: it inspires our greatest aphorisms at least. And the greatest names in contemporary music are easily rattled off: George, Paul, John, and Ringo. Harry Benson comes together with Lizzie Brown to talk about their magical mystery tours, going here, there, and everywhere, all in a hard day’s night. And, of course, art. Art, in all of its many forms, resonates

with the emotion that artists put into their work. But the art world itself is just as prone to social influence as any sector, which is why the current surge of female artists who are being celebrated is a welcome development. Christie’s is at the forefront of the new tide, with their First Open sale containing a larger-than-ever percentage of female artists’ work for sale. Leading ladies of the fine arts world, take a bow. Here in New York, the autumn air has cooled Manhattan streets, and our fall coats have been pulled from the closet. The season is so short, we should take advantage of these few months, maybe even weeks, that have such a distinctive flavor: the turning leaves, the knitted scarves, the apple cider, the pumpkin pie. Fall’s transitory nature leads it to be too easily overlooked, when, instead, it’s that aspect that gives it its value. Enjoy this “season of mist,” as Keats called it, for as long as it lasts. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Andy Warhol, artist and leading figure in the pop art movement, in front of his portrait of Pia Zadora in 1983, photographed by Harry Benson. Benson recounts the shoot in this month’s installment of his “It Seems Like Yesterday” column.

CORRECTION: In the September 2012 issue, our “What The Chairs Wear” column contained an erroneous jewelry credit. The page featured the Roberto Coin Strip Appassionata earrings in 18-kt. golds ($4,400) and the Roberto Coin Diamond Strip ring in 18-kt. golds ($3,680), all available at Neiman Marcus. 20 QUEST

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NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY LEGENDS and Legendary. On

the fifth day of last month, right smack after Labor Day, came Fashion Week. Fashion Week has been around for years now. A woman named Fern Mallis turned a business, a whole industry, into a performance—into New York theater, by which I mean the

feeling that you’re at the center of the world. Two or so years ago, Fashion Week was moved from the tents in Bryant Park behind the New York Public Library to Lincoln Center. People wondered why. I don’t know the story but someone came up with the idea. Maybe it

was Fern Mallis. Upon first hearing, it sounded inconvenient for all those who come to New York specifically to see the collections. However, it turned out to be visionary. Lincoln Center gave the whole schmatte business a sense of stature and grandeur in all the different social pock-

ets in New York. It’s called class. New York style. It used to be, for the rich, chic, and shameless, that summer ended sometime in September. Now, it’s whenever the Fashion Week calendar is calling. For those attending the scores of collections, after-parties, and marketing

T H E S E A S O N O P E N I N G FO R T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N O P E R A AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

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Jeisa Chiminazzo and Nadejda Savcova

receptions, not to mention the dinners and luncheons, it is hyper-social New York. For the younger crowd, the hip and the hipless, it kicks off the season of Going Out. Parties, clubs, parties, openings (store, bar, bicycle shop, etc.), screenings, and whatever is on the scene. This is vintage New York, and always new. This is why people come to here to make their way in life. If you’re 20-something, 30-something, or even something-something, Fashion Week is like the circus comes to town. Now that it is established at Lincoln Center, Fashion Week is launched by a lunch. The Couture Council of the 24 QUEST

Alvin Valley and Michelle Harper

Robert Verdi, Linda Fargo and Sami Gayle

Museum at FIT, hosts an event where they honor a famous designer. Last year, it was Valentino; the year before, Lagerfeld. It is held the day or so before the first collection hits the runway. This year, they honored Oscar de la Renta. A lunch like this brings out the money, so it is good for the fashion retail business. It’s a time to get out the Best Dressed stuff. There must have been scores of well-dressed women in their Oscars. This is the smart crowd, the SUV-with-adriver crowd; the fashion mavens, the culture crowd; and the philanthropic crowd. This year, Henry Kissinger was a guest at Mrs. de la Renta’s ta-

Minnie Mortimer and Peter Davis

ble, along with Mayor Bloomberg and Barbara Walters. Oscar drew the largest attendance that this lunch had ever had—more than 600 people. Some were comparing it to the spring “hat luncheon,” hosted by the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy (by far the most financially successful luncheon in the city). The Couture Council raised almost a million dollars, which goes to the Museum at FIT to fund their exhibitions, lectures, and student programs. FIT is a highly successful college in New York. It is a part of SUNY, but they can claim that a very high percentage of

Jamie Johnson and Lily Kwong

Valerie and Graziano de Boni

their graduates go directly into employment in some aspect of the fashion industry. This event put the organization on the New York social map. This luncheon, which now opens the Fall Gala Season in New York, is important—a must-attend. It is where you can get a look at Who’s Who and Who’s Here… in New York, right now. It is theater but, remember one thing, it is working theater. And work they do. Oscar de la Renta possesses the ultimate stature in American fashion today, or ever. He has European fashion stature. He is also an example of How To Become a Man of Stature.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A The last trained by the Old School of the Couturier, he’s had a long career and come a long long way from Santo Domingo, via Spain and Paris, to New York. In his 50-year career, he has established himself not only as an important American designer (a multimilliondollar-a-year business), but a distinguished member of the community. All of the major philanthropies in New York have been either touched by his professional and social largesse, or by his active work. He is well-known among his close associates for his quiet philanthropies in the interest of his native Dominicans. He wears his success in a patri-

cian manner, a reflection of his Latin roots, and he keeps an intense, daily involvement in his business in his 80th year. Oscar de la Renta’s life is ultimate New York. Despite his European and Latin backgrounds, his achievements could only have been accomplished here. Although it is rarely mentioned, his great success has always been a team effort, a situation of profound support, from his wives—the late Francoise and his current wife of several decades, Annette. These women have been there with their support in myriad ways, both of them excellent partners to an industriously creative, ambitious man.

The luncheon: It was a very hot day, overcast and late summer muggy. Traffic was normal: a logjam. The 2012 Couture Council Award for Artistry of Fashion luncheon was held on the Promenade of the David H. Koch Theater. The program opened with the luncheon’s co-chairs, Eleanora Kennedy and Alexandra Lebenthal, welcoming the guests. Liz Peek, chairman of the Couture Council, told us more about the Museum at FIT and the school itself. Liz then introduced Dr. Joyce Brown, president of FIT, who announced a new Couture Council scholarship for all four years of the program. This year, it was funded

by one of the luncheon guests who wished to remain anonymous (I later learned she was seated at my table). Then Liz introduced Mayor Bloomberg to present the award to Oscar. In accepting his award, Oscar told the guests that he believed that he worked in “the greatest country in the world,” a country that had been generous to him with a long list of friends and supporters, greater than he had time to recount, but he said, “they know who they are.” In reflecting on his career of a half-century, he explained that he loves his work and, to this day, nothing gives him more pleasure than working every day in his studio on his

1 S T D I B S P R E S E N T E D “ T H E W O R L D O F G L O R I A V A N D E R B I LT ” AT T H E I R G A L L E R Y I N T H E N E W YO R K D E S I G N C E N T E R

Ben Brantley and Frederick Everstadt 26 QUEST

Marcia Sherrill, Michael Bruno and Eve Krzyzanowski

Gloria Vanderbilt and Anderson Cooper

Tom Brandenburger and Annie Curtin

Serena Tufo, Peter Tufo and Francesca Nye

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Liz Smith with Sam and Elizabeth Peabody

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A collections. He added that, after all these years, he is still learning. Durability in the fashion business is a hard task. Most designers’ professional life at the top rarely extends beyond a decade or two before the creative juices lose their potency or their star is eclipsed by a new one. Nowadays, as it is in so many businesses, designers often opt for the big hit, the buy-out that leaves them wealthy from licensing royalties (if they can achieve that). Oscar de la Renta, on the other hand, like his European mentors, has quietly become an institution, marrying readyto-wear with couture, serving the chic and well-dressed with

what is now his classic good taste. He himself presents a well-dressed man, easy on the eyes yet impeccable in his tailoring and choices. He commented that one woman present that day was wearing a suit of his from 1968. She was Chiu-Ti Jansen, and I’d guess that Ms. Jansen wasn’t on the planet when that suit was first shown in a collection. Eleanora Kennedy was wearing the great Oscar red dress that Ann Romney wore the night of the nomination of her husband at the Republican convention. Liz Peek also was wearing a brand new Oscar. It was probably a fair guess that almost all the women in the

room who own an Oscar de la Renta design was wearing one. The result was that everyone looked great. On a Saturday night late in the month, Peggy Siegal ran a big screening at MoMA in the big theater for Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s documentary based on her book The Eye Always Travels about her grandmother-in-law, the late Diana Vreeland. There were several hundred in the audience including Lizzie and Jon Tisch, Alexander Vreeland, Hope Atherton, Andre Balazs, Christine Baranski, Dennis Basso and Michael Cominotto, Natasha Bedingfield, Nate Berkus, Hannah Bronfman, Sophie

Buhai, China Chow, Maria Cornejo, Jeffrey Costello and Robert Tagliapietra, Alan Cumming, Lisa Marie Fernandez, Erin Fetherston, Douglas Friedman, Sami Gayle, Valentino and Giancarlo Giametti, Hailey Gates, Gina Gershon, Liz Goldwyn, Bruce Weber and Nan Bush, Zani Gugelmann, Michelle Harper, Mary Hilliard, Kenny Lane, Michele Gerber Klein, Daysee and Paul Kanavos, Stefano Tonchi, Marcia and Richard Mishaan, Brooke Shields, Reinaldo and Carolina Herrera, Tommy Hilfiger, Ally Hilfiger, Jessica Joffe, Kelly Klein, Karlie Kloss, Angela Lindvall, Masha Markova, Tamara Mellon, Charlie Scheips,

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Marisa Noel Brown and Lise Evans

Tania Higgins, Dayssi Kanavos, Gillian Miniter, Susan Magazine and Nick Scoppetta 28 QUEST

Wendi Murdoch

Susan Burden and Eric Brettschneider

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C H E L D A FA L L E V E N T AT I TS E A STS I D E T H R I F T S H O P

Stephanie Griswold and Hilary Dick

Gil Lamphere and Martha O’Brien

Marianne Harrison, Philip Calrson, Carlos Mota, Bridget Moynahan, Elise Overland, Jesse Peretz and Sarah Sophie Flicker, Lauren Remington Platt, Anja Rubik, Marina Rust, Gabe Saporta, Brooke Shields, Peter Som, Franca Sozzani, Tennesse Thomas, Robert Verdi, Arden Wohl. I ran so many names to show you the gamut of enthusiastic viewers. Many of the above mentioned were too young at the time to understand who Diana Vreeland was. Many others were old enough to know the lady, or who she was in the world. And a great many were not even on the planet when Diana Vreeland died in 30 QUEST

1989. They didn’t know about her allure and her charisma. And the fun of it. This film grabs them while delighting the rest of us. It’s like remember good news. Remember good news? She was first famous in the publishing and fashion worlds when she was editor of Harper’s Bazaar and then at Vogue. But it was a compartmental fame—known in her industry and by her readership. However, her image gained stature with professional reversals and her moving over to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to run the Costume Institute. I met her three or four times, one most memorably. I was

Jonathan Rosen and Melanie Holland

Minou Tirasteh, Courtney Arnot and Anette Rickel

with Sarah Churchill, Suzie Frankfort, and Bob Colacello at Suzie’s apartment here in New York on a Sunday afternoon in the fall of 1980. Suzie had arranged the meeting because she knew I had wanted to meet Diana Vreeland and Bob was doing a piece in Interview on Lady Sarah at home in Beverly Hills. Sarah and I had come in from California about a book project. Sarah had known Vreeland for years. Despite her Americanization, Lady Sarah was still very British, speaking à la français when describing Vreeland as belle laide.. Caught in my mind’s eye, sitting across from her, in a

room still lit by the sunny late afternoon, Sarah’s description of her was technically correct but not adequate. Vreeland’s physical-ness was secondary to her vibe: she was just there, glad to be there, and curious. Or so it seemed. To me, the moment rests in memory as having an “audience” with a distinguished presence. Sitting there on an ottoman, one leg crossed under herself, wearing a blackand-white large hound’s-tooth patterned suit, black stockings, and shoes, she was a character of simple, smart distinction. She didn’t look like anybody else. The charm was waiting in the smile that greeted you.

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Rosemarie Audia and Leslie Jones

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SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AT STRIBLING WITH OVER 16 YEARS of experience, Tracie Golding is known for her integrity, skill and success. Her work ethic and knowledge of the market have earned her the trust and respect of her clients, colleagues, and the New York real estate community. Having sold over half a billion dollars of real estate over her career, Tracie has consistently been one of the top-producing brokers at Stribling. As one of the youngest Senior Vice Presidents in Stribling’s history, Tracie came to the business naturally: two of her greatgrandfathers were important developers and builders in New York City, responsible for such notable additions to the skyline as the Squibb Building and Two Park Avenue. Tracie’s success at negotiation can be attributed to her excellent listening skills and her careful attention to detail. Her buyers and sellers also benefit from her ability to wade through sophisticated financial documents and prepare first-rate board packages. Putting her clients first and adhering to the highest ethical standards, Tracie is attentive to the financial and emotional considerations involved in each transaction. Tracie has fine-tuned the art of marketing and tailors an approach for each property she represents, obtaining the highest possible price for her sellers. Her realistic approach to pricing and insightful market analyses are valuable to her clients, as she offers a clear and pragmatic analysis of the everfluid Manhattan real estate market. Tracie possesses an unusual depth of knowledge about each neighborhood in Manhattan, having worked and lived in most. Tracie has a large network of mortgage brokers, attorneys, contractors, and other service providers to enhance and streamline the transaction experience. It’s working: the majority of her business comes through referrals from satisfied customers. Tracie’s expertise also caught the attention of one of the newest internet referral websites. Tracie is a board member of the Grand Street Settlement House and JCP Downtown. She is also active in her children’s school, the Packer Collegiate Institute. 00 QUEST

law’s documentary, you learn, as she admits, that she had no education, but she was a natural learner and always learning. At that afternoon at Suzie Frankfort’s, she was entirely engaging and engaged. It was the way she looked at you (i.e. the way she looked at me)—a stranger looking at a stranger filled with curiosity and a feeling of being simply glad to see a new person. She gave you the same opportunity: to look and to listen. This is unusual among most of us, no matter our status. It is especially unusual among those who are regarded, and frequently regard themselves, as more important when compared to the rest of us. Vreeland lived in that world daily, but was not “of it.” I saw her a couple of times after that in Los Angeles, once at a dinner party at Jean Howard’s (another unique character of fashion, although entirely different) on Coldwater Canyon in Beverly Hills. Vree-

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TRACIE GOLDING

I don’t know how we got onto the subject, but I was telling her about the diaries of Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, which I’d been reading, and about Marie Antoinette and the affair of the muslins. The French explorers had returned to France with, among their possessions, some native American women who were presented at court to Louis XVI and the Queen. Marie Antoniette who was so taken by their muslin dresses that she had them made up for herself and for her ladies of the court, and then painted in a portrait. The portrait caused a sensation in the court, who were against the Queen for dressing inappropriately. Another nail in the coffin of the ill-fated crown. It was an entirely innocent choice on her part. Yet, ironically, it presaged not only her fate but also the French Revolution. Mrs. Vreeland hadn’t known the story and loved it. In her granddaughter-in-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E A F T E R - PA R T Y F O R T H E P R E M I E R E O F D I A N A V R E E L A N D : T H E E Y E H A S T O T R A V E L AT M O N K E Y B A R

Alan Cumming and Christine Baranski

Emilia Fanjul and Reinaldo Herrera

land was a bit like a fish out of water at that dinner, held outdoors in the courtyard of Jean’s hacienda, where the energy of New York seemed almost sedated by the southern California climate. When I lived in Los Angeles, I knew her son Tim, who was interviewed in the documentary. I would see him every now and then at someone’s dinner. He was a tall, slim, agreeable man, like Gary Cooper; an architect with a gracious, gentle manner. The film demonstrates that both her sons had the same kindness that was represented in their mother’s eyes. I don’t doubt that her 34 QUEST

Natasha Bedingfield and Brooke Shields

Tennessee Thomas, Liz Goldwyn and Gina Gershon

other son, Frederick (known as Frecky), whom I did not know, has the same winning quality. Although both boys remember that she did not put too much emphasis on their presence. Tim confided with a subtle smile that, when he was a kid, he used to “wish” he had “another mom” who paid some attention to him. Nevertheless, the grown sons recognize the uniqueness of their amazing mother. The film contains clips from her interview with Dick Cavett, which took place after she had been kicked out of Vogue and had had a triumph at the Costume Institute at the Met. The firing came as a result of

Alex Liberman, who had an executive power that sounds like it resembled a tyrannical impresario or director. Lieberman was a controversial figure and his stepdaughter Francine du Plessix Gray’s autobiographical portrait of him could give you the idea that he was nobody’s friend and anybody’s enemy. “He hated women,” a female friend of mine who knew him told me. The official story was that the advertisers were complaining about Vreeland’s direction of the magazine. The sexy, stormy ’70s were in full force and Diana’s kind of Vogue was out of it, according to some. It was corporate, bottom line.

Ally Hilfiger and Tommy Hilfiger

For her, it was devastating. She was gobsmacked. She recovered, as you will see. She wasn’t like any other fashion editor, which is not to say she was “better than”—although some might successfully argue that she was. What it was, I’ve concluded, was that the magazines were her easels, her palettes for her own brand pastiche and real beauty. She was just a remarkable piece of human art. There was a lot of heart in it—always just around the corner, just outside the cottage door. She was cozy and spectacular at the same time. She came of age when Chanel was putting women in

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Bob Colacello

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E G O R D O N PA R K S FO U N D AT I O N C E L E B R AT E D AT T H E H O W A R D G R E E N B E R G G A L L E R Y

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pants for the first time in the recorded history of the human race. Affected deeply by the transformation of attitude in the culture, over time, she had acquired, or streamlined, the madness that was genius. (I don’t know the word, but the French do I’m sure.) It bloomed fully, like any exceptional or great artist. You can see I loved watching it. Ali McGraw was one of those interviewed. When she was a young girl she was an assistant (lowly, lowly) in Mrs. Vreeland’s office. She recounted one of those scenes right out of The Devil Wears Prada with Meryl Streep, where Vreeland 36 QUEST

Spencer Tompkins and Dana Buckley

John Loengard

Mai Parks Morson and Emmanuel Leroy

flings her coat at McGraw as she enters the office every morning. Put off by it, one day McGraw threw it back at her. Shocked, she stopped and said, “That is very rude.” This assistant then went on not that long after to become a great movie star of the era, when Vreeland was being removed from Vogue. For this interview, McGraw was shown in poor lighting and/or obviously made no effort to make herself up. It is distracting. It is not my intention to criticize because I was a fan and applaud her moments of stardom, as well as respect her choices thereafter. But I could only think she’s probably been

in Santa Fe too long and she should come back to us and light up our world again. All of those interviewed were interesting because the subject was interesting. Everyone had a good story about her and, at the bottom of it, a respect and admiration. Her mother told her at a very young age that she was ugly. “Your sister is beautiful and you are ugly.” Thanks, Mom. Evidently, she told her enough times that the child got the message. So what did she do? She went out in life and found all the beauty. Everywhere. In everything. And everybody. She enjoyed it the way you’d think a beautiful woman would.

Emel Dilek and Durim Cheli

Howard Greenberg and Leslie Parks

She lived to be 86. Kenny Lane told me that Saturday night that all of the business in Full Gallop (the play about her)—not having the money to pay the cook, and having to borrow from Kitty Miller’s cook—wasn’t true. She had enough money, but it worked as a good dramatic device. In the film, she makes several references to horses—racehorses, especially—and their movement, their beauty. You begin to understand that that is how she related to herself. In a funny way, it was her mother’s harsh, apparently insensitive comments that gave her an eye for beauty, (The film is called The Eye Has to Travel.) It was

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Curt Viebranz, Peter Kunhardt and Cissy Viebranz

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A a wonderful experience seeing not only what this woman was, and what she did, but who she was, a rather remarkable creature whose Self was her greatest masterpiece. After the screening, I was walking with Mary Hilliard and Kenny Lane, talking about Vreeland. Because Kenny knew her well and saw her frequently over the years, he was telling us about her tendency to “embellish” stories so that it could sometimes be hard for a biographer to learn the truth. He told us of the time when Deep Throat was the big sensation and everyone was sneaking off to see it. One day, Diana and he were discussing seeing a movie together, and she asked him if he’d seen “Sore Throat.” Recognizing her reference, he asked her if she’d like to see it? She said yes. So they went. She loved it. A few weeks later, they were invited to lunch at Kitty (Mrs.

Gilbert) Miller’s apartment. (She and Vreeland lived in the same building at 550 Park Avenue.) At the lunch, they were discussing movies and Kitty Miller asked Diana what she had seen lately. Diana responded by telling Miller that she had taken another neighbor, a very proper dowager in everybody’s eyes, Mrs. Clarkson Carr, to see Deep Throat. Miller was shocked. “Mrs. Clarkson Carr went to see…?” Vreeland was delighted. Fade Out. On a Wednesday night, midmonth, I went over to Beekman Place where Janet Ruttenberg was giving a cocktail reception in honor of Gloria Vanderbilt and her new show which was opening the following night at the 1stDibs Gallery on the 10th floor of 200 Lexington: “The World of Gloria Vanderbilt: Collages, Dream Boxes, and Recent Paintings.” The selling exhibition features more than 50 works of

Gloria. This is Gloria’s first show since 2006, running through October 24th. The living room of Mrs. Ruttenberg’s apartment overlooks the brand-new Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island, which will be officially dedicated on October 17th. At 7 p.m. one evening, the sun was setting in the west, casting a golden shadow on the river and Brooklyn to the southwest. I didn’t have much time to mingle but the hour and the clear skies gave the reception a beautiful light and the guests were feeling its glow too. This included the guest of honor, who was wearing a golden yellow and looking at magical as ever. The next night was the opening gala preview party for Gloria Vanderbilt and her selling exhibition of works. The evening benefited the Huntsville Museum of Art. Gloria is an amazing per-

son to anyone who knows her as well as to the many who’ve never met her before. I was thinking of Diana Vreeland when I saw her at Janet Ruttenberg’s reception for her. Her life, the saga, while not totally “created” by her, has been lived like a play, or a movie, and she is the leading character. And a very glamorous one, at that! She’s a literary character in that way also—an exponent of the Belle Epoque who was maybe light-years ahead in the interstellar age. I have to be mindful with my adjectives about Gloria because the pleasure of her presence invites hyperbole. That’s what I mean by amazing. Her art is herself, transferred by hand and eye, as if blazing a path that says, “Gloria’s Life.” Vreeland was like that. It was her life, an original, like nothing else. The show expresses that, so get down there and take it all in. That’s Gloria; she’ll leave you

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Luca Bernasconi and Sharon Bush 38 QUEST

Anki Leeds with Peter and Martha Webster

Muffie Potter Aston and Colette Bennett

Robin and Martin Meltzer

Sydney Oliver and Steven Tanger

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Angela Geiger, Harry Johns and Maggie Fitzpatrick

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thinking about it. On a Wednesday night toward the end of the month, the weatherman forecasted big rainstorms and even tornado warnings and, from early morning to late afternoon, the skies were heavy and gray, but without precipitation. I left the house before 7 p.m. with umbrella, in blacktie, headed for Cipriani 42nd Street for the annual New Yorkers For Children benefit. What usually would take three to four minutes on the FDR took 25. Streets were flooding. I was dreading sloshing around in my dress slip-ons before I got into the hall. However, my clever, pa40 QUEST

Cynthia and Jamie Kempner

Ralph Harvard and Freddie Gray

Amanda Nisbet

tient cabbie navigated his car to deliver me right to the door. All I had to do was make the jump across the three-feetwide torrent by the curb. Which I did. Whew! Inside the great hall, the rain was coming down so hard that the several hundred guests had to raise their voices to be heard. The women were beautifully turned out, and the men were in black-tie. Cipriani 42nd Street serves a great signature dinner: a salad of asparagus, mushrooms, artichokes, fava beans, string beans, parmesan, and whole grain cracker, followed by a hefty four-inchthick individual prime roast

filet of beef with Périgourdine sauce, farro with zucchini and corn and a bundle of baby carrots tied with leek, and, for dessert, Zabaglione cake with fresh strawberries and Cipriani chocolate cake with Tahitian vanilla-bean ice cream. I attended the inaugural benefit of New Yorkers for Children about 15 years ago, invited by my friend Beth DeWoody. It was held at Chelsea Piers, a good group but much smaller than this night. New Yorkers for Children had been an idea of Nicholas Scoppetta who was, at the time, the Fire Commissioner of the City of New York. Mr. Scoppetta had been in

Ellie Cullman and Tracey Pruzan

foster care himself. He knew what it was like to come of age and, subsequently, be turned out of the system on one’s own with no back-up support. He wanted to find a way to help those who came after him. At the first benefit, he was joined by Susan Burden, Oscar de la Renta, Beth DeWoody, Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos, and others who’ve slipped from my memory of that moment. Their objective was to reach out and help young people plan their lives and continue their education to prepare for being out in the world. With no family—no center—to hold them. The year’s event was a

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Caroline Rhea and Katie Couric

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EAST 74TH STREET TOWNHOUSE: Huge, single family home between Madison and Park Avenues in the heart of the Upper East Side. Exceptional value. $15,000,000. WEB: Q0017688

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A tribute to its great success. Several of those who received help from New Yorkers for Children spoke about their lives in foster care and afterwards. There are only a few events where the evening is entirely made up of speakers and the audience actually listens. People usually lend their attention for the first few minutes, if that. Then it’s a direct competition between the rostrum and the diners. Not at the New Yorkers for Children event, however. There was an air of celebration in the room. Hope and Affirmation. The evening was opened by Zhanna Raymond and Brentin Brown, two graduates of the New Yorkers for Children

programs. Both Ms. Raymond and Mr. Brown have shared their history of the trauma and despair being placed in foster care. However, at the podium, we saw two self-possessed, dynamic individuals who are out in the world pursuing their educations and careers. Ms. Raymond and Mr. Brown, serving as emcees, introduced Crystalann Rodriguez. Last year, she told us her story of a childhood filled with serious abuse and the ensuing years in foster care. She said the support of New Yorkers for Children had assisted her continuing her education, coming to terms with her personal situation, and had allowed her to gain a self-con-

fidence that she had never had in growing up. One of the people honored that evening was John Demsey, chairman of MAC Aids Fund and group president of the Estée Lauder Companies. He is a very popular yet unassuming, soft-spoken fellow on the social circuit, known for his kindness, generosity, and friendship. He is also active in several other charitable organizations. Following his acceptance, another participant, Jermaine Christian, took the podium to introduce the other honorée of the evening, Justin Tuck of the New York Giants. Christian, like his confreres, told his story about finding New Yorkers

for Children, which supported him through thick and thin, to the point where he is now an Economics major at New York University. (Cheers from the crowd!) Justin Tuck, if you didn’t know, was raised in Kellytown, Alabama, a town known as “Tuckville” to many of its citizens because of the 150+ Tuck family members living in the community of 700 people. He told us how fortunate he was to have a family who always provided him with a strong support system to go out in the world. When he was introduced to New Yorkers for Children, he was amazed at what its young participants just out of foster

C O AC H I N G W E E K E N D AT M AU R E E N D O N N E L L ’ S H OM E I N N E W P O R T

Jerry and Diana Slocum

David and Lynda Lindh

Barbara Cates and Jim Mitchell

Dee Cushing, Fern Tailer and Thomas Cushing

42 QUEST

Irene Aitken and Henry Lynn

Maureen Donnell

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A care could do with the organization’s support. Both he and his wife Lauran Tuck (who is now a board member) have been active in helping children overcome illiteracy in his hometown as well as in New York and New Jersey. The final award of the evening, the North Shore-LIJ Health System NYFC 2012 Spirit Award, introduced by two former recipients, was for Brian Fleurimond, a 21-yearold sophomore majoring in Criminal Justice and minoring in Social Work at SUNY–Genessee Community College.

One day when Mr. Fleurimond was nine, his mother, didn’t pick him up after school. When he and his brother got home, they found her on the kitchen floor, dead. Murdered. By whom and why, no one knows. He and his two brothers and one sister, were placed in foster care. His journey following that loss took him to several foster homes. In school, he was a captain of the soccer, baseball, and basketball teams, learning about leadership at an early age. But by his senior year of high school, he thought his

only option was to drop out of school and look for a job. A trip to a local college sponsored by his foster care agency made him realize that he wanted to go to college. He enrolled in an alternative high school program where he could work during the day and go to school at night and graduated with perfect attendance, a Regents diploma, and a citizenship award. After the speeches, Jamie Niven of Sotheby’s conducted an auction to sponsor a student in foster care to participate in the New Yorkers

for Children Guardian Scholars Program for one year, for $10,000. This was followed by a special musical performance by Marc Cohn. The message of the New Yorkers for Children evening is that it can be done. Young people facing so many odds can progress, take responsibility, improve their lots in life, and show us all the way to a much better world than what was presented to them. It can be done. New Yorkers For Children and its roster of participants are proof, over and over. u

FA S H I O N ’ S N I G H T O U T AT I VA N K A T R U M P O N M E R C E R ST R E E T

Olga Litvinenko, Viktoryia Novo, Alisa Kovalchuk and Kjnel Jackson

Bill White, Jason Wallace, Kristen Bell and Bryan Eure 44 QUEST

Ivanka Trump

Geoffrey Hess and Lindsey Steinhoff

J.P. Rosenbaum, Kelly Sullivan, Jenina Garcia, Cathy Schwartz-Shino and Jade Greene

J E F F R E Y F R I E D P H OTO G R A P H Y

Guests browsing styles from Ivanka Trump

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O S C A R D E L A R E N TA W A S H O N O R E D BY F I T ’ S M U S E U M AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

Barbara and Jenna Bush

Eleanora Kennedy and Jane Holzer

Stephanie Seymour Brant

46 QUEST

Diana Taylor, Hamilton South and Barbara Walters

Sharon Loeb and Mariana Kaufman

Annette de la Renta and Henry Kissinger

Patty Harris and Michael Bloomberg

Oscar de la Renta

Jamee Gregory, Lorna Graev, Darcy Gould and Kitty McKnight

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Gabriel Rivera, Liz Peek with Isabel and Ruben Toledo

WITH GRATITUDE TO OUR MANY HUNDREDS OF SUPPORTERS FOR A HUGELY SUCCESSFUL NEW YORK CITY BOOK LAUNCH AT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN ON MAY 9, 2012.

–MEERA GANDHI AND THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA’S SEASON OPENING NIGHT

Trevor and Alexis Traina

Jack Calhoun and Trent Norris 48 QUEST

Gigi Reed

Diane Rubin, Ann Girard and Cathy MacNaughton

Kathy Hilton and Alan Malouf

Mai Shiver and Charles Githler

George and Charlotte Shultz

David Gockley with Cynthia and John Gunn

Paula Carono

D R E W A LT I Z E R P H OTO G R A P H Y

Dede Wilsey and Boaz Mazor

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N A N C Y G O N Z A L E Z FO R “ T W O X T W O ” AT S OT H E BY ’ S

Christopher Bass and Genevieve Bahrenburg

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Bill Bartholomary and Mai Hallingby

Neil Sedaka 52 QUEST

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Nicki and Ira Harris

Irvin and Joan Schnitzer Levy

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Extraordinary 11 acres in Mid-Country on Round Hill Road.Amazing western views of open sky, grassy meadow and mature specimen trees. The existing 5-bedroom Georgian is fully renovated. Heated pool, 2-bedroom brick guest cottage and 2 greenhouses. $14,000,000.WEB: 0066322. Amanda Miller

Park-like tranquility sets the stage for this old world stone manor amidst 12+ acres. This richly detailed residence exudes warm magnificence with seven bedrooms and eight fireplaces. Wine cellar, heated pool and tennis court. $13,500,000. WEB: 0065193. Joseph Barbieri

This Mid-Country stone Georgian has unmatched quality of construction, finishes and décor. Gracious formal rooms, beautiful kitchen/family room, and unbelievable lower level. Heated pool among mature trees and gardens offers ultimate privacy. $11,950,000. WEB: 0066329. Amanda Miller

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A 12 METRE NORTH AMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS IN NEWPORT

Robin Kelleher and 12 Metre President Dyer Jones

Matt Szala, Rich and Mary Moody, with Jeff and Anne Fisher

David Ray—winner of the Ted Turner Trophy

Tom Whidden and Dennis Connor aboard Kiwi Majic 54 QUEST

Gary Jobson and Ted Turner

Richie Sayer and Andy MacGowan

Jack Curtin and Scott Perry aboard Intrepid

Ronnie Simpson of Hope for the Warriors

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S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

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CALENDAR

OCTOBER For more information, call 713.632.8103.

11

POP STANDARDS

The Amy Winehouse Gala will take place at 7 p.m. at the Waldorf=Astoria, honoring Tony Bennett, Salaam Remi, and Mark Ronson. For more information, call 212.672.0509. SAVE ROOM FOR LUNCH

New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation’s Lunch at a Landmark will take place at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, honoring Steven Holl of Steven Holl Architects. For more information, call 212.669.7819.

15

CALLING ALL CROONERS

Sing for Hope’s gala will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Gustavino’s. For more information, call 212.966.5955.

16

THE CENTER OF IT ALL

American Ballet Theatre opens its season with a gala performance of Agnes de Mille’s “Rodeo” at New York City Center. For more information, call 212.477.3030.

17

FAMILY FÊTE

The American Museum of Natural History will host its family party at 5 p.m. For more information, call 212.496.3495. TAKE ME TO THE WATER

On October 22, the Princess Grace Awards Gala will take place at 6:30 p.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street with Patrick Page and Darron West among the 25 artists who will be receiving awards. The event will take place in the presence of T.S.H. Prince Albert II and Princess Charlene of Monaco. For more information, call 212.245.6570.

1

LAUDING LINEAGE

“Celebrating Families” will benefit the Center for Family Representation at 6:30 p.m. at the Mandarin Oriental. The event will honor the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Brian Steinwurtzel of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank. For more information, call 212.691.0950. HIT THE FAIRWAY

The YUE Cup will take place at 10 56 QUEST

a.m. at the Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey to celebrate China’s National Day. For more information, call 212.407.9337.

4

AMUSE-BOUCHE

Serendipity will present the Greenwich Food and Wine Festival to benefit the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp. Chefs will include Ted Allen, Graham Elliot, and Duff Goldman. For more information, call 203.588.1363.

10

SHOWTIME!

The New York-Presbyterian and the Weill Cornell Medical Center’s cabaret will take place at the Park Avenue Armory. For more information, call 914.235.1490.

Hope for a Healthier Humanity Foundation’s annual Humanitarian Award Dinner will honor Carmen Unanue and Boomer Esiason at 6 p.m. at the Water Club. For more information, call 718.966.4750.

18

OBJETS D’ART

The Society of Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center’s preview party for the International Fine Art and Antique Dealers Show will be held at the Park Avenue Armory—an event that was conceived in 1989. For more information, call 212.829.0002.

ART FOR ART’S SAKE

The Society for the Performing Arts will host a luncheon at 11 a.m. at Jones Hall in Texas. The event will feature Kathryn Stockett, author of The Help.

HAPPY 111TH!

Bergdorf Goodman will celebrate its 111th anniversary at 9 p.m. For more information, call 212.753.7300.

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CALENDAR

OCTOBER Award at 12 p.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

27

ALL AGLOW

“Light Up A Life” to benefit the New York-Presbyterian Phyllis and David Komansky Center for Children’s Health will take place at 4 p.m. at the Field House at Chelsea Piers. For more information, call 646.317.7376.

NOVEMBER 1 ON THE AVENUE

Fountain House’s Fall Fête will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Emporio Armani. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

2

MIRACLE ON 42ND STREET

On October 16, American Ballet Theatre will celebrate its fall season, and the 70th anniversary of Agnes de Mille’s “Rodeo,” with a gala performance at 6:30 p.m. at New York City Center. A dinner dance at The Pierre will follow. For more information, call 212.477.3030.

The American Hospital of Paris will hold its gala at 6:30 p.m. at the Four Seasons Restaurant. For more information, call 212.605.0398.

19

23

ASSOCIATE YOURSELF

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Rita Hayworth Gala will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Waldorf=Astoria. For more information, call 212.843.1712.

IN FULL BLOOM

The San Francsico Garden Club will celebrate its anniversary with “Art of the Flower” at 10:30 a.m. at the Four Seasons Hotel in San Francisco, California. For more information, call 415.771.0282.

22

ALL MY LIFE

The New York Center for Living will host its dinner dance at 6:30 p.m. at The Pierre. The organization supports an outpatient program for young people and their families. For more information, call 212.997.0100. SAY GRACE

The Princess Grace FoundationUSA will host the Princess Grace Awards Gala at 6:30 p.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street, honoring Lynne Watt. For more information, call 212.245.6570. 58 QUEST

HEAR ME ROAR

The New York Women’s Foundation will celebrate its 25th anniversary at 6:30 p.m. at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. For more information, call 646.807.8677.

the Royal Academy Trust’s gala will take place at The Pierre, with entertainment by the Bob Hardwick Orchestra. For more information, call 212.980.8404. POWER LUNCH

The International Women’s Media Foundation will present its Courage in Journalism

5

AGE WELL

The Carter Burden Center for the Aging will hold an event at the Mandarin Oriental. For more information, call 914.235.1490. WELL DESIGNED

The Royal Oak Foundation will present its Timeless Design Award at 6:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Club. For more information, call 301.548.7710.

ALL AROUND THE WORLD

The World Monuments Fund’s Hadrian Award Gala will take place at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 646.424.9594.

24

LAY THE FOUNDATION

Holiday House will open to benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, which was started by Evelyn Lauder, at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 646.424.9594. ROYAL FLUSH

The American Associates of

On October 24, Holiday House will open with a preview party at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. The event will benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, which was started by Evelyn Lauder. For more information, call 646.424.9594.

G E N E S C H I AV O N E ( A BT )

FRANCOPHILES

The Humane Society of the United States will host “To the Rescue!” at 6 p.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 301.548.7710.

ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

Garrison, nY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in The Castle, wellknown landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit, one of only seven units in the complex, offers breathtaking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open 12 to ceilings, 4 fireplaces, a gourmet kitchen, and COLDrooms, SPRING, NY15- foot Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and It dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone balcony fireplace, large sumptuous baths. offers outdoor – a covered COLD SPRING, NY also - Masterfully designed spaces contemporary offers massive two and story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor toconditioning, ceiling stone fireplace, large aing large deck. Comfort is assured with air security mountain stream. Delightful details and highcentral quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 and alarm systems, individual heating hotmaterials water are system, gening mountain stream. Delightful details and highand quality evidentand throughout the homeThe which is sited almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 erator. unit alsoonhas garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,190,000.

Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com

H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY

WHEN I PHOTOGRAPHED Andy Warhol at The Factory in 1983 with his portrait of Pia Zadora in the background, I reminded him of a project that involved both of us. Andy asked me if I had been paid. As I recall, I had been paid no more than $150 and said, “I’ll bet you got more.” He just laughed. When Gerald Ford became president in 1974, I was commissioned to photograph him for LIFE. Later, I got a call from Vogue asking if I had photographs of Ford. I said yes and, because I did assignments for Vogue from time to time, I was happy to oblige by turning in the photographs. I didn’t think anymore about it, and I just waited for the issue to appear. A couple of months later, the magazine arrived

in the mail and I flipped through it. To my surprise, Andy had splashed paint all over my photograph. No one had bothered to tell me. And, yes, his name was in bold type next to my much, much smaller photo credit. What could I do? I just shrugged and went on to my next assignment. But the story is not over. Several years ago, someone from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts called me to ask if I had the actual painting Andy had done of Gerald Ford as it was nowhere to be found. No, of course I didn’t have it. The only time I saw it was on the page in the magazine, which I still have a copy of. A few thoughts come to mind as to where that painting could be today, but no one will ever actually know. Since the copyright of the photograph belongs to me, and I never gave permission to use the photograph in that manner, I’ll be curious to watch the upcoming auction when Christie’s disposes of Warhol’s entire estate this fall. I used to see Andy occasionally in restaurants, clubs, Studio 54—out and about. He was always surrounded by a group of his friends, his superstars, his entourage. I doubt he ever went anywhere alone. He carried his Polaroid camera and tape recorder everywhere he went. Once, Andy took a Polaroid of me taking his photograph at The Factory. Where is the polaroid today? Perhaps he threw it away. Who knows? All I know is his 15 minutes of fame is still going strong. u Andy Warhol, photographed by Harry Benson at The Factory in 1983. Inset: A version of Harry Benson's photograph of Gerald Ford, which was modified by Andy Warhol for an issue of Vogue. OCTOBER 2012 61

TA K I

AN OPEN BOOK I STOPPED READING novels long ago.

When those phonies writing Magical Realism became household names, I dropped out more quickly than you can say Raymond Chandler. Now, that’s what I call a novel: the stuff Chandler churned out about old El Lay, everyone gulping booze and puffing away like steam engines with exercise taken mostly between the sheets. Crime writers have always had an inferiority complex about their work, but they sure beat some of the clowns posing as novelists nowadays. Chandler was a master of style, a serious writer who applied his classical English education to the task of creating rich slang. His similes were extravagant and Wodehousian. “He looked about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.” Chandler turned detective stories into art, labeling Los Angeles the city “with the personality of a paper cup.” Chandler taught himself to write by churning out pastiches of Hemingway—a man who, along with Fitzgerald, formed my life. After reading The Sun Also Rises, I had to go to Pamplona and run with the bulls, chase hard-drinking women like Lady Brett Ashley, and get into drunken fights in Parisian nightclubs. Fitzgerald was even worse for me. All Jay Gatsby did was party, just like Dick Diver and Tommy Barban did in Tender Is The Night. All three had character, were inwardly sensitive and decent, and threw their lives away for women. John O’Hara was another writer I adored when I was still a schoolboy. His

TA K I Appointment in Samarra left me shaken and fascinated as to how quickly one’s life can collapse. O’Hara was obsessed with the world of the rich, forgivable enough for someone who rose from obscure poverty. His short stories were top of the line, as were his novels, such as Ten North Frederick and From the Terrace. And what about W. Somerset Maugham? Willy was a great stylist and a wonderful short-story writer. His The Razor’s Edge is one of the masterpieces of English prose. The protagonist Larry Darrell’s minimal subsistence (by choice) in order to cultivate the life of the spirit is a lesson some of our present masters of the universe would do well to ponder. Norman Mailer’s An American Dream

place I’d only just choose instead of jail. Which brings me to Lawrence Durrell’s “Alexandria Quartet,” comprised of Justine, Balthazar, Mountolive, and Clea. Each novel is meaningless on its own. The structure of the quartet works perfectly, but it is the exoticism of the setting that blew my mind. The quartet was written between 1957 and 1960, the period during which my father sent me to what was called the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan as punishment for running up debts. He owned the biggest textile mills in the region. I spent every weekend in Alexandria and Cairo, which were magical places of easy living, easier service, and very easy sex. Durrell captures the atmosphere like a photographer. Better yet,

bars of its prison.” I was in love with a Justine-type who drove me crazy despite my youth and lust for life. Those were the days. And nights. Durrell is hardly read nowadays. Some of the untalented and illiterate phonies who write unreadable prose and pose as writers and critics dismiss many of those I have mentioned. It’s like insects calling lions weaklings. No one of my generation can write about novels without mentioning The Catcher in the Rye, which I read when I was 14. The acute observations of a boy alone in a world of hypocrisy gave me confidence that the images I had of certain people weren’t so far off. Salinger was the opposite of Waugh, whose Vile Bodies I adored, though I loathed the

This page: A library filled with works by our columnist’s favorites, and not-so-favorites. Opposite page: The four books of Lawrence Durrell’s “Alexandria Quartet.”

was outrageously provocative in the existential angst of the hero, Stephen Rojack. Later, Harlot’s Ghost was recognized as a beautifully written and researched opus. Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire Of The Vanities is a modern classic, illustrating exactly what Larry Darrell had foreseen as capitalism’s soul-wrenching weakness. Gore Vidal’s Washington, D.C. had me enthralled about the goings-on inside the beltway, a

like an Impressionist painter. Anything and everything happens in Alexandria: pederasty, incest, and all the convolutions of lust, greed, and betrayal. Durrell’s Alexandria is a dream city, inhabited by pashas, sophisticated foreigners, mysterious women, rich merchants, ragamuffin street vendors, drug dealers, and spies of all colors and nationalities. He wrote about “the flesh coming alive, trying the

writer. Salinger wrote about love; Waugh, a not-so-closeted queen, about guilt. Graham Greene and George Orwell complete this very incomplete list of my favorites. Greene is our greatest Catholic writer, and Orwell predicted what our free world would turn into. Hooray for all of the above. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. OCTOBER 2012 63

QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

AMBER DAYS, GOLDEN NIGHTS. Whether you’re in the market for autumnal colors (like an amber necklace) or more in the mood for fancy evenings on the town (try any of the gold pickings from Roberto Coin, de Grisogono, Wempe, or Montblanc), we have all your jewelry needs matched. Oh, and then there are clothes and shoes and trinkets galore. With so many finds to be had, decisions were never harder. But we’re here to help you try. Welcome autumn with this David Webb necklace in yellow gold, platinum, diamonds, turquoise, amber, and black enamel. $127,000. David Webb: 942 Madison Ave., 212.421.3030.

Heels for the girl who wears only flats: J.Crew’s chunky Etta snakeskin pump is sleek yet substantial, so there’s more to stand on. $375. J.Crew: At J.Crew boutiques and jcrew.com. Nothing but love from Carolina Herrera: Liberty and Lovers print silk blouse, Lovers print cotton peplum skirt, and cayenne snake belt. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552. It takes 21 Herend artists three and a half days to hand-paint this limited-edition chrysantème-orange Reserve Collection Dragon—and it shows. $5,090. Scully & Scully: 504 Park Ave., 212.755.2590, or scullyandscully.com.

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Make every day more colorful with

You’ll

Asprey’s Morgan day bag in

be drop-dead

sapphire crocodile. $20,100.

gorgeous in

Asprey: Available by calling

de Grisogono’s

212.688.1811.

drop Gocce earrings in pink sapphires and white diamonds set in pink gold. $45,900. de Grisogono: 824 Madison Ave., 212.439.4220, or degrisogono.com. An elegant gunmetal clutch, the “It Kit” from vbeauté holds five luxuryskincare essentials that are easy to take anywhere, anytime. $165. vbeauté: 877.326.5622 or vbeaute.com.

Get a head start on 2013 with Roberto Coin’s Year of the Snake necklace in 18-kt. rose gold with diamonds. $59,500. Roberto Coin: Available at Neiman Marcus, 800.533.1312.

Excite your senses with Wempe’s Sensual Slim BY KIM rings in 18-kt. rose and white golds with diamonds. $9,425-13,325. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Beguile them with your seaward call in this silver paillette tulle Siren gown from Michael Kors. $12,000. Michael Kors: At select Michael Kors stores, 866.709.KORS, and michaelkors.com.

Forever yours: the rose gold and diamond Infiniment Vôtre ring from Montblanc. $2,355. Montblanc: At select Montblanc boutiques, 800.995.4810, and montblanc.com.

OCTOBER 2012 65

Fresh Finds

Serve it up right with a customized wooden serving tray from Pickett’s Press.

Not your everyday belt:

Pickett’s Press:

the Tod’s brown leather belt

1016 Lexington Ave.,

with cut-out details.

917.742.5388, or

$545. Tod’s: Tod’s bou-

pickettspress.com.

tiques nationwide, 800.457.TODS, and tods.com.

Find out for yourself why Casa de Campo was just voted the Caribbean’s Leading Golf Resort by the Caribbean and Americas 2012 World Travel Awards. Casa de Campo: 855.877.3643 or casadecampo.com.do.

The men’s vintage multi-stripe billfold and coin wallet by Paul Smith is a delight of stripes. $275. Paul Smith: 108 Fifth Ave., 212.627.9770, or paulsmith.co.uk.

Polo Ralph Lauren is a perfect fit on fall days: red bike jacket ($695), olive cashmere cable-knit sweater ($395), and khaki cargo pants ($185). Select stores and ralphlauren.com.

Smythson’s large Eliot tote in soft nubuck and taureau leather provides every man-about-town with a stylish solution for keeping things together on the go. $2,300. Smythson: smythson.com.

Ride (or walk) in the highest style with these hand-made Frente boots from Casa Fagliano, exclusively for Etiqueta Negra. $4,000. Etiqueta Negra: 273 Lafayette St., 212.219.4015, or etiquetanegra.us. 66 QUEST

With true heirloom quality and a solid wood core, nothing’s better than the Gentleman’s Umbrella in chestnut from Ghurka. $295. Ghurka: 781 Fifth Ave., 212.826.8300, or ghurka.com.

Color her amber in this gold Carnelian links and red amber flower necklace with citrine centers. $14,800. Sorab & Roshi: 30 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich, CT, 203.869.5800, or sorabandroshi.com.

Your baubles will be both safe and stylishly kept with Chanel’s bronze python jewelry box. $4,300. Chanel: Select Chanel boutiques or 800.550.0005.

A timeless timepiece: Cartier’s Baignoire watch in 18-kt. yellow gold with an alligator strap and quartz movement. $9,700. Cartier: 828 Madison Ave. (212.472.6400) or 653 Fifth Ave. (212.753.0111).

Get dressed in Burberry Prorsum: bronze, red, and garnet T-shirt ($795); cherry nylon-blend tiered skirt ($2,395); black leather-studded gloves ($650). Burberry Prorsum: 9 East 57th St. or burberry.com.

You’ll feel like doing back-flips this fall in Stuart Weitzman’s Backflip scarlet mustanghair bootie. $675. Stuart Weitzman: Available at stuartweitzman.com. OCTOBER 2012 67

SPORT

OVER THE RIVER AND TO FAR HILLS THE FAR HILLS RACE Meeting, or “The Hunt”—the October event in Far Hills, New Jersey, to benefit the Somerset Medical Center—serves as a holiday for waxed cotton-wearers. Year after year, they gather, mucking through the grounds in rubber boots from Hunter or L.L. Bean. The reason? To observe 60 thoroughbreds of the National Steeplechase Assocation compete in six races. And to tailgate, whether it be from the chairman’s tent or the back of a pick-up truck. “There’s something for everyone, old and young alike,” says Victoria Allen, on behalf of the Somerset Medical Center. “Some families have been attending for generations. It’s also the setting for many reunions. College and high school friends come back year after year to renew their friendships.”

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The event was started by the Essex Fox Hounds, a club established in 1870, as an opportunity to acknowledge those who allowed their property to be used for sport. Since 1916, the Far Hills Race Meeting has run at Moorland Farm—a tradition that welcomes 40,000 spectators from New England and beyond. The Far Hills Race Meeting is an opportunity to festively welcome fall, toasting the season with friends (and champagne). “My favorite part of the event is the world-class steeplechase horse racing and the excitement of the spectators,” says Victoria Allen. “It is a great mix of society and sport.” u The Far Hills Race Meeting is on October 20. For more information, visit www.farhillsrace.org.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E FA R H I LL S R AC E M E E T I N G A S S O C I AT I O N

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

This page, clockwise from top left: Spectators at the Far Hills Race Meeting, circa 1970; a variety of tailgates, circa 1970; children playing together at the event; a view from the “hilltop� area, 1976; spectators dressed up for the event; a tailgate scene; a woman wearing a fall-themed hat; a program for the Essex Fox Hounds Race Meeting in 1939. Opposite page: Thoroughbreds racing at the 2011 Far Hills Race Meeting.

OCTOBER 2012 69

L U X U RY

A MOVEABLE WARDROBE

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GARDE ROBE, A COMPANY that provides storage for cloth-

ing, caters to customers with multiple homes—and multiple wardrobes. Experienced with everything from cashmere sweaters to haute couture, Garde Robe offers a variety of services, caring for accessories and clothing while maintaining accessibility for its customers. “In most cases, Garde Robe members utilize the service to protect and preserve evening wear that is worn solely on special occasions, as well as out-of-season garments,” says Doug Greenberg, vice president of Garde Robe. “We ensure that irreplaceable garments remain in pristine condition and provide on-demand delivery—whenever, wherever.” Since 2001, when Garde Robe was conceived as an effort to expand the closets in New York by housing apparel, the company has evolved into a full-service valet. After items are collected and cleaned, if requested, they’re photographed and cataloged for online access via the Cyber Closet—which will soon boast its own iPad app. One click, and the items are on their way. “Our members can receive their ski gear and wardrobe in Aspen this winter, and in Switzerland next winter,” says Adam Gilvar, president of Garde Robe. And, with that, packing—and unpacking—is a thing of the past. Garde Robe is the premier company of its kind, which is something that discerning customers throughout the world know. “Garde Robe has many members who have amassed amazing collections of vintage couture,” says Greenberg. “My favorites would be the Oscar de la Renta and Carolina Herrera archives that we care for or an Alexander McQueen wedding dress worn by a princess from the Middle East. It is one of the last pieces he designed, personally.” With locations from California to New York, as well as internationally, Garde Robe is continuing to expand. Where to next? Palm Beach, Florida. “Many longtime Garde Robe members have residences in Palm Beach,” says Greenberg. “Expanding to Florida is a natural fit.” Vintage Lilly Pulitzer dresses can be delivered for the summer, while fur and formal wear can be delivered for the winter, when the Palm Beach season is aswirl. u

This page: A wardrobe that is cared for throughout the year by Garde Robe (above); a visual from the Cyber Closet, which provides accessibility for owners to view their wardrobes and have items delivered. Opposite page: Garde Robe caters to clients with fashionable wardrobes that include current and vintage items by the best designers.

OCTOBER 2012 71

ART

WHY DO I OWE TAX ON ART I DON’T OWN? BY JUDITH L. PEARSON

TAXPAYERS SPEND a lot of money cre-

ating tax-efficient plans for their real estate investments, business interests, and stocks and bonds, yet they often ignore the future when it comes to their art and other important pieces. The paramount risk in the art world today is the risk of a defective legal title, i.e., a situation in which the client does not actually own the work of art or other important piece in their possession. The resulting financial loss to art owners, their families, and third-party beneficiaries due to the failure of tax, trust, estate, and other philanthropic plans can be substantial. Two recent court cases show the tension between the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) policy to tax personal property without regard to related questions of marketability or the lack of a clear legal title (or ownership) and the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), which requires appraisers to identify assumptions and hypothetical conditions regarding possible liens, encumbrances, or other factors that can affect clear legal title (or ownership) behind their reports on valuation. An important case is that of the Ileana Sonnenbend estate and a Robert Rauschenberg work entitled Canyon, which three appraisers using USPAP standards valued at $0 and which the IRS valued at $65 million. The late art dealer Ileana Sonnebend purchased Canyon in 1970, a collage that includes a stuffed bald eagle. After the sale, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made it illegal to own, possess, sell, or exhibit anything containing bald eagles. But in 1982,

This page: It is important for taxpayers to understand the legislation that surrounds their artwork (pictured, Mark Rothko's Untitled, circa 1957).

CO U RTE S Y O F A R I S

Opposite page: Judith L. Pearson, President of ARIS Title Insurance Corporation.

Sonnebend obtained a special permit to retain Canyon and lend it for use in exhibitions at museums. The work is now on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but with arguably no marketability. Thereore, the taxpayer is unable to claim any value for estate tax purposes. Another important case is that of the daughter of the late rare coin dealer Israel Swift, who found a safe deposit box once owned by her father containing 20 Double Eagle gold coins from 1933 with an estimated value of $80 million. The U.S. government proceded to allege that the coins had been stolen in 1933, and succeeded at trial in seizing the coins from the Swift family. In the court documents, it came to light that the gold coins at issue were not disclosed for IRS estate tax purposes when the executors probated the Israel Swift estate in 1985 and 1990. Although there has yet to

be a claim by the IRS or a dispute in the public domain about the family’s estate tax obligations related to this non-disclosure, the case begs the vexing question of whether a taxpayer who has dominion and control but, according to judicial ruling, no legal title to the property is the owner for estate tax purposes. If so, can the asset can be taxed at full market value despite the lack of legal title? These two cases are examples of ownership defects with substantial financial consequences, highlighting how critical it is for collectors and their professional advisors to understand the impact that art ownership has on tax and estate strategies and the two related issues still in flux: What is the value of and estate tax liability for art and related assets for which a taxpayer does not have clear legal title (as in the Swift case)? And what is an owner to do if an asset has no marketable

value assuming a right to dominion and control but clearly has a defective legal title (as in the Sonnabend example)? Collectors should proactively raise these issues and know the authoritative legal state of title of their art and collectibles for tax planning. And so should their professional advisors, whose role it is to protect their clients and their clients’ trusts, estates, and beneficiaries from the foreseeable risk of loss resulting from ownership-related issues with their fine art and other important collectibles.* *To the extent that this article discusses tax matters, it is not intended to act as law. Taxpayers should seek advice from independent tax attorneys or accountants based on circumstances. See circular 230. For more information about ARIS Title Insurance Corporation, call 212.563.3600 or visit aristitle.com. OCTOBER 2012 73

S E RV I C E

FOCUSING ON FAMILY JUSTICE WITH A PROUD TIP OF QUEST’S CAP to Mayor Mike Bloomberg and his fine team, the concept of “family justice” has become an accessible reality throughout our beloved city. Managed by the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence and supported by private donations to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City, the Family Justice Center Initiative is a public-private partnership that provides critical services to victims of domestic violence and their children. These Family Justice Centers (FJCs) help victims regain their personal dignity, and put them on a path toward recovery and self-sufficiency. Moreover, the centers provide free assistance, shelter, and counseling, all under one roof, affording them the opportunity to legally protect themselves and eventually rebuild their lives. Since Mayor Bloomberg launched this initiative in 2005, the city’s three centers in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens have received over 180,000 74 Q U E S T

client visits, and have helped more than 75,000 families find the crucial support that they need and richly deserve. Quest readers may recall the hugely successful Liz Smithchampioned block parties, known as Fête de Swifty, whose generous donations helped to construct and operate Family Justice Centers throughout the boroughs of New York. Over the past year, the Family Justice Center Initiative has introduced and increased new programs to assist victims. In January 2011, the centers expanded their immigration services for domestic violence victims, providing additional attorneys to help clients find ways to obtain jobs, independent of their abuser—a key first step on their road to full recovery. Last spring, the Family Justice Center in Queens launched a pilot program for entry-level jobs in the technology field. NYC STEPS (New York City Supported Training and

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K C I T Y M AY O R ’ S O F F I C E

BY CHRIS MEIGHER

Oppostie page: Commissioner Yolanda B. Jimenez awarding a certificate of completion to a member of the NYC STEPS program, Marsha Anderson. This page, clockwise: The cheerful decor of the Family Justice Centers, which offer free child care; the centers are designed to facilitate counseling; learning centers help kids adapt.

Employment Preparation Services) has created weekly classes in web-based instruction, with on-site support and remedial help from volunteers and FJC employees. This program has recently expanded to the FJC in the Bronx, and will open in the Brooklyn Center next month. Not coincidentally, October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the Mayor’s Office will be proactively assisting on various events throughout our city—to elevate awareness, and empower New Yorkers who are, or may know of, domestic violence victims. These October events aim to bring community organizations together in an effort to better assist those living in abusive relationships. This is a highly worthy cause, and your grateful publisher encourages you to get involved during National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and to contribute to the Mayor’s Fund at www.nyc.gov/fund. u

T R AV E L

THE LUXURY-AIRCRAFT charter business has changed a great

deal over the years. One could objectively say that with the advent of fractional providers and multiple brokerage firms, charter has become a commodity and that service has been watered down. Two companies, Tradewind and Zen Air, are proof that incredible service and dedication to safety are alive and well. Tradewind is both an airline and a traditional charter company—and, in partnership with Zen Air, a large aircraft operator, it provides a seamless experience in travel. Tradewind operates smaller jets and a luxury niche airline while Zen Air runs larger jets. Unlike brokers, both companies operate the aircraft themselves and comply with and exceed FAA requirements. Clients can book individual seats on scheduled Tradewind flights to both Nantucket and the Vineyard from Teterboro and Westchester airports in the Northeast as well as flights to St. Barth’s in the Caribbean. Tradewind eschews St. Maarten in favor of San Juan and St. Thomas, which significantly improves service and avoids lost luggage. There are more flights from the U.S. to both of these points and no customs or immigration is needed when island-bound. The return is even easier as pas76 QUEST

sengers are escorted through U.S. Customs in San Juan and St. Thomas, then taken on domestic flights back to the U.S. A new daily service from Antigua to St. Barth’s was recently added to service clients from London and Europe, but it is also very convenient for clients flying from the U.S. Tradewind also runs charters throughout the Caribbean to other destinations, including Mustique. All local flights are conducted by two U.S.-trained pilots in modern turbo-prop air-conditioned aircraft. Though both Zen Air and Tradewind shine in service everywhere in the world, the Caribbean is one area where they offer unique advantages. Flights can be conducted from anywhere in the U.S. in aircraft ranging from Pilatus PC-12s to Citation CJ3s to Gulfstreams into any island near St. Barth’s and Mustique, among others, and a waiting turboprop continues the trip to the smaller islands. This is as seamless an experience as one can get, and Zen Air and Tradewind are the only companies that have the resources to offer such service. Zen Air’s specialty is long-range flights, which can mean anything from hops to the Caribbean, Aspen, or London all the way to unforgettable vacations such as India, Botswana, or Ushuaia. What’s more, Zen Air doesn’t believe in having

CO U RTE S Y O F T R A D E W I N D AV I AT I O N

ZEN AND A TRADEWIND IN THE FRIENDLY SKIES

Opposite page: A Pilatus PC-12, one of the many beautiful aircraft in the Tradewind and Zen Air fleet. This page: Clients enjoy attentive experiences from the airline’s staff (above); a Gulfstream coming in for landing; the luxurious and spacious interior; flights to the Caribbean

CO U RTE S Y O F T R A D E W I N D AV I AT I O N ; F R E D B O U R E AU

allow for a getaway to the crystal blue seas; relax in style with the impeccable service Tradewind and Zen AIr provide.

food catered—an expensive but unsatisfying proposition—but would rather plan a meal and have the best chefs from worldrenowned restaurants prepare it to individual specifications. The company also believes children should be catered to with specialized meals and entertainment, and its planes have an abundance of activities like games designed to keep children busy during flight. Tradewind Aviation was founded by brothers Eric and David Zipkin and David Zara. Eric graduated from Wharton and his brother, an avid skier, from the University of Vermont; both have been pilots since an early age. Zara attended Vassar College and, like his partners, worked in different industries but was yearning to turn his life-long passion of flying into a viable business. The Zipkins are dual French-U.S. citizens and grew up traveling around the world, while Zara speaks seven languages. They hold Multi-Engine Airline Transport Licenses with numerous type ratings and have thousands of hours of flying experience. Tradewind was born 10 years ago with one plane and has grown into a 12-aircraft company today. Zen Air was the brainchild of Gianpaolo DeFelice, an Alitalia pilot from Naples, and David Zara. Like the Zipkin brothers,

they decided aircraft management was poorly executed, and traditional charter companies were sometimes taking advantage of their friends who owned aircraft or flew privately. Tradewind was already established as a well-respected small-aircraft company, so they decided to close the loop and start a large-aircraft charter and management firm. They bought a trustworthy operator with whom they frequently worked and proceeded to tweak it to their specifications. Both DeFelice and Zara believe cautious and measured growth is essential to safety and service and, as such, have prospered through this recession by making careful, strategic business decisions. Both Tradewind and Zen Air believe transparence is the best method to grow, and clients seem to agree. Neither would divulge client names but we can safely assume the list is remarkable. Ultimately, both companies believe they are not in the transportation business. They train their pilots to be their ambassadors and their staff to understand they are in the service business and that it is mere coincidence the business happens to be transportation. u For more information, please contact Tradewind Aviation at (203) 267-3305 or Zen Air at (201) 288-5762. OCTOBER 2012 77

FA S H I O N

ANGELO GALASSO AT THE PLAZA

ANGELO GALASSO is a fashion cognoscente who, since found-

ing his eponymous company in 1990, has never failed to instill awe. His latest endeavor has led him to set up shop in the famous Edwardian Room at The Plaza, a perfect home for a label that prides itself on the revival of another era. “Gianni Versace has always been my style icon and idol,” Galasso admits. “I admire his baroque [fashion].” Think of Galasso as the Gian Lorenzo Bernini of bespoke menswear: he brings exuberant life to clothes, weaving a kinetic energy of prints and colors with unrivaled, exceptional tailoring. “I have always been fascinated by the art of creating the perfect shirt.” And it shows. The designer’s signature piece, the polso orologio shirt, was created in the early 1990s and is now a worldwide hit, even at the Design Museum London. The shirt’s cuff recedes in part to expose a frame for the wearer’s watch. Gianni Agnelli, the famously fashionable former president of Fiat, inspired the concept. “In my research, a gentleman who purchases a Ferrari wants to drive around and show [it] off,” 78 QUEST

observes Galasso. “This type of man would want to do the same with his expensive watch.” Enter the polso orologio. The shirt’s success helped launch the full Angelo Galasso collection. “Nothing happens by accident,” confides Galasso. When the Edwardian Room at The Plaza, known for its Spanish Renaissance-revival style, became available, Galasso jumped at the opportunity: “It fit exactly with the philosophies of my brand—classic, Renaissance, innovation, and evolution.” And the synergy here between brand and location is so unmistakable that you feel it immediately upon entering. The Angelo Galasso label is a true tour de force. Galasso understands what men want in clothing and accessories, and manages to continually evolve one-of-a-kind pieces for his clients. But what is the one essential no man should be without? “A little bit of self-irony,” according to the master himself. “Break the rules and dare to be creative.” u Visit questmag.com for an exclusive Q.&A. with Angelo Galasso.

S T U D I O S TE FA N O S C ATA ; CO U RT E S Y O F A N G E LO G A L A S S O

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

This page: Italian fashion designer Angelo Galasso’s new boutique at The Plaza. Opposite page: An organizer, small purse, and travel wallet in light blue crocodile; the ostrich faded biker jacket; twotone brogue shoes; the designer Angelo Galasso.

OPEN HOUSE

AMAZING

LAKESIDE AUBERGE THE BOULDERS INN, one of the truly

special residences in Litchfield County, is a historic lakefront estate on beautiful Lake Waramaug. Lake Waramaug is the second-largest natural lake in Connecticut and, given its limited public access, is designated a “Heritage Lake.� The stone-and-shingle main house, built and designed in 1895 by the famous architect Ehrick Rossiter, has been completely renovated and

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expanded. The main house features an inviting reception area, a paneled living room with a large fireplace overlooking the lake, and a formal dining room that also boasts lake views. There are a variety of settings in which you can relax: a bar area, a cozy library with a fireplace, a large stone patio, and a large veranda with water views.There are six guest bedrooms in the main house, of which one is a junior suite.

This spread, clockwise from top left: The exterior of Boulders Inn; sit back and read a book in the comfortable library; a breathtaking view of the lake; relax in one of the inn’s guest rooms; the boathouse; a warm living room with an even warmer fireplace; take in the fresh air from the lakeside balcony; enjoy all your meals in a dining room filled with natural light; vacation on the waterfront; rich wooden accents create an inviting reception foyer.

The property also boasts a six-bedroom carriage house and four duplex guest cottages. A boathouse, a garage/ workshop, and unforgettable stunning western lake views are all included. It is perched in a park-like setting, with significant water frontage, beach area, and a floating dock on over 25 acres abutting Steep Rock land preserve, one of the oldest land trusts in Connecticut. The Boulders Inn offers a unique

atmosphere of elegance, romance, and warm New England charm, close to New York City. Enjoy the exquisite setting with magnificent sunsets, as well as canoeing, swimming, cycling, and hiking. Have your own On Golden Pond moments at this gorgeous estate. u For more information, contact Peter Klemm of Klemm Real Estate at 860.868.7313 or peterklemm@msn.com.

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presents

Career Transition For Dancers 27th Anniversary Jubilee

A DANCE VARIETY SPECTACULAR

Monday, November 5, 2012 • 7:00 PM • New York City

Hosted by

ANGELA LANSBURY

Honoring

Featuring

LIZA MINNELLI

CHITA RIVERA

ROLEX DANCE AWARD

CAREER TRANSITION FOR DANCERS’ AWARDS

Joni Berry • Michele Herbert • Gerald M. Appelstein • Arthur Murray International With appearances by

Natalie Enterline

Jason Samuels Smith

Amra-Faye Wright

Special appearances and performances by, and artists from

American Dance Machine 21 • Arthur Murray Dancers • Big Apple Circus Cirque du Soleil • Nate Cooper • Dancing Classrooms • EveryDayMan Adventures Hubbard Street Dance Chicago • Hybrid Movement Company • New York City Ballet Suzanne Farrell Ballet • Tigerpalast Varieté Theater Frankfurt For more stars and surprises visit careertransition.org Produced and Directed by Ann Marie DeAngelo Executive Producer

Alexander J. Dubé

NYCITYCENTER.ORG CITYTIX 131 W 55th St (btwn 6th & 7th) 212.581.1212 PERFORMANCE ONLY TICKETS AT $130, $90, $75, $55, $45 Patron Tickets: $1,200, $750, $600. Tables for 10 start at $7,500. Patron Tickets and Tables include premium performance seating and post-performance “Supper with the Stars,” dancing and a live auction at the Hilton New York. Contact Marjorie Horne at 212.228.7446 x 33; Marjorie@mcevoyandassociates.com, or at careertransition.org • Group Sales: 718.499.9691 • Artists and program subject to change.

27th Anniversary Chairs Anka K. Palitz • Susan & 27th Anniversary Jubilee Sponsors

Stewart Wicht

Gerald M. Appelstein • Arthur Murray International • Joni Berry & Stephen Maitland-Lewis • Condé Nast Dance Magazine and Pointe • Michele & Lawrence Herbert • Anita Jaffe • Sono Osato & Victor Elmaleh Photos: A. Lansbury by Stephen Paley; L. Minnelli by Ruven Afandor; C. Rivera by Laura Marie Duncan; J.S. Smith by Michael Higgins

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Stone Hill Riverfront -

Over four beautiful acres along the Stone Hill River. Charming Country Cape, circa 1941 with hardwood floors, two fireplaces, French doors and extensive millwork. Living Room with Fireplace. Library with doors out to the rear terrace with hot tub. Beautiful Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Private Master Suite.Central air. Gated drive to beautiful acreage. Two Bay Post and Beam Barn.$1,495,000

A Penwood Classic - Impeccable White-shingle Country Colonial in

Antique Homestead & Barn Complex - Three level, open acres, part of the original pound. Mid-18th Century Landmark, carefully preserved yet completely unspoiled. Wide plank floors, three fireplaces, original glass, hand-hewn beams, 18th Century doors and original hardware. Keeping Room with Fireplace, cooking crane and beehive oven. Five Bedrooms. Fabulous Antique Barn Complex brimming with possibilities, including potential Pool House and/or Artist Studio or Cottage. Pool. Walk to school and library! $1,100,000

Cross View Farm - Beautiful and historic Country Farmhouse, circa

top estate area. Gracious lines and proportions. 5650 square feet of elegantly finished living space. Two Story Entrance Hall. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Library. Playroom. Five Bedrooms. Four private acres in a prestigious enclave of luxury homes. Beautifully landscaped grounds with Pool.$2,350,000

1848. Rocking chair porch with view of the Cross River Reservoir. 4500 square feet of elegantly appointed living space with wonderfully scaled rooms, great light, hardwood floors, period molding, French doors and four fireplaces. Living Room with Fireplace and French doors to Wisteria-covered terrace. Five Bedrooms. Four breathtaking acres with majestic trees and level lawns. Guest Cottage. Pool and Tennis Court.$1,795,000

Walk to Lake Waccabuc - The lake lifestyle! Swim, fish and boat in Majestic White Ash - Circa 1930’s Country House in the heart of the clear clean waters of Lake Waccabuc. Two tranquil acres along quiet Perch Bay Road. Level, open lawns, flowering shrubs and incredible rock outcroppings Country Farmhouse with 3300 sqft of sun-filled living space. Formal Living & Dining Rooms. Family Room with wet bar. Den with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Fabulous Screened Porch and rear deck perfect for entertaining. $895,000

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Stanwood. Sun-filled Living Room with Fireplace. Dining Room with doors to rear terrace. Open Country Kitchen. Private Master Suite with incredible new Bath. Two Family Bedrooms. Cozy Office. New heating system and central air conditioning. Spectacularly landscaped parcel with beautiful flowering gardens and extensive stone work. Bedford Schools.$465,000

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THEY’VE GOT THE BEAT

Paul McCartney on a train; Harry Benson with John Lennon in January 1964 (inset). 86 QUEST

H A R RY B E N S O N

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

This page: Muhammad Ali, hitting George Harrison (above); the Beatles arrive in New York at the beginning of Beatlemania, 1964. Opposite page: The Beatles—Ringo Starr, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison— composing together at a piano.

H A R RY B E N S O N

“IT WAS REALLY IN PARIS that Beatlemania started to

really move—rumble, you know?” says Harry Benson, the photographer who offers a chronicle of the Beatles in Harry Benson: The Beatles (Taschen). On February 1, 1964, while the Beatles—and Harry Benson—were staying at the Hôtel George V, their manager reported that “I Want to Hold Your Hand” was number one on the Billboard Hot 100. Minutes later, he returned, announcing that the Beatles had been invited to appear on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Harry stages: “Paul was sitting, drinking. John slips away and gets a pillow and hits him in the back of the head with it. That was the pillow fight. That was how it started. I’m sure Beethoven and Mozart had a pillow fight too when they were young. The Beatles are icons to this day and I’m glad to have them having a pillow fight, nearly 50 years ago.” And, with that, George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr were memorialized, by Harry Benson, in midair. “The Beatles had become a story—they were a major story,” says Harry. “They helped America get over J.F.K. It was only

two months after J.F.K. was assassinated that they came, and they helped to get America over it because, then, the songs were the thing.” The United States—struggling with a dissonance caused by the assassination of the President, as well as the anxiety of the Cold War and the disharmony of the Civil Rights Movement— experienced somewhat of a rejuvenation with the Beatles. The songs offered a positive refrain at the dénouement of Camelot. Was it a movement? “Absolutely,” says Harry. It was Beatlemania—the Beatles redefined the era. “It was right down the line. Everyone wanted to see them, touch them.” Harry recalls his assignment to photograph the Beatles in 1964, having been rerouted to France from Africa by his editor. Determined to continue as a photojournalist rather than a rock ’n’ roll photographer, he was disappointed with the news. But there he was, at Fountainebleau for a concert. “Now, I’m not altogether in a good mood,” says Harry. “I was wanting to be in Africa. Then I hear, ‘Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you...’ And I’m on the right story. This is the OCTOBER 2012 89

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private and public moments before racing to develop the film in hotel bathroom after hotel bathroom. Everyone has a Beatles memory—for many, it’s their appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show”—and everyone knows where he or she was when John Lennon was shot on December 8, 1980. Harry was in New York, at his apartment on the Upper East Side. Ordinary, except for that fact that, years later, he was assigned to photograph John Lennon’s murderer, Mark David Chapman, at the Attica Correctional Facility “I photographed him in jail,” says Benson. “He apologized to me for killing my friend. It’s a job.” But what a job, experiencing the road with the four boys from Liverpool, who, with Beatlemania, reset a nation’s tenor—and captured the imagination of the world. u

H A R RY B E N S O N

right story. It was obvious just how great they were.” The Beatles were able to compose amid the swirl of attention that surrounded them. “No matter where they were, they could compose,” says Harry. “They could be in a busy room and they’d compose. You could see each of them... George wanting to have a beer, John wanting to have a beer. And they’d say, ‘Sure,’ and they’re composing. There was nothing pretentious about them, you know? They knew the music was good.” Harry’s work was almost symbiotic as he excercised an organic approach that mirrored the immediacy—the rawness—demonstrated by the Beatles. As a photojournalist, he was constant in his observing the Beatles, capturing their

The Beatles arrived in the U.S. to perform on “The Ed Sullivan Show� in February 1964 (above); the cover of Harry Benson: The Beatles (Taschen), published for the 50-year anniversary of their arrival in the U.S. (below).

FEARLESS FINE ART FEMALES

Wave of Sea, a wall relief of stuffed and sewn fabric by Yayoi Kusama, one of Japan’s most important living artists.

CO U RTE S Y O F C H R I S T I E ’ S

B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

Cindy Sherman, who leaves the majority of her works untitled, uses primarily female subjects in her work.

THE GUERRILLA GIRLS, a group of

feminists who protest sexism in the fine art world, won’t need to pull out their gorilla masks for Christie’s latest show. With 48 lots by 31 female artists featured, the First Open sale reveals the importance of established and emerging women in the art world today. The two new co-heads of First Open, Charlie Adamski and Charlotte Perrottey, are enthusiastic about what this shift means for the place women hold in the contemporary art world. “It’s really fun and we’re excited to be able to feature such great works by the forefront of female artists from the past 60 years.”

OCTOBER 2012 93

Louise Bourgeois’ s Uncontrollable Torrent, a drawing done on paperboard with gouache, ink, and graphite (above).

Adamski shares. Perrottey agrees, “There’s some girl power going into this.” This previous post-war and contemporary art sale at Christie’s last May had already broken records, reaching not only its highest total ($388 million), but also the highest ratio of male-to-female works at five-to-one. “You’re really seeing that collectors are going after works by female artists, and at very strong prices. So as these works are more highly sought after, we’re putting them in very visible places,” explains Adamski. The demand is clearly driving the market, and these women artists are in demand. One artist featured in the collection is Yayoi Kusama, who currently has a major retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art. This makes the sale of her Red Nets, No. 19 perfectly timed. Kusama’s bold red painting graces the cover of the sale’s catalog, drawing attention to an important artist of the avant-garde. Helen Frankenthaler, an abstract expressionist painter, has a color-rich piece in the sale, entitled White Makes Four. She was influenced by her male counterparts like Hans Haufman, Jackson Pollack, and Clement Greenberg, but painted without what she perceived as their egocentric gestures. New York-based photographer Cindy Sherman has enjoyed high visibility, even in the mainstream culture, according to Adamski. One of her photographs sold for a record $3.9 million last year, the highest price ever paid for a photograph at that time. She is one of the few women artists

Red Nets, No.19 is an early example of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Net paintings, which

CO U RTE S Y O F C H R I S T I E ’ S

launched her career (below).

OCTOBER 2012 95

About Helen Frankenthaler, Barbara Rose wrote that “her paintings are not merely beautiful. They are statements of great intensity and significance about what it is to stay alive, to face crisis and survive, to accept

whose auction prices are in the same ballpark as her male peers. Louise Bourgeois’s legendary spider sculptures have been spinning their webs since the late 1990s and one of them, Spider Home, is part of this collection, as well as a rare drawing, Uncontrollable Torrent. As the founder of confessional art, family themes are pervasive throughout her work, and the piece carries echoes of her philandering father’s devastating effect on her young psyche. Art has long been a man’s world, with male artists consistently predominating museums, auctions, and textbooks, while equally talented female contemporaries were overlooked. But the tides seem to be slowly turning and, ultimately, the ideal might be reached: judging a work on its own merit, without bias against the artist’s gender. “We go after the top examples of post-war and contemporary art that is out there for us to put front and center,” says Perrotty. “We’re pushing past the historical placement of female artists behind male artists.” u 96 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F C H R I S T I E ’ S

maturity with grace and even joy.”

Untitled (Ice Skater) by Cindy Sherman, who has raised challenging and important questions about the role and representation of women in society, the media, and the nature of the creation of art.

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P H OTO C R ECO D IUT RTE G O ESSY H O EF RTEH E L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

The entrance hall to The Elms, the summer residence of Edward J. Berwind in Newport, Rhode Island, which the Preservation Society opened as a museum in August 1962.

GRACE IS IN THE DETAILS Horace Trumbauer, one of the most influential residential architects at the dawn of the 20th century, redifined elegance for American homes. American Splendor celebrates his brilliant designs.

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

BY MEGAN MALLOY

THE SPACES WE inhabit are often reflections of ourselves and our desired selves. We find proof of this maxim in our enormous skyscrapers and grand national monuments, but nowhere is it more true than in our homes. Architect Horace Trumbauer made designing the home his magnum opus, garnering a legacy as one of the most influential residential architects during the country-estate era that bloomed at the height of the Gilded Age. In American Splendor: The Residential Architecture of Horace Trumbauer (Acanthus Press), Michael C. Kathrens charts the evolution of Trumbauer’s career and legacy through the estates that made him so sought-after. Hailing originally from Philadelphia, Trumbauer began his architectural career at 14, opening his own practice at only 21. He was, in many ways, in the right place at the right time, harnessing the expanding industrial base and demand for opulence to establish his niche in luxury domestic architecture. With the enormous influx of immigrants crowding into cities, the well-to-do were increasingly drawn to the pastoral fantasy, and Traumbauer was there to make it a reality. Trumbauer’s iconic designs drew heavily from French revivalism and the English classical styles of the 18th century,

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This spread, clockwise from top left: Rough Point, the summer residence of James Buchanan Duke in Newport, Rhode Island; James B. Duke and his daughter, circa 1920; the second-floor hall of George J. Gould’s residence at 875 Fifth Avenue; George J. and Edith Kingdon Gould’s family picture; statues and intricate accents were used to give the interiors an aristocratic flavor; the beautiful staircase in the

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

main lobby of the James B. Duke residence at 1 East 78th Street.

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P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E P R I VATE CO LLE C T I O N ; M O S S A R C H I V E ; CO U RT E S Y O F T H E N E WP O RT R E S TO R AT I O N F O U N DAT I O N

Avenue (above); the neoclassical façade of the limestone mansion was inspired by the 18th-century Hôtel de Tessé on the Quai Voltaire (below); the cover of the revised edition of Michael C. Katherens’ book (inset). Opposite page: The second-floor stair hall connected the main hall to the conservatory, a sklylighted solarium with intricate wooden treillage.

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allowing the denizens of these estates to entertain on equal footing with the European royalty they often played host to. Trumbauer also incorporated a sense of American practicality; the ladies’ bridge room, for instance, was designed to be far enough away so that a gentleman enjoying a cigar in his study would not be bothered. Trumbauer’s list of clients reads like an excerpt from Mrs. Astor’s 400 List, with the likes of Vanderbilts, Goulds, Stotesburys, Phippses, Dukes, and Wideners. The designs oscillate seamlessly between traditional Tudor façades and florid French baroque styles, all the while displaying a masterful grasp of the needs of each individual family. Michael Kathrens’ American Splendor, now published with three additional chapters and 50 new color photographs, pays homage to Trumbauer’s work in all of its grandeur. In its pages you’ll find portraits of the most magnificent American homes— and the fascinating people who occupied their stately halls. u

P H OTO C R ECO D IUTRT GO E SE Y SO H FE RTEH E M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W Y O R K

This page: The dining room of the James Speyer residence at 1058 Fifth

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P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

THOMASVILLE: A TRADITIONAL WAY OF SPORTING LIFE RENEWED

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several winter hotels, such as the Queen Anne-style Piney Woods Hotel, built in 1875, where Yankees would come for the winter months. While dove, duck, and ’gators have always been plentiful for locals to pursue, the first quail shooting plantations in Thomasville were developed over a hundred years ago by the Hanna family from Ohio. Charles Chapin was the first Hanna to set foot in Thomas County, probably in about 1885, and since then Hanna descendants and many others have acquired land and erected homes and lodges so that the Red Hills plantation belt now contains the highest concentration

T R I A L C LU B ; RO B E RT C . B A L F O U R , J R .

TUCKED AWAY IN the southwest corner of Georgia near the Florida border is one of the world’s foremost bird shooting paradises. For over a hundred years, the Red Hills region has been one of the great bobwhite quail bastions in the country and, given the devastating drought in Texas over the last seven years, is now the last redoubt of birds living in the wild for this exciting and highly civilized way of sporting life. The Indians were the first conservators of this land, but the treaties they entered into with settlers were broken and in the mid-1800s they were exiled west on the Trail of Tears. Before the railroad was extended to Florida Thomasville had

B E N M CCO LLU M ; T H E G E O R G I A - F LO R I DA F I E L D

BY JAMES MACGUIRE

Opposite page: The Georgia/Florida Field Trial Club's annual shooting dog trials. This page, from top: Live Oak hounds, casting off for a hunt; the home of Mrs. Parker Poe on Pebble Hill Plantation; John M. Olin and Richard Tift shooting on one of the many area plantations famous for their quail shooting preserves.

OCTOBER 2012 105

and there’s nothing that compares to the quail hunting here,” one transplanted Northerner says. of traditional quail hunting in the world. Families like the Whitneys, Fords, Irelands, duPonts, Perkins, Fitzgeralds, Humphreys, Loves, and Gerrys have maintained a way of life that is reminiscent in its graciousness of the Antebellum South. Its past is dotted with marks of distinction; President Eisenhower and the Duke of Windsor have been among the many honored guests to enjoy Thomasville’s legendary hospitality and unparalleled sport. Along the way, traditions have taken root that continue to flourish into today. The Georgia-Florida Field Trial Club was formed by 30 members in 1916 and at its first trial only 10 dogs ran. The Field Trial is always held on the third Monday in February, and at a recent renewal 23 dogs ran before a crowd of 407 members and guests. All of these plantation owners share a common conservation 106 QUEST

and land-management ethic to preserve this precious part of the world for future generations to come. Tall Timbers, the local land-preservation group, has been highly acclaimed for its innovative research and effective advocacy for conservation easements in the Red Hills. Productivity and conservation have been so sensitively managed that today there is more wildlife than ever before—even more than in the time of the Indians. Why have those on the inner circle of the bird-shooting world flocked to Thomasville for generations? The first reason is undoubtedly the quality of the sport. Quail living in the wild are more wary than those bred on devoted shooting lands, and they flush more quickly and fly much faster, which is a thrilling challenge for Americans and visiting Europeans alike. Then there is the quality of the dog work. The pointers quiver in anticipation, as they hold steadfast for the quail to be flushedl, while the retrievers methodically work the ground in order to locate the birds that have been shot. Still, beyond the sporting life, the appeal of this area also owes to the many-faceted traditions of the plantation lifestyle. “There cannot be anything more beautiful than an earlywinter morning with frost on the fields and a warm sun rising through the tall pines,” writes James Mason. From there—in a region rich with forests, lakes, and rivers—inhabitants and

B E N M CCO LLU M ; T H E G E O R G I A - F LO R I DA F I E L D T R I A L C LU B ; RO B E RT C . B A L F O U R , J R .

“I’ve hunted...all over the world,

Above, from left: Pinetree Boulevard, going through Greenwood Plantation, allows the public to catch a glimpse of the historically beautiful forest around it; modern hunters out on a plantation; a lunchtime picnic in 1939 on the Milestone Plantation. Below: A 1998 map of plantation ownership in southwest Georgia.

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room. Those were the days! "We continue to be engaged by an elite group of sportsmen who recognize the uniqueness of the Red Hills area and who are looking to create their own plantation legacy," states Ben McCollum, whose firm The Wright Group serves as the leading authority on plantation properties. In his elegiac memoir This Land I Have Loved, Thomasville’s historian Robert C. Balfour, Jr., spoke for many when he wrote, “If I were to be granted one last wish it would be that this unspoiled land might stay unspoiled. I would like for my children and their children, and all children for that matter, to be able to fill lungs with its clean, soft air, to watch its wildlife, to listen to its birdsong, to the yelping of turkeys, the distant scream of a hawk, the plaintive, muted cooing of doves high up in the tall pine trees.” Thomasville has been a great American sporting tradition for over a century and is poised to remain so for like-minded generations to come. In addition to its famous quail hunting, the region is home to phenomenal turkey and deer hunting. With recent news of a bumper hatch of quail last summer, as well as many ongoing local cultural events like the Wildlife Arts Festival, Thomasville guarantees a good time for sporting and nonsporting visitors alike. Come on down to southwest Georgia and see Thomasville and its beautiful plantations for yourself! u

B E N M CCO LLU M ; T H E G E O R G I A - F LO R I DA F I E L D T R I A L C LU B ; RO B E RT C . B A L F O U R , J R .

visitors alike ride out to the shoot on horseback or on the back of a mule-driven wagon in traditional shooting attire. “Nooning” takes place for some in the fields, where the wagondrivers and other shoot staff prepare delicious meals deep in the wild. For others, picnic cabins host long cookouts. As long as anyone can remember, lunches have always included a warm casserole, carted out in a part of the shooting wagon called “the hot box.” Southern banter and liquid refreshment stimulate the bonhomie of the sport at hand. In the evening there are elaborate dinners and frequent entertaining of neighbors and fellow sportsmen at the plantations themselves. And the plantation houses are beautiful homes: red brick or white with black shutters, countless chimneys and columns, porches and gardens, all reminiscent of Tara in Gone with the Wind. Their very names evoke another era, too—El Destino, Hines Hill, Easter, and Mandalay, to name but a few. After the evening’s entertainment, residents and guests retire to bed, a fire blazing in their rooms on chilly nights, and before shooting begins the following morning, breakfast is served inroom. In fact, in his autobiography, band leader Peter Duchin recalls a too-early-in-the-dawn knock on the door by a servant at John Hay Whitney’s Thomasville plantation and having to beat a hasty retreat from his fiancée’s bed back to his own

Opposite page: A hunter takes aim; one of the hunting wagons used during the trials; Winstead Plantation (inset). This page, clockwise from top left: Old postcards illustrate the Thomasville of yore; the result of a good day's hunt; Foshalee Lodge; a happy couple coming in from a duck hunt.

D E B O R A H W H I T L A W LLE W E LLY N ( CO U RTE S Y O F K N O P F )

SOUTHERN CHARM AND COMFORTS BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

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Alex Hitz shares his take on classic Southern cooking with a French twist in his new book, My Beverly Hills Kitchen (Knopf ), which includes his Heirloom Tomato Pie, seen here. Opposite page: Hitz has spent a lifetime collecting recipes from the likes of his child-hood cooks to world-renowned chefs.

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spent running an Atlanta restaurant, producing Broadway shows, and, recently, selling the runaway-hit prep-friendly meals from his company, The Beverly Hills Kitchen, on TV’s QVC. Today he lives between New York and Beverly Hills, where he frequently hosts dinner parties that are elaborate but never too fancy. His relaxed, genteel disposition still informs everything he does, from making guests feel welcome to indulging them with the best décor, mixed company, and—yes—cuisine. This month, Alex has published a cookbook-cum-memoir that offers the rest of us a glimpse into his singular life and livelihood. In My Beverly Hills Kitchen: Classic Southern Cooking with a French Twist (Knopf), we are invited to share in the stories and recipes of his family, friends, and the famous chefs and celebrities he has learned from along the way. Bon appétit, y’all. u

J I M F I T TS ( A LL CO U RTE S Y O F K N O P F )

friend of ours, Gail Monaghan—a globetrotting gourmand and chef who famously entertains in her art-filled Manhattan loft— had invited us both to the same dinner party. Most of us New Yorkers in the mix were dressed in our de rigueur black cocktail wear. And then there was Alex, in the sharpest of navy blazers and light-catching cuff links. With a sun-kissed complexion, shiny blue eyes, and a Southern drawl that ebbed and flowed in harmony with the fine Bordeaux wine, Alex was the unexpected exception to the swank and serious-at-heart among us. Alex is a sort of legend in his own time. Raised in true Georgia style by a mother with an affinity for France, he grew up between Atlanta and Paris, attuning his taste for both good-ole Southern cooking and haute French fare. His career has spanned times

D E B O R A H W H I T L A W LLE W E LLY N ; P E TE R B AC A N OV I C ;

I FIRST MET ALEX HITZ, naturally, over great food. A mutual

This page, from top left: The author with Peter Bacanovic and Nan Kempner, whose Baked Potatoes with Caviar are in the book; appetizers; Erlinda’s Exquisite Short Ribs; with his “food family” in the Atlanta History Center garden dedicated to his mother, Caroline; setting the table; the book cover; servers at Hitz’s Beverly Hills home. Opposite page, from top left: Preparing Pâte Brisée; Perfect Roast Tenderloin of Beef; today, the smell of childhood favorites makes Hitz feel 3 years old again; Coconut Pudding with Caramel Sauce; at the Carter White House with his stepfather, Robert Shaw, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra; readying the kitchen for a Beverly Hills party; his mother (front, 7th from left) at the Sorbonne in 1956.

D E B O R A H W H I T L A W LLE W E LLY N ( CO U RT E S Y O F K N O P F )

This page: Southern cuisine authority Edna Lewis, the so-called “Julia Child of Southern Cooking,” who was a guest chef several times at Alex Hitz’s restaurant, The Patio by the River, in the 1990s. Opposite page: Hitz’s Perfect Poached Pears in Red Wine (above) and Roulade of Pheasant Breast Stuffed with Spinach

CO U RTE S Y O F K N O P F

and Mushroom Duxelles (below).

GIRL POWER

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you to the second annual Ralph Lauren Girls Fashion Show. In early September, on the eve of New York Fashion Week, the daughters of some of the city’s most venerable social and fashion figures were themselves called to the front row to experience a runway show featuring 46 looks from the 2012 Fall and Holiday Ralph Lauren Girls collections. Bold-faced moms like Blair Husain, Ali Wentworth, Lisa

Z AC H H YM A N / B FA NYC . CO M

SOCCER PRACTICE, new notebooks, piano lessons, ballet recitals. These tend to be the things that young girls have their minds on when fall rolls around and the bathing suits and sundresses are packed away until the following summer. Unless, of course, you’re being groomed to be a future fashion icon of New York—in which case the extra-heavy-stock, hand-calligraphed envelope arrives at your door, inviting

J O E S C H I L D H O R N / B FA NYC . CO M ;

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

This page: Helaina Beard, prepping backstage, in a navy big pony tee, black cotton tuxedo legging with bow, and super cross low boot. Opposite page: Ralph Lauren on the runway with Sophia and Jasmine, who are sporting faux fur and velvet.

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as well. Except, maybe, for Helaina Beard, the daughter of Veronica Miele Beard and Anson Beard, Jr. Helaina shimmied in a silk evening tunic and one all-too-real accessory—a purple cast, covering the wrist she broke while horseback riding. Which goes to show: Even among the most fashionable, girls will be girls. u Above: Red officer’s jacket and plaid dress. Insets: Filipa Fino with Beatriz and Isabel Morfogen (top); Krista Krieger, Katherine Krieger, Summer Chamblain, and June Ambrose (bottom left); herringbone princess coat (bottom right). Opposite page: Scenes from the show, including Anson Beard, Sr., India Beard, Scarlett Beard, and Anson Beard, Jr. (middle left); Jennifer Cattaui and Camille Cattaui (middle right); Emerson Cassidy and Denise Incandela (bottom left).

JOE SCHILDHORN/BFANYC.COM; ZACH HYMAN/BFANYC.COM

Vreeland, and Susan Fales-Hill dressed their daughters (and often themselves) in the latest Ralph Lauren threads and headed to the designer’s corporate headquarters on Madison Avenue for an all-smiles, brushed-hair, good-natured catwalk. Along the front row, some girls could be found pulling barrettes out of their hair and chomping on Fruit Loops, while others sat with pads and pencils in hand, ready to record their favorite looks—future Vogue editors in the making. Backstage, there was plenty of bubble-gum chewing and texting going on (apparently, one girl got to meet the voice of Dora the Explorer). As the show began to roll, it was hard to tell the professional models from the girls-next-door who’d been invited to walk

KLOPP

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR Karen Klopp, founder of What2WearWhere.com, stalks the night at the Museum of the City of New York’s “New York After Dark” in this month’s What the Chairs Wear.

THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT, which was designed by Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson, is legendary for hosting the city’s most colorful personalities. And the elegant Pool Room will dance with delight during the Director’s Council of the Museum of the City of New York’s “New York After Dark” on October 9. Honorees of this sophisticated soirée, including Eric Javits, Jr., Celerie Kemble, and Allison Rockefeller, and chairs Mark Gilbertson, Celerie Kemble, Nicole Mellon, Heather Mnuchin, Calvert Moore, Allison Rockefeller, Shafi Roepers, Andrew Roosevelt, Alexia Hamm Ryan, and Burwell Schorr, are bringing to life an evening that will embody the glittering glamour of Café Society. Thanks to the generous sponsorship of Graff Diamonds and Badgley Mischka, the nocturnal throng will sip, supper, and shimmy in the shimmering temple of urbane design and modernism. u For more information about the Museum of the City of New York, call 212.534.1672 or visit www.mcny.org. 120 QUEST

1

3

2

This page: We are channeling the extravagant glamour of New York in the Sixties with a sultry stunner in twilight blue from Badgley Mischka (1) and dazzling Stuart Weitzman Swarovski crystal-coated “Striptease” sandals (2). The Taylor clutch with pleated crystal-embroidered panel by Eponymous (5) adds to the sparkle while the Asprey cascading Lily Pad earrings (3) and Diamond Line bracelet (4) complete the opulence of the evening’s elegant attire. Be there when the lights go down and the city comes alive with excitement and expectation of a night where anything can happen! Opposite page: The Director’s Council of MCNY.

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APPEARANCES

KICK-OFF THE SEASON BY HILARY GEARY

OOH, BABY! It is a big, beautiful world out there with so many many fabulous places and watering holes to visit but, come August, Southampton gets first prize for being exactly where I want to be! Where else can you find nearby worldclass golf courses like National Golf Links of America, Sebonack Golf Club, Atlantic

00 QUEST

Golf Club, The Bridge, and Shinnecock Hills Golf Club? (Shinneock has been, I must add, host to the U.S. Open numerous times.) Also, the great, big, wide beaches are unspoiled and uncrowded. Plus, I have to mention how wonderful it is to be entertained at all the beautiful houses with lush gardens hidden behind

those tall green hedges, and what a joy it is to play on the extraordinary pristine grass courts at the fabled Meadow Club, where you can place a drop shot with a little help from the ocean breezes. Of course, there are always the worthwhile charitable events to benefit the Southampton Hospital, the Parrish Art

This page, clockwise from top left: Oscar de la Renta received an award from mayor Michael Bloomberg; Donna Acquavella and Elaine Wynn; Ande Phipps and Gail Gilbert; Woody Johnson at opening day for the Jets; Kari Tiedemann, Sean Driscoll, and Lorna Graev; Somers Farkas, Joanne de Guardiola,

H I L A RY G E A RY; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Janet Allon, and Suzanne Johnson at MetLife Stadium; Roger Federer at the U.S. Open. Opposite page: Opening day for the Jets at MetLife Stadium.

Museum, the Animal Rescue Fund, and more. Another event you can’t miss is the Hampton Classic, with world-class riders on champion horses. Everyone’s favorite parties are the wonderful soirées that come in all shapes and sizes. Everyone’s favorite parties are the wonderful soirées that come in all shapes and sizes but with one common thread—“at home” and one more fabulous than the next. A standout was the concert and dinner at Jane and Peter Marino’s dazzling abode, which sits on vast acreage punctuated with gardens dotted with fabulous sculptures by Francois-Xavier Lalanne and others. We were treated to a delightful concert by the brilliant pianist George Li before sitting down at a long table on the porch to dine al fresco. It was heaven! Among the group were Kathy

and Billy Rayner, newlyweds Virginia and Peter Duchin, Bob Colechello, Katherina Otto Bernstein and her husband, Nathan Bernstein, Larry Gagosian, Tiffany Dubin, Alexis Gregory, and more. One door closes, summer ends. Another opens and the fall season began with the sold-out FIT benefit luncheon honoring Oscar de la Renta at the David H. Koch Theater. All the ladies jumped into their Oscars to toast the very talented and charming Mr. de la Renta. Among his fans were Donna Acquavella with her daughter-in-law Travis, Fiona Druckenmiller, Ande Phipps, Elaine Wynn, Emilia SaintAmand, Karen LeFrak, Jamee Gregory, Sharon Hoge, Alexandra Lebenthal, Liz Peek, Mario Buatta, Mayor Mike Bloomberg with Diana Taylor, Barbara Walters, Eleanora and Michael Kennedy,

Bronson van Wyck, Sharon Loeb, Annette Tappert, Cornelia Guest, and more. Another back-to-school ritual is the U.S. Open tennis tournament, so we came out to watch the tennis stars under the stars with Jenny and John Paulson, and I spotted Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, Dailey and Gordon Pattee, Missy and Max Taylor, Bill Finneran and Carol Rohrig, Carl Icahn and his son Brett, Chan and Tony Ittleson, Clelia and Tom Zacharias, and more. Then it was off to the New York Jets’ opening day as guests of Suzanne and Woody Johnson, and what a big thrill it was to step out on the field to get a view of Sanchez and Tebow before they brought the Buffalo Bills to their knees with a winning score of 48 to 28. Yeah! What a wonderful way to “kick off” the fall season. u OCTOBER 2012 123

BROWN

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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST With fall in the air, our columnist enjoys the outdoors, from PH-D at the Dream Downtown to the Harriman Cup at the Meadowbrook Polo Club—even an event aboard the ship at the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum! BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Max Sinsteden being sprayed with champagne by Ben Broderick.

Julie Macklowe was Zang Toi’s muse for his Spring 2013 collection, presented at Fashion Week on September 9.

Grant Hewit and Susan Meyer at the Harriman Cup on September 8. Jenny Cuminale, who was awarded “best dressed” at the Harriman Cup.

Alexandra Segalas and Paige Corbin at the Meadowbrook Polo Club.

Van Bloys and Lauren Wynns, both of Necessary & Proper,

A tailgate on September 8, which was

with Fred Castleberry, of Unabashedly Prep.

coordinated by alums of Choate Rosemary Hall.

PETER SAN CHIRICO; NECESSARY & PROPER

DEBBIE MIRACOLO; EKA HALIM;

AUTUMN IS A SECOND spring when every leaf is a flower,” said

Albert Camus. And isn’t it? Seriously, a bouquet of foliage and I’m yours forever... On July 24, Joel Peterson of Ravenswood Winery in California hosted a multiple-course meal at Il Buco with Simon Doonan, creative director at Barneys New York. Everything was Edgar Allan Poe-y, in honor of the brand’s namesake, “The Raven.” So, Alex Polkinghorn and I wined and dined in the cellar that inspired “The Cask of Amontillado,” wondering when we would be as contented again. Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.” On August 14, Vixely celebrated its “Endless Summer of Love” issue for iPad at PH-D at the Dream Downtown. There, Sebastian Bland, Eliza Glaister, Carson Griffith, Da-

vid Mehlman, and Amanda Sidman toasted the Vixely trio: Nora Bass, Jennifer Eident, and Lara Glaister. And, à la Vixely, the evening offered all the ingredients for a sexy life! Visit www.vixely.com for more... On the 15th, Clos du Bois fêted Clos du Bois Rouge at Rose Bar at the Gramercy Park Hotel. It was raining, it was pouring—the event wasn’t boring! Jeremy Allen, Lo Bosworth, and Leah Bourne sipped red and white and, from the can-can show to the Ladurée macarons, it felt like midnight in Paris... On the 28th, Moët & Chandon welcomed the U.S. Open with the Tiny Tennis Invitational at the top of the Standard. The matches? Johannes Huebl versus Oliva Palermo, Julie Henderson versus Rebecca Minkoff, and Bee-Shyuan Chang OCTOBER 2012 125

versus Horacio Silva. My match was with Moët & Chandon Imperial, the official champagne of the U.S. Open. On September 6, a.k.a. Fashion’s Night Out, Julia Katherine Wetherell and Kathryn Grace Zambetti of MyDrobe held “Take the War out of Wardrobe” at Toy. The event, hosted by Paul Johnson Calderon, Elisabeth Kieselstein-Cord, and Natalie Obradovich, was a smash—and, seriously, it took the war out of Fashion’s Night Out! On the 7th, Showtime and Time Warner Cable hosted the season premiere of “Homeland” with a screening and after-party at the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum. Claire Danes, Minnie Mortimer, and Anna Wintour were among those who boarded the USS Intrepid for a starry, starry night. On the 8th, the Harriman Cup took place at the Mead-

Jennifer Missoni on September 7 (inset).

owbrook Polo Club, the oldest of its kind in the U.S. I arrived via L.I.R.R. with Fred Castleberry and Sam Dangremond, who had dressed themselves in bleeding madras (and Lilly Pulitzer and seersucker). I snagged a handful of Knockaround sunnies and joined Dane Evans, Pete Hansen, Lily Haydock, Maggie Lydecker, Meredith Murphy, Cooper Ray, and Caroline Smith at a tailgate hosted by Max Sinsteden. After the University of Virginia beat Yale University, Karen Klopp of What2WearWhere and Van Bloys of Necessary & Proper awarded spectators with prizes for things like “best hat.” Oh my goodness, October! Lots and lots to do, including the Adeona Foundation’s “Cowboys and Indians” and—crossing fingers—New York Rangers games! u

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; N ATA L I E P O E T T E

YGL

The season premiere of “Homeland” at the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum;

Vixely co-founders Lara Glaister, Jen Eident, and Nora Bass at their event at PH-D at the Dream Downtown.

Jennifer Creel and Flo Fulton sipping Moët & Chandon at the Tiny Tennis Invitational. DJ Gillian Sagansky at “Take the War out of Wardrobe” on September 6.

Leslie Bibb, Katie Lee, Odette Annable, and Selita Ebanks at Clos du Bois event at Rose Bar on August 15.

MyDrobe’s Julia Katherine Wetherell and Kathryne Grace Zambetti on September 6.

Elisabeth Kieselstein-Cord and Paul Johnson Calderon at MyDrobe’s F.N.O. event.

Joel Peterson and Simon Doonan toasted Ravenswood

Caitlin Fennessy, Callum McLaughlin, and

Winery together in the cellar of Il Buco.

Pav Volkert at a Vixely event. OCTOBER 2012 127

SNAPSHOT

MRS. BROOKE ASTOR had quite the treasure trove. From paintings to jewelry, furnishing to books, this philanthropist’s had style and taste, reflected in each of her purchases. Those belongings were put up for auction this month by Sotheby’s, and fetched an amazing $18.8 million within two days. And, true to her nature, the proceeds will go to various charities, including: Briarcliff Manor’s All Saint’s Episcopal Church, the Animal Center of New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and 128 QUEST

The New York Public Library. The success of the sale was not just due to the value of the pieces, but the value of the lady who had owned them. Many buyers wanted what that remarkable woman had surronded herself with in the hopes that, perhaps, some of her grandeur would rub off on them. —Lily Hoagland Mrs. Vincent Astor, Standing, a portrait of Brooke Astor by Aaron Shikler done in 1983, was part of the sale of her estate.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S

GRANDE DAME ON THE BLOCK

AN ENTRANCE HALL AND LIVING ROOM OF A NEW HOME DESIGNED BY WADIA ASSOCIATES

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Quest October 2012