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CONTENTS 148

THE 25 TH A NNIVERSARY I SSUE 112

On its 25th anniversary, Quest looks back—year by year—at the people, places, and events that best represented each year, as told by the writers who know them so well.

136

THE QUEST 400

140

THE HEART OF THE CITY A history and guide to some of New York City’s greatest landmarks, institutions, charities, and worthy causes. BY THE EDITORS

148

SCRAPBOOK Debutantes, power players, and the smart set: a selection of some of the most memorable articles from Quest’s 25 years in print.

154

THE STORIES AND SOULS OF OUR HOMES A life-long love of houses—and the social history that has shaped their evolution over the centuries—culminates in a new book that walks us through storied homes, room by room. BY HENRIETTA SPENCER-CHURCHILL

160

LOOKING AHEAD TO EXCELLENCE Always staying ahead of the curve, the Palm Beach Day Academy is embarking on a new capital campaign that will serve its students—and community—for the years to come. BY PERRINE MEISTRELL

25

The first of Quest’s annual list of 400 social notables, from 1995.

140


90

176

CONTENTS 94

C OLUMNS 24

SOCIAL DIARY

86

SOCIAL CALENDAR

90

HARRY BENSON

A compilation of our columnist’s photographs, as printed in Quest over the years.

92

OBSERVATIONS

Recalling legendary people and scenes at Mortimer’s.

94

FRESH FINDS

102

FINANCE: CRYSTAL & COMPANY

The story of how it began, from the one who started it all. BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA Our monthly guide to benefits, galas, special events, and goings-on about town.

BY

TAKI THEODORACOPULOS ULOS

New cars, jewels, and fashions for fall. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER One of the best-kept secrets of the industry, the recently rebranded

insurance brokerage Crystal & Company is celebrating 80 years of unparalleled client service.

106

FINANCE: IDB

166

APPEARANCES

168

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

Ehud Arnon explains how IDB bank was able to triumph through difficult times. A reminiscent round-up of the city’s best-loved watering holes.

BY

HILARY GEARY

The evolution of this column and its writers—Andrew Black, Jack Bryan,

and Elizabeth Quinn Brown—and their nighttime chronicles of all the PYTs both uptown and down.

176

SNAPSHOT

Quest’s founding editor explains how the magazine came to be.

BY

HEATHER COHANE


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C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO A S S O C I AT E A R T D I R EC TO R

VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS INTERN

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HARRY BENSON KAREN KLOPP JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY JEANNE CHISHOLM MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD JACK DEUTSCH BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN JULIE SKARRATT JOE SCHILDHORN BEN FINK SHAPIRO 1st

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BRUCIE BOALT EDWARD LEE CAVE JED H. GARFIELD CLARK HALSTEAD PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ELIZABETH STRIBLING ROGER W. TUCKERMAN PETER TURINO WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2012. All rights reserved. Vol. 26, No. 11. QUEST—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. QUEST, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: QUEST—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017.

For article reprints, contact Wright’s Media: 877.652.5295 SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

Call 646.840.3404, ext. 106 Email: subscriptions@questmag.com


EDITOR’S LETTER

Only the music changes: Revelers at a magazine party during this year’s Fashion Week (above); Susan Anton, Sylvester Stallone, and Andy Warhol in 1975 (right).

Coming together is the beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success. —HENRY FORD THE PAST MIGHT BE PROLOGUE, but everyone knows the

Lily Hoagland

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THE GREENWICH ISSUE

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questmag.com

2012

22 QUEST

the issue with a thousand pages. Unfortunately, our printer wasn’t too keen on that idea. But most especially, we are excited about this huge milestone. Graham Greene explained that “excitement is simple: excitement is a situation, a single event. It mustn’t be wrapped up in thoughts, similes, metaphors.” In that spirit, our single event will be a grand affair to ballyhoo the occasion! Surrounded by those we love (and some we just love to talk about), Quest will pop bottles and wear baubles in the style to which everyone should be accustomed by now. Here’s to turning 25 and looking spectacular. u

BEST

part of the book you really want to flip to first is the index. You need to see who made it into the pages at all, whether in good light or bad. It’s this impulse to know the important characters in society’s story that has lead people for 25 years to pick up each issue of Quest from newsstands and doorsteps. To celebrate the magazine’s silver anniversary, our offices were piled high with the issues from our prologue, taking us through the lives of those who made the proverbial cut. We’ve been there: through the lethal shoulder pads and culture of greed in the Eighties; through the alternative music and prosperity in the Nineties; and now though the extremes of both the nadir and apex of fortunes in the turn of this new century. We had fun looking back on these evolving landscapes, chuckling at the morphing hairstyles, and pausing to remember those who are no longer with us. Several forgotten gems were unearthed from these stacks, such as the November 1998 analysis of jazz and its influence with Atlantic Record’s Ahmet Ertegun, Lang Phipps, and Colman Andrews. All in all, we’ve been amazed at how far the magazine has come, without ever losing the essence of what made it great. We collected our favorite moments from these issues to form a loving display of everything these years have meant to us. We present a retrospective of who or what defined each of those 25 years, a scrapbook of great features past, our original “400” list, an enchanted look at the wonderful charities that call New York City home, and so much more. Our layouts are filled with nostalgic pictures of parties through time. We had so much material from the past 25 years—which still resonates with our society today—that we could have filled

THE SPRING STYLE ISSUE

Mrs. Brooke Astor, the late

AERIN LAUDER ZINTERHOFER

questmag.com

reigning doyenne of society

25th Anniversary THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION $5.00 DECEMBER 2011

and philanthropy, as photographed by Harry Benson.

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

HILARY GEARY ROSS FROM HER NEW BOOK WITH HARRY BENSON

questmag.com

The border is comprised of a selection of the editors’ favorite Quest covers from the past 25 years, for either

$5.00 AUGUST 2010

400 THE QUEST

questmag.com C.Z. GUEST AND CONSUELO VANDERBILT IN 1955

their eye-catching layouts

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY TWENTY-FIVE years on…

I was living in Los Angeles when Quest made its debut in September 1987. I was first aware of it shortly thereafter when a friend, Larry Ashmead, an executive editor for HarperCollins (then

still Harper & Row), would send me a copy every month. He knew that the charming little magazine’s histories of prominent New York families would interest me. It wasn’t until five years later, in the autumn of 1992,

that I found myself in New York working on a book project that was already floundering when I serendipitously met its publisher/founder Heather Cohane at a cocktail party at the Chanel store on East Fifth-seventh Street.

Mrs. Cohane and I had a mutual acquaintance, a Philadelphia socialite named Gloria Etting. So, after telling her how much I liked her magazine, I mentioned our friend in common. It turned out that she knew about me

J.O.B. DINNER DANCE TO BENEFIT JUST ONE BREAK, INC.

QUEST, JANUARY 1993

Lee Thaw and John Galliher

Kitty Carlisle Hart

24 QUEST

Sage Lehman and Orin Lehman with Susan and Trent Carmichael

Anne Slater and Stephen Stempler

Jane Dudley, Barbara Bancroft, Norma Dana and Wendy Lehman


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A because of a story I’d done the year before in Connoisseur magazine about the famous Cubist art collector Douglas Cooper and his adopted son and heir, Billy McCarty. (It had been Gloria Etting who introduced the men to each other back in the 1970s.) That night at Chanel, Heather asked if I’d like to do a story for Quest on Gloria. Naturally I said yes, and so began, quite simply, what turned out to be a twentyyear relationship with Quest, still ongoing. Heather, who had no previous experience at such ventures, started the magazine in the true spirit of American enterprise. She was an Englishwoman living in New York with three children of school age when her husband Jack Cohane died suddenly,

leaving her in a very dicey financial situation. Looking for a solution, she hit upon the idea of a magazine to promote high-end Manhattan residential real estate. The editorial would naturally favor stories related to the topic, i.e., families and their histories. Although the magazine’s first editorial offices were in Heather’s Upper East Side home, by the time we met, Quest was operating out of a pleasant little room on the second floor of a building (still standing) on the corner of 80 th Street and Madison Avenue. There were four desks – one for Heather, one for a receptionist/editorial assistant, one for Matthew Harrigan who manned the computer, and one for the freelance art director who

designed each issue. It was a cozy little place, with lots of windows looking out on the busy corner below and dog bowls for Heather’s three (or was it four?) little white Westies. The Gloria Etting piece was good enough for Heather to ask me if I’d like to write something else for the magazine. Within a few months I was turning out a couple of articles a month for Quest and unconsciously forging a topic of expertise based on a lifelong interest. Quest’s early years had been a bootstrap affair. Less than a month after its launch in the autumn of 1987 came the great Black Monday stock market crash that was felt (in markets) around the world when the Dow-Jones Industrial Averages dropped more

than 22% in one day. The panic that followed smacked every business (albeit only temporarily). People were genuinely in fear of a repeat of the Great Depression. Quest’s advertising contracts flew out the window. Heather had no alternative but to work harder and keep pushing. Within little more than a year’s time, her advertising clients were back and Quest was becoming the bellwether for high-end residential real estate, a position it has held for the past twenty-five years of its existence. Heather had the Englishwoman’s knack for making do rather elegantly on whatever’s available. It was her idea for realtors to advertise their product by showing interiors in the ad itself. All these years later it is so com-

M E T R O P O L I TA N MU S E U M C O ST U M E G A L A

The Leonard Lauders 26 QUEST

The Calvin Kleins

Mr. and Mrs. Saul Steinberg

RO S E H A RTM A N

QUEST, FEBRUARY 1988


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A monplace that most assume it was always thus. It wasn’t; it was Quest setting rules. In late 1993, about a year into my association with the magazine, Heather one day casually asked me if I’d be interested in writing a column. Coincidentally, unbeknownst to Heather, writing a social column had been a secret/unexpressed ambition of mine from early youth. I had always been an avid reader of social and entertainment columns. Growing up in a little New England town, it so happened

that my father, who was a born-and-bred New Yorker, got the two top New York tabloids of that era (mid-century): the New York Daily News and the Daily Mirror. I started reading them when I was a ten-year-old and already hoping that I’d grow up soon, so that I could live in New York. I’m not sure what sparked my interest, although it was probably my mother and father’s breakfast table conversations about New York --besides my father being a native, my mother loved the city -- and what

he’d read in the tabloids. Feature columns in the age of newsprint were hugely popular all over America. At his zenith, Walter Winchell had 30 million readers a day. Even farmers in the Midwest read Winchell. Society columns had an added flavor for this kid growing up in smalltown America. They were about the big life --lionized by all the popular print media, not to mention the great American writers like Wharton, O’Hara, Fitzgerald, Marquand, and Hemingway. So when Heather Cohane

presented the idea to me one day in that cozy little editorial room on a corner of Madison Avenue, I said yes. In those first days of the Social Diary, I had no idea how to go about it except to get myself invited wherever I could get myself invited and write about what I heard or saw. By that time, the early ’90s, the only important social columnist in New York was Aileen Mehle writing under the nom de plume of Suzy. Mrs. Mehle’s wit and style as a chronicler matched her glamorous and sparkling persona.

A N N E H E A R ST ’ S PA R T Y AT MO R T I M E R ’ S H O N O R I N G T H E H U D S O N R I V E R K E E P E R

QUEST, APRIL 1994

Chuck Scarborough and Anne Hearst

Helen Brandford 28 QUEST

Robert Kennedy, Jr., and Patricia Burnham

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Peggy Siegal and Steve Benson


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STUART WEITZMAN.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A She’s the only columnist, society or otherwise, who looked like a movie star – spotlight and all. And her rapier-like champagne wit was the bubbles that drew you back for more. That was how New York (and the world) perceived a social column. Although the Suzy column was perhaps the apotheosis, social columns (always known as society columns) reflecting the notion of the high life have been popular in American journalism throughout the late 19th century up until the late 20th century. It was apparent in those early days of the New York Social Diary that the scene was changing. Social celeb-

rity had become more mainstream. Even Mrs. Mehle’s column had frequent jottings about the comings and goings of movie and television actors and actresses. Change is always expected, although the motivation is often seen only in retrospect. In 1992, for example, no one talked about the Internet. The computer had come into our lives. Writers were abandoning the IBM Selectric typewriter for any number of computers. My first computer, which I got in1986, was basically a super-typewriter (with printer attached). Four years later, in 1990, Tim Berners-Lee published a proposal for the

World Wide Web, but few of us even heard about it. It is easy to see now how that cyber-technology has altered our lives radically, ultimately changing modes of ordinary behavior and social habits. But in retrospect, that “innovation,” while being celebrated for its possibilities, was a novelty that invited financial fantasy more than anything else. It was easy to realize that communication would bring us (and the world) closer together, but few imagined that, paradoxically, it would isolate us from one another in many ways also. Starting a column. The first Social Diary I published was

about the summer in Southampton that had just passed. The characters in the copy were mainly members of old New York families or the men and women of Nouvelle Society of the Roaring ’80s and the Reagan days. These two separate factions had united as the New Money consciously took on the patina (and the club memberships) of the Old Guard. Aside from the party calendar and the visiting dignitaries, the big news for a summertime social column was frequently an extra-marital affair among the natives in the estate section of Southampton. However, there were a couple of teenage sisters named Paris and Nicky

W E D D I N G AT C O N YE R S FA R M , G R E E N W I C H

QUE ST, OCTOBER 1990

Nicole de Kwiatkowski and Laurent Timonier

Heather Cohane and Henry de Kwiatowski 30 QUEST

Gerry and Mita Bland with their daughter

Thomas Kempner

Jan and Minot Amory

Barbara de Kwiatowski

Whitney Tower, Jr., with his son, Peanut


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1995

Shellley Wanger Mortimer

Julia Flescher

Michael and Anne-Marie Crichton

Deeda Blair and Maurice Tempelsman

Hilton, who were beginning to show up in the resort’s nightlife and often photographed by the ubiquitous social photographer Patrick McMullan. Teenagers out late were the new fodder for all kinds of gossip (including “how can their parents allow that?”). No one foresaw that these girls in the bloom of youth were becoming icons of the new cyber-celebrity, bound for worldwide fame and fortune. The Hilton sisters’ bursting celebrity in the late ’90s coincided with another phenomenon: the emergence of the Hedge Fund as a financial force, with tremendous social 32 QUEST

Carol Petrie

and political implications. There had been many smaller hedge funds operating in the previous two decades, but in the 1990s, there was a game change – also the result of the changing technology and the internet. It finally was gathered in our consciousness as the Dotcom Boom. The money got bigger, way bigger, and the idea of major wealth inflated and amazed. What followed at the dawn of the 21st century was “change.” Change in perception, change in style, change in outlook, and change in substance. In the mid-1960s when I first came to New York

out of college, the computer’s place in our society was dominated by Big Blue – International Business Machines and Mr. Thomas J. Watson’s well known code word: THINK. There was a storefront on the corner of Madison Avenue in the East Sixties, with exterior walls entirely of glass and an entire interior occupied by a giant computer. This was the astounding symbol of the New Age. Forty years later, the retail space that held that massive, incomprehensible, oh-so-futuristic machine is now a retail outlet for DKNY. There is no longer a need for those

Mick and Ann Jones

massive space-occupying business machines. Nor are they a mystery to the man on the street. Their contents are available to every man, woman and child in the form of a small handheld device known as the “cell,” which often completely dominates the time and thoughts of hundreds of millions of people across the world. In the past twenty-five years of Quest, the expansion of informational content through technology has affected every aspect of our daily lives, our businesses, and our media internationally. In 1996, Quest was sold to Chris Meigher, a


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

QUEST, MARCH 1996

CARON & HANLEY TREATMENT CENTERS

GALA Friday, January 11, 2013 The Breakers Palm Beach

Liza Pulitzer & Nellie Benoit, Co-Chairmen Photography by: Lucien Capehart Photography

The annual dinner dance benefits the Lifesaver Scholarship Fund and provides vital financial assistance to individuals and families seeking treatment for alcoholism and chemical dependency at Caron Renaissance and Hanley Center, who could not otherwise afford it.

For reservations 561.841.1048 or email events@hanleycenter.org

00 QUEST

media executive had been trained in the hallowed halls of Henry Luce’s TIME LIFE empire and notably its People magazine. Under Chris’ supervision, with his superior training and education, Quest -- still a prized beacon for private residential real estate advertising -- has been transformed into a smart-looking monthly, glorifying international highend advertising and editorial content for a faster, far more technically sophisticated reader. The New York Social Diary column, naturally accommodating all those changes, no longer just a record of marital kerfuffles or the nightlife of attention-seeking teenage girls. The Hedge Fund concept, following the Dotcom

boom, has become a major source for participating in, and funding, the social ideas of charity in American life. Social life in New York is now dominated by fund-raising for all kinds of philanthropy, attracting new dynamic energy of men and women who have come of age during this revolution. While the old continues racing to catch up with the new, and the new quickly becoming outdated by the newer, Heather Cohane’s clever little enterprise, its mettle well-tested by the vagaries of changing times, has sailed remarkably through the torrents, still prospecting the fresh comforts of social tradition, and unencumbered by the barnacles of a long journey. u


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 8 8

36 QUEST


A TRIBUTE TO THE MAN WHO CHANGED WATCHMAKING FOREVER

In 1821, Nicolas Rieussec changed watchmaking forever with the invention of the first chronograph. Today, the Montblanc TimeWalker Chronograph Automatic is a tribute to the chronograph’s technical evolution. 43 mm stainless steel case, skelleted horns and sapphire crystal back, black calfskin strap with white stitching. Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE FRICK COLLECTION HONORED HENRY ARNHOLD WITH A DINNER

Emily Frick and Robbie Frolich

Boker Doyle and Ian Wardropper

Jeremiah Bogert and June Dyson

Joan and James Wilson with Elizabeth Stafford

Anne and Sam Polk

Sheila Hoerle and Janine Luke

Patricia Beard Braga and Elise Frick

M I L LY N E W YO R K C E L E B R AT E D F A S H I O N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S N I G H T O U T AT I T S U P P E R E A S T S I D E S T O R E

Ari Horaitis, Louisa Rechter and Tatiana Perkin

Leah Weinstein, Bari Colangeli-Kearns, Keith Nuss, Leslie Yarnell and Emily Haynes 38 QUEST

Caitlin Macbeth, Nancy Fell and Carol Dimaio-Lucas

Yliana Yepez, Andy Oshrin and Michelle Smith

CO U RTE S Y O F M I LLY N E W Y O R K ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Mina Cha and Jennifer Tarpley


Imagine having endless closet space and a personal wardrobe valet at your service “Garde Robe is about organization, storage and maintenance of your wardrobe with a discipline that few have.” -New York SocIal DIarY

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, APRIL 1991

40 QUEST


A

Contemporary CLASSIC

ARTIST RENDERING

3,4& 5

BEDROOM RESIDENCES

FROM $3.155million

www.200E79.com (212) 729-4355 SKYLINE DEVELOPERS / STRIBLING MARKETING THE COMPLETE OFFERING TERMS ARE IN AN OFFERING PLAN AVAILABLE FROM SPONSOR. FILE NO. CD-12-0057. Sponsor: 200 East 79th Street LLC, 13-15 West 54th Street, NY, NY 10019. The artist representations and interior decorations, finishes, appliances and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only. Sponsor makes no representations or warranties except as may be set forth in the Offering Plan. Equal housing opportunity. There are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin or any other protected class. Brand marketing by SeventhArt.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E J U N I O R S E T AT D O U B L E S

QUEST, AUGUST 2003

QUEST, FEBRUARY 1992

Alyne Massey and Melinda Bass

Ned and Pat Cook with Eles and Warry Gillet 42 QUEST

Tania and Earl Smith

Allan and Maggy Scherer

Pauline Boardman and Guilford Dudley, Jr.

ERIC WEISS

Bill Pitt and Toinette Boalt


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A S I TA M A R I A ’ S F I E STA S A L U T E D M A R I N A B AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Adrienne and Gianluigi Vittadini

Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia and Cécile David-Weill

Chus Esquerra, Fe Fendi and Enrica Arangi

Deeda Blair and Pierre Durand

Kiera Chaplin

Jackie Weld Drake and Paul Lubetsky

Randy Lampert, Maria Estrany and Angel Sanchez

N E W YO R K L A N D M A R K S P R E S E R VAT I O N FO U N D AT I O N ’ S L U N C H AT A L A N D M A R K AT T H E G U G G E N H E I M M U S E U M

Diana Taylor and Robert Tierney 44 QUEST

Pamela Banker and Suzette Smith

Liz Peek and Memrie Lewis

Stanley Stillman, Elisabeth Saint-Amand and Nathan Saint-Amand

Juliana Terian and Anna Poulsen

Paula Zahn and Paul Goldberger

M A RY H I LL I A R D ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Steven Holl, Christina Davis and Richard Armstrong


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

M A RY H I LL I A R D

QUE ST, OCTOBER 1995

46 QUEST


S A L E S | R E N TA L S | R E L O C AT I O N | N E W D E V E L O P M E N T S | R E TA I L | M O R T G A G E | P R O P E R T Y M A N A G E M E N T | T I T L E I N S U R A N C E

© 2012 Douglas Elliman Real Estate. Equal Housing Opportunity.

WHEN TALK TURNS TO REAL ESTATE, WHO DOES NEW YORK TURN TO FOR ANSWERS?

New York real estate has an undeniable mystique. From the Hamptons to Westchester to Manhattan, Douglas Elliman is proud to represent New York’s most spectacular residences. Only Elliman has the insider knowledge and influence of the largest global network of real estate professionals to find the perfect New York home to complement your unique lifestyle. Put the power of Elliman to work for you.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E MU S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S “ N E W YO R K A F T E R DA R K ” AT T H E FO U R S E A S O N S R E STAU R A N T

Julian and Jamee Gregory

Marianne Lafiteau and Henri Barguirdjian 48 QUEST

Mark Gilbertson and Carol Mack

Susan Henshaw Jones and Susan Madden

Amy Fine Collins, Muffie Potter Aston, Mark Badgley and James Mischka

Mary Snow and Helene Comfort

Allison Rockefeller, Eric Javits and Celerie Kemble

Whitney and Robert Douglas with Claudia Overstrom

Michele Heary and Denise De Luca

Tris Deery and Ellen Niven

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Amanda Espy and Alexandra Hack


NEW YORK

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AT ATPIツョ policies are issued by ARIS Title Insurance Corporation in the U.S. or in conjunction wit with other insurance company subsidiaries of Argo Group International Holdings, Ltd., an international underwriter of specialty insurance and reinsurance products.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O P E N I N G O F C H I N E S E P O R C E L A I N C OM PA N Y O N PA R K AV E N U E

QUEST, DECEMBER 1994

ASK JOEL Chairman & CEO askjoel@gracioushome.com What was your favorite gift last year during the holiday season? My morning routine is incomplete without a well-made espresso, so I asked for the Nespresso Pixie. The machine is fast and intuitive and the coffee is perfect every time, even when you are on the go. What do you look for in a gift store? NYC Holiday shopping can be quite overwhelming, especially after a hurricane. However, a friendly environment and knowledgeable sales associates make a world of a difference. A unique, wide selection to choose from, free gift wrapping services and same day delivery are the cornerstones of a great holiday shopping experience. I always go where I can get gift-giving advice that is just right for every recipient — from family and associates, to the most discerning friends.

Tina Fanjul and Kenny Lane

Lee Thaw and Khalil Rizk

Louise Grunwald and Boaz Mazor

John Radziwill

Mary McFadden and Jamie Figg

What is the ultimate gift for the home? If I am going to someone’s home, I always like to give a set of 12 Sferra Festival Linen Cocktail Napkins — they come in 100 colors and can coordinate with matching placements and tablecloths — all of which can be custom sized for your table. What are your top gifting picks from Gracious Home for friends and family? Male or female — everyone appreciates great design. Our holiday selection is full of inspiring and exceptionally crafted products. For example, the vintage Flip Clock by Leff or Fatcat’s Portable Device Chargers — ingenious and affordable. Dayna Decker Diffusers come in beautiful packaging and make the perfect gift for women. For the kids — I recommend Urbanears Zinken Headphones. A great gift for the host or hostess is the Waring Pro Malt Maker. And for something both on-trend and unique, I recommend the Cocktail R-EVOLUTION Molecular Bar Mixology Kit. 00 QUEST

Pete Hathaway and Sam Green

Brucie Hennessy and George Trescher

Stefan de Kwiatowski with Michelle and Alessandro Corsini

Charles Washburn and Molly Wilmot


LUXURY BEDDING AVA I L A B L E AT

UPPER EAST SIDE • UPPER WEST SIDE • CHELSEA DESIGN CENTER 212.517.6300 WWW.GRACIOUSHOME.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E D U T C H E S S L A N D C O N S E R VA N C Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S L U N C H EO N I N STA N FO R D V I L L E , N E W YO R K

Max Goodwin and Ottavio Serena

Helen Blodgett 52 QUEST

Craig and Gloria Callen

Nancy Henze, Noel Melhado and Molly Schaefer

Libet Johnson and CeCe Cord

Oakleigh Thorne

Barbara Tober, Pam Howard and Jackie Drexel

Feli Thorne

M A RY H I LL I A R D

Felicity Bontecou and Fernanda Kellogg


Own a piece of paradise. Palm Beach.

210 Via Del Mar • Palm Beach 12,115± sqft • 1.25 acres • 150’ of Direct Intracoastal Frontage $24,900,000 Contact John O. Pickett III • 561.301.5266

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1995

54 QUEST


No 7 SUB

William Greenberg

L A DY M

Luke’s L ob ster

Todd English YO ART D’Avignon t hree tarts Lapain MAISON CHOCOLAT BILLY’S BAKERY SUSHI OF GARI TARTINERY

du

5th AV Kusmi Tea

W. 59th St. FP PATISSERIE LAZ P E

A FOOD H A

o

LL

TH

Meet me at The Plaza.

Established 2012

“ Qu

ality

l o cal f o o d wi th P rove na

nce

.”

O N E W E S T 5 9 T H S T R E E T N E W YO R K , N Y 1 0 0 19 I 212 . 5 4 6 . 5 4 9 9 I W W W.T H E P L A Z A . C O M THE PLAZA FOOD HALL HOURS: MONDAY-SATURDAY 8:00AM TO 9:30PM I SUNDAY 11:00AM TO 6:00PM TODD ENGLISH HOURS: DAILY 11:00AM TO 10:00PM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S P R E V I E W FO R T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L F I N E A R T A N D A N T I Q U E S H O W AT T H E PA R K AV E N U E A R MO R Y

Annette Rickel and Daisy Soros

Sigourney Weaver, Eleanora Kennedy, Candice Bergen and Marshall Rose

Alexia Hamm Ryan and Jamee Gregory 56 QUEST

Roman and Helena Martinez

Anne Jeffrey, Emilia Saint-Amand and Monique Merrill

Bunny Williams and John Rosselli

Martha Glass

Amy Hoadley with Wally and Betsy Turner

Katie Tozer, Kamie Lightburn, Tara Wilson and Rema Parachini

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Sloan Overstrom


Long Island's North Shore danielgale.com

Mill Neck, NY OB/EN SD #6. MLS# 2533618. $2,895,000. Margy Hargraves, LAB, 631.692.6770 ext.227, d.631.692.9227 Peggy Moriarty, LAB, 631.692.6770 ext.224, c.516.769.2843

Garden City, NY SD #18. MLS# 2477345. $2,999,999. Christine Cudahy, LSP, 516.248.6655 c.516.238.8768

Huntington Bay, NY SD #3. MLS# 2528151. $2,190,000. Diane Anderson, LAB, 631.692.6770 ext.222 c.516.383.7354

Huntington Bay, NY SD #3. MLS# 2512397. $1,590,000. Bonnie Williamson, LAB, 631.427.6600 ext.210, c.516.443.5958

Lattingtown, NY SD #3. MLS# 2522769. $3,295,000. Bonnie Devendorf, LAB, 516.759.4800 ext.111 Geraldine “Gerri” White, LSP, 516.759.4800 ext.139

Manhasset, NY SD #6. MLS# 2523156. $8,700,000. Renee Brugal, LSP, 516.627.4440 ext.389 c.516.972.2707

Mill Neck, NY SD #3. MLS# 2528713. $3,275,000. Kathryn “Cottie” Maxwell Pournaras, LAB 516.759.4800 ext.131, c.516.857.3011

Old Westbury, NY SD #15. MLS# 2485152. $4,688,000. Ellen Zipes, LAB 516.626.7600 ext.15 c.516.817.7300

Oyster Bay Cove, NY CSH SD #2. MLS# 2509103. $2,249,000. Deborah Tintle Hauser, LSP 631.692.6770 ext.328, c.631.513.2107

Muttontown, NY SD #3. MLS# 2526096. $2,250,000. Bonnie Devendorf, LAB, 516.759.4800 ext.111, c.516.509.6229 Katherine Cuddeback, LAB, 516.759.4800 ext.133, c.516.238.9919

Sands Point, NY SD #4. MLS# 2481764. $3,499,000. Anne Arter, LAB, 516.883.2900 ext.111 c.516.639.4448

Southold, NY - Bayfront SD #5. MLS# 2511423. $3,275,000. Carol Szynaka, LSP, 631.734.5439 c.917.640.2622

Shelter Island, NY – Waterfront SD #1. MLS# 2475809. $3,250,000. Susan C. Cincotta, LAB, 631.749.1155 c.631.514.9891

Shelter Island, NY – Water View SD #1. MLS# 2521606. $1,350,000. Susan C. Cincotta, LAB, 631.749.1155 c.631.514.9891

Each office is independently owned and operated. We are pledged to provide equal opportunity for housing to any prospective customer or client, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

QUE ST, MAY 1996

58 QUEST


www.hunter-boot.com

HUNTER is a registered trademark of Hunter Boot Limited


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

NEW YORK, NATIONAL HAS YOU COVERED

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Go National. Go Like a Pro.

Denise LeFrak and John Calicchio 00 QUEST

Lewis Barnard, Ellen Futter and Dennis Walcott

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, SEPTEMBER 1998

62 QUEST


Topics best not left until 3am to think about:

“Is my family ready for my wealth?”

You’ve worked hard to grow your portfolio and prepare your money for your family. But have you prepared your family to receive your money? At Wilmington Trust, we’ve been advising families on wealth stewardship for more than 100 years. In fact, family education and governance are key components of our integrated family wealth solutions approach. This preparation and guidance can make all the difference in the world to your legacy. To get started, call Larry Gore at 212-415-0520 today.

WEALTH ADVISORY

Congratulations to Quest on 25 Years of Success C ALIFORNIA | DEL AWARE | FLORIDA | GEORGIA | MARYL AND | MA SSACHUSET T S | NE W JERSE Y | NE W YORK | PENNSYLVANIA | VIRGINIA | WA SHINGTON, D.C . ©2012 Wilmington Trust Corporation, an af filiate of M &T Bank.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E B OYS C L U B O F N E W YO R K â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S FA L L D A N C E AT 5 8 3 PA R K

Allison Aston and Andrew Fry

Jeffrey and Debbie Stevenson

Lindsey Coleman and Christopher Weekes

Rebecca de Kertanguy, Mark Shanker and Emily Blavatnik 64 QUEST

Philip Williams, Gene and Jackie Williams, Harry Williams and Eugene Williams

Sheila Stephenson, Lew van Amerongen and Andrea de Cholnoky

Helen and Ted Pardoe and Jeanmarie Drucker

Travis Acquavella and Lesley Schulhof

Lindsey Pryor

Annabelle Fowlkes and Burwell Schorr

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tom and Marina Purcell with Chip Schorr


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, FEBRUARY 1994

66 QUEST


In addition to all our other beautiful things, we are now your Porthault shop.

LETA AUSTIN FOSTER BOUTIQUE 64 VIA MIZNER, PALM BEACH • (561)655-7367


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST, OCTOBER 1990

68 QUEST


812 FIFTH AVENUE This rarely available gracious 8 room home offers wonderful light and unparalleled Park views from oversized living room, library and master bedroom windows. The home also includes a gracious entrance gallery, formal dining room, a breakfast room and maids room with 2 full baths off the kitchen, excellent closet space throughout, plus an additional separate storage unit. Washer/ dryer and pied a terres permitted. Sorry, no pets. $7,000,000 warburgrealty.com NET# 1117932 Richard Steinberg 212-439-5183


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1987

70 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M AYO R ’ S F U N D : F E T E D E S W I F T Y , B E N E F I T I N G T H E PA R K S A F T E R S C H O O L P R O G R A M

QUEST, NOVEMBER 2004

72 QUEST


Invest. Conserve. Enjoy.

Mandalay Plantation

Hines Hill Plantation

El Destino Plantation

2343+/- Acres $14,175,150

2004 +/- Acres $11,923,800

4138 +/- Acres $20,255,510

For over a century, the Red Hills region of south Georgia and north Florida has served as the winter home to an elite group of discerning sportsmen. The rolling terrain of towering pines and magnificent oaks supports a bountiful bobwhite quail population and offers exceptional wing shooting. As a result, the area is home to the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest concentration of traditional hunting plantations. Rarely do these legacy sporting estates come available for purchase. For more information please contact our firm.

THE WRIGHT GROUP Real Estate Advisory & Brokerage Services Ben W. McCollum, Broker | Thomasville, Georgia (229) 226-2564

WRIGHTBROKER.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

MARINA GARNIER

QUEST, MARCH 1988

74 Q U E S T


After 80 years, we’d like to reintroduce ourselves. Frank Crystal & Company, one of the world’s leading strategic risk and insurance advisors, is now Crystal & Company. A small change perhaps. But after 80 years of family management, we’ve built a reputation for uncompromising independence and fierce dedication to our clients. And that’s not about to change.

www.crystalco.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

H E N RY B U H L

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 8 8

76 QUEST


FIVE GENERATIONS. ONE PRIVATE BANKER.

For over twenty years, the Punia Family has placed their trust in their private banker from IDB Bank.

THE PUNIA FAMILY OWNERS, PUNIA COMPANY L.L.C.

To enjoy this type of personal service and loyalty, call Jim LoGatto at 212-551-8508. PRIVATE BANKING COMMERCIAL BANKING

IDB Bank® is a registered service mark of Israel Discount Bank of New York. Member FDIC

IT’S PERSONAL


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1991

78 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

H E AT H E R CO H A N E

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 6

80 QUEST


THE SOCIAL EVENT OF THE SEASON

©2011 Nancy Ellison/Polaris

Special guest appearance by

Lola Astanova Russian-American virtuoso pianist

at LIFE’S 19th Annual Lady in Red Gala Saturday, December 1 6:00 PM at The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, FL The Lady in Red Gala is the must attend event of the year. A Who’s Who of celebrities, dignitaries and special guests will be among those enjoying Astanova’s poolside performance of Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2, third movement and will be accompanied by the Palm Beach Symphony, under the direction of conductor Daniel Alfred Wachs. To request an invitation please contact LIFE at 561.865.0955 or visit www.life-edu.org.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST, OCTOBER 1993

82 QUEST


FOLLOW THE FOX

Low 70’s (Madison / Park) Price Upon Request BARBARA FOX (212) 639-9711

Magnificent and Unique Private Home

15 East 69th Street, 3A 7 ROOMS, 3 BEDROOMS The Westbury - Grand Prewar Condominium $7,995,000 Web ID 410695 STEPHANIE KANNER (212) 639-9719

20’ WIDE, 6 STORIES Web ID 3211613

941 Park Avenue, 6/7a 12 ROOMS, 5 BEDROOMS Stunning Duplex in One of Park’s Finest Buildings $13,100,000 Web ID 3127903 RONI COWAN (212) 639-9737

1015 Madison Ave. New York, New York 212.772.2666 foxresidential.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

L AU R A W. LE W I S

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 9

84 QUEST


THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION CONGRATULATES ACTOR, DIRECTOR AND SCREENWRITER TIM BLAKE NELSON, WINNER OF THE SECOND ANNUAL MEERA GANDHI GIVING BACK AWARD AT THE 2012 WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL.

TIM BLAKE NELSON DONATED HIS GIVING BACK HONORARIUM TO THE 52ND STREET PROJECT, WHOSE MISSION IS TO BRING TOGETHER KIDS (AGES 9 TO 18) FROM THE HELL’S KITCHEN NEIGHBORHOOD IN NEW YORK CITY WITH THEATER PROFESSIONALS TO CREATE ORIGINAL THEATER. PLEASE VISIT


CALENDAR

NOVEMBER

On November 8, Verdi’s riveting opera “Un Ballo In Maschera” returns to the Metropolitan Opera with a black-tie cocktail reception and dinner starting at 5:30 p.m. preceding the performance. Champagne and dessert will be served at intermission. For more information, call 212.362.6000.

SERVING UP HOPE

The Fountain House will host its fall fête at 6:30 p.m. at the Racquet and Tennis Club. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

States will hold its fall gala “To The Rescue!” at 6 p.m at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 301.548.7710.

4

ONE FOOT FORWARD A SANDY SOIRÉE

The Wasie Foundation will present “BeachBash” as part of the annual AT&T Jeb Bush Florida Classic. For more information, call 954.524.3047.

CancerCare will put on its annual lung cancer “Walk For Hope” at 8 a.m. at the Oyster Bay Golf Course. For more information, call 718.925.2977. SEASON OPENER

CULTIVATING CULTURE

The Horticultural Society of New York will host a fall luncheon at 11:45 a.m. at the Metropolitan Club, honoring influential individuals in landscaping and design. For more information, call 212.757.0915.

2

OH, THE HUMANITY!

The Humane Society of the United 86 QUEST

The Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts will begin its 2012-2013 season. For more information, call 718.951.4500. A JOLLY GOOD FELLOW

The Royal Oak Foundation will present its 2012 Timeless Design Award to Julian Fellowes at 6:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Club. For more information, call 212.480.2889.

5

FOREVER YOUNG

The Carter Burden Center for the Aging will host its 41st anniversary celebration at 7 p.m. at the Mandarin Oriental. For more information, call 914.235.1490.

8

HISTORICAL HAUNTS

The New York Landmarks Conservancy will throw its fall gala at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 914.235.1490. ’TIS THE SEASON

The Central Park Conservancy will hold its annual “Autumn in Central Park” gala at 8 p.m. adjacent to Tavern on the Green. For more information, call 212.310.6632.

dinner at 5:30 p.m. before a 7:30 p.m. performance of “Un Ballo In Maschera.” For more information, call 212.362.6000. PRAISING PICASSO

The Guggenheim Museum will host its annual gala at 7 p.m. in celebration of the exhibition “Picasso: Black and White.” For more information, call 212.360.4309.

11

SOLID FOUNDATION

Hebrew Home at Riverdale Foundation will put on its annual dinner at 6 p.m. at the Waldorf=Astoria. For more information, call 212.614.0400.

13

FOR THE CHILDREN THE MASK

The Metropolitan Opera will host a black-tie cocktail reception and

The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children will host the annual “Protecting

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E M E T RO P O L I TA N O P E R A

1


CALENDAR

NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1

TICKLE THE IVORIES

A piano recital by Lola Astanova will take place at 6 p.m. at the Lady in Red Gala at the Mar-aLago Club. For more information, call 561.865.0955.

3

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

The Food Allergy Initiative will host its annual ball at 7 p.m. at the Waldorf=Astoria. For more information, call 212.867.1117.

4

BRIGHT AND COLORFUL

John Rosselli and Bunny Williams will host an exhibition by Charles Masson at 6 p.m. at Treillage on the Upper East Side. For more information, call 212.535.2288.

7 On November 8, the Central Park Conservancy will host its annual fall gala at 8 p.m. Attendees will enjoy cocktails, dinner, and dancing amid spectacular fall foliage. The Central Park Conservancy aims to raise funds for the restoration, maintenance, and management of Central Park. For more information, call 212.310.6632. Pier 94. For more information, call 973.808.5015. WINTER WONDERLAND

The Women’s Media Center will present the 2012 Women’s Media Awards at 6 p.m. at Gustavino’s. For more information, call 212.721.4071.

The Winterthur Museum will debut a special exhibition, “Yuletide at Winterthur: A Feast for the Eyes.” For more information, call 800.448.3883.

14

22

The Society of Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center will kick off its fall party at 7 p.m. at the Four Seasons Restaurant. For more information, call 212.829.0002.

The Town of Palm Beach United Way’s 5K Turkey Trot will begin at 7 a.m. at Bradley Park. The event will be sponsored by Livingston Builders and PNC. Bank For more information, call 561.655.1919.

AUCTION BLOCK

28

DOYENNES OF MEDIA

FIND YOUR CENTER

The Humane Society of New York will host a benefit auction of photography at its gallery overlooking the Highline at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.752.4842.

House will begin its annual fall associates committee benefit with cocktails at the Armani store at 56th Street and Fifth Avenue at 7 p.m. with a dinner to follow at the Union Club. For more information, call 212.744.5022.

The Palm Beach Food and Wine Festival will hold an event at 7 p.m. at Café Boulud. For more information, call 954.699.5009.

10

HEADING SOUTH

The Buccan Palm Beach will host its “Last Supper” event at 7 p.m. For more information, call 786.877.0757.

HOT TO TROT

SILVER LINING

Silver Hill Hospital will present its annual gala at Cipriani 42nd Street at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

JOYEUX ANNIVERSAIRE

The French Heritage Society will hold a fall festival soirée at 7 p.m. at the Union Club. For more information, call 212.759.6846.

17

SUPER EVENT

The Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation will host “A Magical Evening” at 6:30 p.m at Cipriani Wall Street. For more information, call 646.932.6325.

ON THE WATER

The Pier Antiques Show will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 88 QUEST

DINNER DANCE

The Lenox Hill Neighborhood

On December 1, Lola Astanova will help open the Palm Beach social season with a performance at the Lady in Red Gala at 6 p.m. at the Mar-a-Lago Club. For more information, call 561.865.0955.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E H U M A N E S O C I E T Y; CO U RTE S Y O F T H E C E N T R A L PA R K CO N S E RVA N C Y

Kids First” gala at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 212.628.9090.

FRENCH FARE


MILAN - SHOWROOM, VIA MONTENAPOLEONE 9, 20121 MILAN, ITALY angelogalasso.com

NEW YORK The Plaza, Fifth Avenue at Central Park South, New York, NY 10019 LONDON 8/10 Hans Road, London, SW3 1RX MOSCOW Bolshaya Dmitrovka 20/1, Moscow, 107031 MILAN Via Montenapoleone 21/A, Milan, 20121


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY QUEST COLUMNIST Harry Benson has been contributing to the magazine for five years, and here we assembled some of his most memorable images. This page, clockwise from top: Madame Grès, 1942; Ned Rorem, 1978; the Duchess and Duke of Windsor, 1966; Caroline Kennedy with William Ivey Long, 1986; Roger Tory Peterson, 2011. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Hilary Geary on the a 2012 cover; Valentino Garavani, 1984; Barbara Bush, 1989; Molly Wilmot, 1983; Warner LeRoy, 1976; Bill and Hillary Clinton, 1992; Robert A.M. Stern, 1989.


NOVEMBER 2012 91


TA K I

O.K. IT WAS 1987, the market had crashed, and the next support level was nowhere on the horizon. Wall Street-types were panicking, selling their Porsches, and thinking of going into real estate. And an Irish woman by the name of Heather Cohane started a monthly glossy by the name of Quest. Back then, the Internet was unheard of, Steve Rattner and Stephen Schwarzman were unknown, and the big shots of the charity ball social climb were people like Henry Kravis and Felix Rohatyn. An ambitious trader was Michael Bloomberg at Salomon Brothers, and the head of Salomon, John Gutfreund, was playing Liar’s Poker. His wife, Susan, was hostess-with-the-mostest, competing with old stalwarts like Pat Buckley and Nan Kempner. Sirio’s Le Cirque was the place to be seen, and it’s still going strong 25 years later. But Rick’s—as in Casablanca—was Mortimer’s, Glenn Bernbaum’s café on Lexington Avenue, which looked like the inside of a fireplace and was just as hot. Everyone met at Mortimer’s. Glenn was a very nice gay man who had a weakness for upper-class English freeloaders who used to run up Obama-like debts on his tab. The place had caught on immediately, a mixture of WASP society types, Eurotrash, and fashion folk. He once gave a costume party in honor of a book of mine, Princes, Playboys, and High Class Tarts, one that actually made it to the best-seller list. He dressed all his waiters as nuns and called the bash “A Night of Dolce Vita.” When a couple of “nuns” were intercepted by him in the bathroom sniffing coke, the honoree was forced to 92 QUEST

beg for their jobs until he relented. It was a memorable night recorded for posterity by Women’s Wear Daily, with some extremely sarcastic remarks by the then owner, John Fairchild. The first table on the right next to the large window was reserved for the person Glenn deemed to be the most important in the room. The ladies who lunched fought like tigers to get it, but Pat Buckley and Nan Kempner had the inside track—as did Nancy Kissinger and the social moth, as Jerry Zipkin was known. Zipkin was brash, outspoken, gay, and obnoxious, but had a loyal following among elderly women. His best friend was Nancy Reagan and, whenever she was in the city from the nation’s capital, Zipper would parade her into Mortimer’s and the hoi polloi would stand and cheer, whatever their politics. Reinaldo and Carolina Herrera were also great friends of the proprietor, as were some real Mortimers: Senga, Tony, Dickie, John Jay, and so on. One memorable evening was the night the Herreras gave a grand dinner there for Princess Margaret. It was too much for Glenn, who got crocked early on. When Reinaldo rang to invite me, I told him that unfortunately I couldn’t make it because of a previous engagement. “What previous engagement?” spluttered Reinaldo. “I’ve accepted a dinner from Diego del Vayo.” (I was sure Glenn was picking up the bill as the dinner was, of course, at Mortimer’s.) So Reinaldo hung up rather furiously but, as it turned out, our tables were next to each other so it was like one big happy family. Well, not quite. After the main course

we joined the two tables and Carolina Herrera had the brilliant idea to sit me next to Princess Margaret, known to take a drink or two and to be rather abrupt with those who didn’t treat her with the servility with which she was accustomed to being treated. I was in my cups by then and began the conversation by telling Magsie that we had met in Sardinia some time before. “What, you’re a schivil schervant?” she inquired. “Do I look like a schivil schervant?” I answered imitating her under-the-influence consonants. “He’s a schivil schervant,” she announced, moving her seat as far away as possible. Worse was to come: once the princess got up to leave, we all followed just as the nice black pianist of the place hit a few bars of “God Save the Queen” on the keys. “No, letch have none of that,” uttered Margaret. “It’s not for you, ma’am,” I yelled. “It’s for Jerry Zipkin!” People roared but I had made two mortal enemies that night. Glenn thought it very funny, the Herreras were too nice to have read me the riot act, and the princess got her revenge later on that year at a ball in the English countryside. Zipkin never spoke to me again. Most of the regulars are now gone, as is Mortimer’s. It closed immediately after Glenn’s death in 1999, and its maître d’, Robert, opened Swifty’s two blocks down. The dress code was strictly observed and no boorish behavior was tolerated, with a few exceptions. I was one of them. It was fun while it lasted. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com.

H A R RY B E N S O N

MEMORIES OF MORTIMER’S


C.Z. Guest, Carolina Herrera, and Anne Slater flank the front table at Mortimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, presided over by host Glenn Bernbaum. NOVEMBER 2012 93


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

NOVEMBER IS for giving thanks, and what better way to show your gratitude than by offering something from these pages? Just in time for Thanksgiving comes a new collection of approachable and highquality wines from renowned winemaker Steve Reeder and singer Dave Matthews. We’ll be setting the table with Dreaming Tree (and some fresh caviar from Caviar Russe) to toast some of this month’s finds, from dazzling new baubles and jewels to striking looks from designers Katie Ermilio, Ralph Lauren, and Michael Bastian. Oh, and who better to care for and store your wardrobe than the full-service valet company Garde Robe?

Get in step with your inner vixen with Stuart Weitzman’s Vixen heel, in nero nocturn. $385. Stuart Weitzman: Available at stuartweitzman.com.

Now that’s rock candy: Autumn days, Bombay nights: Sling on Chanel’s Paris-Bombay 2012 flapbag in stingray. $4,695. Chanel: Select Chanel boutiques or 800.550.0005.

Verdura’s platinum and brown diamond briolette ear clips, platinum mounts set with 74 brown briolette diamonds weighing 57.66 carats. $65,000. Verdura: 745 Fifth Ave., Suite 1205, 212.758.3388.

Designer Katie Ermilio ups the ante on ultra-classic chic with this 100% silk faille pearl shaded sheath dress. $1,970. Katie Ermilio: Available at shopbop.com. 94 QUEST

A fantasy come true: Roberto Coin’s Fantasia ring in 18-kt. white gold with black and white diamonds. $5,300. Roberto Coin: By special order at 800.853.5958.


Fresh Finds “Fall” (oil and graphite on canvas), by Henrik Simonsen, is available at Wally Findlay Gallery (124 E. 57th St., 212.421.5390), which is hosting the the New York début of the Danish artist’s works.

Stack them up: Marina B’s Cardan Perles rings in 18-kt. yellow gold and pearl, red chalcedony, and green agate. $1,500-1,700. Marina B: By appointment at the Marina B Salon, 212.644.1155. Surprise her with Cartier’s Trinity long necklace in Treasure all of

18-kt. rose, yellow, and white gold with

life’s journeys with

diamonds and pearls. $187,600. Cartier: Cartier

Scully & Scully’s

boutiques, 800.CARTIER, or cartier.com.

exclusive “Life Is a Journey” enamel

Winemaker Steve Reeder and

box, which can be

musician Dave Matthews

personalized. From

introduce the approachable

$450. Scully & Scully:

Dreaming Tree wines:

212.755.2590.

Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and a ZinfandelMerlot blend. $14.99 at dreamingtreewines.com. Get wrapped up in Theodora & Callum’s black multi Tempe Rug Blanket scarf. $175. Theodora & Callum: At SCOOP NYC or theodoraandcallum.com.

Let’s hear it for Jules, one of the biggest multitaskers in J.Crew’s closet—and quite possibly the most flattering dress you’ve ever slipped into. $228. J.Crew: At J.Crew stores and jcrew.com. 96 QUEST

Hunter Boot’s iconic Wellies get an haute update with signature J. Mendel buckles and trim details in this exclusive collaboration between the two luxury houses. From $585 at hunter-boot.com.


Fresh Finds

Block out the rays the fashionable way in Gucci’s

Shake things up this season with

model 1653 signature goggles.

Asprey’s cocktail shaker in

$195. Gucci: Available at Solstice Sunglasses

yellow enamel. $870. Asprey:

everywhere or online at solsticesunglasses.com.

853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

Go behind the scenes and into the past of The Plaza Hotel with a new limited-edition book, The Plaza Unveiled, with partial proceeds of sales going to the New York Über cool: Michael Bastian’s chestnut snap-pocket leather jacket ($3,310

Landmarks Conservancy. $180 at The Plaza Boutique and theplazaunveiled.com.

at Bergdorf Goodman) and navy-and-white wide chalkstripe skinny pant ($485 at Michael Bastian, 212.228.3400).

Indulge your taste buds with Caviar Russe’s Caviar Indulgent Pairing, including foie gras, smoked salmon, caviar, blinis, crème fraîche, and utensils. From $145. Caviar Russe: 538 Madison Ave. or 212.980.5908.

No other vehicle frames three decades of legendary craftmanship, capability, and civility with such undaunted enthusiasm as the Mercedes-Benz G63 AMG. From $134,300 at mbusa.com.

Step out in style in Angelo Galasso’s red-and-midnight leather shoes. $1,970. Angelo Galasso: Angelo Galasso at The Plaza, One West 58th St., 212.371.4400.

98 QUEST


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Fresh Finds

Need more closet

The pure linen Baron napkin from Laine de Château is hand-embroidered in Paris and available at

space? Have multiple homes? Multiple wardrobes? Then

Leta Austin Foster & Associates: 64 Via Mizner,

let the full-service

Palm Beach, Fla., 561.655.5489.

valet company Garde Robe collect, care for, and deliver your clothes—wherever, whenever. Garde Robe: 888.GARDE.11 or garderobeonline.com.

“Rub Off” Gentle Facial Exfoliator whisks away the day’s debris and dead surface cells while regulating oil and mini-

No two are alike: John Robshaw’s cotton-and-linen pink elephant pillows from Gracious Home are painted by hand with unique detailing on each one. $200. Gracious Home: 1220 Third Ave., 212.517.6300.

mizing pores. $48. vbeauté: 877.326.5622 or vbeaute.com.

Get your sleek on this season in Ralph Lauren’s black bonded-leather wrap coat Wempe’s Blu Intermezzo Color things coral with de Grisogono’s coral and brown

BY KIM haute

($10,000) and black crêpe-wool trouser ($798). Ralph Lauren Collection: Select stores and ralphlaurencollection.com.

couture necklace in rose gold and colored gemstones

diamond drop

is a playful work of

earrings set

art. $42,775.

in 18-kt. yellow

Wempe:

gold. Price

700 Fifth Ave.,

upon request.

212.397.9000.

de Grisogono: 824 Madison Ave., 212.439.4220.

Travel light with the Travelette Belgian linen beige flat with white trim from Belgian Shoes. $325. Belgian Shoes: 110 East 55th St., 212.755.7372, or belgianshoes.com.

100 QUEST


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

Garrison, nY Sophisticated Adirondack style compound with house, cottage and separate garage on 5.6 acres of rolling woodland hills surrounded by endless hiking trails. The main house features livingSPRING, room and bedroom with high beamed ceilings, COLD NYmaster - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and dining room sharing a grandviews floor tofrom ceilingevery stone fireplace, large hardwood floors throughout, nature winCOLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor house to ceilingand stone1fireplace, large dow. Central air and large generator serve beding mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushtheroom home which is sitedThe on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 cottage. heated lap pool has new purification sysing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout the home which is sited on almost Offered at $1,875,000 tem and lovely blue stone5 acres. tile surround. Price upon request.

Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


FINANCE

From left, the Executive Committee of the newly renamed and rebranded Crystal & Company, one of the world's leading strategic risk and insurance companies: John C. Smith, Jonathan H. F. Crystal, Sanford F. Crystal, James W. Crystal, James F. Crystal, and Edward P. Kiessling.

THE INTEGRITY IS CRYSTAL CLEAR AT CRYSTAL & COMPANY, a family heritage of 80 years is being celebrated and reaffirmed, along with a commitment to the future of its business as a close-knit, family-run, client-focused insurance brokerage. And, on the momentous occasion of its landmark 80th anniversary, the company formerly known as Frank Crystal & Company is inaugurating not only a new name, but a reinvigorated brand identity. The recently renamed brokerage firm is one of the world’s leading strategic risk and insurance advisors. In fact, as the 102 QUEST

largest privately held brokerage firm in the United States, Crystal & Company is a unique pillar of the American insurance brokerage industry, striking a rare balance of being large enough to offer services that are competitive with those from significantly sizeable monoliths in the industry, but on a scale that ensures the same client-focused, bespoke service of the family-run company it started as decades ago under founder Frank Crystal’s leadership. For the past 80 years, Frank Crystal & Company established a solid reputation

based on independence and integrity, placing its clients’ needs above all else. Today, on its milestone anniversary, the company is proud to announce its new identity—Crystal & Company—while continuing to maintain its steadfast commitment to its clients. The company’s history dates back three generations, beginning with its original namesake, Frank Crystal. It was 1933, as the country was easing itself out of the Great Depression and Wall Street was showing signs of improvement, when Frank Crystal decided to


Above, clockwise from left: Company Company founder, first leader, and onetime namesake Frank F Crystal; C today, Crystal C & Company is being led by two

CO U RTE S Y O F C RY S TA L & CO M PA NY, C RY S TA L FA M I LY

generations of Crystals, including (from left to right) Jonathan, Jamie, Jim, and Sandy; the newly rebranded Crystal & Company logo.

strike out on his own and establish an independent insurance brokerage firm. A mere three years later, the firm was the broker for one of the largest national mining companies, and was eventually working with financial-services companies. Over the years, Frank Crystal & Company expanded, but strategically so. When Frank’s son James W. Crystal joined the company in 1959, the firm was comprised of only three people— father, son, and a secretary. Under Jim’s vision and leadership, Frank Crystal & Company expanded its reach to work with an ever-growing portfolio of Wall Street clients. Word-of-mouth recommendations from this growing client roster ensured that Frank Crystal & Company continued to attract other clients from firms of significant size and scope. “The idea had always been to use the financial sector as a platform to build something bigger,” explains Jim

Crystal, the current chairman and CEO of Crystal & Company, who also recalls how the company’s first client, a stock market broker, was a baptism by fire in all senses of the term. Still, it was a gateway to several accounts that helped the company to grow. Today, the firm’s Executive Committee is comprised of Jim and his three sons along with industry stalwarts Edward P. Kiessling and John C. Smith. James F. Crystal, or Jamie, works extensively with many of Crystal & Company’s larger clients in the manufacturing, retail, real estate, healthcare, and nonprofit industries to develop custom-designed insurance programs. Jonathan H. F. Crystal, most recently the Chief Financial Officer, leads the firm’s national Private Client Services group. Sanford F. Crystal, or Sandy, manages the company’s Financial Institutions Group and Management and Professional Risks Group. Along

with the Crystal familiy members, John C. Smith serves as a member of the Executive Committee and is responsible for the development and implementation of growth strategies for the firm, while Edward P. Kiessling heads the Commercial Insurance Operations. Kiessling also serves as the executive liaison for the firm’s Employee Benefits Services operation and is focused on building strategy and driving growth in both of these strategic business units. Though the major Wall Street industry player of today is a far cry from the firm that started 80 years ago—with 10 locations across the country—the core values of the original firm continue to guide and inspire the leadership and general office culture at Crystal & Company. The family pride at Crystal & Company extends beyond family members themselves and to each of the 400 employees, whom everyone on the Executive Committee values as toughNOVEMBER 2012 103


FINANCE

JAMES W. CRYSTAL Chairman and CEO

JONATHAN H. F. CRYSTAL Executive Vice President

JOHN C. SMITH Executive Vice President

Recognized as one of the best-kept secrets of the insurance industry, Crystal & Company is strategically expanding its global

minded, talented individuals distinguished by their technical expertise and industry-specific knowledge, united by their common passion for serving their clients. Together, Crystal & Company prides itself as a national firm serving a global clientele. In its global outreach, it is one of the founding members of Brokerslink, a worldwide

alliance of leading independent insurance brokerage companies comprised of nearly 6,000 professionals servicing clients from 260 offices in more than 50 countries around the world. As a private family enterprise, Crystal & Company is beholden to no one but its clients—no boards or balance sheets. It is what the firm refers to as “the integrity of independence.” It continues to serve the full range of its clients’

risk management, insurance brokerage, and employee benefits consulting needs. Offering sophisticated counsel and advice grounded in an analytical approach, Crystal & Company leverages the strength of its market relationships to achieve superior results. Earlier this year, in anticipation of its anniversary, Frank Crystal & Company decided that it had “outgrown” its brand, if you will. One client called the firm “the best-kept secret” in insurance brokerage—a compliment, certainly, but not necessarily what the company was trying to convey as it approached 80 years. Over the following several months, it also heard that even those who were familiar with the firm were not aware of the impressive range of services, the extent of its global footAbove, from left: The Executive Committee of Crystal & Company. Opposite page, inset: The Crystal family, circa 1985, with Frank Crystal & Company founder Frank Crystal surrounded by his son and grandsons, future leaders of what would become Crystal & Company.

CO U RTE S Y O F C RY S TA L & CO M PA NY

reach, combining 80 years of expertise with bespoke client services.


CO U RTE S Y O F C RY S TA L & CO M PA NY, C RY S TA L FA M I LY

JAMES F. CRYSTAL Executive Vice President

EDWARD P. KIESSLING Executive Vice President

print, or the depth of talent represented by its more than 400 professionals. Consistently, repeatedly, and throughout many discussions with clients, nearly everyone referred to the company as “Crystal.” And so, with respect to and in honor of its founder, Frank Crystal, the new leadership recognized that the firm had grown well beyond just one person. And so it decided to reintroduce itself as Crystal & Company, asserting its leadership as an independent, family-owned firm with a major foothold in a network of clients across the globe. Jim Crystal and his sons, all of whom are active on the boards of charities and non-profits throughout the tri-state region, are also working to honor the name and reputation of their family inspiration—the company’s founder— with the establishment of the Frank Crystal Foundation. All members of the Crystal family consider it a privilege to give back to their communities, and

the establishment of the Frank Crystal Foundation is the vehicle by which the family will continue its tradition of philanthropy for the current generation, and beyond. New logo, new identity, new themeline. These are all important elements to the new Crystal & Company—a name that gives equal weight to the family that has shaped it through three genera-

SANFORD F. CRYSTAL Executive Vice President

tions as well as to the strength that comes from the 400 talented individuals who are united by a passion for serving clients. u For more information about Crystal & Company please visit crystalco.com. NOVEMBER 2012 105


FINANCE IDB Bank's location on Fifth Avenue. Opposite page, clockwise from top: IDB Bank's senior employees Ehud Arnon; James LoGatto; and Dennis O'Connor.

106 QUEST

cer of IDB Bank and attributes the amazing lasting success of the bank though these tough financial times with a simple philosophy of looking at where they want to be in five years and planning backward, rather than merely planning for the next quarter’s earnings. “We’re long-term players,” he says. “There’s no reason to change.” When the recession first hit, Arnon noticed that Israeli banks like IDB had an advantage over those based in the States, especially considering the mortgage crisis. On that issue, he believes the Israeli mortgage market benefited from being considerably more conservative. They would never give a loan where the monthly repayment is more than 30 percent

SAM L AWSON

A BANK LIKE NO OTHER

EHUD ARNON IS THE PRESIDENT and chief executive offi-


CO U RTE S Y O F I D B B A N K

NAME

of the person’s income. Also, the Israeli banks are totally selffunded with deposits, and neither IDB Israel nor its subsidiary in New York relied on the intrabank market. IDB in particular thrived while others floundered; although it is a New York State chartered commercial bank with an international parent, they still go to great lengths to know their customers. Clients use the bank through generations, and when times are tough, IDB knows it and helps them through. When the economy faltered, and many banks were in a hurry to foreclose, IDB was in no hurry to do so. Arnon has a saying he’s used for years: “It’s not the bank that pays our employees’ salaries. It’s the customer who pays our employee’s salaries. Because of this, it’s our job to accom-

modate our customers the best we can.” He believes clients should receive the attention they deserve; they should not have to call an 800 number, but rather be able to reach actual individuals when they need to talk about their finances, a subject that has become more vital than ever. As for the future, first senior vice president James LoGatto says, "We are favorable to the technology, energy, and commodity sectors believing the demand from outside the U.S. will help these groups. IDB is expanding into local private banking with branches in both New Jersey and Brooklyn, focusing on both their local and international costomers. u For more information, visit idbny.com. NOVEMBER 2012 107


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1987 Over the past quarter-century, Quest has been blessed with an exclusive tribe of revered and renowned columnists, several of whom still contribute brilliantly to our issues. Many of these “ink-drenched quill drivers” have penned profiles in the forthcoming pages that celebrate another bunch of bold-faced New Yorkers—25 in all. Our columnists’ ever-grateful-andproud publisher tips his cap to each of his noble scriveners, including the iconic photojournalist and Fleet Street renegade, Harry Benson; the doyenne and queen of all New York columnists, and the pride of Galveston, Texas, Liz Smith; the erudite, irreverent, and much-envied scoundrel, Taki Theodoracopulos; the ever-glamorous, kind, and generous society scribe, Hilary Geary; the Midas-minded Renaissance man, Michael Thomas; the Corinthian scholar and decorated sportsman, Eddie Ulmann; the clever and canny rapscallion of “The Young and the Guest List,” Jack Bryan; and our own beloved, best-read, loyal, and most-respected editor-in-chief, 112 QUEST

David Patrick “D.P.C.” Columbia. One Quest columnist no longer among us is a pal from my TIME LIFE days, Slim Aarons. Slim’s photos captured the sensibility of timeless and casual elegance so embedded in Quest’s understated voice and innately chic style. He was an authentic New England Yankee who saw our world as “attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places.” Slim’s column, “Once Upon A Time,” ran in Quest from 1998 until his death in 2006, and we salute, and very much miss him. Godspeed, old friend.

GETT Y IMAGES

Slim Aarons by Chris Meigher


25

How can you define a quarter of a century?

We say, with the people, places, and events that most represent each year, and the writers who know them best. Join us as we travel through time in the 25 years that have defined Quest.

1988 Central Park Zoo by Stephanie Clark The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo is one of the treasures of New York City. Though I have been involved with the Wildlife Conservation Society for over 16 years, as a donor and fundraiser, my passion for the zoo—and all its inhabitants—definitely began when I was a little girl growing up in New York. As a child, I can remember being pushed in my stroller past the fluffy white ducks in the pond at the Children’s Zoo, or watching in amazement from my father’s shoulders the friendly elephant with its floppy Dumbo-like ears lunching on a meal of hay. Today these magnificent creatures watch over the more than one million visitors each year. In 1988, after a major five-year renovation, the Central Park Zoo was re-opened, with 14,000 people attending on that first day alone. My husband and I enjoy breaking from our urban lives to visit the newest exhibitions or to attend a talk from one of the hundreds of WCS field scientists working in over 60 countries worldwide. These incredible men and women are at the frontlines of the troubling challenges facing the conservation of wild life and wild lands. We are so grateful for our zoo; here’s to another 150 years. NOVEMBER 2012 113


1989

Diana Vreeland by Amy Fine Collins Diana Vreeland invented the fashion world as we know it—the glitzy, hyperbolic, personality-driven, social, high-low international glamour spectacle, in which appearances are reality, and surface is substance. She understood the need for neophilia—by which I mean the love of change for change’s sake. Vreeland’s Vogue uprooted editorial from reality and even from aspiration. It was dream-driven, a fantasia, and a cornucopia. Paradoxically, she herself was very disciplined in how she dressed, ate, worked, and lived. She really believed that there was no beauty without strangeness, and that truth could be found only through exaggeration. So she was an oracle, but one with detractors. Geoffrey Beene and Eleanor Lambert, for example, objected to her essential indifference to American fashion designers. It was her more self-effacing colleague, Baron Niki de Gunzburg, who championed American fashion. Vreeland’s present revival—I am reading the galleys of a new biography—shows how much the fashion world is in search of an ancestral totem.

114 QUEST


Metropolitan by Charlie McSpadden “We’ve met before, haven’t we?” asked Whit Stillman, blazerclad despite the summer heat, on a West Village street corner in July of 2010. Though I hadn’t—that day marked my first as an assistant on his recently released film, Damsels in Distress—it certainly felt like I knew him from his wry and deeply personal films: Metropolitan, Barcelona, and The Last Days of Disco. Though he’ll be the first to denote the separation between his opinions and those of his characters, one can’t help but note that (more than) a few of his traits inform his endearing fictional creations. I was fortunate to experience this firsthand, when, in the middle of the Damsels shoot, an unexpected surgery left me apartment-bound for a week,

1990 immobile, recovering, and aching to return to set. A buzz at my door brought a care package of books and films, with a handwritten note from Whit wishing swift improvement. Much like the sentiments of Metropolitan’s Tom Townsend and Damsels’ Violet, I agree that handwritten notes are rare and to be cherished. And the same goes for Whit’s exceptional and distinct voice in film. Whit brings welcome honesty and nuance to a world prone to caricature, and rewards his audience with deft insights on the vulnerability and social discomfort of youth. Luckily, I felt neither of these adolescent afflictions upon returning to Whit’s set, but instead, refreshed and grateful for his words and generosity.


1991 Brooke Astor by David Patrick Columbia She was a child of Victorians who came into young womanhood at the end of the Edwardian era, which had great influence on the American men and women of a certain socioeconomic stratum. This was a woman whose example was contrary to the popular notion of womanhood. Without the physical trappings of youth, she was a lady who often wore a hat and gloves, white gloves, a lady who wrote a memoir and put it all out on the table, and with grace and style, as well as discretion. She slowly but steadily became the grande dame of a New York that had not seen much of grandes dames since her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandmother reigned a century before. She became the right person for the right moment. She had an abiding interest in philanthropy; her choices for assistance were followed up by personal experiences. She walked among the kings, a tiara nearby for her, and had the common touch. By the time she was in her eighties, she was a legend. She was a writer, an artist, an actress. When she lost her love, Fate presented her with the task of giving away the American Astor fortune. She made it her mission and her mission made her. 116 QUEST


1992 La Grenouille by Charles Masson Congratulations on Quest’s 25th Anniversary! La Grenouille looks forward to leaping at another couple of quarter centuries, or half centuries, brimming with feasts around our table. Thank you for celebrating life with us all this time... With your patience, this frog may one day turn into a prince. Please stay tuned. Mille mercis! Charles

This lovely note was written by Charles Masson, owner of the iconic restaurant started by his parents, Gisèle and Charles. Since 1962, La Grenouille has offered the hungry well-heeled crowds an intimate but grand dining experience, and the opportunity to say that they’ve eaten at the place where Antoine de Saint-Exupéry first began penning his literary classic Le Petit Prince. We would like to wish them a happy anniversary as well for a momentous 50 years of bon appétits! N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 2 117


1993

Raconteur, historian, writer, editor, and popular gentleman, David Patrick Columbia has been an integral and vital part of Quest magazine for 25 years now. Since 1987, David has guided his readers through countless tales of New York society, intertwined with its rich heritage, making his readers aware of the past and present social world of the city and its outposts. Very well-informed and often amusing, he is quite the expert on what’s proper and what’s not, and isn’t afraid to point out the difference! However, much to the relief of many a well-known New Yorker, David is the consummate gentleman both in his writings and in person. Everyone always seems so happy to see David on his daily rounds, whether it be at Michael’s, a dinner party, Swifty’s, or one of the myriad of charity events he is so proficient at covering on his online Social Diary or in Quest. When out-of-towners and news stations are looking for the inside scoop on life amongst New York’s upper echelon, it’s David they seek to interview. David is inclusive in his coverage of society and philanthropy, which in New York go practically hand in hand. Charities clamor to get the photos of their benefits into Social Diary and Quest, and he accommodates them if possible. Informed and in demand, fair and entertaining—he’s had a positive effect on Quest and New York. 118 QUEST

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

David Patrick Columbia’s Social Diary by Mark Gilbertson


H A R RY B E N S O N

1994

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis by Harry Benson London, 1961: The minute she stepped off the plane she caused a sensation. This wasn’t Mamie Eisenhower—a perfectly nice woman in her own right. But Jackie was beautiful and chic, well-educated and instinctively elegant. People screamed “Jackie! Jackie! Jackie!” everywhere she went. She took it all in her stride. By the time I moved to New York in 1964, Jackie owned the city. John Fairchild of WWD christened her “Jackie O.” She stopped all conversation when she walked into a restaurant. When I asked Liz Smith what she remembered most about Jackie, she told me, “Re-reading all the recent books about the Kennedy years, I am struck once again with what an influence Jackie had on her adoring and, even later, speculative public. Jackie was in a class by herself. When you first photographed her in London in 1961, I loved her from afar. You caught her essence, right up through Caroline’s wedding and after. When I finally met her she was ever intellectually intrigued, adoring gossip and fun and living through the tragedy which she tried so hard to overcome. I think it amused Jackie to be seen with a gossip columnist. She liked to make waves and she both loved and loathed being photographed. You always knew when you had a real star, and she was a real star for the ages.” I showed this photograph to my friend, design director emeritus of Tiffany & Co. John Loring. It was taken in London in 1962 as Jackie was on her way to Buckingham Palace to lunch with Queen Elizabeth. John said, “That photograph was taken before 1963.” When I asked how he knew, he replied, “She never smiled that way after 1963.”


1995 Dominick Dunne was great company, in art and in life. He was an Irish leprechaun who spun gossip into literary gold. He was also a great friend. I first met Nick when he was emerging from the ruins of a once-glamorous life in Hollywood. He had worked his way out of a deep despondency when an even darker tragedy struck. His only daughter, Dominique, a promising young actress, was strangled by her boyfriend. Her murderer was put on trial in Los Angeles. Nick sat in the courtroom day after day, watching a travesty of justice unfold. He reported it all in a riveting series of articles for Vanity Fair. After that, he deepened. In 1985, he wrote The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, which established him as a vastly entertaining chronicler of low goings-on 120 QUEST

in the high life. He went on to write other classics in the genre he helped create. He also became a crusader for the families of murdered children and for victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights. His power was such that he got a famous murder case reopened and put the perpetrator behind bars. Success became Nick. He was generous with it, always helping others. His personality was as vibrant and colorful as his signature Turnbull & Asser shirts and ties. Nick had his share of controversy, and practically everything else this life has to offer. He wrote it all down for us to savor. He always liked to say that Dominique was watching over him. I like to think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watching over all of us, then giving the on dit to God at dinner.

H A R RY B E N S O N

Dominick Dunne by Jane Stanton Hitchcock


1996 New York Yankees by Jack DeLigter Joe Girardi’s triple in the bottom of the third, Charlie Hayes’s grab in foul ground to end it in the top of ninth, and Wade Boggs’s famous celebratory equestrian jaunt around the stadium. To say that the New York Yankees were late to the championship-winning party way back in 1996 is to underestimate just how long it had been since they had last held World Series gold. By ’96, New Yorkers had grown accustomed to winning. The New York Giants had won the Super Bowl in ’90, the Rangers had captured the Stanley Cup in ’94, and that same year the Knicks fell a three-pointer short of taking home the Walter A. Brown trophy. Hell, if you count New Jersey, the Devils won it all in ’95. For a team that has always taken great pride in its winning traditions, the New York Yankees’ last World Series appearance had been back in ’81—and they hadn’t won it since ’78. Even the lowly Mets of Flushing had managed to eke out a World Series victory since then; their miracle in ’86 had been the last time the City That Never Sleeps had witnessed a World Series triumph. By October, the listless Yankees of the past decade and a half were no longer. Led by Joe Torre, they won five comefrom-behind playoff victories as World Series underdogs. Five rollercoaster games later, the Yankees were on the verge of winning their 23rd world championship. As Boggs’s steed would agree: the Yanks were back in the saddle again.


1997

Metropolitan Museum of Art by Michael Thomas The past quarter-century has, not surprisingly, been remarkably good for New York’s leading cultural institutions—it was a quarter-century that was remarkably good for the slice of society that supports museums and libraries. Of the great arks of civilization that dot the city, one above all seems hardly to have put a toe wrong: the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Let the naysayers whine that high culture has been sacrificed on the altar of mass-market merchandising; they have something of a point, depending on which aspect they complain about. (I hated every inch of the McQueen show; in terms of artistic quality, I think Warhol has no place in a first-class museum, but in terms of impact on the art culture, he certainly does.) The scene in the Great Hall occasionally brings to mind the famous remark of Earnest Thesiger, when asked what it was like in the trenches of World War I. “Oh, my dear,” he replied, “the noise! And the people!” Still, it is hard to fault the Met. Even as it grows as a tourist attraction, it prospers as a fortress of high culture. What we have seen is a perfect storm of best leadership practices: committed trustees working with directors who grasp that the key to running an institution like the Met is a contented, motivated, challenged faculty (curatorial staff) whose head person has their backs. Accomplish that—and all the rest will take care of itself. Thus was the Met run by Philippe de Montebello, and so is it being run by his successor, Thomas Campbell. Of course, they couldn’t have done it without Met President Emily Rafferty, so while we’re on our feet, a round of applause for her! I went to work at the Met as a junior curator in European Paintings in 1959, and have stayed close ever since. And I have never felt better vibes around the place than from 25 years ago up to today.


H A R RY B E N S O N

1998

Glen Bernbaum by Dominick Dunne (1925-2009) When the social history of the ’80s is written, Glenn Bernbaum—the cranky, funny, snobby, taste-perfect, complicated, hilarious, grouchy, generous, gossip-loving friend and owner of Mortimer’s—will be defined as the Ward McAllister of his era. Ward McAllister, in case he’s slipping your mind, was the bon vivant dandy who created the social phenomenon known as the 400, based on the number of people Mrs. William Backhouse Astor, Jr., could fit into her ballroom. Glenn was his own version of McAllister—he created the Mortimer’s set. High society, high finance, and old money mixed with a little new money and a little Hollywood like Betsy and Nancy, plus a few actors and writers, in which category I was. Mortimer’s always seemed more of a swanky club than a restaurant. It was a hangout for a handpicked crowd. A couple nights before his death, I went to a private party in the side room of Mortimer’s. Suddenly Glenn walked in from the main room wearing an overcoat, as if he had come in from some other place. He was walking through the domain that he had created, perhaps for the last time. His restaurant closed the day he died, never to be opened again. That’s the way he wanted it. NOVEMBER 2012 123


1999 Checkered Cabs Retired by Robin Travers They were New York. These instantly recognized, immense yellow checkered cabs once navigated the avenues with pride, their bumpers metallic grins. But in 1999, the venerated vehicles became extinct—dinosaurs of an urban jungle. Now all we have are our memories and a faint nod by a few taxis that wear two small horizontal tapered checkered decals as a black armband. Years have gone by since I sat in a checkered cab, but I remember loving the space. It made it fun and easy to go places with friends because they had fold-up stools in the back so you could get five people in there. This was of course before everyone was hyper about seatbelts. And consider this: a clunky checker could also double as a noble hero. Fresh back from our honeymoon in France, my husband, Peter, was knocked down by a bike messenger and broke his patella. Peter’s Jimmy-Stewart-in-Rear-Window-size cast wouldn’t budge and the colossal cabs were the only cars that could get him to work. It was a very sad day indeed when they were taken off the roads for good.

In the first decade of the 21st century, the public image of the debutante has risen somewhat from its oblivion into what has now become a media circus of both young women and men pursuing publicity and branding rather than marital alliances that support community and family traditions. Young women today, however, have different role models than their antecedents. They expect to advance themselves through education and careers, rather than marriage. They often want fulltime careers rather than, or as well as, motherhood. They also live in a world where the word “marketing,” as much as education, is a key to accomplishment and achievement. The word debutante, aside from its social intimations, is, as it always was, an “opportunity,” but now it is for the experience of meeting people, of going out into the world, of gathering. And so it remains the ritualistic tradition that it always was, but with some major alteration. What has changed is the world, changed to suit the debutante, the young woman of tomorrow.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

2000

The New Wave of Debutantes by David Patrick Columbia


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2001 H A R RY B E N S O N / PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Michael Bloomberg by Liz Smith You can quibble about LaGuardia, Koch, and Guiliani, but Michael Bloomberg is the greatest mayor New York City will ever have. We can, if we like, disapprove of his useful health-minded edicts against tobacco and sugar drinks. Bloomberg has pushed mayoral power as far as he’s been able to for the greater good. His ambitions alone make him as fated for greatness as any philanthropist in history. The 11th richest man in the U.S. has wider, more free-wheeling, bigger, and better ideas of what it takes to become a savior to the world. Consider Gabriel Sherman’s analysis this year in New York magazine, in which he outlines how Bloomberg will shape antipollution and anti-tobacco legislation, improve traffic signs, shutter coal plants, reduce crime, promote education and sci-

ence, work for gun control, establish pension reform, and more. Or, as political advisor Doug Shoan says, “He could well end up more influential and important than the next president!” Those of us fortunate enough to have experienced Mike Bloomberg’s generosity toward our charities, his flirtatious personal charm, his instant savvy, and his humorously smart outlook, of course, find him great. As mayor, we revere his energy and prescience. He has said, “Mayors do things. Mayors make things happen. We don’t have the luxury of giving speeches and making promises!” Luckily, what we do have is the luxury of a future where Mike Bloomberg can eclipse his effective present with a philanthropic future. If only there were more generous, capable, and gifted leaders in the world like Michael Bloomberg. NOVEMBER 2012 125


2002 C. Z. Guest, the celebrated great American beauty, was a society icon but so much more than that. She was a Renaissance woman, a doer who embraced life with her wide range of talents. She could do anything, went everywhere and did everything with taste, style, and enthusiasm. C. Z. was an energetic entrepreneur who never stopped creating. She wrote books, penned a gardening column, and designed sweaters, candles, and more. Her profile graced the covers of Time magazine and Slim Aarons books, amongst others. Her portrait was painted by Andy Warhol, Salvador DalĂ­, and Diego Rivera, and she was photographed by all the greats. She was a horticulturist who adored her garden, an animal lover, an athlete who rode and played tennis too. C. Z. was a fabulous hostess who entertained beautifully at her country house, Templeton. She was always dressed perfectly, never over-dressed but never, ever boring. In fact, C. Z. had a quick wit, was great fun and, best of all, a true-blue friend. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make them like that anymore. 126 QUEST

H A R RY B E N S O N

C. Z. Guest by Hilary Geary


H A R RY B E N S O N

George Plimpton by Daniel Cappello Professional athlete, military man, actor, journalist, author, editor, asteroid namesake, and, yes, even Fireworks Commissioner of New York. Was there any profession or corner of the earth that George Plimpton wasn’t capable of touching? The inimitable lion of the American literary party scene, his mere presence bespoke an erudite but effortless intellectualism. His was a whisky-laced wit: equal part brains to bite. I first “met” George—and his tireless sense of taunting—when I was a Harvard undergrad, working on the Ernest Hemingway Collection at the JFK Library. One day, while arms-deep in archives, the phone rang and it was George. He was calling for permission to publish a letter or some document of Hemingway’s

in The Paris Review. An archivist said we’d have to find the document and get back to him, but George insisted that he needed to know then and there. When the archivist explained that it would take some time just to track the document down, George retorted that he, in fact, already had it. Somehow, at some point in time, he managed to leave the library with it, unnoticed. And now he was playing a game of make-’em-sweat. Suddenly it wasn’t a question about permissions, but whether George would be willing to return the document without a stink about how it left! I don’t remember if he ever published it, but it was George in jest, at his best. In his uncannily capable omnipotence, George—as he liked to remind the rest of us—always had the upper hand.

2003


2005

Graydon Carter by Taki Theodoracopulos

Liz Smith by Carson Griffin

The first time I met Graydon, I thought he was trying to pick me up. I was sunning myself in Central Park when a tall, impressive-looking man stopped in front of me and asked me if I was Taki. When I answered in the affirmative, he said he was starting a magazine—Spy—and asked whether I’d like to write for it. It was the beginning of a long friendship. Graydon was then working for Time, and I asked him home for dinner. He liked my house, done up by Mario Buatta, and told me so. He also asked me who my tailor was (Anderson & Sheppard) and complimented me on my sartorial choice. He then came to a London ball I gave to celebrate the collapse of Communism and wrote a brilliant article about it. Throughout the years I saw his boys, Ash, Max, and Spike, grow up, as well as his girls, Bronwen and later Isabella, with his second wife, Anna. What I always treasure about him is his style, his love for oldfashioned wood, fine old houses, clutter, beautifully tailored suits, tweed sport jackets, old wooden cars. And even more so, his keeping old friends like myself on the same level with the very rich and powerful he has to deal with in his job as editor of Vanity Fair. Graydon is a wonderful family man and a very good friend, and in these days of celebrity worship, it’s as nice a compliment as one can pay him.

The reigning Grand Dame of Dish, as Smith is often called, keeps her position as the most beloved gossip columnist in New York history to this day, between her posts for New York Social Diary online, television commentary, party appearances, and her contributing stories to Quest and Q. The sassy writer got her start with a self-named gossip column at the New York Daily News in 1976, but not as a spring chicken. Smith came pre-seasoned when she ventured into the world of dish. During a 1979 newspaper strike, the journalist, with her trademarked blond hair, began her television career by appearing daily on “Live at Five.” Her television persona helped Smith make a splash on the Manhattan social scene, and her column was syndicated in nearly seventy newspapers. After winning an Emmy, and brilliant careers at the Daily News, Newsday, and the New York Post, she now appears on “Fox and Friends.” While memoirs from modern gossips have sunk or swum (sunk for the most part) Smith soared with the bestselling Natural Blonde and followed that success with Dishing. When I began as the newest gossip columnist for the New York Daily News almost three years ago, I was daunted looking over her omnipresent kingdom. Because the chances of there ever being a Grand Dame of Dish again? Not likely.

128 QUEST

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2004


NAN! (Kempner, of course.) New York is not the same without her. She was a “piece of work” and also a work of art. Her medium was the everyday things of life. She turned them into masterpieces. Simple things like the selection of her clothes, a meal cooked by the wonderful Sylvina, a spaghetti party given on a Sunday night, served by Bernardo…things most people think of as unimportant. She made them an art with her flair, originality, style, and attention to detail. The mundane was banished by the perfect perfectionist. Nan had the wide and diverse circle of friends she deserved with her quick wit and quips (often at her own expense); her generosity and curiosity; her love of beauty, art, and music; and her pleasure in sharing all she had. She had exciting new friends who mixed with good friends from her childhood in San Francisco. I thought she valued most those who were truly down-to-earth under their colorful coating of sophistication, style, and flair—like Nan herself.

H A R RY B E N S O N

2006

Nan Kempner by Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman


2007 PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N / PAT R I C K D E M A R C H E L I E R

Tory Burch by Fiona Kotur Marin As the Tory Burch brand exists today, Tory has indisputably built an empire. But there were signs of greatness even from the start, in days marked by meetings around a kitchen table filled with swatches and sketches, and a few clothing racks lining the hallway of Tory’s apartment—a far cry from the 2,000 employees and enormous corporate infrastructure the business now requires. Tory had a seed vision: to create design-driven product with a personal point of view, suitable for young and old, aspirational in nature, but relatively accessible in price. At the time, there really was nothing like it—a brave vision in a world of either trend-chasing or key-item basics. What amazing foresight Tory had to create the perfect logo, image, store setting, and template for her look. And it was an instant success. I remember the Elizabeth Street store opening, when editors-in-chief, CEOs, and celebrities shared dressing rooms while other eager customers changed right in the middle of the store. The product sold out in the first few days. When editors visited the collection, it was as if they were seeing sweaters and tunics for the first time; they loved, featured, and wore all of them. I can remember Robert Burke from Bergdorf Goodman and Ron Frasch from Saks Fifth Avenue in their initial meetings with Tory, their immediate enthusiasm for her and for her concept, and their offering shops-in-shop before even seeing the collection. Tory’s signature look has evolved in every way—from expanded accessories categories to Fashion Week runway shows, all the while staying true to a brand that resonates with women all over the world. I have seen her Reva ballet flat at school pick-ups in Hong Kong, running through airports in India, and in hotels in London. The world belongs to Tory, and the world is better dressed as a result.

2008 Bronson van Wyck by Stephanie LaCava It’s well-known that Bronson van Wyck creates amazing events and has the best team around. (Shout out to Kari Bien!) I have friends throughout New York City, and elsewhere too, who have had wonderful experiences with his production and planning—from weddings and birthdays to charity dinners and benefits. Having worked with him on one of the most important evenings of my life, I can easily say what a consummate professional he is, though what Bronson is best at is people. You can have the dream setting and all the elements that go with it, but the elusive piece to any event is an authenticity that’s particular to every couple or host. Bronson gets this, just as he understands how to gracefully deal with family politics. The second best part about him is his wit and sense of fun. There’s nothing like planning a party with someone who contributes elegant levity to all that goes wrong—and right. He’s beloved by both sides of my family and by my husband in particular. Any time I would start to worry about something for my own event, Bronson had a simple answer. Today, years after that special evening that he made possible, I still find myself turning to Bronson with questions—and, being the gentleman that he is, he always has the simple answers. NOVEMBER 2012 131


2009 “Jack, just do it. What do you have to lose?” Georgina, my soonto-be editor at Quest magazine, asked me as we sat side-by-side at a 2008 end-of-summer Bryant Park event. She was offering me the magazine’s “Young and the Guest List” column and, having shown up to the cocktail-casual party in black-tie, I thought the idea that I was going to be offered a society column about anything pretty suspect. I knew Chris Meigher, Quest’s sharp and charming publisher, to be a man of taste (he liked me) and admired him for always being surrounded by beautiful women (namely his wife and daughters) so I figured that this was a man I could work for and learn from. I accepted to helm the column, which had started under Andrew Black in 2006 as a means of giving Quest a younger nightlife voice. Over the next two years I acted as Roger Moore to Andrew Black’s Sean Connery. The fun in writing YGL was always in the research: I had a method wherein every month I would go to a certain number of events until invariably I would either stick my foot in my mouth or accidently do something stupid enough to warrant a column. If you know me you know I didn’t have to wait that long. After two years, I went Hollywood (via TriBeCa) and the column went Brown. The lovely Elizabeth Quinn Brown took over in 2010—the Daniel Craig to my Roger Moore. She is smart, funny, and you don’t even see her coming. So, watch out, boys and girls, as you swoon your way through cocktail parties, there’s a new sheriff in town, and she’s packing a powerful pen.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N / CO U RT E S Y O F R A LP H L AU R E N

Young and the Guest List by Jack Bryan


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

2010 Ralph Lauren by Daniel Cappello Ralph Lauren revolutionized the retail experience in 1986 when he took over the famous Rhinelander Mansion and opened his global flagship at 867 Madison Avenue; he was a visionary in having ushered in the branded retail environment. That same year, he was the first American designer to open a store in Paris, on the Place de la Madeleine. Through his various women’s and men’s fashion lines, he fast became the arbiter of American taste. In Ralph Lauren’s case, it’s always been the casual privilege of the WASP lifestyle par excellence. With a pillar in preppy chic, Lauren has built a global empire around the notion of the idealized American guy gone right—and the glamorous, independentspirited American woman who’s evolved right there with him. The company’s founding as a maker of ties, over 40 years ago, could be likened to its prep-school period of life: casual, care-

free, collegiate. Over time, Ralph Lauren has gone on to graduate, enter the world, and capture the collective imagination of the American culture that it represents, and now helps to define. In 2010, on the heels of opening a new Paris location in a sumptuously refurbished hôtel particulier on Boulevard Saint-Germain, housing the still impossible-to-get-into restaurant Ralph’s, the designer dared to recreate a part of that Parisian chic across the street from where it all began in New York. That year, a limestone Beaux-Arts building with wood-paneled windows and decorative ironwork was erected at 888 Madison Avenue as the women’s counterpart to the men’s flagship on the opposite corner. Today, as these iconic edifices anchor a strip of Madison Avenue known as Lauren Land, it is clearer than ever that the evolution of global fashion is being led by Ralph Lauren. NOVEMBER 2012 133


2011 Evelyn Lauder died on a Saturday in late November 2011 at her home here in New York. She had been suffering from a nongenetic ovarian cancer, and had celebrated her 75th birthday that August. She was born Evelyn Hausner to Jewish parents in Vienna in the mid-1930s, an infant when Hitler annexed Austria with the Anschluss in 1938. Her father, who was in the lumber business, had the foresight to get himself, his wife, and his only child out of the country. It was a long and arduous task but, in 1940, the family boarded a steamship for New York. She grew up on West 86th Street. She went to Hunter and met Leonard Lauder. They married four years later. Over the years of their marriage, the Lauders became actively dedicated members of the community. It was an extraordinary life for the child who arrived in New York a refugee from Hitler. In 1989, when Evelyn was 53, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. This matter was never publicized until the time of her death. It was assumed so only because she was so passionately committed to finding a cure. Her own treatment was successful. But by the time she started the Breast Cancer Research Foundation in 1993, she was famous amongst friends and friends of friends for assisting them when the call came. Since she created it 29 years ago, the BCRF has raised more than $350 million. Her bravery, her gumption, and her cleverness, as well as her appetite for life, made all of that possible for her as well as hundreds of thousands—possibly even millions—of others. We’ll miss her. We’ll miss her smiling face, her sweet hello. And her courage. Well done, Evelyn, well done.

H A R RY B E N S O N

Evelyn Lauder by David Patrick Columbia


2012 Albert Hadley by Bunny Williams Years from now, when one looks back on the interior designers of the last 25 years, Albert Hadley will stand out as the star on top of the tree. His unique ability to see interiors in many ways made him a master creator. Though he was interested in tradition, he was passionate about Modernism, and his work was always new and fresh. He never adopted a “look” but treated each project with a fresh eye. He spent time with his clients so that their homes represented their lifestyles. He was a skilled interior architect and paid as much attention to the details of a space as to its furnishings. A scholar of the past, all of us fortunate enough to have worked with him spent hours discussing the great interiors of old. But he was also an innovator; in the ’80s, when design was at its most opulent, Albert was always restrained. Because of his editing and his ability to make magical combinations of pieces, his rooms never became dated. The elegant red lacquer library with simple brass moulding that he created for Mrs. Vincent Astor is a great example of his flair for imagining a fresh approach to a room. The combination of the rich leather-bound first-edition books and the shiny red lacquer shelves will remain one of his greatest rooms. Albert was a true gentleman. In a profession of egos, Albert always put his aside. There was no arrogance or pretension. He was kind and considerate to everyone. Albert cared a great deal about education and was a masterful teacher; because of this and his generosity, many of us received the most amazing education ever. We feel it is our responsibility to pass that gift along to others. NOVEMBER 2012 135


SCRAPBOOK

SOCIETY’S NEW 400

OLD GUARD FAMILIES Mr. Nelson Aldrich Mr. Cleveland Amory Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Auchincloss Mr. and Mrs. John W. Auchincloss III Mrs. Lily Auchincloss Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bancroft Mr. and Mrs. Dixon Boardman Mr. Clifford Brokaw Mrs. Amanda Burden Mr. and Mrs. Carter Burden Mr. Harry C. Cushing IV Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dana Mr. And Mrs. Nicholas Drexel Ambassador and Mrs. A. Biddle Duke

BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony B. Duke Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Eberstadt Mrs. Fernanda Kellogg Gilligan Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Hearst Mr. and Mrs. Amory Houghton Ambassador Francis Kellogg Mr. John Knott Mrs. Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman Mrs. Topsy Taylor McFadden Mr. and Mrs. Henry Middleton Mr. and Mrs. Minot Miliken Marchese and Marchesa Alessandro di Montezemolo Mr. and Mrs. David Mortimer Mr. and Mrs. John Jay Mortimer Mr. and Mrs. Tony Mortimer Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Peabody Mr. Harry Platt Mr. and Mrs. George Plimpton Mr. Eben Pyne Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Rockefeller Mr. and Mrs. David Schiff Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Sherrill DIAMONDS AS BIG AS THE RITZ Mrs. Anne Bass Mrs. Joy Hirshon Briggs Ms. Elizabeth de Cuevas-Strong Mrs. Beth Rudin DeWoody Mrs. Charlotte Ford Ms. Anne Hearst Mrs. Bianca Jagger Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson Kennan Ms. Samantha Kluge Ms. Francine LeFrank Ms. Bokara Legendre Mrs. Anne Ford Scarborough Ms. Ivana Trump Ms. Nancy Whitney Ms. Mollie Wilmot MOSTEST HOSTS AND HOSTESSES Mr. and Mrs. Sid R. Bass Mr. Bill Bernhard and Mrs. C. Cahill

136 QUEST

FEBRUARY 1995

Mr. and Mrs. William Buckley Mr. Henry Buhl Mrs. Anne Eisenhower and Mr. W. Flottl Mr. and Mrs. Anastassios Fondaras Mr. and Mrs. John Gutfreund Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kempner Mr. David Koch Ms. Alice Mason Mr. and Mrs. Rober Miller Mr. and Mrs. William Rayner Mr. Khalil Rizk Mr. and Mrs. Ian Shrager Sharon, Lady Sondes and Mr. G Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Robert Trump Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Mrs. Jayne Wrightsman Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Zilkha THE TASTEMAKERS Mr. Ludovic Autet Mr. Glenn Bernbaum Mr. Bill Blass Ms. Diana Brooks Mr. Mario Buatta Mr. and Mrs. Nicola Bulgari Ms. Naomi Campbell Mr. and Mrs. William Chaney Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Cole Mr. Madison Cox Miss Kitty D’Alessio Mr. Robert Denning Mr. Ralph Destino Mr. Sean Driscoll Mr. and Mrs. Ahmet Ertegun Princess Diane von Furstenberg Mr. Albert Hadley Mr. and Mrs. Mark Hampton


SOCIETYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEW 400 Mr. and Mrs. Reinaldo Herrera Mr. Gene David Mr. Eric Javits Mr. Jed Johnson and Mr. Alan Wanzenberg Mr. and Mrs. Barry Kieselstein-Cord Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Klein Mr. and Mrs. Arie Kopelman Mr. Kenneth Jay Lane Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Lauren Mr. John Loring Mr. Boaz Mazor Ms. Mary McFadden Mr. and Mrs. Brian McNally Mr. Isaac Mizrahi Mr. and Mrs. Richard Nye Mr. Alex Papachristidis Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pennoyer

Ms. Alison Spear Ms. Olivia Watson and Ms. Leighton Candler Mrs. Jean Harvey Vanderbilt Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Forstmann Mr. Ted Forstmann Mr. David Geffen Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kravis Mr. and Mrs. Henryk de Kwiatkowski Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mosbacher Mr. Ronald Perelman and Mrs. Patricia Duff Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Rudin Mr. and Mrs. Julio Mario Santo Domingo Mr. and Mrs. Herb Siegel Mr. and Mrs. Saul Steinberg Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Stern Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Taubman Mr. and Mrs. John Veronis Ms. Linda Wachner Mr. Mortimer Zuckerman LES DAMES

Mr. Campion Platt Mrs. Chesbrough Rayner Mr. Mingo del Ren Mr. and Mrs. Oscar de la Renta Ms. Carolyne Roehm Mr. Arnold Scaasi and Mr. Parker Ladd Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Tilberis Mr. George Trescher Miss Gloria Vanderbilt Mr. Stephen Weiss and Ms. Donna Karan Ms. Bunny Williams Mr. Robert Woolley Mr. Jerry Zipkin THE LAST TYCOONS M. and Mme. Michel David-Weill Mr. Barry Diller Mr. and Mrs. Pepe Fanjul

Mrs. Jan Cushing Amory Mrs. Anne Barish Mrs. Sisi Cahan Mrs. Barbara Cates Mrs. Sybilla Clark Mrs. Virginia Regan Coleman Ms. Adrienne Colgate Mrs. Janne Cummings Ms. Anne Downey Ms. Louise Duncan Ms Charlene Engelhard Ms. Nina Ford Ms. Sarah Giles Ms. Pamela Gross Mrs. Mai Hallingby Mrs. Brucie Hennessy Ms. Baby Jane Holzer Ms. Elizabeth C. Houghton Mrs. Joan Howard Ms. Julie Kammerer Mrs. Patricia Kennedy Lawford Mrs. Ann Nitze Mrs. Patricia Patterson

STERLING GENTS Mr. Peter Bacanovic Mr. Peter Beard Mr. Paul Beirne Mr. Nicholas Berggruen Mr. Marc Biron Mr. Michael Bloomberg Mr. Hamish Bowles Mr. Robbie Brown Mr. Edward Lee Cave Mr. Bob Colacello Mr. Christopher Cuomo Mr. Peter Davis Mr. Robert de Rothschild Mr. Peter Dunham Mr. Jamie Figg Mr. Averell H. Fisk Mr. John Galliher Mr. Mark Gilbertson Prince Nikolas of Greece Mr. Sam Green Mr. Pete Hathaway Mr. Rusty Holzer Mr. Chandler Hovey Mr. Philip Isles Mr. Howard Johnson IV Mr. John F. Kennedy Jr. Mr. Anthony Kiser Mr. Clifford Klenk Mr. Christopher Lawford Mr. Orin Lehman Ambassador John loed Mr. John Loring Mr. Richard Mack Messrs. William, Charles, and Stewart Manger Mr. Cristoph von MeyernHohenberg Mr. Seth Miliken Mr. Chappy Morris Mr. Chuck Pfeiffer NOVEMBER 2012 137


SCRAPBOOK

SOCIETY’S NEW 400

Mr. John Punnet Mr. Harry Tower Mr. Charles Urstadt Mr. Diego del Vayo Mr. Charles Washburne Mr. Paul Wilmot CORONETS AND COUNTESSES Count and Countess Nuno Brandolini Baroness Milly de Carbrol Marchese and Marchesa Alessandro Crosini Laiatico Count Roffredo Gaetony-Lovatelli Count and Countess Demetrio GuerriniMaraldi Princess Firyal of Jordan Ali Reza Pahlavi Baron and Baroness Gottfried von Meyern-Hohenberg Princess Elizabeth of Yugoslavia ARTS AND LETTERS Mr. and Mrs. William Acquavella Mr. Leo Castelli Mr. Charles Cowles Mr. Dominick Dunne Mr. Richard Feigen

continued from pg 137

Mr. Brendan Gill Prince and Princess Michael of Greece Mrs. Judy Green Mr. Alexis Gregory Mr. John Guare and Adele Chatfield-Taylor Mr. Ashton Hawkins Mrs. Jane Stanton Hitchcock Mr. and Mrs. Byron Janis Mr. and Mrs. Mort Janklow Ms. Fran Leibowitz Mr. and Mrs. Norman Mailer Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Mehta Ms. Christophe de Menil Ms. Jessye Norman Ms. John Richardson Aline, Countess de Romanones Mr. John Russel and Mrs. Rosamund Bernier Mr. John Sargent Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Schlesinger Mrs. Jean Stein Mr. and Mrs. Gay Talese Mr. Michael Thomas Mr. Alberto Vitale Mr. and Mrs. Tom Wolfe LES GRANDES DAMES Mrs. Vincent Astor Ambassador Anna Cox Chambers Mrs. Jan Cowles Countess Consuelo Crespi Mrs. C.Z. Guest Mrs. Kitty Carlisle Hart Mrs. Enid Haupt Mrs. Aimee de Heeran Mrs. Henry J. Heinz Mrs. Dorothy Hirshon Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock Mrs. Alyne Massey Mrs. Joseph Meehan Mrs. Milton Petrie Mrs. John Barry Ryan Mrs. Anne Slater Mrs. Lawrence Copley Thaw Mrs. Joseph Thomas Mrs. John hay Whitney LES BRIGHT YOUNG THINGS Serena Boardman Mr. & Mrs. Louis Dubin

138 QUEST

Lucie de la Falaise Alexa and Kate Hampton Carolina & Patricia Herrera Astrid Kohl Stefan de Kwaitkowski Erin Lauder Alexandra Lind Alexandra and Marie Chantal Miller Steven Perelman Andrea Pomerantz Eliza Reed Mr. and Mrs. Steven Rockefeller Mr. and Mrs. Peter Rockefeller Tracee Ross Dr. Andrew Schiff Alexis Stewart Jill Swid Alexander von Furstenberg Tatiana von Furstenberg Ilyse Wilpon THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS Ms. Lauren Bacall Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bregman Mr. David and Ms. Helen Gurley Brown Miss Barabara Carroll Mr. Michael Fuchs Ms. Brooke Hayward and Mr. Peter Duchin Mr. and Mrs. Mick Hones Mr. Lionel Larner Madonna Mr. Christopher Mason Ms. Dina Merrill and Mr. Ted Hartley Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Modine Ms. Tina Nederlander Mrs. Josephine Premice Ms. Joan Rivers Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ross Mr. Bobby Short Ms. Marti Stevens THE GOLDEN COUPLES Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ainslie Mr. and Mrs. O. Kelley Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Rand Araskog


SOCIETYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEW 400 Mr. and Mrs. Warren Avis Mr. and Mrs. Marquette de Bary Mr. and Mrs. Richard Blanchard Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bronfman Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bruckman Mr. and Mrs. Coleman Burke Mr. and Mrs. Charles Byron Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Califano Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Connor Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Creel Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cullman Ambassador and Mrs. Walter Curley Ambassador and Mrs. Thomas Enders Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fomon Mr. and Mrs. Winston Fowlkes Ambassador and Mrs. Evan Galbraith Mr. and Mrs. Francesco Galesi Mr. and Mrs. John Gates Mr. and Mrs. John Geary Mr. and Mrs. Robert Goelet Mr. and Mrs. Alan (Ace) Greenberg Mr. and Mrs. Peter Gregory Mr. and Mrs. Stephanie Groueff Ambassador and Mrs. Henry Grunwald Mr. and Mrs. Martin Gruss Mr. and Mrs. Roberto de Guardiola Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Guthrie Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hallingby Dr. William and Mrs. Gale Hayman Heseltine

Mr. and Mrs. Ara Hovnanian Mr. and Mrs. Heyward Isham Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Isham Mr. and Mrs. Deane Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood Johnson III Mr. Richard Kaplan and Ms. Edwina Sandys Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Lauder Mr. and Mrs. Richard LeFrak Mr. and Mrs. John Loeb Mr. and Mrs. Earle Mack Mr. and Mrs. David Mahoney Mr. Alexandrer Marchessini and Mme. Genevieve Faure Mr. and Mrs. Walter Maynard Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William McDonough Mr. and Mrs. Damon Mezzacappa Mr. and Mrs. Minot Miliken Dean and Mrs. Robert Morton Mr. and Mrs. James Niven Mr. Michael Rena and Mrs. Kalliope Karella Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Rockefeller Dr. and Mrs. Nathan Saint-Amand Mr. and Mrs. Carl Spielvogel Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Tisch Mr. and Mrs. Donald Trump

Mr. Anthony Haden-Guest Mr. and Mrs. James Hoge Mr. Warren Hoge Mr. Peter Jennings Mr. and Mrs. Richard Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kissinger Mr. Jesse Kornbluth and Ms. A. Tapert Mr. Ed Kosner and Ms. Julie Baumgold Mr. David Lauren Dr. Richard and Mrs. Ellen Levine Mr. Patrick McMullen Mrs. Aileen Mehle Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Meigher III Mr. Michael Musto Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Newhouse Jr. Mr. Khoi Nguyen Miss Polly Onet Ms. Alexandra Penney Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pittman Mr. and Mrs. Abe Ribicoff Ms. Liz Robbins Mr. Charlie Rose Mr. and Mrs. Felix Rohayton Mr. and Mrs. Chuck Scarborough Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Schlossberg Ms. Peggy Siegel Grace, Lady Dudley, and Mr. R. Silvers Mr. Howard Stringer and Dr. Jennifer Patterson Mr. and Mrs. John Stubbs Taki and Mrs. Alexandra Theodoracopulis Mr. James Truman Ms. Barbara Walters Mr. Karl Wellner and Ms. Deborah Norville Mr. and Mrs. Jann Wenner

MEDIA AND OPINION MAKERS Mr. Joe Armstrong Dr. Daniel Baker and Mrs. Nine Griscom Mr. Andre Balcz and Ms. Katie Ford Mrs. Eleanor Lambert Berkson Mr. and Mrs. Bill Beutel Ms. Tina Brown and Mr. Harry Evans Dr. and Mrs. William Cahan Mr. and Mrs. Graydon Carter Ms. Jennet Conant and Mr. Steve kroft Mr. Carl and Mrs. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Mr. Malcom Jr., Christopher, and Robert Forbes Mr. Geordie Greig NOVEMBER 2012 139


Above: A photograph of the New York Public Library, circa 1908. Below: Laurence S. Rockefeller and Brooke Astor,

THE HEART OF THE CITY BY THE EDITORS 00 QUEST

PHU CO OTO RTECSRYEO D FI TTG HO E EOSRH GEARNEI Z AT I O N S

together at a fund-raiser.


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

New York Public Library NEW YORK CITY is filled with landmarks, institutions, and worthy causes. Luckily, it is also filled with people dedicated to preserving, enriching, and supporting them. The members of the charities in this city are peerless in their devotion to raising funds and awareness of their projects, and each new generation provides even larger ranks of faithful acolytes. Forget the stereotype of the gruff New Yorker—when faced with these meritorious organizations, we are all idealists.

The New York Public Library claims it has only one precedent for admission: curiosity. The combination of scholarly research collections and its many community branches work together to enrich its holdings and foster accessibility. Outside its headquarters, two marble lions, called “New York’s most lovable public sculpture” by architecture critic Paul Goldberger, rest with gazes of great pride marking the entrance of the stately Beaux-Arts building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. NOVM EM O BNETRH 22001028 1 0401


Lighthouse International

Nearly 75 years ago, Irene Lewisohn founded the Museum of Costume Art. Since then, the institution has evolved to represent five continents and seven centuries of fashionable dress. After a merger with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum, it was renamed “The Costume Institute.” Today, the Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library is also one of the world’s foremost of its kind, providing access to fashion prints, drawings, photographs, sketchbooks, and design archives. The fashion industry believes in the church of the Costume Institute. Each May, the annual gala, its primary fund-raising event, celebrates the opening of its spring exhibition.

Sisters Edith and Winifred Holt discovered their calling at a young age: to help individuals overcome the challenges of vision loss. In 1905, the self-starting siblings founded the Lighthouse, an organization dedicated to vision rehabilitation. The original goal of the Lighthouse was the prevention of blindness. Today, Lighthouse International is an instrumental resource for the blind and visually handicapped. Its mission: “To overcome vision impairment for people of all ages through worldwide leadership in rehabilitation services, education, research, prevention, and advocacy.” Throughout the years, significant contributions have been made to help the organization with its noble mission.

Above, from left: Workmen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art uncrating

Below, from left: Iris Apfel and Mark Ackermann at Lighthouse International’s

“The Madonna of the Rosaries” by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio;

“A Posh Affair” at The Pierre on May 15, 2012; vision-impaired students

Valentino Garavani and Nan Kempner at the Costume Institute Ball.

benefiting from the Lighthouse program with their instruments, circa 1920.

142 QUEST

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The Costume Institute


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E O R G A N I Z AT I O N S ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Central Park Conservancy

The Frick Collection

The Central Park Conservancy was founded in 1980 by a group of philanthropists with steadfast passion to restore America’s first major urban public space back to its original heyday. Designed in the 19th century by Frederick Law and Calvert Vaux, the park experienced an unfortunate decline in the 1970s. Today, the mission is to restore, manage, and enhance Central Park, in partnership with the public, for the employment of present and future generations. Since its inception, the conservancy has managed the investment of more than $600 million, much of which has been raised from private sources, corporations, and foundations over the years.

In 1913, Henry Clay Frick commissioned the architecture firm Carrère and Hastings to build a mansion on Fifth Avenue. There, he featured his artwork throughout the building—a collection of Western painting, sculpture, and decorative art by masters ranging from Bellini and Titian to Rembrandt and Velázquez to Goya and Van Dyck. When Henry Clay Frick died in 1919, he bequeathed the mansion, and its contents, to the public, thereby establishing The Frick Collection. Today, the institution remains a nod to the past, especially when hosting black-tie events like the Young Fellows Ball, which takes place around the fountain and greenery of the Garden Court every winter.

Above, clockwise from top left: The Bethesda Terrace and lake; Anne

Below, from left: Emily Frick, wife of the late Dr. Henry Clay Frick II; the

Harrison, Andrea Henderson Fahnestock, and Sheila Labrecque at the hat

West Gallery of the Frick Collection and its masterpieces; Colin Bailey, chief

luncheon; Anne Ford Johnson, Norma Dana, and Betty Tilghman, 1989.

curator, with models in Tiffany & Co. at the 2010 Young Fellows Ball.


In 1869, Albert Smith Bickmore—a student of Harvard University zoologist Louis Agassiz—proposed the idea of a museum for natural history in New York. With the support of William E. Dodge, Jr., Theodore Roosevelt, Sr., Joseph Choate, and J. Pierpont Morgan, the American Museum of Natural History was established on April 6, 1869, with the approval of governor John Thompson Hoffman. Soon after, it moved to a space on Central Park West (the cornerstone of the building was laid by Ulysses S. Grant in 1874). Today, the museum has a world-class collection of more than 32 million specimens and artifacts and 45 permanent exhibition halls and galleries including the Rose Center for Earth and Space with the Hayden Planetarium, the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, and the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs. Above: The Duke of Windsor and Arthur Vernay looking at the lion group in Akeley Hall, October 1941. Left: Jacqueline Onassis at the 1975 opening of two new halls at the museum with Robert Goelet, the museum’s president at the time. 144 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F A M N H ; CO LE S , C H A R LE S H .

The American Museum of Natural History


CO U RTE S Y O F A M E R I C A N B A LLE T T H E AT R E ; J O E S C H I L D H O R N / B FA NYC . CO M

American Ballet Theatre American Ballet Theatre was founded in 1939 and, under Lucia Chase and Oliver Smith, built one of the most impressive repertoires of storied ballets from the past—while continually commissioning new works by the best living choreographic geniuses. Mikhail Baryshnikov famously assumed leadership in 1980 and worked to refurbish the company’s trademark classical aesthetic. Today, under artistic director Kevin McKenzie, ABT is recognized as the definitive “American” company, the only major cultural institution to tour the globe and perform for more than 600,000 people. This living national treasure, which Congress has named “America’s National Ballet Company,” continues to be celebrated worldwide—especially at home in New York, with its legendary spring gala at the Metropolitan Opera House. Above: Alicia Alonso and Igor Youskevitch performing in Theme and Variations, circa 1947. Right: Blaine Trump with ABT’s artistic director, Kevin McKenzie, and principal dancer Paloma Herrera at ABT’s 2012 spring gala—a highlight of the social season.


The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering

Both an art gallery and a history museum, the Museum of the City of New York celebrates and interprets the city, educating the public about its distinctive character, especially its heritage of diversity, opportunity, and perpetual transformation. Founded in 1923 as a private, nonprofit corporation, the museum connects the past, present, and future of New York City. Gracie Mansion housed the museum from its founding until 1932, when it moved into the Georgian Colonial-style brick building on Museum Mile. The Director’s Council holds its annual Winter Ball to raise money for the museum, and the event is considered to be the unofficial beginning of the charity gala season.

The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering was founded in 1946 in order to support the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and its programs. With 21 committees that range from addressing patient care to education to fund-raising, the organization has become indispensible to the center’s efforts over the years. James D. Robinson III, of Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center affirms: “The Society has been an integral part of the Center’s history. It is a terrific association of people who make a difference, not only in fund-raising but, more importantly, in the ambiance, the heartbeat, of the whole institution.”

Above, from left: Patrons at a Museum of the City of New York fund-raiser,

Below, from left: Julia and David Koch, who are supporters of the organiza-

circa 1985; a photograph of the building’s Georgian Colonial exterior on

tion, photographed by Harry Benson for the October 2011 issue of Quest;

Fifth Avenue taken from Central Park by Samuel H. Gottscho, 1932.

students touring the Kettering Laboratory, circa 1960.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E O R G A N I Z AT I O N S ; H A R RY B E N S O N

Museum of the City of New York


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

City Harvest

Wildlife Conservation Society

For 30 years, City Harvest has been dedicated to feeding the hungry of New York. The effort was launched when a group of New Yorkers saw restaurants discarding food and thought, instead, to give it to the homeless. Since 1982, City Harvest has distributed over 300 million pounds of food to a network of 600 programs. Today, City Harvest receives donations from restaurants, grocers, corporate cafeterias, manufacturers, and farms—providing fresher, more nutritional foods. The mission? “City Harvest exists to end hunger in communities throughout New York City. We do this through food rescue and distribution, education, and other practical, innovative solutions.”

Founded in 1895, the Wildlife Conservation Society endeavors to save wildlife and wild places throughout the world. One of the organization’s first projects, in the 1900s, was to help the American bison recover on the Western Plains. Today, the Wildlife Conservation Society addresses threats to wildlife and wild places such as climate change, natural resource exploitation, the connection between wildlife health and human health, and the sustainable development of human livelihoods. Managing 500 conservation projects in more than 60 countries, the organization works with parks like the Bronx Zoo and the Central Park Zoo, where it hosts its annual summer party. u

Above, from left: City Harvest performing its work by serving the hungry

Below, from left: Guests attending a garden party hosted by the Wildlife

men, women, and children of New York; chefs Eric Ripert and Marc Murphy

Conservation Society, circa 1926; a group of patrons at a Wildlife Conservation

with executive director Jilly Stephens at a Bid Against Hunger Tasting Event.

Society event to raise funds for the organization at the Central Park Zoo.

NOVEMBER 2012 147


FROM THE ARCHIVE E SS

CELEB B RR A ATTIINNGG 2255 YYEEAARRS SOO F FQ Q UU E SETS T u CELEB

SCRAPBOOK A look back at 25 years of stories that made Quest the magazine of interest to so many for so long.We share some of our favorite picks from then and now.


B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T u C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T

: yers, and the smart set Debutantes, power pla les bel d ere cov e s hav Questâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many feature an eye for what is h wit e, alik sts bea and and who will influence important to the times William Hamilton, the future. Writers like Scott shared in-depth Kyra Larkin, and Eliza and top ics tha t sto ries of the peo ple behind-the-scenes shaped our society. The and mo me nts loo ks at per son alit ies ktail conversations. became a staple of coc


FROM THE ARCHIVES

Once Upon A Time

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T u C E L E B

“‘Charlie Dana was a man’s man,’ says Slim Aarons. ‘Which is precisely why he could carry off that lavender jacket!’ Slim took the shot of Charles A. Dana, Jr., in 1985, at his villa at the Lyford Cay Club in the Bahamas. ‘He asked me what he should wear for the photo. As I often did on shoots, I went with him to his closet, and this is what I picked. He hesitated, but only for a moment.’ The photo became one of Aarons’s iconic images, a self-assured man of privilege in a moment of leisure.” —LAURA CUSHING, MAY 2004 150 QUEST

Advancing Backwards

“I love rowing a single scull. Truth to tell, I’m not that good at it, though because I wrote about the quest of some scullers for an Olympic gold medal, I have a special entrée into the world of rowing. Some 44 years ago, I rowed in a novice singles competition at Harvard. One of my competitors was a freshman named Karim Khan, but it was a rough, windy day and we all got swamped and no one finished. So I can’t even boast an intramural title. But I still love doing it.” —DAVID HALBERSTAM, JUNE 1998


B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T u C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T

most ne of its sue is o Is g in d d ads estâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s We ssy spre Top: Qu tiful glo u : a e b h M id d le ted, wit ro o m s . anticipa s and g e d ri , b to n -s o c ie ty a Hamp o f h ig h k e Ale x ra to rs li ie a re o k c s e ri d b r a In te ri o ic h a e l Z M d n a resting a lva to r, and inte S c o tt S novative in ir e th s of ted for working celebra e inner h T : m o o m ig h t c. Bott and wh aestheti eeded, c c u s o gly o t, w h are lovin w h oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s h y home writers. d to sta id te p n e a tr w in h a ve r by our a e y h c led ea chronic


FROM THE ARCHIVES

A Decade Revisited

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T u C E L E B

“When my husband and I moved to New York in the mid ’60s, I was repeatedly informed by a series of firmly entrenched denizens of the city (as they invariably took long drags on their ever-present cigarettes) that New York had dramatically changed—even in the last ten years. I interpreted this to mean—as I know they intended me to—‘Well, bumpkin, you missed The Real Thing.’ I decided to rise above the blasé pessimism of those older interlocutors and make the best of things.” —DUANE HAMPTON, FEBRUARY 1997 152 QUEST

French Connection

“The nuptuals of an Hermés scion and his socialite bride come equipped with an impressive cadre of jet-setters, so it is little wonder as we drop in on the festivities that we find European and Moroccan royalty doing battle with New York bankers and models for a place on the luxury buses picking up their charges in front of the Ritz Hotel in Paris. In no fewer than five languages, guests regale each other with exploits from the night before about a bateau-mouche hired by the groom’s uncle.” —KRISTINA STEWART, JANUARY 2000


B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T u C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T

in its base a y h a ve t rship m u e o d a s e re ch est zine rea The Qu e maga ore n, but th many m a f tt o a ts h n n Ma eve , ple and h o e ic p w e n e th s of Gre to cover garden ptons om the the Ham fr in : s s e e c n u d pla d n a s the the own to ticut, to Connec e way d ries of d all th n to a s , e rk h Yo da. T of New ch, Flori a e B en us happ of Palm glamoro seaside e th d n a s made inating s alway the fasc zine ha a g a m and the much. all over, flect as ages re p s it t a sure th


The Stories And Souls Of Our Homes A stunning new book inspires us to incorporate classic design principles from three centuries of English and American homes into modern living. Revealing the evolution of how they have functioned, it celebrates rooms both great and modest.

EVEN AS A YOUNG CHILD, I had an immense curiosity about houses—not only the history of who had lived in them, but how, when, and why the houses themselves had changed. I was often found wandering off to explore. I’d find hidden staircases and creep into the attics or deep basement caverns; whenever we’d play hide-and-seek, no one could ever find me because I always knew the best places to hide! That fascination with the evolution of houses, and the rooms and spaces within them, has endured throughout my life, based on my interest in architecture as well as in the social history that forces change. 154 QUEST

In my new book, The Life of the House (Rizzoli), I try to give an overview of the main architectural features and layouts of rooms—from medieval houses to those of the present day—and to pinpoint some of the social and industrial advances that led to these changes. I look at alterations and changes to the home on a room-by-room basis, showing how lifestyles and trends have contributed to the way in which we use certain rooms today. A good example of this is in the kitchen, where we have transitioned from kitchens run purely by servants in the basement of the house, to large, lived-in family kitchens

C H R I S TO P H E R D R A K E

BY HENRIETTA SPENCER-CHURCHILL


The entrance to the drawing room at Easton Neston, a grand country house in England near Towcester, Northamptonshire.


Winston Churchill once said, “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” And now, in her new book, The Life of the House (Rizzoli), the author and designer Henrietta Spencer-Churchill illuminates this point by offering a grand tour and social history of some of the most splendid British and American homes.

156 QUEST

home in England, and Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island, where my great-grandmother Consuelo Vanderbilt spent much of her childhood. My hope in writing this book was to showcase how houses and rooms have evolved in practical ways through the centuries, and yet have retained the character of the particular era in which they were built—which, in the end, tends to reveal even more about the lives and lifestyles of those who have lived in them. u This page, from left: The cover of the author’s new book, The Life of the House (Rizzoli); the formal dining room at Easton Neston, which was originally the drawing room leading off the Great Hall, with plasterwork said to be by local stuccoist John Woolston. Opposite page: The drawing room at Easton Neston, originally a triple-story medieval-like Great Hall that was reconceived in the 19th century with lower, double-height ceilings and a partioned wall.

C H R I S TO P H E R D R A K E

that occupy a prime position in the house. All of this started to come about after World War I, when the need for grandscale entertaining diminished, taking with it the need to have an army of servants in the kitchen. Suddenly, daily use was made of breakfast rooms adjacent to the kitchen; in some cases, entirely new family kitchens were introduced, where the lady of the house learned to take on the role of cook. This pattern has pretty much continued through today, with the kitchen or breakfast room becoming the hub of the house. As the topic of my book is so vast, I decided to concentrate mostly on English houses and examples of their American equivalents wherever appropriate. I have included houses that I have worked on as designer (whose problems and challenges I know firsthand), and also some houses that have important historical family relevance for me, such as Blenheim, my family


This page: Sumptuous detailing in the Great Hall at Ditchley Park, originally built for the 2nd Earl of Litchfield, with early Georgian and Rococo motifs. Opposite page: A Regency-style bedroom decorated by the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company at Easton Neston, with a specially commissioned two-tone stripe

C H R I S TO P H E R D R A K E

fabric and antique furniture.


This page: Students and faculty gather decades ago for PBDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 81-year-old tradition of Field Day; pages from the Field Day section of an old yearbook. Opposite page: Palm Beach Day Academy on Seaview Avenue (above); a student engaged in classroom discussion.


LOOKING AHEAD TO EXCELLENCE BY PERRINE MEISTRELL

CO U RTE S Y O F PA L M B E AC H DAY AC A D E MY

APPLE REVOLUTIONARY Steve Jobs liked to describe his

visionary strategy with a favorite Wayne Gretzsky quote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been.â&#x20AC;? Similarly planning to stay ahead of the curve, the prestigious Palm Beach Day Academy has embarked on a new capital campaign to stay on the forefront of education by anticipating the educational advances students require today. As the oldest independent school in Florida, with a proven record of success, PBDA plans to undertake these exciting changes while still preserving its core mission: to enable children to thrive through excellent academic instruction and compassionate support in a family atmosphere. The success of the Great Expectations Campaign will allow PBDA to stay true to these long-standing traditions while meeting the evolving needs of its students. Specific projects


Opposite page, clockwise from top left: A snapshot from the Great Expectations campaign event celebrating the Matthews Performing Arts Center; a scene from the Great Expectations gala, celebrating the new center; a glimpse of the PBDA curriculum and list of pupils; students march down the halls showing school spirit; students commit to the school’s core values through ceremonial banner signing; a student plays the clarinet in music class. This page: The faculty

CO U RTE S Y O F PA L M B E AC H DAY AC A D E MY

reflects the attention each students receives (above); Primary students at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens as part of the Museum Partnership Program.

in the works include the Matthews Performing Arts Center, currently a blueprint for a state-of-the-art auditorium housing a vibrant drama, music, and public speaking program. A Lower Campus designed responsively to meet the needs of students from age two is underway and will distinguish PBDA from other schools. Plans to raise capital have been developed with special care to enhance PBDA’s tried and true values of its mission. Indeed, PBDA’s mission statement reflects a holistic approach for cultivating their students’ development, aiming to “guide each child toward personal excellence of mind, body, and character.” As always, all architecture must be designed not just to follow academic or institutional trends simply for their own sake, but rather to continually enhance the tools and support for students to engage in the rigorous curriculum and achieve exceptional results. The Great Expectations Campaign is designed to support and enhance the carefully articulated curriculum and the superior faculty providing students with further opportunity to grow and meet the high expectations set for them. Many teachers at PBDA have advanced Masters degrees in NOVEMBER 2012 163


This page: Students work on a chemistry lab assignment in one of PBDA’s science labs (above); the scientific education has a long history at the school (inset). Opposite page: Students participate in a

education. Additionally, PBDA sent 33 teachers over several years to Project Zero, a summer program at Harvard that focuses on the methodologies for developing children’s ability to think critically and creatively. Attending teachers bring back improved skills and knowledge and upon their return, through collaborative workshops, they impart invaluable new techniques to the entire faculty and surrounding area schools while reinforcing a culture of continued learning. PBDA teachers also act as ambassadors by presenting their methods all over the world, in Atlanta, Chicago, New Zealand, and Singapore to name a few, proving once again PBDA is a global role model and gaining recognition as such. All these efforts and initiatives serve one primary purpose: to educate and empower PBDA students to leave equipped for success with, “a sense of who they are and what they have to offer.” As one of the school’s administrator remarks, “Our students 164 QUEST

leave us as individuals.” However, they will all have acquired excellent communication skills in writing and public speaking, the ability to present themselves as well-informed and educated citizens who value in participating in their school community via service programs. In the Lower School, children learn vital life skills, such as courage and empathy. In the Upper School, particular emphasis is placed on how values relate to the fostering of leadership. In short, “students from PBDA are good citizens,” prepared to embrace the challenges of the global, modern world and to give back to their communities in a meaningful way. They will also take with them the closeness of the school family that provided them with such a strong foundation for life’s journey ahead. PBDA as an institution is similarly poised to undertake this Great Expectations campaign for growth, building upon a rich past and moving towards a bright future as a leading global school with a warm local feel. u

CO U RT E S Y O F PA L M B E AC H DAY AC A D E MY

100-meter dash on one the school’s lush athetic fields.


PBDA’s mission statement reflects a holistic approach for cultivating its students’ development, aiming to “guide each child toward personal excellence of mind, body, and character.”


APPEARANCES

MEMORY LANE BY HILARY GEARY

COME SAUNTER down Memory Lane with me—in fact, let’s boogie back a quarter of a century to revisit those watering holes we all spent so many “happy hours” at! I still can’t believe it’s been 25 years of 166 QUEST

Quest magazine chronicling New York. And what better way to reminisce than to chat about our favorite haunts! First one that comes to mind is Mortimer’s, as it was the best place for dining on tasty comfort

food as well as for hosting parties—the owner Glenn Bernbaum was a master party giver. We now have Swifty’s, a reincarnation of Mortimer’s, seamlessly run by Robert Caravaggi and Stephen Attoe,

CO U RTE S Y O F H I L A RY G E A RY

Bobby Short appeared in his last private performance at the wedding anniversary of Hilary Geary and Wilbur Ross.


CO U RTE S Y O F M I C H A E L’ S ; CO U RTE S Y O F RO B E RT C A R AVA G G I ; H A R RY B E N S O N ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

you spoke to them or just nodded, it was we miss her and her salon? Michael’s for O.K. Elaine would walk in every night at lunch—I can be away from New York for 9:05 p.m., speak to her favorites, ignore a year and catch up with everyone after the strangers, and sit down to either hear one lunch at Michael’s.” Another La Grenouille fan is Karen or tell you the gossip. Many times I say to Gigi, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if we could Lefrak and she said, “Every special occajust walk up to Elaine’s tonight?’ There is sion in the LeFrak family is celebrated with an intimate dinner at La Grenouille. never going to be a place like it again.” TV star Deborah Norville reminisced about Le Cirque—the original on 65th Street: “On our one-year wedding anniversary, Karl and I went out for a romantic lunch. (I went Glenn Bernbaum, Whitney Tower, Jackie Rogers, to work at 4 a.m. then and Fred Hughes at Mortimer’s in 1986. so dinners were diffiwho both have a Mortimer’s pedigree. I cult). He said, ‘Let’s will always have a soft spot for the truly hold hands, But under fabulous Rainbow Room, where Wilbur the table.’ I thought and I celebrated our wedding some eight he didn’t want a pubyears back with Bobby Short serenading lic display of affecus. It was Bobby’s last performance at a tion but no. He thrust private party. The Rainbow Room was something fabric into the ultimate city setting, impossibly glam- my hands. At first, I thought, ‘Why is Robert Caravvagi and Stephen Attoe with their staff at Swifty’s, he giving me his as photographed by Harry Benson. napkin?’ Turns out, it was the jewelry bag in which Just knowing we are going there puts me my beautiful diamond and sapphire into a festive mood!” ring was hiding!” Who could ever Mario Buatta, the brilliant decoraforget a meal like that? tor affectionately called the “Prince of Another story is that when Chintz,” has a big list of restaurants he Deborah’s son Nick was born, Karl loved that are sadly not open anymore: was in the hospital room. When “Gino’s, Orsini’s, Le Plaisir, Pearl’s, and an unappetizing dinner tray was several others that I am too discreet to brought, he said, “You can’t eat mention.” Ha! Ha! Ha! that! What’s your favorite restauI miss all those great spots too but rant?” Of course, Deborah said “Le N.Y.C. is a town filled with fabulous Cirque” and, with that, her husband restaurants and there is always a new ordered chicken paillard, vegetables, wonderful one about to open! u and, of course, a crème brûlée for take-out! Michael McCarty of Michael’s working the floor My pal Blaine Trump in the garden room of his restaurant. chatted about “The orous with Art Deco architecture and a Frog a.k.a. La Grenouille.” revolving dance floor regally sitting atop She said, “It is the best for special occasions and the Rockefeller Center with views galore. For this column, I asked a few pals upstairs private room is the about their favorite spots, old and new. most romantic room in New Famed photographer Harry Benson said, York! Great food is guaran“Elaine’s—I miss her. I miss it. I truly miss teed. The flowers and lighting it. Going to Elaine’s was like going round are perfection. It makes you to a good friend’s home, being welcome, look and feel good from head staying as long as you wanted to, sur- to toe! Dancing on table tops John McCain and Elaine Kaufman at her restaurant Elaine’s rounded by familiar people, and whether at Elaine’s at 3 a.m. Don’t for an intimate reception on September 2, 2004. NOVEMBER 2012 167


RETROSPECTIVE

YGL THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Though this column launched eight years ago, bright young things have been hitting the New York nightlife scene for decades. In honor of our 25th anniversary, we pay hommage to the younger generation of yesteryear. They may have moved on in age (and tax brackets!), but they remain familiar faces all the same. Gillian Hearst-Shaw, Amanda Hearst, Luigi Tadini, Marissa Bregman, and Nick Raynes in Southampton, New York, on June 25, 2005. Inset: Former Quest nightlife chroniclers, Jack Bryan; Andrew Black.


Jack Bryan, the second “Young and the Guest List” columnist, at the Costume Institute Gala on May 7, 2007. Nicole Hanley and Helena Khazanova at the opening of Lilly Pulitzer on

Kathryn Bohannon and Tatiana

Madison Avenue on May 13, 2008.

Papanicolaou at an event at Christie’s on February 8, 2006. Emma Snowdon-Jones and Mark Langrish at a Maurice Villency-hosted event on December 14, 2005.

Alexandra Richards, Ryan Cabrerra, Theodora Richards, and Lydia Hearst-Shaw on November 11, 2004.

Euan Rellie kissing Nadine Johnson at a Richard Johnson-hosted

Ivanka Trump and Annabelle

party on April 27, 2000.

Vartanian at New York Observerhosted event on June 6, 2007.

Rich Thomas and Tamie Peters at the Shore Club in Miami, Florida, on December 31, 2005.

Hud Morgan dancing at a Cinema Society premiere and after-party at the IFC Center on April 27, 2006

Patrick McMullan and Elizabeth

Harry LeFrak and Topper Mortimer

Meigher at a Dennis Basso dinner

at a Maybach party in Southampton,

on May 15, 2006.

New York, on July 26, 2003.

Fernanda Niven and Shoshanna Gruss

Georgina Schaeffer and

at the launch of a Christian Dior fragrance

Jeff Caldwell at Dressed to Kilt

Kittichai for a party on June 10, 2004.

on April 3, 2006. NOVEMBER 2012 169


R

AO CSKP E C T I V E RBE LT R

Cornelia Guest with Boy George

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

YGL


R Christopher Mason at his

Fernanda Niven and Alexandra Boyer (1994)

birthday party (1993) Topper Mortimer (1999)

Ghislaine Maxwell (1993)

Rachel Hovnanian, Allison Rockefeller Gilles Dufour and

and Tara Rockefeller (1995)

Claudia Schiffer (1995)

Blandy Uzielli and George Moss (1991)

Muffie Bancroft Murray (1993)

Carey Lowell and Griffin Dunne (1994) Muffie Potter Gerard, Chappy Morris, Joanne de Guardiola

Cristina Zilkha (1993)

and Doug Leeds (1991)

Joe Armstrong and

Roffredo Gaetani and

Mark Gilbertson, Susan

George Whipple III, Mark Giordano, J.C. Giordano,

Carolyne Roehm (1993)

Kalliope Karella (1993)

Colley & Bob Arnot (1991)

Candace Bushnell and Robby Banker (1990) NOVEMBER 2012 171


BROWN

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST October: a month fêted with Oktoberfest at Bedford Post and “The Hunt” in Far Hills, New Jersey. As the season changes, the PYTs celebrate everything festively fall.

A bagpiper at the Far Hills Race Meeting, a.k.a. The Hunt, in Far Hills, New Jersey, on October 20.

J U S T I N J E F F E R S / T H E F I N E Y O U N G G E N T LE M A N . CO M

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


Miles Rutter and Steve Medgyesy at the

Christina Staffon representing the

Far Hills Race Meeting on October 20.

red, white, and blue at The Hunt.

Kelsey Nussenfeld and Frank

Megan Spagnola and Christina Haack at

Sanders in Far Hills, New Jersey.

in Far Hills, New Jersey, on October 20.

Taylor Ivey of the brand Ellsworth & Ivey, a company that designs capes.

Stephanie Michaan and Stephanie Fell at the Far Hills Race Meeting.

Kurtis Gibbs, Eric Seitz, Medora Hartz,

Siblings Pete Hansen and Whit

and Katie Parker-Magyar on October 20.

Hansen at The Hunt together.

Nick Ventura with friends in

A Hunt-goer transporting a keg from

the back of a pickup truck.

the grounds after the races.

“YOU HAVE TO have been a Republican to know how good it is

to be a Democrat,” said Jackie Kennedy. While it is gauche (ha) to discuss politics, the party I support is the fun party. On September 14, the Cinema Society, with The Hollywood Reporter and Samsung, hosted a screening of The Oranges. At the after-party at Jimmy at the James Hotel, Sean Avery, Adam Brody, Zoe Kravitz, Leighton Meester, and Shaun White sipped

Meredith Murphy, Lucy Taliaferro, Alyssa

Dane Evans and Grant Wentworth

Sommar, and Missy Weil at The Hunt.

hosted a tailgate together.

L’Orange-flavored Grey Goose around the pool. Where are your swim trunks and your flippy floppies when you need them? On the 27th, a screening of Butter was hosted by the Cinema Society with DKNY, Forevermark, and RentTheRunway.com. Appleton Estate was abounded at the after-party at the Double Seven, where I mixed and mingled with Drew Grant, Ted Gushue, Becky Katz, Lauren Powell, and Caroline Smith while NOVEMBER 2012 173


crushing on Olivia Wilde and discussing how a ticket for Jay-Z’s concert at the Barclays Center is somewhat of a status symbol. On the 18th, New Yorkers for Children hosted its gala to benefit youth in foster care at Cipriani 42nd Street. The event, which honored John Demsey and Justin Tuck, attracted Erika Bearman, Daniel Benedict and Andrew Saffir, Hannah Bronfman, Lindsay Ellingson, and Hilary Rhoda and raised $1.35 million for the organization’s programs. Everything about the evening was money, which makes sense as Cipriani 42nd Street was previously the Bowery Savings Bank. On the 29th, I Metro-Northed with Oliver Ames, Sam Dangremond, Emily Hottensen, Juliet Izon, and Stefanos Kasselakis to the Bedford Post. There, we fêted Oktoberfest with cognac and a multiple-course menu featuring everything from Apfelstrudel to Würste, prepared by chef Jeremy McMillan. Oh, and Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds were also at the restaurant. Casual.

is hosting “harvest dinners” with local farms at Bedford Post in Bedford, New York.

On October 9, the Museum of the City of New York’s “New York After Dark” took place at the Four Seasons Restaurant, where the hors d’oeuvres are so choice—if you have the means, I highly recommend picking some up. Alixe Laughlin, Nicole Mellon, and Bronson van Wyck were among those gathered around the four fall-themed trees. On the 10th, I attended the screening of Seven Psychopaths, hosted by the Cinema Society with Appleton Estate, where I chatted with Gerard Butler about iPhones for multiple seconds. ’Twas special. Then, I trekked—O.K., taxied—to the after-party at No. 8, where DJ Uncle Mike performed for Helena Christensen, Scarlett Johansson, and Christopher Walken. And... On the 20th... The Far Hills Race Meeting, a.k.a. The Hunt in Far Hills, New Jersey. It’s Christmas in October and the presents were moonshine in mason jars and ponies. My mother scolded me for wearing jorts—ain’t nuthin’ but a G thang. u

A S T R I D S TA W I A R Z ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

Throughout the season, chef Jeremy McMillan


Lenay Dunn, Jamie McCarthy, Charles Thorpe, and Simone Burke at the Cinema Society after-party for Butter.

Dave Matthews promoting his own Dreaming Tree wine with Allison Janney at Jimmy at The James for the Cinema Society. Carson Griffith and Nate Freeman at the Cinema Society after-party for Seven Psychopaths.

Heidi de la Rosa, Elsa Hosk, Chrissy Teigen, Nicole Trunfio, and Hannah Davis at a Resolution Project event on October 11.

Sam Dangremond and Stefanos Kasselakis at the Four Seasons Restaurant for the Museum of the City of New York.

Drew Grant at the Double Seven for the Cinema Society after-party of Butter.

Lauren Remington Platt at the New Yorkers For Children

Jodie and Danielle Snyder at the New

gala to benefit youth in foster care at Cipriani 42nd Street.

Yorkers For Children gala on September 18. NOVEMBER 2012 175


SNAPSHOT

IN APRIL 1987, I had an epiphany to start a real estate magazine with color ads. I knew absolutely nothing of the magazine business, photography, or real estate, but boy did I learn from my mistakes. I had no track record, and magazines were like restaurants—only one in ten is a success. Still, real estate firms were intrigued, so I gave up my job and asked my son Alexander to come work with me during his summer break from college. He had the great idea to write about ‘well-known characters and personalities, past and present, both honorable and scandalous subjects,’ by whom I have always been intrigued. For example, in the first issue we commissioned an article about the Collyer brothers, descendants of one of New York’s oldest families, whose deaths led to the removal of over 103 tons of garbage from their house. I chose a printer and visited the plant, only to discover that I had inadvertently chosen one of the largest printers of por176 QUEST

nography in the United States! (We didn’t stay with them very long.) The first issue got lots of press both for its glossy quality of the real estate pictures, but also the content. The New York Post said that my endorsement of the legalization of hemp in the publisher’s letter was “as if Town & Country had endorsed body piercing.” We decided not to write articles on real estate, and instead chose writers like Dominick Dunne, Ormonde de Kay, and Freddy Eberstadt. We captured the imagination of New York society and we received enormous success from the feedback of our customer base. Managing and organizing a magazine is more than a full-time job; I loved it. Life is still busy for me, having recently written the memoir of my daring adventures throughout life. u Above: Heather Cohane, founder of Quest, with her beloved terriers Juansito and Sparky. Inset: The cover of one of the earliest issues.

C H R I S E A S T L A N D / C H R I S E A S T L A N D . CO M

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Quest November 2012