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THE JEWELRY ISSUE


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CONTENTS THE J EWELRY I SSUE 96

FIONA'S TREASURE TROVE

Fiona Druckenmiller’s Upper East Side boutique,

FD Gallery, is more than the discerning shopper’s must-visit Manhattan destination—it’s a journey through jewels and treasures from around the world. BY LILY HOAGLAND

104

TIMELESS AT TIFFANY'S

110

This year, Tiffany & Co.’s Blue Book collection features

stunning Art Deco recreations from its archives, in honor of its role as the official jewelry partner of Baz Luhrmann’s latest film, The Great Gatsby. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

110 116

BEST OF TIME

Our annual guide to the greatest timepieces of the year. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

TIMELESS JEWELS OF THE

20TH CENTURY Vivienne Becker’s The Impossible Collection

of Jewelry (Assouline) singles out last century’s most important jewels. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

122

A MID-HEEL TURNS MID-LIFE

Salvatore Ferragamo celebrates 35 years of its most recognizable

shoe, the Vara. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO, PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIBORNE SWANSON FRANK

130

THE ARISTOCRATIC ARTIST

The Sicilian duke Fulco di Verdura became a legendary jewelry

designer—and built an enduring jewelry legacy—using the charm of a playboy, the eye of an artist, and the friends of the beau monde across the globe.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND


72

84

CONTENTS C OLUMNS

68

20

SOCIAL DIARY

62

SOCIAL CALENDAR

64

HARRY BENSON

66

OBSERVATIONS

68

FRESH FINDS

72

AUDAX

74

CANTEENS

76

DESIGN

78

PROFILE

82

SHOPPING

84

NOSTALGIA

136

APPEARANCES

138

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

The scene is especially sensational in the month of April.

BY

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

A guide to what’s blooming in May, as Memorial Day Weekend approaches.

Our photographer recalls time spent with jewelry designer Elsa Peretti—and her kimono. A look at cultural conflicts, in light of the tragedy in Boston. BY TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

Gifts for others—and for yourself.

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

AND

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Our columnist heads back to the races—to 1973, when Secretariat made Triple Crown history. In midtown, Michael’s sets the standard for the new “power” meal. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

Ann Ziff’s jewelry line, Tamsen Z, is a walk on the unconventional side. BY LILY HOAGLAND Prince Michel de Bourbon-Parme’s missions in France and Vietnam. Cristiana Shields’s jewelry designs have an empowering effect.

BY

BY

L ILY H OAGLAND

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Finding family roots in Nashville’s glamorous Swan Ball. BY TREVANIA DUDLEY HENDERSON A special wedding, art shows, and family fun all along the East Coast.

BY

HILARY GEARY

Our reporter buzzes around town—in black-tie. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Hollywood gem Debra Paget stole the set in a rhinestone-studded Cadillac.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO ART DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

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HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Above, from left: An example of Ann Ziff’s one-of-a-kind rings from her line, Tamsen Z; a diamond tiara from The Impossible Collection Of Jewelry (Assouline); Trevania Dudley Henderson with her mother, Jane Dudley, founder of the Swan Ball.

JEWELRY FALLS SOMEWHERE between sculpture and clothing. Jewelers are artists whose works ultimately have to be worn, so each piece needs to be appealing on the body while still a spectacular work on its own. The two have to be equally balanced; otherwise, you end up with nothing but plain gold chains (yawn) or Damien Hirst’s “For The Love Of God” on a string (can’t...lift...head...). For our Jewelry Issue, we look at the old masters and the new hotshots of design, curation, and gems. On the Upper East Side of Manhattan, Madison Avenue sparkles with jewelry boutiques clustered like side stones on an engagement ring. Tamsen Z showcases the amazing handmade designs of Ann Ziff, who uses everything from giant opals to pieces of the Metropolitan Opera chandeliers in her line. Nearby, the perfectly curated FD Gallery offers the best jewelry and vintage objets d’art that owner Fiona Druckenmiller can find from around the world. Just imagine the fortunes that have been spent in that one small corner of the city. What Capote or Hepburn fan can think of jewelry without a specific name popping up? The iconic Tiffany & Co. has beautiful Art Deco pieces in The 2013 Blue Book, in honor of their partnership with Baz Luhrmann’s Great Gatsby. Hands dripping with pearls and wearing diamond headdresses, this version of Daisy Buchanan has more than just a voice that’s full of money. Traditionally, while the women pace the aisles looking at necklaces and brooches, men peruse the watch displays. We round up the cutting-edge luxury offerings currently available from Patek Philippe, Omega, Rolex, Ralph Lauren, and many more. The office’s current favorite phrase, “Ain’t nobody got time for that,” does not apply here. Vivienne Becker has also just graced us with a gorgeous book 18 QUEST

called The Impossible Collection of Jewelr y, available at www. assouline.com. It was difficult to keep the drool off huge prints in a book that felt like flipping through an oversized spell book where each potion was full of rubies, emeralds, and sapphires. Fulco di Vedura was a connoisseur of those fine gems, as well as a connoiseur of the glamorous women of the 1960s and ’70s, a combination that he used to create an amazing legacy as one of the best fine jewelers in modern times. His Verdura line, now headed by Ward Landrigan, looks to his old sketches for new designs. Next to everything in these pages, don’t the stars in the sky seem slightly dimmer? X

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Fulco di Verdura, the legendary Italian jewelry designer, with the famous French couturière Coco Chanel, looking over her Maltese Cross Cuff bracelets in Paris, 1937. He designed the now-iconic cuffs for her during his eight-year career at Chanel. Photographed by Boris Lipnitzki.


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million (or tens of billions in today’s dollar). He left 90 percent of it to one son, William H. There was a big fight over the will after the old man croaked since the daughters and another son (Cornelius Jeremiah) were left less than a million each. The old man had sincerely felt that was fair because he himself was not especially ostentatious when it came to his own living standards. While he did own a mansion on Washington Square, it in no way compared to what his descendents would build for themselves and their children. He would never have built such palaces for himself. His money 22 QUEST

Patty Myura and Kenn Karakul

was his palace. No doubt, he would have preferred to take it with him but, alas… Like his father, William H. and his wife, Maria Kissam, had a large family of eight children. No sooner had Billy (as his father had called him) inherited that he embarked on a move outside his known personality: he built a double palace for himself and his family on Fifth Avenue, taking up the entire block on the west side of the street between 51st and 52nd streets. He also doubled his father’s legacy before he died less than 10 years later: he increased the fortune to almost $200 million, thereby making him the

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richest man in the world. William H. left the bulk of his fortune to his two eldest sons: William Kissam and Cornelius II. And both of those boys proceeded to build huge mansions, also on Fifth Avenue—right next door, on the northwest corner of 52nd Street and Fifth (where 666 stands today). “Willie K.,” as one of them was known, and his firecracker of a Southern belle wife Alva built their chateau across the street from pappy. Cornelius II built a palace of 143 rooms that occupied the entire west side of the block between 57th and 58th streets, where Bergdorf Goodman and Van Cleef &

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Arpels are today. After the death of the legendary Commodore, the Vanderbilts graduated to the lifestyle of royalty as we would like to imagine it. Riches and leisure unlimited. The old man’s fortune ended up enriching hundreds of his descendents in varying degrees for the next six or so generations of Americans, Englishmen, and Europeans. The earliest descendents through to the grandchildren and great-grandchildren lived like kings—high, wide, and handsome. Consuelo Vanderbilt Earl was named for her paternal aunt Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan, arguably the most famous

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A woman of New York’s Gilded Age after having married the 9th Duke of Marlborough at age 17 in 1894. Mrs. Earl was a member of the fifth generation of this American fortune that came to symbolize an irresistible lifestyle of excess and hauteur. In real life, a lot of these Vanderbilts were, like the rest of us, just trying to sort it out—whatever “it” meant for them. To the American public, the name itself sounded like royalty, as if it came naturally to them. Evidently it did for some. Mrs. Earl was married four times but, like many heiresses, she pretty much lived the way she wanted. She grew up in a

big house that her grandparents built for her parents next door at 666 Fifth Avenue. She had been the middle of three other children: Muriel, Consuelo, and Willie K. III. (Willie died in a horrific auto accident in 1933.) Young Willie’s death was a tragedy from which his mother never recovered. Birdie Vanderbilt died just two years later at 55. She was survived by her daughters. (Muriel predeceased her by 39 years, in 1972.) Consuelo Earl, like her aunt and namesake, had a penchant for animals, especially for dogs. She raised Skye Terriers, poodles, Afghans, more

terriers. Later in her life, she bought a big piece of property in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and raised miniature farm animals such as cows, horses, and chickens—of which she was devoted to all. It was a very long life, yet the miracle of old age was no blessing for the lady. At 90, she began to withdraw. She became blind and her daughter, Virginia Burke, recalls that it was a very difficult, very long time in getting to the end of such a great age. The items of Mrs. Earl that went on sale that morning were interesting reflections of that age and era of vast wealth and the “leisure class” in America.

Luxury then was not a label but an aspect of the rarified. If you had to know how much it cost, then, as J. Pierpont Morgan is said to have put it: you couldn’t afford it. Although she is not remembered as a woman who was fascinated with, or collected, jewels, Consuelo Vanderbilt Earl nevertheless left a plethora of precious and beautiful collectibles. Items include the “Mystery” clock from Cartier and a gold tray inscribed with “Alva 1931,” which was the ship named for Mrs. Earl’s paternal grandmother. The Alva was known as the world’s first superyacht at 265 feet. On her maiden

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adult life an aficionado of speed and built the Long Island Motor Parkway in 1908, when he was 30. By 1911, the parkway extended from Great Neck all the way to Lake Ronkonkoma. It was a month of nonstop events: benefits, parties, exhibitions. On a Wednesday night, international interior designer Geoffrey Bradfield, one of the very last of the great party-givers in New York, hosted a special evening celebrating the birthday of his friend Monique van Vooren. Geoffrey took over the David Burke Townhouse on East 61st Street between Park and Lexington and transformed it in to his version of the Cub Room at the Stork Club. In its day, there was a velvet rope at the entrance to the Stork Club and it was not crossed by just anyone. The Cub Room at the Stork Club was the V.I.P. room. And the V.I.P.s were really considered Very Im-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A portant People, not just in New York but in the world: movie stars, bestselling authors, famous politicians, debutantes, South American playboys and assorted tycoons, visiting royals, millionaires, and Broadway babies. Geoffrey Bradfield’s recreation even had a special canopy made, emblazoned with the words: The Stork Club. The evening was called, “All About Monique” and the theme was Hollywood. He filled his Cub Room walls with big pictures of the Belgian Bombshell, which included an Andy Warhol portrait of Monique. A few nights later over to the Café Carlyle, where the great Elaine Stritch opened

the week of her “farewell” performance. Not officially farewell, but Elaine’s moving back to Michigan—Birmingham, to be exact—where she grew up and where she has lots of wonderful nieces and nephews, the children of her sisters, who will be nearby. It will be wonderful, especially since she’s a single lady at this time in her life. The event was a hot ticket in New York and it wasn’t easy to get a seat in the house. She drew a big crowd of names: Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson, Liza Minnelli with her friend Michael Feinstein, Bernadette Peters, Tony Bennett, James Levine, Rex Reed, for starters. There wasn’t an

empty inch in the place. Two nights later, down at Cipriani 42nd Street, the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House hosted its annual fundraising gala honoring Caroline and Thompson Dean for their decades of devotion to the organization. This was a glamorous affair and probably the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House’s biggest, attendance-wise. They raised over $1.2 million in ticket sales and an additional $140,000 during the auction, half of which was from a matching gift provided by an anonymous donor. The Lenox Hill Neighborhood House is located on East 70th Street between Third and

Second avenues. It’s 119 years old this year. What it has done, and continues to do, is to support those in the neighborhood who have needs that they are unable to fill themselves. From the age of three to 103 is the span of its friends who receive support of all kinds. These are large enterprises. Lenox Hill Neighborhood House has an annual budget of about $21 million with 70 percent of the funds coming from government and corporate foundations. The rest is raised by volunteers. Much of the work there is done by volunteers. At Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, you find many people of long-standing participation. What is opti-

G E O F F R E Y B R A D F I E L D H O S T E D A B I R T H D A Y P A R T Y F O R M O N I Q U E V A N V O O R E N AT T H E S T O R K C L U B

Sam Bolton and Amy Hoadley 28 QUEST

Lee Black and Jeanne Lawrence

CeCe Black, Monique van Vooren and Eric Purcell

Roric Tobin and Geoffrey Bradfield

Christopher Hyland and Katharina Plath

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Alberto Michelazzi and Emel Dilek


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A mistic is that the generations coming up are getting very involved. The night’s glamorous decor was provided by 31 designers, purveyors of the decorative arts, and floral experts working around the theme of “High Society,” a reference to Cole Porter’s High Society in the 1950s, which starred Frank Sinatra, Grace Kelly, Bing Crosby, and Celeste Holm. Lilly Pulitzer died on the first Sunday of the month in Palm Beach. She was 81. The first time I went to Palm Beach was in the winter of 1967–68. Palm Beach in those days was a sleepy little place compared to what it is today. There were still quite a few empty plots of land here and there, and many of the big houses built in the 1920s were being razed, victims of the cost of upkeep. Many of the Old Guard family members were still in residence. Jack Kennedy had given the town a bit of an international publicity lift when he used his father’s house on North Ocean Boulevard for the “Winter White House.” The Grande Dame of them

all, Marjorie Merriweather Post, was still in residence at Mar-a-Lago with an army of servants and a raft of houseguests. (It’s where she hosted her famous square-dance dinner parties.) There were newcomers and up-and-comers, and a lot of the succeeding

Lilly Pulitzer with daughters Minnie and Liza on the January 2007 issue of Quest

Jackie Kennedy, pictured with the first family, was one of Lilly Pulitzer’s first—and most loyal—customers. 30 QUEST

generations of the old fortunes that made Palm Beach, like the Dukes and Biddles, Vanderbilts and Phippses, DuPonts and Dodges. During that era, Lillian Lee McKim Pulitzer Rousseau was in the swirl. Back then, when she had become famous

in the fashion business for her “Lilly” dress, she was still just known as Lilly to her many friends and acquaintances. She didn’t start her dress business by accident—she had a purpose. Her husband, Peter Pulitzer, had orange groves and Lilly had a little business selling oranges from a stand in one of those “vias” off of Worth Avenue. She had already been making shirts of silkscreen, polished cotton with designs by artist Suzie dePoo. The fabrics had a soft sheen, and dePoo’s painting added a lot to their design. The story is that Jackie Kennedy—then all of 31 years— bought a few and started wearing them whenever she was in Palm Beach. And she was photographed. That was it; Lilly was in business. The Lilly and the Gucci loafer (known as the “walking shoe,” for women) were the two hottest fashion items in the Palm Beach of that day. Every man was wearing the now classic Gucci loafer and every girl and woman was wearing a Lilly. Lilly also used the fabrics for men’s and women’s pants

Lilly Pulitzer, carrying her prints, as her husband, Peter Pulitzer, watches her from their plane


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H E N R Y ST R E E T S E T T L E M E N T ’ S G A L A AT T H E P L A Z A

Lesley and David Schulhof

in cotton as well as selling corduroy with the print design. It was a suburban summer costume but it became such a hot item that it was considered chic to wear both day and nighttime at the right resorts or at home. The colors were bright, soft, and flattering, and gave everyone—and the room that everyone was in—a glow and a lift. Within a couple of years, Lilly had shops in Newport, in Southampton, on Cape Cod, and in several other summer resorts where her Palm Beach crowd visited. That first winter visit to Palm Beach, our hostess Kathy, who was working part-time in one of the shops, wanted us to see Lilly’s new house which she said was “so divine.” So, one day, we went off to whatever lane of via it was to see the house. I don’t have a clear memory of the exterior upon arriving at the Pulitzer villa, although it was probably painted a clas32 QUEST

John De Neufville and Ali Wise

Kimberly Schulhof

sic ivory, cream, or pastel and in the style of a Regency or Georgian. It was smart and elegant. You walked into the entrance gallery, which led on to a larger room overlooking Lake Worth. It was light and spacious, with tall ceilings and a beautiful, immaculate, deeppile lime-green rug on a dark, highly polished wood floor. The rug was untrammeled and spotless, except for a nice, medium-size, well-formed, solid dog dump. It was fairly fresh (I’m assuming) and right square in the middle. With the exception of Fido’s natural body functions, the house was impeccable. Nevertheless, as inconvenient as it sounds, I’ve always had the feeling since that day that such a matter wouldn’t have fazed the dog’s owner for a minute. She loved her animals. The kitchen was large, with a family-room quality—a new idea back then—with a big, comfy, slip-covered sofa where

Reed Krakoff and Carolina Gonzalez-Bunster

Lola Rykiel

Lilly’s guests and kids could sit and talk to her while she worked in the kitchen. Everything about the place was en famille and intime. Like her famous clothing designs, there was a bright, cheerful quality that had more than a wisp of wisdom to it. As we were being shown the bedrooms on the second floor, we went into the master bedroom: a bronze, rattan, and tortoiseshell-ish space with a large queen-sized canopy bed on which a completely nude woman with blonde hair lay supine, napping deeply. She was out. Coming upon this horizontally statuesque figure was such a surprise—the door had been left wide open, so there was no hint of someone being inside—that we all just looked at her for a moment, and then left the room. I laugh now when I think of that strangely awkward moment (for us, not her). The lady probably never knew. She

Carolyn Murphy

may have just come from the pool and a shower and instantly dozed. Her name was Peggy Bedford Bancroft D’arenberg D’uzes, a well-known international heiress and socialite and a contemporary of Lilly and Peter Pulitzer. And a houseguest. It also never occurred to us that we were not expected, strange as that may seem. Back to New York. On a Thursday night, they held the annual Henry Street Settlement Gala at the Plaza honoring Alexandra Lebenthal, Carolina Gonzalez-Bunster, and Reed Krakoff. Gala dinner chairs were Natalia Gottret Echavarria and Kalliope Karella. They raised more than $700,000 for the organization, which has served New Yorkers for more than a century with innovative social services, arts programs, and health care efforts. More than 50,000 people a year benefit from these programs. Among those attending: Carolyn Murphy, Reed

B FA NYC . CO M

Maggie Betts


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A DANIEL BOULUD HOSTED A BENEFIT FOR CIT YMEALS-ON-WHEELS

Daniel Boulud and Alix Boulud

Al Roker and Deborah Roberts

Krakoff, Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Bibhu Mohapatra, Claire Courtin-Clarins, Shirin von Wulffen, Alina Cho, Kalliope Karella, Michel Ouellet, Jennifer Creel, Edmond and Marielle Safra, John Demsey, Lola Rykiel, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Zani Gugelmann, Maggie Betts, David and Lesley Schulhof, Paul and Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos, Steve and Christine Schwarzman, Vanessa von Bismarck, Deborah Roberts, Martin and Jean Shafiroff, Alex and Eliza Bolen, Annelise Peterson, Muffie Potter Aston, Martin and Perry Granoff, Claudia Lebenthal and Bettina Zilkha. That same night, 10 blocks north at the Frick Collection, they were hosting the Young Fellows Ball. More than 600 supporters of the Frick and their friends filled the Garden Court and Music Room for cocktails, hors d’oeuvre, and dancing. The black-tie evening ran from 8:30 p.m. to midnight. 34 QUEST

Laura and Brent Nicklas

The following night, Friday, John and Joan Jakobson hosted a dinner dance at the Harmonie Club for about 200 of their friends and their son’s and daughter’s friends. The Jakobsons are one of the most charming and popular couples in New York. Together and separately, they have a lot of friends with whom they keep up and entertain two or three times a year. This was such a big crowd. Someone told me it might be their 25th anniversary, though I asked Joan and she said it was just a chance to get a lot of people together and have a good time. So there was a DJ and the spin was disco with a lot of people on the Harmonie’s accommodating and shiny dance floor. I left the Harmonie about 10:30 p.m. and stopped by The Pierre where Save Venice was holding its annual “Un Ballo in Maschera” with a “Black and White Masquerade” theme. The Pierre’s ballroom was transformed into

Patrick Stubgen with Dana Hammond and Miles Hammond

Donald Tober and Talila O’Higgins

a black-and-white world of whimsy, with the creations of Nicky Balestrieri of EXTRAEXTRA. There was a special performance by ELEW, the “Rockjazz” virtuoso pianist, and Daniel Chetrit deejayed the evening. Chairs for the evening were Laurie Adorno, Adelina Wong Ettelson, Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos, Cecile Andrau Martel, Mary Kathryn Navab, and Lauren Santo Domingo. International chairs were Francesca Bortolotto Possati and Nadja Swarovski. On a very warm (mid-80s) Wednesday, at noontime, I went down to Brasserie 8 1/2, the restaurant in the subterranean level of the Solow Building at 9 West 57th Street, to lunch with Allison Rockefeller and Missy Falchi. Rockefeller and Falchi are involved with the Women in Conservation program of the National Audubon Society. This year, they are celebrating the 10th anniversary of their Women in Conservation Lun-

Gail Simmons and Gael Greene

cheon and the 2013 Audubon Rachel Carson Awards, which will be held on May 29 in the Grand Ballroom of The Plaza. This year, the honorees are Marian Heiskell, the philanthropist and conservationist, and the late Lady Bird Johnson, former first lady and environmentalist. Mrs. Heiskell will receive the inaugural Rachel Carson Lifetime Achievement Award and Lady Bird Johnson’s award will be accepted by her daughter, Lynda Johnson Robb. So what was the conversation? Missy Falchi, who grew up in a little town in Texas, told me about how during Lyndon Johnson’s presidency, Lady Bird made it her project to clean up the roadways and highways across America. Missy recalled how, when she was a very young girl, the highways in Texas were barren, unkempt, and often littered with all kinds of detritus. Today, they are cleaned, groomed, and planted and landscaped

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Adam Levin


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A with green. This is often true all over the nation, thanks to Mrs. Johnson. I was reminded of the irony that all of this beautification was happening as the war was expanding in and ravaging Vietnam. We talked about Rachel Carson and her seminal work, Silent Spring, and how that one woman started a movement of consciousness that now exists within all of us— even those who ignore it. We talked about the bees dying en masse in California and how they are being killed by the genetically engineered pesticides that are affecting the seeds. And we talked about how Rachel Carson’s work

unwittingly created a movement among women to Do Something About All Of It. The following Monday night, another organization of women, the International Women’s Health Coalition, hosted its annual fundraising dinner at The Pierre. It honored Christiane Amanpour, who also served as the keynote speaker. Amanpour’s subject was women’s rights. She spoke about witnessing a female circumcision in Africa during the making of a documentary about it. She conveyed the horror of the young girl’s brutalization with great compassion and was very effecting in her delivery.

Amanpour is one of those women whose voice, with its vague foreign accent, adds to her credibility. She noted that there should be a special place in hell for women who do not help other women. Amanpour closed with the reminder: a six-year-old girl is of value. Listening to Amanpour evoked thoughts of my own mother, who died 25 years ago at 82 after a long hard life of labor and strife—much of it the result of the mores and rules of her time as well as the paucity of support that women now can access more easily and frequently today. She was such a hard worker and possessed a great curiosity about many things, which I seem to

have inherited. And yet, her life was a struggle. Listening to Amanpour, it occurred to me that, had she been born into my generation, she would have had a much different, and perhaps more desirable, way of life. The rules have changed and continue to change toward a greater equality between the sexes. The following night, New Yorkers for Children (I told you it was busy!) held their annual spring dance, A Fool’s Fête, over at the Mandarin Oriental in its great ballroom overlooking Columbus Circle, Central Park South, and Central Park. I couldn’t make it although I’ve been many times before.

N E W YO R K E R S FO R C H I LD R E N ’ S 1 0 T H A N N UA L “A FO O L ’ S F Ê T E ”

Martin Dessoffy and Lauren Pinto

Daniel Benedict and Andrew Saffir 36 QUEST

Harry and Jill Kargman

Martha Hunt

Dianne Vavra

Nicky Hilton and James Rothschild

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Julie and Billy Macklowe


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A It’s a big, young crowd of 20to 40-somethings. The women glam it up and sparkle in their designer gowns and the men are sharply turned out in black-tie. It’s a great evening, raising money to assist New York children coming out of foster care like a good parent tries to help his or her child in preparing them for college and adult life. I was down at Cipriani 42nd Street where The Paris Review was hosting its annual Spring Revel. This is a massive party with several hundreds guests, many of whom are members of the literary community: authors, agents, editors, publishers, and more of the sort. Many others are closely as-

sociated with this community because of their friendships, marriages, and their professional lives. There’s a comfort level that comes from the overall vibe of this evening. I’m sure, with this being New York, that there are other energies operating too. All characters of literature are parented by the imaginations of the writers and, as they say, the apple doesn’t fall far from… “Fool’s” or otherwise, it was another kind of fête. The Paris Review honors writers for their achievements. They honored Paula Fox, now in her 90th year, with the Hadada Award, which was presented by Zoe Heller. (Fox, incidentally, is

the grandmother of Courtney Love.) They honored J. D. Daniels with the Terry Southern Prize for “humor, wit, and sprezzatura,” which was presented by John Hodgman, and they honored Ottessa Moshfegh with the Plimpton Prize For Fiction. The tables were hosted by more than 40 writers, including John Guare, Richard Ford, Hilton Als, Toni Bentley, Wallace Shawn, Gary Shteyngart, Zadie Smith, Gay Talese, Hannah Pakula, Richard Price, Darryl Pinckney, Lewis Lapham, Deborah Eisenberg, Lorraine Adams, Claire Messud, Nathaniel Rich, James Salter, and more than a score of individuals just as

unlike them. The Paris Review, a quarterly literary magazine celebrating its 60th year, was the creation of Harold Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton, established in Paris in 1953. Its founding publisher was Sadruddin Aga Khan. The publication’s legacy, now under the editorship of Lorin Stein and publisher Antonio Weiss, continues to prosper. On a Tuesday, a beautiful day in New York, the department of psychiatry at Columbia University hosted its annual “Gray Matters At Columbia” spring benefit honoring author Andrew Solomon. The luncheon drew a packed house. Solomon, who recently

H A L E H O U S E G A L A AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Barbara Winston and David Lauren 38 QUEST

Sharon Bush

Jean Shafiroff and Christine Larsen

Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin and Michelle Heinemann

Ashley Bush, Pierce Bush and Lauren Bush Lauren

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Patricia Clarkson


      

  

     

 

       

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A AMERICAN FRIENDS OF THE LOUVRE HONORED HENRI LOYRETTE AT T H E C O N S U L AT E G E N E R A L O F F R A N C E

Tom and Janine Hill with Henri Loyrette

Elizabeth Stribling, Elizabeth Gerschel and Guy Robinson

published his latest book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, spoke (without notes) to a rapt audience for a half hour about himself, his book, and what he has learned about children who are born or who grew up in ways their parents weren’t able to anticipate. That night, I went over to the Mandarin Oriental where the National Center for Learning Disabilities was hosting its annual benefit dinner, honoring William Clay Ford, Jr., executive chairman of the Ford Motor Company, with its Distinguished Leadership Award. The organization also honored Quinn Bradlee, founder and CEO of www.friendsofquinn.com. Other honorees included three young people: Kcory Woltz (recipient of the 2013 Allegra Ford Thomas Scholar40 QUEST

Anne de la Guéronnière, Meghan Thrash and Christopher Pastor

Philippe de Montebello

ship) and Ross Chapman and Holly Schallert (recipients of the Anne Ford and Allegra Ford Thomas Scholarships). These scholarships offer financial assistance to graduating high-school seniors with documented learning disabilities who are pursuing postsecondary education or career development. The scholarship program was created in 2002 to commemorate Anne Ford’s decade of board chairmanship and her unwavering commitment to the National Center for Learning Disabilities. Four years ago, in 2009, the program was expanded through generous support by Anne’s daughter, Allegra Ford. Paula Zahn emceed and Sigourney Weaver presented the three scholarship awards. Barbara Walters presented Quinn Bradlee with his award, and Anne Ford introduced her

Edith de Montebello with Gabrielle and Rudolf Bekink

Christopher Forbes and Cynthia Friedman

cousin Bill Ford. The Fords’ relationship with the National Center for Learning Disabilities began when Anne’s daughter, Allegra, was a very small child and demonstrated serious difficulties in learning. The mother’s consultations with several doctors about the matter led to advice that she consider “institutionalizing” her child. This was never an option in the mother’s mind. Through her research for solutions, Anne met Carrie Rozelle, who had started the organization as a result of learning disabilities in her own family. All is history. Now in her 30s, Allegra married Josh Thomas a year ago this May and leads a full, independent life in New York. Something like 20 percent of the population has learning disabilities. The one that

is well documented and seems to hold many people back is dyslexia. That said, there are many other hurdles that people face. All three of the scholarship awardees spoke about the terrible problem of being “slow learners,” and yet all three, now bound for college, gave excellent speeches (of acceptance) about their beginnings and the difficulties they faced and dealt with. They recalled the bullying and taunting that children encounter among their peers. All three also mentioned the underlying secret to their success: the care, patience, and support of parents, family, friends, and teachers. This is where the differences are made. Quinn Bradlee was introduced by Barbara Walters, whom he has known all his life. He was born with a heart defect and sundry

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Angela Chen and Prince Napoleon


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A learning disability problems that seemed insurmountable to others at the time. A resolute, determined mother (journalist Sally Quinn) and father (legendary editor of the Washington Post Ben Bradlee) did everything in their power to fortify, groom, instruct, help, and care for the boy along his way to manhood. That night, he demonstrated their combined success with his interesting acceptance speech about the problems of growing up with a learning disability. Following in the footsteps of his active and industrious parents—thereby reminding me of Andrew Solomon’s

study (and experience) about the apple not falling far from the tree—Quinn, now a married man himself, told us about creating his website to share with and assist others with problems. He also announced that www.friendsofquinn.com was going to merge with the National Center for Learning Disabilities and that he himself was joining the organization to advance its causes. The following night, I went over to the Grand Ballroom of The Plaza where the American Academy in Rome was hosting a Tribute Dinner to honor Elizabeth Diller, Charles Renfro, and Ricardo Scofidio as well as Adele Chatfield-Taylor,

the president and CEO of the program who is retiring at the end of this year after 25 years of success and progress of the American Academy in Rome. She was awarded the Medal of Excellence. Mercedes Bass was dinner chairman and the black-tie affair was a great success. The ballroom was filled to capacity. Playwright John Guare (Chatfield-Taylor’s husband) was emcee, and the guest list was populated with the distinguished Fellows of the American Academy (FAAR), trustees, artists, authors, architects, attorneys, philanthropists, and cultural activists. Prestige is the word that

comes to mind. And it’s prestige that offers and affords the pursuit of Excellence. Here, the pursuit takes place in a kind of oasis, set in Rome, for those selected to join. It is the leading overseas center for independent study and advanced research in the arts and humanities. These individuals are among some of America’s most gifted artists and scholars. The academy is a haven and a heaven for these sorts of men and women, who are gifted the unique experience of living in a community that is composed of people like themselves—people in pursuit of a similar kind of excellence. X

O P P O R T U N I T Y N E T W O R K AT C I P R I A N I W A L L ST R E E T

Alina Cho 42 QUEST

Gigi Stone and Ian Woods

Trish Regan and Brian Weinstein

Soledad O’Brien

Jessica Pliska and Jason Wright

Alan Patricof

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Jack Sullivan


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CUSTOM HOME WITH POOL AND TENNIS | $4,799,000 Fabulous private compound with pool, pool house and court. Striking architectural details with great natural light, high ceilings and flexible floor plan. Web ID: 0066536 | Mary Crist | 203.618.3179

NANTUCKET STYLE LIVING | $3,900,000 Custom built home on 1.24 acres with views of LI Sound. 6 bedroom, 6½ bath residence with terraces, garden, pool/spa, greenhouse, and putting green. Web ID: 0066525 | Robin Kencel | 203.618.3148

OLD GREENWICH WATERFRONT | $3,875,000 Stunning Arts & Crafts style home boasts almost 5,000 sq ft of light-filled living space with soaring ceilings and approximately 150 ft of waterfront. With new dock. Web ID: 0066540 | Steve Archino | 203.618.3144

LOC AL EXPERTISE. EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS

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Thomas Peterffy and Elijah Duckworth

Rosita Spencer Churchill and Gail Theodoracopulos

Earle and Carol Mack

46 QUEST

Kate and Hashem Khosrovani and Susan Lloyd

Kristen and Charlie Krusen

Michael Kennedy, Susan Malloy, Eleanora Kennedy, Tim Malloy and Katherine Mondadori

Cristina de Caraman with Bill and Anna Mann

Don Burns and Greg Connors

Virginia Burke

Shirley Rosenthal

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A N N I E WAT T

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760 PARK AVENUE | Web: Q0018814 | $19,750,000

Entire 4th floor meticulously renovated, 10 room prewar co-op with 4 BR, 10’ ceilings, 2 fireplaces. Roger Erickson | 212.606.7612

225 EAST 81ST STREET | Web: Q0018828 | $7,950,000 Vacant 25’ wide townhouse ready to be transformed. Currently 5 stories, 9,375± sq ft. Fred Williams | 212.606.7737

THE MARK | Web: Q0018823 | $18,900,000 Sun-flooded 5 room tower suite situated atop the Mark Hotel. 4,788± sq ft with 859± terrace S. Boardman, 212.606.7611 | M. Bazo, 212.606.7647

830 PARK AVENUE | Web: Q0018248 | $8,500,000

170 EAST END AVENUE | Web: Q0018743 | $4,100,000

2109 BROADWAY | Web: Q0018819 | $3,153,000

Outstanding 2,200± sq ft, 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath residence with beautiful views. Margaret Cohn | 212.606.7680

Combine 3 apartments for an original “flower-line” Ansonia Hotel classic 7 layout. Colin Montgomery | 212.606.7620

Fabulous 10 room duplex on high floor in a premiere prewar Park Avenue co-op. Triple mint condition. Mary Kent | 212.606.7705

LOCAL EXPERTISE. EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS. Our agents are skilled professionals with local knowledge and a dedication to high-quality service for every client. They take great pleasure in discovering the aspects that make each home unique.

149 FRANKLIN STREET | Web: Q0018825 | $2,950,000

16 EAST 84TH STREET | Web: Q0018836 | $2,699,000

Rarely available. Sun-drenched top floor with 3 bedroom, 2 bath, home office and 15’ high skylights. Martine Capdevielle | 212.400.8702

One of the most beautiful 2 bedroom condos in a Beaux Arts elevator townhouse. Spectacular renovations. Austin Schuster | 212.606.7797

285 RSD | Web: Q0018809 | $2,600,000 Magnificent home waiting to be transformed. 3 bedrooms with dramatic Hudson River views. Christine Driscoll | 212.400.8711

180 EAST 79TH ST | Web: Q0018815 | $2,595,000 Elegant prewar “classic 6” with original details. Gracious sunken living room with fireplace, open views. Pierrette Hogan | 212.606.7767

1725 YORK AVENUE | Web: Q0018547 | $2,195,000

1060 PARK AVENUE | Web: Q0018829 | $1,400,000

Spectacular 2,300± sq ft home with open river and city views. Features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths and balcony. Phyllis Gallaway | 212.606.7678

Elegant French 4.5 room prestigious architect prewar co-op. Perfect as pied-a-terre or full time living. Barbara Anderson Terry | 212.606.7772

MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc EAST SIDE | 38 East 61St Street, New York, NY 10065 | 212.606.76601 DOWNTOWN | 379 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012 | 212.431.2440 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A S T L E C O N N O L LY â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S N AT I O N A L P H Y S I C I A N O F T H E Y E A R A W A R D S AT T H E P I E R R E

Lorena Bassas and Patrizia Salvatore

Jerry Shields, Jr., with Carol and Jerry Shields

Zina Hamati and Harry Buchanan

Karen Burke and Shelley Goldberg 48 QUEST

John Connolly, Dawn Halfaker and John K. Castle

Max Gomez and Richard Edelson

Bart Oates and Kristin Pisarcik

Jo HannaďŹ n and Russell Warren

Jim and Toni Orsini with Eric Korsten and John S. Castle

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Melanie Grossman


SUNRISE TO SUNSET OVER THE BIG BLUE MONTAUK OCEANFRONT Inspired by old world craftsmanship and a boat makers space, the interiors are brimming with authenticity. This extraordinary natural site is over 1.5 acres of Montauk’s famed Old Montauk Highway, bordered by acres of natural preserve, lending to a romantic respite. Meander down the grass walkway to pristine beach for a day of sun and fun. Truly one of a kind. Web#11409. Exclusive. Price Upon Request. Montauk Office 631.668.0500 • montauk@1TownandCountry.com

1TownandCountry.com Owned and Operated by Town & Country Real Estate of the East End LLC


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S YO U N G F E L LO W S B A L L

Andrew Jeffries, Annabel Vartanian with Caroline and Zubin Mehta

Kirby Taylor and Hardwick Caldwell

Lindsey Hess 50 QUEST

Olivia Chantecaille

Hassan Pierre and Hannah Bronfman

Lana Smith

Grace Bennett and Paulina Holmgrem

George Merck

Sloan Overstrom

Kelly Van Ingen

Clare McKeon

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Lydia Fenet and Holly Dunlap


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A J A D E J A G G E R C E L E B R AT E D H E R J E W E L R Y AT T H E H OM E O F A N N E H E A R ST MC I N E R N E Y

Ross Bleckner and Nicole Miller

Amanda Hearst, Gillian Hearst Simonds and Anne Hearst McInerney

Bryn Poulos

Vikram Chatwal

Martha and Peter Webster

Chele Chiavacci and Ann Dexter-Jones

Jade Jagger

CINEMA SOCIET Y AND MONTBLANC HOSTED A SCREENING OF TRANCE W I T H A N A F T E R - PA R T Y AT 49 7 G R E E N W I C H ST R E E T

Anja Rubik 52 QUEST

Genevieve Jones

Kathleen Turner

John Legend

Tony Danza and Peter Cincotti

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Stephanie March

Danny Boyle and Patrick Stewart


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B A L P O U D R E AT T H E F L A G L E R M U S E U M I N PA L M B E AC H W I T H M A R I N A B

Charles Ruger and Christine Schwarzman

Ricka and Kelly Hopkins with Annette Rickel and Andy Armstrong

Grace Meigher and Scott Moses

54 QUEST

Lesly Smith, Danielle Moore and Jane Told

Patrick and Allison Fischoeder with Caitlin Crowe

Jebb and Sterling McCracken with Tate and Black Casper

George and Betsy Matthews

Paul Lubetsky and Leslie Stevens

Ryan and Nicole Munder with Tracy and Matt Smith

L I L A P H OTO

Jean and Will Matthews


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Terri Coopersmith and John DeLucie

Emily Carey 56 QUEST

Patsy Tarr

Sylvester Miniter, Serena Miniter, Ross Meltzer and Gillian Miniter

Dan Brickley and Ruthie Davis

Suzie and Ainar Aijala

Bob Cochran and Eric Rudin

Sandra Ripert and Fiona Rudin

B FA NYC . CO M

Dana Blanton and Christine Aylward


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Avi Fattal, Barbara Tober and Sabrina Forsythe

Noreen Buckfire and Patti Fast

Anne Rohrbach, Friederike Biggs and Maureen Chilton

Somers Farkas and Muffie Potter Aston

Julia Weld and Jennifer Rominiecki

Courtney Szwajkowski and Diane Tierney

Gregory Long and Jeanne Jones

J I M MY C H O O S U P P O R T E D T H E N E W YO R K FO U N D AT I O N FO R T H E A R TS AT S A K S F I F T H AV E N U E

Karen Rassieur and Moises de la Renta 58 QUEST

Peter Lyden

Amber Elliott

Paul Johnson Calderon

Penny Grant

Athena Liu and Marcus Stewart

B FA NYC . CO M ( B E LO W ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E )

Elizabeth Meigher, Elizabeth Kurpis and Joey Lico


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A R I S T I T L E I N S U R A N C E AT W A L LY F I N D L A Y I N PA L M B E A C H

Lisa and Ramsey Speer

Larry Shindell and Dudley Moore

Bob Nederlander

Judy Pearson and James Borynack

Princess Maria Pia de Savoia and Annette Talpert

Beth Hardwick with Lee and Ali Hanley 60 QUEST

Howard Kessler, Bill Rollnick and Patrick Park

Maribel Alvarez and Joe Pappas

Peggy Moore and Nancy Rollnick

Pat Cook

Jim Held and Annabelle Coleman

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Sonny Castor and Judith Grubman


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC

Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

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GARRISON, NY - Sweeping Hudson River views. Watch the eagles soar above 2 acres of tiered gardens and watch from expansive deck as ships sail up the river. Charming, immaculately maintained home with beamed ceilings, walls of windows, and a cozy fireplace, offers a wonderful weekend retreat or full time residence. Many newer upgrades, minutes to Metro North, and low taxes make this property a true find. $975,000.

BEACON, NY - Grand Victorian homestead, designed by Calvert Vaux of Central Park fame, has been restored with care and respect for historic value. The home offers spacious rooms, multiple fireplaces, period details, five bedrooms, four baths. Beautiful grounds, with pool and carriage house, lend a country feel to this city location. This home is perfect for weekend, full time or has potential for charming Bed and Breakfast. $1,325,000.

PUTNAM VALLEY, NY  Glorious lakefront contemporary home on Roaring Brook Lake is impeccably appointed with a sophisticated, professionally designed interior. Sunny living room with a cathedral ceiling and stunning first floor master suite both feature west facing lake views. Two additional bedrooms provide privacy for guests or a work space at home. Tiers of decks and patios step down to a new dock on one of New York’s cleanest lakes. All less than one hour from Manhattan. $1,050,000.

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CALENDAR

MAY

On May 6, the 2013 Arthur Ross Awards for Excellence in the Classical Tradition will take place at the University Club at 7 p.m. The Institute of the Classical Architecture and Arts annual Arthur Ross Awards event is held in celebration of the classical tradition and has become a successful special occasion for friends, members, and supporters. For more information call 212.730.9646.

1

5

6

The International Center of Photography will recognize seven honorees, including David Goldblatt for Lifetime Achievement, at its annual Infinity Awards at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers. For more information, call 212.857.9705.

The Children’s Museum of the Arts will hold its spring benefit at the museum at 10 a.m. For more information, call 212.274.0986.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art will host its annual Arthur Ross Awards in celebration of the classical

FOR YOUNG ARTISTS

ADVANCING ARCHITECTURE

2

A SPRING FLING

The Kaufman Music Center Honors Gala, honoring the RussianAmerican classical pianist Vladimir Feltsman, will take place at The Pierre at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.501.3350.

CELEBRATED DESIGNS

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club will hold the 41st annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House at the Sharp Townhouse. For more information, call 212.822.8178.

A REASON TO SMILE

62 QUEST

MUSIC MATTERS

7

JDRF’s Young Leadership Committee will host its 10th annual Spring For a Cure gala at the Metropolitan Pavilion at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.478.4319.

Operation Smile will celebrate its 30th anniversary and the 200,000+ surgeries it enabled to be performed worldwide at Cipriani Wall Street at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 888.677.6453.

tradition at the University Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.730.9646.

13

ON STAGE

On May 16, the Stuart Weitzman store on Madison Avenue will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the iconic 5050 boot and give customers a first look at the Fall 2013 collection. For more information, call 212.759.1570.

Women’s Theater Project, the nation’s oldest and largest theater company dedicated to producing

CO U RTE S Y O F S T UA RT W E I T Z M A N

IN FOCUS


CALENDAR

MAY the work of women playwrights and directors, will celebrate its 35th Women of Achievement Awards at Three Sixty. For more information, call 212.228.7446.

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MAKE A STATEMENT

Stuart Weitzman will host a trunk show at its 625 Madison Avenue store from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. They will also hold shows at the Madison Avenue location on May 17–20. For more information, call 212.287.0673. FELIZ ANIVERSÁRIO

El Museo del Barrio will host its 20th anniversary gala at Cipriani 42nd Street. This spectacular event brings together luminaries from the worlds of fashion and the arts in order to raise funds for the museum. For more information, call 646.638.2479.

20

FOR A GOOD CAUSE

Freedom Institute will hold its Mona Manseel Award Gala honoring individuals and organizations that have had a significant impact on the field of substance abuse prevention at the St. Regis at 6:30 p.m.. For more information, call 914.231.6180.

23

AMERICAN LANDSCAPES

The Olana Partnership will present its Frederic Edwin Church Award to the person who through his or her vision makes extraordinary contributions to American art, culture, and historic preservation at The New York Public Library at 7 p.m. For more information, call 914.235.1490.

On May 25, the 42nd annual Figawi Race weekend, recognized as a top sailing event, will take place at the Hyannis Port Jetty starting at 8 a.m. The race, which will last the duration of the weekend, kicks off the Cape Cod and Nantucket summer season. For more information, call 508.437.0237. HAVE FAITH

The Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York will host its annual gala benefit at the Waldorf=Astoria at 6:30 p.m. The organization collaborates with parishes and non-Catholic partners to help those in need. For more information, call 212.763.8591.

25

TRIM THE JIB

The 42nd annual Figawi Race Weekend will take place at the Hyannis Port Jetty at 8 a.m. The

weekend is recognized as a top sailing event not only on the east coast but is known nationally as well as internationally. Figawi Race Weekend kicks off the Cape Cod and Nantucket summer season for its seasonal residents. For more information, call 508.437.0237.

31

HEY OLD SPORT

Family Centers will hosts its Jazz Age-themed Gatsby on the Sound benefit at Belle Haven in Greenwich, Connecticut, at 6:30 p.m. Held at a spectacular home that is located on the waterfront of Greenwich Harbor, the event will be planned by co-chairs Laurie Grauer and Brooke Ashforth—an extravaganza straight from the pages of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel. For more information, call 203.869.4848.

JUNE 1 PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

NEWPORT’S NATURE

On May 2, Operation Smile will celebrate its 30th anniversary and recognize the thousands of free surgeries it has financed for children worldwide at Cipriani Wall Street. Fore more information, call 888.677.6453.

Carol and Les Ballard will host a fund-raiser for Friends of Ballard Park under a tent on the estate of their Newport home, Edgehill, which overlooks Arthur Curtiss James’ histoic Surprise Valley Farm

at 6 p.m. For more information, call 401.619.3377.

2

TAKE A RIDE

The New York City Tour De Cure, a day full of fun and excitment to support and raise funds for the American Diabetes Association, will take place at Pier 84. There are route options for riders of all levels ranging from 5 to 100 miles. For more information, call 888.DIABETES.

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INDELIBLE IMAGES

The Gordon Parks Foundation Awards Dinner and silent auction will take place at The Plaza with co-chairs and honorees Karl Lagerfeld and Alicia Keys. For more information, call 914.579.1000.

5

PROVIDING SUPPORT

The Historic House Trust of New York City will host its annual Founders Award Dinner at Gracie Mansion at 6 p.m. The evening will raise funds for the promotion and preservation of 23 marvelous New York City-owned sites, from humble farms to grand mansions across the five boroughs. For more information, call 212.752.4840. M AY 2 0 1 3 6 3


H A R RY B E N S O N

Elsa Peretti, famed designer for Tiffany & Co., in 1984.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY ELSA PERETTI. INCOMPARABLE. Her name alone conjures up classic designs for Tiffany & Co.—Diamonds by the Yard, “Bone” cuff, “Bean” box, “Whip” belt, “Thumbprint” bowl. All unmistakably “Elsa.” John Loring, design director emeritus of Tiffany & Co., commented to me about the firm’s legendary designer: “Elsa Peretti’s unerring sense of stylishness, sensuality, and glamour has brightened the lives of Tiffany customers for 39 years. 64 QUEST

Since her debut in 1974, her Modernist, unorthodox, and refreshing viewpoint brought a new dazzle to jewelry design and had the greatest impact on fashion of any jewelry designer of the 20th century. Timeless yet timely, fashionable and at the same time above fashion, the sheer perfection of her iconic designs—the ‘Floating Heart,’ ‘Teardrop,’ and ‘Bean’ among them—continue to dazzle.” When I arrived to photograph her, she was full of fun right


away. Laughter. She made everyone in the room happy. She posed. There was nothing self-conscious about her. I knew I was dealing with a very creative person; I wanted it to carry on and not stop. Instinctively, I knew that there was no way anyone around her could be boring. She had on jeans and a white shirt. Then, she changed into an antique Japanese kimono. That was the photograph I really concentrated on, and it is the photograph you see here.

When I started to leave, she slipped off the kimono and said, “You know, you should have this.” I put it on, it fit, and I was delighted to have it. That evening, I showed it to my wife, Gigi, who snatched it off of me, and that was the end of its belonging it to me. The moral of this, I’ve learned, is: If a beautiful, talented, Italian designer gives you a kimono, don’t show it to your wife. And that’s the story. X M AY 2 0 1 3 6 5


TA K I

NATIONAL TRAGEDY, GLOBAL SCALE

This page: After the attack at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, Boylston Street was closed to the public. Here, U.S. flags decorate the barricades in a show of support for all those who were affected and their families.

I WRITE THIS during the weekend that

finally saw the end of those two dreadful Chechens who were described by many newspapers—starting with the Times, of course—as typical American teenagers. “Only some Americans” is all that comes to mind. Why is it that after every outrage family members and friends of the perpetrators are given space to air their views, especially here in the United States. I can’t remember British newspapers, or even the grotesquely lefty BBC, giving equal space to Muslims defending the terrorist attack

of 2005, nor any Spanish media allowing defenders of the 2003 outrage in Madrid to soil the airwaves with the usual blah, blah, blah about American imperialism being the real cause of terrorism. Having said that, American involvement in the Middle East, total support of Israel’s occupation of Palestinian lands, and the war against Iraq and Afghanistan are the reasons all terrorists give for blowing up innocent people minding their own business. But this is not the point of this column. As long as Uncle Sam plays

policeman to the world he will suffer the consequences. And without significant reform in international legislature, there will be terrorism at home. Incidentally, what were these Chechens doing here anyway? The family of the bombers arrived with their brood to these shores during the same year of particularly horrifying unrest over there. Did we need to give them priority over, say, Scandinavians? The immigration authorities have as much to answer for as anyone I can think of. It might not sound very


politically correct, but there is no other way of putting it. While we’re at it, we might also want to shut down radical Islamist propaganda over the Internet—the good Uncle listens in on everything so he could do that in a jiffy and to hell with the ACLU—and deport all those who have involved themselves with radical Islamic hate preachers, and presto, you will be reading about terrorism in France and Britain but not over here. (Only the nutjobs to worry about after that.) But as I said, this is not the point I’m trying to make. What I believe is that the problem behind the idiots who either blow themselves up or shoot innocents

that Al Jazeera is not used as a vehicle by Al-Qaeda and is not hostile to the United States, and is only a professionally run news channel that has won prominent U.S. journalism prizes. (Again, some prizes. The fix was on.) Al Jazeera seems to be simply a vehicle for the Sunni Qatari rulers—in cahoots with the Sunni Saudi kleptocracy—to shape the narrative of the volatile Middle East in favor of themselves. Qatar and Saudi Arabia are the two richest countries in the world and are ruled by absolute self-proclaimed monarchs. Their only fear is the Wahhabi fundamentalist clergy that turns a blind eye to their whoring, boozing, and stealing of their respective coun-

and Qataris wish to establish a Sunni corridor throughout the Middle East, cutting out the majority Shiites. Yes, dear readers, it is as simple as that. Take the case of Bahrain, where a tiny Sunni minority keeps a 90-percent Shiite majority enslaved. Obama appears to ignore this outrage because the Fifth Fleet of his navy is based in Bahrain. The Saudis send tanks and troops occasionally over a bridge that connects the tiny island to the desert when the natives get too restless. Currying favors with dictators was a no-no when Obama was running for president, but it has somehow escaped his notice now that he’s in the driver’s seat. We should take a page from the

This page, from left: Bostonians unite to recognize the tragedy, gathering together candles and emblems of the city; Boston’s legendary baseball team, the Red Sox, pay tribute at Fenway Park on Saturday, April 20th, before the first game after the attack.

in public places are our closest allies, the Saudis and the Qataris: those nice fat guys who behead women accused of adultery, execute teenagers for stealing, and, having bought most of Europe, are now busy trying to make their economic power felt over here. Their first client was none other than Al Gore, who just sold his TV network to Al Jazeera for 500 million big ones. (Don’t worry, Al. The man who stole the first election from you sold out the whole country for less to the Saudis after 9/11.) I refuse to think

tries’ wealth. In order to keep the clergy quiescent, the same guys that fly in private 747s keep buying arms from Uncle Sam, France, and Britain. They are a possible source of arms to the radical Islamists trying to overthrow one of the last secular leaders in the Middle East, Bashar al-Assad. Their wealth has ensured that the world sees Assad as the villain, and the so-called rebels as the nice guys. As I write, John Kerry is continuing Hillary Clinton’s mistake in threatening to arm the “rebels.” All this because the Saudis

book of what the Russian captain did to the Monte Carlo authorities when he gambled away his battleship’s money on a drunken night at the casino. He sent a message asking for the money to be returned or he would start firing. The money came back quicker than you can say Monaco. Uncle Sam should tell the unholy trio to stop financing terror or else. That would be the only real tribute to the victims of Boston. X For more Taki, visit takimag.com. M AY 2 0 1 3 6 7


ANUADMAEX

SECRETARIAT’S TRIPLE CROWN:

40 YEARS ON IN THE SPRING of 1973, Secretariat won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness in record times (that still stand today!) and entered the Belmont Stakes as the prohibitive favorite to become the first

Triple Crown winner in 25 years. A son of Bold Ruler and Somethingroyal, Secretariat was bred by Virginia horseman Christopher Chenery. Mr. Chenery died on January 3, 1973, and never got

to see his greatest horse’s triumphs, but Secretariat was campaigned brilliantly by his daughter, Penny Tweedy, who, during her father’s declining years, expertly managed the family’s Meadow Stable.

Secretariat breaks to the side at the start of the Belmont Stakes in 1973.


NAME The Phipps family owned Bold Ruler and—rather than charge stud fees for breeding to him preferred to breed twice and to claim one of the foals for its own breeding program. Thus, in the fall of 1969, after Somethingroyal was bred twice to Bold Ruler, Ogden Phipps and Mrs. Tweedy tossed a coin in the office of the Chairman of then New York Racing Association, Alfred Vanderbilt, Jr. Phipps won and chose to keep a weanling filly from the pair, meaning that Meadow Stable would retain the unborn foal that Somethingroyal was then carrying. The filly was called The Bride, and in the elegant formulation of sportswriter Red Smith, “She couldn’t beat a fat man running.” The colt was foaled on March 30th, 1970, at 12:10 a.m., a bright red chesnut with three white socks and a star with a narrow blaze. He was called “Secretariat.” Secretariat won the Hopeful at Saratoga, and the Eclipse Award for Two-Year-Old Champion Male Horse and began his three-year-old year with an easy win in the Bay Shore Stakes at Aqueduct. In his next race, the Wood Memorial, however, he was upset by his own stablemate, Angle Light. It was later determined that Secretariat suffered from a painful abscess in his mouth that day. The entry of Secretariat and Angle Light went off at 3–2 favorites in the Kentucky Derby the first Saturday of May. Secretariat broke last, moved up on the field in the backstretch, overtook Sham for the lead, and pulled away to win the Derby by two and a half lengths in the still record time of 1:59 4/5. Two weeks later, Secretariat won the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore, again by two and a half lengths over Sham and again in a record time of 1:53. (The Derby is run at a mile and a quarter and the Preakness at a mile and three sixteenths.) Thus, excitement was high when Secretariat came to Belmont Park on June 9th in a bid to become only the ninth Triple Crown winner, and the first in a quarter century. Only four horses dared to enter against him, and, as “The Sidewalks of New York” was played during the post parade, Secretariat was a 1–10 favorite. My brothers and I had driven my gallant but ailing father across from the South Shore for what would be

Helen “Penny” Chenery Tweedy, Secretariat’s owner, circa 2010.

his last day at Belmont Park. I can still remember the first roar that greeted “Big Red” (Secretariat and Man o’ War shared the same nickname, and in most polls are rated as the number one and two thoroughbreds ever to race) as he walked through the tunnel and pranced up the main track to warm up. Belmont Park was crammed with nearly 70,000 fans from all walks of life that day. Racing friends from around the country streamed back from the paddock and stopped to say hello as they passed my father’s box. The tension mounted, and as the starting gate sprung open another roar rose from the crowd. Secretariat and Sham set a fast early pace and opened ten lengths on the field. After six furlongs Sham began to tire and Secretariat opened a larger and larger lead. CBS Television announcer Chic Anderson yelled into his mike, “Secretariat is widening now! He’s moving like a tremendous machine!” A tremendously powerful but also beautiful machine. At the finish, Secretariat, trained by Lucien Laurin and ridden by Ron Turcotte, had won by 31 lengths in an unbelievable time for a mile and a half of 2:24, and neither record that has ever been eclipsed. The iconic photo of the always gracious Mrs. Tweedy exulting in victory with arms upraised over her head is one of the most stirring images in racing history. I have strong memories of that day.

In many ways, it was the climax of a golden era for the Sport of Kings and the interconnected network of families that maintained racing as a sport rather than a business. Today, it’s too often dominated by drugs for the innocent, but ever-courageous animals involved. I remember Secretariat’s great victory gratefully, because of my father’s bravery in getting out to Belmont Park that day to watch him run. And I am further grateful that the lunk-headed celebratory spree I went on after watching that magnificent performance didn’t result in too big of a catastrophe. After a beautiful 21st birthday dinner dance in Mount Kisco and an equally enjoyable deb party back on Long Island, I ended up taking out a Long Island Lighting Company utility pole at 4:30 a.m. after missing a turn trying to get home. Luckily, my younger brother and I escaped without much damage, and a quick visit to the emergency room repaired our scrapes. The car, however, was another story. The bad news was it belonged to my older brother, with whom I was flying off to the United Kingdom that very night. Relations were frosty for a few days, but ultimately the memory of Secretariat’s brilliant Belmont victory melted the ice, and by the time we got to The Curragh we were hoping to see yet another champion. But ones like Secretariat, 40 years ago this June, are few and far between. X M AY 2 0 1 3 7 3


CANTEENS

This page: The front dining room at Michael’s, in midtown. Opposite page: Proprietor Michael McCarty (at left) with general manager Steve Millington (at right); the restaurant’s floor plan, and whom you might spot there.

POWER LUNCH, AND THEN SOME BY DEFINITION, the power meal is meant to be just that: highpowered. Mention the power breakfast or lunch in Manhattan, and immediately images of dark, chalk-striped Italian suits, leather attachés, high-gloss interiors, and platinum credit cards are called to mind. In other words, power on full display, though over a quiet hush of discretion. In spite of “business casual” and the rise of entrepreneurial types who’d rather skype, the power meal is alive and well. Agents still meet writers, actors, and other agents; networks still court their celebrity anchors over poached eggs; and real-estate deals are still signed over mediumrare steaks. At some of the more polished meeting places of the power meal—the Four Seasons Hotel, the Four Seasons restaurant—it’s business as usual. And then there is Michael’s. Michael’s, one of the most iconic power-meal hubs par excellence (especially among the media elite), is something of the affable, approachable cousin among the sovereigns. It has 74 Q U E S T

something to do with the gregarious, good-natured namesake and proprietor, Michael McCarty, a fixture at the front door (along with general manager Steve Millington), who personally greets guests and works the room with smiles, handshakes, and a sun-kissed mien (owing, in part, to the fact that he splits his time between here and his original and ever-strong Santa Monica restaurant−cum−home base). It might also have something to do with the warm, unintimidating façade and entrance, as part of the landmark 1930s taupey-bricked Rockefeller Apartments, designed by Wallace K. Harrison and J. André Fouilhoux, with the iconic curving bays of metal sash windows (one of which houses a prime and highly coveted central table inside). Surely the high-voltage staying power of Michael’s—now more than ever—has something to do with McCarty’s on-thepulse adaptability. Earlier this year, he, along with executive chef Kyung Up Lim, introduced a new approach to the menu,

CO U RTE S Y O F M I C H A E L’ S ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


downsizing the expense account−sized plates while lowering price points. “Many people just aren’t eating traditional threecourse meals anymore,” McCarty explains. “They’re eating an assortment of appetizers, or sharing plates around the table… These new menus give our guests the maximum flexibility to customize their dining experiences at Michael’s.” Indeed, the more attractive price points and diversified selections have made Michael’s even more approachable than ever. Along with its expanding selections (the menu has jumped to 42 offerings from 18), Michael’s is witnessing the birth of an expanding dinner scene: the typical breakfast and lunch crowds, along with an influx of new dinner-time diners, are coming back for more of Michael’s by candlelight. Still on the menu are the “power” staples of old—the famous and seemingly endless Cobb salad, the Michael’s burger—but now there’s also a bevy of sides (from Bass-ale onion rings to Brussels sprouts, from spinach to spring succotash), and inventive introductions like Korean fried chicken wings, sweet-potato Japchae noodles (alongside traditional pastas), duck confit sliders, and the deliciously fried yet fluffy crispy oysters. And that’s just on one visit. Or, as a diner on a recent night put it, “The Korean steak tacos are the best thing to happen to Michael’s since Michael.” One bite of these open-faced Bulgogi hanger steak−and−avocado morsels, and it’s hard to disagree. X Michael’s: 24 West 55th St. (between 5th and 6th avenues), open Monday– Friday from 7:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. for breakfast; Monday–Friday from 12 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. for lunch; and Monday–Saturday from 5:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. for dinner (212.767.0555 or michaelsnewyork.com). Magazine editrix with Visiting European duchess

Times media reporter

Habitué who favors the back garden room

with her lady friends

Network news producer lunching with his anchor Society scribe, raconteur, and diarist In-the-know gallerist Publisher who’s been a

with mixed-media artist

regular since it opened

M AY 2 0 1 3 7 5


depends on the mood I'm in,” she explains. “I generally don't gravitate towards conservative things." One of her collections perfectly illustrates this carefree spirit, as well as her eternal love of the opera house from her childhood (of which she is now the chairman of the board). In 2008, Ann was part of the renovation of the Met's famed Swarovski crystal chandeliers and, when many of the large stones were replaced, she used the old ones in one-of-a-kind designs. That collec-

tion is now sold at the opera house, so music aficionados can hear Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen while wearing a piece of the Met's history. When picking what gems she wants to work with, Ann thinks about color first, letting herself be inspired by what stikes her while out for a morning run, or particular and unusal stones. Her pieces incorporating rough diamonds, for example. "Even if the lights weren't on, and you held those rough diamonds [cupped in your hand], you'd see that there's a sparkle in them." The same could be said for the diminuative but electric jeweler. Aside from her jewelry, Ann is also well-known for her dedication to

philanthropy. On top of major donations like last year’s $30 million to the Met, she was one of the founders of Smile Train, an organization that trains in-country doctors to provide free cleft lip and palate surgery to children around the world. After Smile Train’s successs, she has since expanded that work to include clubfoot, hole in the heart, and blindness with the organization WonderWork. “[Curing] blindness is about a 20-minute operation, and an 11-year-old sees his parents for the first time.” With a heart as big as the opal rings she favors, Ann Ziff is someone who throws herself wholeheartedly into all of her passions. She herself is a rough diamond in a polished world. X

This page, clockwise from top left: A Tamsen Z. aquamarine and gold necklace; an opal and garnet ring; a gold disc and gemstone necklace; earrings made from pearl, diamonds, and 18-ct. white gold. Opposite page: Ann Ziff, founder of Tamsen Z. (above); multi-color sapphire briolette and gold necklace (below). M AY 2 0 1 3 7 7


PROFILE

A PRINCE IN THE STORM B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D “IT WAS VERY DISAGREEABLE,” is how Prince

Michel de Bourbon-Parme describes being marched through the jungles of Vietnam, hands tied with wire, at the mercy of the Viet Minh. He and five other soldiers had parachuted into the country and were immediately captured on August 28, 1945. He was 19 years old. His incredible sangfroid is the result of leading a remarkable life. Born into a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon, a European royal house of French origin, he fled with his family from Paris to New York in 1940 to escape the German invasion. Many royal families had trouble with the Germans, often being sent to the concentration camps. At 17, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and was recruited by William J. Casey to the Office of Strategic Services, the World 78 QUEST

War II predecessor of the Central Intelligence Agency. Alongside British and French special agents, he was sent over to Nazi-occupied France as part of an elite operation called “Jedburgh.” The missions have only recently started to be declassified by the C.I.A., allowing the officers involved to speak more freely. In teams of three, the officers were tasked with sabotage, guerrilla warfare, and inspiring resistance activity. “One was the leader, the second was myself [an executive officer], and the third one was a radio operator. My leader was Major Macpherson, and Sargeant Brown was the radio operator. We are all three still alive today.” They were parachuted into France to meet the Maquis, the guerrilla French Resistance fighters. “We equipped the Maquis and organized with them.” The


This page: Michel de Bourbon-Parme in Sri Lanka, then Ceylon, in 1945 (above); Michel at Fort Benning in 1943 (below). Opposite page: Royal family picture including Nicholas II, Tzar of Russia; Christian IX, King of Denmark; and Alexandra, Queen of Great Britain (above);

CO U RTE S Y O F E D I T I O N S N I M RO D

Un Prince Dans La Tourmente by Michel de Bourbon-Parme (inset).

Jedburgh team would figure out what arms and ammunition the guerrillas needed, and arrange for an airdrop by Allied forces. “We’d give a signal to our base in England or Algeria. When we’d ask for the equipment, around, say, 12 o’clock, lunchtime, we recieved it usually during that same night by parachute.” After completing several successful missions, Macpherson and Brown were sent along to Italy to continue the operation, while Michel was asked to join the French army and go over to what was then Indochina to fight the Viet Minh. After being captured, he and his team were moved from camp to camp, sometimes by buffalo-pulled carts, sometimes by sampan, once all crammed into a small Citroën. They were given a bowl of rice a day at most for eight months. The team would repeatedly try to escape, hitting their captors over the head and running, or jumping into rivers and swimming away. But were always recaptured. Unfortunately, only Michel and one other soldier lived through the awful ordeal, many falling victim to everything from machetes to tigers. After finally escaping through the jungle on foot, they ran into Laotian soldiers, who helped them get to a French outpost. After the ceasefire agree-


PROFILE

This page: Michel at the wheel of a Ferrari GTO-250 during the 1964 Tour de France Automobile (above); participating in the 24 Hours of Le Mans (left). Opposite page: Military orders from the French

ment was negotiated between the Viet Minh and the French at the Geneva Conference, he was sent back to France. All this before turning 20. Once back in civilian life, Michel became a renowned racecar driver, racing in events like the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Tour de France Automobile. He also started a career in business, with numerous successes in contract negotion for the Shah of Iran. He was married to Princess Yolande de BroglieRevel, and they had five children. After a divorce, he remarried Princess Maria Pia of Savoy, daughter to the Prince and Princess of Piedmont. He received France’s highest military award, the Légion d’Honneur, in 1947, and was promoted to its second rank in 2010. Michel has written numerous books about his experiences with the Jedburgs and Vietnam. After the declassification of his missions, he is more free to share stories of those intrepid times. They reveal a man led by a deep sense of justice and an uwaveringly steady hand, able to march on through the worst. A man whose spirit is as noble as his lineage. X For moreinformation, contact Editions Nimrod, www.nimrod.fr.

CO U RTE S Y O F E D I T I O N S N I M RO D

government for Michel’s return after the ceasefire agreement.


A man led by a deep sense of justice and an unwaveringly steady hand, able to march on through the worst. M AY 2 0 1 3 8 1


SHOPPING

FASHION, POWER, RADIATION

CRISTIANA SHIELDS, a native of Palm Beach, continues to make a name for herself with Shields Jewelry. The company offers pieces designed with materials that are beautiful and known to empower the wearer. Here, Quest explores the exciting word of Cristiana Shields as it evolves:

Q: Tell us about Shields Jewelry... A: All of my designs are original, oneof-a-kind, made by me and based on tranquil color combinations that draw on each stone’s known energy. It’s amazing when women tell me how they really feel different after they’ve worn a piece a few times. “Shields Jewelry” is named for my father, Frank Shields, who was known in New York and Palm Beach as a largerthan-life legend. Sometimes I imagine him smoking his pipe and hanging out with his buddies outside my shop in the beautiful Paramount Courtyard. I want 82 QUEST

to honor his legacy by creating jewelry from real, genuine semiprecious stones that “shield” us and let empowerment, inspiration, love, and bliss into our lives. They heal us and make us feel beautiful, inside and out.

Tom Ford as well as brands like Gucci, Ralph Lauren, and Tiffany & Co. We started in the same place, with the same idea of creating with an unbelievable energy and authenticity that people emotionally gravitate to.

Q: Who is your customer? A: My customers are women who want to wear exotic jewelry any time of the day to any type of event. They mix and match my pieces with expensive diamonds and watches.

Q: How are you reflected in your pieces? A: I feel different things as I construct a piece. Some of my earliest memories are of color and light. I try to plan a piece’s mission before I start—a mission that I wish to see in my life: peace, joy, love, romance!

Q: What led you to start your company? A: I was born into a “couture” family, it was just how everybody dressed all the time. My father was an executive of Revlon and my mother, Didi, was a Palm Beach decorator who owned and operated Johnnie Brown’s on Worth Avenue for 15 years. I look up to people like Spencer from Island Company and

Q: What words or phrases do you feel best embody yourself and your brand? A: I would definitely say, “Life’s Eternal; Radiant; Fashion Destiny.” X For more information, call 561.602.1548, email cristiana@shieldsjewelry.com, or visit shieldsjewelry.com.

J A S O N N U T T LE P H OTO G R A P H Y

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


This page: Cristiana Shields wears her own “Quantam Leaps” necklace—styling by Shirrita (hair) and Donna Kelly (makeup). Opposite page: A selection from Shields Jewelry.


This page: Mrs. Guilford Dudley, Mrs. Bing Crosby, and Mrs. Jean Louis decorating themselves for the Swan Ball in Nashville, Tennesee, 1963. Opposite page: The writer, Trevania, with her mother, Jane Dudley.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E SWA N B A LL

N O S TA L G I A


86 QUEST

And there it is: glamour begets glamour. Private planes whisk in the impossibly elegant denizens of the international jet-set, each one thrilled to be included.

supplies an excellent anecdote or two. For instance, at one Sunday luncheon following the ball, the Swan Award recipient rose to toast my parents and express her gratitude for being the weekend’s honoree. Oscar de la Renta smiled and whispered to my mother, “Does she know you sent a plane for me?” And there it is: glamour begets glamour. Private planes whisk in the impossibly elegant denizens of the international jet-set, each one thrilled to be included in the renowned Swan Ball, each one bringing his or her own brand of excitement, each one adding to the allure of the Ball. Fifty years of magic, and my mother made it happen. X

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E SWA N B A LL

of hundreds of dedicated volunteers—mostly women—who put their lives on hold as they learn the ropes in the throes of one ball, in order to make the subsequent ball even more spectacular. But such work builds from a strong foundations, and the groundwork of the Swan Ball was incontestably laid by my mother, Jane Anderson Dudley. Her genius was to create an event so glamorous that, not only did locals clamor to attend, but people in New York, London, Palm Beach, and Paris automatically associate the event with what otherwise might be considered simply a mid-sized southern town. How did she manage? She made it truly international. A glance at the 2012 invitation reveals a committee boasting seven princesses, five countesses, and a duchess, as well as people who have long been considered American royalty. It has always been that way. She made it star-encrusted. At the 1963 inaugural ball, Hollywood designer Jean Louis mounted a fashion show, with Kathryn Crosby (wife of Bing Crosby) modeling. Cartier loaned $3 million of jewels to bedeck the models. And two tables of out-of-town guests included Mary Lou and Cornelius “Sonny” Vanderbilt Whitney, Jane and Clint Murchison, and Lupe and John Murchison. (The week of the ball, the Murchison brothers graced the cover of Time magazine.) My mother made it exclusive. While most charity balls are eager to include anyone who can purchase a ticket, money won’t get you into the Swan Ball. You have to be on the list. In fact, the ball was once offered $100,000 for two tickets. My mother says she thought about it for a long time, but in the end the answer was no. Invitations are not for sale at any price. Those traditions continue. Many of the best Swan Ball tales involve its storied guests, like the French countess who brought eight pieces of matching luggage with 17 gowns for a two-night stay—and then wore the same dress both nights. Another year, the Swan Award recipient began her acceptance speech by saying, “I understand you are a very rude audience; I’m going to see if I can make you listen.” She succeeded. Indeed, most years, subtle vying among the honored guests


N O S TA L G I A

This spread, from left: Duchesse Peggy d’Uzès and Guilford Dudley surrounded by Duc Manuel d’Uzès, Jane Dudley, and Harry Platt of Tiffany & Co., 1970; Joe Tankoos, ambassador Ahmed Benhima, Jane Dudley, Odette de Brunière Benjamin, and Guilford Dudley, 1964; Jane Dudley in the middle, flanked by her guests, including Alice Matthews.


J E W E L RY

BRINGING FORTH GREAT BRILLIANCE

KIM-EVA WEMPE is a natural who goes her own artful way

with her designs. As Wempe’s CEO, her stellar line, BY KIM, is exclusively manufactured in Wempe’s atelier located in Schwäbisch Gmuend, Germany. “The greatest compliment one can make about a piece of BY KIM jewelry is that it feels sensual to the touch,” says the multi-talented CEO and designer. The jewelry itself, which is indisputably innovative and slightly seductive, defines femininity. “It’s a perfect reflection of the modern image of womanhood,” remarks Kim-Eva. One of Kim-Eva’s latest pieces for BY KIM, the “Papillon” brooch, features two pairs of interlocked hearts that symbolize romantic togetherness. Using 18-kt. white gold with 94 brilliant-cut diamonds, “Papillon” dazzles the eye. “In many cultures the butterfly symbolizes mutability, beauty, and immortality,” explains Wempe creative director Catherine Plouchard. Plouchard and Kim-Eva bring this tradition to life by harking to the interconnecting lines in traditional Japanese calligraphy. The parallels are fascinating—there’s magic in “Papillon.” Another piece, the “Helioro” bangle bracelet, is an expression of classic modernism. As with all BY KIM jewelry, each piece is skillfully crafted, but this bracelet’s ever-sleek look expertly walks the tight rope between contemporary and classic. “Helioro’s” nine gold strands flow seamlessly into one 88 QUEST

another and the bracelet’s tapering design follows the curves of the human body. Made with 18-kt. rose gold, “Helioro” is a stunner that stands for indestructible strength and eternity. Kim-Eva has an exhilarating gift. And her choice and placement of stones is flawless. A pair of “Crown” BY KIM solitaire diamond and white gold earrings creates an entire world of light. The earrings, which capture the magic of brilliant-cut diamonds and white gold were created in a tradition of craftsmanship that goes back thousands of years. The crown setting presents the king of precious stones to its best advantage and allows its beauty to shine. As of late, blue—the color of the heavens—has been a trend at the most recent international jewelry shows. There have also been several teardrop-shaped stone cuts. And this year the Wempe brand’s ability to set trends has never been more evident. In an alluring necklace, an 8.65-kt. mint-colored Paraiba tourmaline is accented by 183 brilliant-cut diamonds and 74 ice-blue diamonds, all set in 18-kt. white gold. The piece highlights the two major design trends. But the Wempe brand’s artful eye makes it truly timeless. Wempe has 19 stores in Germany, four in Europe, one in Beijing, and one in New York, located at 700 Fifth Avenue. X To learn more, visit www.wempe.com

CO U RTE S Y O F W E M P E

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


This page, clockwise from top left: Two “Sensual Slim” BY KIM rings; the “Blu Intermezzo” BY KIM necklace; the “Papillon” BY KIM brooch; Wempe’s necklace of brilliant-cut gemstones; a Sapphire bracelet by Wempe; a pair of “Crown” BY KIM solitaire earrings. Opposite page: The “Helioro” BY KIM tapering bangle bracelet.


R E A L E S TAT E

IN GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT, the name “Brad Hvolbeck” is synonymous with realty. For decades, he’s catered to the community by representing its members as they buy and sell property—which makes him the person to comment on the ebb and flow of the market. And, he says, 2003 is an exciting year for Greenwich. “The 2013 real-estate market is, in a word, vibrant,” shares Hvolbeck. “The surge of activity experienced in December has leveled off, but the market continues to be extremely healthy. On the whole, inventory is at a record low for most price points. That, coupled with the pent-up demand, has contributed to bidding wars reminiscent of the years of the real-estate boom. I feel that this trend will continue.” While the real-estate market in Greenwich, as a whole, is on 90 QUEST

an upswing, it’s Conyers Farm that’s not to be missed. “Conyers Farm is a 1,500-acre gated community with a minimum lot size of 10 acres,” explains Hvolbeck. “Developed by Peter Brant in the mid-1980s, the estates have been designed by some of the nation’s most prestigious architects and designers, such as Allan Greenberg, Boris Baranovich, Thierry Dispont, David Easton, and Eric Smith. Conyers Farm is secure, private, and exclusive, but also has a special sense of community—with 24-hour security.” So, if you’ve been angling for that address in Greenwich, Quest can confirm: the grass really is greener there, especially in Conyers Farm. X For more information, contact Brad Hvolbeck at Prudential: Brad Hvolbeck Real Estate (123 Mason Street in Greenwich) by calling 203.661.5505 or visiting www.prubhre.com.

B E N F I N K S H A PI RO ( P O RT R A I T )

GRASS IS GREENER: GREENWICH


This page: A six-bedroom home on 14 acres in Conyers Farm in Greenwich, Connecticut, is listed for $14.5 million—elegantgreenwichgeorgian.com (above); interiors of an eight-bedroom home in Conyers Farm, which is listed for $7.95 million—conyersfarmelegance.com (below). Opposite page: On the New York side of Conyers Farm, a lakefront home listed for $17 million—conyersfarm33acres.com (above); Brad Hvolbeck (below).


Twin Gables - Old World Stone and Shingle Colonial with distinctive Cross View Farm style. Grace and symmetry combine with the most modern amenities. Incredible light, wonderful flow and ceiling height. Gracious Entrance Hall. Mahogany Library. Christopher Peacock Kitchen and Baths. Five Bedrooms. Recreation Room with Fireplace and Wet Bar. Professional Home Theater. Wine Cellar. Four serene acres with Pool. $3,295,000

Pinebrook Lake- Spectacular views overlooking the water! Four landscaped acres along quiet country lane. Sophisticated country ranch with hardwood floors, two fireplaces and great light. Beautiful Living Room. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Two fabulous terraces ideal for al fresco entertaining. Sparkling Pool. Rolling lawns down to the dock. Fish, boat or skate. $900,000

Beautiful and historic Country Farmhouse, circa 1848. Rocking chair porch with view of the Cross River Reservoir. Wonderfully scaled rooms, great light, hardwood floors, period molding, French doors and four fireplaces. Living Room with Fireplace and French doors to Wisteria-covered terrace. Five Bedrooms. Four breathtaking acres with majestic trees and level lawns. Guest Cottage. Pool and Tennis Court. $1,695,000

Fabulous Antique - Circa 1880 Farmhouse brimming with period details. Wide-plank floors, detailed millwork including built-ins and cozy rooms. Beautiful Living Room with Fireplace. Country Dining Room. Kitchen with granite and stainless. Family Room with Fireplace. Master Suite with Dressing Room. Two additional Bedrooms. Central air. Picturesque two acres with mature trees and shrubs. Antique Cow Barn. $825,000

Cozy, Country Retreat - Abutting the protected lands of the Bye Over Eight Acres- Peaceful, sleepy setting along a quiet private Preserve. Charming Country Cape with painted New Hampshire barnsiding, hardwood floors and sun-filled rooms. Front Parlor with Fireplace. Crisp Living Room. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen. Family Room. Two acres off of charming country road. Spectacular setting with gently rolling lawns, old stone walls, shed and wishing well! $575,000

(914) 234-9234

lane. Park-like setting with Pool. Impeccably maintained Country House. Skylit Living Room with vaulted ceiling and Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen with Breakfast Room. Four Bedrooms. Family Room with Fireplace. Recreation Room with Wet Bar. Heated Pole Barn ideal for workshop, studio or collector. $895,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


MAJESTIC ESTATE ON TOPPING LAKE

GEORGIAN ESTATE IN KHAKUM WOOD

$10,750,000 · Please visit: www.toppinglake.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

$9,975,000

CLASSIC MID-COUNTRY COLONIAL $5,895,000

$3,995,000 · Please visit: www.convenientoakwood.com Exclusive Agent: Bonnie Caie

ELEGANT COUNTRY RETREAT ·

MODERN PERFECTION

Please visit: www.greenwichcountryhouse.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

G R E E N W IC H

Please visit: www.khakumwoodgeorgian.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

SOPHISTICATION ON OAKWOOD LANE

· Please visit: www.classicmidcountrycolonial.com Exclusive Agent: Barbara Kelly Cioffari

$3,250,000

·

$2,950,000

F I N E

·

Please visit: www.greenwichmodernperfection.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . JIM CAMPBELL . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DIANE STEVENS . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


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$7,650,000 · Please visit: www.adamcolonial.com Exclusive Agents: Joseph Williams / Blake Delany

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G R E E N W IC H

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Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . JIM CAMPBELL . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DIANE STEVENS . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


Fiona Druckenmiller’s boutique, FD Gallery, is an artistic Upper East Side setting for the wonderous jewelry and objets d’art that she curates to form an impressive collection.

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IT SPEAKS VOLUMES to Fiona Druckenmiller’s own personal-

ity that she stocks her boutique, FD Gallery, with one-of-akind pieces. In an intimate setting at the corner of 65th and Madison, the rare and the hard-to-find are carefully curated from around the world. Fiona’s background is as unique as the collection: In the late ’80s, she was a portfolio manager for the Dreyfus Corporation, responsible for combined assets worth $400 million; she is mother to three girls and serves on multiple charity boards; she is also an ordained interfaith reverend. Certainly, someone that multi-faceted is the right person to spot extraordinary gemstones. The vintage jewelry and watches, from Cartier Panthère rings to rare Patek Phillippes, can also have wonderful provenance: an amythst necklace in one of the cases belonged to the second


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Duchess of Marlborough. FD Gallery is also the exclusive home of contemporary designers like Hemmerle and Viren Bhagat, outside their own shops. We sit down with Fiona to learn more about how she sets up her collection. LILY HOAGLAND: What propelled you to transition from being a private collector into becoming a curator? FIONA DRUCKENMILLER: Well, I still collect; I sort of do them in a parallel manner. I had always worked my whole life, but when my third child was a toddler, I left Wall Street. What really propelled me to start when I did was when my youngest daughter was going to college. So with three girls out of the house I had a lot more time, and I wanted to do something fun that was related to beauty and design. So it was a natural ďŹ t.


LH: Do you believe that your eye for what goes well together is a natural-born talent or is it something that needed to be developed and honed? FD: I think it’s definitely formed and learned as you look at things. Some people might start out with a bigger capacity for that, but looking at pieces and wearing pieces really helps you. It definitely evolved for me personally, and having relationships with designers like Hemmerle and Bhagat—from when I had collected personally for myself—proved to be helpful when starting a business, because it takes so long to build relationships and I already had them. So that was helpful. Everyone has been wonderfully supportive in terms of sharing their experiences and their knowldge, and then we have such a great team.

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LH: When considering pieces, do you look at them as they stand individually or do you consider how they fit the collection? FD: To some extent—we don’t want to have all bracelets and no earrings. If we sell something special and we don’t have anything like that, it’ll be on our wish list. We try to have a range, a rounded-out collection of different materials and designers. Right now, for instance, we are looking for more of the vintage Bulgari because we’ve sold a lot of it in the past few months. We don’t have as much as the beautiful colorful ’60s work as we’d like to have. And then if we acquire that, we’ll have something else we’re looking for.

I like to mix and match; it highlights the strength of each different period and piece.

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This page, clockwise from above: The intimate offices in the gallery create a comfortable atmosphere; Fiona Druckenmiller, owner of FD; the dramatic cases display the rare and unique jewelry in the gallery. Opposite page: A pair of pink and purple spinel ear clips, mounted in white gold and copper, by Hemmerle; a diamond and platinum â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Foliateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; necklace, by Suzanne Belperron, circa 1970.


More than jewelry cases, the store also has exotic collections of interesting pieces, like the tabletop of treasures (below), or the emerald, ruby, opal, and diamond â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brooch, by Verdura (right).


LH: Is there any particular style or time period that you can never pass up when you have the opportunity to buy it? FD: Yes, beautiful Deco pieces. We always like to have them. The best mines were really emptied first—in India the Golkonda diamond mines, and in Columbia the Muzo emerald mines—and so a lot of the old jewelry has the best stones in it. So we are constantly searching for older pieces, but I think we look for whimsical pieces; we like to have things that make people smile. Wearability is really big, of course. Still, as much as we all love animals, we can only have so many animal brooches. There are only so many clients looking for brooches. So it’s always a dance between a variety of different factors. LH: Are there any style rules, like “always remove one accessory before going out” or “never mix silver and gold,” that you think are antiquated or that you object to? FD: I don’t like any of the rules. I believe you can mix whatever you like. Quite frankly, I think the matchy-matchy look—where a woman has a complete set of matching earrings, necklace, ring, and bracelets, et cetera, that all are from a suite—I personally don’t find that appealing. It’s more interesting if you break the rules. That’s kind of my personal philosophy. With art, too—whether it’s sculpture with other forms, Asian with European, or whatever—anything really. I like to mix and match; it highlights the strengths of each different period and piece. M AY 2 0 1 3 1 0 1


This page: FD has a vast array of one-of-akind items to catch anyone’s fancy, whether hadbags, books, or timepieces. Opposite page: Natural pearl and diamond ear clips by Viren Bhagat; gold, emerald, ruby, turquoise, and ivory ‘Elephant’ bangle, by Van Cleef & Arpels, circa 1973.

People are looking for one-of-a-kind pieces, they do not want to have the same thing every other woman has.


This page: Tiffany & Co. moved to Fifth Avenue and 37th Street in 1902, relocating to 727 Fifth Avenue in 1940; the ďŹ&#x201A;agship remains at 727 Fifth Avenue today (inset, left); the Atlas clock (inset, right).


This page, clockwise from top: Composite imagery from the Tiffany & Co. archives; Louis Comfort Tiffany became design director at his father’s company; the façade at 259 Broadway; a “fan” bangle sketch; Charles Lewis Tiffany at his store; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lewis Tiffany. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The interior of the Union Square store; Franklin Roosevelt proposed to his wife, Eleanor, with a Tiffany & Co. ring; Charles Lewis Tiffany’s mansion; the cross streets at the flagship; an old design studio; an original cashier’s book; Mary Todd Lincoln was presented with Tiffany & Co. pearl pieces by her husband, Abraham Lincoln, on the occasion of his inauguration; a pink and white diamond ring.

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T I F FA NY A N D CO .

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BEST OF TIME From Asprey to Ulysse Nardin, Quest explores the latest timepieces that the well-dressed man should never be without. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

Patek Philippe ANNUAL CALENDAR CHRONOGRAPH / Patek Philippe

has been making fine watches since 1839—and the company’s passion for watch-making is peerless. There is even a Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva where many of Patek’s treasures are displayed on four levels. The brand’s latest and greatest watch, the Annual Calendar Chronograph, has a shining case made of rose gold. Its strap, alligator with square scales, is hand-stitched and has a matte black finish. The striking black dial features gold hour markers. At 6 o’clock, 60-minute and 12-hour monocounters are in place. Also worth mentioning: the sapphire-crystal case back. This Patek Philippe creation is a marvel, an instrument of precision and beauty; $79,800.


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2 3 1. Omega’s Seamaster chronometer in a red-gold case with leather strap, $18,900; 2. Longines’ Saint-Imier chronograph sports a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal, with several layers of anti-reflective coating, $4,525; 3. de Grisogono’s Instrumento No. Uno XL radiates sophisticated exuberance with a blackened gold treatment, $32,400; 4. Tiffany & Co.’s Atlas watch in 18-kt. rose gold with black dial, $17,700; 5. Wempe’s Chronometerwerke in 18-kt. yellow gold with 11 Roman numerals and inset chronomter-style seconds sub-dail at 6 o’clock and power-reserve display at 12 o’clock, $19,950.

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1 1. Montblanc’s TimeWalker, featuring a satin-finished titanium bezel and display of 24 time zones, in stainless steel with domed sapphire crystal, $5,700; 2. Vacheron Constantin’s latest version of the classic 1972 Prestige in shades of black and white, $40,000; 3. Jaeger-LeCoultre’s AMVOX5 World Chronograph, featured in Iron Man 3, with luminescent white numerals and a gridwork motif evoking the radiator grilles on Aston Martin cars, $19,900; 4. Audemars Piguet’s Royal Offshore Driver in black ceramic case, $21,800; 5. Chopard’s Superfast Power Control in steel case with black rubber strap, $12,090.

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1. Breitling’s Chronomat 41 in steel and 18-kt. rose gold with Sahara leather strap, $10,605; 2. Asprey’s Annual Grande Date watch in 18-kt. white-gold case with a white dial and alligator strap, $15,000; 3. Piaget’s Altiplano Date 40-mm. timepiece in 18-kt. white gold with black alligator strap, $26,000; 4. Ulysse Nardin’s Monaco Limited Edition in a stainless-steel case, 45.8-mm. in diameter, treated with a vulcanisation process giving it a blue rubber coating with a remarkable apperance and a truly comfortable feel, price upon request; 5. Harry Winston’s Ocean Tourbillon Big Date in 18-kt. rose-gold case, 45.6-mm. in diameter, with brown alligator leather strap, $180,200.

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Ralph Lauren SPORTING WORLD TIME / Inspired by Ralph Lauren’s own

love of travel and international exploration, the Ralph Lauren Sporting World Time watch is a must-have for any travel enthusiast. At the turn of a crown, 24 cities display the sequence of time around the globe and accompany you in journeying the world as experienced by Ralph Lauren. The large 45-mm. case has three crowns: one at 3 o’clock for time setting and winding; one at 10 o’clock to operate the city selector disk; and one at 2

o’clock for date setting and correction. The new steel case pairs wonderfully with the deep blue face and hand-stitched blue wristband; the visceral red of the baton-shaped second hand is a nice touch. With the date at 2 o’clock, a 40-hour power reserve at 10 o’clock, and world time indicators at 6 o’clock, Sporting World Time boasts the finest features. This model also introduces Breguet-shaped hands, which lend the watch a clean look. But from Ralph Lauren, you’d expect nothing less; $9,500. X M AY 2 0 1 3 1 1 5


Timeless Jewels of the 20th Century

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

MORE LIKE A piece of visual poetry than a book, The Impossible

Collection of Jewelry (Assouline 2012) has the seductive allure of a classic romance. Jewelry historian Vivienne Becker stayed up well into the night composing a preliminary list of what she thought to be the 100 most important jewels of the 20th century. “I found I had a ready-made list,” said Becker. “Over the years, [I’ve been] lucky enough to look at jewelry, particularly 20th-century jewelry, all day and every day. I tried to test and hone my own taste and judgment, pondering which 116 QUEST

was the very best of the best in each style of decade.” Her choices glow, and The Impossible Collection of Jewelry takes no time to work its magic on you. Becker begins in 1900 with two pieces by the French master jeweler Georges Fouquet. One of the jewels, a fish corsage ornament, is crafted in gold, enamel, turquoise, and mother-of-pearl. All the colors are sublime. The iridescent mother-of-pearl body of the swimming fish has wing-like fins and a tail of plique-à-jour enamel flecked with gold. It’s one of Fouquet’s most fantastical sea creatures.


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This page: Fulco di Verduraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrapped heart brooch made with platinum, gold, rubies, and diamonds. Opposite page: A Jean Schulmberger for Tiffany & Co. bird brooch made with platinum, gold, rubies, and diamonds.


With emerald drops as green and lively as the waves of the Australian coast, the bracelets came to define Fellowes’ style, which

During the Jazz Age, Van Cleef & Arpels utilized platinum, emeralds, and diamonds for two bracelets—made in 1926 and 1928 for Daisy Fellowes—that clasp together to form a necklace. With emerald drops as green and lively as the waves of the Australian coast, the bracelets came to define Fellowes’ personal style, which Cecil Beaton described as “studied simplicity.” The Impossible Collection of Jewelry also includes one of Fulco di Verdura’s most recognizable pieces, a platinum- and diamondwrapped heart made of rubies and speckled with gold. Becker informs us that “this brooch demonstrated Verdura’s celebrated wit, and his idiosyncratic take on one of the most ubiquitous but meaningful of all jewelry symbols: the gift-wrapped heart.” Originally commissioned for a Valentine’s Day gift to be given to a Palm Beach socialite in 1949, the beauty of this bedazzled heart could win anyone over. It’s just about perfect. 118 QUEST

Just as perfect as Audrey Hepburn in her black Givenchy dress during the opening scene of Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Henri Mancini’s “Moon River” delicately plays, as Audrey’s appetite is satisfied not by the croissant she nibbles on, but by gazing at the jewels inside the Tiffany & Co. window. In 1961, when the film was released, Jean Schlumberger had designed the “Bird on a Rock” brooch for Tiffany & Co. to be used in publicity shots for the movie. Audrey wore it on a necklace. The incredible bijoux in this oversized, silk-covered book are as good as they get. And so is the informative text, which touches on issues that range from the supernatural powers of the elements to how politics, fashion, and freedom reflected the jewelry women wore. The Impossible Collection of Jewelry will sastify even the most insatiable jewelry fan, with its lushious, glossy pages. Dig in. X

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Cecil Beaton described as “studied simplicity.”


This page: JAR’s “Iris brooch”; the handbound linen clamshell case that houses Vivienne Becker’s book (inset). Opposite page: A Van Cleef & Arpels manchette cuff bracelet made of platinum, emeralds, and diamonds.


This page: An Alexandre Reza ring made with platinum, sapphire, and diamonds in 1975. Opposite page: A Cartier ceremonial necklace made for Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala.


Vivienne Beckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choices glow, and The Impossible Collection of Jewelry takes no time to work its

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magic on you.

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A MID-HEEL TURNS MID-LIFE BY DANIEL CAPPELLO PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIBORNE SWANSON FRANK FOR L’ICONA

THERE ARE SOME names every stylish woman keeps close at heart and close in the closet—names so associated with certain accessories that they define them: Jackie Os (those oversized sunglasses), a Birkin (the ultimate handbag), a Lilly (the perfect pastel shift). And then there is the case of Vara, the iconic brainchild of Fiamma Ferragamo (Wanda and Salvatore Ferragamo’s eldest daughter), introduced by Salvatore Ferragamo in 1978: that round-toe, midheel shoe with the grosgrain bow and gold plaque. Though there was no Jackie, Jane, or Lilly who inspired Vara, the name has become so celebrated— and worn on the soles of so many fashionable souls—that the shoe has taken on a personality all its own. Wildly popular, unbelievably comfortable, and untryingly chic, Vara has been favored by movie stars, models, and fulltime moms alike. In 2007, Varina was introduced as the ballet-flat version. And in recognition of Vara’s 35th anniversary, Salvatore Ferragamo is launching L’Icona, an online project artThis spread: Olivia Palermo in Ferragamo’s iconic Vara shoes, which she customized herself, in the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris. Palermo is one of the style-setters featured in Ferragamo’s L’Icona, an online art project launched on May 1st, curated and photographed by Claiborne Swanson Frank: icona.ferragamo.com. M AY 2 0 1 3 1 2 3


directed by the photographer Claiborne Swanswon Frank, as a way of celebrating the house’s most recognizable shoe. For 35 years, Vara has been worn by trend-setters around the globe, so it’s only appropriate that some of today’s leading style muses should be part of the celebration. L’Icona, which launched online May 1st, features a collection of portraits by Swanson Frank of 20 of the world’s most fashionable women—including Chiara Clemente, Miroslava Duma, Olivia Palermo, and Elettra Wiedemann—each in a pair of Vara or Varina shoes that has been customized to reflect her individual personality and lifestyle. 124 QUEST

This page: Asia Baker in her Vara shoes at a private estate in Palm Beach, Florida. “I’m tall,” Baker says, “but I’ve found it so easy to wear Vara in chic ways when I’m running errands during the day—or at night.” Opposite page: Lauren Santo Domingo at home in Paris in Vara shoes.


Miroslava Duma at a private estate in Moscow wearing the red-and-nude Vara mid-heels she customized herself. “What’s iconic?” the fashion writer and arbiter asks. “We say in Russia that everything that’s genius is simple.”


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Even more cause for merriment? You don’t have to be on the International Best-Dressed List to get a made-to-order pair for yourself; visitors to the L’Icona site have the option of customizing their own Vara or Varina in different materials and playful colors, ranging from blu scuro to lava to acqua to rosso. “We wanted to ‘rediscover’ Vara in a new light by allowing women to customize it for the first time in various colors and prints,” says women’s leather goods director James Ferragamo. The endeavor also marks a first for Swanson Frank, who is known for photographing women barefoot. Her book, American Beauty, published last year, is a study of mostly barefoot women in their natural element. “When I think of Ferragamo,” she says, “I think of a brand that embodies timeless elegance—a brand that transcends generations.” She tells how inspired she was to capture each woman while “celebrating the soul of Ferragamo.” Her portraits, in turn—with their inherent spirit of chic and essence of timeless modernity—seem to be a perfect embodiment of the brand: a fit like hand in glove, or foot in Vara. X 128 QUEST

This page: Alexandra Richards on the banks of the Seine River in Paris, wearing Varina ballet flats by Salvatore Ferragamo. Opposite page: Lily Aldridge on her farm in Nashville, Tennessee, in two-tone Vara shoes of her own customization. “Whichever color you choose,” Aldridge says, “it’s always timeless, cool, and elegant. It’s ideal to wear every day, and makes any outfit look effortlessly chic.”


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The Aristocratic Artist Fulco di Verdura built an empire using a natural talent for design, impeccable materials, and the best possible clientele.

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B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

TO BE DUKE IN ITALY is to be listed among the ranks of families like the Medici and the Sforza. A position such as that has led many to embrace its benefits, content with the challenges it affords. Not so for Sicilian duke Fulco di Verdura. “He’s one of those people who didn’t really care how history treated him,” says Ward Landrigan, Chairman and CEO of Verdura, the jewelry house of Fulco’s legacy. “He wasn’t interested in money. He was interested in design.” Using his aristocratic title, natural charm, and that romantic design style, he has become one of the most recognizable names in fine jewelry today. Open any Sotheby’s catalog and there will likely be at least one of his elegantly simple and aesthetically fascinating pieces. In his early twenties, Verdura left Italy for Paris, becoming the head jeweler for Coco Chanel, for whom he created the iconic Maltese Cross cuffs (reportedly, it was part of an overhaul Coco Fulco di Verdura would keep meticulous records of his jewelry: the design, the finished product, the price, and who bought it. Here, an example of a pair of his Baroque-style shell earrings made in Italy and sold in 1943.


This page: A platinum and diamond “Leaf and Flower” bracelet from 1954 with its two orignial drawings (above); a sketch of the Verdura “Herkimer” earclip (below). Opposite page: An example of the way Verdura worked with materials, such as braiding strips of gold to create a novel bracelet. 132 QUEST

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was having done to all the jewelry she had acquired from past lovers, a list that supposedly included several other dukes.) After eight years at Chanel, Verdura was lured by his good friend Cole Porter to Hollywood, where Verdura’s exotic background and great talent created a fanbase of the boldest names in the business: Garbo, Hayworth, and Dietrich among them. With Porter and Vincent Astor as backers, he eventually set up shop on 5th Avenue in Manhattan. The society set soon joined the ranks of Verdura devotees—which now included grande dames like Babe Paley, Diana Vreeland, and Dorothy Paley Hirshon—and a legend was nurtured to life. Verdura was a prolific designer as well as a talented one. When Ward Langdrian bought the company in 1985, he discovered large garbage bags full of Verdura’s original sketches. The nearly 10,000 sketches took three years to catalog, and are now used as constant inspiration for the current designers at the Verdura house to keep the high quality of the Verdura


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intricately designed, uniquely colored engagement rings. Next year will mark the 75th anniversary for Verdura. In preparation, the house has been using the five years leading up to the anniversary to retrace Verdura’s life through their biannual catalogs: from Paris to Hollywood to New York and all points in between. Each catalog contains not just the pieces from the collection, but also interesting stories from the exciting life of a Sicilian duke who loved glamorous people as much as well-designed jewelry. X This page, clockwise from top left: A double-crescent bracelet; one of the designs used in Verdura’s line of engagement rings; an example of an emerald ring from that line, begun by Nico Landrigan; the sketch of an elephant brooch Verdura designed for Lady Metcalf; a twisted horn earclip. Opposite page: A sketch for one of Verdura’s famous “Lily of the Valley” brooches, made with pearls, diamond, green enamel, and 18-kt. gold.

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name intact. “He had a sense of humor, which a lot of jewelers don’t have,” explains Ward. “His jewelry had wit and whimsy. If he saw something he liked, he’d extrapolate it, which is what good designers do. He would take natural forms and create something beautiful using them.” The fluid lines and organic structures of his pieces made them very attractive to people who wanted their gems displayed in a new but natural way. One of the new wave of designers living up to this high standard is Ward’s own son, Nico Landrigan. A few years ago, before he proposed to his wife, he was inspired by her green eyes to use an emerald instead of the traditional diamond. The ring came out beautifully and, despite a slightly rocky proposal where the ring lay hidden under a seashell while he tried to coax his intended out to the beach, it was a huge success. After numerous requests, Verdura developed a line of


His jewelry had wit and whimsy. He would take natural forms and create something beautiful using them.


APPEARANCES

ART, PLAY, LOVE BY HILARY GEARY

This page, clockwise from left: Jessica Ross Brown and Lars Bolander at his store’s exhibition of Jessica’s paintings; John Pickett, Bruce Berry, and Alexandra Gardner; Kit and Bill Pannill with Nadine Kalachnikoff.

I AM NOT TALKING ABOUT basketball

when I say March Madness reigns in Palm Beach! Children of all ages were flying in from all over the place to stay with their families in this glamorous little town for all the Easter festivities. It was such a big treat to see the town overflowing with adorable tiny tots in strollers, 136 QUEST

little kids on bikes, teens in cars, and the hotels, clubs, and restaurants bursting with kiddie-oriented activities to entertain the families. Of course there are always the wonderful private fêtes that Palm Beach is famous for, but, at this time of year, all ages are included. Years ago, I remember taking my kids

to the Fanjul’s family parties, which were like carnivals, with all kinds of rides. They were fun for all the kids. The tradition continues this time of year, and Howard Cox had a great, big, wonderful, old-fashioned family beach party with entertainment for all age groups. Christine and Steve Schwarzman invited us all over for


a delightful Easter brunch with the most beautiful dessert display I have ever seen, topped off with an Easter egg hunt too! Tom Quick also invited a big group over for a scrumptious late lunch on Easter. Spring break was especially joyous for us as my stepdaughter Amanda married Douglas Culver at a quiet ceremony, surrounded by only immediate family, at the heavenly Pine Creek Lodge north of Palm Beach—we all wish them the very best! My other stepdaughter, Jessica Ross Brown, came to town, not only for her sister’s wedding, but also as Lars Bolander, the famed interior designer, hosted a cocktail party at his divine treasure-filled store on Dixie Highway to celebrate an exhibition of Jessie’s beautiful oil paintings and terrific portraits. A big group turned up to applaud Jessie includ-

and Jack Geary, Alexandra Gardner with fiancé Bruce Berry, Tommy Quick, Carol Rohrig and Bill Finneran, Lucy Musso, Enno Ercklentz, Hillie Mahoney, Phil Geier, Susan Warner, Gigi Benson, Susan Llyod, David Ober, Kit and Bill Pannill, Robin and John Pickett, KC and Johnny Pickett, Sharon Sondes, Susan Malloy, Kate Pickett, Kathy Zuckerman, Julie Lund, and lots more. Of course, there are always wonderful dinner parties here and a highlight was Quest’s own Grace and Chris Meigher, who toasted Sunny Marlborough (aka Duke) at their very chic abode. After sipping icy cocktails by the candlelit pool, we dined in the snappy green–lacquered dining room. On the table were centerpieces of luscious spring bulbs flanked by delicious big chocolate bunnies, which

Ertegun–decorated beach house of the Slim Aarons’ book cover fame. They’re back! Yup, spring is here, Easter break is over, and everyone was back in NYC, having fun at the festive Lenox Hill Neighborhood House benefit at Cipriani’s honoring Caroline and Tom Dean. What could be better than catching up with pals at over 40 tables imaginatively and attractively decorated by different designers? This surefire formula guaranteed a successful evening for a terrific cause. Thank heavens we could dance away after having gobbled up that delicious Cipriani fare. Amongst the guests were Mayme and Monty Hackett, Elizabeth Pyne, Gigi and Avy Mortimer, Clelia and Tom Zacharias, Serena Boardman and John Theodoracopulos, Stewart Manger, Marshall Heyman, Tory

This page, from left: Roman and Helena Martinez; Mila Mulroney and Cynthia Boardman toasting the Duke of Marlborough at the Meighers’s

LU C I E N C A P E H E A RT

CO U RTE S Y O F H I L A RY G E A RY;

Palm Beach house (above); Hilary Geary with Bill and Donna Acquavella (below); Amanda Ross and Douglas Culver at their wedding.

ing Lars’s wife, Nadine Kalachnikoff, Donna and Bill Acquavella, Muffy and Don Miller, John Mashek, Mandy Ourisman, Grace and Chris Meigher, Mai Harrison, Ken Karakul, Suzanne and Bill McDonough, Candy and Bill Hamm, Barbara and Randy Smith, Helena and Roman Martinez, Howard Cox, Dolly

some of the guests could not resist—so bye, bye centerpieces! Amongst the group were former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and his wife Mila, Kate Ford, Wilbur Ross, Pauline Pitt and Jerry Seag, Lesly Smith, former mayor of Palm Beach Tom Quick, Cynthia Boardman, who is now en residence in her Mica

Burch, Christy Ferer, Ashley McDermott, Jill Roosevelt, Vera Wang, Arthur Becker, Mark Gilbertson, Dennis Basso, Sydney and Stanley Shuman, Dana Hammond and Dr. Patrick Stuebgen, Alexia and Bayard Ryan, Jacky and Rod Drake, board chair Diana Quasha and president Tom Edelman, and more! X M AY 2 0 1 3 1 3 7


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST If youth is wasted on the young, our columnist doesn’t know—from black-tie to black-tie, she coquetted her way around the city to toast causes such as the Frick Collection, Save Venice, and New Yorkers for Children. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Andrew Saffir, Olivia Palermo, Daniel Benedict, and Johannes Huebl, being photographed at the Mandarin Oriental.


ANA Claire Distenfeld and Zani Gugelmann at the New Yorkers for Children event, presented by Valentino.

Coralie Charriol and Dennis Paul on the dance floor at the Mandarin Oriental.

Harry Brant boogied to music by D-Nice at the New Yorkers for Children event.

Olga Sorokina at A Fool’s Fête, which

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benefited youth in foster care, on April 9.

On April 9, Olivia Sandelman repeated an outfit—a Pucci

Oh Land and Annie Georgia Greenberg at

outfit—which was A-OK with everyone at A Fool’s Fête!

a David Stark-decorated table.

“TO ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS, two things are needed: a plan, and not quite enough time,” said Leonard Bernstein. And with that, I present my comings and goings of the month—there was a plan, and there wasn’t quite enough time... On March 28, the East Side House Settlement hosted its preview of the New York International Auto Show at the Jacob K. Javitz Center. I “dragged” Miles Rutter, who bounced around from Audi to McLaren to Rolls-Royce. Also doing that was 14year-old Nolan Gould, aka Luke Dunphy from Modern Family. The Jeep-sponsored event welcomed guests such as John and Karen Klopp, Neill MacCallum, John Munson, and Peter Smith—as well as Waka Flocka Flame! The event felt sort of

like his lyrics in “Scream and Shout (Remix)” by Britney Spears and Will.I.Am: “It’s Waka Flame, you know my style; This little chain like 40 thou; All eyes on me, thugged out.” So, yeah. On April 2, the Cinema Society and Montblanc hosted a screening of Danny Boyle’s Trance, starring Vincent Cassel, Rosario Dawson, and James McAvoy. A film about hypnotism with a side of nudity—what a formula. The after-party took place at a penthouse apartment at 497 Greenwich Street, which is being sold for $14 million by Jonathan Carroll. There, guests explored the multiple floors over Grey Goose cocktails: a mix of Emerson Barth, David Lipke, Cindy Sherman, Chrissy Teigen, and Emma Watson. Oh, and the girls from M AY 2 0 1 3 1 3 9


Girls: Jemima Kirke and Zosia Mamet. The artwork at the apartment reflected the theme of the film, with one of the pieces reading: “The psychiatrist told her it was a problem with cognition, wrong thinking. He recommended cognition therapy, a hundred dollars an hour, more or less. She imagined her brain, round and knotty, coursed with rivulets as pictured in encylopedias. It only looks that way, the psychiatrist said, it actually works much like slate.” Ready, set, Instagram! On the 4th, Paige Corbin and Alexandra Segalas hosted a pregame at Bemelmans Bar at The Carlyle. After a selfie in the bathroom—I was draped in a green “gypsy” gown from Veronica Beard by Veronica Miele Beard and Veronica Swanson Beard, so there was no stopping me—Alex Travers and I skipped over to the Frick Collection for the Young Fellows Ball. The theme was “Dance of Time,” as inspired by

A Ferrari parked outside of The Pierre on April 5.

Save Venice’s Un Ballo in Maschera.

the exhibition in the Portico Gallery, “Precision and Splendor: Clocks and Watches at the Frick Collection.” Of course, the chairs (Genevieve Bahrenburg, Olivia Chantecaille, Lydia Fenet, Clare McKeon, Sloan Overstrom, Joann Pailey, and Rickie De Sole Webster) looked “timeless” in dramatic looks by Donna Karan, the sponsor of the event. And Martin Ambrose, Sebastian Bland, Milena Duke, Julia Loomis, and Abigail Stone wove throughout the mansion as Hannah Bronfman deejayed in the Music Room. At midnight, some apple crumble for the road and I was off, via Uber... On the 5th, Save Venice, an organization devoted to preserving the heritage of Venice, Italy, hosted Un Ballo in Maschera. Though I was mask-less (and backless, dressed in a confection by Lela Rose), I joined Hayley Bloomingdale, Claire CourtinClarins, Stavros Niarchos, Alexandra Lind Rose, and Luigi

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Jessica Hart and Ashley Hart dressed up for


Christian Lawless and Annelise Peterson together at the Save Venice event at The Pierre on April 5.

Nick Hunt and Liam McMullan, both from Patrick McMullan, partied on April 5.

Natalie Obradovich dressed to the nines for Un Ballo in Maschera at April 5.

Anya Rubik, Sasha Knezevic, Breanna Sabo, and Ronnie Madra at the screening of Trance.

Lauren Santo Domingo (the young and the best-dressed list?) and Prabal Gurung at The Pierre on April 5.

Janice Alita and Olivier Theyskens at a Cinema Society event at 497 Greenwich Street.

Evan Hainey helped to deliver Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza to Rosario

Edward Barsamian and Dalia Oberlander in

Dawson at the after-party of Trance on April 2.

black and white for the Save Venice event. M AY 2 0 1 3 1 4 1


Tadini at The Pierre. Outside, a blue 1960s 275 GT-B Ferrari and a yellow 1972 Dino Ferrari; inside, a black-and-white event. Spotted: Leah Bourne in Marchesa, Sam Dangremond in a green “Augusta Chronicle’s Masters Tournament” jacket, and Greg Cohen in a salt-and-pepper wig stolen from Liam McMullan. Also, Jonah Tulis swooning over Jennifer Wright and Megan Zilis as belle of the ball. On the 9th, New Yorkers for Children hosted A Fool’s Fête to benefit youth in foster care at the Mandarin Oriental. Guests included Erin Heatherton, Nicky Hilton, Harley Viera New-

Alexandra Segalas, Betsey Maloney, and Brad Corbin pregamed at Bemelmans Bar at The Carlyle.

ton, Euan and Lucy Sykes Rellie, Hilary Rhoda, and Atlanta de Cadanet Taylor—many of whom wore Valentino. (Valentino presented the event, echoing its sponsoring of the inauguration of the event in 2003.) I wore Salvatore Ferragamo (#nonhumblebrag) because dresses with silky trains are the best dresses. After a dinner of wine and more wine, it was a twirl around the room with Ted Gushue and Lauren Powell and then this Cinderella put herself to bed... Phew! What a month. Not to quote another rapper, but: On to the next one, on to the next one. X

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Katherine Dwyer, Paige Corbin,


Alexandra Wagle, Max Sinsteden, and Alexandra Porter at the Young Fellows Ball at the Frick Collection.

Hannah Bronfman, between Lizzie Edelman

Catherine Dewey and Matt Douglas

and Daisy Johnson, deejayed at the “Dance

stepped out together on April 4.

of Time” at the Frick Collection.

Lacary Sharpe, Ashley Passik, Rebecca Regan,

John Munson, and Elizabeth Bishop at an

and Oliver Schulze at the Frick Collection.

East Side Settlement House event.

Kelly Van Ingen, Susannah Vasu, and Genevieve Bahrenburg (in Donna Karan) at the Frick Collection on April 4.

Christopher Wolf and Caroline Ellis at a preview of the New York International Auto Show.

Georgina Schaeffer with Emerson Bowyer, Nat Silver,

Chloe Malle and Heidi Rosenau wore chic

and Alexis Light—who work at the Frick Collection.

sheath dresses to the Young Fellows Ball. M AY 2 0 1 3 1 4 3


SNAPSHOT

This page: Debra Paget, circa 1955, sitting in her Los Angeles driveway (left); Debra showing off her strawberry-pink Cadillac, covered in rhinestones (inset); Paget’s love affair with jewels was not limited to cars.

ROADS PAVED WITH RHINESTONES BEST REMEMBERED AS Lilia the water girl in Cecil B. DeMille’s epic, The Ten Commandments, Debra Paget knew how to draw the public’s eye. A stunning natural beauty, she began her acting career at the age of eight, and signed a contract with with 20th Century-Fox before her sixteenth birthday. She received almost as much fan mail at the height of her stardom as fellow actresses Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable. Elvis Presley enthusiasts know her as the King’s first leading lady in 144 QUEST

his 1956 debut film, Love Me Tender. She was a woman who was accustomed to attention, and who reveled in it. A brilliant example of her love affair with the limelight comes from May, 1956. For the previous two years, she had been driving around the studio lot in a pale orchid Cadillac (which, one morning, attracted the attention of actor Dan Dailey, who responded with a wolf-whistle for both the car and the girl). That May, Debra repainted her beloved car a bright strawberry-pink and covered it

with rhinestones, thus ensuring that nobody would ever be able miss her as she drove by. She would spend entire days washing and polishing the stones to make sure they sparkled in the sun. Reportedly, she carried around a bucketful of rhinestone jewels in the back of the Cadillac to replace the ones fans would pick off as souvenirs. Yet she was far from annoyed at needing to continuously refurbish the car with new gems. After all, according to Debra, “a jewel lost off the Cadillac is a fan gained.” —Lily Hoagland


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The Jewelry Issue

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