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$5.00 MAY 2012

E Q U EE N ’S CR O W N JE W EL S

THE JEWELRY ISSUE

JEWELRY DESIGNER LISA SALZER

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108

104

CONTENTS

110

THE J EWELRY I SSUE 92

SPRING JEWELS TAKE BLOOM

124

When Lisa Salzer, the stylish force behind the hit

jewelry line Lulu Frost, heads to the famed Renny & Reed floral shop on Park Avenue, the result is one fruitful bloom. PHOTOGRAPHED BY

104

PRODUCED AND STYLED BY

MIMI RITZEN C RAWFORD

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

FabergĂŠ, a favorite of collectors like J.P. Morgan, Consuelo

Vanderbilt, and Henry Walters, opens on Madison Avenue.

108

DANIEL CAPPELLO,

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

BY

GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

In celebration of the Diamond Jubilee, a catalog of the Crown

Jewels as worn by the British monarchy throughout history. BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

114

PORTRAITS IN MINIATURE

When portraiture turned pocket-sized in the 16th century,

the framed likeness of a loved one was always on hand. BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

118

A GRACE FOR ALL AGES Montblanc's latest collection of fine jewelry, timepieces, and writing instruments pays homage to Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco.

124

MOMENTS IN TIME

130

SPARKLE AND SHINE

Our annual guide to the greatest new watches.

BY

STEFAN DOYNO

"Magnificent Jewels" at Sotheby's. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

114


78

CONTENTS 68

C OLUMNS 18

SOCIAL DIARY

60

SOCIAL CALENDAR

64

HARRY BENSON

Traveling with HRH Queen Elizabeth II on a tour of the West Indies in 1966.

66

OBSERVATIONS

Remembering the greats: Fitzgerald and Hemingway. BY TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

68

FRESH FINDS

72

CANTEENS

74

CORINTHUS

78

FASHION

134

APPEARANCES

136

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR

138

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

Chronicles of the social scene in and about Manhattan.

BY

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

Our monthly guide to the best benefits, balls, and charity happenings in town.

Picks for Mother's Day, and beyond. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Alison Price Becker returns to the dining scene, on 18th Street. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO Our columnist recalls Queen Elizabeth II's personal invitation to the Reagans.

J.Crew opens a second dedicated men's store in Tribeca, the Ludlow Shop. Our society editor bids a farewell to Palm Beach for the season.

BY

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

HILARY GEARY

A pièce d'occasion for American Ballet Theatre's Spring Gala. BY KAREN KLOPP Our intrepid nightlife reporter makes the stops.

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

A history of birthstones, with pieces from Asprey and Tiffany & Co. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

GEORGINA SCHAEFFER FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO A S S O C I AT E A R T D I R EC TO R

VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

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EDITOR’S LETTER From left: Lisa Salzer, designer for Lulu Frost; Queen Elizabeth II, photographed by Harry Benson, 1966; when Lisa Salzer found a box of old Plaza door numbers in an antique store, she created her Plaza collection, which put Lulu Frost on the map.

WHEN WE BEGAN planning this Jewelry Issue, I kept circling-

back to one idea—The Queen of England. Who has a better collection of jewelry than HRH herself? And since this year is her Diamond Jubilee, what better time could there be to profile the Queen and her extraordinary crown jewels? To this end, you will find several stories celebrating Queen Elizabeth II this issue. Corinthus reviews Sally Bedell Smith’s new book, Elizabeth the Queen. Later in the issue, there is a profile of the new book The Crown Jewels. And we cover two current exhibitions curated by the Royal Collection that celebrate the jubilee this June. But the most notable image of Queen Elizabeth II is contributed by Harry Benson. Our beloved columnist has photographed Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II on numerous occasions throughout his career. Most recently, he photographed her in 2010—when he was in London on the occasion of being knighted a CBE by Her Majesty. But Queen Elizabeth II is not the only HRH to be featured this issue. From the beautiful portrait jewelry favored by the ancient courts of the Medicis and Romanovs, to the current collection of Montblanc that was inspired by Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco, royals rule this issue. I can’t claim that the jewelry profiled in this issue is particularly attainable—quite a few of the pieces in Lizzie Brown’s article on Sotheby’s most recent jewelry auction sold for above their estimates and the one-of-a-kind items coming to Madison Avenue at the new Fabergé store later this month are beyond bespoke—but they are spectacular, even if just to look at. Finally, there is our photo shoot produced by Daniel Cappello and photographed by Mimi Ritzen Crawford. Daniel, who has attended and written on flower boot camp, found his inspiration at Renny & Reed’s famed flower and event shop on Park 16 QUEST

Avenue. His selection of clothes from Carolina Herrera and Ralph Lauren coupled with his editorial jewelry choices from the houses of Asprey, Fabergé, Harry Winston, Marina B, Roberto Coin, Wempe, and more are beyond reproach. But it’s our model, Lisa Salzer, whom I adore seeing in our pages. I first met Lisa at a market appointment in a tiny restaurant in the West Village. It was before her profile in Vogue, and before her collaboration with J.Crew. I had just started full-time at Quest as the market editor. Lisa was showing one of her first Lulu Frost collections alongside a belt designer, Catherine Rappetti. I remember it like it was yesterday—I can still remember being impressed with her poise, her inspirations and ideas, her modern approach to a vintage aesthetic—and I would say the same today. On set for this shoot, we were standing face-to-face—I think I was styling something for her—when she rather suddenly said, “I love watching you work.” I was so immersed in what I was doing, it caught me by surprise. But I’d like to return the compliment because it’s Lisa’s work I’ve loved watching over the last eight years and something I imagine will continue for years to come. u

Georgina Schaeffer ON THE COVER: Lisa Salzer, founder of Lulu Frost, in “Spring Jewels Take Bloom,” produced by Daniel Cappello and photographed by Mimi Ritzen Crawford. Lisa wears earrings by Wempe, a necklace by Asprey, a bracelet by Harry Winston, and a dress by Veronica Beard.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY ACTORS AND AUTHORS and writers and such… T.S. Eliot wrote that April is the cruelest month. Maybe, maybe not—but in New York in the worlds of philanthropy and social life, this past April was definitely the busiest month so far this year. Writers. There was the

Paris Review’s annual Spring Revel, a big, special writers’ party held in the gargantuan Cipriani 42nd Street with all those writers and editors and publishers and agents and fans, all wining and dining en masse. All ages, all types, from the business suits and the Marian-the-Librarian editors

to the hipsters, the social lions, and the lawyers and their girlfriends, boyfriends, and spouses of every stripe. Many friends and familiar faces. Many prominent authors who would miss anything but this. It’s a fund-raiser and this year they raised a record amount— whatever that is, I don’t know.

A band called the Slavic Soul Society from somewhere out in Dixieland played with an Oom-Pah-Pah and horns. Very good background music for hundreds of talkers imbibing and glad to be there. Cocktails started at 7 p.m. and ended at about 8:30 p.m., when everyone was finally at his or

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Candace and Rick Beinecke with Daniel Cappello

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A her table, if not sitting. The Paris Review was founded in Paris in 1953 by Tom Guinzburg, Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton. Mr. Matthiessen was there last night taking it all in, enjoying the camaraderie. William Styron wrote the letter to the reader in the front of the first edition, explaining their mission: “The Paris Review hopes to emphasize creative work—fiction and poetry—not to the exclusion of criticism, but with the aim in mind of merely removing criticism from the dominating place it holds in most literary magazines and putting it pretty much where it belongs, i.e., somewhere near the back of the book. I think The Paris Review should welcome these

people into its pages: the good writers and good poets, the non-drumbeaters and non-axe-grinders. So long as they’re good.” (Rose Styron was present at the Spring Revel also.) They presented the Plimpton Prize for Fiction ($10,000) to Amie Barrodale—Mona Simpson (first published in The Paris Review) presented. The Terry Southern Prize for Humor ($5000) was awarded to Adam Wilson, presented in absentia by David Cross, who recorded himself on his wife’s iPhone that was held up to the mic and played for the audience. It was very funny, all about how he didn’t think humorous books were funny and whatnot. Mr. Wilson then accepted the award acknowledging the

shortcomings of his work and himself, evoking more laughter. Chris Hughes, the new editor of The New Republic toasted Robert Silvers, the cofounder of the New York Review of Books (with the late Barbara Epstein). Mr. Silvers was then presented with the Hadada Award which is given annually to a “distinguished member of the writing community who has made a strong and unique contribution to literature.” A Hadada, incidentally, is a large bird found in South Africa which, according to Plimpton, has a “distinctively loud and recognizable haahaa-haa-de-dah that is often heard when the birds are flying or are startled, hence the name.” I think he came

up with it for this award. Coincidentally, Liz Smith had a column that week about the new Lillian Hellman biography entitled “A Difficult Woman.” It reminded me of meeting Hellman when I lived in Los Angeles and, although I was never in her company more than two or three times, it was entirely memorable. The first time was a Sunday when Lady Sarah Churchill invited me to join her at a brunch that Marti Stevens was having at her house in the Palisades. The lure for me was that Hellman would be there. Lillian Hellman by then, about 1981, was in her late 70s and something of a legend as well as a bestselling author, if not too nettlesome as she was viewed by some people (namely fellow authors). I had

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L U N C H EO N FO R T H E C E N T E R FO R C R E AT I V E E D U C AT I O N I N PA L M B E AC H

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read her books and had seen a couple of her plays when they were made into films. She was her own woman and she was good. Her face was famous by then, as she was a frequent guest on T.V. shows. There were about 10 guests including Anthony Andrews, who had recently become famous in the PBS production of Brideshead Revisited. First meeting Lillian was uneventful. I don’t recall much conversation with her personally, but it was a small group and everyone was chatting with everyone. Brunch was improvised after the guests had arrived. Lillian, whose eyesight was failing, volunteered to do the scrambled eggs, claiming that she was very good at it. No 22 QUEST

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one would argue with her although Marti and Sarah were concerned about her ability to see what she was doing. She also smoked a lot. Frequently. Almost all the time. Like those photos of people in the 30s and 40s and 50s, she often had a cigarette in her hand. And in those days, her cigarette of choice was often rolled with marijuana. No one seemed surprised or taken aback by it, but then she was Lillian Hellman—older than the rest of us and clearly didn’t care what anybody thought anyway. Nevertheless, at the stove over the frying pan in front of her with the eggs scrambling, she was occasionally mistaking garnishes for the eggs that Sarah had chopped up and put

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on the side of the stove for an ashtray. This caused a greater alertness over her movements although no one said anything (and those who were watching got a good laugh out of it). The meal was great with everyone around the table on this particular bright sunny Sunday noontime. The second time I saw Lillian was at a dinner party Lady Sarah gave one Saturday night at her house in Beverly Hills. Lillian came with her great friend, the writer Peter Feibleman (who later published a memoir about her, Lilly). She quickly settled comfortably into one of Sarah’s bergères, pulled out a joint, lit up, and conversation flowed. I loved talking to her because she had no airs about

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her, was very responsive to any question, and had well defined and authoritative opinions on subjects that interested her. She also had an obvious fondness for tweaking the conventional. It happened that that night at a theater in Florida was also the pre-Broadway opening night of Elizabeth Taylor’s first stage appearance in a revival of Hellman’s The Little Foxes. As we were finishing the first course, Sarah’s butler informed Miss Hellman that she had a phone call from the producer in Florida with his report of the performance. This was an exciting moment at the table. Lillian came back and told everyone that Taylor was a big hit (surprise, surprise), and she

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A was very pleased. She pulled out another joint out of her pack (they had all been prerolled for her) and lit up. In those days, 30 years ago, people still smoked cigarettes at the dinner table even at dinner parties. Usually they waited until a course was finished, or the dinner was finished, but there were those who couldn’t and didn’t wait. Lillian Hellman was one of them. She never seemed to be “high” or out of character, and she wasn’t one to deeply inhale as if it indicate that she was having a toke. She claimed that she smoked marijuana because it was helpful with her glaucoma. She was a very serious woman in her natural

demeanor and it would never occur to anybody to dare to question her explanation. Dinner conversation eventually came around to politics. People could still discuss politics in a nonpartisan way in those days, and Ronald Reagan had recently been inaugurated president. Among the guests were wellknown Reagan friends and supporters such as the Alfred Bloomingdale and the Armand Deutsches. At the point where the subject was active, Lillian, who up until then had kept her opinion to herself, put out her cigarette and said to nobody in particular: “It doesn’t matter, the whole world will be communist in 50 years.”

Lillian Hellman’s relationship to communism was a major bugaboo during the Cold War witch hunts of the 1950s. But you got the feeling when she put that out on the table which was occupied by several people with close ties to the British and American governments, that she was being not provocative so much as maybe “bratty.” Tweak, tweak. She knew what she thought and wasn’t perturbed by it, but knew it could annoy others. Whether or not it did that night, everyone refrained from contradicting her. She was treated respectfully, or discreetly ignored. Despite her potentially dogmatic way of thinking,

she was an entirely charming woman to share company with. She was friendly, smart and hip, and loved a good laugh. She treated everyone, including her much younger dinner partners, like friends. She was self-assured the way you would expect a distinguished, accomplished artist of a certain age to be. I mentioned this story to Peter Rogers vis-à-vis Liz’s review of the new biography. He reminded me that he’d used her in one of his “What Becomes A Legend Most” Blackgama ads and how it came about last minute. Ginger Rogers was to be the subject. The shoot was set up with photographer

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John and Edie Taylor with Tom Quick 24 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PA L M B E AC H D AY AC A D E MY ’ S D I N N E R D A N C E AT T H E B R E A K E R S

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Bill King and makeup artist Way Bandy, but Ginger never showed up. Peter didn’t want to cancel because he had already contracted the expensive talent for it. He called Rogers’ cousin, Phyllis Cerf Wagner, asking if she knew how to get in touch with her, or where she was. Wagner said that Ginger was always undependable about these things. She had no solution. Peter then called his friend Claudette Colbert who had done the ad long before. Did she have any ideas? She said she was having lunch that day with Lillian Hellman and could ask her if she’d be interested. Yes, Peter replied, but it had to be immediately. So when Colbert met Hellman for lunch she asked. A car would pick her up and deliver her, all she had to do was be made up and wear the coat. In exchange, she would be given the coat. 26 QUEST

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Hellman jumped at it. Colbert called Rogers and said, “I’ve got your next Legend!” After lunch, the car picked up Lillian Hellman and took her over to the studio where she demonstrated “What Becomes a Legend Most” to everyone’s satisfaction. More writers, more legends. Last month, I finished another book Liz recommended: Dropped Names: A Memoir by Frank Langella. This, too, is a great read and full of interesting characters, most of whom you would know about. But it was not like Frank Langella knew them. The book opens with a very short chapter on “meeting” Marilyn Monroe and ends with bidding Bunny Mellon goodbye (figuratively speaking in both cases). Like the first, the final piece is quietly, gently touching. As the author moves on into his life, you see that he came

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Michael and Suzanne Ainslie

to know a wide variety of individuals in the theater and film worlds and in society. You will come to know them a bit too. You will laugh, you will ponder, laugh some more and move on—it moves quickly— to explore his experiences. At a very young age, when he was first in summer stock on Cape Cod, he came to know Bunny Mellon through her daughter Eliza Lloyd who was about his age and worked in the stock company with him. Through her he came to know Mr. Mellon as well and through them he met many other famous and/or otherwise interesting people. The final chapter in the book is about Mrs. Mellon. She was not famous or as famous as many others in the cast of characters at the time. Of course, she wasn’t unknown because Americans were aware of her friendship with Jackie Kennedy and

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Sue and James Patterson

her decoration of the White House which included the creation of the Rose Garden. In more recent years we’ve written about her because of other close friendships that she’s had. Now, she is also remarkable for her great age. In August, she’ll be 104. Her fabulous lifestyle (I won’t say lavish, although abundance is a big part of it) and her highly refined and simply elegant aesthetic reaches well into her relationships with those she loves and cares for. Langella describes some of it very effectively in his book. All of the people who first entered his life through meeting Bunny Mellon have left us, including her husband, Jackie Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Noel Coward, Adele Astaire and several others. Mrs. Mellon is actually the only one portrayed in the book who is still living. Tragically,

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her daughter Eliza was hit by a car in Greenwich Village 12 years ago and remained in a coma for several years before dying. Nevertheless, she remains stalwart, perhaps not an innocent, but exceptionally kind to others. Langella’s relationship with Mrs. Mellon continued over the years and his memories of her included a conversation they had when he was a very young man and anticipating his career as an actor. He asked Mrs. Mellon, “What should I do when I meet a famous person?” Her response: “Oh Frank, don’t think too much about famous people. They already think too much about themselves.” Charity doesn’t always 28 QUEST

Louis and Alexandra Lind Rose

begin at home. During the second week of the month, New Yorkers for Children held their annual Spring Dance at the Mandarin Oriental. This is a great charity and also one of the great events of the season, especially for the younger crowd. It’s also a major fashion evening, as the young women dress to kill. And they knock ’em dead! It’s also a dance in addition to being as a fund-raiser with an awards ceremony. Everyone has a good time and they dance the night away. New Yorkers For Children was founded in 1996 by former Commissioner of the Administration for Children’s Services Nicholas Scoppetta as the non-profit partner to Children’s Services. Susan

Laura Blobel

Luigi Tadini

Burden, who is also actively involved in the Carter Burden Center for the Aging, is vice president and Commissioner Scoppetta is president. New Yorkers For Children focuses on assisting on young people leaving foster care and attending college. The funds raised go to college scholarships, tutoring programs, job training, and network opportunities as well as purchasing computers and other supplies for those attending college. The idea is simple: make a difference in a life by giving these kids a boost as they go out into the world on their own. Mr. Scoppetta knows about this: he was one of those kids. Susan Magazine, who is the executive director, was

Mary Navab

Blair Husain

telling me that only a few years ago they were sending out a few dozen “Back to School” packages (a laptop, a printer, gift cards, linens, etc.) to students in foster care who are in college. Last year they sent out over 900 packages! This made a difference in 900 lives. We rarely think of this but of that 900 there will be several who will one day make a great difference in the lives of thousands of others. Look what Nicholas Scoppetta did. Susan credited the “team effort…we have an amazing board, friends committee, and staff.” She also said, “And this year we started a young associates committee, headed by an early committed supporter Dayssi Olarte’s niece Alex Becker…the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A next generation!” You can help too. Visit on the Web: newyorkersforchildren.org. The Michael’s Lunch. Over the course of a month, the list of prominent individuals who take lunch at Michael’s reads like a page out of Who’s Who or People magazine, or Quest. An unusual spotting at a Wednesday lunch was none other than The Donald, lunching with Richard and Harrison LeFrak, Steve Ross (owner of The Dolphins), and CNBC’s Joe Kernan. Because it is well known that Donald Trump rarely lunches or dines out, he was on everyone’s radar: Donald Trump is here, Donald Trump is here... people were repeating

sotto voce to each other as if they were finally seeing a real celebrity. You could see The Donald had something to say and his listeners were having some laughs with him. Coincidentally, a few tables away at Table 7 Nikki Haskell was lunching with Rikki Kleiman (the Rikki and Nikki table?) and another friend. Nikki and the Trumps go way back to the late ’70s when Donald and his then wife Ivana were new faces on the New York scene, and Nikki had a popular cable talk show when cable was in its infancy and everything was a hope and a prayer, including the sets. The Donald and Ivana first became known

to New Yorkers from their appearances on Nikki’s show. It’s almost 40 years later and, like the troupers they are, they’re still out there working it. Rachel Roy and Desiree Rogers were lunching together. You know Ms. Rogers as an early star in the Obama White House as social secretary. There was a moment there when people thought she was going to revive social life in Washington around the White House after the two-term Bush dormancy. That was not to be and before long she departed for reasons unknown. Ellen Levine and Joan Hamburg were next door to me: Star Jones was lunching

with Wendy Williams who was intense and all in blue. Joe Armstrong, the Mayor of Michael’s, with George Farias; Da Wenzdy Boyz: Imber, Della Femina, Greenfield, Kramer, Bergman; Bobby Friedman with Jeff Sagansky; Peter Brown and guests; Paul Wilmot at Table One with what looked like a confab of ideas hatching for a new venture (this is all my imagination—I know nothing). In the corner, William Lauder with Lida Burpee; Stephen Swid and guests; Michael Kassan; Aryeh Bourkoff; Debra Shriver; Fern Mallis with Elise Kroll; Steven Greenberg with Jeff Toobin; Judy Price; Charlie Scheips; Alice Mayhew; Ellen

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Mike Pratt, Thomas Schutte and Marc Rosen 30 QUEST

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Tara Weedfald, Andrea Fazio, Nessi Erkmenoglu and Danielle Henderson

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Schwartz; Jim Abernathy with Nancy Murray; Patrick Murphy and Tony Hoyt; and Robert Barnett. Lunching down Memory Lane. On another Wednesday at Michael’s I invited Mary Horner, an old friend of mine whom I first met when I came to New York out of college back in the ’60s. We first met in what was a neighborhood bar called the Whiffenpoof, or “the Whiff” to its regulars, a casual restaurant and bar on 75th Street and Lexington Avenue. It was an after-theoffice meeting place for a lot of journalists and press agents. I been taken there by a friend who wanted me to meet someone who might help me get a job. (Editor’s Note: The Whiff later was transformed into Mortimer’s 32 QUEST

Courtney Booth and Gus Christenson

Arie and Coco Kopelman

and, after that, Orsay.) Mary, who is a few years older than I, came to New York out of college. She grew up in Indianapolis and Fort Wayne where she’d been a “fan” of New York from an early age, following the theater, reading the columnists, and dreaming of a New York life. In her earliest years here, she fell in love with the city because everything was so accessible. It was a place where you could live on $50 a week as Mary did. For that, she could rent an apartment (a walk-up), go to the theater every night (if she felt like it), eat at great restaurants, patronize friendly bars and great clubs, and generally be in the thick of the bustling world of New York. Mary worked at Seventeen magazine, which was then

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Geoffrey Bradfield and Sue Chalom

owned by Walter Annenberg’s sister Enid Haupt. Their offices were in the LOOK building, home of the great magazine of its day and Curtis Publishing competitor of Life. The legendary Midge Richardson was the editor-inchief at Seventeen. Richardson had been a nun (Sister Agnes Marie) for a number of years from the time she was 18. However, she left the order, married a tennis star (Mr. Richardson) and became one of the legends of Madison Avenue. In those days, the advertising/magazine/ radio/ T.V. was the center of Mary’s world. Today there’s a popular show depicting it all fairly accurately, according to Mary who watches it faithfully, called Mad Men.

I asked her about that. Was the show authentic, real? She said there’s probably more sex and drinking in the T.V. version but, in retrospect, not a lot more. There was always someone in an office to who was having an affair with a secretary or a girl down the hall and a wife at home. The biggest difference between reality and the T.V. show, she said, was the women. In those days, there were fewer women in these organizations. Very few had jobs outside of magazine editorial staffs, and fewer had executive jobs of importance and power. Women were mainly assistants and, even then, always referred to as secretaries or executive secretaries. The higher the executive post, the higher the secretaries

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ranking in the office hierarchy. There were important secretarial jobs and, in the magazine business, those jobs had perks that were prized. Like 8th-row-center tickets to opening nights or second nights on Broadway, as well a film premieres, concerts, and all kinds of culture and entertainment. Everybody always dressed for the occasions: men and women (and, when present, children). Most women were well educated and very able. Many in New York made it a lifetime career, as did Mary. As we were talking at the table, Chris Meigher, the publisher of Quest, stopped by with Kelso Sutton, who

was the head of Time, Inc.’s magazines in those day. I told them that Mary and I had just been talking about Mad Men and drinking in the office. Chris told us that at Time, Inc., men, like his boss, had bars in their offices and there were bar-carts that came around in the late afternoon after closing an issue, or maybe without closing an issue. Mary hadn’t heard that. Over at Seventeen, she said, they went to the bar across the street. There was much more nightlife in those days and people made a lot of friends. What we call networking today came naturally in those times because of the social life around the bars and restaurants

the walls. There were also martini lunches at many a table. More good works. On another night in New York, again at Cipriani 42nd Street, the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House held its annual spring dance, this year titled “Spring Fever.” The Lenox Hill Neighborhood House people (that is, the staff and supporters) are the best of New York but there is something gemutlich about their united vibe. Maybe it’s because there is so much “heart” in their existence and what they do for their neighbors. The honorees this year were Diana Quasha and Sydney Roberts Shuman. Lenox Hill

in the neighborhoods where people lived or worked. Still on Memory Lane. Mary used to go to Michael’s when back in those days it was called the Italian Pavilion and owned by Bruno Caravaggi whose son Robert is the co-owner of Swifty’s today. Bruno also had a very posh restaurant where the smart set dined called Quo Vadis. The Italian Pavilion, according to Mary, was very popular with the magazine/ advertising/ radio and publishing people—not unlike today—but its interior was entirely different. The windows were well covered, the walls were dark, and leather banquettes ran along

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Neighborhood House makes an impression on the lives of thousands of people every year, from infancy to late age. They are helpers, which we all need at some point or another in our lives. They do so many things for their neighbors as to show the world It Can Be Done. With women like Shuman and Quasha and the scores of other active volunteers along with the executives managing Lenox Hill Neighborhood House beginning with executive director Warren Scharf (and Virginia Pitman who always keeps me in the loop newswise), and the staff, they change lives for the better. This particular event was

the biggest of their galas, and no doubt the best fund-raiser. The theme was executed by a design committee (this is their 15th year contributing) with honorary chairs Bunny Williams and John Rosselli. The design chairs were Christopher Spitzmiller, Michael McGraw, and David Duncan. The results were spectacular. Not a lot of speeches, thankfully. Hugh Hildesley of Sotheby’s was emcee and there was brief raising of money for camps for children for the upcoming summer. Otherwise, it was an excellent dinner with a main course of rack of lamb and dancing to a DJ right after. Life as allegory. Huguette

Clark died a year ago on the 24th of April, two weeks from her 105th birthday. She was a very rich who was solitary almost lifelong and, until a reporter uncovered her longforgotten identity, she was totally unknown to the world, including to her neighbors. She was acknowledged in the end because of the money—many, many inherited millions, riches in real estate, jewels, cash, and securities that was the legacy of her father William A. Clark, onetime senator from Montana and a multimillionaire whose fortune originated with copper mining stocks and claims. Senator Clark died in 1925. In his lifetime, he had had two wives

and two families. Huguette was the youngest of his children. What made her a story for today’s media was her theretofore publicly unknown wealth accompanied by extreme reclusiveness. She lived the last three decades of her life in a hospital room in Beth Israel Medical Center. At the time, she also possessed a floor and a half of apartments on 907 Fifth Avenue at 72nd Street, a mansion in Connecticut, and a mansion in Santa Barbara. One or both of those houses were properties she never saw. The New York apartments had been occupied by her and her mother Anna who died at 75 in 1963. The Clarks were always

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distinguished even by those who knew them, by their great wealth, as is frequently the case among the very wealthy. Senator Clark had been a well known character for that reason and, later, in certain circles for his art collection. He especially gained attention for the palatial limestone mansion he built at 952 Fifth Avenue where Huguette spent her formative years. Clark had many powerful connections but he was not well liked. It was Mark Twain who recalled him as just about the worst human being he’d ever met. What he meant beyond that statement is not known. While the senator had a 38 QUEST

Gillian Miniter and John Truex

Bambi Putnam and Podie Lynch

Anne Harisson and Beth Canavan

certain social sway because of his great financial power and lived more extravagantly and grandly than many other members of society in the day, the Clarks were basically regarded as arriviste and hampered by the old man’s reputation in business and in politics, as well as the enemies he kept. Huguette, for reasons unknown to anyone alive today, was a diffident, shy child. She was artistic (and became a very able portraitist and painter) and loved music and the arts. When she died, she left a huge doll collection which she had acquired as a connoisseur. However, from

Tania Higgins

an early adult age, while she lived in the smaller apartment at 907 and her mother lived in the larger one, her social sphere was tiny and she mainly kept to herself and her dolls. “Oh that’s just Huguette,” was a standard explanation that family and family friends had for her “oddness.” She had had a marriage briefly when she was in her early 20s (three years after her father died) and a divorce the following year. When she was in her 40s, she was “wooed” by a French nobleman but the family lawyers quashed that before it could lead to the altar. Their decision made her very unhappy but her mother

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was on their side. After that she was a poor little rich girl and regarded as such by many who knew her and had no other explanation for her antisocial behavior. Nothing was expected of her in terms of a conventional life. You can see that it was a very lonely, even alienated, existence of splendid isolation. Did the isolation affect her social intercourse, or was it a symptom of deeper troubles? Those who knew her remembered her as kind and gentle, often speaking or answering the phone, with a French accent despite the fact that she grew up and went to school in New York

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Sheila Labrecque and Andrea Fahnestock


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A (her mother was of French descent and her parents had lived in France where Huguette was born). Her mother, Anna Eugenia La Chapelle, had gone to live with Senator Clark when she was 15, and described as his “ward.” A few years later in 1902 she gave birth to their first child, a girl named Louise Amelia Andree. Four years later Huguette was born. Andree, as she was called, died at 17 of meningitis. Huguette lost what might have been her only real ally in her life. Was she really mentally impaired, or was it more like taking a religious vow that separated her for all others? Or was it fear? She was

obviously a healthy woman when she put herself in a hospital in her 80th year. Why a hospital room? Was it for security or protection? From what? From whom? From ghosts of an unrevealed, dark past? Something or someone caused a final shutdown long before its time. By the time she died in hospital at that late age, her “friends” were those who served her: nurses, lawyers, accountants. Her estate was estimated in the hundreds of millions with the largest part going to charity, although tens of millions went to a “friend” who looked after her in hospital. There were other relatives, descendants

of her father’s first family, but they were not in the will. That said, the lawyer was and the accountant was, both from Central Casting, out of the Perils of Pauline. Alas, poor Huguette. Her jewels were sold at auction last month at Christie’s. The original estimate for the 17 items in the sale was $6 to $12 million. However, a large, rare pink 9-ct. diamond alone brought $15 million. It had been acquired from Dreicer & Co. of Paris in 1910, probably for Anna Clark, like most of the items that had been inherited by Huguette. The total sale was more than $20 million with commissions, the second largest estate

jewelry sale this year (after Elizabeth Taylor’s). Most of the jewels had been kept in a vault since the 1940s when Huguette was still a young woman in her 30s. It may be that she rarely saw or wore them, if at all. Like so many other worldly goods she possessed, Huguette had no interest in or use for them. In the end, it seemed that Huguette had long ago given up any real use for life in general. She just happened to live a very long time, as fate would have it, and she just happened to be rich. And alone. Alone with her unspoken, if not unexpressed, fears—the ones that always grow and haunt with time. u

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John Connolly, Marlo Thomas and John K. Castle

Ingrid Connolly, Jim Sullivan and Judy Pilger

Richard and Linda Glazer 44 QUEST

John S. Castle and Charles Rockefeller

John and Diana Clarkson

Albert Levy, Dorie Klissas and Theodore Diktaban

Alec Patterson and Susan Mackinnon

Max Gomez and Martin Levine

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Hans Wilhelm, Judy Henderson and Richard Edelson

Jay Adlersberg, Sandra Gelbard and Stuart Orsher


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K E R S FO R C H I L D R E N H E L D A FO O L ’ S F Ê T E AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Alison Brod

Euan Rellie and Nicholas Scoppetta

Crystal Renn, Zac Posen and Coca Rocha

Arthur and Courtney Huber 46 QUEST

Tinsley Mortimer

Melanie Lazenby and Topper Mortimer

Elizabeth Brown, Ted Gushue and Carson Griffith

Erin Heatherton

Selita Ebanks

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Christine Schwarzman


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA R I S R E V I E W ’ S S P R I N G R E V E L AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

Kurt Anderson and Anne Kreamer

Jim Sterba with Dee and Nelson Aldrich

Lewis Lapham and Chris Carroll 48 QUEST

Amber Tamblyn

Terry McDonell and Richard Price

Lorin Stein and Bob Silvers

Syrie Moskowitz and David Salle

John Jacobson, Larry Guffey and Scott Asen

Gay Talese

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Dominique Nabokov


T HE A RT OF DA NIE L B OTT E RO N ORT W O N OF E X H I BDA I T I O NIE N THRO UG H OTT A P R I L E RO T HE A L B T I M E WA R N E R C E N T E R , N E W Y O R K NOW ON EXHIBITION THROUGH APRIL T I M E WA R N E R C E N T E R , N E W Y O R K

Sweet Dreams of Love, Mixed Media on Canvas, 52” x 62”

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E R EO P E N I N G O F S A LVATO R E F E R R A G A MO ’ S F L A G S H I P TO B E N E F I T T H E S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C

Oliver English and Julia Loomis

Annette Rickel, Mario Calvo-Platero and Eleanora Kennedy

Vincent Ottomanelli and Connie Phillips 50 QUEST

Pablo Koe and Kate Dunn

Chiara Ferragamo

Stefania Allen and Kate Hudson

Glenda Bailey, Anna Baron and Lynn Temperley

Eugenie Niven Goodman and Adrienne Flemming

Kelly Framel and Sarah Framel

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Georgia Kakiris and Eleanor Ylvisaker


THE THE 15TH 15TH ANNUAL ANNUAL MASHOMACK MASHOMACK INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL POLO POLO CHALLENGE CHALLENGE SATURDAY , 2012 SATURDAY JUNE JUNE 16 16 TH TH , 2012 This This year year we we have have the the great great honor honor of of hosting hosting His His Highness Highness The The Maharaja Maharaja Sawai Sawai Padmanabh Padmanabh Singh Singh of of Jaipur Jaipur and welcoming the Royal Family, with and welcoming the Royal Family, with Maharaj Maharaj Narendra Narendra Singh Singh playing playing for for the the dashing dashing Team Team India. India. sponsored by sponsored by

For For tickets, tickets, please please contact contact Camilla Camilla Hellman Hellman 212.729.0127 | mashomackpoloevents@gmail.com 212.729.0127 | mashomackpoloevents@gmail.com

www.mashomackpoloclub.com www.mashomackpoloclub.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B E L L E É P O Q U E B A L L AT T H E F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N

Will Wright and Whitney Chen

Elizabeth Kurpis and Jaclyn Smith 52 QUEST

Allison Ecung

Alexis Light

Linnea Wilson and Ryan Hayward

Elisabeth Saint-Amand

Joan Payson and Jack Hazzard

Lucy Lang and Cator Sparks

Nina Patterson, Caitlin Davis and Sarah Irwin

Nathaniel Bristol and Lacey Dorn

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Andrea Chung and Mauricio Ardila


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E H E N R Y ST R E E T ST E T T L E M E N T ’ S G A L A AT G OT H A M H A L L

Alejandro Santo Domingo and Lesley Schulhof

Julie Henderson 54 QUEST

Maggie Betts, Stephanie LaCava and Maggie Katz

Leonard Lauder with Olivia and Warren Hoge

Jill and Harry Kargman

Vanessa and Mark Mulroney

Michael Tiedemann and David Schulhof

Zani Gugelmann

Kylie Case, Gilles Mendel and Lisa Airan

Santiago Gonzales and Nina Garcia

Ariel Gruber

B I LLY FA R R E LL A G E N C Y

Bara Tisch and Marielle Safra


JSA


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E ST A N D MO N T B L A N C ’ S C O C K TA I L PA R T Y AT C L U B C O L E T T E I N PA L M B E AC H

Carolyn Blitz with Brandon Reid and Diane Reid

Grace Meigher, Dennis Basso and Talbott Maxey 56 QUEST

Harry and Gigi Benson

Dan and Denise Hanley

Annette Allen and Jackie Weld Drake

Lesly Smith and James Walsh

Geoffrey Thomas

Jan-Patrick Schmitz

Susie and Edward Elson

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Anka Palitz and Alfred Fiandaca


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C ’ S S P R I N G B A L L AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A R T

Michel Witmer and Kamie Lightburn

Carol Mack and Lisa McCarthy 58 QUEST

Caryn Zucker and Kelly Ripa

Mazen Jabban

Tory Burch and Muffie Potter Aston

Jamee and Peter Gregory

Princess Alexandra of Greece, Shafi Roepers and Alix Toub

Sara Ayres, Renee Rockerfeller and Kitty Sherrill

Julia and David Koch

Sharon Bush and Joseph Fichera

Annette Rickel and Craig Thompson

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Georgina Bloomberg


FRIEND

FOLLOW

READ

S TAY I N FO R M E D

FAC E B O O K : Q U E ST M A G TWITTER: QUESTMAG FOR MOBILE-OPTIMIZED PRINT EDITIONS V I S I T Q U E ST M A G . C OM O N YO U R I P H O N E A N D I PA D


CALENDAR

MAY

On May 6, the Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library will host its “Point-to-Point” event featuring an exciting pairing of horse racing and meals for guests prepared by chefs Jennifer Behm and Dana Herbert. For more information, call 800.448.3883.

1

ART FOR ART’S SAKE

The American Federation of Arts will host author Adam Gopnik at its annual luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the Colony Club. For more information, call 212.988.7700.

2

SAY CHEESE

The International Center of Photography’s Infinity Awards will take place at Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers. For more information, call 212.857.9705.

3

THE FAIRER SEX

Women Who Care, founded by 60 QUEST

Loreen Arbus, will hold its annual luncheon at 11 a.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 212.683.6700. ARRIBA ARRIBA

The Harlem Educational Activities Fund will celebrate Cinco de Mayo at 8 p.m. at the Union Square Ballroom. For more information, call 212.663.9732. GO FOR A SPIN

Dances Patrelle will present Gilbert and Sullivan, The Ballet!, choreographed by Francis Patrelle, through the 6th at the Dicapo Opera Theatre. For more information, call 212.988.7700.

5

WALK THIS WAY

The ALS Association will host its “Walk to Defeat ALS” event at 11 a.m. at Pier 46 at Hudson River Park. For more information, call 212.720.3042.

6

STRAIGHT TO THE POINT

The Winterthur Museum’s “Pointto-Point” event will feature horse racing and meals by chefs Jennifer Behm and Dana Herbert. For more information, call 800.448.3883. EASY BEING GREEN

Mount Sinai’s “Greening Our Children” event will take place at

the Hyatt Regency in Greenwich, Connecticut. For more information, call 212.824.7041.

8

SQUARE MEAL

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University will host its annual dinner at 6 p.m. at The Pierre. For more information, call 212.627.1000.

9

IT’S BETTER TO GIVE...

Barbara Tober of the Museum of Art and Design and Chris Meigher of Quest will launch Giving Back by Meera Gandhi at 6 p.m. at the Museum of Art and


SUMMER EMPLOYMENT IMPROVES ACADEMIC OUTCOMES AND IS ALSO LINKED TO LONGTERM JOB ATTAINMENT AND WAGE GROWTH. New York City’s targeted Summer Youth Experience programs provide young people with employment opportunities during the summer months. In 2011 over 131,000 young people applied for approximately 26,800 publicly funded slots (private funding provided an additional 4,200 placements). Contact the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City to learn how you and your business can sponsor summer jobs for motivated youth. Visit www.nyc.gov/fund or call (212) 788-7794 for more information.


CALENDAR

MAY RAZZLE DAZZLE

Literacy Partners will hold its “Evening of Readings” event at 7 p.m. at Jazz at Lincoln Center. The event will be chaired by Alina Cho, Jacqueline Weld Drake, Parker Ladd, Arnold Scaasi, and Liz Smith. For more information, call 212.725.9200.

JUNE 3

DRAMA QUEENS

Dramatists Guild Fund will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a gala honoring composer John Kander at 6:30 p.m. at the Mandarin Oriental. For more information, call 212.391.8384.

5

SPIN AROUND

On May 14, American Ballet Theatre’s Spring Gala, sponsored by Graff and Valentino, will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Opera House. Michelle Obama will act as honorary chairman with Caroline Kennedy and Blaine Trump. For more information, call 212.362.6000. Design. For more information, call 212.299.7751.

by Graff and Valentino. For more information, call 212.362.6000.

17

FOR YOUR BENEFIT

10

16

The East Harlem School’s “Poetry Slam” event will feature 30 students between the ages of nine and 14, performing at 6 p.m. at the B.B. King Blues Club and Grill. For more information, call 212.876.8775.

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Explorer’s Party will take place at the Central Park Zoo. For more information, call 718.741.1639.

The Harlem Village Academies will host a benefit with a performance honoring Deborra-Lee Furness, Hugh Jackman, and Dan Och at 6:30 p.m. at the Manhattan Center. For more information, call 212.763.8595.

LADIES WHO LUNCH

21

A ROSE IS STILL A ROSE

FROM A TO Z

The “A World of Possibilities: Reach Out and Read” event will take place at 6 p.m. at the Bridgewaters Museum Club. For more information, call 212.398.1133.

BORN TO BE WILD

Women for Women International will hold its annual luncheon with a discussion called “Good Economics: Investing in Women and Girls” at 583 Park. For more information, call 203.298.0573.

KEEP ME COMPANY

The Keigwin + Company contemporary dance group will perform through the 25th at the Julliard School. For more information, call 212.278.0691.

The School of American Ballet’s Workshop Performance Benefit will take place at 5:30 p.m. at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater at Lincoln Center. For more information, call 212.769.6600.

7

SALUTATIONS

The Boys and Girls Harbor will celebrate 75 years of service during its “Salute to Achievement” event at 6:30 p.m. at the Hecksher Building. For more information, call 212.427.2277.

14

CENTRAL LOCATION

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s annual Spring Gala will take place at the Central Park Zoo beginning at 6:30 for cocktails. This year’s theme for the event is “The Coasts of Patagonia.” For more information, call 718.741.1639.

11

DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY

Stuart Weitzman will host trunk shows at its Columbus Circle and Fifth Avenue locations through the 13th, beginning daily at 10 a.m. For more information, call 212.759.1570.

14

DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY

American Ballet Theatre will open its season with the Spring Gala at 6:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Opera House. The event will be sponsored 62 QUEST

On May 10, 30 students between the ages of nine and 14 from the East Harlem School will perform in a poetry slam at 6 p.m. at the B.B. King Blues Club and Grill. For more information, call 212.876.8775.


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

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COLD SPRING - Marvel at the spectacular HUDSON RIVER VIEWS from this 3100 SF home on ½ acre at village edge. Large open rooms, country kitchen, 2 fireplaces, hardwood floors, private master suite make this home ideal for family and entertaining. Perfect location, huge deck and oversized 3 car garage add to the appeal. Offered at $1,100,000

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

COLD SPRING - “River House” Magnificent views of the Hudson River from this 4500 SF contemporary sited on a private 4+ acre peninsula that extends 500 feet into the river with a 100 foot bulkhead and riparian rights. Open airy living spaces, 3 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, 3 bedrooms. Infinity pool, hot tub. Offered at $3,950,000

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout the home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000

GARRISON - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in The Castle, well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit, one of only seven units in the complex, offers breathtaking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. Offered at $2,595,000

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, photographed March 1966.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 64 QUEST

QUEEN ELIZABETH rose to the throne on February 6, 1952. As you know, this year’s Diamond Jubilee Celebration marks the 60th year of her reign. In 1966, her trip to the West Indies was to visit the countries of the Com-


H A R RY B E N S O N

monwealth. Her Majesty’s schedule was exhausting, yet she looked regal at every stop along the way. Starting out on February 1, and accompanied by Prince Philip, she traveled to Barbados, St. Vincent and the

Grenadines, Mustique, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Genada, St. Lucia, Antigua, Dominica, Montserrat, Saint ChristopherNevis-Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas, Conception Island, and Jamaica—the final stop

on March 6. To say it was a whirlwind would be quite an understatement. I was assigned to cover the tour. The royal pair traveled from island to island aboard HMY Britannia, while the rest of the press scrambled to find island hoppers or seaplanes to get us from location to location in order to arrive before they did. The photograph here was taken in Jamaica as they boarded the BOAC—now British Airways—plane for the return to London. It was a most informal tour for the royals, going from destination to destination, greeting the local dignitaries and riding through the streets in open cars waving to the crowds of people who were waving tiny British flags. There was a cocktail party for the press aboard the Royal Yacht in British Guiana, and we all stood on deck with a glass of dry sherry while the Queen answered questions from the press, reminiscent of Audrey Hepburn in the closing scene in the film Roman Holiday. The rest of the tour was, needless to say, nothing like the film. u


TA K I

MODEL MEN PAPA HEMINGWAY’S recently published Earnest Hemingway, the subject of Hemingway’s Boat, spending a day on the water.

letter to an Italian male friend revealed his human side, one all of his admirers were always aware of. (Like Bogie, tough on the outside, jelly on the inside). Until lately, Papa haters had a good, long run. Soon after Carlos Baker’s matchless biography appeared around 1970—nine years after Hemingway’s suicide—the naysayers started to gnaw away at him. The rats were led by modernists, feminists, and other such rubbish, the kind of nontalented, self-aggrandizing phonies that have turned literature into the unreadable garbage that’s around today, especially in America. Papa’s straight, short, no-nonsense style didn’t suit them. Magic realism did. It hid their lack of talent. He wrote about tough guys doing the honorable thing, which the sandal-wearing sissies who came after him couldn’t imagine. I’ve just finished a 500-pager called Hemingway’s Boat by Paul Hendrickson in which that old chestnut of Papa versus F. Scott Fitzgerald comes up, both sides generously treated by the author. In 1933, nine years before his death, poor old Scott was broke, potted, and praying that Tender Is the Night would resuscitate his fading reputation. Zelda was institutionalized after a breakdown and her affair with a French aviator, which had just about finished Scott. Tender Is the Night is my favorite book of all time, having first read it at 15 immediately following my first visit to the French


Riviera. In late-night bull sessions, when fellow students would talk about their future plans, I only had one: to go the Riviera and find Dick Diver and live like him. After that it was Paris, looking for Jake Barnes and Lady Brett. Screw banking and screw ship-owning. This was for dullards and bores. Well, I did run into some characters who resembled Dick and Jake, and certainly more than a few women who were like Brett, but real life can never live up to fiction. Not the kind Papa and Scott wrote. Fitzgerald had written Tender Is the Night when the Jazz Age was over, just as the Depression had really begun to bite, and while deeply in debt and in despair over Zelda’s schizophrenia. Hemingway had supplanted him as numero uno star writer at Scribners, but Scott didn’t have an envious bone in his body. It was all great talent and self-destruction. Fitzgerald ached to hear from Papa about his book. At first, Hemingway gave it a thumbs-down (he later revised his opinion). “I talk with the authority of failure—Ernest with the authority of success,” wrote Fitzgerald. Scott had gone on a long bender leading up to the publication of his book and Papa was annoyed with him. Scott would pass out on the table, lie down on the floor, and invariably puke all over the place. I think if it had been anyone else Hemingway would have put him to sleep with a left hook. All he did, however, was to tell Fitzgerald that he oughtn’t let Zelda’s psychoanalysis “ball him up about himself,” and if he didn’t write, it meant he was yellow. Grand stuff, because there was nothing lower than being yellow-belly in those heroic times. Fitzgerald had a dream start; his own two or three great experiences took place in the realm of love and imagination. He wrote three bestsellers and he won the girl. But he also lost the girl in an adulterous act, losing even more the golden girl of his imagination. These personal losses provided some aspect of the emotional maturity and depth of understanding that shaped his two best works, The Great Gatsby and Tender Is the Night. Yet, his books were not confessional, they were works of art. And as far as I’m concerned, he was the supreme artist. In August 1936, Papa’s “The Snows of

Author F. Scott Fitzgerald with his wife, Zelda, and daughter, Scottie, in the 1920s.

Kilimanjaro” appeared in Esquire magazine, which also included a Fitzgerald story. Scott read the story while recovering from a broken shoulder. “The rich were dull and they drank too much or they played too much backgammon. They were dull and they were repetitious,” wrote Papa, remembering poor Scott and his romantic awe of them and how he had started a story once: “The very rich are different from you and me.” This is the dying writer Henry speaking in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro.” When Scott read that, he was deeply hurt. He wrote Papa to lay off, and Hemingway wrote back that he hadn’t written anything different than what Scott had written about himself in that very same issue. On a recent T.V. program about books, Ben McIntyre listed The Great Gatsby as his all-time favorite. It’s certainly on my top-three list, and to hear this coming from a Brit made me happy as hell.

What made me less happy was to read a letter from an American professor of literature calling Jay Gatsby/James Gatz an American tragedy. The idiot prof said that Gatsby dreams to possess a wealthy brat whose value he converts into money and calls it love. Gatsby will do anything to amass wealth to buy her and does, briefly. The moron thinks that good old Jay is the wrong role model for Americans. Like most professors, this buffoon did not get the point, although he taught the book for 30 years. The point is that we can never really be someone else. We are who we are, and I’ve known a few Gatsbys in my life and one could see right through them. That’s why Jay was different, he could have fooled even me, an old-timer who regrets only never having had the opportunity to meet and run with Hemingway and Fitzgerald. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. M AY 2 0 1 2 6 7


QUEST

Fresh Finds

BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

IN HONOR OF OUR ANNUAL Jewelry Issue, we’ve picked some of the biggest, boldest, and most stunning (not to mention some downright fun and funky) jewelry pieces on the market this spring. May is also the month of Mother’s Day, and in case some baubles aren’t on your shopping list, we’ve found some fashionable looks for day and evening, along with accessories that every mom will love, from wallets and shoes to aprons, even.

Montblanc’s Silver

Cabochon de Montblanc

Collection earrings dazzle in polished silver, rose quartz, crystal quartz, and amethyst with mother of pearl doublets. $520. Montblanc: 800.995.4810 or montblanc.com.

Wempe’s stunning Blu BY KIM necklace is a one-of-a-kind piece in

Make an entrance in

18-kt. white gold with 3 tourmalines

this hand-painted

and 59 brilliant-cut

off-white silk gauze

diamonds. $91,875.

A-line gown with

Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave.,

ruffle detail, designed

212.397.9000.

by Angel Sanchez. $6,600. Angel Sanchez: angelsanchezusa.com.

Click your heels three times, and you’ll feel at home in these white patentleather pumps from Stuart Weitzman. $335. Stuart Weitzman: 675 Fifth Ave., 212.759.1570.

68 QUEST


He will look his best this summer in this cotton blazer from 1911 L.B.M.—a red-hot alternative to your standard summer tan. $650. 1911 L.B.M.: 212.755.0737 or lubiam.it.

Be pretty in purple when you wear Marina B’s PNEU ear pendants, based on a design of Marina Bulgari’s from 1978. $13,500. Marina B: By appointment at 212.644.1155.

You’ll be over the moon for Hunter Boot’s Luna shoe, in a fresh coral color sure to put a spring in your step. $225. Hunter Boot: hunter-boot.com.

Accessorize in a flick of your wrist with Roberto Coin’s Primavera bracelet in 18-kt. gold with amethysts. $6,200. Roberto Coin: 800.853.5958.

Tory Burch’s Robinson concierge A confection from Dennis Basso—the organza petal dress with embroidery. $8,500. Dennis Basso: 765 Madison Ave.,

wallet in Blood Orange will brighten up any outfit—or any day. $295. Tory Burch: toryburch.com.

dennisbasso.com.

M AY 2 0 1 2 6 9


Fresh Finds

Stage your own Olympic games this summer at Casa de Campo, with its world-class facilities and great packages! Casa de Campo: 800.877.3643 or casadecampo.com.do.

This season, J.Crew

The

will help you block it out in bold colors

grass is never greener

with looks and accessories that are

when you’re accessorizing with

better than ever.

DANNIJO’s Delfine

J.Crew: J.Crew

bracelet, featuring

stores nationwide,

clear and colored

including

crystals. $320.

1035 Madison Ave.,

DANNIJO: dannijo.com.

For something timeless, Welcome May flowers with a walk in Manolo Blahnik’s Stigma shoes, by custom order. $975. Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007.

don Ralph Lauren’s modern Art Deco two-drop earrings with diamonds, black onyx, and green agate. $36,700. Ralph Lauren: 888 Madison Avenue, 212.434.8000, or ralphlaurenjewelry.com.

70 QUEST

LC L A M B R E C H T F O R C A S A D E C A M P O

212.249.3869.


Sorab & Roshi’s coral octopus earrings with diamonds and Tahitian-pearl dangle, mounted in 18-kt. gold. Sorab & Roshi: 30 West Putnam Ave., Greenwich, 203.869.5800.

A necklace from Sequin with pearls, shellshaped charms, and turquoise—it doesn’t need to be buried to be a treasure! Sequin: 330 South County Rd., Palm Beach, 561.833.7300,

Who knows what you’ll cook

or sequin-nyc.com.

up in the kitchen in J.McLaughlin’s printed apron ($55) and oven mitt ($35)? J.McLaughlin: 1311 Madison Ave., 1004 Lexington Ave., or jmclaughlin.com.

Mrs. John L. Strong’s “Regrets His/Her Behavior” cards will make an impression, if you haven’t already. $45 for a set of five. Mrs. John L. Strong: 699 Madison Ave., 212.838.3775.

Feel like a million bucks in the Diva bangle from Frey Wille’s Magic Sphinx collection. Frey Wille: 727 Madison Ave., 646.682.9030. M AY 2 0 1 2 7 1


CANTEENS

ALISON IS BACK, ON EIGHTEENTH BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

A MENU THAT IS “casual” yet “refined;” décor details that are “sophisticated” yet “playful;” a restaurant that is both “simple” and “elegant.” These are just some of the oxymoronic descriptions used by Alison Price Becker and the team behind her latest restaurant, Alison Eighteen (on 18th Street), to describe what marks her first return to the Manhattan dining scene after a nine-year hiatus (her last New York venture was the beloved ’90s hit Alison on Dominick). The restaurant is nestled smack in the heart of the Flatiron District, an area of town we’re tempted 72 QUEST

to say—it can’t be resisted—is neither uptown nor downtown. Maybe it is these rather contradictory juxtapositions at Alison Eighteen that make us ask if the restaurant is this or that, fish or foul, fancy or footloose? None of which is a bad thing, since the question begs for multiple return trips. All ambiguities aside, one thing is for sure: executive chef Robert Gurvich knows good food. This being a semi-homage to the French brasserie, herb steamed mussels and sautéed foie gras occupy a rightful place at the front of the menu, but


MELISSA HOM

CANTEENS

the grilled Portuguese octopus and the polenta with foraged mushrooms are so exceptional that your taste buds won’t know what hit them (you’ll have to ask the waiter yourself how they strip the octopus of any rubber-like consistency). The rotisserie delivers formidable spit-roasted chicken and lamb shoulder (noquestions-asked winners), but the poached halibut with fennel marmalade capers, blood oranges, and pistachios flakes onto your fork like little divots of divinity. And where else besides France will you find chestnut crème (an acquired taste, perhaps)

stir up a seemingly relaxed space. Still, as a recent review noted, men aren’t obliged to wear blazers, but most of the clientele seems to come with a self-imposed, semi-formal dress code. And the friendly brasserie-like waiter service can be punctuated by overly attentive water pourers scared to let a glass dip below the “half empty” mark—thereby constantly interrupting gossipy tables from figuring out if the couple sitting across from them is a business man with his mistress or merely a regular with his art dealer who hasn’t gotten the memo that even Debbie Harry

with caramelized apples, chantilly, and meringue sticks? Price Becker teamed up with Asfour Guzy Architects to create a relaxed, open, and timeless space inspired by the classic brasseries of Paris. And so there are eggplant-colored tufted banquettes, light terrazzo floors, warm walnut tables, and bronze sconces and chandeliers everywhere. The French inspiration carries through in the toile wallpaper, though this isn’t Bunny’s toile; instead, a custom print presents caricatured animals, New York scenes, and Alison herself. The effect is to

wouldn’t try pulling off the Blondie look after a certain age. With a solid menu at stake, though, maybe it doesn’t matter what mix of dress-up, dress-down Alison is going for here. u This page: The menu at Alison Eighteen features French-influenced American dishes; the bar area (top); the downstairs lounge (bottom). Opposite page: The brasserie-inspired dining room. Alison Eighteen: 15 West 18th St., open Monday through Sunday for breakfast, lunch, brunch (weekends), and dinner; 212.366.1818 or alisoneighteen.com. M AY 2 0 1 2 7 3


CORINTHUS

MODERN REIGNS President Ronald Reagan and Queen Elizabeth II on an outing at Windsor Castle (June 1982). Opposite: The book Elizabeth The Queen: The Life of a Modern Mon-

IN JUNE 1982, Queen Elizabeth II invited President Ronald Reagan to Windsor Castle. The Reagans didn’t attend on a state visit organized by the government but, rather, as personal guests for a “quiet two days between summit meetings in France and Germany.” They were the first American presidential couple to spend the night at Windsor Castle. 74 Q U E S T

By all accounts, Reagan and the Queen got along like a house on fire. There were intimate cocktails and suppers (blacktie), private breakfasts, and a white-tie banquet for 158 guests. But the unprecedented highlight was a morning ride: the 56-year-old Queen on Burmese and the 71-year-old president on a stallion. The story goes that as the Queen was

being helped onto her mount, the horse gave off a thunderous fart. Seeing that her guest was taken aback, the Queen, with her down-to-earth manners, turned to Reagan and said, “I’m so sorry.” Reagan replied, “That’s perfectly all right, Ma’am, I thought it was the horse.” It took a moment for this gaffe to sink in before the two heads of state burst into laughter.

S T. M A RT I N ’ S P R E S S ( B O O K J AC K E T )

arch by Sally Bedell Smith.


This is the version the palace wags relate but Sally Bedell Smith, author of the recently published Elizabeth the Queen: The Life of a Modern Monarch (Random House), says that it is apocryphal. But she does agree that it serves as an example of what a good egg the Queen is. The Queen is no snob. How can she be? She occupies the highest social standing in Christendom, sets the standard for behavior and class, and is the guardian of traditions and customs that are centuries old. Smith gives us a unique perspective into the Queen’s earnest dedication to her job, as well as her conscientiousness—she reads dispatch boxes from the government daily and meets weekly with the prime minister. Still, Smith is pleasantly surprised by the Queen’s gaiety, sense of humor, and appealing humility. As far as her duties are concerned, she is “as tough as a yak.” It doesn’t seem to have much effect on crusty old Prince Philip, however. A descendant of Queen Victoria, he treats the Queen as just another woman. The Queen will be 86 on her next birthday. She acceded to the throne upon the death of her father, George VI, in 1952. This year marks the 60th of her reign, her Diamond Jubilee. The only other sovereign in the history of the British monarchy to spend 60 years on the throne was Queen Victoria. Right now, Queen Elizabeth is the longest serving head of state in the world. There’s a lot going on in England this summer. The Olympics, of course, and Wimbledon and Henley as usual. But the once-in-a-lifetime celebratory occasion is the Diamond Jubilee, June 2 to 5. The featured events are the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, in which one thousand ships will accompany the Queen’s Royal Barge, and the Diamond Jubilee Concert, featuring Elton John, Paul McCartney, and Kylie Minogue with Buck House as a backdrop. It is said that the Queen will attend—gritting her teeth, no doubt. Smith says that the polls indicate that the Queen enjoys an approval rating of 80 percent, which, when you think of it, is a lot better than our president, who hovers below 50 percent. Nevertheless, it simply means that 20 percent of the British population would like to abolish

the monarchy. This is a great shame as the Queen has really performed in the most exemplary fashion. It probably reflects more on the expense of financing the lives of the rest of the royal family. There can be little doubt, however, that the Queen does represent a vehicle—a living symbol—through which Britons can show their love for their country. Smith’s book is right up there with the level of interest of her previous biographies on William Paley, Pamela Harriman, the Kennedys, the Clintons, and Princess Diana. Especially notable within this book are the photographs

and the way in which they are accompanied by appropriate quotations. Among the recent revelations in Elizabeth the Queen are a wealth of details about her relationships with American presidents as well as the chronicling of her 11 visits to the U.S. What did the Queen say when she caught her first glimpse of Manhattan? Why doesn’t the Queen perspire in extreme heat? What does the Queen carry in her handbag? And, most importantly, why will the Queen never abdicate in favor of one of her offspring? It’s all here in this riveting read... u

M AY 2 0 1 2 7 5


SHOPPING

TIMELY MATCH


NAME

This spread, from left: The interior of the new Rolex store owned and operated by Wempe; the Rolex flagship at 665 Fifth Avenue.

CO U RTE S Y O F RO LE X

EARLIER THIS MONTH, the venerated German luxury watch

and jewelry retailer Wempe opened their much anticipated new set of doors on Fifth Avenue—a mere two blocks south of the longstanding Wempe store, which has occupied the lobby of the landmark Peninsula Hotel at 700 Fifth Avenue for decades. Back in October, the company made headlines in local press by inking a 15-year lease at 665 Fifth Avenue, the 12-story home of Rolex. The new space, which consists of 1,600 square feet on the ground floor plus an additional 1,277 square feet on the lower level, was formerly occupied by Just Cavalli, Roberto Cavalli’s diffusion brand. Wempe has long been an official Rolex jeweler, providing expert advice and care for these luxury timepieces within the Wempe store, but this real estate opportunity was particularly fortuitous. “Presenting Rolex in the Fifth Avenue flagship boutique is the crowning culmination of our successful partnership,” says Ruediger Albers, president of Wempe, U.S. The new Rolex by Wempe store was designed by Genevabased architects and features 12-foot ceilings, unique wall cases, oversized graphics, and specially made laser-etched aqua glass. The use of exceptional materials including Italian leather, imported marble and bronze, and custom-display walls made from European plane wood, further enhance the refined sophistication of the space (for which both companies are known), creating the ultimate experience in luxury shopping. u For more information on Rolex by Wempe, please call the boutique at 212.759.8278 or visit rolex.com or wempe.com. M AY 2 0 1 2 7 7


FA S H I O N

J. CREW MAKES THE MAN

This page: J.Crew’s Irish linen Ludlow jacket and pant, Old School widestripe tie, Alden for J.Crew Longwing Cluchers shoes, and Timex watch. Opposite page: Scenes from the interior of J.Crew’s Ludlow Shop at 50 Hudson Street in New York City, and a rendering of the Ludlow Shop’s storefront. 78 QUEST

BACK IN 2008, when J.Crew opened its first freestanding men’s shop in Tribeca known as the Liquor Store, it simultaneously debuted a new men’s staple, the Ludlow suit. Today, that particular suit has grown so popular and has become so successful on both a national and international level that it’s inspired a new store all its own: the Ludlow Shop, which recently opened at 50 Hudson Street, just several blocks south of the Liquor Store. The proximity of both dedicated men’s spaces is a testament to J.Crew’s ever-expanding suiting business. The new Ludlow Shop fuses the charm and services of an old-world haberdashery in an updated, modern look. The shop’s interior, inspired by a designer’s atelier, is lighter and loftier than any of the existing J.Crew men’s shops. The décor mixes midcentury modern, industrial, and 19th-century antiques, including a vintage Mies van der Rohe sofa, an original 1950s George Nelson for Omni shelving unit, and a 1970s Marantz turntable. Neat touches abound, including industrial steel flat files that were once used to house architectural blueprints and now display ties and pressed shirting. Art, for a retail space (or any space, for that matter), is impressive, with a mix of limited-edition prints by artists like Jasper Johns, Alberto Giacometti, and Louise Nevelson. The store’s namesake has come a long way in a mere five years. Men have grown so accustomed to and comfortable in the Ludlow suit that they now request it by name and often purchase multiple suits per visit. The Ludlow was inspired by the traditions of bespoke suiting, which is evidenced in such details as a floating chest piece, intricate pick stitching, luxurious Bamberg linings, and fabrics from storied European mills like Loro Piana and Harris Tweed. Though in-house tailoring is available to achieve that perfect fit, the modern cut of the Ludlow has meant that many men are able to buy it off the rack and wear it out of the shop without alterations. With on-site suiting experts, monogramming services, in-house tailoring, and door-to-door courier services, the Ludlow Shop is truly a one-stop destination for the modern gentleman. u

CO U RTE S Y O F J . C R E W

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


NAME


FROM THE ARCHIVES

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T

P U B L I S H E D D E C E M B E R 1 9 9 6 / J A N U A RY 1 9 9 7

80 QUEST


C E L E B R AT I N G 2 5 Y E A R S O F Q U E S T

FROM THE ARCHIVES

M AY 2 0 1 2 8 1


ARTS

THE MANHATTAN ART & ANTIQUES CENTER A CONTINUING STORY NESTLED INTO A BUSTLING NEIGHBORHOOD of high-rise

apartment buildings and street-level shops on Second Avenue at 56th Street in mid-Manhattan stands The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center (MAAC), which houses a vital, eclectic, and extraordinary assortment of art and antiques from all six continents. Housing a variety of galleries from large, full-scale showrooms to small shops filled with jewelry, silver, and objects of art, the MAAC has the ambience of a glorious shopping plaza, each shop more intriguing than the one before. Specializing in such diverse items as period furniture, silver, antique jewelry, folk art, tapestries, porcelains, paintings, clocks, sculpture, Asian art and antiques, and African carvings, the MAAC is the perfect destination for either a quick purchase or a luxurious full day of browsing and shopping (or anything in between). When Glenwood Management Corporation planned to build a luxury high rise complex, the question was raised of how the street-level space could be utilized. The creative vision set forth was of an indoor urban mall devoted to art and antiques which would both expand the space and provide a new home for the small antiques merchants who had been uprooted from their sites along Second and Third avenues. This new environment provided vendors the opportunity to participate together in providing a unique shopping destination, while maintaining their own individual identities. Ultimately, the original flavor of the area was preserved and the city was provided with a unique and revitalized cultural asset. Entering through the lobby, the visitor is enticed by an array of boutiques displaying jewelry, china, silver, and many other art objects. The first concourse, located a level below the lobby, is designed like an avenue with galleries radiating from the center aisle. Here, the visitor finds antique tapestries, clocks, carpets, and fine objects of art from all over the world, including extensive collections of Asian art and antiques. One more flight down, the second concourse is centered around a calming water fountain surrounded by plants at the foot of the spiral staircase, a peaceful place to reenergize before taking an international tour of the larger shops devoted to European furniture, architectural antiques, and Asian and African art. 82 QUEST

The prices of pieces at the MAAC range from a mere $50 to eye-popping $500,000, but anyone from the sophisticated collector to the cost-conscious shopper can find something appropriate to their needs. The possibilities are virtually endless. Most of the dealers travel extensively, and frequently return to their home countries for additional shopping. The MAAC offers such a wide range of international art and antiques that many dealers from abroad make regular trips to the building while in the country to find pieces to replenish their own galleries. The MAAC also serves as a primary source and destination for interior designers and their clients. Again, no matter what the size of the project, from furnishing a full home to just providing a perfect accent, the MAAC is an incredibly convenient resource since all the galleries are located steps from one another. It’s little surprise that the MAAC’s clientele includes an increasing number of people looking for investments for value appreciation in their purchases. Having been burned by other forms of investment, many executives are emulating Europeans and Asians who have traditionally sought protection in the rising value of art and antiques. Many corporations now buy antiques as both an investment and a way to add sophistication and style to their office and corporate image. The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center include Hemingway African Gallery, offering a vast range of African sculpture, pottery, masks, rugs, blankets beadwork, and paintings; Flying Cranes Antiques, Ltd., exhibiting Japanese and Chinese art and antiques from the 18th and 19th centuries; Hoffman-Gampetro, presenting an elegant assemblage of silver, glass, china, porcelains and furniture; Paul Stamati offering Art Deco furniture, chandeliers, and sculpture; and Sundial NYC, featuring antique clocks and accessories. These are just a few of the many exciting finds at The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center. For more, you’ll just have to check it out yourself! u The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center is open to the public Monday through Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 12 to 6 p.m. For more information about the Manhattan Art & Antiques Center, please call 212.355.4400, email info@the-maac.com, or visit the-maac.com.


This page, clockwise from top: The interior of Botier, Inc., gallery; a rabbit ice bucket by Arthur Court (1970) at Sooky Goodfriend; a large Loetz vase (1900) at Lev Tov Antiques. Opposite page: The Manhattan Art and Antiques Center. M AY 2 0 1 2 8 3


OPEN HOUSE

BUYING THE FARM “THE FARM” IS THE ULTIMATE in natural luxury—a very

special property meant to complement just the right buyer. A stunning country estate and retreat in Western Pennsylvania, The Farm has been featured in many top international publications including the New York Times. It consists of 150 acres, all carefully curated and crafted over a decade with a mix of rustic details. On the property there are beautiful, lush vistas and endless spectacular views of natural landscape with seven ponds, a

84 QUEST

waterfall, pastures, forests, streams, and rolling hills. Offering boundless privacy, freedom, a chance to commune with nature, and an elegant space for entertaining, this listing is also ecofriendly. The Farm is comprised of multiple buildings, including a guest house, a barn with stables, decorated greenhouses and a series of elegant areas fit for all occassions. u List price: $10 million. For further information on The Farm, please call 212.727.2155 or email thefarminquiries@gmail.com.


This page: At The Farm, some of the buildings are inspired by barns with exposed beams (above); a greenhouse is located on the property (below). Opposite page, clockwise from top: Located in Western Pennsylvania, The Farm is listed at $10 million; the property is decorated with structures that are inspired by nature; the lush landscape is replete with water features, including seven ponds and a waterfall.


R E A L E S TAT E

HUDSON RIVER OFFERINGS ROBERT A. MCCAFFREY REAL ESTATE is one of the most prominent real estate brokers in the Hudson River Valley area, and is especially noted in the luxury market. The company’s success is furthered by an extensive presence on the Internet, featuring all active listings with multiple photographs and other information like floorplans. Here, Quest speaks with Robert A. McCaffrey, Jr., owner and principal broker—and third-generation resident of Cold Spring, New York.

Q: What attracts buyers to the Hudson River Valley area? A: Robert A. McCaffrey, Jr.: Buyers are attracted to Hudson River Valley for its outstanding beauty, recreation opportunities, and rich history, as well as its varied cultural and culinary offerings. Q: What sort of properties is the area known for? What sort of prices do you see in the area? A: Properties are varied, from old historic to brand new 86 QUEST

contemporaries, from small cottages to large estates, and from village convenience to country estates. Prices vary accordingly, ranging from $200,000 condos to multi-million dollar estates. Q: What trends do you predict for the industry? A: For the next five years, I predict a revitalization of the real estate market. With the reduced prices we are now seeing, more buyers will be able to buy, and the weekend home buyer will be back. Q: How is McCaffrey Realty able to cater to its buyers differently than other real estate agencies? A: Since McCaffrey Realty is an independent agency we can be more flexible in meeting the needs of our clients. u For more information on Robert A. McCaffrey Real Estate, call 845.265.4113 or visit mccaffreyrealty.com.


This page, clockwise from top: 35 Market Street is a threebedroom contemporary home in Cold Spring, New York, with multi-level terraces and a hot tub located on the water (List Price: $4,895,000); a 10-bedroom Georgian brick home located on Mystery Point in Garrison, New York (List Price: $5,800,000); a well-known bed and breakfast that’s included on the National Historic Register can continue to be used as a business, or can be converted into a home with seven bedrooms and six fireplaces (List price: $1,990,000). Opposite page: A grand four-bedroom Hudson River Palladian home in Cold Spring, New York (List Price: $5,900,000).


Magnificent Brick Estate - Overlooking Wampus Lake. Grand Entrance Foyer. Incredible Chef ’s Kitchen. State-of-the-Art Home Theater. Impressive Wine Cellar. Five Bedroom Suites plus Maid’s Quarters. Eight acres with subdivision/conservation easement potential. Pool, Spa, Tennis Court and Professional Batting Cage. Outdoor Grill and Pizza Oven. Byram Hills Schools. The ultimate country lifestyle! $5,250,000

Sunny Hilltop - Incredible light! Beautiful Center Hall Colonial with understated, sun-filled spaces and wonderful open flow. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Family Room with Fireplace. Library. Country Kitchen. Four Bedrooms plus Guest Suite/Artist’s Studio. Four acres with seasonal views of the Pound Ridge Reservation. Fabulous Deck for al fresco entertaining. Sparkling Pool. Professionally landscaped grounds. $1,695,000

Historic 1800’s Schoolhouse -

The former Plains School, circa 1856. Antique detailing, hardwood floors, built-ins and French doors. Entrance Hall. Fabulous Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room with French doors. Country Kitchen. Three Bedrooms. Two Full Baths. Delightful Screened Porch. Beautifully landscaped grounds with specimen plantings and Two Garden Sheds. $550,000

Secluded Estate Setting -

The Stephen Jarvis Homestead -

Stunning Lakefront - A breathtaking backdrop overlooking the clean waters of Lake Truesdale. Sun-filled Country Lakehouse. Formal Living Room. Country Kitchen open to Dining Room. Fabulous Family Room with walls of glass overlooking the water. Three Bedrooms. Recreation Room with stone Fireplace. Level lawn and private dock. A wonderful lake lifestyle! $669,000

Steeped in local history--one of Pound Ridge’s charming antiques. Colonial farmstead with wide board floors, four fireplaces and plaster walls. Family Room with vaulted, beamed ceiling and stone Fireplace. Front Parlor with Fireplace. Dining Room open to Sitting Room with Fireplace. Country Kitchen. Sun Room. Four Bedrooms. Over three picturebook acres with pond, old stonewalls and age-old trees. $699,000

(914) 234-9234

Over 26 spectacular acres with total privacy and incredible possibilities. Magnificent land with phenomenal landscaping in top estate area. Peaceful retreat or fabulous opportunity to create a family compound or build your own estate. Classic 1950 Modern with exposed stone, soaring ceilings and walls of glass. Numerous terraces for outdoor entertaining. A rare offering. $2,975,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


Chappaqua Perfection -

Sophisticated and immaculate Colonial with incredible light. Approximately 5700 square feet of beautifully appointed living space with hardwood floors, raised paneling, extensive molding and French doors. Two Story Entrance Hall with graceful curved staircase. Five Bedrooms. Media Room. Recreation Room. Gym. Over five private landscaped acres with Pool, Spa, Cabana and outdoor barbecue. Every amenity! $2,395,000

Woodlands - Part of Bedford’s rich past. White-washed brick Geor-

Archer Stables -

Sophisticated Modern - Absolutely stunning Myron Goldfin-

Working horse farm property - part of Conyers Farm. Twenty-four level acres convenient to the Conyers Farm polo fields and all major equestrian events. Gated entry to courtyard and barn complex. Two large Barns with a total of 29 stalls, Two Tack Rooms, Wash Stall, Feed Room, Blacksmith’s Stall, Office and Groom’s Apartment. Two Bedroom Caretaker’s Cottage. Five paddocks. 125’ x 175’ outdoor riding with sprinkler system. Incredible! $3,495,000

Refined Rock Rim Ponds -

Sophisticated Shingle Colonial with elegant appointments. Raised paneling, custom crown molding and French doors. Magnificent Entrance Hall. Beautifully scaled main rooms. Music Room. Butler’s Pantry. Five Bedrooms. Recreation Room. Exercise Room. Incredible Deck with outdoor Kitchen overlooking the gorgeous Pool and Spa. Three landscaped acres. Quiet cul-de-sac. $2,475,000

(914) 234-9234

gian, the former Carriage House to the Scribner estate, carefully and exquisitely renovated. Incredible craftsmanship from a bygone era. Spectacular 70’ Marble Entry Hall with Cloak Room. Pine paneled Library. Five Bedrooms. Long, gated drive to over seven private estate area acres surrounded by 630 acres of sanctuary. Absolutely exquisite landscape with magnificent gardens. Sparkling Pool. Tennis Court. $4,850,000

ger design. 8200 square feet of exceptional living space. Fabulous light, curved interior and exterior walls, high ceilings and walls of windows with clerestories. Dramatic Living Room. Sleek Varenna Kitchen. First Floor Master Suite. Five additional Bedrooms. Over four Chappaqua estate acres with magnificent landscaping. Shoreline Swimming Pool. Tennis Court. Generator. Smart House technology. $3,995,000

Location! Location! Location! - On Hook Road, one of Bedford’s finest locations. Long drive to complete privacy. On the Bedford Riding Lanes, eight open, peaceful acres with scenic pond. Europeaninspired Brick Estate brimming with potential. Nicely-scaled rooms with great light. Two Story Entrance Hall. Four Bedrooms. Separate Studio Cottage. The perfect project for the creative builder or investor! $1,950,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


SPLENDOR ON ROUND HILL ROAD

STUNNING NEW GEORGIAN ESTATE ON ROUND HILL

$13,750,000 · Please visit: www.RoundHillSplendor.com Exclusive Agent: Marianne Scipione

$8,900,000 · Please visit: www.RoundHillRdGem.com Exclusive Agents: Laurie Smith / Mary Ann Grabel

LUXURIOUS LIVING IN CHIEFTANS $3,295,000

LAKESIDE SECLUSION

· Please visit: www.ChieftansRetreat.com Exclusive Agent: Leslie Carlotti

$3,250,000 · Please visit: www.82glenville.com Exclusive Agent: Beverley Toepke

MID-COUNTRY BEAUTY

SOUTH OF THE VILLAGE

$2,800,000 · Please visit: www.11willmerryln.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

G R E E N W IC H

$2,695,000

F I N E

· Please visit: www.1oldclubhouserd.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

80 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . JENNIFER BENEDICT . LISA BILHUBER . BERDIE BRADY . ANN BRESNAN . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . LINDA CASTRIOTA . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA CIOFFARI JOSIANE COLLAZO . PATRICIA COUGHLIN . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY DURNIAK . JACKIE EKHOLM . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN JOYCE FOWLER . JANIE GALBREATH . KATHERINE GEORGAS . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . JEANNE HOWELL . MADELINE KEARNS . ROBIN KENCEL . SHARON KINNEY ELIZABETH KOLDYKE-BOOLBOL . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . VILMA MATTEIS . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . CINDY MEEKER . JIM MEEKER . ERIN MOODY . ELLEN MOSHER . LAUREN MUSE . LIZ OBERNESSER MARGARET RYDZIK . MARIANNE SCIPIONE . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS . LYN STEVENS . TORY THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . JOE WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


CLASSIC STONE GEORGIAN IN MID-COUNTRY $5,695,000

·

SPLENDID WATERFRONT SETTING

Please visit: www.MidCountryGreenwich.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

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ELEGANT MID-COUNTRY SECLUSION $3,195,000

ELEGANT OLD CHURCH GREEN

· Please visit: www.9rockwoodlanespur.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

$3,150,000

· Please visit: www.OldChurchGem.com Exclusive Agent: Blake Delany

OLD GREENWICH PRIVATE ENCLAVE

CLASSIC COLONIAL

$2,150,000 · Please visit: www.deepwoodscomfort.com Exclusive Agents: Joe Williams / Blake Delany

$1,720,000 · Please visit: www.RiversidePerfection.com Exclusive Agents: Joe Williams / Blake Delany

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Spring Jewels Take Bloom PRODUCED AND STYLED BY DANIEL CAPPELLO PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD

SHE IS THE DESIGNER behind the jewelry brand Lulu Frost, which, since its founding in 2004, has been a favorite among both uptown ladies and downtown girls, women from the East Coast and West Coast alike. Lisa Salzer has come to claim a devoted following for her signature blend of antique, vintage, and modern elements in contemporary jewelry design. For generations, her family has been in the estate jewelry business, beginning with her grandmother Elizabeth Rock Frost. Here, taking inspiration from the beauty of spring flowers at the famed Renny & Reed floral and design shop on Park Avenue, Lisa dresses up in the latest fashions while donning jewelry from leading luxury houses Asprey, Harry Winston, Marina B, Roberto Coin, and Wempe. The result is one fruitful bloom. u 92 QUEST


Lisa, in the Nautical Tweed Sheath Dress by Veronica Beard, arranges bunches of white tulips while wearing Wempe’s cultured South Sea pearl and diamond earrings; Asprey’s South Sea and Tahitian pearl necklace with diamond clasp; and Harry Winston’s diamond Lily Cluster bangle set in platinum.


In front of Renny & Reed, the floral and event design shop at 505 Park Avenue, Lisa wears a dress by Lanvin and Manolo Blahnik’s neon green BB heels with Roberto Coin’s Mauresque earrings in 18-kt. yellow gold with diamonds; Roberto Coin’s Pallini necklace in 18-kt. yellow gold; and Marina B’s TRISOLA bangle in 18-kt. yellow gold and pavé diamonds with an inside steel spring. 94 QUEST


Red charm peonies and Stuart Weitzman’s satin and feather evening sandal provide the perfect setting for showing off Marina B’s PYRAMIDE earrings in 18-kt. yellow gold, peridots, and amethysts and Marina B’s TWIN ring in 18-kt. yellow gold with amethyst and blue topaz.


Asprey’s Feather Drop earrings in white diamonds find a natural home on a succulent plant.


Lisa, in a jade silk dress with panel detail by Carolina Herrera, shows off Wempe’s 18-kt. white gold aquamarine pendant and teardrop earrings.

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At left: Lisa, in a wool jacket by Ralph Lauren Black Label, fixes a vase of green dendrobium while wearing Asprey’s pavé diamond small hoop earrings in yellow gold; Marina B’s PLEIADES necklace in diamonds, blue sapphires, yellow sapphires, and 18-kt. yellow gold; and Roberto Coin’s CapriPlus bangle in silver and reclaimed ebony wood with cognac diamonds. At right: In the silk Leighna dress by Ralph Lauren Black Label, Lisa, among spring’s prettiest blooms, wears Roberto Coin’s cocktail earrings in 18-kt. yellow gold with double milk red quartz; Wempe’s Helioro diamond pendant with catena necklace in 18-kt. rose gold; three of Wempe’s Helioro bangles in 18-kt. rose gold and diamonds; and Marina B’s OCA ring. 98 QUEST


In Veronica Beard’s Nautical Tweed Sheath Dress, Lisa prunes purple and green dendrobiums and purple mokara orchids while showing off Harry Winston’s spinel and diamond Marquesa Fashion ring in platinum and yellow gold; Roberto Coin’s Fantasia bangle in 18-kt. white gold and diamonds; Harry Winston’s diamond Lily Cluster bangle set in platinum; and Asprey’s Daisy Heritage bracelet in white diamonds. 100 QUEST


Asprey’s Calla Lily bangle with orange sapphires and tsavorites is paired with cut white calla lilies. Hair styling by Josue Perez for Ricardo Rojas Salon. Makeup by Shiko Vun for Valery Joseph Salon. Photographic assistant: Mariya Chekmarova. Shoot assistant: Stefan Doyno. 102 QUEST


Finding inspiration for an elegant evening setting, Lisa, in Carolina Herrera’s black silk faille dress with asymmetrical pleat inserts, sets the table with white muscari, white hyacinth, and mini white calla lilies while wearing Marina B’s ONDA CROISSANT earrings in 18-kt. yellow gold and diamonds and Harry Winston’s yellow diamond Micropavé ring set in platinum and yellow gold.


FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

This page: The Romanov necklace. Inspired by a historic design from the House of Fabergé, the necklace is articulated in 18-kt. white gold with 2,145 white diamonds and 79 emeralds. The choker detaches from the collar, allowing the two neck-

by the House of Fabergé’s famous Imperial Easter Eggs, from left: Oeuf Impératrice Pompon Emeraude; a sketch of the “Serpent Egg;” Oeuf Zarista Diamants; Oeuf Blanc Impératrice Diamant. 104 QUEST

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laces to be worn separately. Opposite page: An assortment of high and fine pendants inspired


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

THE HOUSE OF FABERGÉ has always spellbound great

American collectors. J.P. Morgan, Consuelo Vanderbilt, and Henry Walters (who sailed his yacht up the River Neva to St. Petersburg just to pay a personal visit to the designer) are just a few of the Gilded Age collectors who sought out the designs of legendary goldsmith Peter Carl Fabergé. Though the house closed after the Russian Revolution, social doyennes including Marjorie Merriweather Post and Lillian Thomas continued to collect the fabulous Imperial Easter Eggs, for which Fabergé is perhaps best known. Other collectors have included Matilda Geddings Gray of Louisiana, India Early Minshall of Ohio, and most recently, MONTH 2008 00


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Joan Rivers, and perhaps most notably Malcolm Forbes—whose collection of Imperial Easter Eggs was unrivaled. This month, Fabergé will open its first store in the U.S. The boutique—located at 694 Madison Avenue—is designed to balance the opulence of the Romanov tradition with the modern sensibility of today’s collector. A distinguished palette of gray and silver accented with regal purple evocative of the Romanov reign will be coupled with a striking facade of champagnecolored lattice inspired by the Coronation Egg, one of the most famous Imperial Eggs originally designed for Tsar Nicholas II. The boutique will house Fabergé’s current high- and finejewelry collections, as well as timepieces, cufflinks, and silver. Designed by creative director and managing director Katharina Flohr, these new one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces include necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and rings. To celebrate the longstanding link between Fabergé and its American collectors, the Madison Avenue boutique will also launch an exclusive collection called “Les Précieuses” to pay tribute to this unique relationship. As this exciting new chapter in Fabergé’s history opens, the American fascination with this unique Russian master is set to continue for another generation of collectors. u


This page: The “Kokoshnik” bangle and corresponding sketches. The wide-cuff bangle is set in 18-kt. white gold and features 2,172 alexandrites, rubies, and diamonds totaling 95.38 carats. Opposite page: The “Délices d’Eté” blue sapphire ring is set in 18-kt. white gold and features 342 multicolored sapphires and diamonds. The center stone is a 10.52-ct. cushion sapphire; the “La Lumière d’Eté” necklace and corresponding sketch. This single-strand necklace and pendant are composed with 18-kt. white gold, featuring 382 multicolored sapphires and white diamonds.


This page: Queen Victoria’s small diamond crown. Opposite page: Snuff box made for King Frederick the Great of Prussia. Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh at a Service of Thanksgiving for Her Majesty’s 80th Birthday at St. Paul’s Cathedral, June 15, 2006 (inset).

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER EVERY YEAR, the Royal Collection hosts a variety of exhibitions,

but the efforts to fête Queen Elizabeth on the occasion of her Diamond Jubilee are particularly notable. The first, “The Queen: 60 Photographs for 60 Years,” is now on view at Windsor Castle through October 28. It celebrates Queen Elizabeth’s 60 years as sovereign, beginning with the early days of her reign in the 1950s and ending with the present day as displayed through a selection of 60 photographs. The work of leading 108 QUEST

press photographers is included, as captured over the past six decades. The selection is varied, showcasing both key events in her life as a monarch and more informal moments with her family. Taken as a collective, the images present a full and wellrounded portait of a unique woman who has had to confront the changing role of an ancient institution as it enters a modern age. But the exhibition also delights in speaking to its subject’s role as daughter, sister, wife, mother, and grandmother.


Taken as a collective, the images present a well-rounded portrait of a unique woman who has had to confront the changing role

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E ROYA L CO LLE C T I O N / I A N J O N E S ( T H E Q U E E N A N D T H E D U K E O F E D I N B U R G H )

of an ancient institution.


This page, clockwise from top: The Williamson Brooch; Queen Victoria’s fringe brooch; the Girls of Great Britian Tiara; the Queen and the Duke at Badminton Horse Trials, 1968. Opposite page: The Coronation necklace and earrings. Airport with her dogs, 1974.

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CO U RTE S Y O F T H E ROYA L CO LLE C T I O N / J O H N S COT T, A LP H A P R E S S ( B A DM I N TO N H O R S E T R I A L S ) / A N WA R H U S S A I N ( T H E Q U E E N W I T H CO R G I S )

The Queen arrives at Aberdeen


Diamonds carry associations of beauty, purity, and magnificence, as well as endurance and longevity. Ultimately, these qualities seem to lend themselves to the Queen’s remarkable reign.

Another special exhibition opens later in the year at Buckingham Palace on June 30. “Diamonds: A Jubilee Celebration” will be an unprecedented display of a number of the Queen’s personal pieces, both inherited and acquired. The show will reveal how extraordinary stones are often reset and reconfigured over the years, allowing for their own fascinating history. Diamonds, in and of themselves, carry associations of beauty, purity, and magnificence. But they are often touted as the hardest substance on earth, a material known for its endurance and longevity. Ultimately, these qualities seem to lend themselves to the Queen’s remarkable reign. u


THE CROWN JEWELS BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

the coronation itself) to the Imperial State Crown (which is used for the opening of Parliament). Written by the Curatorial Director of English Heritage, Anna Kaey, the text describes the development of the collection in the medieval period, the dramatic sale and melting down of almost every piece after the execution of Charles I in 1649, and the remaking of the Crown Jewels for Charles II in 1660. The collection has grown over time with pieces created for momentous events in British history, from the additional regalia created for joint monarchs William III and Mary II, to the crown made for King George V’s inauguration as Emperor of India in 1911. From the regalia, to the processional objects, to the major gems, the Crown Jewels ultimately tells the story of the British monarchy itself through these priceless pieces. u This page, from top: the Imperial State Crown; Queen Elizabeth II; the Queen of England on her wedding day. Opposite page, clockwise from top: The Salt of State, 1630; the sovereign’s sceptre with cross, 1661; St. Edward’s crown, 1661; the coronation regalia of Charles II, 1660-1661; a plate (1660-61) belonging to James, Duke of York; the sovereign’s orb, 1661; the sword of offering, 1820.

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

THE MOST SPECTACULAR collection of royal regalia in the world—from a 12th-century golden spoon used for annointing monarchs at their coronations to the platinum consort crown set with the famous Koh-i-Nûr diamond created for the Queen Mother in 1937— comes to life in a new book entitled The Crown Jewels (Thames & Hudson). Published in association with the Royal Collection and Historic Royal Palaces, this prodigious work is illustrated with nearly 300 images, presenting, for the first time, the complete inventory of this illustrious collection of ceremonial objects housed in the Tower of London and guarded by the famous Yeomen Warders. With special, newly commissioned photography, the collection is revealed through incredibly detailed photographs, allowing for each piece and every gem to be seen by the reader almost as closely as from the perspective of the royal jeweler himself (the only other person in the world other than the Queen allowed to touch the jewels). Compelling groupings of items also illustrate the context, history, and use of many of the pieces in the collection— from St. Edward’s Crown (used only for


CO U RTE S Y O F T H A M E S A N D H U D S O N


PORTRAITS IN MINIATURE BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

PHOTOGRAPHY STRUCK the final blow to the unique art of traditional portrait jewelry but, in a new book by historian Diana Scarisbrick entitled Portrait Jewels: Opulence and Intimacy from the Medici to the Romanovs (Thames & Hudson), this special and rarified world of “portraits in little,” returns to center stage. Beginning in the 16th century, powerful monarchs from the Hapsburg, Medici, Valois, Bourbon, and Tudor families commissioned small portraits by artists including Jacopo da Trezzo, Giancristoforo Romano, François Clouet, and 114 QUEST


This page, clockwise from top left: A badge of the Order of the Star of CO U RT E S Y O F T H A M E S & H U D S O N

India with an onyx cameo portrait of Queen Victoria; a pendant with an onyx cameo traditionally associated with Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots; a gold ring set with a sardonyx double portrait of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette; a gold ring set with a cornelian cameo portrait of Charles I. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: A portrait of Countess Yulia Pavlovna Samoilova wearing a bracelet that holds a cameo portrait of her husband; a pendant with a miniature of George, 3rd Earl of Cumberland; a locket with sapphire cameo of Queen Hortense of Holland.


This page, clockwise from top left: A portrait of Matvei Ivanovich Platov, commander of the Cossacks wearing a miniature of the Prince Regent; a centerpiece for a bracelet with a miniature of Alexander I beneath a 22-ct. diamond; a gold pendant set with an onyx cameo of the Emperor Napoleon habillé with a diamond laurel crown.

Nicholas Hilliard. These tiny masterpieces in turn inspired the most celebrated jewelers of the age including François Dujardin and Etienne Delaune in Paris, George Heriot in Edinburgh and London, and Gabriel Gipfel in Dresden to create beautiful and creative pieces as the settings—not unlike fanciful and elaborate frames for paintings. The tradition continued with each new century bringing its own cultural influence to the designs. The botany craze of the 17th century saw an increase of enameled swags of fruit, flowers, and leaves on portrait medals and miniatures. These boîtes à portraits are often studded with diamonds—a note of luxury associated with the French court of Louis XIV. During the 18th century, the Marquise de Pompadour was a great patroness of cameo-cutters, medallists, and miniaturists, and the Rococo and Neoclassical styles popular in the day are prevelant in the pieces created. While the development of photography all but ended the commissions of miniature portraits, it did give rise to an increase demand for bejeweled and enameled miniature frames to be worn or placed on a table. (These are perhaps best seen in the splendid work of the House of Fabergé.) No matter when the ring, pendant, locket, bracelet, or other objets de luxe was created, the purpose was often the same: allegiance to a ruler, commitment between lovers, affection within a family—sentiments we still carry today. u 116 QUEST


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This page, clockwise from top left: A gold brooch set with an onyx cameo portrait of Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia; a silver medallion with a portrait of Charles I, crowned and wearing the collar of the Order of the Garter, framed in laurel; a cameo habillĂŠ of Pope Pius VII praying at the altar of the Virgin of Sorrows; a gold snuff box, the lid centered around a coronation portrait medal of Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia.


A GRACE FOR ALL AGES

WITH THE INTRODUCTION of its latest collection, Montblanc is paying tribute to one of the most remarkable individuals of all time while simultaneously supporting her artistic legacy. The inimitable Grace Kelly, Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco, has been celebrated the world over for her iconic and timeless style, her artistic talent, and her commitment to helping others. She inspired an entire generation with her poise and elegance, and continues to inspire artists in all walks of creative life. Sharing her ideals of personal fulfillment, compassion, and family values, Montblanc is bringing Princess Grace back into the spotlight with a sumptuous new tribute collection: the Montblanc “Collection Princesse Grace de Monaco.� The collection consists of fine jewelry, timepieces, and writing

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Montblanc’s “Collection Princesse Grace de Monaco,” including fine jewelry, timepieces, and writing instruments, pays tribute to the singular and enduring style of Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco.

This page: Montblanc’s Pétales de Rose Motif Stud Earrings J E W E L RY I M A G E S CO U RTE S Y O F M O N T B L A N C

in white gold and diamonds; Princess Grace, carrying her favorite flower, roses, was the picture of elegance and poise. Opposite page: Montblanc’s Pétales de Rose Motif necklace and earrings in white gold and pavé diamonds; Grace Kelly married Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, in April 1956.

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Each piece in the Pétales Entrelacés Motif reflects the warmth and radiance of Princess Grace’s personality with warm pink gold highlighted by bright diamonds.


The Pétales Entrelacés Motif features finely crafted petals that are interlaced to represent and celebrate the loving union between Princess Grace and

J E W E L RY A N D T I M E PI E C E I M A G E S CO U RT E S Y O F M O N T B L A N C

Prince Rainier III of Monaco.

This page: Montblanc’s Pétales Entrelacés Motif bangle in pink gold and creole earrings in pink gold with demi-pavé of diamonds. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Montblanc’s Pétales Entrelacés Motif bracelet and ring in pink gold with demi-pavé of diamonds; Grace Kelly was known for her sophisticated beauty, as portrayed onscreen in her hit film Rear Window; Montblanc’s Special Edition Timepiece in red gold with diamonds, with pink sapphire rose petal detail.

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This page, from top: Grace Kelly earned the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1954 for The Country Girl; Montblanc’s Jewelry Brunch celebrating the “Collection Princesse Grace De Monaco” at the Hotel Bel-Air, in Los Angeles; Grace Kelly’s classic style endures through today; the Special Edition Fountain Pen in royal purple with champagne gold-plated fittings and a drop-cut pink topaz. Opposite page: Montblanc’s Pétales de Rose Motif long earrings in white gold and diamonds.

instruments inspired by Princess Grace herself and her love of beauty in all its forms. For instance, the Grace de Monaco Pink Rose—created in 1956 on the occasion of her marriage to His Serene Highness Rainier III, Prince of Monaco—is a recurring motif in all editions of the collection, embellished with refined petal-cut stones that pay tribute to the unique rose. And, in fitting with the maison’s decades-long commitment to artists and cultural intitiatives, Montblanc is simultaneously partnering with the Princess Grace Foundation-USA, a nonprofit organization that identifies and assists emerging talent in theatre, dance, and film by awarding grants in various fellowship and scholarship programs. Indeed, through the elegant proportions and timeless designs of its new high jewelry collection and its support of the foundation that bears her name, Montblanc is offering a royal tribute to one of the most regal women of all time. u


“I would like to be remembered as someone who accomplished useful deeds, and who was a kind and loving person.” OF

MONACO

J E W E L RY A N D W R I T I N G I N S T RU M E N T I M A G E S CO U RT E S Y O F M O N T B L A N C

—HER SERENE HIGHNESS PRINCESS G RACE

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This page: Ralph Lauren’s 867 watch for women in 18-kt. white gold with diamonds and a black frame on a green satin strap.

MOMENTS IN TIME BY STEFAN DOYNO

QUEST’s annual watch guide, featuring the latest from BaselWorld and the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie to perennial favorites from fine jewelers, offers the perfect opportunity to improve the way you’re keeping time.


This page, clockwise from top left: Bell & Ross’s WW1-92 Military with distressed calfskin strap; David Yurman’s The Classic World Time, stainless steel case on black matte alligator strap; Girard-Perregaux’s 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time watch; Audemars Piguet’s Extra-thin Royal Oak Tourbillon with blue dial and 18-kt. pink gold case and bracelet; Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Duomètre Sphérotourbillon in rose gold. M AY 2 0 1 2 1 2 5


This page, clockwise from top left: Tiffany & Co.’s Gallery watch; Chopard’s Impériale Chrono in stainless steel with a mother-of-pearl dial; Breguet’s Tradition watch in 18-kt. rose gold with a finely fluted caseband, and black-coated engine-turned 18-kt. gold dial; Vacheron Constantin’s Patrimony Traditionnelle 14-day Tourbillon. Opposite, clockwise from top right: Gucci’s I-Gucci Sport with steel case and orange perforated rubber on black rubber strap; Longines’ Saint-Imier Collection Retrograde Moon Phases watch in stainless steel with brown alligtor strap.

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This page, clockwise from top left: Blancpain’s Traditional Chinese Calendar; Wempe’s Zeitmeister Quartz chronograph in 20 micron gilded with hour, minute, second, and date display; Piaget’s Polo FortyFive Chronograph set with a black ADLC titanium and stainless steel case with a black dial on a black rubber strap with black ADLC coated godroons; Montblanc’s TimeWalker ChronoVoyager UTC with a stainless steel-titanium case; Patek Philippe’s Annual Calendar Chronograph in 18-kt. rose gold and white opaline dial. 128 QUEST


This page: Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master II 44-mm. stainless steel case, 18-kt. Everose gold ring, and command rotatable bezel with a blue ceramic disk.

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SPARKLE AND SHINE BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

“MAGNIFICENT JEWELS” at Sotheby’s features a selection of designer and non-designer pieces from the 19th and 20th centuries, including sales from the estates of Valerie Pascal Delacorte, Eunice Joyce Gardiner, and Nancy Blackburn Hamon. Showing jewelry birthed at a variety of houses—from Boucheron to Mauboussin to Tiffany & Co. to Van Cleef & Arpels—the sale serves as a history of ornamentation since the 1800s. An emerald brooch with carved detail by Cartier from the 1920s (the cover lot for “Magnificent Jewels,”


TURI-L ARKEN STUDIO

Eunice Joyce Gardiner The model, born in London, England, on September 6, 1928, met her second husband, Robert Gardiner, 16th Lord of the Manor of Gardiner’s Island as granted by Charles I, on his birthday at the Everglades Club in Palm Beach. After Robert proposed to Eunice with a 10.25-carat diamond, he gifted her with a diamond brooch and a two-strand pearl necklace as well as a tiara of diamonds—a Gardiner heirloom—and a diamond necklace for their wedding, as pictured above. M AY 2 0 1 2 1 3 1


wholeheartedly, to the narrative; Gardiner, for example, collected everything from antique to David Webb. With diamonds, gemstones, and pearls—spectacular, whether dated or dateless—“Magnificent Jewels” has it all, including a range of diamonds boasting up to 30 carats. Mark Twain said, “Let us not be too particular. It is better to have old second-hand diamonds than none at all.” If anything, “Magnificent Jewels” proves that old second-hand diamonds are a world better than none at all, offering a history that sparkles and shines as much as the jewel itself. u

CO U RT E S Y O F T H E C E C I L B E ATO N A R C H I V E AT S OT H E BY ’ S ( D E L ACO RTE ) ; CO U RTE S Y O F T H E E S TATE O F N A N C Y B L AC K B U R N H A M O N ( H A M O N )

priced between $300,000 and $500,000) is emblematic of the Art Deco period. The French designer, who enjoyed a relationship with India beginning in 1901, was inspired by Eastern interest in Parisian styling and Western interest in exoticism and gemstones, capitalizing on the merging of cultures. Other lots include pieces by Jean Dunand or Raymond Templier that exemplify the Art Moderne period through their architectural aesthetic which was, ultimately, a rejection of the flourishes of the Art Nouveau period. The estates of Delacorte, Gardiner, and Hamon contribute,

Nancy Blackburn Hamon The actress, born in San Antonio in 1919, married Jake Hamon, a businessman who worked in oil, in 1949. Settling in Dallas, the couple was famous for their parties, occasions that included masquerade balls with elephants and cruises around the Mediterranean Sea. Always the belle of the ball, Nancy boasted big baubles and an even bigger heart—she and her husband gave generously to institutions like the Dallas Museum of Art and the Dallas Zoo and Zoological Society. 132 QUEST


Valerie Pascal Delacorte The actress, born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1919, married George Delacorte of Dell Publishing Company in 1959, adopting his passion for philanthropy in New York and Palm Beach. Their legacies include the donation of the Alice in Wonderland sculpture in Central Park and artwork by Rembrandt, Rubens, and Tiepolo at the Norton Museum of Art—beneficiery of sales from the estate of at “Magnificent Jewels,” which includes a cuff bracelet by Buccellati, as pictured above. M AY 2 0 1 2 1 3 3


APPEARANCES

PUPS AND PALM BEACH BY HILARY GEARY

Left to right: Dixon Boardman and Nancy Silverman, supporting the ASPCA; Edwina and Richard Kaplan hosted a cocktail party for friends in Palm Beach.

THERE WAS NO DOUBT that New York City is overflowing with animal lovers as The Plaza burst at the seams for the ASPCA benefit in mid April! The sold-out Bergh Ball was especially festive after a very large gift of $1 million from Carroll Petrie was announced during dinner. The fête started with cocktails, and then it was into the ballroom for a 134 QUEST

seated dinner dance plus an auction by Hugh Hildesley, the star of Sotheby’s who auctioned off such goodies as a Peter Beard photograph, a week’s stay at Michele and Fred Gradin’s fabulous Mustique Island house, Hunt Slomen artwork, and more. In honor of the ASPCA, the auction paddles were faces of pooches and cats. Cute, right? I must say, there

were no dogs in this snappy group which included Arriana and Dixon Boardman, Ed Sayres, Linda and Ben Lambert, Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner, Mark Gilbertson, Allison and Jay Aston, Carolina de Portago who is Carroll Petries granddaughter, Star Jones, Dolly and Jack Geary, Tinsley Mortimer, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Georgina Schaeffer, Felicia


Taylor, Barbara Bancroft and Robert Tartarini, Alexandra Kotur and Jonathan Becker, Muffy and Sherrell Aston, Ellen and Chuck Scarborough, Isaac Mizrahi, Robert and Barbara Taylor Bradford, Bunny Williams and John Rosselli, and lots more. Now, for you art lovers: you have to pop into the Marlborough Gallery to see the amazing show of photographs by Diane Tuft. The talented Diane has traveled the world capturing the effect of ultraviolet light on landscapes and turning them into pure magic. Back down to Palm Beach where there is always something wonderful happening every night, ranging from the fabulous dinner dance hosted by Jill and David Gilmour—the dress request was festive for the ladies and white jackets without ties for the men—to the cowboy clothes

that sits smack on the Atlantic Ocean. The purpose of the dinner as to engage in a conversation about the legacy of President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy and to generate interest surounding the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. During cocktails, lovely Caroline looking very chic in black-and-white Michael Kors, graciously greeted and chatted with all, reminiscing about her happy times in Palm Beach as a child. We then went into a seated dinner, with a menu starting with tomato and mozzarella ravioli followed by lemon chicken. Before the yummy dessert choice of gateaux with layers of chocolate meringue or Key Lime Pie with berries, David Rubenstein, the philanthropist who is chairman of the center and cofounder of the Carlyle Group, chatted with Caroline (à la Charlie Rose) on a stage with two comfy chairs and

Mahoney, Bruce and Susan McAllister, Peter and Sydney Lawford McKelvy, Dede and Laddy Merck, Mila and Brian Mulroney, Sally and Dick Phelps, Lois Pope and Bill Porter, Wilbur Ross, Rick Stephens and Elaine Scott, Owen and Rebecca Williams, Bob and Suzanne Wright, and more. Another Palm Beach treat was the “closing” cocktail party that Richard Kaplan gave in honor of his talented wife Edwina Sandys and her retrospective show at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens. You all know that the lovely Edwina is a granddaughter of Sir Winston Churchill in addition to being a wonderful artist! Everyone turned up to toast her and to applauded the show of more than 60 witty and wonderful sculptures, paintings, drawings, and prints displayed in the gardens, studio, slathouses, and

From left to right: Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Arriana Boardman, and Hugh Hildesley at The Plaza; Mark Gilbertson and Allison Aston at the Bergh Ball.

we all wore to the Western-themed cookout hosted by Bridget and Bill Koch at the Society of the Four Arts where guests were given a chance to see Bill’s remarkable Western art collection. Another highlight was the dinner in honor of Caroline Kennedy and Edwin Schlossberg hosted by Michele and Howard Kessler at that their dazzling contemporary abode

asked her all the questions we wanted to know. All and all, it ws a fascinating evening! Among the group were Gerald and Elaine Schuster, Howard Cox and Peggy Siegal, Chuck and Christine Daly, Pepe and Emilia Fanjul, Bill Finneran and Carol Rohrig, Mark and Mary Freitas, Mei Sze and Jeff Greene, James and Judy Harpel, Nicki and Ira Harris, Hillie

more. Among her fans were Gale and Fred Alger, Averell Harriman Fisk, Anna and Bill Mann, Antony and Mary Underwood, Sharon Sondes and Geoffrey Thomas, Gigi and Harry Benson, Louise Stephaich, Vladimir Kagan, Ava Rossevelt, Diane de la Begassiere, Beth and Bob Hardwick, Lars Bolander, Dale Coudert, and more. u M AY 2 0 1 2 1 3 5


KLOPP

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR For the month of May, founder of What2WearWhere.com Karen Klopp creates a pièce d’occasion with a look from Graff and Valentino, sponsors of American Ballet Theatre’s annual Spring Gala, an exhilarating evening of enchanted elegance.

ON MAY 14, American Ballet Theatre will host the annual Spring Gala at the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. With Michelle Obama, Caroline Kennedy, and Blaine Trump as honorary chairs, the event is set to be a tour de force this social season. First, a one-time performance showcasing the renowned stars of the legendary American Ballet Theatre followed by dinner in the tent at Lincoln Center. The American Ballet Theatre endeavors to create, to present, to preserve, and to extend the great repertoire of classical dancing, through exciting performances and educational programming of the highest quality, presented to the widest possible audience. u For more information, please contact American Ballet Theatre’s special event office at 212.477.3030 or specialevents@ABT.org.


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When the invitation to an event suggests “Red or Black Tie,” what could be more vividly dramatic than this vibrant red Valentino dress (1)? The gossamer lace overlay creates a glissade of graceful movement atop a pair of sleek, shimmery Valentino evening sandals (5). Add to the glamour of it all with a chicly-studded Valentino clutch (4). The Graff diamond butterfly earrings (2) add a finishing touch to the dazzling brilliance of this spectacular ensemble worthy of a standing ovation. Brava! A spritz of Valentinos’s Valentina Eau de Parfum (3) and you’re ready for the ball. Opposite page: Diane B. Wilsey and Slaon Lindemann Barnett, former chairs; the Spring Gala invitation.

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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Around New York—and, this month, Philadelphia—our columnist is on the scene, in black-tie for New Yorkers for Children’s A Fool’s Fête and the Frick Collection’s Belle Époque Ball or cocktail for a couple of Cinema Society screenings. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Lauren Remington Platt dancing with Euan Rellie at the New Yorkers for Children event.


ANA Coco Rocha and Crystal Renn at the New Yorkers for Children Spring Dance, benefiting youth in foster care.

Suzanne Diaz and Harley Viera-Newton together at A Fool’s Fête on April 10.

Stephanie LaCava and Eaddy Kiernan at the New Yorkers for Children event.

Douglas Wurtz and Amanda Richman, in

PATRICK MCMULLAN

Wes Gordon, at A Fool’s Fête on April 10.

Guests, including Alina Cho and Linda Fargo, enjoyed a

Alexandra Wilkis Wilson and Alexa Maybank

three-course meal at the Mandarin Oriental on April 10.

celebrated their book, By Invitation Only.

“WITH ENOUGH COURAGE, you can do without a reputation,” said Rhett Butler in Gone With the Wind. Wondering whether the Young and the Guest List-ers would agree... On March 14, I boarded Amtrak’s Acela Express with Leah Bourne, Becky Katz, and Danielle Walsh. We arrived in Philadelphia to toast the history of Veuve Clicquot, which was introduced to the U.S. in 1782. Two-hundred and thirty years later, the brand continues to bubble, from sea to shining sea. From the station, we trolley’d—the verb of “trolley”—past the Liberty Bell to the waterfront where we stepped onto Moshulu, a ship from 1904 serving as a restaurant. We enjoyed a three-course meal paired with glasses of Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Rosé 1978, Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Blanc 1990, and Demi-Sec, to be released in the fall. Cheers! On the 22nd, the Frick Collection’s Young Fellows hosted

the Belle Époque Ball. Inspired by the “Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting” exhibition, the event raised $240,000 for the Frick Art Reference Library and the Frick Collection’s Education Program. Donna Karan New York sponsored, dressing chairs Olivia Chantecaille, Lydia Fenet, Claiborne Swanson Frank, Clare McKeon, Sloan Overstrom, and Joann Pailey in confections of satin or tulle—I wore a black off-the-shoulder number by Angel Sanchez, welcoming compliments left and right! Conversing over cocktails called "L'Etoile Blanc" or "La Marche Jolie" were Paul Johnson Calderon, Martin De LosCobos, Emma Greenberg, Elizabeth Grimaldi Kurpis, and Frederica Tompkins. It was sensational, and sensationally reminiscent of Paris in the 1870s and 1880s. On April 2, Tyler Ahmuty and I joined Alex Polkinghorn and Mickey Stanley at the Cinema Society screening of Whit M AY 2 0 1 2 1 3 9


Stillman’s Damsels in Distress, hosted with Brooks Brothers and Town & Country. Afterward, guests including Tara Dhingra, Meredith Melling Burke, Rainey Qualley, Amy Sacco, and Arthur Wayne gathered at the SoHo Grand where they indulged in Woodbridge Sparkling Wine. There, I remembered Greta Gerwig’s character saying, “Do you know what’s the major problem in contemporary social life? The tendency to always seek someone cooler than yourself.” With that, I reintroduced myself to Chace Crawford. On the 4th, the Cinema Society premiered HBO's Girls with an after-party at the top of the Standard. Judd Apatow and Lena Dunham represented the show and guests included Claire Danes, Fran Lebowitz, Minnie Mortimer, Zac Posen, and Terry Richardson. Thanks heaven for HBO’s Girls! On the 5th, the Beineckes honored Quest and Q’s Daniel Cappello and his book, The Ivy League, with a reception. There, the Kingsmen, an a cappella group from Columbia University,

Gerwig at the SoHo Grand on April 2 (inset).

performing for Upper East Siders and more, including Allison Aston, Darrell Hartman, and Punch Hutton. The hors d’oeuvres were themed—for example, Harvard University was represented by lobster rolls. Anyway, there’s no waitlist to purchase The Ivy League so, yeah, visit assouline.com! On the 10th, New Yorkers for Children hosted A Fool’s Fête, benefiting youth in foster care. There, I swirled around with Carson Griffith and Ted Gushue, admiring Doutzen Kroes, Lela Rose, and Dani Stahl while peacocking in a Haute Hippie dress with a feather print. At dinner, my seat was sandwiched between Lindsay Ellingson and Erin Heatherton who were, you know, angelic—and the reason I didn’t eat my roll. By the time the blueberry tart and chocolate mousse was served, Savannah Engel, Reed Hague, and Kristian Laliberte were on the dancefloor. On the 12th, Salvatore Ferragamo reopened its store on Fifth

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Billy Magnussen at the Cinema Society screening of Damsels in Distress; Chloê Sevigny and Greta


Andrew Saffir and Daniel Benedict celebrated the “Cartier and Aldo Cipullo, New York City in the 70s” exhibition.

Jeffrey Caldwell and Sloan Overstrom at the reopening of Salvatore Ferragamo’s store.

Karli Kloss and Derek Blasburg viewed the Juste un Clou collection from Cartier.

Several bottles of Cartier-brand champagne on ice at Skylight Studios on April 12.

Charlotte Ronson at the top of the Standard following the Cinema Society screening of HBO’s Girls.

Alison Brod at the after-party for the Cinema Society screening of HBO’s Girls.

Leigh Lezark and Sophia Lamar at an after-party for

Sarah Reynolds and Beth Garrabrant at the

Cartier at Skylight Studios on April 12.

reopening of Salvatore Ferragamo’s store. M AY 2 0 1 2 1 4 1


A couple of women admiring artwork at the Frick Collection’s Young Fellows Ball on March 22.

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Avenue, in support of the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where Tripp Potter and I bumped into Edward Barsamian before cabbing to a reception for By Invitation Only by Alexis Maybank and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson—a fellow Brearley and Exeter graduate! Then, it was to the Cartier Mansion for the “Cartier and Aldo Cipullo, New York City in the 70s” exhibition followed by an after-party celebrating the relaunch of the Juste Un Clou collection by Cartier at Skylight Studios. We topped off the evening with some champagne and a Beyonce and Jay-Z (!!!) sighting... u


Carson Griffith, Francis MacArthur, and Drew Grant attended a book party for The Ivy League by Daniel Cappello at a maisonette on the Upper East Side on April 5.

A guest wearing a wreath of red flowers at the Belle Époque Ball at the

Andrew Hoover aboard a trolley in Philadelphia

Frick Collection on March 22.

for Veuve Clicquot’s 230th year in the U.S.

Guests toasted with Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Rosé 1978 and Veuve

The Kinsgmen from Columbia University

Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Blanc 1990.

performed at a book party for The Ivy League.

Candace and Rick Beinecke honored Daniel Cappello and his book The Ivy League on the Upper East Side on April 5.

Lacary Sharpe and Clay Floren at the Belle Époque Ball at the Frick Collection.

A guest, accessorizing with a fan and sunglasses from

Cub Barrett and Chris Rovzar toasted Daniel

Veuve Clicquot, drinks champagne aboard Moshulu.

Cappello and his new book, The Ivy League. M AY 2 0 1 2 1 4 3


SNAPSHOT

A GEM FOR ALL SEASONS Clockwise from top, beginning with January and ending with December: David Yurman earrings with garnets, $1,650; Asprey ring with amethysts, $8,000; Asprey ring with aquamarines, $7,800; Asprey feather earrings with diamonds, $15,400; Tiffany & Co. clip with emerald, $275,000; Mikimoto pearl earrings, $55,000; Harry Winston 8.12-carat ruby ring, price upon request; Tiffany & Co. ear clips with peridots, price upon request; Tiffany & Co. bracelet with sapphires, price upon request; Mikimoto ring with fire opal, $55,000; David Yurman enhancer with citrine, $4,900; Tiffany & Co. bracelet with turquoise, $220,000.

THE HISTORY OF BIRTHSTONES is rooted in the bible: “And Aaron shall bear the names of the children of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart when he goeth in unto the holy place for a memorial before the Lord continually” (Exodus 28.29). The breastplate, designed by God, featured twelve gemstones that were dedicated to the twelve tribes of Israel. The story evolved, and by 5 A.D. the twelve gemstones were associated with the twelve signs of the zodiac. But rather than wearing a birthstone, one wore different gemstones through the ascending and descending of the planets for their perceived powers. It wasn’t until the 18th century, with the introduction of Jewish traders to Eastern Europe, that birthstones emerged—an effort to stimulate sales. 144 QUEST

In 1912, the National Association of Jewelers assigned gemstones to months: garnet for January, amethyst for February, aquamarine for March, diamond for April, emerald for May, pearl for June, ruby for July, peridot for August, sapphire for September, opal for October, topaz for November, and turquoise for December. The list remains, despite the 2002 addition (and subsequent removal) of tanzanite in an attempt to better market the gemstone. Today, “bespoke” is a buzzword for consumers, and birthstones offer a customized option without requiring customization. So, relish in your ruby or sapphire and, whether or not you were born in April, don’t be shy about decorating your birthstone in diamonds.—Elizabeth Quinn Brown


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Available at Ralph Lauren stores, R A LPHL AU R EN.COM and the fi nest eyewear and sunglass boutiques

Quest May 2012  

The Jewelry Issue

Quest May 2012  

The Jewelry Issue