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13 20 THE GREENWICH ISSUE

PRINCE HARRY WITH NACHO FIGUERAS AT THE SENTEBALE ROYAL SALUTE POLO CUP IN GREENWICH

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96

110

CONTENTS THE G REENWICH I SSUE 74

BLAZE OF COLOR

80

A colorful look at the history of blazers—a term that originated

at St. John's College, Cambridge.

80

GREENWICH AVENUE

84

A POINT IN TIME

88

TAILORED FOR THE TOWN

90

CHARM AND STYLE

96

CONNECTICUT COMFORT

BY

JACK C ARLSON,

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

A guided stroll down the suburban street. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

From Monakewego to Greenwich Point. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Hermès fêtes its Greenwich opening. BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER

A look at C. Z. Guest—the boldness behind the blond. BY LIZ SMITH Decorator Cindy Rinfret opens up her home, Laurel Hill,

in Greenwich Style: Inspired Family Homes (Rizzoli).

100

F.E. C ASTLEBERRY

MODERN NATURE: O'KEEFFE AND LAKE GEORGE

BY

E LIZABETH Q UINN B ROWN

A close look at the history

behind the exhibit of Georgia O'Keeffe's pivotal work at Lake George.

104

KINGS OF THE HEARTLAND

POLO SECTION

TONY HALL

Anthony Edgeworth's Legendary Golf Clubs

of the American Midwest is as good as hitting the links.

110

BY

BY

MICHAEL M. THOMAS

A roundup of the sport, featuring Prince Harry and Nacho Figueras.

104


62 58

CONTENTS 72

C OLUMNS 20

SOCIAL DIARY

56

SOCIAL CALENDAR

58

HARRY BENSON

60

OBSERVATIONS

62

FRESH FINDS

66

JEWELRY

68

OPEN HOUSE

122

APPEARANCES

124

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

128

SNAPSHOT

A burst before summer, in the city and its suburbs.

BY

D AVID P ATRICK C OLUMBIA

Our guide to the goings-on in New York, in the Hamptons, and beyond.

William F. Buckley, Jr., is described as the perfect gentleman by our columnist. An anecdote about Halston's visit to Kensington Palace. BY TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

A medley of styles for warmer weather. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Personalized perfection from Katie Schloss of Three Jane. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Bob McCaffrey is the go-to in the Hudson River Valley.

BY

K ATHERINE W HITESIDE

Enjoying the weather with friends at the Central Park Conservancy. BY HILARY GEARY Busy as a bee, throughout the month of May.

Connecticut and New York competed to own this island.

BY

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


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HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

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HARRY BENSON DARRELL HARTMAN BILL HUSTED MICHAEL THOMAS JAMES MACGUIRE

Greenwich: The Perspective of Time July 17 – September 1, 2013

ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY JEANNE CHISHOLM MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD JACK DEUTSCH BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN JULIE SKARRATT

A juried show by the Stamford Photography Club

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Now taking the lead: Prince Harry was on our June 2005 cover, but behind his older brother (left); from princes to [k]nights, “Starry Night” from the Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit (right).

GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT, has been prominently appearing in the news lately. Its reputation as “the richest town per capita in the world” has held true, as evidenced by the 50-acre Greenwich estate currently on the market for a cool $190 million, one of the most expensive ever listed in the United States. And recently, there has been a renewed interest in what many consider to be New York City’s most famous suburb, and a cosmopolitan flair has been added to the stately small-town atmosphere. It also never hurts to have a prince come visit. Yes, Prince Harry popped over to Greenwich during his recent U. S. tour for the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup. The younger Windsor brother, who has been captivating the public with his charm and joie de vivre, arrived to a crowd eager to see if he was just as wonderful in person. Spoiler: He was. And who better to grace our Greenwich Issue cover than a regal royal in the saddle? We (as well as most of the ladies in attendance) were sad to see him hop back over the pond. Our own Greenwich native, Elizabeth Quinn Brown, lovingly spearheads this issue, and gives an insider’s scoop on the preppy styles, grand houses, and nostalgic past of the town she knows best. If you ever need reliable recommendations of what to do, where to go, and most importantly, who to go with, she’s the one to call. The fondest memory this former debutante has of Greenwich? “It’s where I learned to play ice hockey.” Mean girls would do well to remember that our sweet Lizzie has a pugilistic side. Another complex woman, C. Z. Guest, is fondly remembered by our talented columnist Liz Smith. Liz reveals C. Z.’s charitable nature, which, combined with her strong sense of self, made her one of the most beloved members of high society. While everyone remembers her as the style icon of a simple but elegant American look, the chic exterior hid a woman who laughed frequently and loved fully. Love bound together Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz during their time at Lake George, and Tony Hall looks at how 18 QUEST

the experience and locale influenced O’Keeffe’s work. “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” is an exhibition of her work on display in Glens Falls, New York, and art lovers should look up the train schedule as soon as possible. After admiring her work, some adventurers might want to take that train out to the Midwest, as Michael M. Thomas makes the case that the golf courses and clubs out there are not to be missed. But if you can’t spare the time, he recommends Anthony Edgeworth’s beautiful book, Legendary Golf Clubs of The American Midwest, whose glossy pages and wonderful stories will transport you there. Get ready to smell the fairways from your armchair. All of this lush countryside gets us ready to look forward to the summer, and future travels ahead. Can’t wait to be cleared for takeoff! X

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Nacho Figueras, of the St. Regis team, and Prince Harry, of the Sentebale Land Rover team, at the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup in Greenwich, Connecticut. The event marked the conclusion of Prince Harry’s tour of the United States. Photography by Dominic James.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY the legitimacy of the title. I knew that would happen when I made the reference but, as an American, it makes no difference what’s proper in that department since it’s a salutation that is distinctly foreign. The de Lesseps family title is French. The first was given to the uncle of Ferdinand de Lesseps by Louis XVI and

the second to the father of Ferdinand de Lesseps by Napoleon I. (The one related to “The Countess” is Ferdinand, who in the late 19th century built the Suez Canal.) The use of the de Lesseps title in the 21st century is really an anachronism, but still happily employed whenever necessary. People rank and rag on the business of titles but like the

King Edward VII of England

Princess Margarita of Romania 20 QUEST

sound of them from their own lips anyway. Americans definitely do—it separates the riff from the raff, among other human endeavors in the making and getting of money. Titles are always “honorary” and are all over the place in Europe. Many are now centuries old. It’s a brand of scorekeeping. You can even buy one if you know the right

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall

Count and Countess de Lessepps and their children

CO U RTE S Y O F DAV I D PAT R I C K CO LU M B I A

THE NAME ABOVE the Title. A European friend sent me an email, correcting a reference I made in print to LuAnn de Lesseps as The Countess de Lesseps. According to Debrett’s—the authority on etiquette, taste, and achievement—such is not the proper way to address the divorced wife of a titled count. My friend also took issue with


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A people. Maybe not that of prince or duke, and rarely that of your majesty, but there are others still precious enough to accommodate the ego of its holder, and to impress the neighbors sufficiently. You can marry it, too. Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall attended the opening of Parliament with hubby, H.R.H. Charles, Prince of Wales, a couple of weeks ago and was wearing a tiara that had belonged to Charles’s gram, the late Queen Mum. The presence of said tiara on the duchess’s head was seen by some as a signal that she may one day be “queen” herself. If that happens, people will be required to address the greatgranddaughter of Charles’s great-great-great-grandfather’s mistress, Mrs. Keppel. So it can all take time, but one never knows, does one? Nevertheless, it’s all a

description of elitist tendencies that have existed in all “civilized” societies—old or ancient—all acquired early in life by anyone who has access to a lot of money or is born to the right parents. In the case of LuAnn de Lesseps, now divorced from the grandson or greatgrandson of the viscount canal builder, it’s a moot point. She can call herself anything she likes because: (1.) she’s in Show Business, and (2.) Americans don’t know the difference, and she’s got a career to manage. I understand the tradition of the proper address, but as a born-and-bred Amurrrican, it seems awkward to relate to on a one-on-one basis. A few weeks ago, I was seated next to Crown Princess Margarita of Romania, who was the honored guest and speaker at the Versailles Foundation dinner at The Pierre.

The princess a very nice woman—very comme il faut, as they say—and easy to engage in conversation about the world and how she experiences it. I liked her, although I can’t bring myself to call someone “Princess” unless that is her name. Same with “Your Royal Highness,” which also sounds absurd to the American ear and is a hindrance to having an honest communication. But that’s my American-ness. The princess and I had a fairly intense conversation about what New York was like to her after having been away for more than 10 years. She is a keen observer and also curious—a rare quality these days. We also talked about her family’s return to Romania 60 years after her father, King Michael I, abdicated his throne in 1947 when the Communists took over. She is now officially the

Crown Princess, appointed by her father, the representative of the family back in their land. She is working to assist in reviving the country to what it was in the days of yore (but without a monarchy), or what it might have been today had it not had to endure the savage insanity of Hitler, Stalin, et al. What impressed me was her awareness and apparent dedication to a native, natural purpose. As far as her being a “Crown Princess,” it had no bearing on the pleasure or gravity of our conversation. Coincidentally, a couple of nights after that dinner, I was in a taxi where I learned the cabbie was Romanian. A gruff sort of guy at first, polysyllabic in his replies to my questions about him. I aroused his curiosity when I told him that the night before I had been at a dinner with a member of the royal family of Romania.

G R E E N W I C H P R E S E R VAT I O N T R U ST W E LC OM E D S P R I N G B AC K TO C O N N EC T I C U T

Russell Reynolds, Jo Conboy, Rob Aaronson and Debbie Reynolds 22 QUEST

Donna Moffly, Betty Brown, Gaby Hall and Janie Galbreath

Cruger and Nancy Fowler

Bill Gedale and Katie Brown with Lile Gibbons

KK Lowther, Pam Pagnani, Linda Hodge and George Lowther

Elise and Greg Green with their family

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E G R E E N W I C H P R E S E RVAT I O N T RU S T

Kevin and Margaret Conboy with Debbie DiRaimo and Sal Scalisi


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A successful real estate transaction means having a team that can pull all the elements together flawlessly. From buying and selling to appraisals, mortgage financing and rentals, top experts on AskElliman.com offer timely answers to today’s questions about all things real estate. With the largest regional and global network, Douglas Elliman has the influence, savvy and resources to personally guide you from beginning to end. Put the power of Elliman to work for you.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O R T I C U LT U R E S O C I E T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S D I N N E R D A N C E AT T H E A LT M A N B U I L D I N G

Sheila Stephenson

Missey Condie and Kamie Lightburn

(I also pointed out also that I knew they were no longer the family of power.) He asked which member I’d dined with. When I told him it was Princess Margarita, he became very excited and animated. He loves her father, King Michael I, who is now in his early 90s. He recounted how Michael had given a speech at some occasion in the U.K. a few years ago. And even at his great age, he was wearing—a half century later—“the same suit” he wore when he abdicated his throne in 1947. “He is a man of great humility!” the cabbie stated, adding with certain pride of person, “And he was 24 QUEST

CeCe and Lee Black

seated next to the Queen of England, his cousin!” The cabbie referred to “His Royal Highness” as representing the best spirit of “his people.” The best always has the real title. The Merry Month of May in New York. Wednesday, May 1. The Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy’s 31st annual Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon, which is popularly known as the “Hat Luncheon.” I’ve been covering this lunch for years, and it seemed it was hattier this year than ever before. Many were very stylish, some very funny, others amusing, and some occasionally a question mark. I liked it all. You could see the influence of

Mario Buatta and Clare Potter

Julie Skarratt and Howard Christian

Kate Middleton in the crowd too. There were a couple of girls (young women) who kind of looked like her. One thousand and three hundred guests under the vast, white tent. Festive mood. A beautiful day in the park’s festooning and flowering Botanical Garden, taking place behind the Vanderbilt Gates on Fifth Avenue and 104th Street. The trees are in full, fresh bloom in that shiny, lime-green shade, and so were the tulips, in masses. They honored Jenny and John Paulson, who last October donated $100 million to the Central Park Conservancy. This is the largest sum ever given to the organization (the

Martin and William Dessoffy

Charles and Cristina Masson

lunch raised $3.3 million this year—a record). Mr. Paulson also didn’t request that his or anyone else’s name be placed anywhere in or around the park, although the nature of his donation is significant and civic-worthy. That, too, signified a fresh outlook. The night’s jam-packed calendar: The Art and Antique Dealers League of America opened its spring show at the Park Avenue Armory with a preview to benefit the ASPCA. Down at Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers, the International Center of Photography hosted its ICP Infinity Awards, featuring a presentation with actor Jeff Bridges, who is also a serious photographer.

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Carolina Zapf and Douglas Steinbrech

Yanna Avis, Luigi Vittadini and Violaine Bernbach

And down at the Joyce Theater, they were holding the Stephen Petronio Company Spring Gala, featuring the world premier of Like Lazarus Did (LLD 4/30). Meanwhile, up at the Academy Mansion at 2 East 63rd Street, the Financial Times was hosting its 125th anniversary party. Also that night, the annual Jazz at Lincoln Center gala benefit, which featured a concert by the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and Crosby, Stills, and Nash. Ashley Schiff Ramos produced the concert. There was another important event over at Cipriani 42nd Street, where Liz Smith’s Literacy Partners was holding its annual gala. Anyway, the Crosby, Stills, and Nash concert got underway at 7:30 p.m. when Bette Midler appeared on stage to introduce the evening’s honoree, Mica Ertegun. Mica and her late husband, Ahmet Ertegun, 26 QUEST

Bob Steel and Audrey Gruss

Billie Jean King and Harry Leeds

have been major benefactors of Jazz at Lincoln Center. The Turkish-born Mr. Ertegun and his brother were sons of the Turkish ambassador in the 1930s. They were avid fans of American jazz and pursued it by founding Atlantic Records. Midler told us that she first met the family when she was a kid and signed with Atlantic Records, which was a major career coup for her. The Erteguns took her under their wing and they became friends. She said their philanthropy all over the world is legend. Their fellowships for study of the humanities at Oxford is the largest endowment for a fellowship ever given to Oxford in its 900-year history. The combination of Mica Ertegun and Crosby, Stills, and Nash brought out a big, black-tie crowd. More than 800. They raised $3.7 million. Thursday, May 2. I went over to Sotheby’s, where the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery

Jackie Drake

Renée Fleming and Peter Brown

Liz Smith

Alina Cho, Jane Friedman and Sheila Nevins

Foundation was hosting its seventh annual Connoisseur’s Dinner. The foundation was established in 1998—15 years ago—by brothers Leonard Lauder and Ronald Lauder. Their mission: to accelerate the discovery of drugs to prevent, treat, and cure Alzheimer’s disease, related dementias, and cognitive aging. In that time, the ADDF has granted more than $60 million to fund more than 400 drug research programs at academic centers and biotechnology companies in 18 countries. It was the epitome of a black-tie evening. Leonard Lauder spoke briefly about the progress they are making in research, as did Dr. Howard Fillit, who is the founding executive director and chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation. The dinner co-chairs were Nancy Corzine, Sir Evelyn and Lady

de Rothschild, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Goodes, Leonard Lauder, the Honorable and Mrs. Ronald Lauder, and Mr and Mrs. Randal Sandler. The honorary chairs were Jamie Niven and Mr and Mrs. William Ruprecht. There was a special film clip, a rough-cut scene from the still untitled Glen Campbell documentary, presented by director/producer James Keach. In the film, Campbell, who is in early stages of Alzheimer’s, recorded a song about his experience. Alzheimer’s affects one in three Americans over 80 and there are more than 5 million currently suffering from the disease. Paula Zahn was given the Chairman’s Award. (Paula’s mother is currently deeply afflicted.) The sons of the lady who built an empire out of a single fragrance product have taken her legacy to greater heights for the good of all of

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA R K I N S O N ’ S D I S E A S E FO U N D AT I O N H O ST E D “ C E L E B R AT E S P R I N G ” AT L AVO N E W YO R K

Sherrell Andrews and Rob Kahbach

Kate Shillo and Andrew Gustin

Virginia Powell and Penn Egbert

us—of mankind. When Leonard Lauder assured the guests on Thursday night that they were making great progress, I’d bet everyone in the room believed him for the same reason I did. Sunday, May 5, 2013. 32,000 bicycle riders participated in a Five Boro Bike Tour to raise money for the Boston Marathon bombing victims. It was a 40-mile car-free ride through the five boroughs. On a much lighter note (but still not without its sad subtexts, the stuff that novels are made of), the Greek island of Skorpios—where Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, married the widow of our assassinated President John F. Kennedy—has been sold. (Or technically, leased.) The seller was Onassis’s granddaughter, whom he never lived to know, and the only surviving heir to the fortune, Athina 00 QUEST

Jonathan Romero, Jr., and Lee Wagner

Missy Sheehan with Jeff and Sarah Pribyl

Onassis Roussel. The 28-year-old leased it to Ekaterina Rybolovleva, who is 24, for a rumored $150 million. Grampa Onassis bought the rock of 74 acres in the Ionian Sea off Greece 50 years ago for 20,000 bucks, which is 1/7,500 of the current rumored price. It was a barren island when he picked it up. He brought in utilities, planted forests, and built beaches, several buildings, and residences—plus a helicopter pad. He could also park his famous yacht, the Christina (named for his daughter, Athina’s late mother), at the water’s edge. A second island, Sparti, was included in the new deal. Skorpios is also the burial place for Onassis’s son, Alexander, who died in a plane crash when in his 20s, and his daughter, Christina, who died at age 37 when Athina was 3 years old. What will the young Russian woman do

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Georgina Schaeffer and Marcia Schaeffer


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A MADISON SQUARE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB’S “PURSE S AND PURSENALITIE S” LUNCHEON AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

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with all that resort property? The Greek press reported that she intended to build a resort for the world’s rich and powerful, athough there are other purported explanations for the acquisition. The official purchaser was a trust in Ms. Rybolovlev’s name. Her pa is a rich Russian named Dimitry Rybolovlev, who used to be the fertilizer king of Russia. He sold his interest in Urakali, the country’s largest producer of potassium fertilizer, for $6.5 billion. According to the Forbes 400, he is the 119th 30 QUEST

Susan Meyer, David Patrick Columbia and Libby Fitzgerald

Jennifer Creel and Cynthia Lufkin

richest person in the world. Ms. Rybolovlev also owns the $88-million penthouse that her father purchased for her from Joan and Sandy Weill at 15 Central Park West. At the time, it was said to be purchased so she’d have someplace to put up her feet while attending college classes in Manhattan. Sounds sensible. Daddy (Mr. Rybololev) is himself the proud owner of a house that Donald Trump bought, fixed up, and flipped for $95 million—the highest price ever at the time for a

Valerie Urry and Marina Killery

single-family home in the United States. Purchased in cash, the 60,000-square-foot, beachfront is known as Maison de L’Amitie. But if that weren’t enough shelter for the former Russian fertilizer king, five years ago, in 2008, he also bought a penthouse in Monte Carlo for $300 million. It’s only money! Oh, the same year Mr. Rybolovlev bought in Monaco, he acquired a villa owned by Will Smith on the Hawaiian island of Kauai—for a mere $20 million. Aside from the realtors’

Kate and Alex Donner

Courtney Arnot and Jill Fairchild

boon, his ex-wife, Elena Rybolovlev, mother of Ekaterina, is suing the old man for divorce. She was married to Dimitry for almost 25 years and he had two children with her when he decided to take a powder. She claims Dimitry bought the Weills’s apartment for $88 million, not for Ekaterina, but for “the specific intent of hiding and diverting his personal interest in the property” from his wife. Elena’s now out to freeze Dimitry’s assets in courtrooms everywhere, so they say.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Eric Javits and Emily Leonard


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A It came as a great shock to Americans back in 1968 when Jackie Kennedy’s mother, Janet Auchincloss, announced to the press that her daughter was marrying Mr. Onassis the next day. The first thing the ordinary American thought, if he or she even knew who the man was, was: “Why that dog?” Jackie was the most famous, most admired woman in the world. Her husband’s death was still deeply etched in the thoughts of many Americans and their empathy and sympathy for her and her children was almost religious in its reverence. Aristotle Onassis was sort of a mythical character, one of the leaders of the Greek shipping tycoon crowd. But he also had a reputation for being a shady kind of character. He had made his main (untaxed) headquarters in Monaco. He had been married once, to

a daughter of the shipping tycoon Stavros Livanos. They had two children, Alexander and Christina. It was not a happy life. Eventually they divorced and she married the present Duke of Marlborough (wife number two for him). All the while Ari had a long, publicized affair with Maria Callas. Jackie and her sister, Lee Radziwill, came into Onassis’s social orbit in the late 1950s. Peter Evans’s book Nemesis is a must-read for the background of the sisters’ relationships with Onassis. Skorpios became famous because of the Kennedy imprint. Within very few years of the wedding, however, there were rumors about the marriage being on the rocks. Jackie Onassis was in New York for the children’s school year most of the time. And when Ari came, he often stayed elsewhere. He wanted

it, he got it. They hadn’t been divorced, however, when he died in 1975. Whatever the pre-nup was, Jackie evidently walked away with $20 million or so, according to all the reports— of course, it doesn’t mean that it’s true. Christina, by then, was already a troubled poor little rich girl. It was said that she hated Jackie. She thought Jackie married her father for his money. No kidding. Christina was married several times. Not for her money, of course. Her third or fourth husband was a good-looking heir to a French pharmaceutical fortune named Thierry Roussel. With him, she had her only child, Athina, named from Christina’s mother Athina (Tina) Livanos. Athina was three years old when her mother’s heart gave out, attributed to excessive medications and drugs as well as mental exhaustion. The

child inherited the Onassis fortune. She was brought up by her father and his wife, who had been his girlfriend when he was married to Christina and with whom he had two more children. When she was 18, Athina came into the first part of her fortune. When she married at 20, her father and stepmother were not invited to the wedding, according to press reports. Can’t buy you love. The young woman is now an accomplished equestrienne, and married to Álvaro de Miranda Neto (known as Doda to friends), an Olympic showjumper. Just last April, the Onassis de Mirandas took part in the FTI Winter Equestrian festival in Wellington, Florida, where they keep a house. De Miranda placed first in his category and won $150,000. Athina came in third in her category. Monday, May 6. City

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Elsie Reid and Dixie de Kooning 32 QUEST

Mariana Kaufman, Topsy Taylor, Donna Acquavella and Charlotte Ford

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Kathryn Steinberg, Joy Ingham and Edwin Ayala

Adrienne Vittandini and Muffie Potter Aston

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A W OM E N ’ S VO I C E S FO R C H A N G E AT T H E H A R MO N I E C L U B

Marshall Heyman

Harvest’s annual “On Your Plate” luncheon at the Metropolitan Club. Martha Stewart was the speaker. There are more than 1.7 million New Yorkers now living in poverty. Basics like food, rent, and medical are often financially out of reach. City Harvest feeds more than a million people a year. They rescue more than 115,000 pounds of food daily, and they redistribute it to almost 600 community programs all over the city. They are fighting hunger or, in modern technospeak, “food insecurity.” That means not enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members, no matter what you call it. The most popular charities in New York are those that involve the personal issues and interests of the givers in one way or another. Medical research, hospital support, the parks, the libraries, the 34 QUEST

Shelley Carr, Heather Leeds, Lesley Francis and Bambi Putnam

Catherine Wood

Clelia Zacharias and Wendy Mills

colleges, religious, educational, and mental health. The social and humane philanthropies lag behind like stepchildren—cared for, but without the empathy required to coax donations. This is just the way we are. Most of us, that is. It is the ultimate dilemma for all life. Men and women who can pay $250, $500, or $1,000 for a ticket to lunch are not that hungry. What they are is empathic. They possess a sense of responsibility to one’s fellows. They don’t personally relate to the issue unless they are on a diet—and even then, the feeling that intrudes is often guilt, not the pangs of food deprivation. Also, a great many of us are on diets if we know what’s good for us. The millions going to bed without food or enough food every night is growing in this country, to previously unimagined percentages. More

Chesie Breen and Lisa McCarthy

Ellen Levine

Mary Kelly Selover and Grace Haggerty

than 47 million Americans are using food stamps. These people are hurting, and, for their children, it is even worse. Much worse. This is ironic, considering the fact that the United States is potentially the breadbasket of the world, as it was 40 years ago. All of this is bad news. It’s not the stuff people want to read. There’s enough bad news available everywhere else in our world. What we are being forced to do now, however, by the state of our finances, both as a nation and as individuals, is to look at how we are going to sustain a society that can live healthily and in peace with on another. Without food, we won’t. Wednesday, May 8. Evening, at The Pierre, CASAColumbia (the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University) hosted its 21st anniversary dinner. CASA was founded in

1992 by Joe Califano. They honored Leslie Moonves and Julie Chen, Tom Coughlin (head coach of the New York Giants), and Jamie Lee Curtis. Master of ceremonies was Norah O’Donnell, co-host of “CBS This Morning.” Jamie Lee Curtis told us right off that she was an alcoholic and addicted to prescription drugs. And a child of the same. She’s recovered, but the statement stands. Curtis is a dynamic speaker. She’s got gumption, not to mention (despite her humility) the tricks of the trade; she’s an actress, after all. She can use that to make her point all the more effectively. And she did. You like her. You listen. They raised $1.5 million. Thursday, May 9. The Women and Science Lecture and Luncheon at the Rockefeller University on York Avenue and 67th Street.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Colleen Caslin and Maria Bartiromo


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A This is a very prestigious luncheon in the New York scheme of things. Its roster of supporters includes some of the most active philanthropists in the city and the world. Rockefeller University, a.k.a. Rockefeller Institute—and, at the time of its founding more than a century ago, Rockefeller Hospital—once upon a time ministered to patients. During the Depression of the 1930s, children of financially stressed, working people, a.k.a. the poor, found free first-rate treatment there. Yes, really. It is one of those great Rockefeller-founded philanthropies that makes tangible differences in the lives of individuals and in the health

and welfare of society. More recently, it was the first institution in our country devoted solely to biomedical research. The Women and Science event is a fundraiser, organized by large group of women and men. They contribute more than $1 million annually to support research and education at the university. This luncheon always begins with a lecture. This year’s was “Ancient Molecules and the Modern Brain: Understanding Our Social Nature,” given by Cori Bargmann, Ph.D., of the Torsten N. Wiesel Professor Lulu and Anthony Wang Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior at Rockefeller

University. An excellent teacher. A tall, attractive woman with a gentle, matterof-fact style of lecturing. Her grasp of her subject is awesome and perhaps because of that, she can ply your imagination so you’re compelled to listen. She talked about the similarities of all living creatures, using worms as a base example. Like us, they can taste, smell, seek physical comfort, and bond (among other similarities). She talked about oxytocin, a mammalian hormone that plays a role in sexual reproduction during and after childbirth, as well as in facilitating birth, and maternal bonding of all living creatures. From the worm to

us. Its presence also plays a key role in various behaviors such as social recognition, pair bonding, anxiety, and orgasm. This is you that I’m talking about. Me. Us. And all. We. Monday, May 13, 2013. American Ballet Theatre held its opening night spring gala at the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. This is one of those big, beautiful social events on the spring calendar. Black-tie, and the ladies dress for it. Honorary chairs were Michelle Obama, Caroline Kennedy, and Blaine Trump. President Obama happened to be in town but the First Lady did not appear at Lincoln Center. Neither did

A P R E V I E W O F T H E S C U L P T U R E A N D A N T I Q U E S F A I R AT N E W YO R K B O TA N I C A L G A R D E N

Barbara and Tom Israel 36 QUEST

Judy Steinhardt, Gregory Long and Susan Burke

Catherine Singer and Jennifer Rominiecki

Linda and Robert Douglass

Holly Bannister, Martha Stewart and Memrie Lewis

Gigi Mortimer

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Carolyne Roehm


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R E A S T C A N C E R A L L I A N C E H O S T E D A B R I D G E TO U R N A M E N T AT T H E G R E E N W I C H C O U N T R Y C L U B

Debbie Black and Yonni Wattenmaker

Mrs. Kennedy. Co-chairs for the evening wereSloan LindemannBarnett, Nina Rennert Davidson, Karin Luter, Kalliope Karella Rena, Christine Schwarzman, Tracy Snyder, and Monica Wambold. These are the girls who sell the tickets (tables) and raise the money to pay for everything, including the ballet. At least five of them have multi-billionaire husbands or fathers and the rest of them have access to big funds. This is how the opera and ballet survive in New York. During intermission I happened to be having a glass of champagne by the bar and noticed I was also standing alongside Roman Abramovich with a very attractive young brunette woman. Soon after, another Russian tycoon, also a New Yorker, Len Blavatnik, came by to say hello to the man who spent more than half 38 QUEST

Laurie Fried, Debbi O’Shea and Ellen Kaidanow

Tad Smith and Caroline Brecker

of a billion dollars on one of his three yachts. Both men were dressed very casually: open-collar shirt, jacket, and pants. They were fairly innocuous looking, all things (and site) considered. Not the sort of costume you’d expect from men of great wealth attending the ballet on a gala opening. But then… Mr. Abramovich went mainly unnoticed and he was enjoying himself looking around at the company he was keeping. At one point, a young man came up with a camera and asked if he could take a picture. Abramovich and his lady friend pleasantly agreed. Then the young man asked the lady friend if she would take a picture of him with Abramovich, who found the whole thing amusing and went along. Tuesday, May 14. I went over to Roosevelt House

Terrie Henry, Kim Augustine, Lee Woodruff, Mary Jeffery and Annie Amato

Carol Santora and Kathy Clark

to hear a lecture by David Stockman, who wrote the current bestseller The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America. Roosevelt House is part of Hunter College. It is located in twin townhouses built by Sara Delano Roosevelt for her and her son and only child, Franklin, and his wife Eleanor and their children in 1908. The Roosevelts (including Mama Sara, the mother-inlaw) lived there until Franklin and Eleanor and family moved to the White House in 1933. Stockman’s book contradicts the mainstream media’s message about our current economic “recovery.” Although I haven’t read it yet, I will because its subject is, in my opinion, as pertinent to the health of our society as ecology is to our planet. Stockman is a very good orator. He had been a

Richard Blumenthal and Lisa Matthews

congressman from Michigan before he joined the Reagan administration at its beginning. He learned well. He began adult life in divinity school. His path that led to politics and finances seems entirely coincidental in the telling although, in retrospect, he must have had a proactive attitude about what interested him. His story on how he became involved with Ronald Reagan and was appointed as Reagan’s first director of the Office of Management and Budget is a fascinating political anecdote, and a rewarding story as well as a story of political reward. His is not the first of this kind. What is different about his knowledge is that he understands what it means to The Man On the Street. He understands the financial mechanisms. He understands the political process—the Wall Street process—and

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Scott Mitchell with Maura and Frank Corvino


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A the ramifications. He communicates on a learned but still understandable level. He would have been a very good teacher. When pressed for a thought on what he thinks this is all leading to, like a consummate politician, he avoided a direct answer but provided other substantive thoughts to consider. Wednesday, May 15. Over at 583 Park Avenue, generationOn, whose mission is to “inspire, equip, and mobilize youth to take action that changes the world and themselves through service,”

honored Bank of America, Chelsea Clinton, and Julie Fisher Cummings for their commitment to youth service. They also honored six young leaders, aged eight to 17, with the fourth annual Hasbro Community Action Hero Award “for creating positive change in their communities and around the world through exceptional service.” It was especially interesting to see the young people individually collecting their awards with grace and poise reflecting their self-confidence in their contributions. Silda Wall Spitzer introduced

me to this organization several years ago when she founded Children for Children, an organization that has since merged into what is now generationOn. The objective is that of empowering children and young people to make decisions, take responsibility, and become leaders through service to their communities and to their contemporaries in the communities. Aside from inspiring the children who participate, their works potentially inspire all of us. There were 350 attending. They raised more than $797,000. The evening was

hosted and co-chaired by longtime generationOn advocates Kevin Arquit, Brian and Barbara Goldner, and Silda. Monday, May 20. The 92nd Street Y held its annual spring gala with cocktails, dinner, and a performance by the great Jennifer Hudson. The 92nd Street Y is synonymous with cultural events in New York. Artists, authors, actors, musicians, historians, sociologists, and psychologists—all appear there regularly, almost nightly. It’s what makes New York the town it is, like no other.

T H E O P E N I N G O F T H E K I P S B AY D EC O R ATO R S H O W H O U S E

Bunny Williams and John Rosselli

James Huniford, Alison Levasseur and Charles Fagan 40 QUEST

Mariette Gomez and Brooke Gomez

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Felicia Zwebner and Jamie Drake


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The nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co-chairs were Amanda and Jonathan Elian, Libbie and David Mugrabi, Jenny and John Paulson, and Jacqueline and Mortimer Sackler. Vicechairs were Debbie and Glenn August, Jill and Darius Bikoff, Emily and Len Blavatnik, Stacey and Matthew Bronfman, Harriet and Steven Croman, Jean Doumanian and Jacqui Safra, Nina and Mitch Davidson, Susan and Stuart Ellman, Susan and Jeffrey Goldenberg, Jane H. Goldman and Dr. Benjamin H. Lewis, Daphne Recanati and Thomas S. Kaplan, Lori and Marc Kasowitz, Jennifer and Marc Lipschultz, Christine and Richard Mack, Tami and Fredric Mack, Julie and Billy Macklowe, Cheryl and Philip Milstein, Nancy and Frederic M. Poses, Erica and Joseph Samuels, Carolyn

and Curtis Schenker, Selina and Sihan Shu, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, and Buddy Teich. And the event was sold out. They raised $4 million for the Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many programs. Also, that same night, the Frick Collection held its annual (its 41st) Spring Party at Mr. Frickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house on Fifth Avenue and 70th Street. Blacktie, of course. (Remember the erstwhile residents of yore dined there every night in black-tie.) Bob Hardwick (www.bobhardwick.com) and his Bob Hardwick Sound kept everyone on the dance ďŹ&#x201A;oor, no matter the age or the time. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing like the Frick to give you an authentic taste of Old New York and the Gilded Age, not to mention its stupendous collection of masterpieces. X

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Nina Dobrev

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

LAGUARDIA AIRPORT 


YOU ARE A BUSINESS PRO And business pros rent from National. Because only National lets you choose any car in the Aisle and go.* No trips to the counter. No asking for keys. No hassles. In the Aisle you can choose any car and pay the mid-size price, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a full-size or above. Take control.

Go National. Go Like a Pro. nationalcar.com *At participating locations and subject to availability and other restrictions. Requires enrollment in the complimentary Emerald Club. Š2013 National Car Rental. All other marks are property of their respective owners.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G R E E N W I C H H I STO R I C A L S O C I E T Y C E L E B R AT E D 2 5 YE A R S O F P R E S E R V I N G L O C A L A R C H I T EC T U R E AT T H E B E L L E H AV E N C L U B

Bruce Fogwell and Sandra Morgan

Barbara Brickman with Bob and Fraser Beede

Jack Morris and Barbara Bishop

Liz Smith, Roxanne Vanderbilt, Darcy Cassell and Everett Smith

Chuck and Debbie Hilton and Aris Crist

Bruce and Helen Dixon with Russ and Debbie Reynolds 44 QUEST

David Ogilvy with Betsy and Michael Vitton

Samuel White

Anne Bradner with Jane and Marsh Stuart

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E G R E E N W I C H H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

Ann Ogilvy and M.E. Kjaernested


THE SPIRAL HOUSE $7,595,000 Exclusive Agent: Alison Farn-Leigh 203.667.7832

THE HISTORIC WILSON HOUSE

RIVERSIDE CHARM

$3,295,000 Exclusive Agent: Kaye Lewis 203.249.9603

$2,495,000 Exclusive Agent: JoAnn McCarthy 203.561.5160

OLD GREENWICH CLASSIC

RIDGEFIELD COUNTRY COMPOUND

$2,495,000 Exclusive Agent: JoAnn McCarthy 203.561.5160

$1,549,000 Exclusive Agent: Kaye Lewis 203.249.9603

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E ST TO A ST E D P E R R I N PA R I S AT I TS U P P E R E A ST S I D E STO R E

Julie Vacca and Genevieve Loomis

Melanie Lazenby and Elizabeth Kurpis

Elizabeth Meigher and Matthew Mellon

Niki Connor and Oliver English

Adelina Wong Ettelson

Martin Ambrose, Julia Loomis and Alex Travers

Ammara Yaqub, Jackie Valls, Alex Polkinghorn and Elizabeth Brown 46 QUEST

ChloĂŠ Perrin

Lily Hoagland, Daniel Cappello and Amanda Meigher

Cole Rumbough

Caroline Reuschel, James LaPorte and Caroline Smith

Miles Rutter, Molly Connelly and Nick Tarantino

Tanne Crosby and Gordon Stewart

CO U RTE S Y O F P E R R I N PA R I S

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A SOCIET Y OF MSKCC’S SPRING BALL WITH HARRY WINSTON AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A R T

Patsy and Sandy Warner

Jamee and Peter Gregory

Karen LeFrak and Hilary Geary

Delphine and Henri Barguirdjian

Ros L’Esperance

Amanda Ross and Lottie Oakley

Sara Ayres

Julia Restoin Roitfeld

T H E 1 5 0 T H A N N I V E R S A RY O F T H E H O S P I TA L FO R S P EC I A L S U R G E RY

Jo Hannafin and Hollis Potter 48 QUEST

John and Carol Lyden

Andrea and Amar Ranawat

Mary and Ed Jones

Ken Wilson, Ann Jackson with Renee and Seymour Flug

Emme and Jonathan Deland

Anne and David Altchek

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Laura and Domenick Sisto


Bedminster, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5IJTTUBUFMZCFESPPNIPNF XJUI GVMMCBUITBOEIBMGCBUIT TQSFBETPVUPOPWFSMFWFM  CFBVUJGVMBDSFTJOUIFIFBSUPG)VOU$PVOUSZ&BDISPPN JTTQFDJBMJOJUTPXOSFHBSEmGSPNUIFMJHIUàMMFE IJHI DFJMJOHFE HSFBU SPPN UP UIF DP[Z àSFQMBDFDFOUFSFE  CFBNDFJMJOHFEMJWJOHSPPNUPUIFMBSHFDPVOUSZLJUDIFO XJUIJUTPXOSBJTFEIFBSUICSJDLàSFQMBDF"MTPJODMVEFT àSFQMBDFT BOEBOBVQBJSBQUXJUITFQBSBUFFOUSBODF B CBSO BOEBQPPMXJUIBQPPMIPVTF $1,725,000 Roger Christman x6100

Bedminster, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; i5XJO0BLTuJTTJUVBUFEPO BDSFT PG TXFFQJOH MBXOT BOE HMPSJPVT HBSEFOT  CFESPPNT  CBUIDPVOUSZFTUBUFXJUI&OHMJTITUZMFBSDIJUFDUVSBM EFUBJMT MJLF DSPXO BOE EFOUJM NPMEJOH QSFEPNJOBUF 0UIFS XPOEFSGVM GFBUVSFT JODMVEF B DBSSJBHF IPVTF  DBS HBSBHF  B QPPM  QPPM IPVTF  FYFSDJTF SPPN  BOE BCPUUMFXJOFDFMMBS.JOVUFTUPUSBJOJO'BS)JMMT GPSFBTZDPNNVUFUP.BOIBUUBO $1,795,000 Roger Christman x6100

Essex Fells, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5IF i-FOGFMM &TUBUFu JT B HPSHFPVT &OHMJTINBOPSXJUITUBUFPGUIFBSUBNFOJUJFT5IBOLT UP B NFUJDVMPVT SFOPWBUJPO  UIF IPNF CPBTUT SJDI BSDIJUFDUVSBM EFUBJM UISPVHIPVU  GSPN JUT HSBOE DFOUFS IBMM BOE CBORVFUTJ[FE EJOJOH SPPN UP JUT WBVMUFE DFJMJOHFEHSFBUSPPNXJUIIBNNFSCFBNUSVTTFTBOEB CBMDPOZ5IFMVYVSJPVTMPXFSMFWFMIPTUTBCJMMJBSESPPN  HBNF SPPN BOE XJOF DFMMBS 1SPQFSUZ BMTP JODMVEFT B DBSSJBHF IPVTF  B HSFFOIPVTF BOE B QPPM XJUI UXP DBCBOBT$4,795,000 Carol Spry x6136

Far Hills, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5IJT FYRVJTJUF  #FESPPN TUPOF BOE TUVDDPNBOPSIPNFXJUICBUITPOBDSFTJTCPUI HSBOE BOE DPNGPSUBCMF " MJNFTUPOF áPPS BOE TXFFQJOHTUBJSDBTFJOUSPEVDFTQBDJPVTMJWJOHBSFBTXJUIVOJRVF BSDIJUFDUVSBM EFUBJMT " SJDI DIFSSZ XPPEDMBE MJCSBSZ CPBTUT B DPGGFSFE DFJMJOH BOE FMFHBOU àSFQMBDF XJUI NBSCMFTVSSPVOE5IJTJTPOFFYBNQMFPGNBOZTQFDJBM GFBUVSFTUISPVHIPVUUIJTTUBUFMZNBOPS.JOVUFTUPUSBJO BOEIJHIXBZT $2,475,000 Roger Christman x6100

Rumson, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4FU PO  TFDMVEFE QBSLMJLF BDSFT  UIF #JOHIBN )JMM &TUBUF IPNF JT POF PG UIF àOFTU  SJDIMZEFDPSBUFEFYBNQMFTPG4IJOHMFTUZMFBSDIJUFDUVSF "QQSPBDIFE CZ QSJWBUF ESJWF BOE HSBDFE CZ BSDIFE XSBQBSPVOE QPSDIFT  UIJT CFESPPN  BQQSPYJNBUFMZ  TRVBSF GPPU NBTUFSQJFDF GFBUVSFT HSBOE PSJHJOBM XPPE QBOFMJOH  GPPU DFJMJOHT BOE HPSHFPVT IBSEXPPE áPPST $PNQMFUJOH UIF TFSFOF QJDUVSF JTBGSFFGPSN(VOJUFQPPMXJUITQB$2,950,000 Mary Loizou x6118

Rumson, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; /P EFUBJM IBT CFFO PWFSMPPLFE JO UIF DPNQMFUFSFOPWBUJPOPGUIJTFMFHBOUDPMPOJBMNBOTJPOPO POF PG 3VNTPOT NPTU TPVHIU BGUFS TUSFFUT 5IF DIFGT LJUDIFO PG $BSSFSB NBSCMF BOE IPOFE HSBOJUF JT àMMFE XJUI DVTUPN DBCJOFUSZ 5IF NBTUFS CFESPPN TVJUF FODPNQBTTFT B TVNQUVPVT CBUI BOE PWFSTJ[FE XBMLJO DMPTFU5IFWFSZQSJWBUFCBDLZBSETVSSPVOETBQPPMBOE TQBXJUIJODSFEJCMZCFBVUJGVMMBOETDBQJOH $3,900,000 Carin Henderson x6128

Rumson, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; "OBDDMBJNFEDPVOUSZIPVTFDJSDB  UIFUSJVNQIBOUMZSFOFXFEi4FBDSPGUu JT BO FODIBOUJOH  TRVBSFGPPU NBOTF TFU PO  QSJWBUF BDSFT XJUI B IFBUFE QPPM BOE NBOJDVSFE HBSEFOT UP GSBNF JU JO TFSFOF  FZFàMMJOH CFBVUZ *UT HSBOEMZTDBMFE  IJHIDFJMJOHFE SPPNT CFDLPO XIJMF JSSFQMBDFBCMF BSDIJUFDUVSBM EFUBJMT BCPVOE m GSPN SBSF CVUUFSOVU XPPE QBOFMJOH UP TJY NFNPSBCMF àSFQMBDFT UP UIF PSOBUFMZ DBSWFE QPTUT BOE CBMVTUFST UIBU MJOF TUBJSXBZT BOECBMDPOJFEIBMMXBZT$4,475,000 Dana Miller x6174

Short Hills, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8JEFGSPOUQPSDIHSBDFT1FOOTZMWBOJB TUPOF GBÃ&#x2030;BEF PG UIJT HSBDJPVT DPVOUSZ FTUBUF   XIJMF SFNBSLBCMZ àOF DSBGUTNBOTIJQ BOE BSDIJUFDUVSBM EFUBJM QSFWBJM UISPVHIPVU UIF  #3 NBOTF XJUI  GVMM CBUITBOEIBMGCBUIT"DIFGTHPVSNFULJUDIFOPGGFST BOUJRVFT DBCJOFUSZ BOE UPQMJOF BQQMJBODFT  BOE áPXT JOUP UIF WJFXàMMFE HSFBU SPPN XJUI áPPSUPWBVMUFE DFJMJOH 1FOOTZMWBOJB TUPOF àSFQMBDF  'SFODI EPPST UP UIF QBUJP  QSPGFTTJPOBMMZ MBOETDBQFE ZBSE  XJUI PWFS BDSFPGQSJWBUFHSPVOETBOEHPSHFPVTQPPM $3,725,000 Debbie Rybka x6138

Short Hills, NJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; /PUFE BSDIJUFDU +PIO +BNFT EFTJHOFE UIJT NBTUFSQJFDF PG B TIJOHMFBOETUPOF FTUBUF POUXPTFDMVEFEBDSFT XJUICFESPPNT CBUITBOE  àSFQMBDFT *UT HSBOEMZ QSPQPSUJPOFE SPPNT QSPWJEF  GFFUPGMJWJOHTQBDFVOEFSFYUSBPSEJOBSZCFBNFE DFJMJOHT :PV DBO EJOF BM GSFTDP PO UIF MBSHF CMVFTUPOF QBUJP XJUI JUT PVUEPPS LJUDIFO 5IFO SFMBY BMM FWFOJOH JO UIF FOUFSUBJONFOU TVJUF CFGPSF SFUSFBUJOH UP B NBSWFMPVTEPNFDFJMJOHFENBTUFSTVJUFXJUITJUUJOHBSFB BOEàSFQMBDF$5,999,000 Debbie Rybka x6138

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A F U N D F O R PA R K A V E N U E AT S C U L LY & S C U L LY

John Glass III with Martha and John Glass, Jr.

Stephen Attoe, Robert Caravaggi and Jay Jolly

Shirley King

Anne Ford, Missie Rennie and Tina Sloan

Barbara McLaughlin with Clay and Karen Tompkins

Michael Scully and Sadie Sink

THE 37TH ANNIVERSARY OF DOUBLES

Jim and Susan Blair 50 QUEST

Nancy Pearson and John Regan

Amy Hoadley and Polly Onet

Kamie Lightburn and Mark Gilbertson

Wendy Carduner

Mary and Michael Darling

A N N I E WAT T

Mary and Guy Van Pelt


PLEASE VISIT

THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION WAS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN REACH BY GLOBAL CORPORATE AWARDS, NEW YORK, APRIL 2013 WITH THANKS AND IN RECOGNITION OF SOME OF THE PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERS OF THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION: YOU INSPIRE US! ASIA SOCIETY, NEW YORK CHERIE BLAIR FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN, LONDON DAVID SHEPHERD’S TIGER TIME, LONDON THE ELEANOR ROOSEVELT LEADERSHIP CENTER AT VAL KILL, HYDE PARK, NEW YORK INNOCENCE IN DANGER, PARIS HARROW SCHOOL, LONDON INDIAN HEAD INJURY FOUNDATION, NEW DELHI AND JODHPUR, INDIA KHEL SHALA, PUNJAB THE LOOMBA FOUNDATION, THE UK AND INDIA THE ROBERT F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS, WASHINGTON, D.C. ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, NEW DELHI, INDIA WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL, WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK TROPICAL CLINICS, KENYA UNITED WORLD COLLEGES ATLANTIC COLLEGE, WALES AND PEARSON COLLEGE, VICTORIA, CANADA


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST AND STUART WEITZMAN FÊTED CORNELIA GUEST’S SIMPLE PLEASURES W I T H A L U N C H EO N AT A R L I N G TO N C L U B

Stephanie Smith

Susan Duffy, Elizabeth Meigher, Jackie Giusti Seaman and Cornelia Guest

Dori Cooperman, Nicole Mellon and Dani Stahl 52 QUEST

Katrina Szish and Gigi Stone

Alexia Hamm Ryan and Mary Snow

Kari Talley and Tantivy Gubelmann

Alexandra Lind Rose

Nicky Hilton

Christine Schott and Sharon Bush

Lydia Fenet

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Dana Auslander and Julie Macklowe


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A FO U N TA I N H O U S E H O ST E D I TS A N N UA L SYM P O S I U M AT T H E P I E R R E

Kirk Henckels and Fernanda Kellogg

Payne Middleton and Linda de Roulet

Lorna Graev, Louise Ross and Bea Van Ryan

Deeda Blair

Ann Rapp

Podie Lynch and Frances Adler

Kitty McKnight and Diane van Amerongen

Karen Cox and Mary Pederson

Wendy Breck

John Marsden and Kevin Marshall

Alexandra Hamile 54 QUEST

Arlene Dahl, Donald Stannard and Annette Green

Catherine Malandrino and Veronique Pinsky

Marc Rosen, Juliana Terian and Mark Ackermann

Theo Spilka and Carol Alt

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; CO U RT E S Y O F K X A S S O C I ATE S / PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

P R AT T I N ST I T U T E â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S A R T O F PAC K A G I N G G A L A AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y C L U B


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC

Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

GARRISON, NY In addition to stunning Hudson River views, this spacious home, a mix of traditional and contemporary style, offers peace and privacy on 9.12 acres. The open living/dining room features 20 foot ceiling, a soaring stone fireplace and wall of windows. The generous kitchen includes a more informal dining area and access to the screened porch. Outdoors, expansive decks provide the ideal spot to relax and enjoy the calming mountain and river views. Offered at $2,900,000.

Garrison, NY An elegant approach to country living! This unique converted barn is nestled on a plateau overlooking the Hudson River. Designer remodeled and updated, it offers one floor living with river views from almost every room. Open living /dining room with fireplace, two en-suite bedrooms, room to expand either upstairs or down. A rare offering – ideal for weekend retreat or full time residence. $1,800,000.

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


CALENDAR

JUNE

On June 4, Four Freedoms Park Conservancy will host its first Sunset Garden party at Four Freedoms Park, located at the southern tip of Roosevelt Island in New York City. All funds raised will help keep the park clean, safe, and free for everyone. For more information, call 212.486.0194.

4

Carol and Les Ballard will host a fundraiser for Friends of Ballard Park on the estate of their Newport home, Edgehill, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 401.619.3377.

The Gordon Parks Foundation will host its awards dinner and silent auction at The Plaza at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.794.0060.

PRESERVING NEWPORT

CELEBRATING THE ARTS

A NEW TRADITION

Four Freedoms Park Conservancy will hold its first Sunset Garden party at Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island at 5 p.m. For more information, call 212.486.0194.

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

The Bruce Museum will hold its 26th annual Renaissance Ball at the Century Country Club at 8 p.m. For more information, call 203.869.0376.

5

DON’T GO CHANGING

The Historic House Trust of New York City will host its annual Founders Award Dinner at Gracie Mansion at 6 p.m. The evening will raise funds for the promotion and preservation of 23 marvelous New York City–owned sites, from humble farms to grand mansions, across the five boroughs. For more information, call 914.834.2868.

7

CALL ME ISHMAEL ART OF ALL MEDIUMS

Mack and Heuer will sponsor a group exhibit of art and photography based on the themes of Moby Dick at 4 North Main Gallery in Southampton, New York. The exhibition will run through June 9. For more information, call 631.283.2495.

Guild Hall will celebrate its 75th Members Exhibition to kick off the East End’s art season with a vibrant show that will feature over 400 artists. For more information, call 631.324.0806. REWARDING EDUCATION

Ross School will host its 10th annual Live at Club Starlight benefit to raise funds for school programs at the Ross Upper School in East Hampton at 6 p.m. For more information, call 631.907.5214.

MUSIC, PLEASE

3

8

The American Cancer Society will celebrate its 100th birthday with a dinner and star-studded performance at the Hudson Theatre at the Millennium Broadway Hotel at 6:45 p.m. For more information, call 212.237.3832.

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival will celebrate its Swing Into Summer gala, offering cocktails, drinks, and dancing at the Great Lawn at Boscobel in Garrison, New York. For more information, call 845.809.5750.

The Perlman Music Program will present Classical Collaborations at the Southampton Cultural Center. For more information, call 212.877.5045.

A SPECIAL CENTENNIAL

56 QUEST

A NIGHT WITH THE BARD

A photograph of Ann St. Marie in Times Square by Frances McLaughlin-Gill, 1961, in honor of the Humane Society’s photography auction on June 13. For more information, call 212.752.4842.

CO U RTE S Y O F F O U R F R E E D O M S PA R K CO N S E RVA N C Y; F R A N C E S M C L AU G H L I N - G I LL , 1 9 6 1 ( H U M A N E S O C I E T Y )

1


CALENDAR

9

17

Grant Cottage will present a historic portrayal of Ulysses S. Grant, remembered by his old friend James Longstreet. For more information, call 518.584.4353.

The Fox23 News Golf Invitational will take place at Saratoga National Golf Club in Saratoga Springs, New York. For more information, call 518.583.4653.

10

18

UNICEF will host its Children’s Champion Award dinner at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.880.9146.

The Floating Hospital will celebrate its fourth annual Garden Party event at the Central Park Zoo at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 718.784.2240.

FASHION’S FÊTE

19

LEADER OF THE UNION

IMPROVING LIVES

The Fashion Institute of Technology will host its gala at Cipriani 42nd Street at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.217.4105.

TEE TIME

WILD NATURE

SAVOR IT

The Humane Society of New York will host its fourth benefit photography auction at Marianne Boesky Gallery at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.752.4842.

Central Park Conservancy will host its Taste of Summer event at the iconic Bethesda Terrace in Central Park at 7 p.m. Guests will enjoy delicious culinary fare from top New York City chefs and restaurants at this one-of-a-kind tasting event in the heart of Central Park. For more information, call 212.310.6632.

14

22

The Brewers Association will host “Savor: An American Craft Beer and Food Experience” at 7:30 p.m at the Altman Building. The event will go through the 15th. For more information, call 303.447.0816.

Phoenix House will hold its annual summer party, Triumph For Teens, at the Southampton house of Margie and Michael Loeb, honoring Dr. Mitch Rosenthal, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 646.505.2083.

13

LOVING OUR ANIMALS

CHEERS TO THAT

DOCTOR’S ORDERS

On June 14 and 15, the Brewers Association will host “Savor: An American Craft Beer and Food Experience” from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Altman Building. For more information, call 303.447.0816.

23

HITTING HIGH NOTES

Opera Saratoga will present H.M.S. Pinafore by Gilbert and Sullivan at the Spa Little Theater in Saratoga Springs at 2 p.m. For more information, call 518.587.4427.

24

GO FOR THE GREEN

YWCA of Greenwich will hold a golf outing at Greenwich Country Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 203.869.6501.

JULY 2

DRAMA TRAGICO

Opera Saratoga will present Lucia di Lammermoor by Donizetti, a tale of forbidden love filled with hairraising drama and sumptuous singing, at Spa Little Theater in Saratoga Springs, New York. For more information, call 518.587.4427.

5

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E B R E W E R S A S S O C I AT I O N ; CO U RTE S Y O F T H E P E R L M A N M U S I C P RO G R A M

A BREATH OF FRESH AIR

Southampton Fresh Air Home will hold its annual American Picnic with a fireworks display over the Shinnecock Bay. The fundraiser will have carnival games and other activities for guests. The Southampton Fresh Air Home is one of the few residential camp facilities in the eastern United States that accommodates severely as well as mildly and moderately physically challenged children. SFAH provides an environment in which campers play, socialize, mature, and develop physically, emotionally, and psychologically For more information, call 631.283.5847.

6

BUILDING NEW FUTURES

On June 7, the Perlman Music Program—a group of gifted and young string players—will present Classical Collaborations at the Southampton Cultural Center. For more information, call 212.877.5045.

IYRS, Newport’s trade and technology school, will host its Maker, Builder, Craftsman: Past and Future summer gala at 449 Thames Street in Newport, Rhode Island, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 401.848.5777. JUNE 2013 57


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY THE PERFECT GENTLEMAN. Perfect. That’s how I would describe William F. Buckley, Jr. Handsome, intelligent, educated at the best schools, completely self-assured, soft-spoken, dressed as if from Savile Row, a commanding presence in a room, impeccable manners, at times controversial—in other words, a perfect gentleman and a real conservative. Over the years, I had photographed Bill Buckley and his captivating wife, Pat, many times, at their maisonette on East 73rd Street and Park Avenue and at at their country home with the Cavalier King Charles Spaniels they so dearly loved. I found them to be exceedingly charming and personable. Dogs are always a great talking point with me as I love my dogs and they have always been a big part of my life. Buck58 QUEST

ley’s dogs were perfect examples of the elegant spaniels in oil paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries. The photograph here was taken as we were on the way to the PBS studio for a taping of Buckley’s weekly show “Firing Line,” which aired from 1966 to 1999. I like this photograph and, to me, it captures the man who was Bill Buckley.


William F. Buckley, Jr., photographed in 1972.

When we arrived at the studio, I was surprised at how many people were waiting outside to see Buckley. They would stop him to ask for his autograph and say, “Why don’t you run for president? You should be president.” I could see he liked hearing that and was delighted by the attention. “Firing Line” and The National Review, which Buckley

founded in 1955 and edited until 1990—the conservative’s handbook—both catapulted Buckley to prominence in the public eye, where he remained all his life. I am glad to have had the opportunity to photograph Bill and Pat Buckley as they will be remembered as the ultimate New Yorkers. X JUNE 2013 59


TA K I

A BAD AFTERTASTE

Halston, Liza Minnelli, and Steve Rubell, photographed by Andy Warhol in 1978.

WHAT IS THE MOST infamous bite in history? Surely Adam’s, but then there’s the expensive one that Steve Rubell took out of Halston’s leg. Let me explain for you whippersnappers who’ve probably never heard of these people, who both died of AIDS in 1990. The theme of this column is inspired by Louis Suarez, no stranger to controversy in Britain but a hero in his homeland Uruguay, where 60 QUEST

biting is almost the equivalent of our kissing—or so the volatile Liverpool FC footballer thinks. Suarez bit a Chelsea FC rival during a match and got a 10-match ban as a result. Of course, there’s Mike Tyson, who, when way behind in points against Evander Holyfield years and years ago, bit Evander’s ear right off and spat it out on the deck. He got disqualified, thus depriving Holyfield of an out-and-out

victory. Back to Rubell, whose bite was less violent but almost as costly. Although this has nothing to do with Greenwich or Connecticut, the theme of this issue of Quest, I broke the HalstonRubell story more than 30 years ago in a Connecticut-based newspaper, a local sheet whose editor could not believe his eyes. It came back to me when I recently saw a documentary on Halston, a milliner


TA K I

From left: Studio 54, where revelers were known to indulge in drugs like cocaine; Halston, the designer who was favored by icons like Jackie Kennedy.

who became famous because he designed the pink pillbox hat Jackie Kennedy was wearing the day her husband was assassinated. Actually, Halston was quite a talented designer. But I would rather stick to his constant partying in Studio 54 and profuse cocaine use. Halston partied exclusively with gay people. The owner of Studio 54, Steve Rubell, partied with everybody, even unknowns—something that Halston and Warhol did not. When Halston’s fame went international, as silly matters like fashion tend to do sometimes, he asked his friend John Bowes-Lyon, known as “Bosie” to the rest of us, to front a party for him in London and to produce Princess Margaret. Bosie did both, also inviting yours truly. It was either the Savoy or the Ritz and it was a lunch. Bosie stood in front of the dining room with Halston a few feet behind him. Bosie did the greetings and introductions until Rupert Galliers-Pratt sauntered in with his faithful wife walking a few paces behind him. “Hi, Bosie,” said Rupert cheerfully and then quickly headed for the bar and free hors d’oeuvre. “I’m Halston,” said the milliner in his very stiff manner, sticking out his hand. “Thank you, Halston,” boomed Rupert, throwing his Anderson and Sheppard coat on poor Halston’s extended arm while rushing to the bar. End of story, but not quite. (Rupert later remarked that only Ancient Greeks and butlers had one name, hence the gaffe. Poor Taki.) Once we sat down, Halston was at the top table with Bosie, Steve Rubell, and

Princess Margaret. I was later told that the situation was uncomfortable, though downright catastrophic would be more to the point; Halston not on cocaine was ludicrously polite and inane, whereas Rubell was bored, drunk, and sleepy. He signaled to Halston for the cocaine and got a furious look in return. After an interminable minute or two he again made the sign and got a loud “never” back. That’s when he decided to take the bull by the you know what, slipped underneath the table, grabbed Halston’s leg and bit the calf hard enough to make it bleed. As Halston jumped, writhing in agony, he dumped sauce all over Princess Margaret’s dress, evoking a scream of horror from her and the exact words: “Look what you’ve done to my best dress. You’ve ruined it.” Gallant to a fault, Halston immediately offered two of his latest originals by tomorrow morning. “I will hold you to that,” said the unselfish, disinterested royal (joke). End of story, but, yet again, not quite. Bright and early the next day, Halston, carrying two of his original creations costing thousands, got into his stretch limo, a rarity in London back then. His mistake was that he asked Bianca Jagger, a Studio 54 fixture, to go along with him, thinking Princess Margaret might like to meet the Nicaraguan party girl and social climber par excellence. But upon pulling up at Kensington Palace, a stiff upper lip– type told him in no uncertain terms that only one person was expected. So Halston fished into his pocket and threw all of the

cash he had Jagger’s way, ordering his driver to take her shopping. Come back in an hour or so, he said. When he was ushered in, Halston had the beautifully wrapped dresses extracted from his grasp and was shown to the door. Poor Halston had been inside for 30 seconds. Now, the rest I’m making up because there are no witnesses: The poor wretch had to stand in front of Kensington Palace because there was no way to reach the driver and he didn’t know where the profligate Bianca had gone. He didn’t want her to return to Kensington Palace and find out that he had been dismissed immediately, so he had to stand there, all dressed up with nowhere to go. When I was told the story of the bite— I had been at another table—my only question was whether Halston had given up the cocaine. “He had to, Steve wouldn’t let go,” said Bosie. Apparently, things got honky-dory after that. Steve and Halston lived approximately another 10 years. I got along fine with Rubell; Halston I hardly knew. The Jagger woman is now on to another scam—Human Rights—and thank God neither of us ever liked each other. I admit that this is hardly a typical Greenwich story but, the way the world is going, it could one day be a lesson to Stevie Cohen and other Greenwich hedge funders: Never stick your arm out unless you use both your first and last name, and never, but never, offer presents to European royals. X For more Taki, visit takimag.com. JUNE 2013 61


QUEST Let your neckline be kissed by Judith Murat’s N-55 Blue Topaz “Butterfly

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WHETHER YOU’RE SHOPPING Greenwich Avenue, Fifth Avenue, Highland Park

Kisses” necklace in 18-kt. yellow gold, diamonds, and blue topaz. Price upon request. House of Murat: Available at Scully & Scully, 212.755.2590.

Village, or Melrose Place, June weather will welcome you to a delight of summer finds. From airy fashions to significant stones, golds, and jewels, mere window-shopping won’t be an option this month. With Father’s Day around the corner, don’t forget to pick something out for your husband and dad while you’re at it. Oh, and kids come first, so we’ve found treats the little ones will love.

Connect the fashion dots in Carolina Herrera’s multi-dot off-the-shoulder organza dress. $6,990. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., New York City, 212.249.6552 or 31 Highland Park Village, Dallas, Tex., 214.219.6060.

KOTUR’s Barnett Cicada straw clutch in lavender with drop-in chain is the perfect summertime bag for both day and evening. $495. KOTUR: At koturltd.com.

Gold never gets old, especially in Jimmy Choo’s new Anouk metallic pump. $675. Jimmy Choo: Available at select Jimmy Choo stores and at jimmychoo.com.

62 QUEST


It’s time to get ready for summer in Salvatore Ferragamo’s quartz chronograph timepiece with orange rubber strap. $1,925. Salvatore Ferragamo: At Salvatore Ferragamo boutiques or 866.337.7242.

The soft smell of Kiehl’s Original Musk—with bergamot nectar, orange blossom, rose, lily, ylangylang, and neroli—is a clean, sensual Oriental scent fit for all seasons. $42.50. Kiehl’s Since 1851: Available at kiehls.com.

Be among the first to sport shades from the haute house of Balmain. $270 (Style BL4004). Balmain Eyewear: Available at zappos.com.

The Pillar, from Stellé Audio Couture, bridges the gap between home decor and technology, pairing wirelessly with your playlists anywhere and delivering unparalleled sound quality. $349. Stellé Audio Couture: At stelleaudio.com.

Be cool in Belstaff’s Beechfield sweater ($850), Lincoln military trouser ($395), Stanwick coat (price upon request), and Tyburn bag ($2,150). Belstaff: 814 Madison Ave., 212.897.1880, or belstaff.com.

Mercedes-Benz delivers time-honored style and design with an attractive price point in its all-new 2014 CLA250, set to arrive in U.S. dealerships everywhere this fall. $29,900. Mercedes-Benz: At www5.mercedes-benz.com/en.

JUNE 2013 63


Fresh Finds Altruette’s delicately sized Girls Link bracelet ($20) is the perfect starter, and teaches her

It’s never too early to learn

about giving back with each charm: turtle charm

good table manners,

($15) benefits the Sea Turtle Conservancy;

and the Tiffany ABC

elephant charm ($15), the African Wildlife

Bear three-piece porcelain set is the

Foundation ($15). Altruette:

best way we

At altruette.com.

know to start. $135. Tiffany & Co.: tiffany.com.

Ralph Lauren’s cashmere baby elephant will be your baby’s favorite new friend, in luxuriously soft cashmere knit in the brand’s signature cabling. $135. Ralph Lauren: 878 Madison Ave., 212.606.3376.

Little girls love getting dressed in Bonpoint: silver cardigan ($165), Lollipop skirt ($255), and netting dress in milky white ($650). Bonpoint: 805 Madison Ave., 212.879.0900, or bonpoint.com.

Keep kids happy in Happy Socks: knee-high, striped, combed-cotton socks in pink, white, and blue and red, white, and blue. $10 per pair. Happy Socks: 436 West Broadway, 212.966.9692, or happysocks.com.

Baby Bespoke’s Bespoke Bubble Gift Set, with piqué-trimmed bubble and gingham bib, is shipped in a custom keepsake box they’ll keep for all of life’s treasures. $75. Baby Bespoke: babybespoke.com.


It’s a whole new wave at Cartier: the Paris Nouvelle Vague Impertinente ring in 18-kt. white gold, onyx, lapis lazuli, and diamonds. $24,900. Cartier: 653 Fifth Ave.,

Treat her to a special bouquet

212.446.3400, or

of daisies with Asprey’s Daisy

cartier.com.

heritage earrings in yellow sapphire and diamonds. $12,050. Asprey: 853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

Carry it with you: Chanel’s navy blue tweed flapbag with a “CC” lock. Price upon request. Chanel: At Chanel boutiques or 800.550.0005.

Keep up with the contrast trend in Elie Saab’s vanilla and charcoal stretch-crêpe knee-length sleeveless dress with contrasting panels. Elie Saab: At eliesaab.com.

Your skin will thank you for Fresh’s Seaberry Body Cream, an ultrahydrating restorative and calming combination of omegas 3, 6, 7, and 9 and seaberry oil, a powerful antioxidant. $26. Fresh: 872 Broadway, 212.477.1100, or fresh.com.

The glorious creations of Zurich-born, Pariseducated, Geneva-based Nouveau French chic: Isabel Marant’s Alexia top ($525), Bario pants ($735), and Charlotte shoes ($1,035). Isabel Marant: 469 Broome St., New York City, 212.219.2284 or 8454 Melrose Place,

jewelry designer Suzanne Syz are on full display in her new book, Suzanne Syz: Art Jewels, from Assouline. $150 at www.assouline.com.

Los Angeles, 323.651.1493. JUNE 2013 65


THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

THREE JANE—a New York–based costume jewelry company

owned by Katie Schloss—offers a whimsical approach to accessories. Often personalized, always personal, the brand features must-haves for the bright and energetic customer. Here, Quest speaks with Three Jane’s Katie Schloss: Q: How did your career as a designer start? A: I was lucky enough to intern for Rachel Leigh Blumenthal of Rachel Leigh Jewelry after my sophomore year of college. The first piece I made for her was a large chain bracelet with a tie-dye ribbon. It was really cool for me, as a student, to see things that I made or helped make in places like Henri Bendel. Knowing where jewelry was manufactured around the city, I was able to have things made—postcollege—and the experimentation with design started from there. Q: What have been the more exciting moments for you and your company, thus far? A: One of my first goals was to do a trunk show at Henri Bendel, and I did that just one month after launching my website. I feel like everyone who makes a career in costume jewelry is “discovered” by Henri Bendel, which is why this was such a huge deal for me. Another amazing moment was at Cynthia 66 QUEST

Rowley’s Spring/Summer 2013 presentation. I was commissioned to do all of the jewelry, including the “flask” bracelet: a hollow, stainless-steel bracelet with a screw top that you can actually drink beverages from. It’s a must-have from the beaches in the Hamptons to any polo match in Greenwich. Q: Let’s talk about your map collection, which includes pieces inscribed with street maps of locations that are meaningful to the individual— what are the most popular schools? A: The most popular prep school is Miss Porter’s and the most popular colleges are Boston College, Elon, and Georgetown. Q: Why is Three Jane perfect for the residents of Greenwich and its surrounding areas? A: The Three Jane map collection is the perfect gift for residents of Greenwich and its surrounding areas because they tend to have many places of significance to them from prep schools and colleges to country clubs and homes in Nantucket. The map collection allows customers to keep these places closer to their hearts. X For more information, visit www.threejaneny.com. Three Jane is sold at Darien Sport Shop (1127 Boston Post Road in Darien) and Togs (66 Elm Street in New Canaan).


J E W E L RY

This page: The map collection necklace, 18-kt. gold with diamond detail (above); Katie Schloss (below). Opposite page: The “hair-tie” bangle, 14-kt. gold with colored enamel ($14); New Canaan– native Allison Williams wears a necklace from the map collection (inset).


BOB KNOWS EVERYBODY BY KATHERINE WHITESIDE THESE ARE MAJESTIC properties, year-round, filled with the serenity that comes with expansive, peaceful views of the Hudson River. There is ample acreage for grand gardens, pools, putting greens, ponies, horses, dogs, and outdoor family activities. The rooms are big—sometimes “ballroom” big—with multiple fireplaces to keep everyone cozy after cross-country skiing, pond skating, or sledding. These properties speak to calm, traffic-free, old-fashioned country life on a very grand scale and, almost unbelievably, they are only 50 miles outside of New York. How does one get a piece of this? Call Bob. He knows everybody. Bob McCaffrey, owner of Robert A. McCaffrey Realty in Cold Spring, New York, is well-connected throughout the Hudson Valley. His family has been in town since the 1820s and he is on friendly terms with everyone from the grand dames to their great-grandchildren. Every year, Bob invites all of his relatives to Easter lunch and he is happy to report that, this holiday, there were 30 people—“Everyone from my 94-year-old uncle to three-year-old Hooper.” Since the population in Cold Spring is around 2,000 people, it seems that not only does Bob know everyone, he is related to a lot of them. And that kind of deepseated connectivity really works well in the property business. His office is easy to find and easy to visit. You can’t miss his 1837 building, painted a rich, brown eggplant trimmed in light blue. Inside, the atmosphere is genteel and vintage clubby, with old-fashioned carpets and lamps, paintings, historic maps, antique cupboards, and two Windsor chairs with the daily papers and reading glasses—in case you have forgotten yours. This year, Bob boasts about 40 listings, from Westchester to Albany and on both sides of the river. Right now, he has at least three properties that amply fill the bill for those who long for a 68 QUEST

magnificently tranquil Hudson River Valley lifestyle. The newest of the three, high on a Cold Spring hillside, resembles the grand old Garrison castles built in the 1920s. It is more than 7,500 square feet on 14 acres with views of West Point and Constitution Island. There isn’t a ballroom necessarily, but a large granite terrace allows for tented waltzing. At another house a bit further north, I once attended a Viennese Ball during an unbelievably romantic blizzard. The tall windows in the 8,000-square-foot Greek Revival were wreathed with white roses. Four towering columns frame sailboats on the Hudson River from a porch overlooking 28 acres. With a hidden pool and seven bedrooms, there is plenty of space for guests. Another property is the 2,800-square-foot condo in Dick’s Castle, which was built in 1903. From the balcony, you can see everything from the graceful Bear Mountain Bridge to the striking bedrock ridges of the Shawangunk Mountains. The rooms are huge; there are four fireplaces and a chef’s kitchen. Despite the high stakes of the business, Bob is a low-profile, discreet, country gentleman. His calm, quiet voice, his quips, and his genuine smile are a comfort to any buyer. These days, his idea of evening fun is to cross Main Street from his office to his 1850s brick townhouse and sit on the front steps—with me—to “play Brooklyn.” We greet young people with baby strollers, the commuters getting off the Metro-North train, and older folks out for their strolls. We have take-out sushi and a drink, and Bob says “hello” to everyone—Bob knows everybody . X For more information, contact Robert A. McCaffrey Realty at 143 Main Street in Cold Spring, New York, call 845.265.4113 or email info@mccaffreyrealty.com.


OPEN HOUSE

This page, clockwise from top left: A 7,530-square-foot home on 14.18 acres in Cold Spring, New York; the author with Bob McCaffrey, the go-to realtor in the Hudson River area; Dickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castle, built in 1903, features a 2,800-square-foot condo with two private outdoor spaces and a two-car garage. Opposite page: A view of the Hudson River; a Greek Revival-style home with a pool and six fireplaces (inset).


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F I N E

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This page: Emerson Curry, Dartmouth College (Hanover, New Hampshire). Opposite page: Brianna Stubbs, Wallingford Rowing Club (Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England).

74 Q U E S T


BLAZE OF COLOR BY JACK CARLSON PHOTOGRAPHED BY F.E. C A STLEBERRY

A LL R I G H TS R E S E RV E D

CO P YR I G H T C A R L S O N M E D I A , I N C .

CLASSIC AMERICAN “PREPPY” style has its origins in the

sporting kit of Oxford and Cambridge, where the very first blazers were created in bold colors for college rowing clubs. Fascinated by the striped, piped, trimmed, and badged blazers that are still worn by oarsmen and oarswomen around the world today, I set out to create a book that tells the story of these authentic rowing jackets and of the elite athletes, esoteric traditions, historic clubs, and races associated with them. This book, Rowing Blazers, will be released in 2014. Here— exclusively for Quest—is a sneak peek at some of the images, and a few insights into the culture of rowing.


76 QUEST

A LL R I G H TS R E S E RV E D

red boating jackets worn by Lady Margaret Boat Club at St. John’s College, Cambridge. Today, traditional blazers are de rigueur among British rowers, and their designs range from the understated to the absurd. The blazers worn by Oxford University’s top crew, for example, are dark blue with dark blue grosgrain trim (the original “blue blazer”), while those worn by the Cambridge second crew are striped light blue, gold, and British racing green. In the Netherlands, rowing blazers are

CO P YR I G H T C A R L S O N M E D I A , I N C .

I enlisted fashion photographer and preppy–aesthetic pundit F.E. Castleberry as the book’s principal photographer, and we have spent nearly two years traveling to the boathouses and crew rooms of the most prestigious schools, universities, and rowing clubs—from New Haven to New Zealand, Exeter to Eton— photographing college rowers, club captains, and Olympic champions in their team blazers and listening to their stories. The word “blazer” was first coined to refer to the blazing-


This spread: Will Zeng, Oriel College Boat Club (Oxford, England).


This page, clockwise from top left: Liv Coffey, Phillips Academy Andover (Andover, Massachusetts); Kyle Traub, Kent School Boat Club (Kent, Connecticut); Mike DiSanto, Belmont Hill School (Belmont, Massachusetts).

Jack Carlson is a Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University and was a member of the United States rowing team at the 2011 World Championships. F.E. Castleberry is a fashion photographer and publishes the blog Unabashedly Prep.

A LL R I G H TS R E S E RV E D

passed down from one generation to the next and are almost universally ill-fitting, threadbare, and filthy; Dutch tradition dictates that a blazer may not be washed until its wearer has won the nation’s most prestigious regatta, The Varsity. For American oarsmen and oarswomen, these coveted jackets are usually earned by winning a domestic championship or at the end of an undefeated regular season, when the crew will have blazers made up before heading across the Atlantic to compete at the Henley Royal Regatta. When it hits shelves next year, Rowing Blazers—which will include a foreword by Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss of Facebook and Olympic fame—will bring readers into the world of America’s oldest intercollegiate sport. Drawing together sport, fashion, and history, it approaches rowing through its rituals, pageantry, culture, and enduring contributions to British and American style.X

CO P YR I G H T C A R L S O N M E D I A , I N C .

Opposite page: Al Sinclair, Inverness Rowing Club (Inverness, Scotland).


JUNE 2013 79


GREENWICH AVENUE Over the years, Greenwich Avenue—Connecticut’s premier shopping and dining destination—has been reinvigorated by beautiful new boutiques and charming restaurants. Yet, the Avenue still maintains its old-world charm, making it one of our favorite places to explore and, of course, shop for the latest fashions. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

Clockwise from top: Woolworth’s, circa 1960; Greenwich refuses to install stoplights on the Avenue, so policemen direct traffic at intersections; a strip of storefronts near the bottom of the Avenue, circa 1950.

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TIFFANY & CO. 140 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.7847 At Tiffany & Co., the jewelry and fine gifts do not vary with the capriciousness of trends. They endure, and have done so since the first half of the 19th century. In 2000, Tiffany & Co. opened its Greenwich branch, located at 140 Greenwich Avenue, continuing to trade in welcome-back congeniality, don’t-change-a-thing conventionality, and “Hey, isn’t that Stephanie Seymour?” celebrity. The showroom offers a mélange of fine goods, from shining diamonds to alluring fragrances, all sure to fascinate. And don’t forget to admire those deliciously designed windows now featuring pieces used in Baz Luhrmann’s film The Great Gatsby.

RALPH LAUREN 265 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.2054 Here’s a store on Greenwich Avenue you can’t miss. Boasting a barrel-vault entrance that leads to a towering glassand-wrought-iron door, this Beaux Arts wonder welcomes you to the world of Ralph Lauren. Denizens of Greenwich flock here to outfit themselves in the latest and greatest offerings from America’s peerless designer. From short-sleeve polos for the golf and tennis courts to elegant eveningwear for elaborate nights on the town, you’ll find it all at this multi-level marvel. For summer, look out for chic silhouettes and stunning Bayonne bouquet prints that perfectly illustrate this season’s romantic look. The Jestina patent platform sandal was also one of our favorites. When it comes to perfecting American style, we always look to Ralph Lauren.

J.CREW

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126 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.5181 With the mailing of a catalog in 1983, J.Crew started offering comfortable, classic clothing. The brand has expanded ever since, incorporating accessories and more through collaborations with brands like Comme des Garçons and Saint James. Known for its luxurious basics, J.Crew offers high-quality men’s, women’s, and children’s clothing. The brand has outfitted icons from Naomi Watts to Katie Holmes—and even Michelle Obama, who is lionized for embodying J.Crew’s aesthetic of elegance. Here in Greenwich, the twolevel store always offers a pleasant shopping experience.


RESTORATION HARDWARE 239 Greenwich Avenue 203.552.1040 When you walk into Restoration Hardware, you’ll enter a realm of home furnishings that features furniture, lighting, textiles, bathware, garden and outdoor décor, as well as baby and child products. RH’s collection offers timeless classics and modern masterpieces that are great for any style of home. Their authentic reproductions also provide a combination of inspired design, high quality, and unmatched value. RH operates 70 galleries, and the brand’s source books and website serve as virtual extensions and compelling tours of the company.

STUART WEITZMAN 120 Greenwich Avenue 203.622.5036 He’s the man who created the million-dollar shoe! But that’s just one of Stuart Weitzman’s many achievements. After 30 years of designing footwear and being honored with a lifetime achievement award by Footwear News, it’s no wonder Stuart Weitzman is embraced by the shoppers of Greenwich Avenue. From flats to pumps to wedges, the brand is known for breathing new life into classic looks. A one-stop shop for footwear, Stuart Weitzman showcases shoes that always look stunning, whatever the occasion. Shoppers would be remiss to forgo an opportunity to indulge in some of the other items from the brand, like its collection of handbags. Whether it’s a clutch or a carryall, it’s sure to look even better with the shoes.

SORAB & ROSHI 30 West Putnam Avenue 203.869.5800 Here at Quest, we would like to start by congratulating Sorab Bouzarjomehri and Roshi Ameri—founders of Sorab & Roshi—on the 25th anniversary of their eponymous brand. The duo’s pieces are works of art, and it’s easy to get lost in the beauty of Sorab & Roshi’s creations. In fact, their infectious enthusiasm and fastidious attention to detail has earned the company an illustrious reputation. With inimitable style and welcoming hospitality, Sorab & Roshi will be serving up statement pieces to Greenwich shoppers for years to come.


SECOND TIME AROUND 6 Greenwich Avenue 203.422.2808 In 1973, Second Time Around opened a small consignment store just outside Boston. They now operate 41 boutiques from Maine to Miami to Chicago that offer new and gently worn high-end merchandise. With one-of-a-kind pieces constantly coming into the store, shopping at Second Time Around is always an adventure. Staffed by clothing enthusiasts who devour the latest fashions, Second Time Around keeps up with seasonal trends and offers pieces that are timeless. It’s a fashionista’s dream come true.

HERMÈS 289 Greenwich Avenue 203.622.3007 Hermès is the latest addition to Greenwich Avenue—and we are certainly glad to welcome the French luxury brand, specializing in leather, lifestyle accessories, perfume, luxury goods, and ready-to-wear to a shopping destination that embodies luxury and smart style. Established in 1837, the celebrated brand has had equally influential designers, including Lola Prusac, Christophe Lemaire, Pierre Hardy, Eric Bergère, Marc Audibet, Mariot Chane, Martin Margiela, and Jean-Paul Gaultier. Eager Greenwich shoppers will be able to dive in and discover all that Hermès has to offer—and since it’s polo season, don’t forget to check out the equestrian section!

MADEWELL

W I LL FA R G E LL I ( M A D E W E LL , R E S TO R AT I O N H A R D WA R E )

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256 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.1591 Looking for great denim? Head over to Madewell. Founded back in 1937 as a denim workwear label, the brand remains focused on straightforward pieces that are designed for everyday. Madewell is the source for effortlessly cool styles you’ll love forever. Think great jeans, perfect-fitting tees, chambray shirts and dresses, and all the wear-everywhere accessories you’ll pair with them. In fact, it’s east to spend hours inside the store mixing and matching the clothes and accessories! JUNE 2013 83


A POINT IN TIME five coates.” The peninsula was renamed, “Elizabeth’s Neck,” in honor of Elizabeth Feake. In 1730, the Ferris family purchased the property. They, like others in the area, farmed for produce such as asparagus, celery, potatoes, and strawberries. And like the Siwanoys, residents turned to the sea for oysters and scallops. By 1884, the land had proved itself—in terms of its vistas, as well as vitality. J. Kennedy Tod, a banker from New York, started the three-year process of purchasing the property. In 1887, he called it “Tod’s Point,” and commenced constructing his estate, Innis Arden. The renovation

H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

THE COUNTRY CLUB is a term that’s near synonymous with Greenwich, Connecticut—where they exist with all of the exclusivity one would expect. And then there’s Greenwich Point. Tennis whites or not, everyone’s encouraged to visit. The park, which is owned by the town, extends from Shore Road to the Long Island Sound. The Siwanoys knew it as Monakewego (or “shining sands”), and used the land for fishing. But on July 18, 1640, captain Daniel Patrick and Robert and Elizabeth Feake bought “ye neck by ye Indians called Monakewego”—as well as the area of Old Greenwich (then, “Old Town”)—for “twentie-

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BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


This page, clockwise from above: An interior view of J. Kennedy Tod’s home, circa 1910; the Chimes Building is now used by the Old Greenwich Yacht Club’s community sailing program; the gatehouse at Greenwich Point. Opposite page: The Innis Arden cottage—then and now.

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was extensive, as it included the construction of a lake as well as the building of a stone 37-room manse with an accompanying boat house, guest house, and golf course. Tod contributed to defining Greenwich as the suburb of New York that it is today: he commuted from his home to his office, J. Kennedy Tod & Co. at 45 Wall Street, and socialized at the Knickerbocker Club and the Metropolitan Club, among other clubs at which he was a member. Like many New Yorkers, he engaged in philanthropy, and was especially involved with the Presbyterian Hospital of New York as his uncle, John S. Kennedy, had been the president of its board of trustees. Often, Tod and his wife, Mary Howard Potter, would invite the staff of the hospital of New York to Innis Arden, providing a respite from New York. They developed a relationship with their visitors, including Anna Maxwell, a nurse credited with pioneering the field of nursing in the United States—she organized nurses for the SpanishAmerican War and World War I and succeeded in lobbying to award a military rank to nurses in the army. When the Tods died, he in 1925 and she in 1939, they bequeathed their estate to the Presbyterian Hospital of New York. And in 1944, the hospital accepted $550,000 for the 148.5 acres from the town, under the condition that it would be used “along dignified lines without undesirable concessions or other features which would be unattractive or objectionable to the general neighborhood or to those making use of the property for bathing and wholesome recreation.” Today, Greenwich Point is used for just that. X

This page: A current view of Greenwich Point; J. Kennedy Tod, who started the process of purchasing the property in 1884, soon renaming it “Tod’s Point” (inset). Opposite page: Tod’s pond, with black and white swans (above); another interior view of Tod’s home, circa 1910—also featuring an animal-skin rug.

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TAILORED FOR THE TOWN JOINING THE RANKS of Tiffany & Co., Ralph Lauren, and Saks Fifth Avenue, Hermès has made its way to Greenwich Avenue. Hermès of Paris Inc., recently celebrated the opening of its first flagship store in Greenwich, Connecticut, with a cocktail party at its new location at 289 Greenwich Avenue. Following cocktails, one hundred guests proceeded on to a private dinner in a glass tent that floral designer Raul Avila designed to resemble an enchanted forest. Built in 1906, the Greek Revival building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Spanning 5,250 square feet (2,900 of which are dedicated to retail space), the store provides Connecticut clients with an extensive, exclusive offering of Hermès products. RDAI, the Parisian architectural agency founded by the late Rena Dumas, designed the store’s interior. The boutique features all of the fine goods the brand is known for: men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, fine leather 88 QUEST

goods, home furnishings, fine jewelry, luggage, and more. In keeping with Hermès’ 2013 theme, “The Sporting Life,” Spanish artist Pamen Pereira has created a window installation of iconic Hermès objects meant to appeal to the Greenwich community’s strong equestrian culture. For example, the new Hermès Cavale saddle and the Jumping ladies’ boot are spotlighted in the store windows and even hanging from the ceiling rafters. Robert Chavez, president and C.E.O. Hermès of Paris, commented: “We are delighted to introduce the complete world of Hermès at our very own new location on Greenwich Avenue. Inspired by the company’s founding in the crafting of refined equestrian furnishings, we eagerly anticipate the opportunity to serve discerning clients within this special community. Our new store will enable clients to fully explore the Hermès lifestyle with an enhanced level of service, selection, and style.”X

B FA NYC . CO M

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This page, clockwise from top: The private dinner for the Greenwich store opening; the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s façade; Eaddo Kiernan, Peter Malachi, and Cena Jackson enjoying cocktails before the dinner; Carmela Kaufman and Robert Chavez; Genevieve Bahrenburg and Yvonne Fielden. Opposite page: The Pamen Pereira window installation (above); Robert Clymer (inset).


C. Z. Guest, poolside at her home in Palm Beach, Florida, circa 1957.

BY LIZ SMITH

“THERE ARE BLONDES and there are blondes,” as Raymond Chandler wrote. Truman Capote continued Chandler’s thought: “Mrs. Guest, shimmering on the blue smoky light, was one of them. Her hair, parted in the middle and paler than Dom Pérignon, was but a shade darker than the dress she was wearing, a Mainbocher column of white Crêpe de Chine. No jewelry, not much makeup, just blanc de blanc perfection. Mr. [Cecil] Beaton introduced me to her. She acknowledged with ice-cream reserve. Who could have imagined that lurking inside this cool, vanilla lady was a madcap, a laughing tomboy?” So begins the saga of C. Z. Guest being reported on in “the good old days.” She and Truman went on to become fast friends. She wasn’t just one of the social ladies he collected, or the movie stars; she was the only one not to “diss” and abandon the writer after the mess that was created by publishing La Côte Basque toward the end of his career. His other “swans” had all turned against him. All except C. Z. She didn’t know what Gloria Vanderbilt, Slim Keith, and Babe Paley meant by saying they felt “betrayed.” She said to me at the time, “My heavens, Liz. Everyone knows that writers write what they know, suspect, or imagine. It’s the way writers work. What did these women expect?” C. Z. Guest has been immortalized since she first said of herself as a young socialite: “My ambition was to be a successful enough actress to get myself thrown out of the Social Register. I had no talent at all but I enjoyed every minute of my experience.” 90 QUEST

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Nothing bad ever stuck to C.Z., who was open, honest, had a sense of humor, and had another sense— common sense.

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C. Z. went on to abandon acting aspirations and made herself infamous by having the Mexican artist Diego Rivera paint and hang her nude portrait over a bar. But nothing bad every stuck to C. Z., who was open, honest, had a sense of humor, and had another sense—common sense. Now there is a great new coffee-table book about this goddess, by Susanna Salk, titled C. Z. Guest: American Style Icon (Rizzoli). It’s got everything to sum up the late Mrs. Guest and her several eras. I realized when looking at it—and I can’t leave it alone— that the reason we can’t forget this immortal is because of the photographs. She is the star of Irving Penn, Slim Aarons, Michael Mundy, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Tony Armstrong-Jones, Mario Testino, and everybody else. The photos of her from Vogue in 1943 and until her death in 2003, with the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Diana Vreeland, Anna Wintour, Barbara Hutton, her husband, Winston, and her children (Cornelia and Alexander) are legion; everyone an elegant masterpiece. No other social name comes up to her in my opinion. She was virtually alone in her caste in not being, at heart, a snob. She liked all sorts of people and tried to understand them. She was reasonable and practical. I’ve told the following story in my memoir, Natural Blonde, and repeat it in this new photo book, which has a foreword by the perspicacious Bill Norwich. When I rang the bell on a Christmas Eve at the Winston Guest estate on Oyster Bay and the fabled C. Z. herself answered the door, she had recently been on the cover of Time magazine as the last of her kind. She was a new friend to me then. That night, she was accompanied by at least 20 dogs, each a different variety, This page: C. Z. Guest, in an oatmeal tweed cocktail suit by Mainbocher, photographed by Irving Penn in 1952 (above); C. Z. Guest: American Style Icon by Susanna Salk (Rizzoli) examines the life of the glamorous socialite, who was one of Truman Capote’s famous “swans” (below). Opposite page: C. Z. Guest at her home on Long Island, where she loved to ride horses.


She liked all people and tried to understand them. She was reasonable and practical.

wedding night in 1947 at the Hemingways’ home in Havana, Cuba. As a good friend of the couple, Hemingway was the best man at the wedding. 94 QUEST

OF RIZZOLI

C. Z. and Winston Guest with Ernest and Mary Hemingway on the Guests’

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from purebreds to mutts, each wearing a bright red ribbon. This charming and unexpected scene seemed right out of a movie. Because I was early, I asked Mrs. Guest to show me the John Singer Sargent painting of the infant Winston with his grandmother. She was delighted and surprised that I knew about it. It was at this party I felt a little sting of triumph. I had begun my social coverage in 1955 at the bottom of the heap. At that time, Aileen Mehle, the society columnist known as Suzy, was the queen of all she surveyed. She had decreed to New York hostesses that she would not come to parties where I was also invited. This aced me out pretty well. But C. Z. Guest was the first to ignore Suzy’s exclusivity dictum. She invited both of us to her Christmas Eves and let the chips fall where they would. No shots were fired that first time, and I was through the breach lines, thanks to C. Z. At this time late in her life, C. Z. made news again, just as she had from her teens on, with a personal gardening column that gave her great pleasure. She embraced the Rupert Murdochowned newspaper The New York Post with no prejudices. The most memorable time as a reporter was when she covered the funeral of mob boss Paul “Big Paul” Castellano, gunned down at Sparks Steak House on East 46th Street. C. Z. went to the Brooklyn Funeral Home where he was laid out in state. She took a Post photographer and described the incredible flowers. Later, she became close friends in Oyster Bay with a neighbor, Victoria Gotti, who became a momentary celebrity when her father and husband were in prison. C. Z. liked Victoria and they often talked together about what to do with their rambunctious offspring. Yes, C. Z. Guest—gone, but never forgotten as long as fashion, style, manners, and good taste prevail. X


RIZZOLI

CONNECTICUT COMFORT BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

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This page: The kitchen and pantry at Laurel Hill, decorator Cindy Rinfret’s home in Greenwich, Connecticut. Opposite page: Laurel Hill’s master bedroom’s bath, with hand-painted walls.

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“THE INSPIRATION FOR all my decorating is family,” says Cindy Rinfret in Greenwich Style: Inspired Family Homes (Rizzoli). “It doesn’t matter if your house is a colonial or contemporary, made from stucco or stone, it simply can’t be called a home until it is filled with the lives and experiences of the people who live there.” And with that, Rinfret—a decorator whose store is located at 354 Greenwich Avenue in Greenwich, Connecticut— introduces her book, the pages of which reveal a woman who delivers the comfortable stateliness that defines the suburb. She opens by recounting the process behind the exteriors and interiors of her own home, Laurel Hill. She applied fabrics (e.g., fur, leather, linen) and materials (e.g., limestone, wood beams) that wouldn’t look too “decorated.” The inside transitions seamlessly to the outside—French doors in the bedroom open to a terrace with a Koi pond. Subsequent chapters explore a “Classic Connecticut” (the Chippendale staircase inspires design throughout the house, including the furniture in the dining room) and a “Transitional Colonial” (a clapboard house opens to reveal Asian accents, honoring the owner’s heritage). Throughout Greenwich Style, visuals of refined rooms in muted colors pay homage to the sensibility of their structures while incorporating the personality of their inhabitants— whether they’re adults, children, or pets. Rinfret, it is clear, is an expert at making the living room livable. X

Laurel Hill, decorator Cindy Rinfret’s six-bedroom home on 5.24 acres in Greenwich, Connecticut, is currently listed for $8.25 million. For more information, call Shelly Tretter Lynch of Sotheby’s International Realty at 203.550.8508. 98 QUEST

RIZZOLI

“It simply can’t be called a home until it is filled with the lives and experiences of the people who live there.”


A room at Laurel Hill, with wood beams and fabrics that are sophisticated but not overly â&#x20AC;&#x153;decorated.â&#x20AC;?

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MODERN NATURE: O’KEEFFE AND LAKE GEORGE

BY TONY HALL

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE is so closely identified with New Mexico that fans (and not a few scholars) are surprised to learn that much of her most important work was completed on the shores of Lake George, in upstate New York. Our ignorance is largely the fault of the artist herself, who once told The New Yorker’s Calvin Tomkins, “Lake George is not really painting country.” It should be noted that she told the same writer, “We’d push the past out of our way entirely if we only could.” The “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” exhibition will travel from the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York, to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Sante Fe, and then to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. This demonstrates that Lake George, far from being a footnote to O’Keeffe’s career, was its crucible. According to Erin Coe, who curated the exhibition, O’Keeffe completed more than 200 paintings at the lake between 1918 and 1934, the most prolific years of her career. Acknowledged or not, Lake George was indeed “painting country.” For instance, those images of flowers that made her a celebrity in the 1970s (at least among undergraduates) and which people attribute to the bohemian doyenne of the Southwest, were painted on Lake George. Here, she pushed representation toward the edges of abstraction, where something essential about the natural world is found on the canvas, albeit distilled or abstracted from the particulars of the landscape. It was an approach to nature that she would take with her when she turned to the desert landscapes of the Southwest. Although O’Keeffe spent a summer on Lake George in 1908 at an artists’ colony founded by Yaddo benefactors Spencer and Katrina Trask, it was not until 1918 that she became an annual summer resident. A few years earlier, she


This page: “Petunias” (above) and “Lake George” (below) are some of the many examples that reflect the lush and tranquil style that

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Georgia O’Keeffe developed as a painter during her time in New York. Opposite page: “Chestnut Grey” shows her subtle and graceful techniques.

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This page: The photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O’Keeffe sharing a tender moment at Stieglitz’s family home in Lake George. Opposite page: “Apple Family” (above) and “Lake George Barns” (below) are two more of the paintings on display at the upcoming exhibit at the Hyde Collection.

had fallen in love with Alfred Stieglitz, the photographer and impressario whose family started coming to Lake George in the 1870s. The family compound would become the couple’s sole, permanent home until Stieglitz’s death in 1946. For the six to eight weeks the property was theirs, Lake George was the motionless fulcrum of their hectic lives: a place to garden and hike, to row out to islands or to the village, and even to play miniature golf. But above all else, it was a place for both to work in companionable silence. “Georgia O’Keeffe reveled in Lake George; in her letters she constantly remarks how perfect it is,” says Erin Coe. “Over and over again, I hear people say, ‘Georgia O’Keeffe hated Lake George.’ It simply wasn’t true.” To be sure, the relationship between Stieglitz and O’Keeffe, which had been formalized with a wedding in 1924, had its challenges. Twenty-three years older than O’Keeffe, Stieglitz began an affair in the early 1930s with an even younger

woman named Dorothy Norman. By then, O’Keeffe had begun began making annual trips to the southwest, a place where she could escape Stieglitz and the powerful, obtrusive influence he exercised over her art and life. “I have not wanted to be anything but kind to you—but there is nothing to be kind if I cannot be me,” she wrote to Stieglitz in 1929. A “me,” of course, is a very ductile thing indeed, and the “me” O’Keeffe fashioned over the last decades of her life was one that purported to owe nothing to Stieglitz and Lake George. Stieglitz himself had more or less single-handedly created a public image or “newspaper personality” for O’Keeffe, first with an exhibition of his nude photographs of her in 1920 and then, in 1924, with a show of flower paintings which he interpreted and then publicized as representations of the female eros. Among the many things O’Keeffe carried with her to New Mexico were the tricks she had learned from a master of public relations.

While much of the wooded shores of the 32-mile-long lake remain untouched, there is little in the village of Lake George today that O’Keeffe and Stieglitz would recognize. The family mansion became a motel. The farmhouse and barns were burned in the 1950s and the property subdivided. Stieglitz’s ashes are buried, depending upon whom you talk to, beneath a parking lot or a pump house that pushes lake water to a treatment plant. And, with the exception of a historical marker near the site of the farm, there is little to inform visitors that two of the most famous artists of the 20th century once lived and worked there. Residents, of course, are a bit more knowledgeable. Over the years, prints of Stieglitz’s photographs, which presumably he discarded in Lake George, have made their way to auction houses and into private, local collections. And when a developer proposed demolishing Stieglitz’s favorite miniature golf course and replacing it with an outdoor bar, the Lake George Mirror newspaper launched a campaign to block him, citing Stieglitz’s connection to the golf course as reason enough to preserve it. Lake George’s mayor and the chamber of commerce hope that “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” will bring renewed attention and more tourists to the resort community. A commercial calculation like this one is something both Stieglitz and O’Keeffe would have understood, and perhaps even appreciated. X “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” is on view at the Hyde Collection from June 15 to September 15, when it will move to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, from October 4 to January 26, 2014. The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco de Young Museum will exhibit the show February 8, 2014, to May 11, 2014.


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KINGS OF THE HEARTLAND BY MICHAEL M. THOMAS

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This page: The entrance hall of the Old Elm Club, with photographs of the golf course in 1913. Opposite page: Shoreacres is situated on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan.

ONCE UPON A TIME, a gentleperson’s library would include a short shelf of erotica placed where the prying eyes and hands of the children couldn’t get at them. These would be finely printed and bound volumes, often splendidly, seductively illustrated, with titles like The Perfumed Garden and Memoirs of a Lady of Pleasure. Books to be savored alone or in very select company, delectations of forbidden pleasures to be enjoyed by the firelight with a fine old brandy. This sort of erotica has probably had its day, overrun in our time by Internet porn the way Alaric and his Visigoths sacked Rome. If gentlepersons’ libraries are still formed—and expecting anyone with the cultivation to appreciate great erotic books must per-force be a golfer—such a person’s bookshelves will contain a selection of choice works on the great Scots’ game, including a book I have just put down with that mixture of admiration, mental fulfillment, and melancholy known only to golfers condemned to their armchairs by the seasons of the year or the seasons of life. It is Legendary Golf Clubs


This page, clockwise from top left: The golfer’s veranda overlooking the 11th green at the St. Louis Country Club; members on the outdoor terrace of the Scioto Country Club; the leaded-glass window in the Grill Room of the Country Club of Detroit; the walk to the 11th hole of the Interlachen Country Club; the living room at Shoreacres; the 1900 Polo Members Cup of the St. Louis Country Club. Opposite page: Ray Whitmore’s painting of a young Jack Nicklaus hangs in the Nicklaus Room of the Scioto Country Club.


CO U RTE S Y O F E D G E WO RT H E D I T I O N S ; R AY W H I TM O R E

of the American Midwest (Edgeworth Editions), with photographs by Anthony Edgeworth, text by his longtime collaborator, John de St. Jorre, and a forward by Jack Nicklaus, the man who bestrides Midwestern golf in much the same way the Statue of Liberty bestrides New York Harbor. Midwest, as I shall call it, is the fourth such volume produced by the Edgeworth/de St. Jorre team, and, like its predecessors, it is absolutely splendid. But note the title carefully, gentle reader: this is a book about golf clubs, not simply golf courses. It doesn’t end on the eighteenth green of such hatcheries of sublime talent as Kansas City Golf Club, where a towhead named Tom Watson first picked up sticks, or Scioto, whose fairways helped hone the game of the young Jack Nicklaus. These are places with their own Gestalt, and Edgeworth and de St. Jorre give them to us holistically, with a real grasp of what clubs are and how they work. To be sure, the great courses are here—it was at Interlachen in 1930 that Bob Jones won the U.S. Open, third leg in his Grand Slam—and these clubs have hosted a wide range of important competitions. Caviar

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Golfers on the beginning of the back nine at the Kirtland Country Club.

names like Donald Ross and Francis Ouimet dot the pages, and fans of local history will wriggle with delight, but at the end of the day it is the wholeness of the whole that matters. Golf not only is, to paraphrase the poet, it means, and a grasp of this meaning is as well provided in this book in as any I can think of. Private golf clubs aren’t the entire story of American golf, but they are among the game’s mainstays of survival and lore. I should explain why I read Midwest with a certain melancholy. Another poet I relish wrote long ago: “I see the land of lost content/ I see it shining plain/ The happy highways where I went/ And shall not go again.” Change those last two lines to “The happy fairways I never went/ And will know only in vain” and you’ll appreciate my vexation. Save for a tour of the amazing Prairie Dunes links, I’ve never played these courses or visited these clubs, and now, thanks to advanced age (and tee shots that barely carry 170 yards) I fear I never shall. But thanks to Midwest, I have a good idea of what it must feel like to play these great courses and hang out in these fine clubs, being treated to their oldest members’ choicest anecdotes. It doesn’t get much better than this. Thanks Tony, John, and Jack. Now—on to Texas! X To purchase the book, visit www.edgewortheditions.com or any of the private clubs featured.

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This spread:


POLO JOURNAL 2013 SEASON

This page: Nacho Figueras, for the St. Regis team, and Prince Harry, for the Sentebale Land Rover team, at the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup. Opposite page, clockwise from top:

Steve Lefkowitz for the St. Regis team; Dawn Jones for the St. Regis team. Nacho, a St. Regis connoisseur; Trine Ackelman, Priscilla Alexander, and Paul Nash; DelďŹ na Blaquier cheered on her husband, Nacho; the match.

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P h ot o gra p h y by D o m i n i c J am e s

The Sentebale Land Rover team;


GREENWICH POLO CLUB

BFA n yc. co m

St. Regis Hotels and Resorts Kicks Off the 2013 Polo Season at the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup in Greenwich, Connecticut On May 15, H.R.H. Prince Henry of Wales concluded his tour of the United States at the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup at the Greenwich Polo Club in Greenwich, Connecticut. It proved to be the event of the season, with sponsorship from brands such as St. Regis—whose support of the sport pays tribute to colonel John Jacob Astor, founder of the iconic St. Regis New York. The match started at 3 p.m., with Prince Harry leading the Sentebale Land Rover team against the St. Regis team, captained by St. Regis connoisseur Nacho Figueras. It was tied until Prince Harry scored in the fourth and final chukka, leading his team to a 4-3 victory. “Prince Harry scoring the winning goal was the highlight of the match and a great way to end both the game and his tour,” said the Duke of Arygyll, who was in attendance. “It

was a truly nail-biting game, with both teams evenly matched.” Afterward, guests such as Peter Brant, Karolina Kurkova, and others departed—many in cars from Bentley, including the St. Regis’ custom 2013 Bentley Mulsanne. From sailing and automobile racing to deep-sea fishing and, of course, polo, St. Regis continuously aims to cater to its guests’ passions, which include sport and speed. At the event, Prince Harry said, “It is wonderful to be here at Greenwich Polo Club in Connecticut for the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup 2013. The success of our three previous polo events has helped Sentebale make a real difference to the lives of vulnerable children in Lesotho, the Mountain Kingdom of southern Africa.” This year’s match raised over $1 million. X

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H AV I L A N D H O L L OW FA R M Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 013

POLO CLUB Haviland Hollow Polo Club, at NYCpolo.com, Enters its Fifth Season of Sport

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Above and below, panoramas of Haviland Hollow Farm—located an hour from New York City and 30 minutes from Greenwich, Connecticut.

on the quality of their play. We break down the game into horsemanship, hitting, playing, and rules skills. Once our students learn the basics, we encourage them to improve,” says owner and two goal–rated player, Sam Ramirez, Jr. The club successfully introduces people of all ages to this challenging and exciting sport in a unique way. The social aspects offer horse enthusiasts an opportunity to watch games and tournaments, as well as to attend charity matches in September. The fields are ideal for an afternoon relaxing on the hill while picnicking and viewing a match. This year, schedule highlights will include the Rules Clinic from June 7 to the 9th, the White Polo Ball on June 29, and the Charity Cup on September 7, as well as two USPA Amateur Cups—a four-goal and a six-goal. X For more information, visit nycpolo.com.

Co u r te sy o f H a vi l an d H o llow Far m / NYC po lo. co m

Haviland Hollow Farm, at NYCpolo.com, is headed into its fifth season with some major growth. On the heels of rave reviews from the polo and equestrian communities, Haviland Hollow Polo Club continually develops a strong following of professionals, students, and fans from around the world. The farm has become known for the incredible quality of its facilities, its fun-loving people, and family-friendly environment. The Polo Club boasts a year-round polo program with two top-notch polo fields and an indoor polo arena. The summer polo season is from May until October, hosting four- to 14-goal polo. The winter season is from November until March. The club offers a lessons program for beginner and intermediate players to learn and improve their game. In addition, a highschool polo program was introduced last year—this past winter, Haviland Hollow Polo Club grew to include two arena teams that trained at the farm and competing in the Regional USPA Intercollegiate/Interscholastic tournament at Cornell. “Many of our students have gone on to play matches outside of the club and receive M.V.P. awards and other compliments


Challenge Both Your Body & Mind

With the Most Exhilarating Sport in the World

Play The Sport of Kings Just One Hour North of Kings County! Haviland Hollow Farm, entering its 5th season, is a premier polo & equestrian facility and a great place to play, socialize and be introduced to this exciting and challenging sport. The 2013 Polo season offers members 4 to 14 goal levels of play and tournaments throughout the summer. Season begins in May and runs until September. This season’s events will feature our title and field sponsor Badoid, Evian, Vita Coco, Ramirez & Company, Inc.. For more information contact us at info@nycpolo.com.

Haviland Hollow Farm www.nycpolo.com Connect With Us at facebook.com/nycpolo Did You Know? The first polo match played in the U.S. was played at Dickel’s Riding Academy on 39th and 5th avenue in the late 1800’s. A tradition that continues…


CHUKKAS OVER THE YEARS Rooted in Eastern tradition, “the Sport of Kings” has gained an international following. Quest looks back at the early days of the sport’s popularity in the United States.

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NOSTALGIA Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 013

This page, clockwise from top: The International Polo Cup at Meadowbrook, Long Island, on June 13, 1914; female polo players, April 1924; a young girl successfully mounts a wooden polo pony; a player about to strike. Opposite page: An army polo team, 1912.

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POLO CLUBS Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 013

CASA DE CAMPO

GREENWICH

The Bridgehampton Polo Club returns for its 17th season, hosting matches on Saturdays from July 20 to August 24 at Two Trees Farm. White Birch Polo, the home team owned by Peter Brant, will compete with visitors for the Hamptons Cup and the Monty Waterbury Cup. Recently presented with the Five Star Diamond Award by the American Academy of Hospitality Sciences, the Bridgehampton Polo Club continues to cater to the elite— for the 2013 season, a number of tents by the field with champagne and a picnic for 10 that are included in the purchase.

Ready to encounter pure equestrian bliss? With three luscious fields, one practice field, and the largest string of polo ponies under a single brand in the world, Casa de Campo facilities are among the best in the Caribbean. Equipment, group instruction, and personalized training are among the amenities available for beginners and medium-goal players. Guests may hire ponies for stick-and-ball tournaments and families can compete against each other in matches held each week, year-round. A way to experience polo, no matter your level of expertise.

Since 1981, the Greenwich Polo Club has catered to the storied suburb of New York City as the venue for high-class, high-goal polo in the Northeast. With matches on Sundays in the months of June, July, and September, the venue hosts players such as Steve Lefkowitz and Peter Orthwein, as well as owner of the venue Peter Brant. On May 15, the Greenwich Polo Club hosted the Sentebale Royal Salute Polo Cup, matching Prince Harry and his team against Nacho Figueras and his St. Regis team—of course, Prince Harry scored the winning goal!

Visit bridgehamptonpolollc.com.

Visit casadecampo.com.do.

Visit greenwichpoloclub.com.

Co u r te sy o f th e Re sp e c ti ve Clu b s

BRIDGEHAMPTON

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POLO CLUBS Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 013

SARATOGA

WELLINGTON

Located on a 1,900-acre preserve in Pine Plains, New York, the Mashomack Polo Club is a full-service club for polo players of all levels. The season extends from Memorial Day Weekend through September, with practice chukkers hosted weekly and coaching league and junior chukkers hosted on Saturdays. The 16th annual International Polo Challenge, which will take place on June 22, promises to be the highlight of the 2013 season—this year, a Carnaval-style celebration will be held in honor of the match against Team Brazil!

Saratoga, New York—a place that is synonymous with horses and the sporting events that surround them—is home to the Saratoga Polo Association, established in 1898. This season, matches will take place on Fridays and Sundays from July 12 to September 1, encouraging guests of all ages and experience to enjoy the sport of polo. Especially anticipated events include Women’s Week at Saratoga Polo, which will feature the Veuve Clicquot Women’s Challenge; the Whitney Cup Tournament; and the Ylvisaker Cup Tournament. Giddyup to upstate!

Picture the scene: a beautiful palm-lined drive leading past tennis courts and a magnificent pool to the lush, carefully manicured polo fields that make up the International Polo Club Palm Beach. Located in Wellington, the heart of South Florida’s legendary horse country, the International Polo Club Palm Beach is a world-class polo club designed by and for polo players. This season, get ready for gourmet brunches, après-polo celebrations, and charitable events at this one-of-a-kind venue. It’s certainly worth the trip south, even in the summer!

Visit mashomackpoloclub.com.

Visit saratogapolo.com.

Visit internationalpoloclub.com.

C o ur te sy of t he Re s pe cti ve C lub s

MASHOMACK

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MASHOMACK POLO CLUB Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 013

POLO CHALLENGE The Mashomack Polo Club hosts its 16th annual International Polo Challenge

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This page, clockwise from top left: Guille Aquero on the field; James McBride, Leticia and Giovanni Beretta, Bruce Colley, and Felicia Taylor; Tatin Zubiarre, Frederic Levy, Oakleigh Thorn, Philip MacTaggart, and Nick Bienstock competing; Team Quest.

and-ball areas, and a regulation outdoor arena. Over the past 48 months, an extensive renovation has resulted in the preservation and update of many of the barns on the Mashomack Polo Club grounds. These barns will now remain an historical landmark to be enjoyed by future generations—this history gives the club a one-of-a-kind feel. Throughout the summer, the club hosts four- to 12-goal tournaments, including the White Pants Open (four-goal), the USPA Officers Cup (eight-goal), and Mashomack Cup (12goal). The club also hosts pro/am tournaments and lessons. This year, Nespresso will sponsor the Mashomack International Polo Challenge—it's not to be missed! X For more information, please visit mashomackpolo.com

Co u r te sy o f th e M as h o ma c k Po lo C lu b

On Saturday, June 22, the Mashomack Polo Club will host its 16th annual Mashomack International Polo Challenge. The event—which will take place on the venue's 1,900-acre preserve in Pine Plains, New York—promises to be the highlight of the season as it marks the start of summer in Millbrook. Last year, the Mashomack International Polo Challenge attracted more than 700 patrons to this spectacular day of sport, drawing guests from all over to spend time in the country and experience “The Sport of Kings.” “The event begins at noon with a champagne reception followed by a tented field-side luncheon and the exciting eight-goal International Polo Challenge,” says Bruce Colley, a chairman for the event. “In the past, teams representing the United States, Great Britain, Italy, and France have battled to secure the coveted trophy for their team and country.” This year, Team Brazil will participate for its first appearance at the match, which has inspired a Carnaval-style celebration at the event. The Mashomack Polo Club, part of the Mashomack Preserve Club, features five tournament-class fields, a practice field, stick-


APPEARANCES

BE AS IT MAY BY HILARY GEARY

day,” wrote Alan Jay Lerner, for Camelot. This month, New York is ever so pretty with flowers blooming everywhere, especially in Central Park. Of course, one of the best ways to see the park is to sign up for the Central Park Conservancy’s Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon on the first Wednesday in May. For 31 years, this luncheon has been a roaring success because absolutely everyone loves the park! This year, all the stars were lined up and the luncheon was better than ever with perfect weather, a perfect menu, and record-breaking revenues! The evergenerous philanthropists Jenny and John Paulson were the honorees and the event was once again sold-out. Nothing has more razzle dazzle than a night on the town taking in a big hit of a Broadway play with a megastar like Tom Hanks! So, off we headed along with Mario Buatta—an aside: must mention Mario’s first book that we have all been waiting for, Mario Buatta: Fifty Years of American Interior Decoration (Rizzoli)— to see Lucky Guy. Hanks was fabulous in this Nora Ephron play. (You better go and see it quickly as it is a limited engagement!) Now, Tom was not the only star we spotted that night. In fact, for a minute, I thought I was in Hollywood since there in the theater were David Letterman and Steve Martin. Afterward, we headed to Orso for dinner, where we saw at various tables around the room: Meryl Streep, One of the many confections on display at the Central Park Conservancy’s “Hat” luncheon.

CO U RTE S Y O F H I L A RY G E A RY; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

“IT’S MAY! IT’S MAY! That gorgeous holi-


This page, clockwise from top left: Anne Harrison speaking on behalf of the Central Park Conservancy; our columnist, Hilary Geary, Blaine Trump, and Karen LeFrak at the Frederick Law Olmstead Awards Luncheon; Nancy Missett in Central Park; photographer Bill Cunningham on the scene.

Liza Minnelli with Michael Feinstein, Alec and Hilaria Baldwin, Tracy Ullman, and more! Gotham Hall. Don’t you love that name, since it sounds like a venue in Batman movie? But no no no, I am talking about New York. Gotham Hall was where the Queen Elizabeth II September 11th Garden gala dinner, which supported of the lovely oasis in the Financial District, was held this year. Everyone jumped into black-tie and came to lend support to this beautiful memorial garden, a tribute to the 67 Brits that we lost in the September 11th terrorist attacks and a symbol of the deep friendship that Great Britain shares with the United States. The festive dinner was in honor of André Desmarais of the Power Corporation of Canada and

Duncan Niederauer of NYSE Euronext. We all dined royally on smoked salmon, followed by black-truffle chicken with rapini and leek and a yummy Meyer lemon–custard cake for dessert. Famed Sotheby’s auctioneer Jamie Niven worked his magic with a pledge auction, raising a bundle more for the garden. The guest speaker was the honorable John Howard, former Australian prime minister. Among the guests were Viscount Astor and Lady Astor (a.k.a. Annabelle and William), Wilbur Ross, France Desmarais, Riprand and Maria Arco, Violaine and John Bernbach, Natalie and Malcolm Pray, and more. It takes a very extraordinary event to draw a big crowd on a Sunday night, especially when you ask them to wear black-tie, but Dinner on Stage at the

Met Opera is a truly extraordinary evening. After cocktails on the Mercedes T. Bass Grand Tier, we were led down the aisle right up onto the stage—how fun is that? It really was a big thrill to walk onto the set of Rigoletto, designed à la Las Vegas, dine on glorious food and listen to such stars as Jay Hunter Morris sing “You Gotta Have Heart” followed by Danielle de Niese, Isabel Leonard, and Patricia Racette, all singing like angels. Among the lucky guests were Mercedes Bass, honorees Jeanette and Joseph Neubauer, Frayda and George Lindemann, Gay Gaines, Judy Ney, Boaz Mazor, Tina and Terry Lundgren, Joe Torre of baseball fame, Susan and Richard Braddock, Cathy and Walter Isaacson, newlyweds Maria Eugenia and Bill Haseltine, and more. X

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BROWN

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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST This month, the weather was as scattered as our columnist’s schedule,

as she ventured both to the Metropolitan Club for a true ladies’s luncheon and to the Brooklyn Beefsteak for an all-you-can-eat and all-you-can-drink event. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN The Susquehanna Industrial Tool & Die Co. performed at the Brooklyn Beefsteak, featuring McSorley’s Ale.

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Susan Meyer and F.E. Castleberry at the Purses and Pursenalities luncheon at the Metropolitan Club.

Nicky Hilton attended the Cinema Society after-party for Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s. Beefsteak Betty emceed at the Brooklyn Beefsteak at the Bell House on April 28.

Ryan Conlon, Carver Diserens, Katie Cox, Jack Deitch, and Connor McKenna at the Brooklyn Beefsteak.

McSorley’s Ale provided beer for the Brooklyn

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; S A B R I N A L A N TO S I T G O E S H E R E

Beefsteak at the Bell House on April 28.

Sloan Overstrom, Daniel Cappello, and Blair Husain

Valerie Aston and Allison Aston at the Purses

supported the Madison Square Boys and Girls Club.

and Pursenalities luncheon on April 25.

“I HOPE SHE’LL BE A FOOL— that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool,” says Daisy in The Great Gatsby. Sorry, Daisy, but I think the best thing a girl can be is on the scene in New York City... On April 18, Roberto Cavalli presented the Museum Dance at the American Museum of Natural History. The theme, “Under the Sea,” was a nod at the “Whales: Giants of the Deep” exhibition. The dress was described as “resortwear chic,” so Micaela English and I dressed in full-length floral—I wore

a jumpsuit. Less resortwear, more chic: Elizabeth Kurpis in blue sequins, Alexandra Lind Rose in black lace. After dinner, guests such as Yumi Matsuo, John Munson, and Lacary Sharpe dove into dancing in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life to music by DJ Jus-Ske. On the 25th, the Madison Square Boys and Girls Club hosted its “Purses and Pursenalities” luncheon at the Metropolitan Club. Sponsored by the Lee W. Robinson Company, the event was a swirl of socials, including Mark Gilbertson, Amy HoadJUNE 2013 125


ley, Karen Klopp as well as Claudia Overstrom and Betsy Pitts of Eponymous. I was seated with honoree Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, but the treat of treats was the speech by Carline Balan, an alum of the program (and personal assistant to Jay-Z). On the 28th, I ventured with Caroline Smith and others to the Brooklyn Beefsteak at the Bell House in, well, Brooklyn. No, it isn’t written about by David Patrick Columbia. But yes, it is Christmas in April with McSorley’s Ale and medium-rare meat—an homage to a tradition from the 1900s. On the 29th, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of Scatter my Ashes at Bergdorf’s with Grey Goose and Swarovski, and an after-party at Harlow. Invited: the wellest of the wellheeled, including Veronica Beard, Wes Gordon, and Gilles Mendel—all of whom enjoyed cameos in the film about Bergdorf Goodman.

A view Inside 5 Beekman Street, where Derek Blasberg, Dani Stahl, and more showed for Carrera Ignition Night on May 7.

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Group at Carrera Ignition Night.

On May 1, the Literacy Partners’ Evening of Readings at Cipriani 42nd Street featured the Liz Smith presenting the Lizzie Award (what, what) to Jackie Weld Drake. Tatiana von Fürstenberg was also honored, so Diane von Fürstenberg and Barry Diller showed to support. Also, Bill O’Reilly read from his Killing Kennedy—totally killing it. On the 7th, Carrera Ignition Night took place at 5 Beekman Street, where the company toasted its history since 1956. The Carrera 6000s are the new Oakley Frogskins, so a stop into Solstice Sunglasses is a must. Later, the Cinema Society screened The Great Gatsby, with an after-party at the Lambs Club. I may have indulged in too many Caliche cocktails, because I adored the movie (sorry, every critic ever) and when Lady Gaga appeared, I almost started to sing “Beautiful, Dirty, Rich” because, you know, how Gatsby would that have been? X

M A R I O N C U RT I S / S TA R PI X ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Olivia Wilde and Roberto Vedovotto of Safilo


Thomas Matthews and Kick Kennedy at the Cinema Society after-party for The Great Gatsby with Caliche cocktails.

Anneleise Peterson at the American Museum of Natural History.

Lauren Remington Platt at the Museum Dance with an “Under the Sea” theme on April 18.

Flo Fulton dined with Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump at the Museum Dance.

Rebecca Regan and Melanie Lazenby at the American Museum of Natural History on April 18.

Kirsten Robinson and Marko Bon toasted Baz Luhrmann with the Cinema Society.

Luke Parker-Bowles and Douglas Steinbrech at the Literacy Partners’ Evening of Readings.

Gigi Stone, Alina Cho, and Samantha Yanks at

Carolina Zapf at the Literacy Partners’

Cipriani 42nd Street for a Literacy Partners event.

Evening of Readings on May 1. JUNE 2013 127


SNAPSHOT

This page, clockwise from top left: Great Captain Island in Greenwich; in 1858, a Fresnel lens was installed in the lighthouse; the tower, built in 1829, was replaced in 1868; the lighthouse and the five-room keeper’s house; another view.

“WHAT HAS GREENWICH done that the government inflicts such severe punishment on this community?” demanded a newspaper in 1905. The source of the siren—which was compared to “an army of panthers” and “the wail of a lost soul”— was the lighthouse on Great Captain Island, a 17-acre plot to the west of the Long Island Sound and north of the East River. The U.S. government purchased the 3.5 acres of Great Captain Island from Samuel Lyons in 1829 in order to erect the lighthouse. And with that, the states of Connecticut and New York started a dispute as to whom the property belonged; 50 years later, a decision was made in favor of Connecticut. This inaugurated Great Captain Island as the southernmost 128 QUEST

point in the state—and thereby, in New England. Over the years, Great Captain Island would become home to a variety of keepers, including Adam Kohlman and his stepgranddaughter (who would stay for the summer in the 1930s and 1940s) and four members of the Coast Guard, content to fish and swim together, leaving for a week per month. By 1970, technology had eliminated the need for a keeper. But due to vandalism, Otto Lauersdorf was installed to oversee the property in 1985. “If you have to depend on others, this is not the job for you,” said Lauersdorf, who was able to occupy himself with gardening, modeling airplanes, and reading. Today, anyone can visit Great Captain Island via ferry. —Elizabeth Quinn Brown

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

THIS LITTLE LIGHT


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