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100

104 142

CONTENTS T HE S UMMER ISSUE 78

SOUTHAMPTON SUMMER FUN

Six marvelous moms and their

kids create a lifetime of memories spending their summers in Southampton. PRODUCED BY

E LIZABETH

Q UINN BROWN,

86

MEIGHER ,

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

A SANDY SHANGRI-LA

LILY HOAGLAND,

AND

ELIZABETH

KATE OWEN

In The Spirit of the Hamptons (Assouline) looks at

how the Hamptons have changed in the past decade. BY LILY HOAGLAND

92 96

ART ON THE AVENUE

Park Avenue’s new sculptures.

HAMPTONS SHOPPING

NATURAL INSTINCTS

LILY HOAGLAND

From beach towels to lime rickeys to home decor,

the Hamptons have top-of-the-line everything.

100

BY

BY

ALEX R. TRAVERS

Agnès Monplaisir, the Parisian gallerist, has an

eye for art from around the world. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

104

HEALTH, HISTORY, HORSES

The rich history of when thoroughbred

racing came to Saratoga Springs, New York.

110

HALLOWED HALL

BY

B RIEN BOUYEA

The National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame

in Saratoga boasts an impressive lineage.

BY

EDWARD L. BOWEN

96


48

70

CONTENTS C OLUMNS 14

SOCIAL DIARY

48

SOCIAL CALENDAR

50

HARRY BENSON

52

OBSERVATIONS

52

AUDAX

56

FRESH FINDS

60

LIBERT Y PELL

68

UNDERWATER SAVIOR

102

BOOKS

162

APPEARANCES

164

YGL

168

SNAPSHOT

Summer heralds some of the finest fêtes.

BY

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

This month’s guide to the best festivities to attend and enjoy.

Bianca Jagger gamely playing on the beach in Montauk in 1977. Remembering a dear friend, Eddie Ulmann.

BY

TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

The iconic Southampton novel, The Devil Walks on Water. BY JAMIE MACGUIRE Summer’s best trends.

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

AND

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Washington, D.C., greatly needs a public-relations makeover. BY HAVEN PELL Sylvia Earle’s mission to save the ocean. BY LILY HOAGLAND

Family secrets are revealed in Callie Wright’s Love All.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

Kip Forbes takes fun to a higher altitude with balloons. BY HILARY GEARY

Time to party like an animal at the Central Park Zoo. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Super Saturday celebrates 16 years of luxury yard sales.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

78

78


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JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS INTERN

AMANDA PEREZ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON DARRELL HARTMAN BILL HUSTED MICHAEL THOMAS JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY JEANNE CHISHOLM MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD JACK DEUTSCH BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN JULIE SKARRATT JOE SCHILDHORN BEN FINK SHAPIRO ANNIE WATT


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EDITOR’S LETTER

The joys of summer: Hamptons moms Ali Edwards with daughters Veronica and Zinnia, and Meredith Waterman with sons Weston, Bowe, and Miles (left); Sylvia Earle wants to save sharks from extinction (right).

SUMMERTIME OFTEN brings a kind of carefree lunacy.

There’s the summer romance that won’t make it to next Fashion Week, the impulse buy abroad that looks terrible once brought home, and, for a rapper named Kanye West, the decision to christen your child “North.” I believe that Kanye is actually a huge Alfred Hitchcock fan, and will soon launch an eponymous clothing line for his child: North by North West. We found children with more conventional names for our Southampton Summer Fun shoot. Elizabeth Meigher, Lizzie Brown, and I ran around with some adorable munchkins and their infinitely unflappable mothers. As an old Jewish proverb says, “God could not be everywhere, and therefore he created mothers.” And these are the mothers who certainly put that into practice: from the stables, to the Fudge Company, to the pool, the Hamptons are full of babies displaying the beauty they’ve inherited from their gorgeous moms. Photographer Kate Owen captured them at their relaxed best. Maybe it’s something in the water? Hold on, be right back... OK, nope, not the water. Better switch back to my margarita and enjoy this summer retreat. Helping me do so is Assouline’s latest book on the subject, In The Spirit of the Hamptons, which makes the case that though there are more and more people coming here during the summer, it’s still a lovely place to escape from the city’s sweltering weekends. After all, you can cherry-pick who you “have” to see out here, so it’s your own fault if you find yourself surrounded by the same Manhattanites you were trying to get away from. We also wanted to shine a spotlight on Saratoga, a place where history buffs come visit the famed battlefields, cou12 QUEST

ples have romantic weekends at bed and breakfasts, and everyone’s there for the racing. We look back at the 150-year history of the place, the current best racetracks, and what keeps us so captivated with the scene. Even if you can’t globetrot like Edward Snowden, New York has some great things to offer as well. The sculptures along Park Avenue have been getting a lot of buzz, and the new installation by Albert Paley is clearly going to be another coup for the organization that commissioned it, the Fund for Park Avenue. And if you want to make sure that future summers can be as pleasant as this one, check out Sylvia Earle’s Mission Blue, a nonprofit dedicated to saving the world’s oceans. We need more than sand for a beach, after all. So welcome to summer and feel free to be loony! X

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Lily Maddock and her daughter Mimi, both wearing Ralph Lauren, with Mosaik, one of the family’s horses at the Two Tree Stables in Bridgehampton, New York. From our Southampton Summer Fun photo shoot. All pictures by Kate Owen, from Kate Owen Photography.


Art by renowned illustrator Alex Nabaum.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY THE NEW YORK Real Estate

Market. I don’t follow it very closely other than to marvel at the prices; however, a couple of weeks ago, Louis Webre of Doyle Galleries asked me if I wanted to see the apartment of the late Leo Lerman and Gray Foy in the Osborne, which is the classic Victorian apartment building on the northwest corner of Seventh Avenue and 57th Street. Lerman and Foy were a

famous-to-the-famous couple here in New York from the 1940s through the 1980s. Leo, a big burly man with a beard that gathered volume over time, was a writer and editor for Condé Nast when Condé Nast himself owned it. He was a culture maven of the first order, a born and bred New Yorker who gloried in the city with its theater, its art, its society, its opera, and its ballet. As a result of that,

as well as his personal charm, he befriended many of the leaders of the areas he was interested in. By the early ’50s, he was his own kind of celebrity in the big town. He was one of those people who knew everybody. Marlene Dietrich was a very close friend. So were Maria Callas, Lennie Bernstein, Comden and Green, and Truman Capote; Broadway stars, composers, and the maestros

of the music and their wives, their lovers; movie stars; and social dowagers. Everyone might be met at Leo’s. This was back in the day when New Yorkers saw and met one another at cocktail parties in other people’s apartments. All the time. Every income level followed that path. Leo’s parties were often en masse; an eclectic mix, all kinds of people showed up. It wasn’t a snobbish affair ever. Gray

Part of the bulletin board in the Lerman-Foy kitchen, clockwise from left: A dog birthday card to Leo; Isak Dinesen, a.k.a. Karen Blixen; an inscribed photo of Maria Callas; young Gray Foy on the beach; and a bearded Joel Kaye in the green shirt. 14 QUEST

A four-year-old Leo in his sailor suit with a pony, circa 1918.

The table in the kitchen always set for three (in case a friend showed up around dinner time).

CO U RTE S Y O F DAV I D PAT R I C K CO LU M B I A

A pensive Leo, shipboard crossing the Atlantic.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C ’ S S P EC I A L P R O J EC TS D I N N E R AT L E C I R Q U E

Wally Tomenson and Virginia Wettlaufer

Foy was a newcomer from Los Angeles, an artist in his early 20s—six years younger than Leo Lerman. He had come to New York to make a career as a professional. He was a very good-looking kid in the Montgomery Clift mold. He hardly knew anybody in New York and spent most of his time by himself exploring his new hometown. One day, someone he worked with asked him if he wanted to go to a party that night. He was given the 16 QUEST

Marcie Pantzer and Shoshanna Gruss

Lucy Lamphere, Jackie Williams and Betsey Ruprecht

Emilia Pfeifler and Allison Aston

address on Lexington Avenue up in the 90s. It was an old townhouse. He went, knocked on the door, and Marlene Dietrich answered. So began the life of Gray Foy. And Leo Lerman. It lasted until Leo died at age 73 in 1987. Gray later lived in the apartment with a man whose father had owned the penthouse in the building when Foy and Lerman moved in. His name was Joel Kaye. Gray and Joel married a few years after Leo died; Gray

Kate and Chris Allen

Fernanda Niven, Eugenie Goodman and their father, Jamie Niven

died at 90 last December. What I didn’t know about Leo and Gray’s life before I visited the apartment that they moved into in the 1960s was that, among their many interests and passions, they were connoisseurs of the flea market. No matter where they traveled, hither and yon, across the world, they visited flea markets. And they bought. Oh, did they buy. With a connoisseur’s eye, a working journalist’s budget, and a compulsive, obsessive, and

very knowledgeable curiosity. The apartment boasted a massive nine-room layout. The Osborne was built between 1883 and 1885 around the same time that the Dakota was going up 14 blocks to the north. It was still very new. It was developed as luxury apartments for upperto-middle income families who spent the warmer months in the mountains and by the seashore, then in the city during the autumn and winter. Residents on the

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Ashley and Ogden Phipps, Carter Simonds and Eleanor Dejoux


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L I G H T H O U S E I N T E R N AT I O N A L H O ST E D “A P O S H A F FA I R ” AT 5 8 3 PA R K

Becca Thrash and Hamish Bowles

north side of the Osborne could actually see the Dakota from their windows, almost a mile away as the crow flies. Two blocks to the north was the new Central Park. Six blocks to the south on Fifth, William H. Vanderbilt was building the first two of the several family mansions and townhouses that would run up the next 10 blocks of the avenue. Today, 130 years later, the only wear the Osborne shows from Father Time is in the style of its architecture and interior design. Otherwise, it remains the fortress against the elements that its architects intended and its developers demanded. The apartment itself, which has south, east, and north views, is impressive for its substantial walls, high ceilings, windows, cornices, figures, and woodwork—all perfect 18 QUEST

Alex Hitz and Annette Tapert

B Michael and Kathryn Chenault

examples of what New York exemplified at the beginning of the Gilded Age. Little has been changed in the apartment since that time, except for the kitchen and the bathrooms. Just to enter the building is to step back in time 150 years ago, when midtown was only beginning to be developed and settled. The Osborne had been built for the wealthier classes who often spent only part of the year—the colder parts—in the city. The building is rangy but, originally, the apartments were enormous. They were enormous enough to leave behind large apartments when broken up. As it is in New York today, the recent developer of the Osborne was marketing to a higher income bracket with the same key selling points: luxury, style, and convenience. When Lerman and Foy moved in, in 1967, the building was

Darren Henault and Margo Nederlander

already in its ninth decade and just a few blocks north of The Great White Way, which is what Broadway was often referred to because of its lights. It was no longer in an appealing neighborhood for the wealthy upper-to-middle classes of the city. However, artists, actors, writers, and theater people knew a good thing when they saw it. These big, grand apartments back in the 1960s were often renting for less than $500 a month. This recent tour was the first time I’d ever seen the apartment. I’d met the men only once in the 1980s at Jean Howard’s house in Beverly Hills. I’d heard about their “entertainments,” enormous cocktail parties populated with the literati, the glitterati, and assorted friends and acquaintances. An ordinary guest list might include Sir Frederick Ashton,

Marina Conor and Michael Cominotto

Tom Glaser and Laura Freeman

George Balanchine, Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Maria Callas, Truman Capote, Carol Channing, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Aaron Copland, Marcel Duchamp, Margot Fonteyn, John Gielgud, Martha Graham, Cary Grant, Anaïs Nin, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Edith Sitwell, Susan Sontag, Virgil Thomson, Lionel and Diana Trilling, and Anna May Wong, among the dozens, maybe scores, of guests filling the rooms, conceivably all on the same night. I’m probably dreaming with these numbers but, nevertheless, it was close. They were parties; they were fun. People could and would fill almost every room and stay for hours yakking, talking, drinking, noshing, and entertaining—all together in this treasure trove of memorabilia, curiosities, paintings, photographs, crys-

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Kenneth J. Lane and Amy Fine Collins


© 2013. Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

Equal Housing Opportunity.

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WHEN TALK TURNS TO REAL ESTATE, WHO DOES NEW YORK TURN TO FOR ANSWERS?

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A tal, china, Victoriana, books and books and books, and then more tchotchkes, curiosities, silver, and fascination. It was a cacophony, a kind of theater expressing the personalities of its occupants. There was so much stuff that was beautifully displayed that when Jackie Kennedy came one day with her young son John, he so innocently asked quite seriously, “Where are the price tags?” He had observed that every shelf and tabletop and wall and mantelpiece was covered with objets of one form or another, perfectly placed, and had assumed that his mother had brought him to a store. Leo Lerman was a prolific writer and magazine editor, as well as a balletomane, opera fan, theater critic, art collector, gourmand, and many other things. Only a few years younger than he, Gray

fell effortlessly into the fold of cornucopian collecting. Leo wrote hundreds, maybe thousands, of magazine pieces and other assignments for Condé Nast and others in his long career. He also wrote thousands of pages of personal journals about his day to day. Six years ago, Stephen Pascal edited them for a book titled The Grand Surprise: The Journals of Leo Lerman (Knopf). Several hundred pages of accounts of this chockfull of life—the life of Lerman and Foy—are document to the first three quarters of the 20th century in New York, Hollywood, and Europe. It is intriguing, even sometimes astonishing to read of a life that was distinctly a New York life, the kind people that others dream about and come here for. Gray Foy was one of those people when he moved here as a young man to pursue

a career as an artist in New York. Meeting Leo Lerman serendipitously at that party one night led to all he dreamed of and more, forever. I spent more than two hours looking through the warren of rooms when I visited. Members of the Doyle staff were already tagging and cataloguing. There were so many things to look at, to see and inspect. So many things collected are now brilliant collectibles: a complete set of Meissen china, for example, as well as other copious sets of china, silver, pottery, books by the thousand, and light fixtures. In the large living room that looks out on 57th Street, with 14-foot ceilings, there are complementary framed mirrors over the two fireplaces from the original Grand Union Hotel in Saratoga, where mid-

19th century tycoons and politicians from all over young America congregated for the summer social season. It’s all a wonder, and you could see that there was never a dull moment in the lives and life of these two men when something wasn’t taking their eye or evoking a memory or provoking a thought. All goes under the auction gavel at Doyle Galleries this coming September. Thousands of items! Louis Webre told me it would be an all-day sale. This will be an enormous event for collectors, dealers, curators, and fans. The Theater of the Absurd. This past month, mid-June, Anthony Marshall, the son and only child of the late Brooke Astor, surrendered himself to prison this week to serve a term of one to three years. Marshall, who was 89 last month, will not be—

S I LV E R H I L L H O S P I TA L H O ST E D YO U N G P R O F E S S I O N A L S AT L AVO N Y

Cary Neer and Amanda Fialk 20 QUEST

Ben Stapleton, Hugh Carey, Kate Gibson and Maureen Stapleton

Matt Semino, Katie McNamara and Russell Grant

Michael Gleicher, Penelope Lawson, Denise Rollandi and Jake Indyk

Brendan Regan, Susie Griffin and Roland Morris

Cassandra Seidenfeld

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Kerwelyn Craig, Caroline Kelso and Paige Pedersen


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T R E E S N Y H E L D I TS A N N UA L ST R E E T A W A R D B E N E F I T AT T H E A R A D A R G A L L E R I E S

Irma Fisher and John Chadwick

according to the Times—the only old guy in the prison. That’s about as sympathetic as the paper of record could be toward the man. The article pointed out that he will get no special treatment. That’s good, because aside from being unable to stand up or walk for any prolonged period of time, he should be comfortable and be able to “learn the lessons of justice” for the crimes he was accused of by his mother’s devoted friends and supporters. This drama began more than 60 years ago when Vincent Astor was married to another woman named Minnie Cushing. Minnie, who was wife number two, was famous in New York and some 22 QUEST

Nadia and Paul Ort

William and Robin Hubbard

parts of the world as one of the Cushing Sisters, daughters of the great Dr. Harvey Cushing, America’s first neurosurgeon. The sisters were famous, not because of their father, but because they followed their mother’s guidance and each married rich (very rich) men. The first to marry was Betsey, the middle sister, who married Franklin Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt’s eldest son, James, a couple of years before F.D.R. was elected President. This marriage was not a success because Roosevelt fils, evidently, fooled around. However, through much of the 1930s, Betsey Cushing Roosevelt was a favorite of her father-in-law and often substituted as official hostess

William and Patricia Brock, Caroline Gerry and Bruce Colley

Margaret Ternes

for her mother-in-law, the First Lady, when Eleanor was traveling or unavailable. Betsey and James Roosevelt had two daughters and the marriage was dissolved in 1940. Two years later, Betsey married John Hay (“Jock”) Whitney, one of the richest Americans at the time. During the 1930s, Minnie, the eldest, then in her late 20s, was the mistress of Vincent Astor, who was 14 years her senior and the principal heir to the American branch of the Astor real estate fortune. Astor had been married to Helen Huntington Astor since 1914, when he was 23. The Astors had known her since childhood, as their families had nearby estates

Carolyn Maloney and Larry Rockefeller

near Rhinebeck. The Huntington-Astor marriage was a distant one by the time Minnie came along, and it surprised no one that Vincent had taken up with her. In 1940, at what was said to be at the urging of Minnie’s mother, Kate Cushing, to make her daughter a respectable woman, Vincent divorced Helen and married Minnie. The third Cushing sister, inarguably the most famous, was Barbara, always known as “Babe,” the youngest and only real beauty of the three. Babe first married Stanley Mortimer, a patrician heir to part of a Standard Oil fortune, with whom she had two children. They were divorced

C U T T Y M CG I LL

Lo van Dervalk, Diana Rowan, Susan Relyea and Joe Rowan


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L E S B I J O U X G A L A AT D I X O N G A L L E R Y A N D G A R D E N S I N M E M P H I S

Kevin Sharp, Erin Riordan, Priscilla Presley and Chantal Johnson

Susannah Rhea, Linda Rhea and Brad Martin

in the mid-1940s after only a few years of marriage and, in 1947, Babe, who was pregnant at the time, married William S. Paley, one of the founders of CBS, who had been married to Dorothy Hart Hearst (later Dorothy Hart Hirshon). The Cushing-Astor marriage was not an exciting one for either partner. One of Vincent Astor’s brothersin-law described the couple as “low-voltage,” sexually. Minnie, who was a very sociable woman and forged many relationships with artists and writers as well as movie stars and society people, also conducted much of her life separately from Vincent. The person who got the most satisfaction out of the marriage 24 QUEST

Gilles Chazal

apparently was her mother. Her mother was very proud of her daughters’ marital alliances and they treated her in kind, with great respect and adoration. It was said that every Monday morning, each daughter would have their chauffeurs deliver flowers from their respective greenhouses to fill Kate Cushing’s apartment. After a luncheon with friends, Mrs. Cushing liked to pass by Van Cleef & Arpels and check out the windows and display cases, looking for items she felt were right for each daughter. Her sonsin-law (who, too, adored and respected her) would soon be informed and, in some cases, comply gladly. Kate Cushing died in 1949,

Jim Liles and Joe Orgill

Steve Morrow with Gaye and Haywood Henderson

satisfied that her daughters had made marriages to three of the richest men in America. One of those daughters— Minnie—was already thinking of making a getaway from her marriage. Vincent Astor was socially ungainly in the company of women, a moody fellow who was possessive and alcoholic—although the term was not used in those days to describe compulsive drinking. In his later years, he was known to sometimes consume a bottle of brandy before lunchtime. When his wife complained about it—gently, to avoid his predictable angry outbursts and tantrums—he justified it by quoting his personal physician, Dr. Connie Guyon,

who told him he could drink and smoke as much as he liked and that it would not affect his health negatively. Guyon was a highly respected physician in the New York world of society. By the early 1950s, Minnie Cushing had had enough of a separate life that she told her husband she wanted a divorce. She was now also free of whatever pressure her mother might have exercised regarding a divorce. Whether the news surprised Vincent is unknown to this writer, but it may be that he was unaware of his wife’s great unhappiness with the marriage. The news made him very unhappy. He insisted that she not divorce him until he found another wife to replace her; he did

WHITNEY MCNEIL

Lewis and Barbara Williamson with Chantal and Jeff Johnson


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A not want to be alone. He had been permanently deprived of maternal affection as a child and, as a rich man, he was used to getting his own way. He was determined to avoid being solely on his own. The hunt for a new partner began in earnest. Vincent made at least two attempts to engage other women in the idea of becoming his wife, but without success. One of them was Janet Stewart, the

wife of one of Vincent’s great friends, William Rhinelander Stewart. She was known in her day as “the most beautiful woman in New York” and was repulsed by the idea of marrying Vincent when he presented it to her. “Marry you?” she asked shocked. “I don’t even like you; why would I marry you?” He is said to have explained that it might be to her advantage because he was now

in his sixties, had all that Astor money and might not live much longer. “But what if you did,” Mrs. Stewart is said to have replied, adding, “I’m perfectly comfortable with what I have.” Word soon got around society circles that the Astors’ marriage was on the rocks and that he was in the market for a new wife. As rich as he was, and as much as he was liked by

his male friends, women were not attracted to him physically, sometimes to the point of revulsion. One of the biggest drawbacks was his heavy, daily drinking, rendering him inebriated by midafternoon. Another was his mainly charmless personality in the company of women. He was awkward and given to sullenness. Vincent was well aware of the disparaging effect his drinking had on others, not to

T H E N E W YO R K AC A D E MY O F M E D I C I N E ’ S G A L A AT T H E W A L D O R F = A STO R I A

Stanley Chang and Herbert Freedman 26 QUEST

Judy and John Lahey

Cheryl Wills and Jo Ivey Boufford

Steven and Carol Schwarz

Mark Kaplan and Jerimiah Barondess

Mark Wagar and Tom Morris

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

John and Ingrid Connolly with Ray Lopez


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A mention himself. Occasionally he’d check into Silver Hill, a private sanitarium in New Canaan, to “dry out.” It was during one of those visits— around the same time that Minnie wanted out—that he met Brooke Russell, a recent widow who happened to live just around the corner from Minnie and Vincent Astor at 10 Gracie Square. Brooke Russell had coincidentally volunteered to work at the private hospital. There were Astor relatives who later concluded she volunteered

knowing that the head of the family was looking for a new, acceptable wife and that she needed a new acceptably solvent husband. Brooke Russell was then in her early fifties. In those days, 50 was old, even ancient, in terms of marriage eligibility, especially for a widow with comparatively modest financial assets. She had been married twice: divorced from her first husband, father of her son and only child, whom she had married at 17, and widowed by her second husband,

Buddie Marshall (Marshall had, coincidentally, been first married to Helen Astor’s sister, and was therefore once a brother-in-law of Vincent Astor). These coincidences give you an idea of how small and closely connected society in New York was in mid-20th century, and how cloistered were the lives of men like Vincent Astor. Soon, Minnie became aware of the new “friendship” between Vincent and Brooke, and not only approved but wholeheartedly encouraged it.

She even plotted to bring it to fruition by befriending Brooke and inviting her for a weekend at the Astor estate Ferncliff, in Rhinebeck, on the Hudson River. It was there that one afternoon, on a ride that Vincent and Brooke took to survey the 2,800-acre property, that he stopped the car along the way, and told Brooke the state of his marriage. He then asked her to marry him. She later recalled in her memoir that she was shocked by the suddenness of his proposal, admitting that she

T H E MU N I C I PA L A R T S O C I E T Y P R E S E N T E D T H E J ACQ U E L I N E K E N N E DY O N A S S I S M E DA L AT V A N D E R B I LT H A L L

James McGuire and Michelle Coppedge

Matthew Bucklin, Ariana Rockefeller and Adam Rockefeller 28 QUEST

Vin Cipolla, Patti Harris, David Rockefeller, Jr. and Eugenie Birch

Sam Peabody

Alexandra Ford and David Patrick Columbia

Susan Morgenthal

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Sutton Stracke and Shawna Hamilton


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A hardly knew him. No doubt, she also had heard of his famous drawbacks: the drinking, the petulance, the anti-social behavior. She also probably had learned by then that he was very direct and hardly subtle in expressing his opinions and needs (and grievances). Within a few weeks, she accepted. Brooke and Vincent Astor were married in 1953, shortly after his divorce from Minnie was finalized. (Minnie would soon marry James Fosburgh, to whom she remained married until her death in 1978 at 72.) The new Astor marriage was not an easy task for the new wife, as she candidly recorded in her memoir. Her husband was jealous and, as was his habit, disliked his wife to spend much time with others, even in telephone conversations. For a woman who was naturally gregarious, this was a difficult task to bear. Furthermore,

his drinking did not abate. Whether or not his alcoholism was the cause, or his cigarette smoking, Vincent Astor died at home of a heart attack on the night of February 3, 1959, in the 68th year of his life. At the time of his death, the marriage had already become a burden to bear for his widow, and there were rumors among their set that she was already aiming to get out of it to save her sanity. On his death, the man left his wife a large sum of more than $20 million and a large foundation of more than that with the instructions that it be given away to various philanthropies. Initially, the foundation was run by a board that Vincent had selected, and the board assumed that they (not the widow) would run things. However, the widow knew she was quite capable to seeing through her late husband’s wishes.

S E N ATO R M I T C H MC C O N N E L L H O ST E D A F U N D R A I S E R AT T H E PA L M B E A C H H OM E O F J O H N K . A N D M A R I A N N E C A S T L E

Kathryn and Leo Vecellio

Ed Cox and Sallie Phillips

Rich Palumbo and Laurie Gardella

Patricia and Richard Theryoung

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Marianne Castle, Mitch McConnell and John K. Castle


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Vincent was the first Astor in generations to give away the family money, and ultimately he gave away all of it. His philanthropy had begun as a young man in 1912 when he first inherited a family fortune when his father, John Jacob Astor IV, died on the Titanic. He continued his philanthropy all through his life. Despite his often coarse and disagreeable social personality, he was always profoundly aware of the needs of others, especially children who were deprived and underprivileged. HE no doubt shared their suffering on some emotional level. When he was in his early 20s, he even converted some of his very valuable real estate

into playgrounds for children in the city’s working-class neighborhoods. Vincent Astor’s death raised another sore point in the Astor family’s history. His half-brother John Jacob Astor VI, born to Jack Astor’s second wife, Madeleine Force, only four months after the sinking of the Titanic, sued the estate claiming that the widow Brooke had unduly influenced her husband— allegedly, always when he was in an inebriated state— from directing a part of their father’s patrimony to him, the youngest son, whom the father had never known. Vincent Astor never accepted that his half-brother

was his father’s birth son. He adamantly claimed that Madeleine Force (who was 18 when she married the 49-yearold Jack Astor) had been impregnated by a man other than his father. This most likely preposterous notion was backed, in Vincent’s argument, by the lack of specific bequests for the second son, except for the allowance of children “unborn” at the time of Jack Astor’s death. The infant’s share of his father’s fortune (estimated to be more than $80 million, or more than $2 billion in today’s dollars) was only a few million. In his suit, John VI claimed that Brooke Astor had exercised influence over her

allegedly alcoholic, unstable husband to gain more for herself. She settled without going to court by giving the half-brother $250,000 (which is about 20 times that in today’s dollars), avoiding legal costs. He really didn’t have a case. She also continued to claim throughout her life that Jakie, as the brother was known to friends and family, was not the son of Vincent’s father. There were other Astor relatives in the American side of the family who were also angry about Vincent Astor’s will because he was the first in five generations not to leave bequests to other members of the American Astor relatives. Further resentment toward

FO R T U N E S O C I E T Y ’ S S O I R É E AT T H E B O W E R Y H OT E L

Steve Santo, Alison Green and Steve Levine 32 QUEST

Johanna Dahlberg and Eric Buckley

John Murphy and John Forte

Louise Tabbiner and Luke Weil

Emily Charette, Lauren Weinberg and Susan Chase

B FA NYC . CO M

Mia Belldegrun, Dan Belldegrun and Kelly Belldegrun


FULL FLOOR PREWAR | $22,500,000 10 rm, 3 br, 3 ba | Web ID: 0018761 J. Roger Erickson | 212.606.7612

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A JILLIAN MANUS AND MARIA SHRIVER HOSTED A LUNCH IN SAN FRANCISCO

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his widow existed among them, also. Brooke was well aware of this and was dismissive of the matter. So, another half century later, and a century since the tragic death of John Jacob (Jack) Astor IV on that night in April in the North Atlantic, the fortune has taken its second victim, also 34 QUEST

Maria Shriver and Jillian Manus

Christina Dickerson and Ann Barry

most definitely not a blood relative of the Astors, but a natural heir to his mother, Anthony Marshall. The case brought against him in which he was found guilty, according to the Times, of stealing “millions” from his mother’s estate, has ruined a man, a devoted son for 82 years, now in his 90th

Missy Morris and Sarah Kirkham

year and nearly an invalid. Ironically, many millions of the lady’s estate have gone to lawyers (by the dozen) and to “maintaining” her property, which included paying staff and security until said properties had been sold. Her son’s share has been decimated, except for her property (given to her by

Erin Stein and Maria Moretti

Laura Schlesinger and Marla Knapp

Vincent in Northeast Harbor, Maine, although there is said to be a lien on it), a bequest she had always intended in all of her more than two dozen wills to be his. When she signed that property over to him before she died, he soon thereafter signed it over to his wife Charlene. This move was

D R E W A LT I Z E R

Judy Koch and Nancy Mueller


PLEASE VISIT

THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION WAS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN REACH BY GLOBAL CORPORATE AWARDS, NEW YORK, APRIL 2013 WITH THANKS AND IN RECOGNITION OF SOME OF THE PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERS OF THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION: YOU INSPIRE US! ASIA SOCIETY, NEW YORK CHERIE BLAIR FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN, LONDON DAVID SHEPHERD’S TIGER TIME, LONDON THE ELEANOR ROOSEVELT LEADERSHIP CENTER AT VAL KILL, HYDE PARK, NEW YORK INNOCENCE IN DANGER, PARIS HARROW SCHOOL, LONDON INDIAN HEAD INJURY FOUNDATION, NEW DELHI AND JODHPUR, INDIA KHEL SHALA, PUNJAB THE LOOMBA FOUNDATION, THE UK AND INDIA THE ROBERT F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS, WASHINGTON, D.C. ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, NEW DELHI, INDIA WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL, WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK TROPICAL CLINICS, KENYA UNITED WORLD COLLEGES ATLANTIC COLLEGE, WALES AND PEARSON COLLEGE, VICTORIA, CANADA


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A D EC O R ATO R S - D E S I G N E R S - D E A L E R S S A L E AT T H E S O U T H A M P TO N F R E S H A I R H OM E

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one of the sparks that ignited this awful scenario because one of Anthony Marshall’s sons believed that his grandmother (Brooke) had intended it for him. What Brooke Astor’s grandson didn’t know at the time the suit was launched against his father was that, according to the divorce settlement Anthony Marshall 36 QUEST

Diane and Peter Manning

Anne Roche and Elizabeth Roche

Charles Womack and Donna Clower

Laura and Brent Nicklas

made with his first wife, the mother of his sons, at least one third of his estate would revert to his two sons on his death, thereby leaving little for his wife Charlene, the woman he loved. Tony Marshall’s mother did not love his first wife, however. She made it known to all within earshot over the years. This knowledge led to

Gloria Meyers and Laura Blair

a campaign of besmirching Charlene Marshall in the press and among her friends—another blow to Marshall’s dignity, integrity, and lifelong devotion to a mother who never paid much, if any, attention to him until she was an old woman who could depend on that support. Ironically, it was a relationship not unlike, in

Sandra Ripert and Sarah Senbahar

Rebecca Desman and Jennifer Panciera

many ways, Vincent’s mother and her behavior toward her son, Vincent the boy. Tragedy begets tragedy, and now a very old man, trashed in the tabloid press by innuendo and false stories of elder neglect, stripped of all dignity, must pay for the resentments and duplicity accumulated from the generations that came before. X

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Paulina Keszler, Michaela Keszler and Lulu Keszler


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Magical Central Park views from 3-4BRs & library in iconic prewar bldg. Private landing, WBFP, large square rms. $9.5M. Web #8514852. L.Dauber 212-452-4378

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New. Fab West Village 2BR + office, prewar doorman penthouse with appx 550 sf deck & city views S, N & E. $3.995M. Web #8508786. P.D'Arc 212-452-4377

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Lis Waterman and Peggy Mejia

Sherry Arnold and Gina Lin Chu

Missie Rennie Taylor 38 QUEST

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Lynn Sherr and Peggy Kerry

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E N AT I O N A L AU D U B O N S O C I E T Y ’ S “ W OM E N I N C O N S E R VAT I O N ” L U N C H AT T H E P L A Z A

Monica Wambold, Gloria FIeldcamp and Violaine Bernbach

Frances Beinecke

Deborah Royce, Nancy Farrell and Nina McLemore

Susan Rockefeller and Allison Rockefeller

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Marian Heiskell and Lynda Johnson Robb

G O R D O N PA R K S FO U N D AT I O N AT T H E P L A Z A

Nick Loeb and Sofia Vergara 42 QUEST

Gene Young, Peter Kunhardt, Jr., and Diana Revson

Valerie and Graziano de Boni

Donna Karan and Calvin Klein

Theodore Stebbins and Lauren Hutton

Veronica Swanson and Jamie Beard

Henry Gates, Jr., and Dylan McGee

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A FA S H I O N I N ST I T U T E O F T EC H N O L O G Y G A L A AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

Susan Bennett, George and Mariana Kaufman, Iris Cantor and Tony Bennett

Joyce Brown, Carl McCall and Deborah Krulewitch

Jamee Gregory and George Gould

Liz Peek, Stefano Tonchi and Jessica Chastain

Priscilla Zoullas and Topsy Taylor

Richard and Karen LeFrak

Paul de Leon and Emily Smith

T H E C O N S E R VATO R Y B A L L AT T H E N E W YO R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N

Susan and Henry Johnson

Anne and Bill Harrison

Maureen Chilton, Gillian Miniter, Cosby George, Gregory Long, Patti Fast and Ann Johnson 44 QUEST

Patricia and Edward Falkenberg

Michelle Smith and Andy Oshrin

Tom and Leslie Foley

Wendy and William Nolan

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tom and Melinda Hassen


INTRODUCING RODE ADVERTISING A new vision by ron nelson debbi melman 212.228.3700 ron@rodenyc.com debbi@rodenyc.com rodenyc.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E S T C E L E B R AT E D O B S E S S E D B Y M I K A B R Z E Z I N S K I AT M I L LY N Y

Elizabeth Brown and Mark Gilbertson

Elizabeth Meigher, Julie Macklowe and Zang Toi

Jill Fairchild and Karen Baldwin

Michelle Smith, Mika Brzezinski and Margaret Grace

Olympia Shields, Donna Simonelli and Jackie Valls

Gillian Miniter

Dendy Engelman, Ainsley Eirhardt, Will Proctor, Caroline Mullen and Kimberly Guilfoyle

Katie Couric and John Molner

Roman and Helena Martinez 46 QUEST

Kim and Payson Coleman with Priscilla and Ward Woods

Sydney Schumann with Scott and Dana Schiff

Amee Ruby and Carrie Baker

Kate Erickson and Micaela English

George and Melanie Wambold with John Wambold, Jr.

Trevor Kempner and Meghan Murphy

M A R KO K RU N I C F O R G U E S TO FA G U E S T ( A B OV E ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N S O C I E T Y ’ S “ W O N D E R S O F S O U T H E A ST A S I A” G A L A AT T H E C E N T R A L PA R K Z O O


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Remarkable 1930 Brick Estate - One of Westchester’s finest estates.

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Turn-of-the-Century Colonial Manor House exquisitely restored to its former glory. 9600 square feet of elegantly appointed living space. High ceilings, restored quarter-sawn oak and bird’s eye maple floors, graceful archways, French doors, seven fireplaces, original moldings and sleeping porch. Seven Bedrooms. Gorgeous grounds with views of the reservation, rolling lawns, ancient trees and frontage on the Waccabuc River. Stone work designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead. $2,495,000

Classic Bedford Estate - Quintessential Bedford. The perfect country

Pre-Revolutionary Jewel - One of the town’s oldest homes. Circa 1764 Antique Gem with wide-plank floors, hand-hewn beams, windows with period glass and a center chimney. Nicely scaled Living Room with antique floors, plaster walls, exposed beams and a phenomenal stone Fireplace with original beehive oven. Sun Room. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen.Three Bedrooms. Nearly two acres with Carriage House, Chicken Coop and Garage. $739,000

Turn-of-the-Century Farmhouse - Imbued with relaxed style. Living Room with copper wet bar and Fireplace. Sitting Room open to Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Spectacular Great Room with floor-to-ceiling stone Fireplace, cupola, vaulted ceiling and beams. Five Bedrooms. Two acres with level lawns, specimen Japanese Maple, Magnolia and Spruce. Swimming Pool. $1,379,000

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house in a foremost estate area. Long circular drive to eight, magnificent, peaceful acres with age-old trees and specimen plantings. Majestic O’Brien and Kinkel Colonial, circa 1920. Incredible period details usher in the past--aged wood floors, five fireplaces and incredible millwork. Sun-filled Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Study. Greenhouse. Five Bedrooms. Studio with Fireplace. $3,595,000

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CALENDAR

J U LY

On July 20, LongHouse Reserve will celebrate its 22nd season with the annual White Night summer gala on its 16-acre East Hampton grounds at 6 p.m. This year, LongHouse will honor Richard Meier, Lisa de Kooning, and Ai Weiwei. For more information, call 212.755.2100.

ARTIST’S PROOF

Joel Perlman’s sculptures will be on display at Guild Hall in East Hampton. For more information, call 631.324.0806. SAVING HORSES

Adopt A Horse, a program that rescues horses from abuse and abandonment, will raise awareness at Amaryllis Farm Sanctuary in Southampton. For more information, call 631.537.7335. 48 QUEST

GHOSTLY SIGHTINGS

Raven’s Night will host its Ghostly Adventure walk at 7:15 p.m. on Nantucket. For more information, call 508.257.4586.

2

BRAVO TO SATIRE

The Bay Street Theater of Sag Harbor will present The Mystery Of Irma Vep, a satire of several theatrical and film genres including Hitchcock’s Rebecca. For more information, call 631.725.0818.

4

6

Fireworks will be shot from a barge off of Jetties Beach on Nantucket at 9 p.m. For more information, call 508.228.3643.

Westhampton Beach Farmers’ Market will take place on Saturdays at 85 Mill Road from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call 631.288.3337.

INDEPENDENCE DAY

5

HOMEGROWN

THE PERFECT PICNIC

HONEY HARVESTING

Southampton Fresh Air Home will hold its annual picnic with a fireworks display at 36 Barkers Island Road at 7 p.m. For more information, call 631.283.5847.

Red Bee Apiary and Gardens will host a beekeeping weekend workshop at 77 Lyons Plain Road in Weston, Conn. at 10 a.m. For more information, call 866.530.3022.

CO U RTE S Y O F LO N G H O U S E R E S E RV E

1


CALENDAR

8

ROND DE JAMBE

The New York Theatre Ballet will present a 10-day summer intensive for ages 9 to 12 starting on July 8 at their 30 East 31st Street studios. For more information, call 646.765.4773.

11

SHOPPING SPREES

Greenwich Avenue stores will host a sidewalk sale in Connecticut starting at 10 a.m. For more information, call 203.869.3500.

12

ESTATE CLEANSE

The Bridgehampton Antiques and Design Fair will take place at 2357 Montauk Highway at 10 a.m. For more information, call 631.537.0500. PERFECT PITCH

The Perlman Music Program will present a concert at the Geffenberg Performance Tent in Shelter Island at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.877.5045.

16

PRESERVING OUR PARKS

On July 31, Bridgehampton Chamber Music Festival will present its Captivating Combinations concert featuring a mixed ensemble led by American composer John Musto. For more information, call 212.741.9403. EN PLEIN AIR

The Friends of Van Cortland Park will host a picnic and concert in Van Cortland Park at 6 p.m. For more information, call 718.601.1460.

LongHouse Reserve will celebrate its annual summer benefit at 133 Hands Creek Road in East Hampton at 6 p.m. For more information, call 631.329.2100.

20

27

Havens House Museum will host its Black and White benefit at Havens House Barn at 6 p.m. For more information, call 631.749.0025.

Super Saturday will take place at Nova’s Ark Project in Watermill at noon. For more information, call 212.759.2800.

SHELTER ISLAND’S PAST

FOR A GOOD CAUSE

28

MIXED MEDIA

Silvermine Arts Center in New Canaan, Connecticut, will host Chris Durante’s exhibition entitled “No Mans Land” at noon. For more information, call 203.966.9700.

31

ESPRESSIVO

Bridgehampton Chamber Music festival will present its “Captivating

Combinations” concert at Bridgehampton Presbyterian Church at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.741.9403.

AUGUST 2 IN HARMONY

The Perlman Music Program will hold its annual summer benefit concert and dinner at 73 Shore Road in Shelter Island Heights at 6 p.m. The evening will begin with a reception featuring local wines and signature cocktails, followed by an orchestra and choral concert. For more information, call 212.877.5045.

3 CO U RTE S Y O F B R I D G E H A M P TO N C H A M B E R M U S I C

PERFORMANCE ART

Southampton Hospital will host its annual summer party under the Art Southampton Pavilion at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.580.0835.

9

STAGE RIGHT

On August 9, the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in Saratoga Springs, New York, will hold its annual ball at the museum at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 518.584.0040.

The annual Be Our Guest gala will take place at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center at 6 p.m. For more information, call 631.288.2350. J U LY 2 0 1 3 4 9


Bianca Jagger and Peter Beard in Montauk, New York, 1977.


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY “YOU KNOW, BIANCA, if you sat on the edge of the diving board and did your makeup as if you were nonchalantly sitting at your dressing table at home waiting for your morning coffee...” But she wasn’t. We were in Montauk. “That’s a good idea,” she replied, as she sat on the edge of a diving board extended 30 feet above the Atlantic Ocean—except there was no water beneath, only a menacingly rocky beach. I only took one picture where she looks as if she could be flying on a magic carpet before photographer Peter Beard rushed in, wearing a sarong. He picked her up and leaned out over the edge of the diving board as if to toss her into the sea. Terrified, she pleaded, “Please let me down, please let me down!” I was absolutely frightened myself and stopped taking photographs because the situation was quite terrifying and I didn’t want to give it any encouragement. He carried her back to safety and let her down. Bianca was shaken, but relieved. I would not have been surprised if she had said that’s enough and left, but she regained her composure—she is a poised woman—and we carried on taking photographs the rest of the day. Some assignments are more interesting than others. Bianca Jagger was definitely one of the former. Through the years, she has always had good manners and been a pleasure to work with. She is truly a beautiful woman. X J U LY 2 0 1 3 5 1


TA K I

A TRUE FRIEND to more gentlemen’s clubs than Eddie Ulmann was the late Bobby Sweeny, of amateur golf fame, who once pleaded poverty to me while signing checks to something like twenty clubs spread around the Western world. Eddie was, of course, the quintessential clubman. He cherished his clubs, took part in club

activities until the very end, and was as popular with the members as he was with the staff of the various establishments he frequented throughout his life. Before I go into his sporting accomplishments, I want to take the time to tell you about Eddie’s “secret” life—that of a writer—and to pat myself on the back for discovering him. It was about 15 years ago; we were

having lunch at the old Mortimer’s, and Eddie was criticizing some article that had appeared in “Taki’s Top Drawer,” a section of the New York Press, a weekly that has since bit the dust. As editor of the section, I realized that he was right. “So why don’t you write it?" I asked him. “Oh, no,” he said, looking shocked, “My dear fellow, it simply wouldn’t do, club members might suspect me of being a secret ink-stained agent.” That’s when I had the most brilliant idea since Leopold Mozart sat his son Wolfgang down on a piano stool. “Use a pseudonym,” I said. “After all if it was good enough for Stendhal (Henri Marie Beyle) it’s good enough for you.” Eddie was delighted by the comparison, and after a couple more Bloody Marys, he This page, clockwise from top right: Eddie Ulmann's logo used for his "Corinthus" column in Quest; Chuck Pfeifer and Eddie Ulmann; Priscilla and Eddie Ulmann. Opposite page: Willie Surtees and Eddie Ulmann on the racquets court.

CO U RTE S Y O F C H U C K P F E I F F E R

THE ONLY MAN I KNOW who belonged


CO U RTE S Y O F A N T H O NY E D G E WO RT H

agreed. So began a long run of more or less wonderfully droll and sophisticated essays by “Classicus,” a name he plucked from the Greeks in my honor, or so he said. The owner of the New York Press, Russ Smith, a very good writer himself, soon wanted to know “Who the hell is this guy?” I was not at liberty to divulge. Classicus was a hit because it was written in a style that evoked gentlemanly prose, and it stuck out because next to my section were rows and rows of ads for all sorts of sexual enticements, and I shall leave it at that. In fact, Eddie used to tremble with contrived panic, “Can you imagine if any of my friends ever found out that my byline appears next to an ad selling dildos?” This went on until New York Press was sold and eventually shut down, but then Eddie followed me and began writing for Quest, this time under the pseudonym of “Corinthus,” although by now his cover was blown. After I started Takimag, a website run out of London by my daughter, I enticed Eddie to write a quasi-gossip column about the manners—or lack thereof— among the new rich. I insisted he write under the name of Bunky Mortimer. “If Dickie Mortimer ever finds out I’ll have to resign from half my clubs,” was his response. “If the Mortimers didn’t mind when Glenn Birnbaum named a café after them, they won’t mind you writing under their name,” was mine. Bunky was a great success right off the bat, and my little girl loved it. She wanted more, but Bunky by then was not feeling his best. The few pieces that appeared about what a gent wears as underwear, and how a gent behaves in our brutal and coarse society were terrific, but, alas, too few. I’ve been trying to find another Bunky Mortimer but it’s like trying to discover another S. J. Perelman, not an easy task. (My daughter, in desperation, asked me if a real Mortimer, Dickie, would do it, but I have as yet to approach them for some strange reason.) Which brings me to EFU, the man about town and sportsman. Here’s Chuck Pfeifer on Edward Ulmann: “I was a green cadet at West Point and had a date with a beautiful girl by the name of Nancy Gillon. This was the early Sixties. Nancy had a sister, Priscilla, who was going out with a man I had never heard of. When

the three of them arrived to pick me up I almost dropped my cookies. The man was driving a Ferrari, was impeccably dressed in a Dunhill Tailors suit, and was wearing driving gloves. He smelled of some exotic cologne and was extremely friendly. The first question he asked me was what prep school I had attended. I had never seen such a sophisticated fellow before. I was a jock, and jocks don’t wear driving gloves or drive Ferraris. It was the start of a great friendship.” Priscilla, of course, became Mrs. Ulmann and presided over a grand townhouse on the Upper East Side. That’s just about when I met Eddie, probably during the tennis tournament in Southampton when I was still on the tennis circuit. Eddie was deceptive because he neither walked nor ran like an athlete, but he sure had great hand–eye coordination. On the tennis court he dressed like Bill Tilden, but unlike Big Bill, Eddie had an eye for the ladies. He would sigh and remark about a lady’s protuberance on the beach, but never, ever use foul language. Eddie reached the highest level in the game of racquets, where he won nine national amateur racquets doubles championships with Willie Surtees and Willie Boone. He also won a myriad of club championships in racquets, but I could always get a rise out of him when I asked how many people in the world played racquets, as compared to the sports I compete in. But where Eddie really excelled was in his Anglophilia. Mind you, he revered the British classical system of education and he really knew his stuff. It used to drive him crazy when I’d tell him that Napoleon could have wiped the floor with Wellington if Blucher hadn’t come in late in the afternoon on June 18, 1815. So childlike he would quote from a book in which a lady who had been the mistress of both men had said, “Le Duc était de loin le plus fort.” “She would, wouldn’t she?” was my reply. “Women tend to go with the winner.” It was this childlike attitude at times that endeared Eddie to me. Having gone to Exeter and Columbia, he would snort about me having gone to Lawrenceville, Blair and Virginia. Staying with him in

Southampton one year, I swore never again because of two broken-down Englishmen who were also staying got on my nerves as only freeloading pseudotoff Englishmen can. Eddie once told me he descended from Ulmann, the Latvian tyrant who used to de-bowel his enemies. I mentioned it in my London Spectator column and he was delighted. “I hope no one in White’s reads it,” he said laughing. “Everyone in White’s reads the Spectator,” I told him, “In fact it’s the only thing they read except for the racing form.” Eddie’s illness was a terrible one but as expected of his kind, he bore it like a man, if one can still use this term without some feminist throwing a bomb. His wife, Priscilla, was a true heroine, leaving her job to take care of him, and although money was tight at the end, none of his friends heard a peep of complaint. Eddie was articulate, witty, erudite and very knowledgeable, especially in history and literature. One of the pleasures of my life was having breakfast with him and Dickie Mortimer in Southampton, Eddie driving Dickie—who had a classical education— crazy by trying to catch him on some obscure poetry or a historical non-fact. Goodbye Eddie, and as we Greeks say, let the earth that covers you be soft.X For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J U LY 2 0 1 3 5 3


ANUADMAEX

STORM IN SOUTHAMPTON

The first edition cover of The Devil Walks on Water (left); the

THE ICONIC Southampton novel The Devil Walks on Water was written by John F. Murray, known as Jake—a kinsman of our lovely society editor, Hilary Geary Ross. It was penned in 1968, but set 30 years earlier in the days leading up to and including the great hurricane of 1938. Brian “Briney” Mitchel, a somewhat 54 QUEST

arriviste Irish-American, is the devil: the protagonist or, more properly, the antihero of the story. Briney is a graduate of The Priory, as Portsmouth Abbey School was then known, who is now on an insolent, indolent summer vacation from Princeton, which he loves, though his uncle Aidan Carew, citing canon law,

would prefer he attend Georgetown. Briney is the Peck’s Bad Boy of the East End, removing his polo shirt as he watches Midge, the object of his lust, play tennis at the Meadow Club. Other Hamptons locales used as settings in the novel include the Devon Yacht Club, countless shops, and a colorful Pre-War

P H I L I P P E M O N TA N T

book’s author, John F. Murray, also known as “Jake”(right).


CO U RTE S Y O F M R S . J A M E S B U T LE R M ACG U I R E / DA N M CCOY

house of assignation, referred to here as “Aunt Margaret’s,” where Briney frequently shacks up with the frustrated wife of a local town cop. Briney is a handsome and hairy-chested bad actor who delights in tweaking convention, insulting his elders, and trying to nail every girl in sight. He discusses sexual mechanics at great length (e.g., the difference between vaginal versus clitoral orgasm) in a way that may have seemed racy when written before how-to books on the subject began outselling the Bible. He is an angry black sheep in search of himself who delights in his alter ego: “The Phantom.” He speeds by police cars in his sports car and then hides from them on unpaved tracks deep in the sand dunes. On the final night of the novel, as the hurricane descends, Briney helps start a brawl during a dance at Devon between the “Andovers” and the more recently couthed-up Irish-American contingent. Later, he gets set upon by the “natives” (a.k.a. year-round workingclass residents) at Aunt Margaret’s when he brings Midge there, but his compliant cop’s wife is waiting for him in an upstairs bedroom. Though badly beaten, he somehow escapes back to the house where the night began and seduces a newly arrived Irish maid, a generous soul well-practiced from her interactions with the farm boys back home. Then, in the climactic scene, as the hurricane crashes inland, Briney tries to leave the maid’s room by her window but is unintentionally knocked off it when his sister opens her shutters. Rather than die in a 30-foot fall, however, the storm has burst the dunes and flooded the back of the town. Briney is thus swept away, gets to his car, and drives to Midge’s house, The Wreck, which has been swept out the the nearby pond. Briney swims to the remains of the roof of Midge’s room. He knocks and hears Midge knock back faintly, trapped but

still alive in an air bubble below. Briney saws and hacks through the roof with his bare hands, extricates Midge, and swims her to safety, all the while imagining them coupling lustfully. Once out of danger, he is utterly exhausted and also realizes the last vestiges of his tuxedo have been shredded. The devil/hero stands before all the wreckage of the world, starkers. But, unlike Adam and Eve expelled from the garden, he is utterly unashamed. Quite a tale of days long gone by, and much of it based on fact. The “real lace” Irish-Americans were considered upstarts by the older, established WASP families in Southampton. The Murrays and McDonnells both lost houses in their oceanfront compound. There was an “Aunt Margaret’s” fondly remembered by my father’s generation. The clubs are much the same as they were then, and friction still breaks to the surface like a painful hernia between the summer folk and the year-rounders. If you haven’t picked a beach read yet for this summer, give Jake Murray’s The Devil Walks on Water a try!X

Clockwise, from top left: The devastation of the 1938 hurricane; a Murray family portrait; John Murray Cuddihy as painted by Robert Henri; cleaning up the aftermath. Below: “Real lace” Irish-American Mrs. William F. Buckley, Sr., with her family at their Hamptons house, Great Elm.


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WHETHER YOU’RE HOPPING on one of the ubiquitous Citi Bikes or are in the market for

some wheels of your own, this summer in the city is all about biking to get around. Why not hop on a brand new Biria and fill your basket with treasures from up and down Madison Avenue? Your Biria will also be your friend at the beach or summer home, as will all of our summer-inspired finds, from sun-resistant Parasol shirts for her to stylish GLASS swimwear for him—and a choice rosé for savoring sunny days and stellar sunsets.

Each hand-carved studio-glass Summer vase, from Asprey’s Four Seasons collection, is unique and takes hours to produce. $4,000. Asprey: 853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

Win her heart all over again with Harry Winston’s Sunflower triple-drop Carolina Herrera keeps you dressed in the best with this navy and

diamond earrings, 1.95 carats set in platinum. Price upon request. Harry Winston: 718 Fifth Ave., 212.399.1000, or harrywinston.com.

ivory Mikado dress with floral embroidery. $3,990. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., New York City, 212.249.6552 or 8441 Melrose Place, Los Angeles, 323.782.9090.

It’s no shock that Roger Vivier has done it again—this time, with the Choc T-100, a blue metallic patent-leather pointed-toe pump. $675. Roger Vivier: 750 Madison Ave., 212.861.5371.


Delicate, whimsical, and divine: colorful straw clutches with shell and stone accents from Kayce Hughes. $140–170. It’s “anchors aweigh” for

Kayce Hughes: At kaycehughes.com.

this Louis Vuitton necklace, with fun summer motifs on a delicate chain. $470. At select Louis Vuitton boutiques, 866.VUITTON, and louisvuitton.com.

Barton Perreira, the eyewear brand for those in the know, offers this cat-eye enamel Valerie frame in gold and crimson. $510. Barton Perreira: At Silver Lining Opticians, 92 Thompson St., 212.274.9191.

Truly monumental: Kara Ross’s Pangea ring with 18-kt. yellow, white, and rose gold and diamonds. Price upon request. Kara Ross: 212.223.7272 or kararossny.com.

Ride off to the beach—or to the office—on Biria’s aqua green Easy Boarding bicycle. $580. Biria: At Ciel Bicycle Store, 360 E. 65th St., 212.288.0996.

Protect your skin from the sun’s damaging rays in comfort and style with Parasol’s poppy striped crew-neck swim shirt. $165. Parasol: At parasolsun.com.

J U LY 2 0 1 3 5 7


Fresh Finds

Give your toast some extra flair with the 40th anniversary limitededition champagne flute from Riedel’s Sommeliers Series—the brand’s most elegant line—in black, red, and clear crystal. $159 per glass. Riedel: At riedelusa.net.

Bunches of love: Chanel’s metal-and-glass golden necklace in pearls and plexiglass. $4,375. Chanel: At select Chanel boutiques or 800.550.0005.

Make your mark in Valentino’s silk fluid garden-print dress ($3,790), nude patent-leather tango heels ($795), and nude patent-leather Punkouture singlehandle bag ($2,895). Valentino: At Valentino boutiques.

It’s as if the delicately refreshing rosé from Provence’s Whispering Angel descended from the heavens. $22. Whispering Angel: At Chelsea Wine Vault, 75 Ninth Ave., 212.462.4244.

Moms and babies everywhere are discovering the luxuriously delicate and organic hair, skin, and body products from Noodle & Boo, gentle enough for even the most sensitive of skin. Noodle & Boo: At noodleandboo.com.

You’ll be walking on sunshine in Monique Lhuillier’s orchid print open-toe d’Orsay pump, one of the prettiest pieces in footwear this season. $650. At Monique Lhuillier boutiques and moniquelhuillier.com.

Nothing says summer chic like this yellow leather wallet from Salvatore Ferragamo. $310. Salvatore Ferragamo: At Salvatore Ferragamo boutiques nationwide and 866.337.7242. 58 QUEST


This summer, Swatch introduces its big new Irony Chrono, a high-performance time machine that’s big on style. The Sobro version comes in sun-brushed black with golden and white indexes: At swatch.com.

Let Kiehl’s do the lifting for you with the new Facial Fuel “Heavy Lifting” firming moisturizer, a dual-action anti-aging powerhouse for men. $40 for 1.7 oz.

Classic tailoring and fanciful, hand-drawn

Kiehl’s Since 1851: At kiehls.com.

patterns combine to make GLASS swimwear, the latest “it” trunks from John Glass, suitable for the beach or the city. $200. Available at glass-nyc.com.

American cool: Michael Bastian’s chambray double-breasted jacket ($1,295) and side-buckle pant ($575) with cotton plaid button-down shirt ($485). Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman and Barneys.

Learn to paddlesurf on the Pacific by day and dine by the light of Hawaiian burn bowls at night at the St. Regis Princeville Resort, on the lush island of Kauai. For more information, call 888.625.4988 or visit stregis.com.

Walking is a fashionable breeze in Ralph Lauren’s red Lamerwood shoe in durable canvas with a raffia sole. $250. Ralph Lauren: At select Ralph Lauren boutiques and ralphlauren.com.

Any well-traveled or wellappointed man will appreciate Ghurka’s Folding Snap Tray No. 58, which keeps him organized at home or abroad. $175. Ghurka: 781 Fifth Ave., 212.826.8300. J U LY 2 0 1 3 5 9


PELL

FORMER GLORY

This page: Haven Pell hopes that our capital improves upon its second-rate status. Opposite page, from above: The Camelot era is something

FOR YEARS, Washington, D.C., has tried

to get by on pretty buildings, urban design, and the fading memory of elegant soirées, where glamorous hostesses ran the world. But our capital is due for some updated public relations. Examples abound, but Washington ignores them. In the U.K. version of House of Cards, the female reporter— who has had an affair with the Speaker— takes an assisted header off the roof of the House of Parliament. The U.S. 60 QUEST

version tones it down and, in real life, John Boehner, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, prefers tanning or crying to proper diddling, let alone murder. Does he really think “securing the borders” can compete with a wellchosen tryst? Clearly, nobody on the public-relations team for our capital has watched even an episode of Scandal, where the main character is doing the president amid murder and mayhem. It’s the most popular show

on T.V., fellas! Get your act together. Again, the capital’s inferiority complex is highlighted by another loss in the attention-grabbing derby, thanks to the emerging high-end sex scandal that could topple the Cameron half of the CameronClegg/Tory-LibDem coalition. “Middleaged and not in the cabinet” is a splendid start for the public-relations dream of several weeks above the fold. Meanwhile, Washington languishes amid overblown volleys of attacks about

H E A D S H OT CO U RTE S Y O F H AV E N P E LL

to aspire to; a public-relations team should be called upon into Washington, D.C.; when Richard Nixon was in office, our capital boasted elegant soirées.


policy differences. It is closer to third-rate than second-rate in the all-important sex scandal category. Our former rulers are also engaged in a bit of legislative larceny involving pocket money for planted questions. For £24,000, the Government of Fiji bought five of them thanks to Tory MP Patrick Mercer. This is a reminder for Washington to pay more attention to such a sure way to make headlines. But forget the little stuff—go big. Begin with the idea that your elected officials have not the slightest idea how to price the bribes for which they are so famous. In Washington, those bribes are called campaign contributions and they are a major industry in this former swamp. Wiggling a few phrases into thousands of unread legislative pages can provide billions of dollars in benefit to this or that industry. All in exchange for a paltry six figures. The return on investment is so extraordinary that a board decision on such an expenditure would take but seconds. To recapture status, why not hire a squadron of gel-headed, testosterone-filled traders, who are no longer needed by failing proprietary trading desks, and put them to work teaching senators and congressmen the discounted present value of the goodies they provide? It would not even be necessary for New York or London to give up the really good traders; the also-rans would do quite nicely in a market that has yet to achieve any semblance of efficiency. Surely scandal would follow the increased flow of money resulting from this initiative. A national effort is needed to help the second-rate capital climb the tawdriness of the league-table. Nonprofits could even be formed, at least until the nice ladies in Cincinnati learn to search for “diddling” and “legislative larceny” instead of “Tea Party” and “patriot.” In time, the Holy Grail: a fundraising gala complete with red carpets and beautiful dresses (imported from wherever beautiful dresses come from, as it’s not here). And awards. Always awards. Tawdriness, scandal, attention-grabbing. Limitless possibilities. X


FINANCE

MAKING IT PERSONAL ISRAEL DISCOUNT BANK, or IDB Bank, is setting the standard for personalized, professional service from a full-service commercial bank by succeeding in its mission statement: “To dedicate ourselves to the success of our clients, and to provide quality service and exceptional, personalized attention; to offer innovative and valuable products and services that meet the diverse financial needs of our clients; to provide state-of-the-art technology and ensure utmost security; to adhere to our time-honored tradition of developing 62 QUEST

long-term, multigenerational relationships.” Founded in Tel Aviv in 1935, IDB Bank opened in New York in 1949. Since then, the company has continued to establish itself in esteem, delivering big-bank size and smallbank service to its clients. Every member of the team at IDB Bank—including Ehud Arnon, U.S. president of IDB Bank; Jim LoGatto, director of U.S. private banking; and Dennis O’Connor, senior vice president of U.S. private banking— capitalizes on the momentum and knowledge of a decades-

CO U RTE S Y O F I D B B A N K

IDB Bank continues to earn its esteemed reputation, attracting clients with its unparalleled service and personalized, professional attention.


FINANCE

This page, clockwise from top left: Ehud Arnon, United States president of IDB Bank; Jim LoGatto, director of United States private banking; Dennis O’Connor, senior vice president of United States private banking. Opposite page: The Fifth Avenue

CO U RTE S Y O F I D B B A N K

façcade of the reputed Israel Discount Bank, or IDB Bank.

long career to attract more and more clients to IDB Bank’s already sizeable base. “Our clients depend on our expertise, service, and loyalty. It is my intention to build on IDB Bank’s well-established reputation for providing outstanding value for our clients, and I am honored to have the opportunity to do so,” says Ehud Arnon. IDB Bank’s demonstrated success when weathering the crests and troughs of the market (including, for example, the recent recession) is truly a testament to the company’s integrity, resilience, and talent. “In this economic climate, our customers need advice from a stable, unbiased source. IDB Bank has a very strong balance sheet and is not preoccupied with the problems our competitors are facing. This allows us to focus all of our attention on our clients. I look forward to the opportunities MONTH 2013 00


FINANCE

This page: IDB Bank has established a strong presence in the United States, boasting a main office in New York, New York, and branches in Staten Island, New York; Brooklyn, New York; and Short Hills, New Jersey, as well as in Aventura, Florida; Beverly Hills, California; and Los Angeles,

this current market provides as clients discover the IDB difference,” says Jim LoGatto. For many of the company’s clients—including Danny Bensusan of Blue Note Entertainment, Howard M. Lorber of Vector Group, and Buzz O’Keefe of the River Café and Water Club—there is no substitute for the unmatched quality of IDB Bank. Offering depository services, investment managment and trust services, custody services, custom lending services, and cash management services, the division caters to its clients in any and all capacities, boasting a record of impeccable service and outstanding results. “The United States private banking team builds lasting relationships with its clients. Many existing relationships are clients who have dealt with members of our teams in the 00 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F I D B B A N K

California (above); to contact IDB Bank, visit 511 Fifth Avenue in New York or call 212.551.8500 (below).


FINANCE past and have responded positively because of the trust that they have built over the years. It is all about trust. They like the IDB Bank story, which is a comforting message in these uncertain financial times,” says Dennis O’Connor. IDB Bank has earned the trust of its private-banking clients with a history of strong liquidity and capital ratios, top-quality loan and invesetment portfolios, and a history of profitability. By following a conservative, sound banking philosophy and by providing outstanding advisory services, the company has proven itself one of the strongest commercial banks in the United States. Couple that with a time-honored tradition of highly individualized attention that is unparalleled in the industry, and a staff of knowledgeable, experienced, responsive bankers, and you have a powerful combination. Here, three clients comment on why their experience with IDB Bank is so valuable to them and their needs.

button,” and nobody ever answers. It’s almost like the government. You know, the government doesn’t work really well. Anyway, IDB Bank pays the highest rate possible on your investment. They try to be fair to their customers. IDB Bank wasn’t involved with the recession because they didn’t gave too many bad loans out. They didn’t bundle the loans up and toss them to people who had money to invest. IDB Bank is about the individual—dealing with people, knowing people. If you know the people you’re working with, you don’t have to worry about them. I see Jim LoGatto, who works at IDB Bank, come into

“The United States private banking team builds lasting relationships with its clients. Many existing relationships are clients who have dealt with members of our teams in the past and have responded positively because of the trust that they have built over the years. It’s all about trust. They like the IDB Bank story.” —Dennis O’Connor HOWARD M. LORBER CEO, VECTOR GROUP

If you want to have personalized, old-fashioned serviced handled by professionals, you should use IDB Bank. I was introduced to Dennis O’Connor at a Quest dinner a few years ago, and then I joined IDB Bank. Dennis makes it a habit to call me at least once every couple of weeks to get together if I need anything. I don’t have to chase him for service; he gets in touch with me. No other bank has both the size and wherewithal of IDB Bank. You have the stability of a major institution but the service of a smaller bank.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

BUZZ O’KEEFE OWNER, RIVER CAFÉ AND WATER CLUB

I have bank accounts with CitiBank, HSBC, Chase—a lot of banks. Most banks have forgotten what the basis of banking was about. It was about honesty, character, and trust. Now, it seems like it’s all about numbers. IDB Bank is more of an old-fashioned bank that works on trust and honor. When you call IDB Bank, you get a real human being to answer the phone, the person who is in charge of your account, which is rare these days. With a lot of banks, it’s like, “Go here, go there, push this

my restaurants, the River Café and the Water Club. Once in a while, he meets with bigger clients, because he has to meet with them at some place, and often the client will pick the Water Club. DANNY BENSUSAN CEO, BLUE NOTE ENTERTAINMENT

How long have I been a client? That’s a good question. I’ve been with IDB Bank for at least 20 years. I’m the CEO and owner of Blue Note Entertainment Group, which owns Blue Note locations in New York, Japan, and Milan. I also own the B.B. King Blues Club and Grill in Times Square and the Highline Ballroom in Meatpacking. In addition to the music, I deal with real estate—which is where IDB Bank comes in very handy. They have much more experience in real estate than other banks, in my opinion. As far as credit lines and real estate loans, they are the greatest. I do work with other banks, but the difference between other banks and IDB Bank is it’s more of a “relationship” bank, a bank that quickly moved into action. Other banks, the big banks like Chase or Bank of America or CitiBank, they usually take a lot more time when you need to have decisions made quickly or move forward on a deal. IDB Bank is there for you, and they move quickly. X J U LY 2 0 1 3 6 5


J E W E L RY

BRINGING JEWELRY TO LIFE BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


But no matter the subject, Judith Murat’s creations are marvels, personal visions that dare to reach for the stars.

This page: a pink sapphire necklace with Oriental Hat kunzite pendant (above); Judith Murat wearing her own necklace and earrings (below). Opposite page: A Medusa pendant featured

CO U RTE S Y O F J U D I T H M U R AT

in Judy’s Journey Into the Land of Murat.

ARTISTIC AMBITION CAN be tough to come by. Even when it’s there, turning an idea into a tangible product presents challenges. Luckily, jewelry designer Judith Murat follows her own path. In her storybook-like catalogue, which features her ambitious designs inspired by nature and her journeys, Judith takes on the role of a doughty traveler. Her goal: “To unlock the secret language that will explain the meaning of happiness.” Judith’s quest begins—and ends—in her own backyard. Along the way she flirts with regal mermaids dressed in gilded scales. She dances with sun-kissed monkeys, whose intoxicating blend of laughter and legerdemain intrigues her. It’s this vivid imagination that makes the collection exciting and all her own. Everything she’s seen or dreamed of comes to life. When she returns home from her trip, she realizes that the key to happiness was in her backyard all along. Looking at her designs, it’s easy to tell that Murat has found her true calling. Judith Murat’s craftsmanship is pert perfection. In particular, her Celestial collection is most illumining. An aurora borealis necklace and earrings, made with amethyst, topaz, and burnished sterling silver, expertly blends raw and refined gems. The color palette, also

top-notch, is hypnotizing. Murat is most inspired by the sea and its mythological creatures. Her Princess of Atlantis Mermaid, in 18-kt. yellow gold and diamonds, portrays Bernini-like motion. The gilded fishes with gems for eyes are also worth mentioning. Judith’s jewelry has been spotted on the red carpet on the likes of Anne Hathaway, Tyra Banks, Jennifer Lopez, Eva Longoria, and Jennifer Hudson. Judith also has a heart for philanthropy. She is a proud supporter of the American Heart Association, Cleveland Clinic, American Red Cross, Southampton Hospital, and Alzheimers Association. Each year, the Judith Murat brand continues to grow. Murat, who has recently expanded into men’s wear, crafts mystical cufflinks and studs. Alligator cuff links in red coral, 18-kt. gold, and diamonds are delightfully playful. The gators hold silver pearls in their mouths, the fruits of the oyster. But no matter the subject, Judith Murat’s creations are marvels, personal visions that dare to reach for the stars. X Join Judith Murat from 1 to 4 p.m. on July 6 at Rose Jewelers in Southampton and at 11 a.m. on July 9 at Scully & Scully in New York City. For more information, visit www.judithmurat.com. J U LY 2 0 1 3 6 7


N AT U R E

UNDERWATER SAVIOR B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

“I HOPE THAT SOMEDAY we will find evidence that there is intelligent life among humans on this planet,” said Sylvia Earle when accepting the 2009 Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) prize to galvanize support for marine protected areas. Oceanographer, explorer, and a Library of Congress “Living Legend,” Earle has now dedicated her life to educating people about how vital it is to protect the immense world beneath the water. Her career is one of tremendous achievement: she has led more than 60 expeditions around the world, wrote a dissertation that is still used by scientists as a landmark study,

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captained the first all-female team to live for two weeks underwater in 1970, and has walked untethered on the sea floor deeper than any other woman. With her husband, engineer Graham Hawkes, she designed and built undersea vehicles that allow scientists to work at previously inaccessible depths. In 1998, she led the Sustainable Seas Expeditions, a five-year program to study the United States National Marine Sanctuary sponsored by the National Geographic Society, where she is an explorer-in-residence. Because of her knowldge and mapping of the areas, she helped add new ways of displaying oceans in the latest version of Google Earth. But all of this exploration opened her eyes to the danger that the ocean and its inhabitants are in. She is often called in for consultation on environmental tragedies like the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez and the Deepwater Horizon disaster


O C TAV I O A B U RTO ; K I P E VA N S ; B RYC E G RO A R K

in the Gulf of Mexico. She has long decried the practice of overfishing, demonstrating that entire marine ecosystems are being irreparably harmed by being stripped of its resources. Earle’s desire to help preserve what she calls “the blue heart of the planet” has led her to create Mission Blue, a nonprofit she founded in response to her TED prize. Marine protected areas, or MPAs, exist only in a few places, like the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and in most of them, fishing is still permitted. Earle is on a mission to have MPAs in the high seas, in places that she calls “hope spots”—sensitive marine preserves whose protection is particularly vital to the region. She calls upon everyone to “use all means at your disposal—films, expeditions, the web, new submarines—[to create] a campaign to ignite public support for a global network of marine protected areas.” The term “hope spots” is a rallying cry in response to

the term “hot spot,” which is used to designate places of high biodiversity that are in serious danger of extinction. With all of the statistics on how the environmental conditions are exponentially deteriorating, trying to save them seems like a Sisyphean task against an apocalypse. But Sylvia Earle does not give in to the doom and gloom narrative, instead offering words of promise delivered with encouraging passion. “Everyone should care about the ocean. Just imagine the Earth without one. No blue; no green. A lot of people are really concerned about what’s happening on the green—to terrestrial life. But everyone needs to understand that all life depends on the existence of the ocean.” A woman of boundless energy and keen intellect, her conscience is as vast as the ocean. Now, with Mission Blue, everyone can be involved with this vital cause. X

This page, clockwise from top left: Sylvia Earle in her natural habitat; a spectacular school of fish; stingrays and sharks; Earle filming underwater; swimming with a spotted whale; a whale stuck in a fisherman’s net. Opposite page: A manta ray, one of the amazing creatures that are threatened by the deterioration of the acquatic environment.


BOOKS

SECRETS OF A SMALL TOWN COOPERSTOWN, New York, is an idyllic village, home to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, the Glimmerglass Opera, and a smalltown atmosphere that anyone in a big city romanticizes as a welcome escape from their high-pressured lives. But it is also a town that, in 1962, was rocked by the publication of a pulp-romance novel called The Sex Cure by Elaine Dorian. The story was a thinly veiled account of the social set’s extramarital affairs and secret lives, written by an insider with all the salacious details—an upstate New York version of Grace Metalious’s Peyton’s Place. The book rapidly sold out to the point of extinction (as literature, it wasn’t worth many printings), which lent credibility to rumors that a prominent local family had bought all the remaining copies in order to keep it out of circulation. If the rumor’s true, they succeeded: it’s not even available on Amazon.com today. Callie Wright grew up in Cooperstown, surrounded by tales of how the small community had been affected by the scandal. Hearing about whose parents, relatives, or neighbors had potentially been implicated or involved begat a lifelong curiosity with the local lore. How does a private family recover from having their skeletons so permanently 70 QUEST

dragged out of their closets, and how do the consequences live on through successive generations? Those questions led Wright to find the answer in her first novel, Love All (Henry Holt). Through the eyes of three generations of the fictional Obermeyer family, she examines the fallout of The Sex Cure, as well as the concepts of inherited shame, communal secrets, and infidelity in a small town. Following the death of their matriarch, the remaining family is suddenly

gathered under one roof: the widowed grandfather, Bob, one of the unfaithful in The Sex Cure era; his daughter Anne, whose own husband, Hugh, is currently cheating on her; and their two teenage children, Teddy and Julia (the latter a budding tennis champion, making a clever double-entendre of the title). Wright takes the familiar “sins of the father” theme and applies it to a physical—and emotional—suburban landscape. The turbulent inner life of each character, often at odds with the façade they present, is richly painted. Each victims of deception by someone they love, the Obermeyers share a hurt frustration at not avoiding traps they had been forewarned against by family history. Their relationships are loving, painful, and messy, ringing as true as any in real life. Wright crafts a cast of characters that engage, even when behaving unsympathetically. Anyone who has been part of a tight-knit community will get lost in this thoughtful, engrossing story. Seemingly perfect villages have always been hotbeds of indiscretion, but the general rule is that it must be kept quiet and behind closed doors. With Love All, Callie Wright deftly brings to life a family dealing with their secrets being discovered, while wisely not giving any easy answers.X

CO U RTE S Y O F H E N RY H O LT; J U S T I N B I S H O P

B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D


NAME This page, clockwise from top left: Julia Obermeyer is a tennis hopeful in Love All; Coopertown’s Kingfish Tower, circa 1910;the town’s welcome sign; the themes of family and tennis are intertwined throughout the book; a 1905 launch of a Cooperstown steamboat; Callie Wright. Opposite page: Love All (Henry Holt) by Callie Wright.


T R AV E L

AT THE WHEEL OF LUXURY

EXTRAORDINARY IN EVERY WAY, from the vast selection of luxury vehicles to the white-glove service, Enterprise’s Exotic Car Collection is a freshly imagined operation devoted to traveling in style. After beginning with one office in West Los Angeles servicing all of southern California, Enterprise has since expanded its Exotic network to six states and 13 locations, recently including Houston, Texas, and Naples, Florida. Now, the Exotic Car Collection boasts an impressive assortment of vehicles from the world’s top brands. Here’s how it works: First, customers choose their car. The best way to do so is on Enterprise’s sleek website, which categorizes vehicles by coupe, convertible, SUV, and sedan. Clicking on a car brings up its description accompanied by pictures (both interior and exterior), special features (including GPS and engine specs), and where the vehicle is currently available. Now, on to the cars. This stunner of a collection features over 40 different makes and models of cars that purr high-per72 QUEST

formance hubbub. The coupe and convertible section leads off with the Aston Martin Vantage, a two-seat convertible sports car with a soft leather interior and gunmetal outside. It’s pure Bond. Enterprise also carries several models from Maserati, Mercedes, Porsche, and BMW. If you’re looking for American muscle, check out the Dodge Challenger and Chevrolet Camaros. Enterprise sees a diverse customer base for its Exotic Car Collection. Filmmakers and movie studios often call ahead and rent from the collection; insurance companies and dealerships use the cars as loaners while servicing vehicles; local brands reach out to Enterprise to add a special touch to their events; couples try out the car of there dreams for a few days. The reasons to rent are endless. But no matter the occasion, Enterprise is ready to put you in the driver’s seat. X For more information, visit www.exoticcars.enterprise.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F E N TE R P R I S E

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


One of Enterpriseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Exotic Car Collection showrooms, featuring a Mercedes luxury sedan, an alpine-white Jaguar, a jet-black Aston Martin, and a breathtaking Maserati convertible. J U LY 2 0 1 3 7 3


EAST HAMPTON POINT as well as privacy and comfort. Each room or suite features a private entrance with an outdoor terrace or courtyard, king-size beds with Frette linens, plasma T.V.s, cedar-lined closets, and marble bathrooms. Stylishly tasteful décor and other special features add a distinctive personality to each room, some with fully appointed wet bars and sitting rooms with a fireplace. Thirteen custom seaside cottages dot the lushly landscaped property. Like individual homes, they vary in size and layout, all equipped with features such as full kitchens, private decks, and spa bathtubs. Guests seeking more than peace and quiet can keep busy with a wide array of activities at the hotel, which boasts a heated swimming pool, private tennis courts, and a full-service marina. The concierge team can direct guests to cultural and other attractions like galleries, museums, theaters, spas, yoga studios, fishing charters,

horseback riding, and tours of wineries. Overlooking Three Mile Harbor, the restaurant at East Hampton Point offers a striking setting with exceptional contemporary American cuisine. The nautical-themed interior features a full-size mahogany sloop with a mast that reaches the ceiling cupola, an ode to the sea outside the restaurant’s floor-to-ceiling windows. The master chef brings the sea inside with fresh seafood specialties and a popular raw bar. A more casual menu is served on the outdoor deck. Dedicated to making each stay unforgettable, the offerings at East Hampton Point allow guests to tailor their trips by bringing together all the finest elements of a luxurious vacation. X For more information, call Judi A. Desiderio of Town & Country Real Estate in East Hampton at 516.445.6491.

CHRIS FOSTER

THIS ULTIMATE WORLD-CLASS hotel is anchored at one of the East End’s most breathtaking harbors: Three Mile Harbor. Its international standard of luxurious excellence blends gracefully with informal elegance. East Hampton Point is more than a hotel, it’s a life of consummate ease and comfort—a modern-day refuge for those who seek the utmost in accommodations, dining, and activities. The East Hampton Point cottages and Palmer House guest rooms and suites are the ultimate in high-end living. The full-service waterfront resort offers guests unparalleled hospitality, elegant accommodations, exceptional dining, and a stunning setting—everything to make East Hampton Point your home in the Hamptons. The most recent addition to East Hampton Point is the completely renovated Palmer House, where seven guest rooms and suites provide deluxe lodging


OPEN HOUSE

This page, clockwise from top left: Sunset dining at the restaurant at East Hampton Point; a cottage that is classic of the Hamptons; East Hampton Point provides the finest in accommodations; a heated pool is among the amenities on the premises; the interior of the restaurant; a view from the patio. Opposite page, clockwise from top: East Hampton Point is a full-service resort with a private marina; a warm welcome to the hotel; an interior of the accommodations, which are the epitome of luxury living.


MAGNIFICENT GEORGIAN COUNTRY ESTATE $7,250,000

·

BRAE HEAD

Please visit: www.backcountrysplendor.com Exclusive Agent: Jane Gosden

$6,450,000

· Please visit: www.braeheadgreenwich.com Exclusive Agent: Sharon Kinney

BINNEY LANE

A CLASSIC BEAUTY NEAR TOWN

$4,495,000 · www.classicbinneylane.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

$3,200,000 · Please visit: www.martindaleprime.com Exclusive Agents: Joseph Williams / Blake Delany

PENTHOUSE ON MILBANK $2,250,000

SOUTH OF THE VILLAGE

· Please visit: www.milbankpenthouse.com Exclusive Agent: Miha Zajec

G R E E N W IC H

F I N E

$2,195,000 · Please visit: www.18shoreacre.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . JIM CAMPBELL . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DIANE STEVENS . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


UNIQUE EUROPEAN STYLE $5,795,000

STATELY BACKCOUNTRY MANOR

· Please visit: www.elegantfrenchmanor.com Exclusive Agent: Beverley Toepke

$5,495,000

OVER SEVEN SPECTACULAR ACRES ON ROUND HILL $2,775,000

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Please visit: Please visit: www.407roundhill.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

GRACIOUS LIVING IN OLD GREENWICH $1,895,000

BREATHTAKING WATERFRONT $2,750,000 · www.splendidwaterfront.com Exclusive Agents: Joseph Williams / Blake Delany

NEW ENGLAND CLASSIC IN OLD STONE BRIDGE

· Please visit: www.oldgreenwichcharm.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

G R E E N W IC H

· Please visit: www.backcountrymanor.com Exclusive Agent: Liz Obernesser

F I N E

$1,845,000 Please visit: www.104oldstonebridge.com

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . JIM CAMPBELL . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DIANE STEVENS . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER, L I LY H O A G L A N D , A N D E L I Z A B E T H Q U I N N B R O W N PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATE OWEN

SOUTHAMPTON SUMMER FUN

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Meredith Waterman and Ali Edwards Meredith Waterman and her three boys, Weston, Bowe, and Miles; with good family friend Ali Edwards with her daughters, Veronica and Zinniaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both pretty in pink in Oscar de la Renta.


THE VILLAGE OF Southampton, settled in 1640 and incorporated in 1894, is the oldest English settlement in the state of New York, and is named after the British Earl of Southampton. Southampton is home to nearly 55,210 people on a year-round basis with the summer population often swelling to twice that number or more. Although some know it for its celebrated guests and extravagant wealth, natives will remind you that the “original” Hampton has much more to offer when it comes to local charm and subdued appeal. We were happy to spend time with six bright and beautiful Southampton (summertime) natives and their equally adorable offspring. We followed them as they rode horses, strolled through town’s well-known locales like the Fudge Company, took a turn on the swings, dipped in the pool, climbed a tree, and ran around familiar family gardens. At the end of the day, everybody was ready for a nap (young and old!). One thing we all agreed upon— Southampton is a fun place to be in the summertime.


Lily Maddock Both wearing Ralph Lauren, Lily Maddock with four-year-old Mimi, on the back of one of their family horses, Mosaik. Lily also launched a swimsuit line, Ă&#x2030;TĂ&#x2030; Swim, with Laura Poretzky-Garcia.


Kay Nordeman One-year-old Zahra may be young, but she is already a natural model with her bright smilesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just like those of her mother, Kay Nordeman.

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Briggs Coleman Not one, but two blonde bombshells enjoy hopping into the local candy store, the Fudge Company, to satisfy their sugar cravings. But Briggs Coleman, in an Island Company dress, and her Annabelle are already too sweet!


Dominique Punnett Super realtor Dominique Punnett, in a J. Crew shirt, has nothing but ups with her fun twoyear-old son, Kayden, who is already turning into an avid outdoorsman. Styling by Valery Joseph Salon: Ryan Austin Kazmarek (hair) and Houda Casablanca (makeup).


A SANDY SHANGRI-LA B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

“THERE IS DANGER,” The New York Times announced, “that East Hampton will exchange much of its quaint and rustic flavor for the glare and show of wealth.” That dire prophesy was printed in 1881. Since then, the Hamptons have come to represent more than a stretch of villages on Long Island—now, the name conjures up a lifestyle of luxury that people aspire to be a part of each summer, mixing with the old guard and the wealthy arrivistes on the sandy dunes. Insider Kelly Killoren Bensimon first wrote a column, “In The Spirit Of,” for Hamptons magazine in 1995 to give 86 QUEST

a behind-the-scene glimpse of the fabled playground. The column was such a hit that Prosper Assouline asked her to publish a book In The Spirit Of The Hamptons, thus launching an entire series of books on various sunnied destinations of the jet set, from Capri to Saint Barths. But that was all the way back in 2002, and even if “plus ça This page: The annual “At the Common Table” dinner benefiting Quail Hill Farm. Opposite page: One of the many shops on Southampton’s Jobs Lane, featuring weathered signs of the local villages and townships.


ASSOULINE


Patrick Foy competing in the 2007 Meadow Club invitational croquet tournament at the famed club in Southampton.

ASSOULINE

A lifestyle of luxury that people aspire to be a part of each summer, mixing with the old guard and the wealthy arrivistes on the sandy dunes.


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The changes seemed subtle enough that they simply blended in. change, plus c'est la même chose,” those Hamptons are not today’s Hamptons. So Bensimon picked up her pen once more and updated her insider’s guide to show what had grown and what had felled in the decade that had passed. “Whether the population is 8,000 or 200,000 the Hamptons always seem to stay the same,” she writes. “Certainly over the years there has been change, but the changes seemed subtle enough that they simply blended in.” She illustrates this with an array of fun pictures by noted photographers (including her ex-husband, Gilles Bensimon) that show the rich and famous on their downtime: from André Balazs waterskiing to Uma 90 QUEST

Thurman curled up in a turtleneck, each moment tells personal stories of public figures in unguarded moments. While there will always be a chorus bemoaning the fact that the Hamptons are not what they used to be, it still holds the promise of great days at the beach, thrilling polo matches, posh beach clubs, and some of the best dinner parties of the summer. Society’s fascination with the grand retreat is still undimmed. Funny how a place where everyone is trying to get away from it all ended up being the place where it all is happening. X For more information, visit www.assouline.com.


This page: Kids taking over the lifeguard station on Coopers Beach in Southampton. Opposite page: A sign attesting to the increased population of the Hamptons (above); In The Spirit Of The Hamptons (below),

ASSOULINE

published by Assouline.


ART ALONG THE AVENUE

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This page: Albert Paley in his studio in Rochester, New York, working on his Park Avenue sculptures. Opposite page: Alexandre Arrachea’s “No Limit” series bent famous New York City buildings (above); while Rafael Barrios ’

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bent the mind (below).

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And now, modernist sculptor Albert Paley will have his turn. Paley usually works with metal elements, creating large, wave-like structures that reflect light in a way that suggests the undulation of water. But this is not an artist who works only in the vague, conceptual ether. This is someone with an MFA in metalsmithing, who straps on his gloves and welding helmet to forge his pieces with his own two hands. For this project, Paley approached each space that the 13 sculptures would occupy and tailored it accordingly. “He’s not only a good sculptor, he’s a good public sculptor,” said Patterson Sims of the Fund for Park Avenue Sculpture Committee. “He’s someone who makes sculpture that addresses a public site with great drama and with great style.” The importance of having beautiful public space was the reason the Fund for Park Avenue was originally created. In the 1950s, Mrs. Albert D. Lasker began planting flowers on the grassy median running through the avenue, and decided to start a program with her neighbors. Thirty years later, the Fund was officially founded and that planting project is now helmed by Barbara McLaughlin, the Fund’s president. This June, the flowers have a particular importance. “The planting of the white begonias coincide with the Cancer Research Institute’s ‘Cancer Immunotherapy Month’ and ‘Wear White for a Cure Day,’” explains McLaughlin. “When selecting the color, I always try to link it to something significant.” These bright nests can be spotted along the mall and around the sculptures. These wonderful projects along Park Avenue come together to result in one of the most pleasant, occasionally provocative, and definitely un-stuffy strolls to take around New York City.X

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AN UNLIKELY VENUE has become host to some of the most avant-garde art being talked about in New York today: Park Avenue. To some, the street name conjures the staid and stuffy, but these daring artists are decorating the blocks with anything except the expected. The project began in 1999, when New York City’s Department of Parks and the Fund for Park Avenue created the Fund for Park Avenue Sculpture Committee. The first exhibit debuted the following year with kinetic sculptor George Rickey’s "Annular Eclipse Variation VI," a stainless steel sculpture of two circles that would dance in the wind. Since then, displays have included Tom Otterness’ playful figures (which you can still find peeking around the 14th Street subway station), Will Ryman’s 25-foot tall roses, and Yoshitomo Nara’s serene white ghosts. On average, two instillations are displayed every year. Last year, Rafael Barrios first played tricks of the eye with his brightly colored geometric shapes that would appear to be precariously stacked giant blocks, only to virtually disappear from the side. His work was then replaced by the ever-festive figures Niki de Saint Phalle is known for gamboled up and down the grass mall in a splash of movement, detail, and color. This year has already seen a success with its first series by Cuban artist Alexandre Arrechea. Titled “No Limits,” the exhibit is comprised of famous New York City skyline landmarks that Arrechea has put his own twist on, quite literally. His sculptures of buildings like the Citigroup Center, the Courthouse, and the Empire State Building were rolled or flexed into shapes that contradict the rigid structures upon which they are based.


This page: Paley puts together one of the 13 Park Avenue sculptures; Arrechea’ s “ Sherry Netherland” (inset). Opposite page: Paley designing and building models before the work is completed; the Empire State Building twisted into a new shape by Arrechea.


SUMMER SHOPPING As beautiful as all the homes and beaches are, nothing quite says, “Welcome to the Hamptons” like that first drive past the shops on the main drags. Here, our writer takes a look at some of Quest’s favorite stops along the way.

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

This page: East Hampton’s Hook Mill was constructed in 1806 and remained operational until 1907. Insets, from left: A surfer catches a wave on Montauk beach; an old postcard illustrates what the town of Southampton used to look like.

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RALPH LAUREN 32 Main Street / East Hampton 631.324.1222 Leave it to Ralph Lauren to craft the perfect shopping environment for the weekend getaway. Inspired by the quintessential Hamptons lifestyle, Ralph Lauren’s boutique captures the casual and sophisticated spirit of the area. Inside, you’ll find intimate spaces, reclaimed wooden floors, white walls, beautiful millwork, and, of course, spectacular clothes for any occasion.

THE MONOGRAM SHOP 7 Newtown Lane / East Hampton 631.329.3379 In a world where so much is mass-produced, the Monogram Shop strives to make items personal. But at this family-owned boutique, it’s more than just adding initials or text to a product. After weaving in skillful touches, napkins, towels, glassware, matchbooks, cutting boards, notepads, and clothes become design pieces, wonderful for special occasions or everyday use. The possibilities here are endless and continue to suit both classic and contemporary tastes.

J.CREW 84B Main Street / Southampton 631.287.2869 Since 1983, J.Crew has earned praise for its smart shapes and lively prints. And before color was a runway trend, the design team at J.Crew was mixing it in ways we’d never seen before. The brand has expanded ever since, incorporating accessories and collaborations with brands like the Steele Canvas Basket Corporation. By spinning fresh items out of familiar ideas, J.Crew has become a global success. Be sure to see what’s new at their Southampton store.

SEQUIN 20 Jobs Lane / Southampton 631.353.3137 Here’s a fact: Sequin’s jewelry pieces are wildly popular on the runways. In the recent past, they’ve been spotted at the Ruffian, J. Mendel, and KaufmanFranco shows. The brand also actively supports national and local charities, including the Southampton Animal Shelter. So, while you’re out east this summer, stop by this lovely boutique. It’s more than a find. It’s a treasure trove.


DYLAN’S CANDY BAR 52 Main Street / East Hampton 631.324.6181 Confession: I’ve never gone to the Hamptons without stopping at Dylan’s Candy Bar. This Willy Wonka– inspired wonderland has it all, from sweet chocolate to mouth-puckering sour candy in every flavor imaginable. Dylan Lauren, the company’s founder and daughter of fashion designer Ralph Lauren, even offers pop art–inspired apparel.

MISSONIHOME 50 Jobs Lane / Southampton 631.353.3700 When you walk into a MissoniHome store, you are instantly seduced by bold color palettes, contemporary patterns, and fashion-inspired playfulness. This summer, owners Roxane Mosleh and Bobby Ginsberg bring the MissoniHome brand to Southampton, where it is bound to shine. Sit in the soft furnishings. Examine the linens. Mix and match the textiles. After all, creativity is what Missoni is known for. Word is there’s also an outdoor garden.

SIP ’N SODA 40 Hampton Road / Southampton 631.283.9752 Sip ’n Soda, the classic luncheonette famous for its homemade ice cream and lime rickeys, has been a hit since it first came to Southampton in 1958. Today, the diner/soda fountain/ice-cream parlor still maintains its classic charm. Owned by Mark and Jim Parish, Sip ’n Soda serves up delicious dishes to hungry Hamptonites taking breaks from the beach or shopping. If it’s a milkshake you crave, don’t miss the extra-thick old-fashioned shake, made with Sip ’n Soda’s flavorful ice cream.

BOOKHAMPTON 16 Hampton Road / Southampton 631.283.0270 Insatiable readers know there’s nothing quite like devouring books at the beach. And there’s no better place to fill up on titles than at BookHampton. With its vast selections and friendly staff, BookHampton has been the neighborhood bookstore for generations of East End residents and vacationers. The charming locale also has branches in East Hampton, Mattituck, and Sag Harbor.


TIFFANY & CO. 53 Main Street / East Hampton 631.324.1700 Housed in a whitewashed storefront with Tiffanyblue awnings on East Hampton’s Main Street, shoppers who walk by are drawn to Tiffany & Co.’s stunning window displays. Step inside and you’ll find all the impressive jewelry and fine gifts the house is known for. Whether it’s a diamond ring or a picnic basket in natural wicker, Tiffany & Co. is sure to impress.

CALYPSO ST. BARTH 24 Jobs Lane / Southampton 631.283.4321 The Calypso St. Barth boutique, like its merchandise, offers a refreshing sense of escape. At the Southampton store, you’ll marvel at the bright-colored bohemian-style clothes, all of which are entirely feminine and quite smart. In fact, Calypso St. Barth embodies the Hamptons style so well that they have other nearby locations in Montauk, Sag Harbor, Westhampton, and East Hampton. From floral embroidered linen tunics to tie-dyed maxi slip dresses, a woman dressed in Calypso St. Barth personifies effortless elegance.

VILEBREQUIN 25 A & B Newton Lane / East Hampton At Linde Gallery 631.604.5757 Vilebrequin’s president, Brian Lange, calls the Hamptons the Côte d’Azur of the United States. So it’s fitting that the swim- and resort-wear manufacturer makes its way out east this summer. The boutique, which will remain open until October 15, is housed inside the Linde Gallery and offers the company’s swimwear as well as a range of ready-to-wear clothing and accessories. The pop-up also carries the new women’s capsule collection.

VALERY JOSEPH 2454 Main Street / Bridgehampton 631.537.8967 Valery Joseph, the Israeli-trained stylist with a background in architecture, may be known for his layered cuts, but his Bridgehampton salon offers even more: cuts, color, make-up and “bridal,” nail care, and waxing. Whether you have a special event to attend or just want to look (and feel) your best, make an appointment at this delightful salon. During the summer season, Valery Joseph keeps its doors open until 10 p.m., primping and prepping those in need.


exhibit of works by Manuela Zervudachi, including Zervudachi’s bronze “Tronc” (pedestal table), “Spiral” (wall lamps), and “River Weed” (wall sculpture). Galerie Agnès Monplaisir: 8 bis, rue Jacques Callot, Paris, France; +33 1.56.81.83.51, www.agnesmonplaisir.com. 100 QUEST

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67 x 27.5 x 21.25 inches. Opposite page: A view of Galerie Agnès Monplaisir during an

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This page: Manuela Zervudachi’s “I Mitéra,” bronze, 2008, edition of eight, measuring


NATURAL INSTINCTS

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


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her name, is not only an ardent admirer of multiculturalism—she is the embodiment of it. Though quintessentially Parisian (she exudes great style, is possessed of inarguably good taste, and speaks with indefatigable conviction), Monplaisir is by no means bound by quintessential Parisian traditions. Her gallery, on Rue Jacques Callot in the chic quarter of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, stands apart from many of its brethren in its representation of a wide-ranging, culturally diverse artist list. On any given visit, a journey to the Galerie Agnès Monplaisir is like a journey to another part of the world. The varied roster of international artists includes the likes of the Colombian textile artist Olga de Amaral, the Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, the German painter Albert Hermann, the Italian artist Girolamo Ciulla, the French painter and sculptor Richard Texier, and the Greek sculptor Manuela Zervudachi. Diversity, apparently, is nothing foreign to Monplaisir. The Monplaisirs are a French family with origins in St. Lucia. “This mix,” she says, “has given me an open mind, a sense of travel, and a sense of language.” (She speaks French, English, Russian, Creole, and Portuguese.) This mix might also explain what makes Monplaisir such an appealing figure herself. Though utterly Parisian, she loves Brazil and South American culture, and now spends much of her time in Prahina, Brazil, where she and her husband own a home. Back in Paris, her apartment suggests comme il faut French flair (parquet floors, gilt-edged Louis XV–style desks), but is also an

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AGNÈS MONPLAISIR, much like the Paris art gallery that bears


This page, clockwise from top left: The artist Hermann Albert’s “Femme et fruit,” 2002, tempera on canvas; views of Galerie Agnès Monplaisir during an exhibition of the works of artist Girolamo Ciulla, including Ciulla’s travertine columns; Olga de Amaral’s “Nudo magenta,” 2011, mixed media, linen, acrylic paint. Opposite page, clockwise from bottom left: Igor Mitoraj’s bronze sculpture “Tindaro,” 1997, edition of three, at La Défense, the business district near

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Paris; Mitoraj’s bronze “Corazza,” 1980; the gallery owner Agnès Monplaisir standing before Mitoraj’s gilded bronze “Per Adriano d’Oro,” 2011, edition of eight.

organic trove of ethnographic art, almost as if we’d stumbled into André Breton’s apartment itself. “I cannot live without an atmosphere,” she says, simply. Whatever its national origin, art is her self-avowed passion. And disparate though they may be, the artists she is drawn to all seem to communicate a sense of artistry endemic to the societies from which they were born, or which they are meant to represent. Instead of specializing in one period or discipline, Monplaisir is drawn to that which moves her on an instinctive level. She has an innate eye for the beautiful, and her aptitude balances a visceral reaction with a meditated approach. In short, she knows what she likes—which has proven to be very good art. This natural instinct has been with her throughout her career, which began in 1987 in an initial gallery launched in the Bastille district of Paris that moved to Rue de Charoonne to Rue Bonaparte and, finally, to her current address on the tony Rue Jacques Callot. Apart from seeking out new artists and building her gallery into the international showpiece that it is today, Monplaisir has also consistently been involved with major art fairs. This fall, during the Frieze Art Fair in London, she will mount an exhibition at the Louise Blouin Foundation, opening to the public on October 15 and featuring the works of Olga de Amaral, an artist close to her heart. And, as she looks to Brazil and plans for a possible gallery presence in Rio de Janeiro, suddenly it’s looking as if Agnès Monplaisir doesn’t have to bring the world in to her gallery space; instead, she’s bringing herself to the world. X J U LY 2 0 1 3 1 0 3


HEALTH, HISTORY, HORSES Saratoga was already famous for its role in the Revolutionary War, but everything changed in the summer of 1863 when thoroughbred racing ofďŹ cially arrived. BY BRIEN BOUYEA


This spread: The U.S. Triple Crown Champion Secretariat, racing at Saratoga in 1992 (left); William R. Travers, founder and first president of the Saratoga

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Race Course, in 1863 (right).

IT WAS TWO YEARS before the 13th Amendment to the Constitution outlawing slavery and involuntary servitude was ratified, when an unlikely individual pulled off an even more unlikely endeavor that dramatically altered the course of history for the sleepy village of Saratoga Springs, New York. Exactly one month after an estimated 8,000 Americans were killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, a 32-year-old former bare-knuckle boxing champion named John Morrissey acted on his seemingly illogical plot of bringing the first organized thoroughbred race meet to Saratoga. It was August 1863, and the Civil War was tearing America apart. In fact, even finding enough quality thoroughbreds to stage the meet was problematic because the Union had requisitioned every horse it could find for the war effort. Morrissey, however, proceeded undeterred. Gambling was not part of Saratoga’s early allure. A state law was passed in 1802 that prohibited any form of wagering.

Horse racing made its way into Saratoga by taking advantage of loopholes for county fairs and informal trotting events. On Saturday, August 14, 1847, Saratoga entrepreneurs George Cole and Alfonso Patten, with the financial backing of James Marvin, opened the Saratoga Trotting Course. The trotters were supposedly staging only exhibitions and “trials of speed.” The inaugural race was won by the immortal Lady Suffolk, known as “The Old Gray Mare” in Stephen Foster’s folk song. A month later, the State Fair, featuring five days of racing, opened at the Saratoga Trotting Course. The first thoroughbred race at Saratoga went virtually unnoticed as part of the festivities. Racing was sporadic in Saratoga during the years between 1847 and 1863, until Morrissey’s meet. Two races were carded each day from August 3 to 6, 1863. The curtain had risen on bigtime racing in Saratoga. The Spirit of the Times said Morrissey’s meet “laid the foundation for a great fashionable race meeting J U LY 2 0 1 3 1 0 5


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racehorse Kentucky. One of the vice presidents, Jerome, was a lawyer, publisher, and the grandfather of Winston Churchill, as well as a partner in Vanderbilt’s railroad deals, who went on to play a major role in the opening of three tracks in the New York City area and helped form the Jockey Club. Hunter, a prominent breeder and horse owner, was brought in to represent the Association’s executive committee. Hunter later became president of the Jockey Club, and is credited with proposing the race that led to the creation of Pimlico Race Course in Maryland, the home of the Preakness Stakes. Others who played key roles were John Purdy, a gentleman jockey and wine dealer, and Charles Wheatly, who served as Saratoga’s racing secretary for decades and became director of

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at the Springs” and added, “the formation of a competent club, and further proceedings, would seem to be a matter of course.” Morrissey moved quickly to build upon his success. He purchased an initial 94 acres across the street from the Saratoga Trotting Grounds to construct the Saratoga Race Course almost immediately after the conclusion of his inaugural meet. Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt helped underwrite the cost of the new racecourse, while Morrissey brought in William R. Travers, Leonard Jerome, and John Hunter to lend prestige to the new Saratoga Association. Travers was a Baltimore-born stockbroker and the first president of the Saratoga Association, as well as a partner in the famed Annieswood Stable, which campaigned the legendary


This page, clockwise from top left: Native Dancer, winner of the Preakness Stakes in 1945; Helen Tweedy and Roger Laurin; Bold Ruler, 1957 winner of the Preakness Stakes, with Lillian Phipps; the Saratoga Association, 1927; legendary horsewoman Elizabeth Whitney Tippett and friends; Marylou Whitney, who resided at Cady Hill House (inset). Opposite page: Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt II, whose great-great-grandfather helped start the Saratoga Race Course.


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the Saratoga Association in 1890. Wheatly set most of the racing policy at the spa and also served as the track superintendent and clerk. He was one of the most respected men in the sport and an expert handicapper. James Marvin, who provided ďŹ nancial support to Cole and Patten in 1847, was now a U.S. congressman and was also listed among the incorporators. Others with minor roles included railroad executive George Osgood; John Davidson, a friend of Morrissey and a riverboat operator; Erastus Corning, Jr., a prominent banker and manufacturer; Saratoga resident John White, a local government ofďŹ cial; John Eddy, a Saratoga farmer who had prospered; and Vanderbilt, who stayed in the background. The team Morrissey assembled was


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described in the New York Herald as “a guarantee of the thoroughly high-toned character of all the proceedings.” The Saratoga Race Course opened for the first time on August 2, 1864. The first race was won by the great racehorse Kentucky, owned in partnership by Travers, Hunter, and Osgood. Kentucky became the track’s first equine hero, as he also won the first two editions of the prestigious Saratoga Cup. A new era of racing excellence had been ushered in. The track was popular from the beginning and is now regarded as a pillar in the sport. Today, 150 years after Morrissey’s inaugural meet, the Saratoga Race Course stands as the oldest active sporting venue in the country. It remains the standard by which all of American racing is measured. X MONTH 2013 00


HALLOWED HALL LED BY CORNELIUS VANDERBILT Whitney, a group of people prominent within the sport of thoroughbred racing established the National Museum of Racing in Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1950. Less than a year later, on August 6, 1951, amid a great deal of fanfare, the museum opened in a temporary location at the Canfield Casino in Congress Park. “The long-range purpose,” Whitney said at the opening in the famous old casino, “is to build a permanent home for the important memorabilia for the sport whose beginnings in this country antedate by one hundred years or more the United States of America.” Four years later, the museum moved to a newly constructed facility at 191 Union Avenue, directly across the street from the historic Saratoga Race Course. Over the decades, the museum has grown in size and scope, and occupies a sprawling building with some 45,000 square feet of space. Joining Whitney as the founding group in signing the charter for the museum were George D. Widener, F. Skiddy von Stade, Donald P. Ross, Kenneth K. Burke, Nelson Dunstan, John Hay Whitney, Carlton F. Burke, and John C. Clark. Also recognized as organizers of the museum are Walter M. Jeffords, Francis Dorsey, Howell E. Jackson, Paul Kerr, Denis Mansfield, Dr.

Charles Strub, Bryce Wing, Spencer Eddy, Robert F. Kelley, and Addison Mallery, who was the mayor of Saratoga Springs. The first gift for the museum project was $5,000 from the Saratoga Association, which owned and operated the Saratoga Race Course. Harold O. Vosburgh, a steward for the Saratoga Association, donated the first piece of memorabilia, a shoe from the legendary horse, Lexington. Whitney served as the first president of the museum from 1950 to 1953, a position that Stella F. Thayer now occupies. The museum was popular from the beginning. During its first year of operation at the Canfield Casino in 1951, the museum attracted more than 8,000 visitors. At the end of 1952, the register showed 11,500 names. When it was announced the museum would move out of its original quarters in the Canfield Casino and into a structure being built specifically to house it, a Saratoga citizen, James E. Benton, applauded. He sparked some of the impetus toward a Hall of Fame with a letter to several journalists. He made an eloquent plea, noting that some aspects This page: The five Gold Cup trophies won by Kelso are showcased at the museum. Opposite page: Hall of Fame Day (above); the Von Stade Gallery features artwork inspired by the sport of racing (below).

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This page: The National Museum of Racing in Saratoga, New York. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Silks on display at the Hall of Fame; the National Museum of Racing opened in 1950; a statue of Secretariat greets visitors; the original home of the museum;

of Saratoga were changing but that tradition was an important part of the area and racing. “If a board of turf writers, for instance, were to elect annually to the Hall of Fame one or more jockeys, horses, or trainers, it would be of national importance,” Benton wrote. “An annual special award would be coveted.” By early 1955, Jeffords announced that the new building would, indeed, include a Hall of Fame. The museum board passed the following: “Resolved that the National Museum of Racing create and be custodian of racing’s Hall of Fame and its president be empowered to appoint a committee whose duties it will be to recommend to the board of trustees ways and means of selecting candidates.” Since thoroughbred racing had been a part of American life since the colonial days, there was a lot to catch up on. The first group of inductees was comprised of horses that had raced prior to 1900 as well as jockeys and trainers who were no longer active. The inaugural class of inductees included the horses, Ben Brush, Boston, Domino, Hanover, Hindoo, Kingston, Lexington, Salvator, and Sir Archy. Soon, ground was broken for the museum’s permanent home during the final week of November 1954. The cornerstone was laid in April 1955 and New York governor W. Averell Harriman presided over the formal dedication on August 16. Harriman spoke briefly prior to the ribbon-cutting ceremony: “Racing, in order to continue, must remain as a sport,” he said, “and not as a commercial enterprise. We must maintain the traditions of racing, and Saratoga is rich in such traditions.” The New York Times wrote about the dedication, stating that the building cost $300,000. The Times said that Harriman was greeted by Ashley Trimble Cole, chairman of the State Racing Commission; William C. Langley, a member of the commission; Widener, the chairman of the Jockey Club; Burke of the Thoroughbred Racing Association; and Max Hirsch, representing the American Trainers Association. 112 QUEST

The National Museum of Racing opened to the public on June 2, 1956. The building was designed by New York City architect Augustus Noel. In 1957, the first addition, called the Patrons of the Turf Gallery, was completed. More expansion followed. A third wing was added in 1979, becoming the Hall of Fame. Until the mid-l980s, the Museum functioned primarily as a diversified set of galleries and was open only during the summer. In the 1980s, the Museum began evolving into a professionally managed institution. The board of trustees raised $6.4 million and hired an English design team experienced with thoroughbred racing to renovate the building and develop historical galleries covering three centuries of racing in America. The renovation took 10 months and the building reopened on July 14, 1988. Between 1999 and 2000, a major renovation and a 10,000-square-foot expansion of the physical plant costing $18 million improved collections storage and created a changing exhibition space, a curatorial workroom, and a Children’s Gallery. The storyline of the semipermanent historical galleries also expanded to include 20th-century history and current events in racing. Extensive audio and video presentations, as well as interactive exhibits for families and adults, have been added throughout the museum. During the past 20 years there has been tremendous change in all areas of museum operations. The unique horse racing simulator was developed in 2006 and an interactive Steeplechase Gallery opened in 2012. Opening in July 2013, there will be a two-year exhibit to celebrate 150 years of racing. More than 60 years after its founding, the museum continues to be a dynamic part of the vibrant sport it celebrates. With the 2013 election of jockey Calvin Borel; horses Housebuster, Invasor, Lure, McDynamo, and Tuscalee; and Pillars of the Turf selections August Belmont II and Paul Mellon, the Hall of Fame has 386 members. They, and the other greats who follow, represent the courage of victory, the glamour of the turf, and the heartbeat of the sporting world. X

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memorabilia from over the years, including a clock used to countdown before the races, decorates the walls of the museum.


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IT'S BEEN A memorable month and a half for two highly respected equine sons of Saratoga. It began with racing’s revered First Saturday in May, when Ogden “Dinny” Phipps, joined by his first cousin Stuart Janney, recorded the first-ever Kentucky Derby victory for the Phipps family stable in the 139th Run for the Roses. It was also the first Kentucky Derby win for the family’s trusted trainer, Shug McGaughey. “The Phippses and Janneys have been my whole life for 20 some years now; I’m extremely proud to work with people such as this,” said Shug, modestly in his thick Kentucky drawl. In a Derby dominated by closers, the husky bay Orb slogged wide through the mud to grab the lead deep in the stretch,

holding on to the finish for this historic family victory. Even more recently, on the much heralded first day of racing at Royal Ascot—the very same day that Queen Elizabeth won her first ever Royal Ascot Gold Cup—America’s beloved Joe Allen won two major races over this fabled race course. Allen’s four-year-old Declaration of War ran away from the favorite, and former Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom in the important Queen Anne Stakes. But, unlike the Queen of England, Joe Allen was hardly done for the day. A few races later, our Yank-in-London’s two-year-old colt, War Command, which he campaigns with Coolmore, came from dead last to win the prestigious Coventry Stakes by six lengths as a 20–1 longshot.

Both of these winning colts come from an 11-year-old stallion, War Front, who was bred, not surprisingly, by Allen. Seasoned Saratoga track hands will recall the powerful War Front winning the Alfred G. Vanderbilt Stakes as a four-year-old, then trained by Allen Jerkens. Thoroughbred racing has been honored and well-served by these two highly principled sportsmen—two gents whose passion for breeding bloodstock with a longterm focus sets a high bar for horses and humans alike. As the Phipps family patriarch advises: “Take your time; let the horse bring you to the race.” Saratogians and horsemen everywhere tip their cap to Dinny, Joe, and Stuart too, and salute their well-deserved successes. —“Clocker”

This page: Owners Dinny Phipps and Stuart Janney with trainer Shug McGaughey celebrate Orb’s 2013 Kentucky Derby victory at Churchill Downs (above, left); jockey Joel Rosario during his winning race aboard Orb (above, right); Joe Allen, an owner of War Command, holding the trophy for the 2013 Royal Ascot Coventry Stakes (below, left); winning jockey Seamie Heffernan riding War Command to the finish line (below, right).

PAT H E A LY O F H E A LYR AC I N G . I E ( A S COT )

A FITTING FEAST OF FIRSTS


This page, clockwise from top left: Jeff and Katy Dew Amling; Robert and Blythe Clay, with Joseph and Maury Shields; brothers William W. and Thomas M. Bancroft, Jr., Frank Whiteley, jockey Bill Shoemaker, and presenter Mrs. Richard duPont, August 1976; Linda Miller, Robert and Whitney Douglass, with Leverett Miller; the 2010 National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame ball; Bronson and Stella Thayer; Earle Mack (inset).


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

Presented By TRADITIONAL HOME BeneďŹ ting SOUTHAMPTON HOSPITAL

Showhouse Dates SUNDAY, JULY 21 - MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 LOCATION: 990 BRICK KILN ROAD, BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY HOURS: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Sunday ADMISSION: $35. Admission fee includes a Journal HOUSE PROVIDED BY: BODENCHAK DESIGN AND BUILD

Directions to 990 Brick Kiln Road, Bridgehampton, NY: FROM THE WEST: Take Route 27 (Montauk Hwy) through Water Mill. Turn left at Scuttle Hole Road (at the Hess gas station). Continue 3.4 miles on Scuttle Hole Rd. Go through the traffic circle and turn left onto Brick Kiln Road and continue for 1.2 miles. You will come to a fork in the road. Bear right and continue on Brick Kiln Rd. The house is on the right side. FROM THE EAST: Take Route 27 (Montauk Hwy) toward Bridgehampton. As you enter Bridgehampton, turn right onto the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike for 1.9 miles. Turn left onto Scuttle Hole Road. Proceed 8/10th mile to Brick Kiln Rd and turn right. Continue for 1.2 miles. You will come to a fork in the road. Bear right on to Brick Kiln Rd. The house is on the right side. FROM SAG HARBOR: Exit hamlet of Sag Harbor (heading south) and turn right onto Brick Kiln Road at the Getty gas station and traffic light. Continue for 1 mile. The house is on the left side. You will be directed where to park. BY HAMPTON JITNEY: Frequent daily buses run to and from Bridgehampton. For bus reservations and NYC pick-up locations: call: (800) 936-0440 or (631) 283-4600.

R E N D E R I N G CO U RT E S Y O F R E V E L I N S PI R E D

Children under six, infants, strollers, and pets are not allowed in the Showhouse.


For more information about our showrooms or to work with a designer, contact Access to Design™ 212-679-9500 x19 or email accesstodesign@nydc.com SHOWROOMS OPEN Mon - Fri 9am-5 pm 200 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10016 212.679.9500 · NYDC.COM

Featuring furniture, fabrics, accessories, lighting, kitchen, bath, antiques, 20th Century and vintage.

THE RESOURCE


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

THE 2013 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE

THE 2013 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE will open with a

Gala Preview Cocktail Party on Saturday, July 20, 2013 and will run until Labor Day, Monday, September 2, 2013 in Bridgehampton, New York. Proceeds will benefit Southampton Hospital, Southampton, NY. The Showhouse is happy to announce that Traditional Home magazine is the 2013 Presenting Sponsor and LX.TV Open House is the 2013 Television Sponsor. Mario Buatta is the Honorary Showhouse Chairman. Jamie Drake and Alexa Hampton are the Honorary Design Co-Chairmen. The Hampton Designer Showhouse, now in its thirteenth year, is a showcase for America’s premier design talent. 30 top interior designers and decorative artists will turn a lavish shingle style home into a decorating masterpiece. This year’s Showhouse located at a traditional shingle style Hampton home located at 990 Brick Kiln Road in Bridgehampton, NY has been generously provided by the exclusive firm of Bodenchak Design and Build (www.bodenchak.com). “What could be more inspiring than the Hamptons at the height of the summer season?” says Ann Maine, Editor in Chief of Traditional Home magazine, the 2013 Presenting Sponsor. “We’re delighted to once again serve as the national media sponsor of The

Hampton Designer Showhouse. This incredible project is not only a premier showcase for innovative design ideas from some of the top talent in the industry—but more importantly—raises critical funds to support Southampton Hospital.” Benjamin Moore & Co., Ballard Designs, Caesarstone, Circa Lighting, Electrolux, Frontgate, Gloster, Henredon, Hinkley Lighting, Hudson Valley Lighting, Lillian August, Lladró, MaitlandSmith, P.E. Guerin, Pearson, The Rug Company, Shaw Floors, Stanton, and Sub-Zero & Wolf are the 2013 Sponsors. Designer Sales will be featured on LiveAuctioneers.com. The Hampton Designer Showhouse opens with a Gala Preview Cocktail Party at the Showhouse on Saturday, July 20 from 6:00pm - 8:30pm and will be open to the public Sunday, July 21 through Labor Day, Monday, September 2, 2013. Showhouse hours will be as follows: Monday through Sunday, 11:00am - 5:00pm. Children under six, infants, strollers and pets are not allowed in the Showhouse. Admission to the Showhouse is $35 and includes the Showhouse Journal. Gala tickets are $225 each. For more information on the hospital, please visit: southamptonhospital.org.

For more information on the Showhouse and to purchase tickets, please visit: www.hamptondesignershowhouse.com or call (631) 808-3008. For press information, please call Mitchell Manning Associates at (212) 980-1711 or email: info@mitchellmanning.com. All proceeds raised from The Hampton Designer Showhouse will benefit Southampton Hospital. The event is open to the public Sunday, July 21 - Monday, Sept. 2.

Mario Buatta and

Annemarie diSalvo

Patricia Fisher and

Bradley Stephens

Brian del Toro, Lynne Scalo

Tony Manning and

Janice Langrall and

Jim Druckman

and Gregory Giannotti

Michael Herold

and Elizabeth Hagins

and Michael H. Florio

Jamie Drake

Bryant Keller

Richard Mortimer

Sherrill Canet and

Brad Shar, Lisa Wyer

Keith Baltimore, Kim Hendrickson-

Barbara Page, Steven

Beth McDonough, Irene

and Dennis McAvena

Jonathan Kutzin

and Michael Arbini

Radovich and Ken Gemes

Bernstein and Libby Langdon

Diaz-Paloma and Sara Rossi

PATRICK MCMULLAN

THE RUG COMPANY HOSTED A KICKOFF PARTY FOR THE 2012 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE AT THE RUG COMPANY STORE LOCATED AT 88 WOOSTER STREET IN NEW YORK


484 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10022 Y 212-838-0650 Y WWW.EBRAUNNEWYORK.COM


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

THE 2013 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE

THE HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE Foundation, Inc. is led and operated by a

dynamic team of experts from the worlds of marketing, public relations, fundraising, and special events production. This is the 13th year they have combined their talents to produce what is now recognized as one of the country’s most successful showhouses. Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corporation. Anthony Manning is the Showhouse producer and also president of Mitchell Manning Associates, a full service public relations and marketing agency with a special focus on the home furnishings industry. His realm is the creation of the full-scale public awareness campaign that has propelled the Hampton Designer Showhouse to national prominence in three short years, with phenomenal coverage in local and national newspaper media, home design magazines, and television. He has also directed the packaging and sales of various sponsorships that have linked the Showhouse to a variety of corporations in the publishing, banking, home design, and related fields. The administration of the 1,001 details that comprise the planning and day-to-day man-

Tony Manning; Mary Lynch.

agement of the Showhouse is under the control of the highly talented Mary Lynch, whose background as the director of special events at Southampton Hospital for 13 years makes her uniquely qualified to administer the myriad complexities involved in running a Showhouse. These range from supervising the rejuvenation of the house to coordinating the diverse needs of the designers creating their individual “fantasy space” within the Showhouse. The Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation, Inc. has produced the Hampton Designer Showhouse benefiting Southampton Hospital for eleven years, The Designer Showhouse of New Jersey benefiting The John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center for four years, The Greenwich Designer Showhouse benefiting Greenwich Hospital in spring 2007, The Orchard Hill Designer Showhouse benefiting Old Westbury Gardens in spring 2008, and Holiday House benefiting the Greater New York City Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. With this skilled, focused, and hardworking “Dream Team” behind it, the stage is set for this year’s Hampton Designer Showhouse to once again be a spectacular design tour de force.

2013 PRESENTING SPONSOR Traditional Home As the largest upscale shelter magazine in America, Traditional Home celebrates the union of timeless design with modern living, inspiring 5 million design lovers to reinterpret classic elegance in a thoroughly personal way. From home, garden, and green living to food, entertaining, and travel, the magazine is a tribute to quality, craftsmanship, authenticity, and family --a trusted resource that respects the past, lives in the present, and embraces products designed for the future. For more information, please visit www.traditionalhome.com. For more information regarding the magazine's exciting online companion, TRADhome, please visit www.tradhomemag.com.


2013 PARTICIPANTS ALAN COURT & ASSOCIATES

BRYANT KELLER INTERIORS

LYNNE SCALO DESIGN

THE ALPHA WORKSHOPS

DALE COHEN DESIGN STUDIO

MARK HUMPHREY GALLERY

AUDIO COMMAND SYSTEMS, INC.

DENNIS R. MCAVENA INC.

MICHAEL HEROLD DESIGN

BAKES AND COMPANY

DISALVO INTERIORS

MICHAEL MARIOTTI INTERIOR DESIGN

BALTIMORE DESIGN GROUP

HAGINS & MORTIMER DESIGN

OLD TOWN CROSSING

BARBARA OSTROM ASSOCIATES

JACK LEVY DESIGN LLC

PATRICIA FISHER DESIGN

BARBARA PAGE HOME

KEMBLE INTERIORS

PATRICK MELE DESIGN

BRADLEY STEPHENS, STEPHENS DESIGN GROUP

KEN GEMES INTERIORS

SHERRILL CANET INTERIORS

BRADY DESIGN

KIM E. COURTNEY INTERIORS & DESIGN

VARNER INTERIOR DESIGN LLC

BRIAN DEL TORO INC.

LILLIAN AUGUST

WORTH INTERIORS

LOWY FRAME & RESTORING COMPANY

sponsored by


APPEARANCES

FLYING COLORS

BY HILARY GEARY

This page, clockwise from left: A bird’s eye view of the Château de Balleroy in Normandy, France; our columnist, Hilary, with her husband Wilbur Ross; Malcolm Forbes housed a museum devoted to ballooning at his French home.

UP, UP, AND AWAY for a quick spin over to Europe with stops in England, Spain, and France. We breezed into Barcelona then Madrid with a quick pop in to Bilbao to see the famed Frank Gehrydesigned Guggenheim Museum there. It had been well over a dozen years since 122 QUEST

I had first seen that amazing building, which has delighted art lovers worldwide and revitalized a city all on its own. Did it pass the test of time? Oh, yes—and with flying colors. In fact, it was more beautiful than ever, glowing in the sunshine. This stunning building rivals the fabulous art

that it houses. It was hard to decide what was more spectacular, the building or art such as the Richard Serra sculpture, “A Matter of Time,” or the works by de Kooning, Motherwell, Kiefer or Koons. Ah, it is all terrific! The last stop was in France to stay with Astrid and Kip


Forbes at their storied family abode, the fabulous Château de Balleroy in Normandy. This François Mansart masterpiece was built in 1631 and bought by Kip’s father, Malcolm Forbes, in 1970. It is truly a magnificent building, surrounded by beautiful gardens and more. In fact, in 1975, as Malcolm Forbes adored ballooning, he converted a stable into a mini museum dedicated to the pursuit. The weekend was exquisitely organized with all kinds of activities starting with ballooning—what else? When in Rome, do as the Romans do, so, when in Normandy, go ballooning! And that is what we did. It is quite amazing to quietly soar high in the sky in a wicker basket under a colorful balloon above the landscape. You truly feel like a

called, “Un été au bord de l’eau. Loisirs et Impressionnisme” before heading to Le Carlotta restaurant for a delicious lunch. Next was something I have always wanted to see as everyone has told me how heartbreakingly beautiful it is, as well as a place every American should see: the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial with its new vistor’s center. It is one of 14 permanent World War II military cemeteries on foreign soil. France has granted use of this land, in perpetuity, as a permanent burial ground without charge or taxation to the United States. It is truly a magnificent memorial to those brave young heroes. I will never forget it. Back to the Château to put our feet up and then down to the Salon Louis XIII

what a joy! Then, into a seated dinner in the magnificent dining room filled with art and treasures. After dinner, we shot a little pool then night, night! Next day, it was off to another glorious spot: the Château de Canisy for lunch and a tour by its charming owner, Count Denis de Kergorlay. This fabulous château on 740 acres has remained in his family, despite revolutions and more. It was such a treat to see this historic building, which is available for rent! Back to Balleroy where we dined cozily by the fire in the “old kitchen” on all kinds of yummy pizza! Next morning, we all headed off after a glorious weekend. Among the lucky quests were Konrad and Barbara Bernheimer, Max Blumberg, Eduardo Araujo, Elisabeth and Henrik von Dehn,

This page, clockwise from top left: Kip Forbes; plates echoed the theme of the weekend; Astrid Forbes and H.R.H. Christa Princess of Prussia; the shadow of a balloon over the French countryside; Tom Quick; the Normandy American Cemetary and Memorial.

bird! But that was only one of the amazing treats that weekend. We popped into a pristine deluxe bus that ferried our large group of more than 30 everywhere and visited a wonderful little museum: the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen. There, we enjoyed a special exhibition

for champagne and a piano recital by the very talented couple Lucia and Julien Le Prado. They magically played Claude Debussy’s “Petite Suite Pour Piano à 4 Mains” then Ludwig Beethoven’s “La Sonate au Clair de Lune” then George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.” Heaven,

Simon Edsor and Mary Goodwin, Julieete Franco, Margaret and Greg Hedberg, BJ Kirwan and Terry Hanna, Dina and Brad Martin, Frances Marzio, Lee Pearce, H.R.H. Christa Princess of Prussia, Tom Quick, Didier Thiery, Sarah and Ian Wardropper, Shelby White, and more. X J U LY 2 0 1 3 1 2 3


BROWN

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST June was bustin’ out all over, but especially at the Veuve Clicquot

Polo Classic at Liberty State Park and Gilligan’s at the Soho Grand Hotel. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Gilligan’s—the seasonal eatery at the Soho Grand Hotel—is the “it ” spot for al fresco drinks and more this summer.


Robert Chen, Fort Parker, William Jameson, and Andrew Ward in between dancing to music by Swizz Beatz.

Teddy Kunhardt kisses his girlfriend, Sarah Yoder, in the terrace room of the Plaza Hotel. Lara Glaister and Oliver Blodgett supported their friend, Peter Kunhardt, Jr., at his event.

Sam Leeds and Owen Murphy toasted the honorees at the Gordon Parks Foundation Event on June 4.

Tara Dhingra and Evan Speiser at the Plaza

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E E S O H O G R A N D H OT E L ;

Hotel for the Gordon Parks Foundation event.

Anne de la Mothe Karoubi and Liz Kneiling enjoyed a

Peter Kunhardt, Jr., director of the Gordon

concert by Swizz Beatz on June 4.

Parks Foundation, with Kick Kennedy.

“THERE IS ONLY ONE STEP from the sublime to the ridiculous,” said Napoleon Bonaparte. And if that quote doesn’t apply to the month of June—which vacillated between being sublime and being ridiculous—I don’t know what does. On June 1, I ferried with Alex Travers to Liberty State Park, leaving my worries (and SPF 15) in Manhattan. The Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic proved to be the epitome of Madame Clicquot’s “Only one quality, the finest,” from the caviar to the view of the Statue of Liberty to the all-yellow everything. A

kiss-kiss to Christianne Amodio and Lo Bosworth—co-founders of Revelry House (www.revelryhouse.com)—before buzzing like a bee from friend to friend, including Leah Bourne, Sam Dangremond (with brother, Gus Dangremond), and Andy Gale. After the match, I spotted Alex Chunn and Cory Perlson among the 7,000 spectators, hopping aboard their yacht for the return. All in all, it was flossy flossy. On June 4, Peter Beard, Swizz Beatz, Donna Karan, and Carrie Mae Weems were honored at the Plaza Hotel by the J U LY 2 0 1 3 1 2 5


Gordon Parks Foundation, which is dedicated to preserving the work of Gordon Parks and other artists. There, Peter Kunhardt, Jr., director of the Gordon Parks Foundation, was joined by Veronica Beard, Sebastian Bland, Avery Broadbent, Karlie Kloss, David Mehlman, Meeyun Taylor, and Olivier Theyskens to toast creatives—past and present. After a concert by Swizz Beatz in the terrace room and a dessert of strawberries, I was ready for the sweetest of dreams. Others? They armed themselves with espresso before dipping to No. 8 for the after-party... On June 6, the Wildlife Conservation Society hosted its “Wonders of Southeast Asia” gala at the Central Park Zoo. Lily Hoagland and I were wined and dined around the sea lion pool, darting to and fro throughout the meal to visit Micaela English or Carson Griffith or Georgina Schaeffer at their

Dree Hemingway tosses the ball before the first chukka of the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic.

Polo Classic at Liberty State Park on June 1.

tables. The evening was about saving wildlife and wild places so of course the after-party was wild, between the ’90s music by DJ Chelsea Leyland and a sea of Lily Pulitzer, Shoshanna, and Tibi. Also, I saw someone with a sloth! On June 8—at the suggestion of Ted Gushue—I visited Gilligan’s at the Soho Grand Hotel, an pop-up conceived by Nick Hatsatouris and Lincoln Pilcher of Moby Dick’s in Montauk. The menu, from chefs Gary King and Emily Wallendjack, includes a Tuscan kale salad with Caesar dressing, parmesan cheese, and breadcrumbs and Wagyu skirt steak. I shared a pizza with Dionne Anderson, Miles Rutter, and Gordon Stewart and a mojito with nobody. It was delicious and deliciously outside. Definitely the place for a first date, or a twenty-first date. X

CO U RTE S Y O F V E U V E C L I C Q U OT; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

Timo Weiland at the sixth annual Veuve Clicquot


Medora Hartz, Alex Price, and Matt Marrone supported the WIldlife Conservation Society on June 6.

Kelsey Breining and Catherine Dewey fêted a good cause at the Central Park Zoo.

Padget Crossman and Eliza Whetzel caught up at the Central Park Zoo.

Alex Forrey, Andy DeWitt, David Hess, and Henry Cushin posed with Patrick McMullan on June 6.

Harrison Waterstreet and Lynden Volpe celebrated the work of saving wildlife and wild places.

Jennifer Cuminale and Alexandra Klestadt were among the 1,000 guests on June 6.

Tyler Gaffney, Milena Duke, Charlotte Woltz,

Chris Kempner, Jackie Rohrbach, and Meggie Kempner at

Sebastian Pinto-Thomaz and Natasha

and Mark Schillings at the Central Park Zoo.

the “Wonders of Southeast Asia” event.

Blodgett at the Central Park Zoo. J U LY 2 0 1 3 1 2 7 MONTH 2013 00


SNAPSHOT

This page: The balloons were just one of the fun little touches that Mark Addison provides each year; Hilary Rhoda at last year’s event (left inset); Steven Dann, Tara Rudes, Matthew Settle, and Laura Spencer (right inset).

WHEN IS A YARD SALE not a yard sale? When it’s in the Hamptons, dahling. Celebrating its 16th year, the Super Saturday sale and fundraiser is not where you’ll find cheap and rickety foldout tables sporting Grandma’s old thimble sitting next to an incomplete card deck. Instead, this grand garage sale has one-of-a-kind designer clothes, a kids carnival, a luxury raffle, and gourmet treats in Water Mill. Naturally, there is a good cause attached to the event—after all, nobody here wants for much. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund deservedly benefits from the proceeds. Hosts Kelly Ripa and Donna Karan draw a crowd of friends from the entertainment and fashion worlds, on top of the usual Hamptons sus128 QUEST

pects who come out from behind the trimmed hedges to have a good time snapping up high-quality designers for H&M prices. Entertainment guru Mark Addison is behind the chic-yetplayful atmosphere, making sure that every detail is fresh and fun. And for those who can’t get enough of his presentation mastery, he’s just created a new entertainment party series through his firm Eventstyle: Entertain U., which magically transforms any harried, overworked modern woman into the perfect hostess in minutes flat. So on July 27, Super Saturday 16 will be in the most capable hands. Just be prepared to see some manicured ones playing tug-of-war over particularly ravishing pieces. —Lily Hoagland

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

SUPER SWEET SIXTEEN


A NEW COUNTY HOUSE ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN & DECORATION BY WADIA ASSOCIATES

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN ~ INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION ~ LANDSCAPE DESIGN (203) 966-0048 ~ WADIAASSOCIATES.COM

SCAN TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF THIS AND OTHER CUSTOM DESIGNED HOMES


Jewelry for Generations No jewel is more feminine or mysterious than the pearl. The warmth of this Van Cleef & Arpels Lamballe Necklaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yellow gold perfectly complements the luminosity and LULGHVFHQFHRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;QH6RXWK6HDSHDUOGURSVFUHDWLQJDFODVVLFDOO\EHDXWLIXODQG romantic necklace. Matching earrings available to complete the suite.

The Betteridge Estate Collection

Quest July 2013  

The Summer Issue

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