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Nassau Point, NY SD #9. MLS# P1119082. $4,500,000. Donielle Cardinale, LAB, 631.298.0300, c.631.872.9558

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Muttontown, NY SD #3. MLS# 2527309. $3,250,000. Kathy Borg, LAB, 516.759.4800 ext.104 c.516.457.9656

Old Westbury SD# 2. MLS# 2475508. $3,488,000. Ellen Zipes, LAB, 516.626.7600 ext.15 Jared Zipes, LSP, 516.626.7600 ext.16

Sands Point, NY SD #4. MLS# 2534486. $2,950,000. Nava Mitnick, LAB, 516.883.2900 ext.103 Diane Goetze, LSP, 516.883.2900 ext.166

Sea Cliff, NY SD #1. MLS# 2520307. $2,199,000. Marilyn R. Jenney, LAB, 516.759.6822 ext.107, c.516.236.4278

Sea Cliff, NY SD #1. MLS# 2539692. $1,339,000. Paola Kanakaris, LSP, 516.674.2000 ext.109 c.516.635.7155

Nassau Point, NY SD #9. MLS# P1091758. $3,950,000. Donielle Cardinale, LAB, 631.298.0300, c.631.872.9558

Shelter Island, NY SD #1. MLS# 2475809. $3,250,000. Susan C. Cincotta, LAB, 631.749.1155 ext.207, c.631.514.9891

Shelter Island, NY SD #1. MLS# 2507380. $860,000. Susan C. Cincotta, LAB, 631.749.1155 ext.207, c.631.514.9891

Shelter Island Heights, NY SD #1. MLS# 2520843. $1,100,000. Susan C. Cincotta, LAB, 631.749.1155 ext.207, c.631.514.9891

Westhampton Beach, NY SD #2. MLS# 2518226. $799,000. Linda Mulrooney, LSP, 516.248.6655 Michael Foreman, LSP, 631.734.5439


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Jean Jean JeanDufy’s Dufy’s Dufy’shighly highly highlystylized stylized stylizedmanner manner mannerofof ofpainting painting paintingbecame became becamemore more moreand and andmore more morerecognizrecognizrecognizable. able. able.Th Th Th isisismomentum momentum momentumcontinued continued continuedtoto tobuild build builduntil until untilDufy Dufy Dufyachieved achieved achievedwidespread widespread widespreadrecogrecogrecognition nition nitionwith with withhis his hisexhibition exhibition exhibitionin in inParis Paris Parisatat atthe the theSalon Salon Salond’d’ d’ AAA utomne utomne utomnein in in1920. 1920. 1920.His His Hissubsequent subsequent subsequent artistic artistic artisticand and andfififi nancial nancial nancialsuccess success successallowed allowed allowedhim him himtoto topursue pursue pursuethemes themes themesthat that thathe he heloved, loved, loved,namely namely namely his his hisfamily family familyand and andthe the thearts. arts. arts.Dufy’s Dufy’s Dufy’sexploration exploration explorationofof ofthese these thesesubjects, subjects, subjects,including including includingperforming performing performing and and andvisual visual visualarts, arts, arts,led led ledhim him himtoto towork work workthat that thatwould would wouldeventually eventually eventuallybe be bedescribed described describedasas as“charmingly “charmingly “charmingly disarmingâ€? disarmingâ€? disarmingâ€?and and andhis his hisexhibitions exhibitions exhibitionsoft oft oft en en enopened opened openedwith with withcritical critical criticalacclaim acclaim acclaimand and andsold sold soldout. out. out. 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106

122

CONTENTS THE PALM B EAC H I SSUE 96

A SON'S LOVE

These Palm Beach duos (and trios) prove there’s no

denying the special relationship between mothers and sons. BY

106

ELIZABETH MEIGHER,

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

A RESORT FOR ALL SEASONS

LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

Pamela Fiori’s new book from Assouline is a visual

homage to the history, style, and spirit of Palm Beach.

110

HIGH SOCIETY

BY

D ANIEL C APPELLO

The Society of the Four Arts continues to enrich Palm Beach’s culture

with the new Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building.

116

110

PRODUCED

TEN DROPS IN MY PALM BEACH BUCKET

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

The author walks us through ten

Palm Beach “musts” worth adding to your bucket list. BY BINKIE ORTHWEIN

120

FUN IN DELRAY BEACH

122

ROLLS-ROYCE: THE SPIRIT OF ECSTASY

A look at Florida’s hopping party town.

WORTH IT ALL

Avenue.

BILL HUSTED

The undeniable legacy of one of the most

celebrated automobile companies in the world.

126

BY

BY

ELIZABETH Q UINN BROWN

Making the stops in our pick of shops along the fabled Worth

WRITTEN BY

ALEX R. TRAVERS,

PRODUCED BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

116


68

72

160

CONTENTS 72

C OLUMNS 18

SOCIAL DIARY

64

SOCIAL CALENDAR

68

HARRY BENSON

Learning the ropes back in the day with the “Queen of Palm Beach.”

70

OBSERVATIONS

On the rules of marriage and those of nature. BY TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

72

FRESH FINDS

80

CANTEENS

82

CULTURE

84

ART

88

SPORT

138

APPEARANCES

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

Current chronicles of the social swirl.

BY

D AVID P ATRICK COLUMBIA

Our guide to benefits and events, from New York to Palm Beach.

All you’ll ever need for Palm Beach. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Reservations are recommended—and required—at Table 26. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

Windsor, the “Village by the Sea” near Vero Beach, Florida, is celebrating its arts scene.

The European Fine Arts Fair in Maastricht, Holland, looks ahead to the next 25 years. Ralph Lauren dresses up the St. Moritz Polo World Cup on Snow.

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

From Palm Beach book parties to holiday lunches at Swifty’s. BY HILARY GEARY Bidding 2012 a fashionable farewell.

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Keeping it citrusy and bright at the Tropical Fruit Shop. BY LILY HOAGLAND


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EDITOR’S LETTER

The wild and the tame: The Palm Beach Zoo has a rare Malayan tiger among its many animals (above); a watercolor showing the more civilized side of the city (right).

I got wheels, I got Cutter spray / And a healthy sense of worth Half of me is the gasoline / But the other half’s the surf. —VAMPIRE WEEKEND WHILE NEW YORK FREEZES, the tropical beaches and sunny weather of Palm Beach beckon. Taking off from the cold grays of the city and landing in a bright festival of pink and turquoise does wonders for one’s well-being. And, what’s more, anywhere that both Michael Jackson and John Lennon at one point called home must be infused with some tremendous ch’i. But if you can’t make it down there this year, don’t fret: we’ll give you a metaphorical tour real enough to make you wiggle your toes and swear you feel sand. The best people to give a behind-the-scenes look are, naturally, the families of insiders who’ve known the who and the where of it all for generations. In last year’s Palm Beach Issue, we featured dads and their daughters, so it stands to reason that this year we look at the mirror relationship within the family structure: moms and their little princes. Because no matter how mature, cool, and tough a boy may become, it will only take one look from Mom to put him in his place. So that’s the “who” and, as for the “where,” Binkie Orthwein lists the top ten things to do around town—like visit the Rare Species Conservatory Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving global diversity, which teaches about high-profile, priority species that need protection. And while learning is its own reward, there’s the added bonus of being able to play with the animals! For a more relaxed program, Alex Travers flits in and out of the stores of Palm Beach and gives tips on the best places to splurge on a silk scarf, an eye-catching fabric for your pillows, or the work of a local artist. On the subject of art, the Society of the Four Arts has recently opened the Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building, where adults can get their creative mojo going with lectures, classes, and workshops on any medium from painting to 16 QUEST

sculpture to cooking. Lizzie Brown draws a pretty picture of the new space and inspires us to grab our palettes and paint the colors of the wind. And for those who would like to have this paradise laid out on their coffee table, Assouline offers In The Spirit of Palm Beach. Daniel Cappello flips through the gorgeous spreads that reminisce about the glory days when high society first established itself in the area. Palm Beach, the easternmost town in Florida, has many hidden gems to discover, and every year we unearth a few more treasures to add to our display. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Nickie Fanjul, wearing an Island Company shift, Stubbs & Wootton espadrilles, and Helga Wagner earrings, with her son Nicholas Fanjul, underneath the Tiki hut in the back of their residence in Palm Beach, Florida. Photograph by Lucien Capehart Photography.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY END OF THE YEAR in New

York. The autumn social season comes to a close by midDecember, when the private holiday parties take over the calendar. There were three major fund-raising events that stood out. The official end of the season was the New York Botanical Garden’s annual

Winter Wonderland Ball, a lovely dinner dance in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory. There are some traditions that remain steadfast in New York and this is one of them. It’s a black-tie evening and the women add a lot of glamour to the holiday luster. This year’s chairs were Byrdie Bell,

Alina Cho, Cristina Cuomo, Victoria Vargas D’Agostino, Nina Garcia, Emma Goergen, Patrick Herning, Alexandra Lebenthal, Christian Leone, Monique Lhuillier, Dalia Oberlander, Connie Anne Phillips, Alexandra Lind Rose, and Gillian Hearst Simonds. Of the two other memorable

evenings on the calendar was the Child Mind Institute’s third annual Child Advocacy Award Dinner, which was held at Cipriani 42nd Street. Not black-tie, so sans the “glamour,” but a rip-roaring success. $6.4 million was raised for the cause. I don’t recall ever attending a dinner

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Nicki Harris and Craig Shadur

David Mack with Jill and Sanford Sirulnick 18 QUEST

Lori Gendelman, Dorothy Kohl and Juliana Gendelman

Kate Ford, Ira Harris and Norma Tiefel

Roberta and Paul Kozloff

Phyllis Krock and Frank Chopin

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A that raised anywhere near that figure before. The enormous dinner hall was packed, wallto-wall. Among the guests: The Hon. Christine Quinn, Donald and Melania Trump, Dr. Ruth, Stephanie LaCava, Jared Kushner, Joan Granlund, Lisa and Michael Evans, Jenny and Michael Price, Rob Wiesenthal, Anne McNulty, Claude Wasserstein, Serena Altschul, Andrew Ross Sorkin, Vanessa and Henry Cornell, Kate and Robert Niehaus, Michael Gould, Molly Jong-Fast and Matthew Greenfield, Erica Jong and Ken Burrows, Anne Keating, Marcia and Richard Mishaan, Valerie Mnuchin and Bruce Moskowitz, John and Amy Phelan, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff, Frank Sciame, Lenard and Fern Tessler, Glenn Fuhrman, Dawn

Ostroff, and Linda and Arthur Carter. The chairs for the evening had a lot to do with that astounding success. The chairs were: Beth Fascitelli, Christine and Richard Mack, Julie and Edward Minskoff, Brooke Gerber and Daniel Neidich, Debra G. Perelman and Gideon M. Gil, and Preethi Krishna and Ram Sundaram. The night before, at another Cipriani (the one on Wall Street), the Museum of the Moving Image held its 27th annual “Salute,” honoring Hugh Jackman. This black-tie affair was a love fest with a starstudded roster of “presenters,” including Mike Nichols, Anne Hathaway, Eddie Redmayne, Rachel Weisz, Liev Schreiber, Christopher Nolan, Rachel Dratch, and Mrs. Jackman, a.k.a. Deborra-Lee Furness. The week before, we had

been touched with sorrow after the loss of two of city’s prominent citizens: Mona Ackerman and Saul Steinberg. Mona, who was only 66 when she died after a long battle with ovarian cancer, was known professionally as Dr. Mona Ackerman. She was a practicing psychotherapist and also wrote an advice column for the Huffington Post called “Dr. Mona Knows.” I was never a patient, but I am sure she was very good at her practice. She was a jolly-yet-serious, naturally empathic person—warm and gregarious—who made friends easily. She was also the daughter of Meshulam Riklis, who made millions or billions beginning in the “go-go” days of the 1960s stock market. Riklis generously provided his children with the wealth to live well and comfortably. Mona

had a big apartment on Fifth Avenue, across from the Met, and on occasion, she’d fill it with lots of friends. Her apartment, which she shared with her longtime companion, political commentator Richard Cohen, once belonged to Barbara Hutton, the nation’s first Poor Little Rich Girl. Nobody ever said “poor little Mona” when she was in her prime. They’d say, “Oh, yippee!” when an invitation arrived from her aerie, for she was famous among her friends for her gemütlich hosting and her Asian chef’s brilliant creations. The guest list was heavy on establishment media and investment banking. Mona made friends everywhere she went. She was one of those people you will find yourself telling everything to just as matter of course in

YO U N G N E W YO R K E R S FO R T H E P H I L H A R MO N I C

Chappy and Melissa Morris with Kyle Zerna

Ben Stapleton, Connie Brown and Jason Dillow 20 QUEST

Matan Eden and Fatima Sanandaji

Courtney Gerwin and Brandon Parks

Alice Campbell and Stefanos Kasselakis

Kirby Taylor and Henry Bodmer

L I N S LE Y L I N D E K I N S

Kate Bradbury and Lindsey Harper


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A V B E AU T É TO A ST E D I TS O N E - YE A R A N N I V E R S A R Y AT B E R G D O R F G O O D M A N

Catherine Billon, Philip Kessler and Leslie Carranza

the conversation. She was not overly inquiring. It was her vibe. Gemütlich. She wasn’t a party girl, although she had a spectacular venue for such and used it advantageously at times. She simply loved people. There are many today who will always remember her for her hospitality and her welcoming presence. Two days after Mona’s passing, Saul Steinberg, the legendary entrepreneur and financier, died in his sleep at his eastside townhouse. He was 73. Although his health and mobility had been seriously impaired 17 years prior in 1995, when he suffered a stroke, he had otherwise been in robust health. 22 QUEST

Julie Macklowe

Amy Kalaczynski, Annie Lai and Mariana Queiroz

Martha McCully and Heidi Wald

Saul Philip Steinberg was always a brilliant boy, born and bred in Brooklyn as the eldest of four children to Anne and Julian Steinberg. At 11, he was a world-class chess champion. He had the kind of mind that could easily comprehend and create programs, models, projections, profiles, integrations, simulations, strictures, systems, and— finally—computers. If he had been born only 10 years later, he very well might have been a resident genius in Silicon Valley. Such was his intellect. After graduating from U. Penn in 1959, he was 22 in 1961 when he burst upon the financial scene with the idea of acquiring second-generation computers—which, in those

days, were so huge they could occupy a space as large as a small gymnasium—and leasing them out to corporations. It sounds like a no-brainer today but at the time the future flourishing of computers was unimaginable to almost all. His initial idea came as a result of his instructor at Wharton asking him to write his senior thesis on the decline and fall of IBM, which was the hottest stock of the late ’50s and the ’60s. His research led him to conclude that his instructor was very wrong about the idea of the “decline and fall” of Big Blue. He later recalled: “I discovered that IBM was an incredible, fantastic, brilliantly conceived company with a

Maud Cabot and Cameron Silver

very rosy future.” His research convinced him that computers were the future, and that there was a lot of money to be made. IBM had been charging a 50 percent premium on rentals, which gave the lessee the privilege of returning the machine before the end of the lease. Saul signed up clients for nonrefundable long-term leases at reduced rates. Financed by his father, Julian Steinberg, and his uncle, Michael Steinberg, he called it the Ideal Leasing Company. They set up shop in a tiny 200square-foot cement space in a loft in the lowest rent district of Brooklyn. Within four years, he built a company, renamed Leasco, with assets of $7.9 million.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Meaghen Stark and Giovanni Lucchetti


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E N E W Y O R K C I T Y O P E R A ’ S F A L L L U N C H E O N A T T H E C A R LY L E

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00 QUEST

Mary Libby and Susan Stamell

Three years after that, it was the world’s largest independent computer services company with 8,500 employees in 50 countries and assets of more than $1 billion. When it went public in 1965, Leasco became one of the hottest stocks of the “go-go” years of the Sixties. Using the company’s stock for leverage, the Wunderkind of Wall Street was soon expanding. Now personally worth $60 million—or 10 times that in today’s currency—he made a bid for the Chemical Bank, then the fifth-largest bank in the country with assets of $8.5 billion. The bid caused a sensation, considering the bidder, who was then regarded as a crass upstart from the wrong side of the tracks, meaning the wrong side of the class. The forces of the then heavily WASP establishment put the kibosh on Saul Steinberg’s plan. It was a lesson. “I learned that there really was an establishment,” he

Heather Randall and George Steel

later commented. The foray put him on the map, however, as a force to be reckoned with. Running the debt-free, expanding enterprise Leasco, he realized that insurance companies had deep pools of cash. This is what computer leasing companies needed. He discovered Reliance Insurance Company, a 150-yearold fire, life, and casualty company in Philadelphia with assets of $700 million and annual revenues of more than a quarter of a billion dollars. It was ten times the size of Leasco. In 1968, at 29, Saul Steinberg acquired Reliance. The takeover increased his personal wealth substantially, giving him the opportunity to continue making acquisitions, including Penn Central Transportation Company (the railroad holding company with a wealth of commercial real estate) and Flying Tiger Airlines, which he eventually sold to FedEx. These deals brought him tens

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

The annual dinner dance benefits the Lifesaver Scholarship Fund and provides vital financial assistance to individuals and families seeking treatment for alcoholism and chemical dependency at Caron Renaissance and Hanley Center, who could not otherwise afford it.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E A S S O C I AT E S C OM M I T T E E O F T H E L E N OX H I L L N E I G H B O R H O O D H O U S E H O ST E D I TS FA L L B E N E F I T AT A R M A N I

Christopher Spitzmiller and David Duncan

of millions in profits and established him as a “corporate raider” par excellence. In1984, he made a famous attempt on Disney, which brought the word “greenmail” into the financial lexicon. The Disney attempt was not completed successfully but Saul Steinberg walked away with a $60 million profit on his attempt. In 1984, he was named on the initial Forbes “400 List” with a fortune of over $200 million. He had also made his entire family rich: his brother, Robert, his two sisters, his mother, and his children. That same year the already twicemarried financial mogul gave a dinner party. Among others, 26 QUEST

Mary Van Pelt and John Royall

Kamie Lightburn and Guy Harley

he invited his friend Richard Feigen, the art dealer, who brought along a friend of his, Gayfryd Johnson, a 35-yearold businesswoman from New Orleans. Saul took one look and immediately switched place cards at the table, seating Gayfryd next to him. It was a coup de foudre and they married the same year. This was the roaring ’80s, the days of Nouvelle Society. Together, Saul and Gayfryd Steinberg cut a wide swath among the dazzling crowd of bankers, socialites, and philanthropists in New York. With Gayfryd’s leadership and guidance, he became involved with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Public

Henry and Whitney Topping

Stewart Manger and Kristen Swenson

Harry Heissmann and Diana Quasha

Library, and PEN, among other organizations. Then, in 1995, fate struck the charmed life. He had a stroke. He was only 56 and was able to overcome much of the impairment, though never entirely. The portentousness of his misfortune was not initially apparent, but the next few years demanded focus on recovery. What followed naturally was a decline in the man’s business activity. In 2000, Saul Steinberg retired from Reliance, installing his brother, Robert, as CEO. The fortunes of Reliance were already waning and, by 2001, the 184-year-old company had filed for bankruptcy. What followed was a mass

divestiture of Saul and Gayfryd Steinberg’s personal property. Their great triplex apartment at 740 Park Avenue was famously sold to Stephen and Christine Schwarzman for a record price of $31 million. Its contents were put up for auction at Sotheby’s, fetching many more millions. To pay the pressing debt, even their world-class collection of Old Masters went on the block. The “downsizing” was highly publicized, marking the end of a great 20th century saga of New York and the financial world. Or so it seemed. The couple moved to a three-bedroom rental on the Upper East Side. But, along with his

C U T T Y M CG I LL

Cindy Ketchum, Heather Georges and Dana Schiff


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A brilliance, Saul Steinberg had been blessed with a very special good luck. The beautiful Gayfryd, impeccable hostess, member of bestdressed lists, mother of their daughter, Holden, and their adopted son, Rayne, took over the reins for the family and managed her husband’s health. As those who knew the couple—and as those who didn’t know the couple assumed—they were defeated (and broke). But Gayfryd, the former executive who once ran her own company, rose to the occasion. Within a few years, Saul’s impairment had improved from rehabilitation. He was able to walk and get around. They acquired a townhouse on the East Side which Gayfryd, herself very handy with a hammer and nails, staplers, and paintbrushes, renovated

into a comfortable and elegant abode for her husband and their family. Although he would never work again, Saul began to get out and about again, making regular strolls through the neighborhood with a friend. Surrounded by his books, his children—and their spouses and children—by the family dogs and his in-laws, Saul never foundered. He declared, whenever asked, that he had never felt better or happier in his life. The great big life he made was now merely a memory. However, Gayfryd had made a new home for him—a haven where he passed his days in a serene atmosphere, buoyed by his intellectual interests and his books. The marriage was his saving grace, a perfect dénouement to a spectacular career of fame and fortune.

When he passed away in his sleep in his bedroom on that Friday morning, Saul Steinberg was already a man at peace. On the Monday afternoon of Christmas Eve, Archivia, my favorite bookstore for browsing (and buying), closed for good, much to the chagrin of many of its loyal customers. Aside from the astronomical commercial rents on the Upper East Side, which make it almost impossible for any small retailer to run in the black, Archivia was suffering the economic tortures of the publishing damned caused by Amazon.com. Everything had been further exacerbated by the appearance of the Kindle. Perhaps printed books on paper will become entirely obsolete, and therefore valuable collector’s items. I could mourn those facts because I love bookstores and

I love books. But such is the progress, if that is the correct word, of the technological age—an age in which is it presumed that there are infinite planetary and inter-planetary power sources to keep our machines running so that we can read, learn, communicate, and progress. Infinitely. Cynthia Conigliaro, who founded Archivia, had a good business and a good location. However, in the book business, she could not obtain the discounts or the advertising help from publishers that she needed to keep her product moving as voluminously as needed to compete with Amazon.com. A couple of Christmases ago, one of her wealthier clients wanted to buy 50 copies of one particular coffee-table book to gift to friends. She wanted a discount. Cynthia figured that

T H E A M E R I C A N AU ST R I A N FO U N D AT I O N H O ST E D M U S I C FO R M E D I C I N E AT C A R N EG I E H A L L

Thomas and Eleanor Fahey 28 QUEST

Katharine Eltz-Aulitzky and Dieter Flury

Dominic and Nella Habsburg

Donald D’Amico and Susan Binder

Joel Bell and Marife Hernandez

William and Melinda vanden Heuvel

S TA R B L AC K

Thomas and Diahn McGrath


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Tom Llamas

Alison Dwyer and Josh Santry

Betsy Kilmartin and Jennifer Gallivan

Raj Narayan

she could give the customer a 5-percent discount, covering everything but leave not a penny of profit. I’m sorry, the customer replied, but I’ll have to go to Amazon.com. And so she did, saving at least $1,500. Fifteen-hundred smackers! The savings could go to: a small quantity of the fuel for her private jet, assisting the monthly utility bill on one of her several houses, paying for the Social Security tax on her various household staffs, helping with the insurance on her multimillion-dollar art collection, etc. She was only being practical. One of the ironies of our “expanding” consumer society is that, in its expansion via the World Wide Web, it is subsuming the elements of community that we’ve known for the past several thousand years—those places where you see other human beings, neighbors, friends, strangers. Up until now, people have flourished in communities with social contact and presence.

Lorraine Bracco and Penny Marshall

Patricia and Bradley Van Nostrand

Much of this is disappearing in the name of convenience. Convenience seems to be the father of our modern social dilemma, between faulted communication, a lack of community, and the extinction of what has come to be called Manners but is fundamentally Courtesy. The glue that keeps us together as a society is drying up. Meanwhile, outside my windows as I write this, there is a power source that is indeed infinite: Mother Nature is howling, blowing the last of the leaves from the trees along the side streets of the city, washing the sidewalks and the roadways, and getting us ready for the new day dawning in just a few hours. On Christmas Eve, I went to the annual buffet dinner that Nan and Gay Talese give at their Upper East Side townhouse with their daughters Pamela and Catherine as co-hosts. The Taleses are a remarkable New York family, by which I mean an immensely

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A talented family with a large presence in the public mind due not only to their talents, but their bonhomie. Gay is, of course, the famous writer, famous for his bestsellers of contemporary 20th-century American life. Nan is one of the New York publishing world’s most important editors with her own imprint at Doubleday. They are both, separately and together, very cordial and friendly people. They’ve been giving this party on Christmas Eve for years and it seems that many of the guests have been coming for that long. Jill Krementz told me that she and her late husband, Kurt Vonnegut, first started sharing the evening’s

festivities with Nan and Gay way back when they were newly married. Now, they have been married for more than 50 years, which is hard to grasp when you consider their youthfulness and spirited wit when in their company. The evening is a favorite of mine because it nourishes those fantasies of aspiration that I had in my youth about New York cocktail parties with their literary contexts and subtexts. An author and a book editor would, naturally, be surrounded by literary people. Wow. Among the guests: Frank Stella and Mrs. Stella, the Hoges, Jim and Kathy, Warren and Olivia, David Margolick,

Jules Pfeiffer, Chuck Pfeifer and Mrs. Pfeifer, Anne Roiphe, Shirley Lord Rosenthal (up from Washington, D.C., with his wife), Peter Heywood, Jim Hoagland without Jane Stanton Hitchcock, who was home nursing a petit mal de tête, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Toni Goodale, Vartan Gregorian, Jim and Ene Greenfield, Charlie Rose, Joel Grey, Barbara and Michael Gross, Elke Gazarra with her adored little dachshund, Doctors Mitch and Sarah Rosenthal, Jonathan Foer, Adele Grossman, Anne and Jim Sitrick, Kati Marton, and Kathy Sloane. It was a merry Christmas Eve.

More festivities. The day after Christmas in West Palm Beach, Beth Rudin DeWoody and Firooz Zahedi were married before family and friends at her family compound, overlooking Lake Worth and Palm Beach. Beth is the popular contemporary art collector, the daughter of the late Gladyce Begelman and Lewis Rudin, who was one of the great New Yorkers of his age. The Iranian-born Firooz is the famous photographer who has lived in this country since the beginning of the revolution in Iran in the 1970s and has been making his home in Los Angeles. The new Mrs. Zahedi also has homes in New York and Southampton.

T H E C I N E M A S O C I E T Y H O ST E D T H E P R E M I E R E O F STA N D U P G UYS W I T H A N A F T E R - PA R T Y AT T H E O A K R O OM AT T H E P L A Z A

Anne and Griffin Dunne 32 QUEST

Chuck Zito and Gina Gershon

Addison Timlin

Sam Rockwell and Fisher Stevens

Al Pacino

Martin Bregman and James Lipton

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Christopher Walken


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A H O L I D AY PA R T Y AT T H E M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K

Juliet Arrieta with Isabelle and Tristan

Friday, December 28, 2012. A week before—10 years ago—Johnny Galliher died “peacefully in his sleep” in New York, according to his death notice in the New York Times. He was 88. On the afternoon before Christmas Eve, I ran into a mutual friend of John’s and mine, Billy Norwich, who told me that he’d just reread the “In Memoriam” that I wrote about John a few days after he died. I’d forgotten about the piece and so I went back to look to see what I had written (and how it had held up). He was a most unusual person, the likes of whom I’d never met before. Although no stranger to the world known as 34 QUEST

Courtney Kuriger and Tate Hardy with Paige and Ivy

Courtney Belhumeur with Christian

The Comfort children, Margaux, John-Jay, and Stuyvesant

“society” in the 20th century, he was the kind of character you’d read about in a novel but never the type you’d ever hope to meet. Here is the piece: January 7, 2003—John Galliher died in his sleep on the Saturday before Christmas at his apartment on East 63rd Street here in New York. He was 88 and had been ailing with pancreatic cancer, a condition he learned about a little less than five months before. He told very few about his condition. He accepted it, put his house in order, even to the point of writing his death notice which appeared a few days later in the New York Times stating that he had

Shirin Christoffersen with Claudia

The Jacob children, Cecilia, Sharon, and Georgia, with Ameilia Montgomery

“died peacefully.” He was known to his multitude of friends down through the decades, as Johnny, Johnny Galliher (pronounced Gal-yer), or occasionally Johnny G. He was a unique combination of characteristics and qualities—easily said but rarely so in life—difficult to define. His old friend of more than 50 years, Tony Hail, the San Francisco interior designer, had put it most succinctly for the many friends who survived him. “He was fun to know.” He was the kind of man who, if he didn’t have something nice to say—or amusing, which might be more like it with him—he said nothing. Ever. Yet he navigated skillfully,

and with pleasure, for more than 60 years, through a world where bitchery and malice can be commonplace and lethal. Instead, for him there was often a smile on his face, or if not, then the obvious promise of one. He was born in Washington, D.C., on May 24, 1914, the second son of five children. He was handsome, from childhood to manhood. Not tall—about 5’9’’—but slender, almost slight but sinewy, and with a thick head of curly black hair that turned a whitegray in his later years, and bright blue eyes. As a late teenager, the coltishly handsome young man was a favorite of one

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Alison Strong with Henry and Elby McKay


William R. Eubanks I N T E R I O R D E S I G N, I N C.

www.williamreubanks.com 340 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach, Fl. 561-805-9335 New York, NY 212-753-1842


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A J AC K I E W E L D D R A K E H E L D A PA R T Y FO R C A S I TA M A R I A AT R O B E R TO C AVA L L I

Alessandro and Fe Fendi

of Washington’s leading hostesses, Evalyn Walsh McLean, the fabled owner of the Hope Diamond, and her daughter, also named Evalyn. He and young Evalyn often went out together, and if the evening were formal, her mother would often insist that she wear the Hope Diamond. As soon as they were away from the house, young Evalyn would take it off and give to John to put in his pocket. The whole transaction, he recalled 70 years later, made him very nervous. He was firstly worried about possibly losing the legendary rock that was worth a small fortune and secondly, (or maybe even firstly) he was afraid that its reputation for bringing tragedy and loss would affect him too. 36 QUEST

Jonathan Marder, Catherine Petree and Laurent Biron

Jackie Weld Drake and Agnes Gund

After high school and college (Lehigh University), he served in Europe during the Second World War as a naval officer with the rank of lieutenant. After the War, he moved to Los Angeles, where he shared a house in Beverly Hills with Diana Barrymore, daughter of John Barrymore and Michael Strange (a nom de plume for Oelrichs). By his early twenties, John’s path in life was beginning to take direction. It was on a sidewalk in Beverly Hills, where one day he ran into Lady Mendl, Elsie de Wolfe, whom he’d already known. Learning that he was “new” in town, she asked if there were anyone he’d like to meet. He told her he couldn’t think of anybody, that he’d already met

Adrienne Vittadini

Dimity de Milberg and Kirat Young

so many. Then he thought of Garbo, already a legend. “That might be difficult,” John later recalled Lady Mendl saying. A few days later, he got a call from Lady Mendl’s secretary inviting him for cocktails. He expressed his regrets that he already had a previous engagement on that day. “Break it,” she said emphatically. So he did. The following Tuesday, he went over to Lady Mendl’s Mediterranean villa behind the Beverly Hills Hotel, where he found waiting: Lady Mendl, Cary Grant, Marlene Dietrich, and Greta Garbo. In 1948, he went to work in Paris for the Marshall Plan and worked out of (if not for) the Department of Protocol in

William Ivey Long

the American Embassy. It was a charmed life and was thus to remain so for the rest of his life. He walked with a brisk, yet unassuming gait, an almostjaunt, and an almost musical swing to his arms. There was often a smile on his face, and also always the characteristic kindly wrinkles in his brow. As a young man, he was already displaying a mature, yet rare talent: the talent for enjoying life. In his mid-thirties, he knew and/or met everybody, from Cocteau and Gertrude Stein to the Windsors, and everybody in between. There were Rothschilds and Mona von Bismarck (Mrs. Harrison Williams), there was Cole Porter and Elsa Maxwell and Noel Coward and Errol Flynn and Rock Hudson. He dined

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Susan Gutfreund and Edgar Batista


Cristina Condon 561.301.2211 cristina.condon.@sothebyshomes.com

EXQUISITE PALM BEACH PROPERTIES

LAKEFRONT ESTATE | $38,000,000 7 Bedrooms, 8 Baths, 5 Half Baths | WEB: 0075170

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PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Suite 337 | Palm Beach, FL 33480 561.301.2211 | cristina.condon@sothebyshomes.com | cristinacondon.com Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A at Marie Laure Noailles’. All the world was coming to Paris. He was entertained and was entertained by Barbara Hutton and her cousin Jimmy Donahue, with Fulco Verdura, with Elsa Schiaparelli, Arturo and Patricia Lopez-Wilshaw, Aly Khan, Rita Hayworth, Daisy Fellowes, and Porfirio Rubirosa. He had a luminous notoriety giving him great allure for being highly desirable in many ways. Not only charming, handsome, and fun to be with, he also had a great reputation as a lover. Of both sexes. More than a few reveled in the telling of Diana Barrymore’s famous description of him being “well-bred and welleverything else.” Paris in those days was, he

recalled to me, “the best place in the world to be, the most exciting, creative era. Everyone wanted to go there. There were many different sectors of Paris life that one could see.” We can safely assume he saw them all. In the following years, his life took on the pattern of early jetsetters, traveling frequently between Paris, London, and New York, with trips to the resorts, to yachts on the Mediterranean, to Mexico, to Jamaica. At one point, he kept the apartment in Paris, a house in London, and an apartment in New York. He worked for a time with Hubert de Givenchy at the beginning of his design career. Givenchy did not speak English and John spoke French beautifully. With his linguistic and social talents he

served as a “liaison” for the rising designer. Very popular, highly sought after, enigmatic, he was a mystery to most who knew him, even with those who’d know him for decades. He was discreet in a way that is almost unknown in today’s world. Many make the claim but few can actually accommodate the title. He did not divulge or break confidences, and he had many to keep. One might learn how he felt about someone or something only by observing his reaction carefully: if he were to laugh, or lower his chin and turn his face away with a wave of the hand—a very characteristic action. Always a “gent” in attitude and bearing toward others; always courteous and kindly toward everybody, this rare

quality is even rarer in the circles John traveled in. In his long life, he had seen many rise from often humble beginnings to great fortunes accumulated or married into. He’d also seen many fall from grace and, with his incisive sensitivity, he often sympathized. In the 1960s, he bought a house in London in Chester Square. In the following years, he bought and redid several houses, making a tidy sum from the business. While the haute monde and the demimondaine were always in proximity, there were also the worlds of the arts, the theatre and show business open to him (he loved music and was a very close friend of Lena Horne and Bobby Short, to name only two among many). In his sixties, he sold his

A S H O P P I N G E V E N T FO R S AV E V E N I C E AT A N G E L O G A L A S S O I N N E W YO R K

Nathalie Kaplan and Karen Lamb

Gillian Miniter and Adelina Wong Ettelson 38 QUEST

Alexandra Lind Rose

Andrea Danese, Gianluca Galletto and Nick Ferman

Inga Ramos with Joelle Maslaton and Avi Oster

Mary Snow

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Martha O’Brien and Lisa Bytner


It’s time you met the “& Company.” Frank Crystal & Company, one of the world’s leading strategic risk and insurance advisors, is now Crystal & Company. Yes, a new name. But at crystalco.com, you’ll see something that isn’t new. Tough-minded, talented professionals who are beholden to no one but their clients. And that’s not about to change.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA L M B E AC H P R E S E R VAT I O N FO U N D AT I O N ’ S A N N UA L C H R I ST M A S PA R T Y

John and Liz Schuler

properties abroad and settled in New York. Although no one thought of him as a rich man, he was well known to be rich in friends, some of whom bestowed their riches on him. When Billy McCarty-Cooper knew he was dying he settled a lifetime annuity of $50,000 a year on John, in thanks for John’s generous friendship at the beginning of McCarty’s adult life. In New York, he was the ideal extra man. Keeping up with the times, always aware of the changing tastes, the changing crowds and attitudes, he did not suffer fools gladly nor accommodate rudeness. Instead he avoided both whenever possible, and when not, he removed himself quickly. He was always interested in the fashions of 40 QUEST

Elizabeth Murphy and Scott Moses

Jane and Will Tylander with Rikki Klaus and Alan Jardeleza

younger people; so much so that he was never at loss for the company of new people who wanted to be with him, for he continued to fascinate in the same way he had all his life. He loved to play cards. At the card table a different side of Johnny Galliher came out. For this man who’d made an art of living a life unfettered by temperament, hated to lose. Though games were most often played for money, a penny a point, a dollar a point, and it was never a question of stakes. He simply hated losing and could get very angry, openly at his partner if he thought they’d played an especially bad hand. His temper at losing was so out of character that friends easily sloughed it off with a laugh, albeit sometimes

Penny and Keith Williams

Philip Nicozisis and Stephanie Rockwell

feigned. For they always remained cowed by it. In those last few years, he was seen around New York, attending theater, movies, opera, ballet. Three times a week he walked the thirty blocks from his apartment on East 63rd Street to the pool in the Asphalt Green on York and 92nd Street, for an hour’s swim, and then walked back home. To the world, it seemed that the levity of youth remained his. So it came as a surprise to those who knew him, to learn that just before the Christmas holiday, he had been gravely ill and had died. He lived comfortably, with style, although modestly, the last years of his life. He went to sleep that Saturday night in his apartment and he never woke up. He had avoided

hospitalization throughout his brief illness and although he accepted very few invitations in the last few weeks, three days before his death, he did make a lunch at La Grenouille of a young close friend he’d acquired in the last few years. People were very surprised to learn that he’d left an estate of close to $2 million to 35 friends from all walks of life, including those he hadn’t seen much of, if at all, in years. He left each $25,000, tax-free. There were many who needed it—as he knew. The remainder of his fortune was left to God’s Love We Deliver, City Harvest, and the Gay Men’s Health Crisis. He loved life and it loved him back, with grace, many good friends and many good times. u

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Bruce Langmaid, Debbie Caplenor and Charles Poole


Own a piece of paradise. Palm Beach.

209 Bermuda Lane • Palm Beach 3 Bedrooms / 3 Baths / 3,176± SqFt $2,950,000 John O. Pickett III 561.301.5266 jpickett@barrettwelles.com

251 Kenlyn Road • Palm Beach 3 Bedrooms / 3.5 Baths / 3,652± SqFt $2,490,000 KC Pickett / Terry Bankey 561.676.2874 / 561.779.5553 kcpickett@barrettwelles.com tbankey@barrettwelles.com

420 Royal Palm Way // Suite 300 // Palm Beach, FL 33480 • 561.899.2400 • barrettwelles.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

NEW YORK, NATIONAL HAS YOU COVERED

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Wesley and Dianne Card with Wayne Kulkin 00 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E C O C O N U TS ’ 8 1 ST A N N UA L N E W YE A R ’ S E V E PA R T Y I N PA L M B E AC H

Peter and Ann Summers

Erin and Richard Cowell

India Paull and Joanne Paull

Bingo Gubelmann, Bettina Anderson and Win Lapham 44 QUEST

Robert Surtees, Willie Surtees and Nicholas Surtees

Michael McCarty, Girard Brownlow and Piper Quinn

The members of the Coconuts

Sarah Gates and Alex Ives

Laddy and Dede Merck with Blair Meyer

Carol Mack, David Koch, Earl Mack and Julia Koch

Troy and Debbie Maschmeyer

Gigi and Harry Benson

Jon Ylvisaker

Will and Jean Matthews

David Ober

Kane and Mary Baker

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Nickie and Alex Fanjul


Fite Shavell Associates Fite Shavell && Associates Fite Shavell & Associates LuxuryProperties Propertiesininthe thePalm PalmBeaches Beaches Luxury Luxury Properties in the Palm Beaches

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528BALD BALDEAGLE EAGLEDRIVE DRIVEn nJUPITER JUPITER 528

n PALM BEACH n JUPITER 577 SOUTH ROAD 528 BALD DRIVE Masterful renovation ofCOUNTY this 1938 Volk Bermuda Classic in the estate section. One One largesthomes homesinEAGLE inEstate Estatesection section Trump NationalGolf GolfClub. Club. Masterful renovation of this 1938 Volk Bermuda Classic in the estate section. of of thethelargest of ofTrump National Masterful renovation ofnear this 1938Ave. Volk Classic in2801 the estate section. 5BR/6.5B One of theSmart largest homes in8,000 Estate section ofWeb Trump National Golf Club. Conveniently located Worth Ave. & beach. Web 2801 $5.75M 5BR/6.5B Smart house with 8,000 total Web 2793 $3.395M Conveniently located near Worth &Bermuda beach. Web IDID $5.75M house with total SF.SF. IDID 2793 $3.395M Conveniently located near Worth Ave. &Lynn beach. Web ID 2801 $5.75M Susan 5BR/6.5B Smart house with 8,000 total SF. Web ID 2793 $3.395M Gary Little 561.309.6379 Lynn Warren 561.346.3906 Susan DeSantis 561.301.4888 Gary Little 561.309.6379 Warren 561.346.3906 DeSantis 561.301.4888 Gary Little 561.309.6379 Lynn Warren 561.346.3906 Susan DeSantis 561.301.4888

812 MARBELLA LANEn nHYPOLUXO HYPOLUXOISLAND ISLAND 3800N.N.OCEAN OCEANDRIVE DRIVE#750 #750n nSINGER SINGERISLAND ISLAND 812 E.E. MARBELLA LANE 3800 n HYPOLUXO ISLAND n SINGER ISLAND 812 E. MARBELLA LANE 3800 N. OCEAN DRIVE #750 Amazing wide water views from 4BR/4.2BA home with deep water Resort Resort Singer Island 3BR/3.5BA floor apartment. Designer decorated. Amazing wide water views from thisthis 4BR/4.2BA home with deep water at at Singer Island 3BR/3.5BA 7th7th floor apartment. Designer decorated. Amazing widegreat water views from this 4BR/4.2BA home with$1.699M deep water Resort at Singer Island 3BR/3.5BA 7th floor apartment. decorated. dock. Oversized great room pool with cabana. Web ID 2792 $1.699M Floorto to ceilingswindows windows withfullfullOcean Ocean views. WebIDDesigner ID2795 2795$1.15M $1.15M dock. Oversized room && pool with cabana. Web ID 2792 Floor ceilings with views. Web dock. Oversized great room & pool with cabana. Web ID 2792 $1.699M Floor to ceilings windows with full Ocean views. Web ID 2795 $1.15M Jack Elkins 561.373.2198 Bunny Hiatt 561.818.6044 Susan Susan DeSantis 561.301.4888 Jack Elkins 561.373.2198 Bunny Hiatt 561.818.6044 DeSantis 561.301.4888 Jack Elkins 561.373.2198 Bunny Hiatt 561.818.6044 Susan DeSantis 561.301.4888

561.655.6570 561.655.6570 561.655.6570 101 North County Road 101 North County Road 101 North County Road Palm Beach, Florida 33480 Palm Beach, Florida 33480 Palm Beach, Florida 33480

© 2013 Shavell & Associates © 2013 FiteFite Shavell & Associates © 2013 Fite Shavell & Associates

www.FITESHAVELL.com www.FITESHAVELL.com www.FITESHAVELL.com

561.694.6550 561.694.6550 561.694.6550 11237US USHighway Highway1 1 11237 11237 US Highway 1 33408 North Palm Beach,Florida Florida 33408 North Palm Beach, North Palm Beach, Florida 33408


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E ST H O ST E D H O L I D AY C O C K TA I L S AT D E G R I S O G O N O O N M A D I S O N AV E N U E

Giovanni Mattera and Michele Heary

Evelyn Tompkins, Grace Meigher and Joan Levy

James Little and Jay Gunther

46 QUEST

Kirk Henckels and Kathy Sloane

Gordon Von Broock and Emel Dilek

Robert Forbes, Martha Kramer and Daniel Morales

Roric Tobin, Amy Hoadley and Geoffrey Bradfield

Alexa Winner

Jean Shafiroff

Scott Fishkinz and Tatiana Shoan

Emma Snowdon Jones and Kate Hemphill

Richard McIntosh and CeCe Cord

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Denise de Luca and John Wilson


3485 NORTH SAVANNAH DRIVE $5,895,000

10020 RENFREW AVENUE $3,750,000

10640 SAVANNAH DRIVE $2,995,000

10540 FIFE AVENUE 4 BEDROOMS, 3 FULL AND 1 HALF BATHS

$2,195,000

Nestled between two beautiful green spaces, this property enjoys a unique location within the village and its well-conceived plan takes complete advantage of the setting. With its superb golf course views and thoughtful design, this exceptional residence enjoys all the benefits of a central location.

3075 HURLINGHAM WAY $1,075,000 A PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL SPORTING CLUB 772 388 8400 OR 800 233 7656 VERO BEACH, FLORIDA WWW.WINDSORFLORIDA.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E FO O D A L L E R G Y B A L L AT T H E W A L D O R F = A STO R I A

Hugh Sampson and Rosanna Mirante with Neil and Nancy Minikes and Amie McKenna

Abbey and Steve Braverman 48 QUEST

John Lehr, Heather Bresch and David Koch

Drew Nieporent

Florence and Richard Fabricant

Liana and Arthur Backal

The atmosphere at the ball

Nina Davidson

Judy and Todd Slotkin

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tamara Tweel with Stephen and Sharyn Mann


NORTH LAKE WAY $8,800,000 | WEB: 0075474 5 Bedrooms, 5.5 Baths Cristina Condon 561.301.2211

DOUBLE OCEANFRONT PENTHOUSE $5,800,000 | WEB: 0075888 6 Bedrooms, 7 Baths, 2 Half Baths Heather Woolems 561.301.0928

GORGEOUS GEORGIAN $5,450,000 | WEB: 0075224 5 Bedrooms, 6 Baths, 3 Half Baths W. Turner 561.301.2060, C. Weitzman 561.818.5475

Expect Expertise ONLY WITH US Precise valuation. Deep market knowledge. Exceptional experience.

CALYPSO PALMS RIVERFRONT ESTATE $3,450,000 | WEB: 0075834 6 Bedrooms, 5 Baths, 2 Half Baths

ENCHANTING MEDITERRANEAN $2,500,000 | WEB: 0075258

4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, 2 Half Baths

WEST INDIES BERMUDA $2,450,000 | WEB: 0075886 4 Bedrooms, 4 Baths

Doc Ellingson 772.229.2929, D. Ellingson 772.284.1111

C. Koeppel 561.329.0019, B. Koeppel 561.310.8494

P. Mahaney 561.352.1066, C. Condon 561.301.2211

IMPORTANT INTOWN LIVING $2,300,000 | WEB: 0075876 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths with guest house

400 BUILDING $2,195,000 | WEB: 0075743 2 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths Dragana Connaughton 561.379.5467

NORTH END BERMUDA $1,995,000 | WEB: 0075617 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths +staff bed and bath

M. Boykin 561.379.3767, C. Poorman 404.307.3315

PALM BEACH BROKERAGE 340 Royal Poinciana Way Suite 337 | Palm Beach, FL 33480 sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach | 561.659.3555 Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

S. Van Pelt 561.379.4759, C. Condon 561.301.2211


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E C H I L D R E N ’ S C A N C E R A N D B L O O D FO U N D AT I O N ’ S B R E A K T H R O U G H B A L L AT T H E P L A Z A

Peter Marsh, Pam Posner and Erika Marsh

Craig Kallman, Michael Kushner and Bob Roth

Heather and Cliff Robinson

Ron Iervolino, Nancy Raquet and John Cook

David and Liz Sherman

Julie Commings, Denise Ilitch and Lisa Murray

T I P P I N G P O I N T C OM MU N I T Y ’ S A W A R D S B R E A K FA ST I N S A N F R A N C I S C O

50 QUEST

JaMel and Tom Perkins

Danielle Delansky and Angela O’Conner

Hosain Rahman and Abby Durban

H E AT H E R W I LE Y O F D R E W A LT I Z E R P H OTO G R A P H Y ( B E LO W )

Emily Lambert and Frish Brandt

Daniel Lurie and Brian Lurie

S T E P H A N I E B A D I N I ; J O N AT H A N Z I E G LE R ( A B OV E ) ;

Lisa Congdon, Katie Paige and Katy Wiliams


CHARLOTTE KELLOGG for the Palm Beach Lifestyle

Jewelry by Helga Wagner

256 Worth Avenue • Amore Courtyard • Palm Beach (561) 820-2407 332 South County Road • Palm Beach (561) 820-2402 charlottekellogg@aol.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E W I N T E R W O N D E R L A N D B A L L AT T H E N E W YO R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N

Julia Moore and Elizabeth Hartnett

Derek Blasberg, Byrdie Bell and Peter Brant, Jr.

Susan Krysiewicz and Kim Hicks 52 QUEST

Alina Cho

Dori Cooperman, Liz Cohen and Fotini Copeland

Brittany Weeden, Jessica Danisavage, Lauren Davenport, Alecta Hill and Jordan Nystrom

Gigi Stone and Dendy Engelman

Jay Zuckerman and Wendy Svarre

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Dalia Oberlander


LOLA

JAHJA

ASTANOVA

LING

TWO GREAT VIRTUOSOS

Ms. Astanova’s photo is by Nancy Ellison Copyright 2011 Nancy Ellison / Polaris

TWO TIMELESS CONCERTOS

TCHAIKOVSKY PIANO CONCERTO NO.1

RACHMANINOFF PIANO CONCERTO NO.2

SMETAnA. THREE DANCES FROM “THE BARTERED BRIDE”

THE ORCHESTRA OF ST. LUKE’S

ALICE TULLY HALL AT LINCOLN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23 AT 7:30PM

For tickets call 212.721.6500

Event partner


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U C Y MU S S O H O ST E D A C O C K TA I L PA R T Y FO R T H E PA L M B E AC H H O S P I C E G A L A

Gail and Ted Cooney

Bill and Kit Pannill 54 QUEST

Rod and Cece Titcomb

Pat Cook and Bob Nederlander

Lucy Musso and Lora Dodge

Talbott Maxey and Dan Ponton

Melinda Hassen and Barbara Bryant

Eddy and John Taylor

Michele Kessler and Tom Quick

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

James and Dottie Alban


Local Experts Worldwide

MANHATTAN PROPERTIES

Grand penthouse with 4,825± sq ft of entertaining space. $42,500,000.WEB: Q0017969. Elizabeth Lee Sample,212.606.7685, Brenda S. Powers, 212.606.7653

RESIDENCES AT MANDARIN ORIENTAL:

MAISONETTE DUPLEX: 16 room residence with 11’10’’ ceilings. 3 fireplaces, 9,000± sq ft with grand reception rooms. $18,000,000. WEB: Q0018611. Lois Nasser, 212.606.7706, Chris Rounick, 212.606.7643

ONE SUTTON PLACE SOUTH: Extraordinary and sprawling 13 room simplex with truly spectacular views of the East River. $18,000,000. WEB: Q0018577. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611

80 COLUMBUS CIRCLE: Rare 2 bedroom with Park views in the Residence Mandarin Oriental Hotel. $9,500,000. WEB: Q0018557. Elizabeth Lee Sample, 212.606.7685, Brenda S. Powers, 212.606.7653

FULL SERVICE TRIBECA DUPLEX: 101 Warren St. Impeccably designed 2 bedrooms, 3 baths with balcony, oversized windows, cityscape views. $4,900,000. WEB: Q0018580. E. Malley, 212.606.7625

775 PARK AVE: Beautifully scaled 8 room residence with lovely leafy views over Park Avenue and East 73rd St. Two bedrooms with a library. $6,000,000. WEB: Q0018562. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611

5 EAST 75TH STREET: Exceptional 1 bedroom on the 5th floor of a 30’ wide limestone mansion. Beautiful moldings, fireplace, 10’5” ceilings. $1,500,000. WEB:Q0018506. Jeffrey Firth, 212.606.7673

Views, views, views. Sun-flooded 4 room condo. Perfect peid-a-terre or full time living. $1,900,000. WEB: Q0018581. Anne Aransaenz, 212.606.7645

2 BEDROOM PENTHOUSE WITH 2 TERRACES:

9 EAST 96TH STREET: Classic 6 in wonderful prewar co-op awaiting your imagination. Features 2 bedrooms, 2½ baths, formal dining, staff. $1,700,000. WEB: Q0018591. Olga Neulist, 212.606.7707

9 BARROW STREET: Penthouse perfection in the center of historic Greenwich Village. Flooded with light and offers open views. $1,682,000. WEB: Q0018599. Stan Ponte, 212.606.4109

2 SUTTON PLACE SOUTH: Prewar elegance, sunken living room with fireplace, 1 bedroom, office, formal dining, 1½ bath, wrap around terrace. $1,650,000. WEB: Q0018586. Pierrette Hogan, 212.606.7767

4 EAST 70TH ST: Architecturally designed mint 1 bedroom, 1 bath located across the Frick Museum. Renovated with south and east exposures. $1,100,000. WEB: Q0018583. Michele Llewelyn, 212.606.7716

MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc EAST SIDE 38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661 DOWNTOWN 379 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10012 T 212.431.2440 F 212.431.2441 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark. The Yellow House, used with permission.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C O C K TA I L S W I T H G EO R G E FA R I A S , J AY A N D A N N E H E A R ST M I C I N E R N E Y AT T H E 2 1 C L U B

Frank Bennack with Anne Hearst and Jay McInerney

Terry McDonald

56 QUEST

George Farias and Joe Armstrong

Gillian Hearst and Christian Simonds

Martha Webster and Nicole Sexton

Morgan Entrekin, Ann Dexter-Jones and Taki Theodoracopulos

Caroline Dean and Dana Hammond

Henry Amory, Santa Claus and Minot Amory

Jennifer Creel, Allison Rockefeller and Valesca Hermes

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Sharon Sondes and Geoffrey Thomas


SAVE THE DATES! SHOP POSH PALM BEACH ®

Fantastic savings on designer fashions and accessories

OPENING NIGHT DINNER DANCE honoring Kit Pannill and Talbott Maxey February 20, 2013, 7 pm • Club Colette For information or reservations call 212.821.9428, or e-mail mread@lighthouse.org

POSH SALE ®

February 21, 10 am – 9 pm • February 22, 9 am – 6 pm Lake Pavillion, 101 South Flagler Drive West Palm Beach Donate your designer pieces and receive a tax deduction POSH accepts men’s and women’s clothing, scarves and shoes, belts and bags, jewelry, sweaters and suits ®

To donate call 561.828.1522 poshsale.org FASHIONABLE PHILANTHROPY All proceeds benefit MANY THANKS TO BIL DONOVAN FOR HIS MOST PALM BEACH POSH ILLUSTRATION

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Helping people overcome the challenges of vision loss lighthouse.org


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A B O O K PA R T Y FO R FO R E V E R G R E E N BY M A R I O N I E V E R A AT T H E PA L M B E AC H H OM E O F H I L A R Y G E A R Y A N D W I L B U R R O S S

Melinda Hassen, Susie Elson and Jean Matthews

Patrick Park and Lola Astanova 58 QUEST

Hilary Geary, Mario Nievera and Wilbur Ross

Mark and Mary Freitas

Tom and Carol Kirchhoff

Charles Schmidt and Jean Tailer

Peggy and Dudley Moore with Carol Rohrig

Hillie Mahoney with Carlos and Renee Morrison

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

John Mashek and Rand Araskog


GRAND MID-COUNTRY ESTATE | $17,500,000 4.52 acs, in/out pools, court, pool/tennis house | Web ID: 0065944 Steve Archino | 203.618.3144

ROUND HILL EQUESTRIAN FARM | $15,950,000 11.47 acs, recreation barn, stable, pool | Web ID: 0066126 BK Bates | 203.618.3126

PREMIER GREENWICH ADDRESS | $12,000,000 6 br, 5 ba, 2 hf ba, 2.48acs | Web ID: 0066410 Gideon Fountain | 203.983.3808

EXTRAORDINARY CUSTOM COLONIAL | $10,995,000 6 br, 6 ba, 3 hf ba, 2.5 acs | Web ID: 0065463 Leslie McElwreath | 203.618.3165

SPECTACULAR RENOVATED GEORGIAN | $8,500,000 6 br, 6 ba, 2 hf ba, 2.15 acs | Web ID: 0065824 Alice Duff 203.618.3132 | Cynthia Vanneck 203.618.3169

A GREENWICH CLASSIC NEAR TOWN | $5,475,000 6 br, 5 ba, 2 hf ba, 2.98 acs | Web ID: 0066323 Tom Gorin | 203.983.3801

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A R I S H O ST E D A D I N N E R W I T H Q U E ST I N N E W YO R K

Alan and Melinda Blinken

Kitty and Billy McKnight

Daisy Soros and Geoffrey Bradfield 60 QUEST

Marlene Hess and Jim Zirin

Sam Peabody and Judith Pearson

Thorne and Tatiana Perkin

Emilia Saint-Amand and Fred Krimendahl

Lawrence Shindell and Lisa Cohen

Terry and Robert Evans

C U T T Y M CG I LL

Ellie Cullman


My Private Banker from IDB. He knows what it took to get this far. Because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been there all the way.

Our Private Bankers offer you and your family the level of attention you deserve. Call Jim LoGatto at 212-551-8508 or visit www.idbbank.com IDB BankÂŽ is a registered service of Israel Discount Bank of New York. Member FDIC.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A R O N A N D H A N L E Y T R E AT M E N T C E N T E R S ’ G A L A P R E - PA R T Y AT L I Z A P U L I T Z E R ’ S PA L M B E AC H H OM E

Amber Hopkins and Ricky Grow

Linda and Leverett Miller

Amy and Drew Rothermel with Nellie Benoit 62 QUEST

Margie and Michael Picotte

Anne Keresey and Clark Appleby

Joan and Paul Van der Grift

Colleen McCaffrey and Catherine Kent

H E AT H E R H O LT F O R L I L A P H OTO

Chris Leidy and Liza Pulitzer


CITY WOMAN / COUNTRY GIRL

ine Creek Sporting Club members enjoy the best of town and country. Within the club’s 2,400 acres of pristine wilderness and ranch land there are hundreds of acres of dedicated quail fields, high tower pheasant shooting, sporting clays, horses, hunting dogs, and miles of nature trails. It’s a very special place where you can find solitude, be one with nature and spend precious time with family and friends. The social hub is Pine Creek’s magnificent lodge featuring our own master chef. Here, relaxing days are spent at the pool and fitness center. The founder’s list is impressive and the staff is always there to please. Build your own custom ranch house on a 40-acre site or choose your luxurious retreat from the most architecturally stylish cabins this side of Aspen. Indulge your passion. Live out your legacy.

Luxurious Cabins from $600,000 / Pristine 40-acre Ranch Sites from $800,000.

Just a one hour+ drive from Palm Beach in the heart of Florida’s ranch country. Please contact: / email: jreynolds@pinecreeksportingclub.com www.pinecreeksportingclub.com Sales Office: One N. Clematis St., Suite 100, West Palm Beach, Florida 33401


CALENDAR

JANUARY SHOPPING IN SOHO

Stuart Weitzman will open its SoHo location on the corner of Spring and Greene Street. For more information, call 877.793.4896.

9

WILD NIGHTS ARE CALLING

The Palm Beach Zoo will host its annual Wild Things dinner dance at Neiman Marcus at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.547.9453.

11

DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY

Gotham Arts Exchange will present Dance Gotham at New York University’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.352.3101. A CLEAR VISION

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute will host its Annual Palm Beach Friends luncheon and medical forum at Mar-a-Lago Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 561.515.1500. BACK ON TRACK

Caron Hanley Treatment Centers will put on its annual gala at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.841.1048. GREATER GOOD

Glades Academy Foundation Inc will host its Evening of Great Expectations dinner and auction at Café Boulud at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.366.5115

17

SPREAD YOUR WINGS

On January 17, the National Audubon Society will present its highest award, the Audubon Medal, to Louis Moore Bacon and its inaugural Dan W. Lufkin Prize for Environmental Leadership to George Archibald at The Plaza at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.979.3062.

PROVIDING CARE

Hospice of Palm Beach County will host Palm Beach Membership’s Hospice Evening at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.8585.

5

MEN AND WOMEN IN BLUE

The Policemen’s Ball will present the Palm Tree Award honor64 QUEST

TALKING HISTORY

ing those who support the Palm Beach Police Foundation at Mar-aLago Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.820.8118.

8

MAKING MUSIC

School of the Arts Foundation will put on its luncheon at the Beach Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 561.805.6298.

AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE

GALLERY WALK

The Daughters of the American Revolution will host their Flagler chapter luncheon at the Chesterfield at noon. For more information, call 202.628.1776.

The Society of the Four Arts will present its Contemporaries Reception at 4 Arts Plaza at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.7226.

The New-York Historical Society Museum and Library will host a cocktail reception at 1296 South Ocean Boulevard in Palm Beach at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.485.9221. HABITAT PRESERVATION

The Palm Beach Zoo will host its annual dinner dance at the Mar-a-Lago Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.533.0887.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L AU D U B O N S O C I E T Y

4

The National Audubon Society will host its gala dinner and present its highest award, the Audubon Medal, to Louis Moore Bacon, at The Plaza at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.979.3062.


PROPERTIES IN PALM BEACH MIDDLE ROAD, PALM BEACH Rare opportunity to own an oceanfront compound in the heart of Palm Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estate section! This assemblage of five properties includes two main residences by noted architects Addison Mizner and Marion Sims Wyeth and three staff/guest houses all on a park-like setting. A co-exclusive. Carole Hogan 561-805-5041, Carol Digges 561-805-5031

PULITZER COMPOUND Offered at $8,800,000 Liza Pulitzer 561-373-0666

OCEANFRONT PENTHOUSE Offered at $7,300,000 Anne Carmichael 561-308-2535

PARADISE FOUND Offered at $7,250,000 Anne Carmichael 561-308-2535

LAKEFRONT MASTERPIECE Offered at $7,200,000 Liza Pulitzer 561-373-0666

PALM BEACH OCEANFRONT Offered at $5,350,000 Elaine Edwards 561-346-3618

NORTH OCEAN BOULEVARD Offered at $3,695,000 Gregory Weadock 561-309-3666

DUNBAR ROAD Offered at $3,200,000 Peter Pulitzer 818-212-0090

NORTH LAKE WAY Offered at $2,600,000 Peter Pulitzer 818-212-0090

N E W YO R K 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Suite 329

PA L M B E A C H

353 Worth Avenue

THE HAMPTONS

Palm Beach, FL 33480

561-659-6400

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.


CALENDAR

JANUARY FEBRUARY 2

Trunk Show at 10 a.m. For more information, call 212.836.1101.

The Norton Museum of Art will host Bal des Arts at the museum at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.5196

The Anti-Defamation League will host its Palm Beach Dinner at The Breakers at 6 p.m For more information, call 561.988.2940.

3

8

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum will celebrate Whitehall Society’s Bal Poudre at the museum at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.2833.

The American Red Cross will host its International Red Cross Ball at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.833.7711.

A SPECIAL EXHIBITION

MUSEUM MAGNIFICENCE

5

INCREASING AWARNESS

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation will host its Hot Pink luncheon and symposium at The Breakers at 11:45 a.m. For more information, call 646.497.2606. LUNCH AT SAKS

On February 8, the American Red Cross will host the International Red Cross Ball with the Honorable Mary Ourisman at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.833.7711.

HONORING FRIENDS

The American Friends of the Hebrew University will host its award gala honoring Barbara and Richard Rothschild at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.750.8585.

22

BREAKTHROUGHS

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will kick-off its annual Discovery reception at the home of Howard and Michele Kessler at 6 p.m. For more information, call 617.632.3000.

24

ADVANCING EDUCATION

The English-Speaking Union will host its dinner dance at the Beach Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.818.1200. ADVICE & RELIEF

The St. George’s Society will host its dinner meeting with guest speaker Jim Ponce at the Chesterfield at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.659.5800. 66 QUEST

WOMEN WHO SHOP PALM BEACH COMUNITY

The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties will celebrate its 40th anniversary at the Flagler Museum at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.659.6800.

The UJA-Federation of New York’s Manhattan Women’s Philanthropy will hold its annual Manhattan

CIVIL RIGHTS

SAVING LIVES

9

HAVE A BALL

The Fifth Annual Cleveland Clinic Florida Ball will be held at the Mar-a-Lago Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.804.0264. GREAT BEGINNINGS

Palm Beach Day Academy will celebrate its Feather Ball with dinner and an auction at The Breakers at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.1188. ANGLOPHILES

American Friends of British Art will host a luncheon with guest speaker Lady Henrietta SpencerChurchill at The Colony at 1:30 a.m. For more information, call 561.687.3394

25

ANTIQUES GALORE!

The Winter Antiques Show will celebrate its 59th year as America’s most distinguished antiques show at the Park Avenue Armory at noon. For more information, call 561.655.1919.

27

MENTAL HEALTH

The 8th annual bipolar dinner dance will take place at Club Colette at 7 p.m. For more information, call 888.944.4408.

31

FOR YOUNG COLLECTORS

The Winter Antiques Show will host its Young Collectors Night at the Park Avenue Armory at 7 p.m. For more information, call 718.292.7392.

On January 8, Stuart Weitzman will open a new boutique in the SoHo neighborhood at the corner of Spring and Greene streets. For more information, call 877.793.4896.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E A M E R I C A N R E D C RO S S ; CO U RTE S Y O F S T UA RT W E I T Z M A N

20

The Society of Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center will host the 5th annual Associates Luncheon at Saks Fifth Avenue’s flagship at noon. For more information, call 212.639.7972.

7


JENNIFER GARRIGUES, INC.

P H OTO BY: DA N I E L N E WCO M B

Interior Design

308 Peruvian Avenue Palm Beach, Florida 33480 Tel. (561) 659-7085 Fax (561) 659-7090

954 Lexington Avenue, Suite 225 New York, New York 10021 Tel. (212) 249-2516 Fax (212) 737-2646

For more information, please visit: www.jennifergarrigues.com


IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 68 QUEST

IT WAS COLD in New York in February 1974. I was happy to fly to Palm Beach along with famed Hollywood gossip columnist Sheila Graham for a story we were planning on notable residents of the illustrious island. Also arriving


H A R RY B E N S O N

for the week were Bob Hope and his wife Dolores, who would add a bit of Hollywood glamour to the story. It was all very festive with lots of parties and charity balls planned, which I have learned over time is the norm for Palm

Beach in February. I needed to get to people quickly and was told the person to ask for was the “Queen of Palm Beach” Mary Sanford. The former actress and widow of Laddie Sanford was a very good sport and made

a few phone calls on my behalf, which opened all the right doors. Estée Lauder was another elegant lady who introduced me to her friends. I was pleased that the story was taking shape. Over the years, I have visited Palm Beach on assignment many times, each time staying longer and longer, until ultimately becoming a resident of Wellington. I am presently in the midst of working on a new book about Palm Beach with writer Hilary Geary Ross, which will include new photographs along with this one of Mary Sanford dancing the night away with couturier Arnold Scassi. An interesting aside: many of Scassi’s designs worn by notable first ladies and women in film, the arts, and philanthropy are now in the collection of the Historical Society of Palm Beach County in West Palm Beach. u Mary Sanford and Arnold Scassi on the dance floor in Palm Beach, 1974.


TA K I

KEEPING IT QUIET This page: General David Petraeus, who recently resigned as head of the CIA due to a sex scandal. Opposite page: The start of the infamously unfaithful marriage of Prince Charles and Princess Diana.

LET’S START the new year right by

asking an eternal question: Why is it that adultery can ruin a man’s career but rarely a woman’s? (In so-called civilized countries, that is. In Saudi Arabia an adulterous woman is stoned to death.) An American diplomat slated to become the next ambassador to Iraq, Brett McGurk, lost his chance because of an affair with a reporter, who is now his wife. Why is it suddenly criminal to sleep with the opposite sex? Who says that government officials are stewards of the public trust, which includes what 70 QUEST

they do in the bedroom? Poor General Petraeus. A lifetime of public service gone down the drain for hooking up with a leggy social climber. Dwight Eisenhower did it with his female driver; Kennedy did it daily while president; not to mention Warren Harding and Grover Cleveland, the latter fathering a child outside marriage while in the White House. General Christian de Castries, the defender of Dien Bien Phu, named his outposts after his 11 mistresses to the delight of the French government back home. Bill Clinton does not rate a

mention because his women were “trailer park,” and that includes Hillary. General George Patton was a fabled womanizer, as hard charging tank commanders are bound to be, with the exception of Erwin Rommel, whose uxorious behavior contradicted his aggressive tactics while leading the greatest fighting unit ever: 25th Panzer of 7th. There was no crime or breach of security in the Petraeus’ affair, hence no hint of blackmail. So why resign? His wife’s ancestors were generals in the Civil War, and presumably those guys got lucky quite a bit when away from


home. The Spartans even openly borrowed older men’s wives in order to give them children and produce strong warriors. Lycurgus, the Spartan lawgiver, had a high opinion of this practice and called it an act of liberality, laughing at those who thought the violation of their bed an intolerable affront. Lycurgus thought that an old man with a young wife should recommend an agreeable young man that she might have a child by him. The English upper classes still follow this practice, and it was one of the reasons I moved to Britain back in the Sixties. Rumor has it that half the Lambtons are Freuds and none of the Tennants are Tennants—which might not be such a bad thing in view of the horror that was Colin Tennant. Everyone knows that Lady Diana Cooper was someone else’s, as is Lady Cosima Somerset (whose daughter Romi is my godchild) but at the end no one really gives a damn. Except for the press and the media who have nothing else to talk about here in the Land of the Depraved. The greatest Greek sleuth ever, Taki, thinks the neocons set up Petraeus once he called Israel a liability in the Middle East. The irony is that “General Order No. 1” prohibits troops from fraternization, all sex, alcohol consumption, pornography and generally from all activities that might make the boredom of service more bearable. The military code of conduct varies with countries, but it’s a general rule that one does not commit adultery with a brother officer’s wife. So why is Prince Charles still in business? He cuckolded Andrew Parker Bowles, who got a promotion as a result, which goes to show it depends who does the deed, not the deed itself. Petraeus was set up by Paula Broadwell, who was most likely set up herself by Washington neocon insiders who knew what they were doing. The funny thing is that I believe if Petraeus had had a homosexual dalliance with a writer who brought along his own ghostwriter, like Broadwell did, he’d still have his job in Langley.

Talk about American exceptionalism. In 23 states, adultery remains a criminal act. That includes my own favorite, Virginia. This means most of the Kennedys should have died in jail by now. And it gets worse. General John Allen, the Marine who succeeded Petraeus in Afghanistan, is under a cloud for sending flirtatious e-mails to some Lebanese hustler back in Florida. In other words, they don’t even have to catch you with your pants down, it’s the thought that counts. What utter crap. Of all social institutions, marriage is that of which the laws are the most difficult to determine because they are the opposite of nature. I often ask the mother of my children when she complains about my behavior whether she would prefer me to be a lousy husband and a faithful one, or the opposite. She lies and says the

former. Then she laughs. Percy Shelley asked how long ought the sexual connection last? He said that a couple should stay together as long as they were united by love, by which I believe he meant only sexual love. He called it an intolerable tyranny if a man and a woman stayed together after the affection had worn off, “and the most unworthy of toleration.” I agree to a certain extent. As he said, constancy has nothing virtuous in itself. The way to keep a good relationship going is for the man to fool around when he gets the urge, and keep quiet about it afterward. Never admit and you will make the wife happy. Petraeus committed no crime or breach of national security. A good man has gone down for doing what comes naturally. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 7 1


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

NEW YEAR, new resolutions. And what bet-

ter way to keep them than by rewarding yourself for all your newfound efforts? When heading to Palm Beach, don’t forget to keep it light and easy with linen tops from Charlotte Kellogg, gauzy cotton tunics from Calypso St. Barth, and a breezy straw hat from Chanel or J.Crew. The new year is the perfect occasion for picking up some new jewelry, and there are no better baubles than these stunners from Tiffany, de Grisogono, Roberto Coin, Fabergé, and Sequin. As for the guys, Ralph Lauren and Stubbs & Wootton are must-haves, as are new swim shorts by Altru.

Hats off to Chanel for this beige and pink-painted straw hat with pink ribbon—a reminder of what it means to be a lady. $3,180. Chanel: At select Chanel boutiques and 800.550.0005.

A tribute to Tiffany’s 175th anniversary, the Tiffany diamond-and-gemstone pendant uses gemstones that Tiffany originally introduced to the world. Price upon request. Tiffany & Co.: 259 Worth Ave. or 561.659.6090.

The 1.5-inch heel and turquoise touches on the golden Carolyndo by Manolo Get in the swing of the Palm Beach season with resident designer Charlotte Kellogg’s turquoise swing-top linen shirt. $195. Charlotte Kellogg: 256 Worth Ave. or 561.820.2407.

Blahnik make the transition from daytime to evening easier than ever. $915. Manolo Blahnik: At manoloblahnik.com.


Introducing the Giving Back app by Meera Gandhi Featuring sixty partners and inspirations of The Giving Back Foundation

You are invited to Innovate and Donate in this heartwarming app, which features: • Moving and expanding videos of charities • Moving and expanding still images • Scrolling text about charities and mission • Inspirational Quotes • Music • audio of Meera Gandhi • Social networking, Twitter, and Facebook linking opportunities to global charities and causes, through The Giving Back Foundation • Free access via ITunes


Fresh Finds Need more room for your New York and Palm Beach wardrobes? Then let the fullservice valet company Garde Robe collect, care for, and deliver your clothes— wherever, whenever. Garde Robe: de Grisogono offers a new take on pearls

888.GARDE.11 or garderobeonline.com.

with these earrings made from South Sea pearls surrounded by peridots, emeralds, and yellow and orange sapphires, all in 18-kt. white gold. Price upon request. de Grisogono: 212.439.4220.

Put your favorite drink on a pedestal with the Juliska

Lightweight, durable, and highly stylish: Eric Javits puts a tropical twist on things with the Paradis clutch, made of Squishee® with a detachable chain shoulder strap. $370. Eric Javits: ericjavits.com.

Colette footed goblet, embellished with timeless trimmings. $29 each at Gracious Home, 1220 Third Ave., 212.517.6300.

Hunter Boot proves it’s fit for any season and any style with the brightly chic HB Highcliffe sandals in rubber. $75. Hunter Boot: At hunter-boot.com.

Brilliant colors of the East come together in Roberto Coin’s Shanghai necklace in 18-kt. yellow gold with semiprecious stones. $37,000. Roberto Coin: 800.853.5958 or robertocoin.com. 74 Q U E S T


WHERE ARE YOU?

You’re traveling along an old road... on the same road that I was on a few months ago... where I found so many wonderful things... There are still so many villages and shops to visit... See what I brought home with me... We’re on Madison Avenue... or online... Oh... the road is in Provence... not far from Bonnieux

LINDA HORN www.lindahorn.com

1327 MADISON AVE at 93rd STREET NYC 10128 212-772-1122 see us on facebook


Fresh Finds

Time will tell—and so will Rolex’s 41-mm. Oyster Perpetual Day-Date II in platinum, with polished bezel and President bracelet. $62,500. Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX.

72 Degree Jack, 2011, a cast and machined-bronze sculpture by Michael Dunbar, is a handsome addition to the home. Price upon request. Wally Findlay Galleries: 165 Worth Ave., 561.655.2090.

Why bring just

For Palm Beach

a bottle of

or any des-

champagne when

tination, this

you can also put it

Stubbs &

on ice in Asprey’s octo-

Wootton Keeper

pus champagne

shoe in natu-

cooler in clear crystal?

ral linen is, well,

$2,600. Asprey:

a keeper. $450.

853 Madison Ave.,

Stubbs & Wootton:

212.688.1811.

1 Via Parigi, Palm Beach, 561.655.6857.

Spruce up your home with this recently reupholsetered circa-1900 Swedish armchair, from an estate oustide outside of Stockholm.

Once he tries on Altru’s Sharkey Street short in yellow and Bikini Street short in light blue, he’ll never go to the beach in anything else. $59 each at altruapparel.com.

$8,400. Lars Bolander: 3731 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, 561.832.2121.

When in Palm Beach, dress like a Palm Beacher—with a little help from Ralph Lauren Purple Label. Available at the Ralph Lauren store: 300 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, 561.651.3900.

76 QUEST


Fresh Finds It worked for Ernest Hemingway and Paul

She’ll thank you for Fabergé’s Oeuf Sophie Rouge in 18-kt. gold, white

Newman, so why

diamonds, and red

not add the perfect

enamel, which makes

tomboy touch with J.Crew’s white

for an egg-ceptional

straw Panama

gift. $12,738. Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave.,

hat? $58. J.Crew:

646.559.8848.

Available at jcrew.com.

Embrace your inner artist with Calypso St. Barth’s Corisa Smocked Embroidered Tunic, in lightweight cotton gauze. $250. Calypso St. Barth: 247B Worth Ave., Palm Beach, 561.832.5006.

Sequin’s Hockney earrings in semiprecious stones and crystal are a work of art. $125. Sequin: 330 South County Rd., Palm Beach, 561.833.7300. Based on Japanese calligraphy, Wempe’s Papillon BY KIM butterfly brooch is a symbol of beauty and immortality. $9,675. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Add a special touch to your tabletop with the Leta Austin Foster exclusive Coral china line. Stay footloose and fancy-free in the white patent-leather Midinette slipper by Belgian Shoes. $350. Belgian Shoes: 110 East 55th St., 212.755.7372, or belgianshoes.com.

78 QUEST

Available upon request at Leta Austin Foster Boutique: 64 Via Mizner, Palm Beach, 561.655.7367.


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

COLD SPRING - Stunning cedar

and stone contemporary is nestled on 2 ½ acres of private, fenced, woodland property. The spacious three bedroom home features pine slat-wood ceilings, stone walls, gleaming hardwood floors, open floor plan and clean, modern lines. The beautifully landscaped property, with blue stone paths and patios and lovely gardens is only minutes to the village and Metro North. GARRISON, - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known Offered atNY $849,000.00 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breath-

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout the home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000

COLD SPRING - Wish it, Dream it,

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

…Do it! First floor is currently a dance studio, but the open floor plan will allow many possibilities. The second and third floor home will captivate you from the moment you walk in the door. This spacious and light-filled home is stunning and well designed offering living room with gas fireplace, kitchen with marble countertops, 2 bedrooms, Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 2 4 ½full baths,baths, 2 working fireplaces, room hardwoodon floors, and numerous floor country retreat bonus on almost 5 acres. This C.third 1935 home offers Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms,and 4 ½ baths, 2 workingwith fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous balcony mountain views. ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes Ofa forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at at $1,300,000 fered $950,000.00 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


CANTEENS

AT HOME AT TABLE 26 BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

A DEFINITIVE SENSE of “getting it right” prevails at Table 26, a vibrant new addition to the Palm Beach culinary scene. From the refreshingly uncluttered, smart-casual vibe to the beachy hints throughout (a nautical map on the ceiling subtly reminds us that Palm Beach is located at a latitude of 26º: hence the name), Table 26 is pleasingly unpretentious—and delicious. Whether mingling at the trendy bar over one of the many thirstquenching, spirits-spiked cocktails (the sake-laced Sakifruta seems appropriate for, say, your next jaunt on the yacht) or sitting al fresco under the covered outdoor terrace, Table 26 has an easy navigability to it. It’s intimate but never overcrowded, which also means that reserving in advance is obligatory. Located just a block south of the Norton Museum of Art, in the Mango Promenade Historic District of West Palm Beach, 80 QUEST

Table 26 is the brainchild of restaurateurs Ed Schmidt and Ozzie Medeiros, along with executive chef Steven Polowy. The team describes their fare as “global comfort,” which covers just about all the bases, and which is also easy to swallow once you sit down with the menu. “Comfort” is written all over the map, from Jo’s buttermilk biscuits served with jam (Jo refers to pastry chef Jo Polowy, wife of executive chef Polowy) to the Kobe footlong hot dog (the Kobe, of course, transmutes this footlonger into the “global”). Here, fried calamari is given that global kick in Pad Thai style, with toasted peanuts, lime, and soy-ginger mayo. Standouts on the menu are too numerous to list, but what mouth won’t water at the sound of beef brisket tacos with red chile sauce and jalapeño-corn salsa? On any given night, no table can seem to pass on the blackened jumbo shrimp with sweet


This page, clockwise from top: A nautical chart on the ceiling reminds diners of where the restaurant’s name comes from, Palm Beach’s 26° latitude; the Sakifruta cocktail with sake, muddled berries, peach vodka, agave nectar, and lemon and lime juices; blackened jumbo shrimp with sweet corn grits

M O N TA N A P R I TC H A R D P H OTO G R A P H Y

and tomato confit; the dinner and wine menus (inset). Table 26: 1700 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, Fla., open daily for dinner; 561.855.2660.

corn grits and tomato confit. Entrées span the globe from New York strip steaks to Wagyu meatloaf (this ain’t your mamma’s meatloaf), from Maryland crab to continental-style roast duck and chicken breast. An exceptionally edited, well-priced wine list offers sensational selections from around the world, from a white Languedoc by European Winery of the Year Gérard Bertrand to American West Coast prizes in red and white by the houses of Lancaster, Flowers, and Hess. Digesting the excess of riches at Table 26 might make dessert seem downright superfluous, but with a S’mores fudge sundae and warm bread pudding with rum-raisin ice cream on offer, we haven’t heard of a single diner who’s said no to that sweet tooth. u


C U LT U R E

W. GALEN WESTON, the Canadian businessman, and his philanthropist wife, the Honorable Hilary M. Weston, founded Windsor, a “Village by the Sea,” on 416 acres of lush barrier island between the Indian River and Atlantic Ocean, north of Vero Beach, Florida, over 20 years ago. The 350 homes are in a natural and unspoiled setting, which provides homeowners privacy and seclusion combined with the finest amenities, exemplary services, and sporting activities. Windsor (www.windsorflorida.com) was designed by the renowned New Urbanist town planners and architects Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk. Homeowners and their guests enjoy the 18-hole links-style golf course designed by Robert Trent Jones, Jr., the Equestrian Centre with its own polo field, the Fitness Centre, and gun club. Highlights include an assortment of dining options, a beach club, a Above: The Gallery at Windsor, founded in 2002, is an independent art space that exhibits works by leading contemporary artists. Left: W. Galen and the Honorable Hilary Weston, founders of Windsor.

CO U RTE S Y O F W I N D S O R

SCENES OF BEAUTY


Clockwise from top left: Simon and Michaela de Pury; Iwona Blazwick; Gert Tobias, Galen Weston, Hilary Weston, and Uwe Tobias; Susan and Glenn Lowry; Danna Swarovski and HRH Princess Michael of Kent; Rod Waywell and Lisa Dennison. Below: Gert and Uwe Tobias’s Untitled.

clubhouse, the Town Hall, and the Village Centre, along with a series of superb cultural programs throughout the season. The Gallery at Windsor is famed for its world-class exhibitions and partnership with London’s Whitechapel Gallery. Timed to coincide with Art Basel Miami Beach, Whitechapel’s Director, Iwona Blazwick, curated a stunning exhibition of works by the Romanian-born twin brothers Gert and Uwe Tobias. The exhibition, which opened at Windsor with a cocktail reception and dinner hosted by the Westons on December 8, 2012, will continue through April 3, 2013. The exhibition will travel to London to

be on view at the Whitechapel Gallery beginning April 16, 2013. The Tobias brothers create large woodcuts, gouache paintings, typewriter drawings, and ceramic sculptures, combining traditional folk art and abstract art from the early 20th century. Gert and Uwe Tobias’s work is currently in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Saatchi Gallery in London. The exhibition can be viewed by appointment. u For more information, call 772.388.4071 or email gallery@windsorflorida.com.


ART

THE EUROPEAN FINE ARTS FAIR (TEFAF) keeps growing, both in capacity and in quality. Attracting, on average, 10,000 visitors a day, this fair is brighter, bolder, and more beautiful than ever. The grand scale encapsulates restaurants, activities, and loan exhibitions like the prestigious “Van Gogh’s Drawings: Masterpieces from the Van Gogh Museum,” an exclusive collection of 15 works on paper by the master that are not normally on display, from every period of his life. What started as a relatively small fair in Maastricht, Holland, has now blossomed into a large upscale operation that services the needs of the clientele that come from all corners of the world to see the art. Jets, cars, and concierge and travel services are all part of the TEFAF experience, and now exclusive trips are offered to VIP groups, which also include tours of private chateaux, not open to the 84 QUEST

public, to view personal collections and luxiourious dining experiences with private chefs and sommeliers. One such group is the Palm Beach organization, the Society of the Four Arts, which has already booked for this year and the next. With over 5,000 years of history of art, the fair is continuously busy throughout its run. Michel Cox Witmer, TEFAF’s official U.S. ambassador and a board member, is excited for the future. “We’re trying to maintain our high standards with the new entrances and look, but the same vast amount of flowers.” Why the flowers? “They accentuate the beauty of the art and antiques, and are emblematic of Holland.” And with an updated logo, TEFAF proves that once again, the Dutch are leading the world in modern design. u Please visit TEFAF.com for more information.

CO U RTE S Y O F T E FA F

AN ART FAIR LOOKS TO THE FUTURE


This page, clockwise from top left: A large bronze cat, the embodiment of the goddess Bastet, Egypt, XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 B.C.; an exhibition booth on the opening night of TEFAF 2012; Pharmacy Jar, Workshop of Domenico da Venezia, circa 1560; Art Deco brooch by Lacloche Frères, Paris, circa 1930; Untitled, by Sam Francis (1923-1994), acrylic on paper; a mother and daughter browse paintings at the 2012 fair. Opposite page:

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

A circular scuplture on display during the opening day at the 2012 fair (above); Michel Cox Witmer, official U.S. ambassador for TEFAF (below).

MONTH 2008 00


L U X U RY

CARING FOR YOUR COUTURE

THIS MONTH, GARDE ROBE is expanding to South Florida. A

one-of-a-kind company, it offers museum-quality storage and preservation for couture wardrobes, furs, footwear, and accessories—as well as an accompanying on-demand, ready-to-wear valet service accessible worldwide. In South Florida, Garde Robe is partnering with Rey’s Cleaners to provide the area with a service worthy of its excellent reputation. With the beginning of the social season in Palm Beach, residents are especially pleased with the introduction of Garde Robe. Transitioning between your New York home and your Palm Beach home? Garde Robe will assist you in maintaining two wardrobes for the two climates. “People forget that, like a valuable painting, valuable clothing is susceptible to weather and temperature changes,” says Susan Magrino, founder of Susan Magrino Agency. “For people who move around a lot or have homes in New York and Palm Beach, it’s nice to have your wardrobe stored.” Preparing for the annual parties benefiting the American Red Cross or the Palm Beach Zoo? Garde Robe delivers your dress to your door—and retrieve afterward. “I think it’s sensational. I think it’s the future,” says Donna Livingston, CEO of Donna 86 QUEST

Livingston Interior Design. “Your gowns or your special-occasion clothes are stored beautifully. They’re stuffed so that they retain their shape. You want to store them properly and know maybe the last time you wore them and to what event—Garde Robe will record that.” Garde Robe boasts a website that allows members to view their wardrobes piece by piece. “The search feature is great,” says Susan Magrino. “I go on and search ‘Pucci’ and I have 31 items—105 for ‘Yves Saint Laurent.’ I keep a lot of coats and consider myself the queen of the trench, the queen of outerwear. You need coats in New York more than anything and I certainly don’t have the space in my apartment to store them.” Ultimately, Garde Robe’s success is founded upon its ability to deliver. The staff, described by members as “committed,” “passionate,” and “professional,” is at the heart of the operation. “I have complete confidence in Garde Robe. I trust them as much as any family member,” says Susan Magrino. u For more information about Garde Robe, call 888.427.3311 or visit GardeRobeOnline.com.


This page: Garde Robeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top-notch storage facilities. Opposite page: Garde Robe offers access to your wardrobe online, with accompanying descriptions and pictures.


PONYING UP FOR ST. MORITZ BY DANIEL CAPPELLO 88 QUEST


SPORT

This page, from top left: Snow polo in action; St. Moritz is an Alpine idyll; a previous St. Moritz Polo World Cup on Snow; a vintage map of St. Moritz. Opposite page: Nacho Figueras plays on the Ralph Lauren team; Ralph Lauren’s Custom-Fit Crest Polo

CO U RTE S Y O F R A LP H L AU R E N ( O P P O S I TE PA G E )

($165); Fleece Big Pony Track Jacket ($165); and Fleece Crest Shawl Pullover ($165).

EACH JANUARY, approximately 15,000 people set out from every corner of the globe to make an annual winter pilgrimage to the so-called “top of the world,” also known as St. Moritz, the posh resort town in Switzerland’s Engadine Valley. Set amid soaring peeks and plateauing lakes, this placid Alpine community is also home, since 1985, to the St. Moritz Polo World Cup on Snow, the highest-level winter polo tournament, representing the ultimate expression of strength, elegance, speed, and pride. One thing that each of this year’s teams can be proud of is the level of achievement on display. Each team—BMW, Cartier, Ralph Lauren, and Sal. Oppenheim—boasts an impressive 18goal handicap. And though it remains to be seen who will capture the ultimate prize—the Cartier trophy—it’s a fairly certain bet that team Ralph Lauren, with the likes of Nacho Figueras

and Michael Bickford, will be the most fashionable. In fact, in celebration of its team and in the spirit of the games, Ralph Lauren is introducing an exclusive St. Moritz Polo World Cup on Snow fashion line. Available in Ralph Lauren stores worldwide and in finer luxury department stores everywhere, the collection includes everything one might need to pack for the plane ride to Switzerland (including the St. Moritz rugby shirt and a selection of custom-fit crest polos), and then once on the ground (like fleece track jackets, crested fleece shawl pullovers, and crest-bearing knit hats). This year’s tournament will take place from January 24th through 27th. The question isn’t, “Will you be going?” It’s more like, “Who will you be wearing?” And, from this vantage point, at least, the answer should be: “Ralph Lauren.” u J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 8 9


OPEN HOUSE

FOR OVER A CENTURY, the Red Hills region of south Georgia and north Florida has discreetly served as a wintertime retreat for some of America’s greatest industrialists and titans of business. In 1886, Harper’s Magazine classified Thomasville, Georgia, as one of the Top 10 most fashionable places to visit in the world. Attracted by the mild climate and abundance of wild game—in particular the bobwhite quail—the area is now defined by its large concentration of traditional hunting plantations. Rosewood Plantation consists of approximately 1,050 acres and is perhaps the most unique of all the properties available within the famed Red Hills. The original owners’ love of trotter racing led to the construction of the 5/8-mile 90 QUEST

racetrack, situated on a hilltop overlooking the property. Presently owned by a prominent Atlanta businessman and thoroughbred owner, the equestrian component of the property was further developed to include a 24-stall horse barn, including stallion and mare barns, as well as 18 paddocks. Additionally, the property includes a six-bedroom, four-and-a-half bath, house overlooking a 10-acre, fully stocked lake. The property is truly reminiscent of the Old South with azalea-lined driveways and majestic oaks clad with Spanish moss and wisteria. In addition to equestrian activities, Rosewood features an abundance of recreational opportunities. A large duck impoundment exists on the property

and has historically attracted migratory ducks by the thousands. The pristine pine forest serve as an exceptional habitat for bobwhite quail, deer, and turkey, with further entertainment provided by the manicured three-hole golf course, tennis court, and Remington-designed skeet and trap range. The property adjoins the vast shooting estate of the Ford family known as Longpine. Rosewood Plantation is truly a one-of-a-kind property that seamlessly blends all of the amenities the area has to offer. Priced at $7,500,000. u For more information on this exclusive listing and lifestyle, please contact our firm or listing broker Ben W. McCollum at The Wright Group, 229.226.2564 or www.wrightbroker.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E W R I G H T G RO U P

ROSEWOOD PLANTATION EQUESTRIAN AND SHOOTING ESTATE


This page, clockwise from the top: The main residence includes a three-hole golf course, often frequented by deer and turkey; the mature pine forest offers exceptional quail and wildlife habitat; spring feed lake behind the home is one of four lakes located on property; the observation and timing house overlooks the 5/8-mile horse track; rose bushes around the main 18-stall barn. Opposite page: An aerial photo depicts the main residence nestled within a quiet, country setting only minutes from historic Thomasville, Georgia. This area, known as the Red Hills, consists of over 300,000 acres of private estates and plantations.

J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 9 1


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Stonebrook - Stunning Shingle Country House perfectly positioned to take in spectacular views of a stone-lined pond and brook. Inspired by the past, a perfect balance of traditional architecture seamlessly integrated with the most modern amenities. Beautifully proportioned, sun-filled rooms with wideboard floors, quality millwork, oil-rubbed bronze hardware and marble baths. Four Bedrooms. Gated drive to nine spectacular acres. $3,200,000

Spruce Hill - Stunning and sophisticated Country Estate. Modern interior with Flos lighting and Boffi Kitchen. Hardwood floors and French doors. Living Room with stone Fireplace. Designer Kitchen. First floor Master Suite. Three additional Bedrooms. Gated drive to incredible four-acre property in top estate area. Terraced gardens down to heated Pool. Spectacular stone work, meditation gardens, reflecting pool and an outdoor terrace with Fireplace. Also for rent. $1,875,000

David’s Brook - Turn-of-the-Century Farmhouse perfectly sited Foremost Estate Area - Over four beautiful acres of open meadows to take full advantage of pond and brook views! Impeccably renovated with the finest attention to detail. Rocking Chair Porch, wainscoting, and gleaming hardwood floors. Living Room with Fireplace. Dining Room with built-ins. Family Room. Fabulous Country Kitchen. Master Suite. Office. Guest Suite. Nearly eight peaceful acres. $1,295,000

with incredible views of neighboring horse farms. Heart of Bedford’s top equestrian area on the Bedford Riding Lanes. Adorable 1910 Farmhouse on beautiful country road. Charming Rocking Chair Porch. Three Bedrooms. Potential to build a main residence while keeping the existing building as a gatehouse or cottage. A remarkable opportunity! $995,000

Four Bedford Acres -

In-Town Living - Walk to everything—restaurants, shops and train!

Private and serene setting along quiet country lane just moments from Bedford Village and Town Park. Traditional Country Colonial with hardwood floors and sun-filled rooms. Beautifully proportioned Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room with French doors to Screened Porch. Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Gorgeous land. $759,000

(914) 234-9234

Nicely landscaped half-acre across from the elementary school. Sun-filled Georgian Colonial built in 1993. Eight well proportioned main rooms. Entrance Foyer. Formal Living and Dining Rooms. Country Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Private Master Suite. Three Family Bedrooms plus Office/Den. Exercise/Playroom. Central air. Also for rent. $699,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


CONYERS FARM ESTATE

EUROPEAN ELEGANCE

$12,499,000 · Please visit: www.LinwoodEstate.com Exclusive Agent: Sally Maloney

$7,350,000 · Please visit: www.FrenchOnNorth.com Exclusive Agent: Beverley Toepke

STATELY BACKCOUNTRY MANOR $5,495,000

A JEWEL IN DEER PARK

· Please visit: www.backcountrymanor.com Exclusive Agent: Liz Obernesser

$5,199,000 · Please visit: www.DeerParkJewel.com Exclusive Agents: Mary Ann Grabel / Laurie Smith

HISTORIC BACKCOUNTRY COMPOUND

SOUTH OF THE VILLAGE

$3,450,000 · Please visit: www.HistoricGem.com Exclusive Agent: Bonnie Caie

$2,850,000 · Please visit: www.ShoreRoad35.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

G R E E N W IC H

F I N E

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


SPECTACULAR GREENWICH COVE SETTING

SOPHISTICATED COUNTRY HOUSE

$6,500,000 · Please visit: www.36WestWay.com Exclusive Agent: Scott Elwell

$6,400,000 · Please visit: www.HycliffRoad.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

EUROPEAN STYLE ON ROUND HILL $3,800,000

MID-COUNTRY SANCTUARY

· Please visit: www.EuroStyleLuxury.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

$3,750,000

LUXURY AT THE WATERFORD $2,800,000 · Please visit: www.Waterford14.com Exclusive Agent: Sally Maloney

G R E E N W IC H

· Please visit: www.59Dingletown.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

‘‘THE COTSWOLDS” $2,650,000

F I N E

·

Please visit: www.10EdgewoodGreenwich.com Exclusive Agent: Scott Elwell

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . BERDIE BRADY . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA KELLY CIOFFARI . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI BLAKE DELANY . CANDY PETERS DURNIAK . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN . JANIE GALBREATH . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . SHARON KINNEY MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . ELLEN MOSHER . LIZ OBERNESSER . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS VICTORIA THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGI VORDER BRUEGGE . JOSEPH WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


The Fanjul Family Nickie Fanjul stands next to her son, Nicholas Fanjul, under their Tiki hut. Nickie is wearing an Island Company linen shift, Stubbs & Wootton espadrilles, and Helga Wagner earrings. Nicholas is wearing an Island Company linen shirt and a Polo Ralph Lauren belt with a Tiffany & Co. buckle.

A SON’S LOVE PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

There’s no denying the special relationship between mothers and sons. In a nod to these bonds, we photographed seven of our favorite duos—and trios—as these Palm Beachers relaxed outside their family houses. 96 QUEST


The Bardes Family Dani Smith Moore (seated) with daughters Ali and Lesly, and her mother, Lesly Smith (standing), gathered around the pool of Lesly Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home in Palm Beach.

The Orthwein Family Binkie Orthwein in Veronica Beard pants and a Ferragamo top, with her boys, Teddy, Wyatt, and Henry, in Polo Ralph Lauren pants, crewcuts shirts by J.Crew, and needlepoint belts by Binkie McSweeney Orthwein.

98 QUEST


The Anderson Family Loy Anderson (left) and Kent Anderson (right) on either side of their mother, Inger Anderson, on the lawn in front of the Anderson house.


The Hanley Family Andrew Hanley and Denise Hanley relax by the pool at the Hanley house, with Deniseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adorable rescued Chihuahua, Chica, happily perched between them. Denise is wearing a tunic from Roberta Roller Rabbit by Roberta Freymann.

J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 0 1


The Page Family Blakely Page and his mother, Brittain “Britty” Bardes, on the shore of Lake Worth at Britty’s house.

102 QUEST


The Geary Family Ted Geary, Hilary Geary, and Jack Geary in front of a sculpture by Les Lalanne at the home of Hilary Geary and Wilbur Ross. Hilary is wearing Oscar de la Renta, JAR earrings, and cuffs by David Webb from Fiona Druckenmiller.


The Bardes Family Merrilyn Bardes and Piper Quinn stand on the front steps of their lushly landscaped family house.

104 QUEST


This page, left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Guillermo Aguilera at their Palm Beach home in 1970; cars parked along Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, one of the world’s toniest shopping addresses, circa 1970. Opposite page: Durie Desloge and Wendy Vanderbilt wearing sundresses by Palm Beach designer Lily Pulitzer, 1964.

A RESORT FOR ALL SEASONS BY DANIEL CAPPELLO MUCH LIKE NICE and the South of France—built to glamorous heights by the flocks of northerners (in France’s case, mostly wealthy Englishmen and women) seeking sunkissed refuge during the winter months—the Florida Gold Coast capital of Palm Beach owes its beautiful, wealthy, and exclusive existence to the rich Americans who sought out this sixteen-mile-long island as the ultimate retreat from harsh, icicle-laced winters elsewhere in the country, mostly to the north. And just as Nice has its iconic sea-hugging boardwalk known as the “Promenade des Anglais,” an enduring memorial to the English who instigated its construction, so Palm Beach has The Breakers, the soaring Villa Medici–style hotel that’s 106 QUEST

synonymous with both “luxury” and “resort”—a standing testament to Henry Morrison Flagler, the man whose vision for the community put it on the map. The area was, in the beginning, exceedingly simple: nothing more than a stretch of tropical trees (the “Palm”) scattered among a deserted expanse of sand (the “Beach”). Occupied for millennia by Native Americans, it wouldn’t be until the early 1890s that Flagler, a founder of Standard Oil, would purchase the island’s oceanfront acres for $300,000, laying the groundwork for the opulently exclusive retreat it is today. From its early history to its modern-day social swirls, Pamela Fiori captures the essence of this unmitigatedly extravagant


S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S


This page, from left to right: Caroline, John, John, Jr., and Jacqueline Kennedy in Palm Beach on Easter Sunday, 1963; Rose Kennedy with the Duke and Duchess of Windsor at the Everglades Club in 1967. Opposite page: Sam Snead, Dick Buskey, Richard George, Bobby Cruickshank, and Johnny Farrell at the Palm Beach Golf Club, circa 1962 (above); Henry Flagler’s Hotel Royal Poinciana, circa 1900 (below); Pamela Fiori’s In The Spirit of Palm Beach, published by Assouline, available at assouline.com (inset).

“Is this little piece of paradise for everyone?” Fiori asks. “Decidedly not. Nor does it aim to be. If it did, Palm Beach wouldn’t be what

resort community in her new book, In The Spirit of Palm Beach (Assouline). Through richly evocative words and images, Fiori brings to life this playground—this extended holiday—of the ultra-rich, tracing its development along the way from what used to be called “a mecca for millionaires” to what is today more like, in her words, “a bastion for billionaires.” Fiori sets the scene by putting Palm Beach on display in all its glory, showcasing it as breathtakingly beautiful, squeaky clean, and secure as a fortress. As a whole, her book lays bare why the rich so readily called it home (or second home) in the first place, and why they continue to keep unbelievably pristine family compounds and retreats there today. Everything in Palm Beach, after all, seems as if sculpted in marble magic—or as if meant to be captured in a photograph by Slim Aarons. For all of its ravishing embarrassment of riches—and there are many, from hedged-in Mediterranean-style villas, to exclusive shopping streets like the world-renowned Worth Avenue, to the coterie of insider clubs like Everglades, Bath and Tennis, Colette, and Sailfish—Palm Beach remains, as 108 QUEST

Fiori aptly points out, a truly hospitable place. To be sure, there are in-the-know habits that help (like the singularly bright dress code perpetuated by the cognoscenti), but walk into any restaurant, hotel, or shop, and outsiders are treated with the same friendly service showered upon the locals. A ballyhoo for inhabitant bold-faced names—from Babcocks, Maddocks, and Kennedys to Huttons, Guinesses, Guests, and Graces—In The Spirit of Palm Beach does not shy away from this sheltered island’s fair share of scandals, swindlers, and shameful episodes. (While you may not remember the stir it caused in the ’20s when sewing-machine heir Paris Singer had a fling with the dancer Isadora Duncan, surely more modern bells of infamy will ring at the mention of the likes of Bernard Madoff.) So is Palm Beach, as Fiori herself asks, a piece of paradise for everyone? Decidedly not. But picking up In The Spirit of Palm Beach, we’re reminded that this community doesn’t aim to be the dreamed-of destination for every man. And that, with all of its unapologetic affluence, is the true spirit of Palm Beach. u

T H E B E RT M O R G A N A R C H I V E ; CO R B I S ; CO U RT E S Y O F A S S O U L I N E

it is—a ravishing and unapologetic embarrassment of riches.”


HIGH SOCIETY BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

This page: The Gioconda and Joseph King Library at the Society of the Four Arts (above); a rendering of the entrance to the Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building, scheduled to open in mid-February (below). Opposite page: The gardens at the Society of the Four Arts. 110 QUEST

C H R I S TO P H E R FAY / RO B E RT S TE V E N S ( P H OTO G R A P H S )

Palm Beach, Florida, since 1936, providing the community with access to the the arts via exhibitions, performances, and more. This year, the organization will continue to extend its offerings with the Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building, having raised $17.7 million of the $20 million necessary to open in midFebruary. “We are grateful for the generosity of our donors and the success of this campaign so far is a testament to Palm Beach’s commitment to culture,” says Katie Edwards, development director at the Four Arts. The Dixon building will serve as part of the Campus on the Lake program, a series of lectures and workshops for adults.

G L I D D E N S PI N A + PA RT N E R S ( R E N D E R I N G S ) ;

THE SOCIETY OF THE FOUR ARTS has served the town of


This page: A rendering of one of the classrooms housed in the Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building (above); the Philip Hulitar Sculpture Garden (right). Opposite page: The Esther B. O’Keeffe Gallery Building (above); a rendering of the apartment for the endowed artist-in-residence at the

C H R I S TO P H E R FAY / RO B E RT S TE V E N S ( P H OTO G R A P H S )

G L I D D E N S PI N A + PA RT N E R S ( R E N D E R I N G S ) ;

Fitz Eugene Dixon Education Building.

(Recently, the Campus on the Lake program hosted the “Best of Britain” series.) “Our newly expanded Campus on the Lake promises not only to enrich our lives and minds, but also to create a larger model: one that other communities will emulate as our population ages and demand for life-long learning grows,” says a spokesperson for the Four Arts. Acquired from the Palm Beach County School District in December 2010, the Dixon building will feature four classrooms of different sizes—a welcome complement to the existing 700-seat Gubelmann Auditorium. From art studios to demonstration kitchens, the Dixon building will encourage hands-on learning, with classes ranging from cooking to painting. “Whether it be Mexico’s former president Vicente Fox giving a lecture, a wine tasting with Sotheby’s top

wine expert Jamie Ritchie, or family story time with Robert Forbes, the programming is diverse and world-class,” says Erik Waldin of the Contemporaries at the Four Arts. The Dixon building will also feature an upstairs apartment, where the Four Arts will welcome a visiting artist every season. The composer, painter, or writer will live in the community, teaching and working and, according to a spokesperson for the Four Arts, “help[ing] us to unlock our own creativity.” Justly, the community eagerly anticipates the arrival of the Dixon building: “I think real credit is due to the leadership of the Four Arts for repurposing an existing landmarked building and returning it to its original splendor while at the same time updating it to satisfy its modern-day needs. I look forward to involving myself in a wide variety of programs from yoga in the J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 1 3


This page: A rendering of a testing kitchen, where everything from cooking classes to wine tastings will be held (above); the gardens at the Society of the Four Arts (left). Opposite page: A rendering of the new 250-seat auditorium (above); an interior view of one of the buildings, featuring a permanent exhibition,

on the Lake promises not only to enrich our lives and minds, but also to create a larger model: one that other communities will emulate as our population ages.” 114 QUEST

garden to portrait painting lessons,” says Waldin. Lance and Patricia Mahaney, members of the Four Arts, echo the sentiment: “Isn’t it nice that we were able to take a historical school building from our past and repurpose it for the future? Tradition is a big part of Palm Beach and education never goes out of style. This building is a dramatic advance in that strategy. Excellence is the mantra of our organization and this building will allow us to complement the 317 programs and offerings this year.” u To learn more about the campaign to support the Dixon building, call the Society of the Four Arts at 561.655.7227.

C H R I S TO P H E R FAY / RO B E RT S TE V E N S ( P H OTO G R A P H S )

“Our newly expanded Campus

G L I D D E N S PI N A + PA RT N E R S ( R E N D E R I N G S ) ;

at the Society of the Four Arts (below).


SURF ON REEF ROAD: If you can appreciate a perfect beach break with a sandy bottom, Reef Road is ideal at mid-tide. Look out for a strong wind from the northwest, west, or southwest on a breezy day. You will often find a regionally classic, hollow tube at a standout spot on the island of Palm Beach. Call the p.b. Boys Club Surf Shop for boards and lessons from talented locals who will show you the way. For more information, visit pbboysclub.com.

TEN DROPS IN MY PALM BEACH BUCKET BY BINKIE ORTHWEIN

Creating a bucket list is the ideal way to utilize your time and resources to accomplish and experience as much as you can out of life. My bucket list keeps me moving, motivated, and adventuresome. Some things promote spontaneity, while others require careful planning and execution. The backbone of any good list consists of fears to overcome, goals to achieve, adventures to take, and things to try. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be an exotic trip around the world. In fact, there is no better place to start than with some of the simplest of pleasures in your own backyard. For me, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Beach...


VISIT THE RARE SPECIES CONSERVATORY FOUNDATION: The Rare Species Conservatory Foundation is a non-profit organization that is located to the west of Palm Beach. Its goal is to save critically endangered species and ecosystems from the brink of extinction. This 30-acre conservatory is a labor of love where staff members are so committed that they don’t take a salary. Among the several interesting species currently involved in the breeding program and conservation efforts are the pygmy marmoset from South America, the mountain bongo antelope from Kenya, and the Golden Lion Tamarin from Brazil. For more information, visit rarespecies.org.

GO FOR DRINKS AT HMF: The Breakers in Palm Beach is bringing back “Cocktail Culture” at HMF, the newly renovated hotel bar and tribute to Henry Morrison Flagler. Internationally renowned designer Adam Tihany—of New York’s Per Se, Daniel, and Le Cirque and London’s Mo Ba—focused on bringing American glamour to Palm Beach. Chef Joey Tuazon wows his guests in a theater-style kitchen while vibrant music plays in the background. Custom cocktails such as the Railcar #91 and the Chanel #6 complement the small plates and tastes from the “Food Truck” portion of the menu. If you prefer wine, there are 28,000 bottles to choose from in The Breaker’s collection. A 1950sinspired cigarette girl in a bright red dress offers menu items to try outdoors in the grand courtyard. For more information, visit thebreakers.com.

Between the months of March and October, F O U N DAT I O N ( R A R E S P E C I E S ) ; J I M A B E R N E T H Y ( S E A T U RT LE S )

CO U RTE S Y O F D R . PAU L R . R E I LLO , R A R E S P E C I E S CO N S E RVATO RY

WATCH SEA TURTLES HATCHING:

almost 90 percent of all sea turtle nesting takes place in Florida. Turtles return to the beaches where they were originally birthed. There, in nesting sites, they lay close to 100 golf ball–sized eggs. After laying eggs, they return to the ocean and let the babies incubate for about 50 days. When the babies emerge, they use environmental clues, including the light of the moon, to find their way back to the ocean. Only one in 1,000 hatchlings survives at sea for 12 to 50 years in order to become a reproductive sea turtle. Learn more on a “turtle walk” with the Museum of Discovery and Science. For more information, visit mods.org. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 1 7


GO SHOOTING AT THE SOUTH FLORIDA SHOOTING CLUB: The South Florida Shooting Club owns 600 acres of land located only 30 minutes from Palm Beach. There, you can enjoy eight trap fields, two skeet fields, and tower shoots. Afterward, sip a cocktail in the lodge and take a peak at the renowned gunroom, stocked with the most prestigious gunmakers in the world, including Purdey, Kriegoff, Holland & Holland, and Parrazzi. Famed coach Doug Vine offers many levels of instruction for newcomers and old pros alike. There are many tournaments to take advantage of and parties and gatherings for the sporty clientele. For more information, visit stuartshootingclub.com.

GO SAILFISHING: Twenty miles north of the Palm Beach inlet and 6 miles offshore is where you will find “sailfish alley,” where the acrobatic billfish jump from December to April during their migration. Sailfishing success requires a bit of luck and a skilled angler. When sailfish catch their wind, there’s no telling where they will end up, as they are the fastest fish in the sea. The Silver Sailfish Derby is the oldest tournament of its kind and is held out of the West Palm Beach Fishing Club. Watch for red pennants hanging from outriggers on fishing boats that are returning to the harbor—they keep track of the days catch. When a chilly wind blows out of the north, look for sailfish jumping up and surfing the waves. They are truly an amazing site to see! For more information, visit westpalmbeachfishingclub.org.

ATTEND THE CITIZEN POLICE ACADEMY: If you are a Palm Beach vigilante, then the Citizen Police Academy is the perfect class to hone your skills. It provides an opportunity for individuals who live and work in the town to become familiar with the day-to-day operations a year, typically in March, and consists of six consecutive afternoons. Participants take part in two-hour rides with police officers. Classes cover topics such as the history of the Palm Beach Police Department, officer selection and training, traffic and DUI enforcement, and more. For more information, visit palmbeachpolice.com.

T E R RY G I B S O N ( S A I L F I S H I N G )

of the police department. It takes place once


DINE AT MEAT MARKET: This much-awaited establishment is bringing a piece of Miami to Palm Beach with a sexier, more glamorous take on the traditional steakhouse. Restaurateur David Tornek and partner chef Sean Brasel focus on regional ingredients and traditional favorites. Savor the Crudo bar for raw preparations or Kobes and Porterhouses in the modern dining area—all served with succulent sides. The Palm Beach location promises the same sophisticated cuisine, innovative cocktails, and bustling energy that has earned its sister restaurant on Lincoln Road in Miami national awards and accolades since it opened in 2009. Meat Market will be located at 191 Bradley Place.

TAKE A CLASS AT THE PALM BEACH PHOTOGRAPHIC CENTRE: Now celebrating more than 25 years of world-class exposure, the Palm Beach Photographic Centre is esteemed throughout the U.S. and beyond as an epicenter for the photography world. Its school offers a wide range of educational programming, from mastering basic techniques to investigating the latest innovations in photography. Offering one-on-one instruction, one-day classes, or weeklong workshops taught by master photographers, the not-for-profit Palm Beach Photographic Centre has a global reputation for providing a preeminent education. Classes in January include basics as well as more advanced classes, like Joyce Tenneson’s “The Intimate Portrait” and Craig Blacklock’s “Nature Photography.” For more information, visit workshop.org.

ATTEND THE TUESDAY LECTURES AT THE SOCIETY OF THE FOUR ARTS: The Esther B. O’Keeffe Tuesday lecture series begins every January at 3 p.m. and continues for 12 weeks. This year the series will include opera legend Renée Fleming, political commentator George Will, and actor-turned-cookbook author Stanley Tucci. The lecture series is the Four Arts’ most well-attended event, consistently filling the 700-seat auditorium with members, and even drawing an additional crowd to a nearby live telecast provided for overflow audiences. Members are admitted free and tickets go on sale to the public one hour prior to the event for $15. For more information, visit fourarts.org. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 1 9


FUN IN DELRAY BEACH IF PALM BEACH is Sleeping Beauty,

Delray Beach is Yosemite Sam, a rootin’ tootin’ party town with a street scene that rivals anything in Florida. Eighty bars, restaurants, and cafes are on or just off of Atlantic Avenue, between Swinton Avenue and the beach. From the City Oyster for bivalves, to The Office for burgers, to Buddha Sky Bar for sushi and what passes for a view in this low-rise village. Cut 432 cooks up prime steaks in a raucous bar scene, while across the street an Elvis impersonator gyrates for the crowd at Johnny Brown’s, and further down Dada has a live band you can snap to while drinking a martini under the winding roots of a Banyan tree. Tourists and locals are shoehorned onto the sidewalks, on their way from this place to that. And that’s why people live here. The lives of many well-heeled locals are very club-based, but when they venture to town, they enjoy the pure effervescence of it. The mix of people and cultures is attractive and diverse, with a sense of ease permeating the air. It is the Florida of the Northern imagination. “First of all, we thought Delray was more fun,” says the well-connected Kristin Alexandre, who has lived here during the winter for 10 years with her husband, DeWitt, and their two children. “We think everything is more relaxed in 120 QUEST

Delray.” New Canaan real estate guy Billy Hecker and his wife, Leslie, moved to the area last year. “I never thought Florida was my kind of place,” he says. “But I drove down Atlantic Avenue the first time and I went, ‘Wow. This I can do.’ It was young and vibrant, the restaurants, the crowds.” It is only 18 miles from Palm Beach to Delray Beach, but they are worlds apart. The ride down A1A takes you past the grand and the not-so-much: the Ritz-Carlton, the Omphy, Briney Breezes trailer park—finally taking you to Atlantic Avenue, the vein that pulsates with the beat that has become Delray Beach. Take a right, go over the Inland Waterway, and on your right you’ll see the Colony Hotel, the golden-hued inn that defines this town. Jestena Boughton owns and runs this hotel. She’s elegant, lean, and sophisticated—with a background that isn’t exactly built from the hotel management kit. She’s a landscape architect and a former professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her family bought the hotel 77 years ago, and when her parents died, she packed up the mortarboard and came home. She brings her brilliant designer’s eye to all she touches, yet has left much of the original 1923 structure intact, including the small, hand-operated elevator that sits next to the reception desk in

the lobby. “It’s not for everybody,” says Boughton of this eccentric touch. “Like the train that runs through town is not for everybody. Delray isn’t for everybody, but no town is.” She credits the rebirth of the area with the small scale of the buildings along Atlantic Avenue, which allows the sun to shine on the sidewalk cafes all day. And, of course, there are the people. In the ’30s, the town was an artist’s colony of sorts. Today, Delray is youngish, proud, carefree. There are preppies who live near the beach, visiting Palm Beachers, old-timers, snowbirds, and the women the Urban Dictionary calls “Princess Bocahontas.” They are of one, however, in their affection for Atlantic Avenue—the end of which leads you to the beautiful public beach. Delray is also saturated with private clubs, both for the old families and newcomers looking to belong, and are far less stuffy than their Palm Beach brethren. Broughton runs the Colony Cabana Club, which sits on 250 feet of prime beach, comfortable and decidedly unpretentious. It’s even pet-friendly—can you imagine a dog at the Everglades Club? “That’s what’s so perfect about Delray,” says a local society lady. “There are so many clubs there is a place for everyone. No one’s feelings get hurt.” Of course, her family belongs to the two Gulf Stream clubs, the ones with the most juice. u

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y O F PA L M B E AC H CO U N T Y; CO U RTE S Y O F J E S T E N A B RO U G H TO N

BY BILL HUSTED


Opposite page: Yachts have been making their way to Delray Beach for decades. This page, clockwise from top left: Delray’s vibrant social scene; the golden façade of the Colony Hotel; the houses of Delray Beach in 1919; dancing on the Colony’s porch; the luxurious pool at the Colony Cabana Club; a parade for the 4th of July, 1914, along the beach; an announcement for the reopening of the Colony after renovation for the 1936-1937 social season (inset).


ROLLS-ROYCE: THE SPIRIT OF ECSTASY

“THE BEST CAR IN THE WORLD,” announced an advertisement

for Rolls-Royce Motor Cars after its establishment in 1904, when the Honorable Charles Stewart Rolls and Sir Frederick Henry Royce were introduced. Today, the company continues its commitment to excellence—nay perfection. Entering the plant at Goodwood in West Sussex, England, visitors are greeted with the words of Sir Royce: “Take the best that exists and make it better.” And, for more than a century, Rolls-Royce has met the standard, always nodding to the past while incorporating advancements of the present into its cadence. At the heart of the brand is the iconic Spirit of Ecstasy, which has ornamented the hood of Rolls-Royce models since February 6, 1911. According to some, the figure is based on a likeness of Eleanor Thornton, an employee associated with Rolls-Royce who may or may not have seduced the designer, Charles Sykes. “It’s an interesting story and, if it makes you happy, let the myth prevail,” encouraged Sykes’s daughter, Josephine. The symbol is so prized that, should someone attempt to remove it from a car, a sensor immediately responds to retract 122 QUEST

the piece into the hood for safety. Sometimes, customers order the Spirit of Ecstasy in solid gold—at an illustrious $8,650. The excitement that accompanies the Spirit of Ecstasy, and its story, has accelerated with the brand over the years—and was preserved when the company was purchased by BMW in 1998. Rather than be uprooted to Germany, Rolls-Royce was relocated within England, honoring its heritage. The architect, Nicholas Grimshaw, emphasized a construction that was cohesive to its rural setting. And, between the sedum roof and the sustainably sourced wood, as well as the extensive windows, he succeeded. The plant is harmonious with its environment—so much so that, since it was built into a recessed area and surrounded by 400,000 plantings, it’s invisible unless one is standing on the premises. At Goodwood, two familes of cars are currently manufactured: the Phantom and the Ghost. The Phantom, This page: A car participating in the Federal Rally of the Rolls-Royce Owner’s Club of Australia—part of the Centenary World Tour, which took place in 2004; a Rolls-Royce 10-horsepower, two-cylinder model, 1904 (inset).

RO LL S - ROYC E E N T H U S I A S TS C LU B ; RO LL S - ROYC E M OTO R C A R S LT D .

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


Clockwise from top left: A Silver Ghost from the 1920-22 period in India; a bespoke timepiece; centenary celebrations at the Midlands Hotel in Manchester, England; the Honorable Charles Stewart Rolls; preparing leather for the interior of a RollsRoyce car; the assembly of the legendary Merlin engine; a team working on a bespoke Phantom Drophead CoupĂŠ, 2011; Sir Frederick Henry Royce; Rolls-Royce celebrated the success of the Olympic Games in London, England, with the symbol of the torch at the center of the wheel, 2012.

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bulls, rather than cows, are used to address the problem of stretchmarks from pregnancy. In 2011, Rolls Royce sold 3,538 cars—its highest number yet—with China surpassing the United States as its biggest market. The legacy of the Honorable Charles Stewart Rolls and Sir Frederick Henry Royce is alive as the company thrives beyond its centennial anniversary in 2004. “We are still driven by Royce’s inspiring words,” says a spokesperson for Rolls-Royce. “They encourage our designers to challenge automotive conventions and produce ideas others would consider impossible. They challenge our engineers to find innovative solutions to make them possible. And spur our craftspeople to painstakingly turn them into the finished product. It’s how we’ve always made our cars, and it’s how we always will, which is ultimately what makes a Rolls-Royce a Rolls-Royce.” u

RO LL S - ROYC E E N T H U S I A S TS C LU B ; RO LL S - ROYC E M OTO R C A R S LT D .

which is the traditional car—stately and upright—is priced at $398,970 and up. “When a Phantom drives by, the world stands still,” says Ian Cameron, chief designer at Rolls-Royce. And the Ghost, which is the driver-oriented car—athletic and sleek—is priced at $256,650 and up. “Ghost is as refined and cosseting as anything this marque has ever produced,” says Charles Coldham, interior designer at Rolls-Royce. As expected, the production of each and every car is oustanding, passing through 60 craftspeople and technicians before completion. Paint is applied in five coats over the course of seven days, then polished by hand for five hours. The wood for the interior is attended to for a month, between shaping, sanding, lacquering, and polishing. And the leather! Sourced from a farm in the Alps, the Bavarian bulls are raised at an altitude (to prevent mosquito bites) and without barbed wire (to prevent scratches);


This page: The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gearâ&#x20AC;? Centenary Trial hosted a drive for Rolls-Royce cars from London, England, to Edinburgh, Scotland. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Omar Sharif and Ingrid Bergman with a yellow Rolls-Royce car; Eleanor Thornton, the alleged model for the Spirit of Ecstasy; Her Magesty Queen Elizabeth II in a RollsRoyce car; Eric Platford, the chief tester at Rolls-Royce, during the Alpine Trial, 1913.


WORTH IT ALL WRITTEN BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

excitement felt by stepping into the stores on Worth Avenue. Merely picture the thoroughfare: a colorful mélange of luxe shops, colorful garments, and Mediterranean Revival architecture—a marriage that is pure bliss for eager shoppers. Since the 1920s, this palm tree–lined promenade has been a mecca for the fashionable seeking the world’s top designers. At the end of Art Basel Miami, I headed north toward breezy Palm Beach to get my Worth Avenue fix. From trying 126 QUEST

on new Stubbs to marveling at the Marc Chagall show at Wally Findlay, my shop-’til-you-drop journey was filled with adventure. But what made an equally deep impression on me this year was the diversity of fashion, art, and furniture available. At Jennifer Garrigues, I found exquisite Oriental pillows; at Island Company, I unearthed unique accessories; at Saks Fifth Avenue, I discovered Dennis Basso furs for those occasionally cool Palm Beach nights. From classic to cuttingedge, Worth Avenue is always sure to impress. u

H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

FEW SHOPPING DESTINATIONS can match the charge of

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E PA L M B E AC H

PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


This page, clockwise from top: Mediterranean Revival architecture and palm trees at the top of Worth Avenue; a photograph of Worth Avenue taken in the 1940s; the clock tower at one end; Worth Avenue as it looked in the 1920s. Opposite page: A 1960s look down the avenue.


WALLY FINDLAY GALLERIES 165 Worth Avenue / 561.655.2090 Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no small feat to fill over 12,000 square feet with exceptional art. But at Wally Findlay Galleries in Palm Beach, expect to see it done effortlessly. Representing leading contemporary artists as well as secondary markets in Impressionist and Modern masters, the collections at Wally Findlay are sure to suit the best in taste. The galleries are steeped in rich tradition with origins dating back to 1870 in Kansas City. Today, art lovers and collectors both marvel anew at the rotating exhibitions that go on inside. Currently, there are exhibitions featuring Jean Dufy and Marc Chagall.

STUBBS & WOOTTON 1 Via Parigi / 561.655.6857 Purveyors of handmade slippers to be worn day into evening (yes, one of their concepts features a right slipper with the sun and a left one with the moon and stars), Stubbs & Wootton is a favorite among both ladies and gentlemen for their iconic designs that exude both style and comfort. Whether in velvet or needlepoint, prepare to turn heads when you step out in your Stubbs. With boutiques in New York, Southampton, and Palm Beach, Stubbs & Wootton has been outfitting the well-heeled since 1993. The iconic brand has collaborated on designs with Marc Jacobs, J.Crew, and Kanye West. Stubbs & Wootton also allows you to create your own monogram on your choice of velvet or linen slippers. Prince Albert would be proud!

CHARLOTTE KELLOGG

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the destination for tropical colors in linen, silk, and cotton. Tucked away in a corner of the Amore Courtyard, Charlotte Kellogg offers casual clothing designed for the lifestyle of South Florida and other bright-hued resort communities. Her cheerful and breathable designs have been making a colorful splash on the Palm Beach scene since the botique opened in 1998. Now, the store has become a true Palm Beach tradition for fashionable pieces that will suit every occasion, from sportswear to eveningwear. Stop in for a refreshing take on Palm Beach chic. The County Road location just opened, so be sure to visit! 00 QUEST

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

256 Worth Avenue / 561.569.3339 322 South County Road / 561.820.2402


RALPH LAUREN 300 Worth Avenue / 561.651.3900 Make no mistake: Ralph Lauren is synonymous with American style. For over forty years the brand has provided quality products that embody elegance. Ralph Lauren’s Palm Beach location, situated on Worth Avenue, boasts a grand Beaux-Arts façade and an imported European stone fountain that are in perfect step with the Ralph Lauren brand heritage and Palm Beach tradition. As with all their boutiques, you can find apparel for a glamorous evening on the town or a simple polo shirt for tennis. Walking inside the Ralph Lauren boutique is more than walking into a store—it’s like walking into a dream.

SEQUIN 219 Worth Avenue / 561.328.8405 From the set of “Gossip Girl” to the runways of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, Sequin’s presence began over a decade ago. Founders (and sisters) Kim and Linda Renk meld innovative materials and design processes, continuing to produce refreshingly experimental collections season after season. Their colors pop and their designs are one-of-akind. The Renk sisters have created runway and retail pieces with a variety of designers and are currently collaborating with Ruffian, Badgley Mischka, Houghton, Douglas Hannant, and Tadashi Shoji. Stop by one of the locations in New York, Newport, or Palm Beach—or the new Naples and Delray Beach stores. It’s absolutely worth it, pun intended!

JENNIFER GARRIGUES

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

308 Peruvian Avenue / 561.659.7376 Jennifer Garrigues started as a high-fashion model for Christian Dior, James Galanos, Hanae Mori, and Jean Muir, and has always had an eye for sumptuous design herself. Known for her creative taste that harmoniously blends style and comfort, Garrigues offers design services for residential, commercial, and hospitality projects. She has designed for the Carlyle Hotel in New York and for the Palm Beach Polo and Country Club. Her showroom is the perfect place to find that item you didn’t know you needed for your home. From luxurious textiles and pillows to one-of-a-kind furniture, this boutique is a treasure trove filled with items collected from around the world. Drop in and explore. JAN MU OA NRTYH 22001038 1 0 29 0


WILLIAM R. EUBANKS INTERIOR DESIGN 340 Worth Avenue / 561.805.9335 Ever since William R. Eubanks opened his Palm Beach location almost 14 years ago, the showroom has been every designer and connoisseur’s must-see first stop when shopping the sunny isle for exceptional French and English antiques and fine accessories. Unanimously known for providing its design clients with nothing less than well-dressed and uniquely placed sumptuous interiors, the showroom combines beauty and originality by stocking many of the unique furnishings, objets, and fine art from William R. Eubanks’s constant travels throughout the U.S. and Europe.

DENNIS BASSO (AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE) 172 Worth Avenue / 561.833.2551 Dennis Basso has long been considered one of America’s premier celebrity designers. His feminine silhouettes and styles are seen on the most fashionable and socially influential women in the world, no matter their generation. Ever since his entrée into fashion in 1983, Mr. Basso has attracted an enviable following for his luxurious designs in fur. In 2007 he complemented his furs and outerwear with ready-to-wear pieces on the runways of New York City, and continues to show during New York Fashion Week. Over the years, Basso has created furs for many major celebrities, including Ivana Trump, Eva Longoria, Brooke Shields, Nicole Kidman, Penélope Cruz, Jada Pinkett Smith, Kim Raver, Naomi Campbell, and Stephanie Seymour. Today, Dennis Basso furs and ready-to-wear collections can be found at select Saks Fifth Avenue boutiques, including the impressive Palm Beach location.

ISLAND COMPANY 256 Worth Avenue / 561.655.3231 “Quit your job, buy a ticket, get a tan, fall in love, never return,” reads Island Company’s mantra. Sounds like a good plan! In 2002, Spencer Antle, founder and creative director, was trying to help his girlfriend find a bikini that they both liked for an island getaway. Neither had any fashion background, but after making the company’s first 13 bikinis and successfully selling them in the U.S. and the Caribbean, Antle realized Island Company required his full attention. Now, Island Company has full lines of travel apparel for both men and women, a vintage eyewear collection, and a complete suncare line, as well as accessories for the intrepid world traveler.


TIFFANY & CO. 259 Worth Avenue / 561.659.6090 It marks the heart of town. This spectacular Tiffany & Co. boutique opened its doors in 1991 and has since come to define the Palm Beach shopping experience. Tiffany & Co. was founded in 1837 as a “stationery and fancy goods emporium” and has now grown into a global brand. Tiffany & Co. is renowned for its fine jewelry, often given as gifts for the most special of occasions. Whether you are looking for an engagement ring or some new stationery, Tiffany & Co. in Palm Beach is sure to suit your needs.

FIANDACA 330 Worth Avenue / 561.659.3339 Alfred Fiandaca was born into fashion: the Boston native cut his first patterns by his father’s side at just nine years old! In 1962, Fiandaca founded his eponymous label, which has expanded into New York, Boston, and Palm Beach. Fiandaca continues to wow both stars and the social set with his one-of-a-kind designs. His clients have included Audrey Hepburn, Lady Bird Johnson, Julie Andrews, Louise Fletcher, Nancy Reagan, Anita Baker, Gail Ryan, and Ann Romney. Don’t expect to find Mr. Finadaca’s clothes online or in department stores. The carefully crafted pieces are available exclusively at Fiandaca boutiques. From classic to modern, Fiandaca never fails to fascinate.

LARS BOLANDER 3731 South Dixie Highway / 561.832.2121 Lars Bolander knows furniture. From interior design stints in London to working with German industrialist/playboy Gunter Sachs, Bolander went solo in 1987 and has since opened locations in the Hamptons, New York City, and Palm Beach. His showrooms inspire awe—the one in Manhattan is almost 3,000 square feet! While this Nordic designer may seem an odd pairing for the tropical scene, Bolander’s theatrical style and passion for furniture make his showroom a perfect fit for Palm Beach. Over the years the famed Swedish decorator has developed a form all his own: a daring mixture of ideas and geographic blends that exudes both sophistication and a pleasing restfulness for the eye. Come treat your eyes to Mr. Bolander’s feast. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 3 1


The Party that Made Palm Beach

The Bal Poudré in Whitehall’s Grand Ballroom, March 1903

Mary Lily Flagler dressed for the Bal Poudré

Henry Flagler 1830 - 1913

Ever wonder why there are so many galas in Palm Beach each Season or how they became a traditional part of each Season? The next time you’re donning black tie or gown, you can blame or credit, as the case may be, Henry Flagler and Whitehall. One hundred ten years ago, the first gala in Palm Beach, a Bal Poudré, was hosted by Henry and Mary Lily Flagler in Whitehall’s Grand Ballroom on March 5, 1903.

Bal Poudrés (literally translated, powdered wig balls) were popular, both in America and in England, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In


England, for example, the Countess of Warwick loved to host Bal Poudrés (Whitehall’s Breakfast Room is a copy of the State Dining Room at Warwick Castle). In America, Bal Poudrés became an interesting fusion of America’s fascination with Marie Antoinette (Whitehall’s Drawing Room is an homage to Marie Antoinette) and hero worship of George and Martha Washington. Bal Poudrés were typically hosted around the time of George Washington’s birthday, which nicely coincided with the end of the Season in Palm Beach. And as a consequence, in Palm Beach the Bal Poudré became the traditional way to celebrate the end of the Season.

In fact, the first Bal Poudré hosted by Henry and Mary Lily Flagler at Whitehall was so important in Palm Beach history that what has become a rich tradition of hosting an extraordinary number of galas each Season in Palm Beach, raising much-needed funds for an impressive number of worthy causes, can be traced directly back to that single extraordinary party in 1903, a party that was described at the time by the New York Herald as, “One of the most sumptuous social affairs ever attempted south of Washington.” Two thousand thirteen will mark the centennial of the


end of Henry Flagler’s extraordinary life, though his profound legacy and influence in Florida continues even today. In honor of Henry Flagler’s amazing and enduring legacy in Palm Beach and Florida, on February 23rd the Flagler Museum’s Whitehall Society will host the first Bal Poudré in more than a century, at Whitehall, where it all began 110 years before. The Whitehall Society’s Bal Poudré will be staged throughout the interiors of one of America’s most beautiful National Historic Landmarks. Valet parkers will greet guests as they arrive in white or black tie and period costume to Whitehall’s grand portico. Climbing the steps of the portico guests will enter the Grand Hall, through Whitehall’s massive bronze doors flanked by doorman in period costume, where they will enjoy a cocktail reception in the largest room in any Gilded Age home in America, the Grand Hall.

The funds raised through the Whitehall Society’s Bal Poudré will support the Museum’s education programs, including school tours. Each year thousands of students visit the Museum freeof-charge. Their visit to Whitehall is underwritten by the Museum’s Members and Contributors, and the proceeds of fund-raising events like the Bal Poudré. For more information of the Whitehall Society’s Bal Poudré, please visit www.flaglermuseum.us or call (561) 655-2833.

Following the cocktail reception, guests will move to the Grand Ballroom where an elegant dinner awaits them amid a Louis XV interior preserved exactly as it was when Palm Beach’s first grand party was hosted there 110 years before. Following dinner in the Grand Ballroom, guests will be invited to enjoy an evening of dancing in the West Room, and for VIPs, exclusive access to a tented area on Whitehall dock with special drink and hors d’oeuvres service.

Whitehall, 1902


Builders of the Highest Quality

It has been our mission to set the standard for excellence in construction in the spirit of the age-old builder/patron tradition. To that end, we have worked to differentiate ourselves from other contractors and have created a corporate culture that is built upon enduring relationships - a place where company personnel, clients, designers and architects are assured that quality, integrity and service are inseparable from our fundamental mission, which is to build enduring value for our Clients. The Company is the logical extension of our belief that construction companies should be held to a higher standard and judged not only on the basis of uncompromising workmanship and service, but the quality of the total experience.

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The Whitehall Society’s Community Impact The Whitehall Society’s purpose is to cultivate the support and patronage of a new generation of residents of the Palm Beach area who have an interest in arts and culture, history, architecture, and the preservation of Whitehall. Funds raised support children’s education programs. Each year thousands of students visit the Flagler Museum free-of-charge. Their visit is underwritten by the Museum’s Members and Contributors, and the proceeds of fund raising events like the Whitehall Society’s Bal Poudré.


KOCHMAN & ZISKA PLC and NIEVERA WILLIAMS DESIGN salute the Chairwomen of the Bal PoudrĂŠ

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY: L I L A P H OTO

Sterling McCracken Susan Malloy Tracy Smith Nicole Munder


APPEARANCES

MOMENTS TO TREASURE BY HILARY GEARY

DECEMBER BRINGS Christmas cheer with the calendar brightly lit with all kinds of nonstop holiday festivities. New York City literally sparkles this time of year with decorated trees, wreaths on every door, and candles in windows to illuminate it all. The town is glowing and is decked out like no other place on this planet. Every time I stroll up Park Avenue, I cannot believe how magical it looks with Christmas trees lit with hundreds of tiny white lights in the 138 QUEST

center islands for blocks and blocks. Fifth Avenue dazzles me too with a thousand points of light; every store has made a huge effort. There is a touch of fantasy as well: Cartier looks like a great big present wrapped in an enormous bow, and Bulgari looks as if it is in the grasp of a glittering snake coiled around the building. And of course there is the enormous Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center and Santa on every corner! Intrepid New Yorkers never

lose their spirit, especially Christmas spirit, despite the fact the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;particularly downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is still limping from Hurricane Sandy. Everyone jumped into their black tie to toast and cheer on Grace and Chris Meigher, Joseph Ripp, and the star of stage and screen, nine-time Tony Award-winner, the one and only Tommy Tune, as they were being honored at the Lighthouse International benefit for the blind at a festive dinner dance.

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Left: Hilary Geary and Wilbur Ross hosted a book party for Mario Nievera at their residence in Palm Beach. Right: Susan Malloy and Harry Benson.


Alex Donner’s orchestra got everyone on the dance floor, and Alex also brilliantly ran the auction, which raised significant funds for this worthwhile cause! Amongst the gang supporting this important event were Gigi and Harry Benson, Karen LeFrak, Peggy and Alberto Mejia, Marianna and George Kaufman, Connie and Randy Jones, Peter Lyden, Roberto de Guardiola, Arlene Dahl and Marc Rosen, Gillian and Sylvester Miniter, Fe Fendi, Sharon Bush, Amy Fine Collins, Mario Buatta, William Ivy Long, Enid Nemy, Somers and Jonathan Farkas, Eleanora and Michael Kennedy, and more. That same night supporters of the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center popped into Harry Winston to salute the spring dance chairs Julia Koch, Karen LeFrak,

Bunny Williams and John Rosselli, and also to celebrate the 50th anniversary of that heavenly restaurant we all adore, La Grenouille. Kathy Hilton breezed in from Los Angeles and wanted to catch up with her pals, so what did she do? Take over the back room at Swifty’s and give a lunch, and a very festive lunch at that! Kathy’s fabulous decorations got us all in the spirit of the season: when you stepped into the room you saw round tables with snowwhite cloths topped with little Christmas trees, candy canes, Santa place cards, and groupings of ceramic gingerbread houses (that we all got to take home along with Cornelia Guest’s yummy cookies). The lunch started with crabmeat, cheese soufflé, sorbet, and cookies, yum! Among the guests were the beautiful Nicky

photos of his magical gardens, I called him and said to sign us up for a book party! So Wilbur and I invited some pals over to toast our favorite landscape designer and his dazzler of a book, a must-buy for Christmas, Valentine’s Day, or any day! Everybody is crazy about darling Mario, so all of Palm Beach turned up to raise a glass to him. Among the guests were Robin and John Pickett, Kit and Bill Pannill, Michele and Howard Kessler, Martha and Ken Kessler, Belinda and Tom Hassen, Talbott Maxey, Hillie Mahoney, Harry Benson, John Mashek, John Loring, Fernanda Niven, Lucy Musso, Mary and Mark Freitas, Whitney and Eric Bylin, Peggy and Dudley Moore, Jean Tailer, Tommy Quick, Leta and Ridgely Foster, Page Lee Hufty, KC and Johnny Pickett, Patrick Park and

CO U RTE S Y O F H I L A RY G E A RY; LU C I A N C A P E H A RT

From left: Nicky Hilton, Kathy Hilton, and Dana Hammond, at a festive lunch at Swifty’s with friends; Corniela Guest and Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia.

and Shelly Carr, and to see the “Harry Winston Hope Collection Bracelet.” This limited-edition bijoux will have 100 percent of its revenues donated to charity—way to go, Harry Winston! We also sipped champagne and applauded the very generous Frédéric de Narp, the star CEO and president of Winston’s. Also on that same evening, I have to mention the ever-talented Charles Masson (of La Grenouille fame) had a show of his most recent artworks at Trelliage, hosted by

Hilton, Boaz Mazor, Pamela Gross, Allison Mazzola, Mark Gilbertson, Nina Griscom (who has a cool new blog at www.ninagriscom.com), Anne Hearst, Cornelia Guest, Cornelia Bregman, Katharina Otto-Bernstein, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Dana Hammond, Peggy Siegal, Debbie Bancroft, and more. ’Tis the season in P.B. too, and when I heard the very talented landscape architect Mario Nievera had just come out with the big, beautiful book Forever Green, with

Lola Astanova, Susan and Dom Telesco, Liz and John Schuler, Kate Gubelmann, Susan and Tim Malloy, Rand Araskog, Renee and Carlos Morrison, Annette and Joe Allen, Sue and Ed Elson, Mimi and LeRoy McMakin, Mary Ourisman, Jean and Will Matthews, Gillian Fuller, Ken Karakul, Carol Mack, Lee Lee and Ambrose Monell, Candy and Bill Hamm, Jackie and Richard Cowell, Pat Cook and Bob Nederlander, Rodney Dilliard, and lots more. u J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 3 9


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST With a trip to England cutting into our columnist’s time on the scene, this month begins with a Cinema Society screening or two and ends with dancing at Doubles—the most Christmassy spot in New York—and a day spent SantaCon-ing. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

The Biergarten at The Standard hosted a Cinema Society afterparty on December 11.


Daniel Benedict, Olivia Palermo, and Johannes Huebl at the Cinema Society after-party for Django Unchained.

Mackenzie Lee and Amy Greenhough at Ph-D atop Dream Downtown. Sia Furler making an entrance at the Biergarten at The Standard for an after-party.

Quentin Tarantino celebrating his film

PATRICK MCMULLAN

Django Unchained with a fist pump.

Paul Johnson Calderon and Peter Davis at an event

Zoe Kravitz at the Cinema Society after-party

sponsored by The Hollywood Reporter and Samsung Galaxy.

for Django Unchained on December 11.

“THERE ARE NO STRANGERS on Christmas,” said Adele Comandini and Edward Sutherland—whoever they are. If I learned anything in December, it’s that the statement is true. Between the merriment and the mistletoe, everyone was joyful with everyone, especially post-eggnog. On December 5, the Cinema Society hosted the premiere of Playing for Keeps with Chrysler. At the after-party at Ph-D at the Dream Downtown, I spotted arm candy Jessica Biel with her arm candy, Justin Timberlake—be still my teenage heart—as well as Gerard Butler, Zosia Mamet, and Rachel Roy. And, as always, there were plenty of models and plenty of bottles. On the 9th—a Sunday, FYI—I attended the premiere of Stand Up Guys at MoMA, which was hosted by Lakeshore

Entertainment, Lionsgate, and Sidney Kimmel Entertainment with the Cinema Society. Seated by Matt Dillon, Jeremy Piven, and Anja Rubik, I pinched myself. And when Al Pacino and Christopher Walken (a.k.a. the O.G.s of everything ever) addressed the audience within run-up-and-hugyou distance, I pinched myself twice. At the after-party at the Oak Room at the Plaza, guests drank Appleton Estate cocktails like Monday wasn’t hours away... On the 11th, I attended a screening of Les Misérables with Amanda Seyfried, the spokesperson for Clé de Peau Beauté, which was launching its Spring 2013 collection at the Crosby Street Hotel. After experimenting with lip colors named “Raspberry Ripple,” “Sugar Candy,” and “Sweet Nougat” J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 4 1


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Bobby Cannavale, of “Boardwalk Empire” fame, at the Cinema Society after-party for the

(noms?), I entered the theater. Oh, to experience a drama like Les Misérables in a room of beauty editors (read: women)... So many tissues! Later, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of Django Unchained with The Hollywood Reporter and Samsung Galaxy, which was attended by the starriest of stars, between 50 Cent, Naomi Campbell, Cameron Diaz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Zac Efron, Liv Tyler, and Ronnie Wood. Guests mixed and mingled around the ping pong table at the Biergarten at The Standard, sipping on DeLeón cocktails rather than ale and lager. A Thom Brown for Target blazer here, a conversation with Couri Hay there... The result? An evening that was anything but “standard.” On the 14th, the West Side Y’s Grosvenor Neighborhood House provided partygoers with an excuse for dancing at the

From left: Jeremy Piven at the Oak Room at the Plaza; Albie Hueston and Tali Lennox at the Cinema Society afterparty for the premiere of Stand Up Guys.

Sherry Netherland. Black-tie is always a good look, especially set against the red velvet-ness of Doubles. Adam Klopp, Nina Mayfield, and Nina Platt were among the revelers twirling and being twirled on the dance floor, between glasses of champagne and desserts. By morning, I had relocated to Bar and Books—as was to be expected. The next day? SantaCon. Aspirin, Red Gatorade, Repeat. I met for brunch at Extra Place—which serves delicacies like $3 mimosas and breakfast BLTs and lamb meatballs in the alley of CBGB fame—before ho ho ho-ing, en masse, from Brother Jimmy’s Union Square to somewhere in the West Village to the Financial District. All of that while earing fur and a thermal onesie from Land’s End! Some people hate this event. Some people are the Grinch. u

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

premiere of Stand Up Guys on December 9.


Fletcher Hall and Alex Oelsner together at an event at Doubles at the Sherry Netherland on December 14.

Miles Rutter and Dane Evans toasting a worthy cause at Doubles.

Brad Hunnewell and Carver Diserens modeling two styles of suits for SantaCon.

Guests dancing to the DJ at the West Side Y’s Grosvenor Neighborhood House event.

Maggie Lydecker, Pete Hansen, and Meredith Murphy supporting the West Side Y’s Grosvenor Neighborhood House.

Sarah Brown and Amanda Seyfried at Clé de Peau’s screening of Les Misérables.

Carver Diserens and our columnist, both wearing onesies, at SantaCon on December 15.

Scott Gourlay and Medora Hartz in the lobby of the

Marcus Lindholm and Caroline Smith at a

Sherry Netherland before dancing at Doubles.

pre-SantaCon brunch at Extra Place. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 4 3


SNAPSHOT

ESTABLISHED IN 1915, the Tropical Fruit Shop is the oldest store in Palm Beach, Florida. This community landmark has never changed its address in all that time, even as it has changed hands, remaining at 261 Royal Poinciana Way for nearly a century. With its bright, cheery decor and authentically retro style, the shop encapsulates the very essence of the Palm Beach of yore. What is the secret to this little store’s success? Freshness. From the end of October through the end of May, the Tropical Fruit Shop offers the most luscious, ripe, and juicy citrus available. The best-seller is, naturally, the oranges everyone associates with the state, which you can have squeezed into a glass of scrumptious juice, or order a basket of them to be delivered to the poor, deprived Northerners you know. With a variety of grapefruits and tangerines in stock as well, this 144 QUEST

store could have cured the pirates’ curse of scurvy if they’d made it a regular stop on their sea-faring routes. The shop’s current owner, Stephanie Bojokles, purchased the place in 1995. She has added coffee, vegetables, and baked goods to the menu, as well as cute souvenirs and outdoor seating. In 2010, she won the “Business Leader of the Year” award from the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce, and insists that her employees have her same friendly and attentive attitude. For example, she insists they all learn proper phone etiquette because “you only get one chance to make a first impression.” Certainly, the impression this store has made on Palm Beach is a lasting one. —Lily Hoagland This page: The colorful outdoor seating welcomes customers to sit a spell; an old pink Cadillac complements the store’s style (inset).

CO U RTE S Y O F S TE P H A N I E B O J O K LE S O F T H E T RO PI C A L F RU I T S H O P

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