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400 The Quest

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146

134

CONTENTS THE 400 I SSUE 112

THE QUEST 400

112

Our annual list of the prominent figures who have

made the cut and shaped the city as we know it today, accompanied by festive pictures of tbe best parties in society. WRITTEN BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

134

NEW YORK’S NARRATIVE

Via Murals of New York City: The Best of New

York’s Public Paintings from Bemelmans to Parrish (Rizzoli), readers are invited to explore the writing on the wall.

142

THE BANDLEADER PLAYED ON

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

A look at the bandleader, Alex Donner,

who brings style and flair to the momentous events he creates the soundtrack to, and sets the tone for great times.

146

STATELY HOLDINGS

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

For centuries, the English aristocracy elevated country

living to an art, as our author discovers on a grand tour.

BY

DARRELL HARTMAN


100

88

CONTENTS C OLUMNS 26

SOCIAL DIARY

82

SOCIAL CALENDAR

86

HARRY BENSON

88

OBSERVATIONS

90

FRESH FINDS

96

BUSINESS

100

TRAVEL

152

APPEARANCES

154

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

160

SNAPSHOT

The chronicle of social happenings about town. BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA Our guide to this month’s events in Manhattan and beyond.

90

Our tribute to an artist and beloved columnist.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

Our columnist shares memories of summers past.

BY

TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

All your fashion needs for fall. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Next Step Realty helps to situate graduates as they transition into their careers.

Rhode Island’s Ocean House remains the ultimate seaside retreat. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO To Italy, with love—then back to the New York scene. Staying cool as a hot child in the city.

The Bowery: New York City’s original thoroughfare.

BY

BY

BY

HILARY GEARY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

E LIZABETH Q UINN BROWN


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO ART DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY A SSI STANT EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS INTERN

AMANDA PEREZ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON DARRELL HARTMAN BILL HUSTED MICHAEL THOMAS JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

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NEW FROM RIZZOLI:

CLARK HALSTEAD PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ELIZABETH STRIBLING ROGER W. TUCKERMAN PETER TURINO WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2013. All rights reserved. Vol. 27, No. 8. QUEST—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. QUEST, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Whether hedonistic (The Great Gatsby, above) or intellectual (Breakfast at Tiffany’s, inset), the best parties can make us connect with one another and, even best, a scintillating version of ourselves.

NOBODY LOOKS back at his or her life and wishes they’d

gotten to bed earlier. If you’re on the list for a good party, you have to make an appearance. The 400 list is the apex of that concept, setting the standard of who’s who (and, by omission, who’s not) in High Society. One of the last true bibles of American peerage, we here at Quest are lucky to be its gatekeeper. “How do you pick who makes the cut?” asked intrepid reporter Ariel Rubin. The truth is, the list writes itself. It grows on its own, with strong roots using the graduating class as fertile soil. We’re just the gardeners. This is the 20th anniversary of the list, hence the pictures of people toasting, dancing, and having a ball on our pages. We picked only the best parties, naturally: Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball, Bianca Jagger’s over-the-top birthday at Studio 54, J.F.K. and Jackie’s wedding celebration, and many more events that became shining moments in our cultural memory (that said, they are slightly dimmer for those revelers who over-indulged). Perhaps, if you flip through this issue in your cocktail best, a Midnight in Paris–type adventure could unfold, and suddenly Andy Warhol is handing you a drink while Babe Paley is telling you to start wearing your scarf like so. Unfortunately, for now, our time machine is still in beta testing, and can only go in one direction: forward. We keep that in mind when going through the names on our list, because who “the social elite” are will be redefined continuously as society 24

QUEST

itself evolves. Railroad barons have been replaced by tech wizards, titled noblewomen now make room for female heads of enterprise, and debutantes can now become “celebutantes.” Being involved with a living historical document is a real treat, and much credit must be given to our columnist David Patrick Columbia, who created the list for Quest in 1993. He is still the best gage for someone’s stature in society, and a gentleman in the old tradition that the original author of the 400, Caroline Astor, would have appreciated. “People are interested in people,” he explains, “and lists are people, that simple. The Quest 400 defines, however broadly, that segment of the population today that is ‘society.’” As a side note, researching old party pictures is incredibly fun—go through some of your own for a good laugh.

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Nancy “Slim” Gross Hawks Hayward Keith, photographed by J. Engsteadt; Marella Agnelli by R. Avedon; Gloria Vanderbilt by F. Scavullo; C. Z. Guest by Clifford Coffin; Lee Radziwill by H. Clarke; Barbara “Babe” Cushing Mortimer Paley by J. Rawlings; Dolores Guinness, by R. Avedon.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY MY TAKE on the wet, cold

spring that we had this year was that we’d have a sometimes wet, lovely, sunny, cool summer to anticipate. Wouldn’t that have been nice? Instead, it seems that, all around the world, people are

having an experience that’s anything but that. Summer Nights. The city cleared out for vacation last month, except for the tourists and the young who are old enough to go out on their own. New York is a great

place to be if you’re a teenager in summertime and have some money in your pocket (or more likely, some plastic in your pocket). The teenagers are still taking in the New York nightlife, which caters almost specifically to them

anyway nowadays. I did get down to the Booth to see Bette Midler for her last week in I’ll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers. Broadway was jammed with people. It was a Friday night, and the Great White Way

YO U N G N E W YO R K E R S FO R T H E P H I L H A R MO N I C

Whitney Lee and Tom Anderman 26 QUEST

Amanda Muchnick and Jennifer Volmer

Julianna Young, Collins Ward and Ludovica Ferme

Elijah Duckworth-Schachter and Katy DeConti

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1995

Shellley Wanger Mortimer

Julia Flescher

Michael and Anne-Marie Crichton

Deeda Blair and Maurice Tempelsman

was wall-to-wall with people, many of whom looked like tourists—although, nowadays, a lot of New Yorkers look like tourists too, if you catch my drift. However, Times Square and the blocks that exist just north of it are awesomely sensational to look at. Talk about razzmatazz! Broadway has always been a promenade of ballyhoo and neon with thousands of people just strolling along, taking it all in. The difference now is there are more people, mobs of them, even. And the lights are brighter, and bigger, and more animated, and even in greater quantity. 28 QUEST

Carol Petrie

The Booth was packed for Midler. Probably three quarters (or more) of the audience had never heard of Sue Mengers until Bette came along to play her. As soon as the curtain went up, the audience applauded and cheered, and applauded and cheered—a good start for any show. She is nothing if not a supremely talented performer, never letting that energy drop off even for a second. The show ran for 90 minutes. She sat on an ample sofa and, except for moving around on it frequently, she never got up until the very end. (It wasn’t

mic’d, though it should have been.) She kept the audience rapt and hanging on to her every word, which included the blue stuff. And they were laughing, such guffawing all the way through. The play is a one-woman show, packed with one-liners that Midler delivered with hilarious, sleek bravado. But Mengers’ life—which was mainly her career in a careeroriented town—had a very bittersweet denouement. And it came when she was still a comparatively young woman. She was on top of her world and then her world went away. It went to Mike Ovitz, etc.

Mick and Ann Jones

This was not funny, and no amount of ironic cracks could have made it thus for her. She basically got kicked out of her business by some bad choices, but mainly by clients— many of whom were friends—which “tells you a little something about the gentlemen of the community,” as Billy Wilder used to say. Mengers had such a powerful personality and ability to endure, however, that she created a new world for herself: that of hostess (read: high priestess) on her sofa, smoking her cigs and her marijuana, having her drinks, and entertaining all her buddies, many


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A of them her former clients, but nevertheless… The world has now seen Bette Midler’s version of the character, but it’s a classic Hollywood tragedy—think Norma Desmond in Sunset Boulevard or Margo Channing in All About Eve. Another actress will do something quite different and equally as affecting. Maybe Streep or Redgrave—it will be someone surprising. The Great Big World of what used to be called society… Today, society exists as its simplest and most effective version. There was an

article by Ruth La Ferla called “What Price Generosity?” in the Style section of The New York Times, which discusses the charity circuit and how much it costs those girls to make it in New York and to keep at it. La Ferla used the annual New York Botanical Garden dinner dance as the scene to exemplify the result of all that expense. The evening is one of the very last of the spring season; it used to mark the end of it, though nowadays there is no end to anything. Its patrons are among the wealthiest, and in many cases

(though, not all cases), most established members of the New York social set. La Ferla called me about the piece when she was working on it. The objective, as I understood it, was to figure out how much it cost to partake of this kind of highprofile New York social life. I told her, off the top, that it took “a lot of chutzpah and a lot of money.” She thought that was funny and laughed, but never used the quote. It is funny and it doesn’t apply to everyone, of course, but it does apply to a prominent aspect of the charity social

scene these days. The getting and spending of money has long been a part of New York’s social life. It reaches back decades, even centuries. There have always been women who were extravagant in their achievement as fashion plates. Cole Porter commented on it in the 1930s in a song he wrote for Ethel Merman called, “I’ve Still Got My Health (So What Do I Care)”: What do I care if Mrs Harrison Williams, Is the best-dressed woman in town?

L AU N C H O F G L A S S S W I M W E A R AT H OT E L A M E R I C A N O I N N E W YO R K

Martha and John Glass 30 QUEST

Emilie Ghilaga and Skender Ghilaga

Georgia Stafla and Peter Smith

John Glass

Karen Tompkins, Evelyn Tomkins and Peter Tufo

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Victoria Leeds and Olimpia Emo


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A What do I care if Countess Barbara Hutton, Has a Rolls-Royce built for each gown? Why should I get the vapors when I read in the papers, That Mrs. Simpson dines behind the throne? I’ve got a cute king of my own… When Jacqueline Kennedy was married to Aristotle Onassis, it was reported that she spent hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on her wardrobe—which, allegedly, was much to his annoyance. Although this came as a surprise to the average reader, it was still a pittance compared to some of her friends who could and would spend in the millions. They were considered the “best dressed,” of course, and many believed such funding

was necessary in order to achieve such fashion glory. The irony is that it is unlikely that Mrs. Onassis would spend those kinds of sums of her own money, as she was known to be tight with a buck. These women, especially Mrs. Onassis and some of the Capote swans like Gloria Guinness, Babe Paley, and Marella Agnelli were also good for the fashion business. Mrs. Paley was once photographed (by Women’s Wear Daily) emerging from lunch at La Côte Basque with her Hermès silk scarf tied around the handle of her Hermès bag. That picture was seen around the world. It sent sales through the roof, making the Hermès scarf and bag nationally famous—and longed for, as they were very expensive. In no time, every woman in New York who

could afford it was doing the same thing with the same scarf and the same bag. You could argue that those ladies established the pattern that has, decades later, gone ballistic in several ways. For example, although the aforementioned were already established in their social environs as the leaders of the pack, the way to social notoriety for many these days is via the purse—or, in most cases, the wallet. (Remember, social acceptance is another matter entirely.) It is almost always the women who are doing the advancing (read: climbing), although, usually, there is a man in the background who is presumably pleased with the exploit for a variety of reasons having to do with getting around and getting to know people in New York.

There is nothing new about this behavior in the history of metropolitan social life, but it is far more publicly obvious than ever before. The New York Botanical Garden’s annual gala is a longtime, well-established one. Its founders and backers were mainly people who were interested in the park, with its horticulture, plants and flowers. The result of their efforts over the decades is self-evident: it is beautiful garden park in the Bronx, filled with extraordinary specimens collected and nurtured over time. In its day it could have been regarded to those who did not attend, or could not afford to attend, as a closed club because it had some of those markings. You’d see the same names year after year, people who socialized with each other year-round on the

H O S P I TA L FO R S P EC I A L S U R G E R Y ’ S A N N I V E R S A R Y D I N N E R AT T H E W A L D O R F = A STO R I A

Michael Reed with Joan and Barrie Damson, Craig Ivey and Chelsea Reed 32 QUEST

Oheneba and Hilda Boachie-Adjei with Thomas and Cynthia Culco

Peter and Martha Webster

Edward Craig, Patricia Warner and Brian Williams

Michael Bloomberg and Billy Salomon

David and Anne Altchek

D O N P O LL A R D

Louis Shapiro, Michael Bloomberg, Ann Jackson and Kendrick Wilson


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QUEST, DECEMBER 1994

Lee Thaw and Khalil Rizk

John Radziwill

Tina Fanjul and Kenny Lane

Pete Hathaway and Sam Green

Mary McFadden and Jamie Figg

golf courses and private clubs and international watering holes. These venues were fairly exclusive to their set, by which I mean to say the rich and powerful. This event was—and still is—essentially, a beautiful cocktail garden party followed by a swell dinner dance in a tent. The ladies dressed; the men wore black-tie. A kind of thank you, as well 34 QUEST

Louise Grunwald and Boaz Mazor

Stefan de Kwiatowski with Michelle and Alessandro Corsini

Brucie Hennessy and George Trescher

as a fundraiser, for their own devotion and financial support. The prestige of the New York Botanical Garden still exists with that set. But like so many charities nowadays, the competition to sell tickets and raise money is keener than ever. It has made the event, like many of these galas, more of a photographer’s night, with everything but the insipid step-and-repeat scrim

Charles Washburn and Molly Wilmot

advertising some commercial contributor. Social photographers are now a big business here in New York. This has been going on for decades but it’s becoming more and more of a huge revenue producer for the photographers, and a boon to the publicists and their clients as well as to the charities who host the events. Once upon a time, there

were a few men like Jerome Zerbe and Bert Morgan and Slim Aarons who covered the smart set at their galas and parties in Palm Beach, New York, Newport, and Southampton. These men were also part of that social milieu, dining, dancing, and quaffing the bubbly with their hosts and hostesses, many of whom were close—even very close—friends. The cast


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Fairchild’s Women’s Wear Daily established itself as the new social bible by decorating its editorial pages with blackand-white candids by photographers like Eric Weiss. They were images of the society ladies and the jetsetters in their latest fashions—which were always the latest, and the chicest. They were dancing at private parties in discotheques (no one called them discos) or exiting their luncheons at spots like La Côte Basque, Caravelle, or La Grenouille. These were all fashion shots, showing you what the fashion empresses were wearing, carrying, walking in. And the dye was cast there. In the late ’70s, when paparazzi were flourishing in Rome and Paris, an industrious and enthusiastic kid from Long Island named Patrick McMullan began shooting strips of black-and-white photos for Andy Warhol’s

Interview of the outré or the downtown set, which was just beginning to be part of of social life in New York. Then, Studio 54 was born and Andy Warhol’s dishabille Factory people were being replaced by Halston’s nightly group (which included Warhol) of chic, celebrity playthings with their high-end fashion style and cocaine and champagne bacchanals. Still fascinating for us ordinary folk agog at life among the leisurely. Today, Patrick McMullan is a small industry employing a corps of photographers who cover all kinds of events. He has a lot of competition, notwithstanding the now legendary Bill Cunningham of The New York Times and Mary Hilliard, photo-heiress of the Slim Aarons set. There’s also Rob Rich, Julie Skarrett, Mia McDonald, and Billy Farrell and his band of merry photogs, to name only a few

Patrick McMullan

Bert Morgan (pictured in 1950 with his son, Richard) was part of the “crowd” that he photographed. 36 QUEST

who are busily covering the scene. Some websites have even turned the scene into a business—hire them and they’ll run your pictures. The upshot of this mass of lenses at every gala or kickoff or preview opening has created a new kind of social competition; a Paris Hiltonesque social celebrity can now be seen at all of the social charity events in New York. That is, that someone who is always angling to have her picture taken. There have always been socially ambitious women in New York (and occasionally, a man) eager to be photographed and thereby publicized on various social pages. But the ritual was always in pursuit of recognition and acceptance from those whose company they aspired to. There are not a few of the socially prominent couples in New York who have enhanced and even

Mary Hilliard and Bill Cunningham

Slim Aarons documented the goings-on in the world of society, from Newport to Palm Beach.

G E T T Y I M A G E S ( S L I M A A RO N S )

of characters in their photos was very social and you’d see the faces over and over: the bejeweled princesses and the social dowagers. They also appeared in the Social Register. That famous photo of C. Z. Guest leaning in to listen to Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan comes immediately to mind. Or the Duchess of Windsor hovered over by her society penguins in their white-tie, with the Duke of Windsor seated nearby looking like he was about to pass out from terminal ennui. It was another world, way out there, way up there— fascinating to see and a million miles away from us ordinary working stiffs. It was intriguing, or desirable, or laughable, or outrageous, or all of the above. But, nevertheless, it was fascinating. Amusement. Show Business, with a real diamond tiara. Back in the late ’60s John


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established their standing among the glitterati and social set by being “noticed” by the photographers. It’s publicity at its simplest and most effective. The expense of gaining “acceptance”—of “belonging” among this strata—is an expensive task. Not ever prospector been successful, and there have been more than a few Madame Bovary’s cast aside by the “betters” they aspired to be. This is Edith Wharton’s territory, even today, and it is classic. But today, society—for want of a better word—is far more homogenous socioeconomically. It is often a business with a moveable profit-and-loss statement. The objective is closer to Warhol’s famous “15 minutes of fame” category than the Almanach de Gotha. Get in the spotlight and stand there as long as you 38 QUEST

can get the light (or lights) to shine on you. Paris Hilton’s approach began one summer in Southampton in the mid-1990s. She later moved West to her hometown of Hollywood, where she monetized it all very successfully. Her opponents, the Kardashians, are now the blue-ribbon champions. Their influence is far wider than most would imagine. If there’s any real gossip today among the social set, it is: Who’s in front of the camera? On a Thursday morning at 11 a.m. last month, at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, they held a memorial service for Paul Soros, who had died on June 15, just 10 days after he celebrated his 87th birthday. Soros had been very ill for the past several years, although he made the best of his time and lived his life to

the fullest possible right to the very end. There were several hundred guests all but filling the auditorium, including many of the city’s prominent philanthropists, businessmen, and the many friends of Paul and his wife, Daisy. Memorials of this sort, of prominent New Yorkers, are uniquely impressive because of the great public curiosity and the guests they draw. The program began promptly. Peter Soros, the eldest of the two Soros sons, spoke first, followed by his brother Jeffrey. Then, the Soros grandchildren—Preston, Simon, Sabrina, Tommy Soros—spoke, followed by Stella Powell-Jones, a relative through marriage, and Paul’s nephew Robert Soros. Paul’s younger brother, George, was not present.

Emi Ferguson performed a delicate and moving rendition of “Ave Maria” on the flute, followed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an admiring, longtime friend of Paul. He was followed by one of the Soros doctors, Dr. Louis Harrison, and then Kathy Cohen, who was a longtime bridge partner. Afflicted with Parkinsons Disease, among other physical ailments, Paul was unable to hold his cards and sometimes unable to speak by the end of this life. Nevertheless, he played, with someone holding his cards for him, by pointing to which card he wished to play. Ms. Cohen remarked that, in all the years they played together, he remained unruffled (and un-angry) at the end of any game, win or lose. Afterward, Elizabeth Joy


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D A N I E L G A L E I N T E R N A T I O N A L R E A LT Y C E L E B R A T E D “ L A P R E S Q U ’ I L E ” I N S A N D S P O I N T

James Retz, Ellie Johnson and Christine Petersen

Bonnie Devendorf and Miriam Ainbinder

Roe performed a powerfully haunting interpretation of Chopin’s “Nocturne in C-sharp minor, Op.27 No.1.” She was followed by a longtime friend, Peter Georgescu (who described Paul as a good man and a good man) and Lera Auerbach, a young composer whose education had been assisted by a grant from the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans. Finally, the service ended with a few words from his wife of 61 years, Daisy Soros. The Soroses were a popular couple in New York, New 40 QUEST

Barbara Candee, Tom Calabrese and Carol Cotton

Meredyth Smith and Beth Laffey

Canaan, Nantucket, and at Tryall in Jamaica. It was always clear to anyone who knew them that they were a very successful and dynamic team, always on equal and respectful (and often amused) footing with each other. Although I was in his presence, in his company, a number of times, and came to regard Daisy as a friend, I never knew him nor had a conversation with him. I did observe him frequently, however. He was especially interesting to the eye because he was a handsome man, dis-

tinguished in looks and bearing. He carried himself with a courtliness not seen in most men, no matter their financial or socially sophistication. He was self-possessed, with an almost royal, yet modest, deportment. I once remarked about it to Daisy because Paul always gave a slight bow with a smile when shaking one’s hand or greeting someone. Daisy laughed when I mentioned it, adding, “You know, he answers the phone like that, too.” He was a very successful businessman who had made

Susan Poli and Potee Saluja

his millions as an engineer. He had endured World War II in Hungary first surviving the Nazis and their deportation of Jews, and then the Russian victors who pillaged and murdered so many. The Russians had accused him of being a Nazi officer, and he barely escaped with his life from captivity. He and Daisy were very active philanthropists here in New York. For almost two decades they underwrote the Midsummer Night Swing dance-a-thon every summer at Linocln Center. They


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were also big supporters of the New York Philharmonic and the program they founded, the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans, had an endowment that eventually totaled $75 million. Paul was a man of few words. He had the ability to listen, then respond thoughtfully and concisely. He was a champion skier who lost his chance to participate in the Olympics because of a freak accident on the slopes, which ended with him losing a kidney. He was an excellent tennis player who also lost an eye, but kept on playing. He came to this country with $70 in his pocket. He was accepted at M.I.T. and at Harvard, but chose Brooklyn College because it was only $14 per credit. Each speaker at the memorial shed light on the 42 QUEST

qualities and characteristics of the man. What fascinated me about their comments was that, although I didn’t know him except to say hello to, he was exactly the man I’d imagined from frequent observation. This was not because of my perception or perspicacity so much as it was a reflection of a man clearly defined by his conduct and respect toward others, which in turn elicited respect and even reverence. He was kind; he was brave; he was sensible and sensitive, courteous and courtly, highly intelligent and thoughtful. He was a man who had a lust for life and the ability to enjoy so much of it. He was curious and therefore inventive and innovative, and he never lost track of who he was as merely a man. Another grievous loss occurred last month with the death of Cynthia Lufkin. I

put off writing about it when I first heard the news on a Wednesday afternoon because it disturbed me deeply. I felt there was nothing I could add to the situation but could only look for solace. She died on a Wednesday morning at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center hospital. She was 51. She had been ill with cancer of the brain and lung. I don’t know how long this had been going on, but several years ago she had triumphed over breast cancer. In the meantime, she became a mother for the second and third times with another daughter and then a son. Her first daughter from her first marriage is now a young teenager. Cynthia fought valiantly and courageously by living each day as fully as she possibly could. She had much to live for, including her three children and a devoted,

supportive husband, Dan Lufkin, who had enhanced her life immeasurably in the last decade of her life. These realities must have distressed her even more deeply than the great pain she endured; she knew she was being overtaken and leaving them. I loved Cynthia. We were friends—not close, but good—for almost 20 years. When I first met her, she was newly out of Trinity College, and working in public relations at Tiffany & Co. under Fernanda Kellogg. Her charm was her smile and her kind laughter. In conducting herself in business and in friendship she was seriously conscientious, as if to make certain that she got something, everything, right. She was also newly married for the first time, and forging a professional life in New York as well. That marriage ended a few


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A short years later, right after she gave birth to her daughter, Schuyler. The word went around among friends that she was devastated by its ending. All dreams she might have had about a future were shattered. She was, nonetheless, fortunate despite her great disappointment because she had backbone and possessed the gift of friendship. She was

a good friend, and she had many friends and a support group. Her professional life at Tiffany & Co. also gave her access to an expansive social life. As a young married woman, she and her first husband had already become part of the younger set that was, and in some ways still is, identified with social impresario Mark Gilbertson.

After her divorce, she continued to remain active on the charity circuit, a kind of volunteering that allows a lot of young people to meet and form friendships. This is where making a social life begins in New York for many newcomers who are seeking to become members of the community. Cynthia was well-suited for it because she

was a “joiner” by nature. Her professional experience also gave her something to bring to the table in party planning and fundraising and entertaining. Shortly after her marriage ended, she met Dan Lufkin. It wasn’t an accident; they were introduced by their great mutual friend Wendy Carduner, the directrice (and proprietress) of Doubles,

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Lorraine Ricard, Giambattista Valli and Elizabeth Von Guttman 44 QUEST

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Vera Wang and John Demsey

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A R EC E P T I O N FO R S O U T H A M P TO N H O S P I TA L AT S EQ U I N

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the private club in the Sherry-Netherland where both Cynthia and Dan were members. Wendy had a feeling that the two would like each other. Dan was immediately taken with Cynthia. But for her, despite her natural charm and openness, she was experiencing a moment in Cynthia’s life when she 46 QUEST

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was still picking herself up from a serious loss. She wasn’t interested in a new relationship with anybody. She was not given to illusions or visions of some white knight coming to her rescue. Her focus would be on pulling her life together and taking care of her child. Dan Lufkin, however, is a glass-half-full man, so

no matter. He pursued her, gently but assiduously. She couldn’t help liking him, but she had a life to work out and she couldn’t see any man as part of it at that moment. Furthermore, he was older, and very wealthy, and had a couple of marriages in his past. However, as she soon learned, youth blessed him. It was a moment when she

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felt unprepared emotionally. She turned him down the first couple of times he called for a date. The third time she relented, thinking that would at least get him to stop. He didn’t. Instead, he romanced her despite her doubts. He took her “no” for an answer, but continued to pursue her anyway. And she liked him. He

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A made her laugh. He was kind and thoughtful. He was fun and a mature man behind that youthful joie de vivre. On the second or third date, he proposed marriage. That shocked her. Although she had an effervescent charm that could have been mistaken for impulsive, she was quite the opposite: levelheaded, responsible, and grounded.

Doubts or not, those magic powers of persuasion that made Dan a wunderkind in his youth prevailed. Not long after, she agreed to marriage. She made the transition to newlywed, wife of a wealthy and influential man, patiently and prudently. She was naturally committed to holding on to her own identity. She was cautious. She

had now married a dynamic man, an experienced leader in the community, a man of means and an adventuresome curiosity. He was also a man in charge of his life: selfpossessed, confident, and worldly. But this was a new, very different experience from her first marriage. There would be a lot to learn and a lot to adjust to.

She met the challenge. I don’t know who motivated whom but, together, the Lufkins became more active in New York philanthropy and the social life surrounding it. Cynthia took on more committee work. She also became pregnant. Then, toward the end of her pregnancy she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y ’ S “ TA ST E O F S U M M E R ” AT T H E B E T H E S D A T E R R AC E

Pablo Alfaro, Ann Dexter Jones and Mark Amadei 48 QUEST

Deborah Roberts

Alexandra Richards

Gillian and Sylvester Miniter

Ray and Veronica Kelly

B FA NYC . CO M

Suzanne and Bob Cochran


Conyer s Fa r m E lega nt Colon ia l

Conyer s Fa r m Georg ia n 14 Acres

E

legantly appointed stone and clapboard Colonial beautifully situated on over ten acres of flat open land inside the gate in Conyers Farm. The public rooms, all with fireplaces, are magnificently proportioned. A well-appointed gourmet kitchen with an adjoining breakfast room and a luxurious master suite with two baths and two dressing rooms complete the first floor. The second floor features four additional bedrooms with en suite baths, exercise room and a second office. A 30’ X 36’ barn with loft and a heated pool and spa are added amenities. $7,950,000 View brochure at www.conyersfarmelegance.com.

T

he unparalleled caliber of materials and workmanship is apparent throughout this residence. The large gracious public rooms include a pine paneled library, living room, formal dining room and family room, all superbly appointed with fireplaces, intricate moldings, raised paneling and quarter sawn wide oak floors. Special features include a two bedroom cottage, and a three bedroom guest house, pool, tennis court and heated barn/garage. View brochure at www.elegantgreenwichgeorgian.com.

“T he C apt a i n’s Hou se”

Ha nd some Greek Rev iva l Colon ia l

he Captain’s House” built in 1820 and meticulously renovated in 2012 offers elegant living at the water’s edge. Exquisite gardens surround the house. Almost every room has ever changing panoramic views of Smith Cove out to Long Island Sound. The interior has been built and decorated to the highest standards. A true gem not often found. View brochure at www.prubhre.com.

his elegant home was built to the highest standards with 10’ ceilings, raised paneling, quarter sawn oak floors, dentil moldings and custom cabinetry. The home offers large well appointed public rooms, a fantastic master suite, 5 additional en suite bedrooms and an indoor golf practice range. Set on over 2 landscaped acres with pool and large terrace with fountain. View brochure at www.classicgreenwichcolonial.com.

T

123 Mason Street

T

www.prubhre.com • Greenwich, Connecticut 06830

© 2013. An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

• 203.661.5505

Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity.


It was a very serious case, requiring extensive surgery. The window of opportunity in beating it was narrow. It was decided that she’d have to have the baby prematurely so she could have chemotherapy as soon as possible. It had become a matter of life and death. She did it, and she sailed through her treatment and her recovery to arrive at a clean bill of health. Whatever hardship Cynthia had to endure is known only to her husband and those closest to her because she was soon out in the world again, active and working. Summers were spent at their house in Amagansett. They bought a house here in New York, and also acquired a country house in Litchfield County. Later, they build another property on the sea in Nova Scotia. A few years after the birth of her daughter, Aster Lee Lufkin, Cynthia gave birth to a son, Daniel Patrick Lufkin. The family spent much of their weeks in Connecticut where the children were in school. Never more than two hours away from the city, they continued their involvement in several charities, including the American Cancer Society, Evelyn Lauder’s Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the Museum of the City of New York, the Women’s Conservation Committee of the Audubon Society, the Central Park Conservancy, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the American Museum of Natural History—to name only a few of their interests. Cynthia and Dan Lufkin became one of the most attractive and sought-after couples in New York, and for a number of reasons: both 50 QUEST

IN MEMORIAM

Cynthia Lufkin

warm, friendly, empathic, and philanthropically inclined, they liked people and they were participators. Separately and together they were gregarious, courteous, gracious, serious about their interests, and easy to laugh. Away from their social life, they were a family of children, at least three dogs, and friends. As comfortable as they were at fundraisers and black-tie benefits and opening-night galas as they were comfy at home in their jeans and tweeds, dividing their time mainly between Manhattan and Litchfield County. I don’t know when she was last diagnosed with the cancer that would take her. I had heard vague references about her state of health in the last year but I am not one to inquire about such things. I saw her once in the last couple of months at Michael’s, where she was lunching with Dan and friends, and at the Audubon Society’s Women in Conservation luncheon. That was only a little more than a month before she died. Cynthia was her warm and smiling self. There was a memorial for Cynthia at the Dune Church in Southampton on Friday afternoon, a week after she died. The church is where Dan and Cynthia were married and where one of their children was baptized. The church was full to capacity with her friends mourning their loss. Cynthia’s concern would be the grief of her children and for Dan, who was her rock on what turned out to be a difficult and challenging path of life, deeply satisfying for her on many levels, and greatly sorrowful for the rest of us, at its end. X

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

QUEST, NOVEMBER 1991

54 QUEST


UNDER CONTRACT The Sherry-Netherland | Tower Apartment

Landmark 17 | Penthouse

$5,480,000 The Sherry-Netherland | Hotel Pool

STANLEY PONTE Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 212.606.4109 | stan.ponte@sothebyshomes.com

RANDALL G. GIANOPULOS Licensed Salesperson 212.606.7622 | randall.gianopulos@sothebyshomes.com EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE | 38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065 Operated by Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty, Inc.

$11,240,000

$2,395,000


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S T R I B L I N G C E L E B R AT E D T H E O P E N I N G O F I T S B R O O K LY N O F F I C E

Patricia Weeks and Linda Hobrrner

Patricia Fossutta and Tim White

Kathryn Kempton and Cecilia Kempton

Joanna Underwood, Nancy Schuh and Leila Yusuf 56 QUEST

Jim Moraan, Kirk Henckels, Jennifer Wallace and Paul Newman

Libby Leahy and Chris Wilson

Marcy Brown and Ellen Cohen

Elizabeth Ann Kivlan, Guy Robinson and Elizabeth Stribling

Ron Nelson and Debbie Melman

Courtney Gibson and Beatrice Ducrot

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Lisa Wax, Michelle Ogden and Grace Mascioli


www.hunter-boot.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O U STO N SYM P H O N Y ’ S M A E ST R O ’ S D I N N E R AT J O N E S H A L L I N T E X A S

Jim and Molly Crownover

Max Barrett and Lauren Baughman 58 QUEST

Phoebe and Bobby Tudor

Christina and Mark Hanson

Fred and Kelly Williams

Scott and Soraya McLelland

Betty and Jesse Tutor

Sarah Cotting

Lynn Wyatt

Margarita and Hans Graf

M I C H E LLE WATS O N / C ATC H L I G H T G RO U P

Audrey and Brandon Cochran


SPEAKING WITH RICHARD

STEINBERG Zen-Nirvana, $50,000 per week

770 Park Avenue, $19.9 million

Q: What differentiates Warburg Realty from other agencies? A: I’ve been with Warburg Realty for more than 20 years. I’ve been with the firm for so long because of the way it operates. We’re a boutique firm—individually owned and not part of a large chain. We have a very personal, warm atmosphere.

half years and it’s been great for me. It’s extended my brand to two and a half million viewers! I want people to get up in the morning and, when they think about buying or selling a home, think about the guy who they saw on T.V. It’s all about recognition. I’ve gotten inquiries from people as far as Europe.

Q: How did you develop your understanding of the marketplace? A: I live my work. I live on the Upper East Side and my friends are my clients.

Q: What are some of the trends you’ve seen in the past year? A: The big seller is the high-end condo market, anything over $5 million. Prices are at an all-time high. There’s a rash of developments on the Upper East Side, as witnessed at 432 Park Avenue, the Extell development on East 57th Street, and 737

Q: How has being featured on HGTV’s “Selling New York” affected business? A: I’ve been on the show for two and a

Park Avenue, adding much needed inventory to what has been available in recent years during the recession. Q: What’s one of your most exciting, recent projects? A: In addition to the great resales that I’m representing, I am very excited about two projects. The first project is a boutique sixunit condo located on East 63rd Street, hitting the market this fall. The second project is in St. Barth! I am thrilled to have been selected as the local representative for St. Barth, which has the most exceptional villas in paradise. The villas range from bungalows to grand estates and can be rented by the week.X

To contact Richard Steinberg, please call 212.439.5183 or 917.676.0150 or email rsteinberg@warburgrealty.com.

733 Park Avenue, $8.45 million

15 Central Park West, $9.9 million

Vitti, $48,000 per week

795 Fifth Avenue, $27 million

Cap au Vent, $29,750 per week

Belle Bague, $25,000 per week

To view the variety of properties represented by Richard Steinberg, licensed associate real estate broker at Warburg Realty, please visit www.warburgrealty.com.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PA R T Y FO R P H O E N I X H O U S E I N S O U T H A M P TO N

Keith and Barbara Gollust with Pete Peterson and Nathalie Kaplan

Craig and Jackie Moffett

Sara Pilot and Aviva Drescher

Rose and John Franco

Lisa Simonsen and Howard Meitiner

Lauren Walk and Rosanna Scotto

Lydia and Rudy Touzet

S O U T H A M P TO N A N I M A L S H E LT E R F O U N D AT I O N G A L A

Courtney Cameron and Kim Dryer 60 QUEST

RenĂŠ Schlather and Jonathan McCann

Jodie Weber, Bud Gundersen and Cheryl Dovenberg

Chuck and Elizabeth Scarborough with Michael Brett

Cindy and Ladd Willis

Jill Rappaport

Thea and Bill Hattrick

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

Sharon Phair, Henry Buhl and Marianna Olszewski


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A BRUCE MUSEUMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RENAISSANCE BALL IN GREENWICH

Mark Gilbertson with Allison and Peter Rockefeller

Leah and Bob Rukeyser 62 QUEST

Marijane and Brad Hvolbeck

Mary Russell, Walter Haydock and Audrey McNiff

Linda and Steve Munger

Eliazabeth Galt and Lucy Day

Adie Von Gontard, Norma Bartol, Peter Sutton and Marie von Gontard

Aundrea and Jim Amine

Carolyn and Steve Westerberg

C U T T Y M CG I LL

Chuck and Deborah Royce


247 CENTRAL PARK WEST | $37,000,000 Interior: 12,000+/- sq. ft. | Web ID: Q0018875 V. Kaufman, 212.606.7639 | S. Ponte, 212.606.4109

16 EAST 95TH STREET | $23,500,000 Interior: 8,000+/- sq. ft. | Web ID: Q0018915 Serena Boardman | 212.606.7611

857 FIFTH AVENUE | $13,500,000 9 rm, 4 br, 5 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0018727 Louise Beit | 212.606.7703

LOCAL EXPERTISE. EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS. Our agents are skilled professionals with local knowledge and a dedication to high-quality service for every client. They take great pleasure in discovering the aspects that make each home unique.

431 EAST 52ND STREET | $7,500,000 12 rm | Web ID: Q0018912 Meredyth Hull Smith | 212.606.7683

181 EAST 65TH STREET | $6,850,000 8 rm, 3 br, 3 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0018983 Leslie S. Modell | 212.606.7668

PRE-WAR CONDOMINIUM | $6,750,000 6 rm, 3 br, 3 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0018976 Danielle Englebardt | 212.606.7608

1025 FIFTH AVENUE, PH A-S | $3,950,000 6 rm, 2 br, 2 ba | Web ID: Q0018949 F. Williams, 212.606.7737 | M. Perceval, 212.606.7790

1025 FIFTH AVENUE, PH C-N | $2,950,000 4 rm, 2 br, 2 ba | Web ID: Q0018979 Helene Alexopoulos Warrick | 212.606.7701

188 EAST 76TH STREET, 14C | $2,850,000 4 rm, 2 br, 2 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0019003 M. Perceval, 212.606.7790 | J. S. Skiff, 212.606.7794

227 CENTRAL PARK WEST | $2,750,000 6 rm, 3 br, 2 ba | Web ID: Q0018959 J. Janssens, 212.606.7670 | A. Koffman, 212.606.7688

155 WEST 68TH STREET | $2,195,000 5 rm, 2 br, 2 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0018458 Michele Llewelyn | 212.606.7716

455 CENTRAL PARK WEST | $1,930,000 4 rm, 2 br, 2 ba, 1 hlf ba | Web ID: Q0019004 V. Kaufman, 606.7639 | B. Goldenberg, 606.7636

EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE 38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065 | 212.606.7660 | sothebyshomes.com/nyc Operated by Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

L AU R A W. LE W I S

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 9

64 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O P E N I N G O F “ C H ” C A R O L I N A H E R R E R A O N R O D E O D R I V E I N B E V E R LY H I L L S

Molly Sims

Camilla Belle 66 QUEST

Angie Harmon

Louise Roe

Amy Adams and Edward Menicheschi

Wendy Morrissey

Sarah Paulson

Ali Larter

Amy Turner and Tracy McMillan

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Carolina Baez and Carolina Herrera


WHERE ARE YOU?

I turn a corner... suddenly I’m surrounded by artifacts from ancient times... classic fragments from a different era... exciting inspiration to add to my modern world... See what I brought home with me... We’re on Madison Avenue... or online... Ohh... You’re in the “Museo Capitolini”

at the Campidoglio in Rome

LINDA HORN www.lindahorn.com 1327 MADISON AVE at 93rd STREET NYC 10128 212-772-1122 see us on facebook


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A F I G U E O P E N E D AT 6 8 J O B S L A N E I N S O U T H A M P TO N

Susie Gilbert and Kate Platt

Kaela Wells, Sessa von Richthofen and Di Petroff

Heather Mnuchin and Wendy Landes

Adrien Gautier and Jessica Maher

Toby Peters and Gretchen Gunlocke Fenton

Alex Kramer and Liz Cohen

Stephanie von Watzdorf and Joey Wolffer

Jen Brown and Whitney St. John

Nick and Eugenie Goodman

W AT E R M I L L C E N T E R ’ S “ D E V I L ’ S H E AV E N ” B E N E F I T

Marina Abramovic and Robert Wilson 68 QUEST

Kimberly Guilfoyle and Richard Johnson

Maren Otto and Julian Mommert

Ali Berry and Kyle Hotchkiss-Carone

Christophe de Menil and Lucinda Childs

Yan Assoun and Polina Proshkina

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Nanette Lepore and Bob Savage


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G A R D E N PA R T Y AT T H E F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N

Jay Livingston and Miller Gaffney

Christopher Mairs and Gemma Gucci

Joanne and Victor Wright with Jennifer Wright and Mary Stewart 70 QUEST

Alexandra Pethtel, Julia Sergeon, Christopher Wolf and Yasmin Kooros

Max Sinsteden and Mark Gilbertson

Phyllis Kossoff and Richard Weber

Christina Eberly and Juliet Falchi

Kate, Michael and Lizzie Horvitz

Margot Bogert, Ian Wardropper and Sarah McNear

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Kristen Sterner and Elena McKee


NANCY ELLISON / POLARIS

LOLA ASTANOVA, VIRTUOSO PIANIST AND RECIPIENT OF THE 2012 VLADIMIR HOROWITZ DISTINGUISHED ARTIST AWARD, ANNOUNCES HER WITH

AUSTRALIAN TOUR

MAESTRO GERARD SCHWARZ AND CONTINUES HER WITH

AND THE

IN

OCTOBER 2013

COLLABORATION

MAESTRO JAHJA LING

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA

IN

J ANUARY 2014.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

QUEST, NOVEMBER 1987

72 QUEST


Grand Loft-Like 4 Bedroom on Park Avenue | $8,300,000 | WEB ID: 0018939 Recently undergone a renovation and is in triple mint condition. Co-exclusive.

Grand Terraced Duplex with River Views | $8,750,000 | WEB ID: 0017605 Grand ±5,200 sq ft, 5-bedrm apt, formal dining room, huge kitchen, 3 fireplaces & central air.

J. ROGER ERICKSON Recognized in 2013 by The Wall Street Journal and Real Trends as the #4 Agent in Manhattan and #10 Agent in America by Sales Volume.

Triple Mint Four Bedroom | $3,495,000 | WEB ID: 0018936 Newly renovated apartment with 3 exposures, 2,800+/- sq ft. on the Upper East Side.

760 Park Avenue - Sublime Prewar Elegance | $19,750,000 | WEB ID: 0018814 Grand-scale living room with 10 ft ceilings, 2 fireplaces, wood paneled library, 4 bedrooms.

The 2013 Kips Bay Decorator Show House $16,000,000 | WEB ID: 0018930

J. ROGER ERICKSON, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 212.606.7612 | roger.erickson@sothebyshomes.com | www.roger-erickson.com EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE | 38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065 | 212.606.7660 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A SOUTHAMPTON FRE SH AIR HOME’S PICNIC WITH FIREWORKS BY GRUCCI

Mildred Brinn and Kay Gilman

Barbara Smith and Danielle Ganek

Kate Gascoyne and Johanna Caine

The Douzet Family

Cristina Cuomo and T.R. Pescod

David Ganek and Izak Senbahar

Peggy Hill, Melanie Wambold and Lise Evans

Doug Feagin, Tucker Johnston and Frederick Masri

T H E N E X T S T E P R E A LT Y ’ S C U S TO M E R A P P R E C I AT I O N E V E N T

Field Hucks and Patrick Crosetto 74 Q U E S T

Emily Pimack and Annie Corbett

Blair Brandt and Skylar Stetten

DJ Matt Winter

Jennifer Buntz, Emily Corbin, Caroline Corbin and Rebecca Kesner

Banloo Klein, Isabelle Hill and Olivia Kleinman

Becky Mayo and Jake Shea

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; A M A N DA P E R E Z ( B E LO W )

Michael Fisher, Joe Hudson, Bowen WIlliams and John Gibbs


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H U D S O N VA L L E Y S H A K E S P E A R E F E ST I VA L AT B O S C O B E L I N G A R R I S O N

Teri Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and Jane Praeger

Bob McCaffrey and Brian McNeary

Wilbur Foster, Melissa Meyers, Meredith Huer and Liz Strianese

Geoffrey Platt, Robin Arditi, Marit Kullsia and Hope Platt

Chris Oden and Jennifer Cook

Joe Mahon, Karen Grund and Jack Willoughby

A L B E R T S C H W E I T Z E R H O S P I TA L I N H A I T I B E N E F I T AT T H E S A I L F I S H C L U B I N PA L M B E AC H

Firooz Zahedi

76 QUEST

Liz Scully and Susan Cushing

James Walsh, Lesly Smith and Howard Cox

Jo Kendall and Michel De Bourbon

Isabel and Dick Furland

Anna Mann, Tom Quick and Louise Stephaich

T K T K T K T K ( A B OV E ) ; LU C I E N C A P E H A RT ( B E LO W )

Antony Underwood and Jennifer Garrigues


NE W YORK CIT Y

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UPPER EASTSIDE, NEW YORK VIEWS OF THE MET $12,500,000 Web#3712415 Laurie Silverman 212.381.4262

TRIBECA, NEW YORK

EAST HAMPTON, NEW YORK

ABOVE IT ALL $11,500,000 Web#4009914 Richard Orenstein 212.381.4248

KNOWN AS THE ARC HOUSE $4,995,000 Web#18091 Jennifer Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Auria 917.287.5533

SOUTHHAMPTON, NEW YORK ELEGANCE PERSONIFIED $2,850,000 Web#45541 Dorothy Somekh 212.381.2265 / Timothy J. Haftel 631.702.7503

UPPER EASTSIDE, NEW YORK

DARIEN, CONNECTICUT

PREWAR 2 BR PENTHOUSE $3,500,000 Web#8566199 Fern Hammond 212.381.3270

MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT ESTATE- $30,000,000 Web#99034592 Janet Olmsted 203.656.6542 / Chris Merritt 203.656.6510 / Judi McCarty 203.656.6513

In the City

In the Country

At the Shore Find Yours at halstead.com

*CNUVGCF2TQRGTV[..%We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an afďŹ rmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin. All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. No representation is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate and all information should be conďŹ rmed by customer. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A LVA R Y H O S P I TA L A W A R D S AT T H E P I E R R E

Rosemary DiVito with Matt and Nancy McKenna and Larry Bradley

Frank Calamari and Manfred Altstadt

John and Ingrid Connolly

Thomas and Eleanor Fahey

Carlos and Claire Hernandez

Diahn and Tom McGrath

Christine Varney and Domenic Recchia

Alli Corbat with Michael and Donna Corbat

George and Wendy David with Anais Touton 78 QUEST

Douglas Brinkley

Andrew and Zibby Right with Elizabeth Right

Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill and Richard Parsons

J O H N V E CC H I O LL A ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; A M N H / D . F I N N I N ( B E LO W )

A M E R I C A N M U S E U M O F N AT U R A L H I S TO R Y H O N O R E D M I C H A E L C O R B AT AT I T S A N N UA L D I N N E R


My Private Banker from IDB. He’s been there for me. And he’ll be there when my son takes the helm.

Our Private Bankers offer you and your family the level of attention you deserve. Call Jim LoGatto at 212-551-8508 or visit www.idbny.com IDB Bank® is a registered service mark of Israel Discount Bank of New York. Member FDIC.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF FITCHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CORNER HORSE TRIALS IN MILLBROOK

Gloria Callen

Felie Thorne

Lorna Graev and Dixi von Maltzahn

Libet Johnson and Cece Cord 80 QUEST

Kirk Henckels and Fernanda Kellogg

Parker Thorne

Monica Wambold and Patty Hambrecht

Emily Hottensen and Boyd Martin

Jim and Zibby Tozer

A procession of Joyaux Marisol umbrellas

Marion de Vogel and Nina Reeves

Perrin Martin and David Theiringer

Alexandra Kasmin

Hilary Block, Nancy Stahl and Susan Cocke

M A RY H I LL I A R D

Judy and David Sloan


PLEASE VISIT

THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION WAS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN REACH BY GLOBAL CORPORATE AWARDS, NEW YORK, APRIL 2013 WITH THANKS AND IN RECOGNITION OF SOME OF THE PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERS OF THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION: YOU INSPIRE US! ASIA SOCIETY, NEW YORK CHERIE BLAIR FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN, LONDON DAVID SHEPHERD’S TIGER TIME, LONDON THE ELEANOR ROOSEVELT LEADERSHIP CENTER AT VAL KILL, HYDE PARK, NEW YORK INNOCENCE IN DANGER, PARIS HARROW SCHOOL, LONDON INDIAN HEAD INJURY FOUNDATION, NEW DELHI AND JODHPUR, INDIA KHEL SHALA, PUNJAB THE LOOMBA FOUNDATION, THE UK AND INDIA THE ROBERT F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS, WASHINGTON, D.C. ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, NEW DELHI, INDIA WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL, WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK TROPICAL CLINICS, KENYA UNITED WORLD COLLEGES ATLANTIC COLLEGE, WALES AND PEARSON COLLEGE, VICTORIA, CANADA


CALENDAR

AUGUST Itzhak Perlman and Patrick Romano. The tasting dinner will begin at 8 p.m. For more information, call 212.877.5045. PONY GOAL

Newport Polo will celebrate its Bacchanale Ball at Rosecliff Mansion in Newport, Rhode Island, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

3

FUN IN THE SUN

Southampton Hospital will host its 55th annual summer party under the Art Southampton pavilion at 6:30 p.m. Jean Shafiroff, Audrey Gruss, All & Co., Barclays, and Douglas Elliman will chair this “Forward to the Future” summer party, where attendees will enjoy dinner by Robbins Wolfe Eventeurs and dancing to the Alex Donner Orchestra. For more information, call 212.580.0835. BAL MASQUÉ

The Preservation Society of Newport will hold its masked Venetian Ball at The Elms at 7 p.m. For more information, call 401.847.1000. OFF TO THE RACES

Saratoga Race Course will celebrate its 150th anniversary of racing at Saratoga at 11 a.m. The Cake Boss will provide a special birthday cake, and guests will be able to take photos in the Victorian-themed photo booth. For more information, call 518.584.6200. OPENING RECEPTION

On August 24, the Saratoga Race Course will host the 144th Travers Stakes, a 1.25-mile race for extraordinary three-year-old horses. The Travers Trophy is known as the Man o’ War Cup, and is designed by Tiffany & Co. Gates will open at 7 a.m., with early-post time at 11:35 a.m. For more information, call 518.584.6200.

1

TEE TIME

The Boys and Girls Club of Greenwich will host its 10th annual golf tournament at Sterling Farms in Stamford, Connecticut at 7 a.m. The 10th anniversary marks a milestone for the Club, and is an opportunity for golf enthusiasts—both novice and advanced—to come together to play in support of the children who need it most. For more information, call 203.461.9090. 82 QUEST

SHOP FOR CAUSE

The UJA-Federation of New York’s Manhattan Women’s Philanthropy will host its eighth annual trunk show at Bridgehampton Historical Society at 10 a.m. The Trunk Show will showcase designer clothing for women, men, and children, as well as designer jewelry, furs, swimwear, toys, art, and home accessories. Participating designers include Gerber-Seid Fine Art, Ramy Brook, Scoop NYC, SoulCycle,

and Pologeorgis Furs. For more information, call 212.836.1884.

2

MUSIC TO OUR EARS

The Perlman Music Program will present its annual benefit concert and dinner at 73 Shore Road in Shelter Island, New York, at 6 p.m. The evening will begin with a reception featuring local wines and signature cocktails, followed by an orchestra and choral concert conducted by maestros

The Saratoga Arts Center Gallery will put on an exhibit entitled “Saratoga 150: Then, Now, and Beyond.” The exhibition will merge history with the present day and anticipate fresh, innovative ideas of what’s to come. For more information, call 518.584.4132.

6

LE MIDI

The Preservation Society of Newport will host a lecture on the French Riviera titled “Life on the Riviera: The English in the Winter, Americans in Summer” by David Garrard Lowe at Rosecliff Mansion at 8 p.m. The evening is in honor of John Grenville Winslow. For more information, call 401.847.1000.


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CALENDAR

AUGUST SEPTEMBER 5 ON THE CATWALK

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week will take place from September 5–12 at Lincoln Center. Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week is New York City’s single largest media event, taking place twice a year (February and September) at Lincoln Center, one of the most well known arts and cultural institutions in the world. The event provides top designers an international platform to showcase their collections to more than 100,000 industry insiders from around the world including buyers, editors, retailers, and more. For more information, call 212.489.8300. On August 6, the Preservation Society of Newport will host a lecture by David Garrard Lowe titled, “Life on the Riviera: The English in the Winter, Americans in Summer.” The lecture will take place at Rosecliff Mansion at 8 p.m. and will be held in honor of John Grenville. For more information, call 212.671.1818.

FASHION GETS WILD

The Gabby Wild Foundation will host an environmental fashion show featuring eco-friendly fashion designers at the Cornell Club at 7 p.m. Using green fashion to promote the benefits of a sustainable lifestyle witho compromising style, funds are being raised for the protection of endangered animals facing extinction across the globe. From garnished crochet dresses to repurposed plastic, each piece on the runway is representative of the multitude of methods and materials in which green fashion is embodied. For more information, call 561.212.13339.

9

AND THEY’RE OFF

The National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame will celebrate its annual ball at 191 Union Avenue in Saratoga Springs, New York, at 7:30 p.m. The Museum fosters education and understanding of Thoroughbred racing by providing public access to equine art, artifacts, memorabilia, film, video, books and historical archives. For more information, call 519.584.0400. A CLOSER LOOK

Guild Hall in East Hampton will hold its “East End Summer Gala” celebrating Chuck Close at 6 p.m. 84 QUEST

The exciting evening will feature music, dancing, and a live art auction held at a breathtaking location with an exclusive VIP preview of Chuck Close’s recent works. For more information, call 631.324.0806.

10

SPLISH SPLASH

The American Cancer Society will host its “Flip Flops Gala” at the Bridgehampton Tennis and Surf Club at 6:30 p.m. This year, the American Cancer Society will celebrate its 100th birthday as it continues to work relentlessly to save lives and create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. For more information, call 212.237.3898.

world, that is dedicated entirely to the art of dance. For more information, call 518.584.2225.

22

A LENGTH AHEAD

The Travers Celebration, the only evening affair at the Saratoga Race Course, will return to celebrate the 144th Midsummer Derby at 7:30 p.m. Each year, events and entertainment include music, giveaways, and much more. For more information, call 518.584.6200.

CHOO CHOO

Saratoga and North Creek Railway will present a special excursion on the Leviathan Steam Engine at 3 Railroad Place on the weekends of September 7 and of the 14th. The Leviathan No. 63 is a highly sought after reproduction steam engine that will make its first visit to New York and the Northeast. The Leviathan No. 63 will operate exclusively on the Saratoga and North Creek Railway. This replica is faithfully reproduced from the original design of one constructed at Schenectady Locomotive Works in 1868. For more information, call 877.26.7245.

17

TAKE BY STORM

Newport Storm, Rhode Island’s microbrewery, will put on its annual luau at Fort Adams Parade Field at 4:30 p.m. For more information, call 401.849.5232. LET’S DANCE

The National Museum of Dance will host its fifth annual “Saratoga Arts Celebration” at 99 South Broadway in Saratoga Springs, New York, at 10 a.m. The National Museum of Dance and Hall of Fame was established in 1986 as the only museum in the nation, and one of the few in the

On August 9, the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center will hold its fourth annual “Be Our Guest Gala” at a private home in Quogue, New York, at 6 p.m. The evening will be Great Gatsby-themed and will feature live performances. For more information, call 631.288.1500.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E WP O RT P R E S E RVAT I O N S O C I E T Y A N D W B PAC

7

7


From left: University of St. Andrews senior lecturer Dr. Tom Normand, chancellor Sir Menzies Campbell CBE, Harry Benson CBE, and principal Louise Richardson FRSE.

86 QUEST


H A R RY B E N S O N

NEIL DOIG

HONORS FOR AN ARTIST “HARRY IS A Scottish treasure,” affirms David Friend, an old collegue and pal. “They simply revere him there.” In Scotland and everywhere, our beloved columnist and photographer Harry Benson has been a part of truly incredible events, and has never stopped searching for more. He has captured iconic moments like the Beatles tousling on their beds, national tragedies like the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, and the sober resignation of Richard Nixon. He frames his subjects in such a way that the image pulls the viewer into a point in time with a visceral sense of emotion. That talent, combined with a V.I.P. pass to modern history, has secured Harry’s place in the pantheon of great photographers. With his wife, Gigi, by his side, Harry recently flew over to his native Scotland to receive an honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from the University of St. Andrews. The award celebrates his outstanding contribution to the creative arts, and comes only four years after he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. Harry received his doctorate as part of a formal ceremony conducted in Latin, and was introduced with a moving speech by Dr. Tom Normand. “I was very proud,” says Gigi, who was brought to tears by the occasion. We offer congratulations to the man whom fellow Quest compatriot David Patrick Columbia describes as “indefatigable—full of mirth and full of beans.” We’ll keep looking for him, steadily shooting our era from the best possible angle. —Lily Hoagland AUGUST 2013 87


TA K I

THE LIVIN’ IS EASY

From left: "Summertime," 1943, by Edward Hopper is evocative of our columnist's memories; when in New York, President Harry Truman resided at the Carlyle, experiencing the city without the secret service—it was another era. Opposite page: The South of France was the only place for a respectable girl to go topless.

WHY IS IT THAT summers used to last so

much longer back then? School would be out in early June and, by the time the horrid September rolled around, it seemed like three years had passed. What fun it was to be young and for it to be summer. No homework, no need to stay in shape, no starving oneself to make weight for wrestling, and girls galore at the country club and on the 0 08 Q 8 QU UE E SS T T

beach. There was softball on the public lawns of Greenwich, Connecticut, or soccer on the lawns of Vouliagmeni, which is east of Athens, where Greek ship owners parked their yachts (sailing boats, that is). The first man to own a gin palace was Aristotle Onassis, who had a Canadian frigate converted, and it all went downhill from then on. Youth never worries but takes its fun whenever

and wherever it can get it—one didn’t worry about being locked up in boarding school until it actually happened (now, in old age, I worry about something unpleasant for several months before I have to go through with it). And how quickly and easily one fell in love during those long summer days and nights, and—thank God—how even more rapidly one fell out of love when


something more exotic came along. I say, on average, there were three to four major romances during those unending summers, with each one starting for life and for ever after, until the inevitable happened. Time seemed to go so slowly that one is now embarrassed at how little a bite at the cherry one had with all that time on one’s hands. The first girl I ever kissed was during a hot summer evening. Marina, she was 11 and I was 12. Then came Margo, Isla, and Mary. Then came September and the kissing had to stop. It's amazing how, 64 years later, I don’t only remember their names but exactly what they looked like. Mind you, they wouldn’t recognize me now and nor I them, I’m sure. Yes, as the song says, "Summertime and the livin' is easy," with those haunting Jo Stafford songs and Peggy Lee and Joni James and Edward Hopper’s masterpiece called "Summertime," of a beautiful and shy young woman with her hat shielding her from the sun standing on some steps. Those were the golden haze years after the war, when baseball was played in flannels: players flung themselves on guard rails without pads to catch a fly ball and pitchers went nine innings. There was no trash talk in professional or college football. Everyone, rich or poor, wore a suit and a hat and every man took his off when a lady entered an elevator. Taxi drivers spoke English, Brooklynese, actually, and they were either Jewish or Italian, with a few Greeks thrown in for good measure. They wore caps, were extremely polite, and most of the yellow cabs were Packards with jump seats. Fifth Avenue went both ways and Harry Truman used to walk without the company of the secret service up and down the thoroughfare early in the morning. When in New York, he lived at the Carlyle. Through the mist of time and nostalgia I now imagine summers where doors were left unlocked, children played in the streets, crime was nonexistent (at least where I lived) and people really did look out for each other. War was central in our lives. We remembered World War II only too well, and waited in vain for news from Fräulein, who had brought us up and had left as

the Greek civil war raged to return to Dresden. When the Korean War began, children would fire imaginary machine guns in the woods, and dive bomb with ear-damaging howls into the arc of heroic death. Poor kids had wooden Tommy guns and we’d laugh at them because we were grown-ups. Wartime values, however, were still very strong. Respectability, conformity, restraint, and trust were what underpinned the Fifties. Children, especially in Athens, would walk to school by themselves, even as young as eight. No one would think of bothering them. Bicycles were left against walls unchained at bus stops or at railway stations. Parents were remote figures, especially one’s father, who was either away at war or in his office. But, come summertime, things changed. My father would take us boating, play soccer with us, and once, in Greenwich, even try to

play a strange game to him (he called it “palouki," which means a large piece of wood): baseball. No respectable girl bared her breasts on the beach, except in the South of France. Even as far back as the summer of 1952, a 15-year-old could sit on the railings in Cannes and look at barebreasted women to his heart's content. At night, young prostitutes would tease one at the Croisette, asking if one had ever been with a woman or not. “Come on, I’ll show you, how much change have you got on you?” Once, I met Olga, whose mother was a Norwegian ship owner, on the Constitution returning to New York. We had six days and secret nights together, swore eternal love and planned marriage, but once I was off the boat, I never spoke to or saw her again. X For more Taki, visit takimag.com. AUGUST 2013 89


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

AS SUMMER WANES AND hints of fall

beckon, August is the time for enjoying that last stretch of vacation on beaches, in the mountains, or trotting across the globe. But you don’t need to travel the world in search of the latest finds in fashion: we’ve done the legwork for you by selecting some Fall and Resort looks by labels like Ralph Lauren, Prada, Lela Rose, and Bottega Veneta; some stones and some shoes; and a sail-themed bag and savor-worthy soap.

Look no further than Stuart Weitzman’s CASTANET, in black suede, when casting for the perfect shoe for fall occasions. $498. Stuart Weitzman: At stuartweitzman.com.

Brilliant colors and a lively design define the beautiful Blu Intermezzo BY KIM pendant from Wempe, in 18-kt. rose gold, prasiolite, tourmaline, peridot, and diamond. $3,125. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Prepare your wardrobe for fall with this Kara Ross takes a classic to modern levels with the Priscilla clutch, in graffiti cork with gold

90 QUEST

sublime silk-velvet dress in Prussian blue from Ralph Lauren Collection. $2,798.

and black onyx hardware. $970. Kara Ross:

Ralph Lauren Collection: In select Ralph

212.223.7272 or kararossny.com.

Lauren stores and at ralphlauren.com.


Ginnel Location3

Magazine on your iPad

Visit the Apple App Store or ginnel.com/location3 to download

Exquisite English -

Near the Bedford Oak. Located on Hook Road—one of Bedford’s foremost addresses and top estate areas. Long fruittree lined drive to gracious Ivy-covered Stucco Colonial. Stately Two Story Entrance Hall. 20’x30’ Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Library with Fireplace. Country Kitchen. Family Room. Five Bedrooms. Four acres with path to the rushing Beaver Dam River. Rear terrace with outdoor kitchen, firepit and hot tub. Pool and Pool/Guest House. $4,750,000

The Linden Farm - Reminiscent of the great estates of Europe. Spectacular distant views from over 60 breathtaking acres with natural ponds, a waterfall, lush lawns, spectacular gardens and a multitude of magnificent age-old and specimen trees. Long, gated drive through park-like grounds. Majestic Ivy-clad Fieldstone Manor House built in 1929 with eighteen main rooms. Pool. Tennis Court.Three Bedroom Caretakers Cottage. Garages for six cars. Stable, paddocks and riding ring. Abutting a 4700-acre preserve with miles of trails. $22,000,000

Sophisticated Mid-Century Modern - Open floor plan with dramatic wood and steel trusses and vast expanses of glass. Ideal for large scale entertaining! Beautiful architecture with the finest materials: wide plank white oak floors, Maine granite and fixtures by Philippe Starck, Durat, and Dornbracht. Spacious Studio. Picturesque courtyard with terraces and an ancient maple. Pool. Guest House. Protected pocket of land in a top estate area abutting the Marsh Sanctuary. $1,675,000

Historic Hook Road -

Peaceful Retreat -

1930’s Lakehouse -

Perfect privacy on beautiful country road. Wonderful Country House great for entertaining and everyday living. Formal Living and Dining Rooms. Country Kitchen. Fabulous Family Room. First Floor Master Suite. Nearly four beautiful acres with flowering gardens, dramatic rock outcroppings and lovely landscaping. Shoreline Pool. Tennis Court. Just moments from Bedford Village. $1,350,000

(914) 234-9234

All that is Bedford. Circa 1850 Federal Colonial brimming with grace and character. Clean lines and perfect proportions. Sun-filled rooms with hardwood floors, period millwork and extensive built-ins. Herringbone brick terrace for outdoor living. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Chef ’s Kitchen. Nearly two gorgeous acres with open, level lawns, specimen trees and incredible gardens. Sparkling Pool. Charming Guest House. One of Bedford’s finest estate locations. $1,875,000

Charming 1930’s Country House with seasonal views of Lake Katonah. Wood floors, paneling painted in crisp white and extensive millwork. Beautiful Great Room with Fireplace. Skylit Kitchen. Wonderful Sun/Dining Room. Spacious Family Room. Four Bedrooms. Separate heated Studio. Beautifully landscaped grounds with private terrace and wonderful Sun Porch. Beach, tennis and clubhouse! $659,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

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Fresh Finds

Say, “Ahoy, matey!” to Dash & Albert’s nautical tote bags in easy-to-clean polypropylene with appliquéd anchors on each side. $75. Dash & Albert: At Gracious Home, 1220 Third Ave., 212.517.6300.

Your wrists will rejoice in Judith Ripka’s Allegria cuff in 18-kt. gold with guava chalcedony, pink tourmalines, and white diamonds. $23,000. Judith Ripka: 777 Madison Ave., 212.517.8200.

With layers Talk about sweet: Lela Rose’s folded-bodice strapless dress in “spun sugar.” $1,595. Lela Rose: 69 Highland Park Village, Dallas, Tex., 214.599.6283.

of eye-catching stones and gold, the Polina ring in pink and white gold with brown diamonds and pink sapphires is a stunner for life. Price upon request. de Grisogono: 212.439.4220.

The Mr. Casual slipper in khaki linen with tan trim from Belgian Shoes is a perfect summer fit for the mister—or the missus. $415. Belgian Shoes: 110 East 55th St., 212.755.7372, or belgianshoes.com.

Remind yourself to stay on time and in style with Rolex’s 36-mm. Oyster Perpetual Day-Date in 18-kt. Everose gold with fluted bezel and Oysterlock bracelet. $35,550. Rolex: Visit rolex.com for location of Official Rolex Jewelers. 92 QUEST


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC

Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

GARRISON, NY  American Gothic home, designed by the foremost 19th century American architect, Alexander Jackson Davis, offers 7800 square feet, restored to reflect the gilded age of country homes. The home features an impressive keyhole staircase, large public rooms, and the architect’s signature split level design on the upper floors. The 19 acre estate also offers an in-ground pool with pool house, three car garage and barn. Additional buildings on adjoining land are also available. Offered at $7,500,000.

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


Fresh Finds

Savor summer afternoons all year long with “L’Aprèsmidi sur la plage,” an oil on canvas by André Hambourg (1909-1999), available at Wally Findlay Galleries: 124 East 57th St., 212.421.5390.

Book an early winter escape to Casa de Campo, a Leading Caribbean Resort, member of The Leading Hotels of the World, and benefit from great savings—just mention booking code WIN-EBB. Casa de Campo: 800.877.3643 or www.casadecampo.com.do. They’ll be green with envy over your Judith Murat “Spring Growth” necklace in gold, peridot, and diamonds. Price upon request. Judith Murat: At judithmurat.com.

Look to Bottega Veneta for fall fringe fashions, like this nero pearl rafia fringed embroidered dress. $9,500. Bottega Veneta: At Bottega Veneta boutiques, 212.371.5511, or bottegaveneta.com.

Something to wrap your fingers around: Roberto Coin’s Martellato snake ring in 18-kt. rose gold with cognac diamonds. $4,600. Roberto Coin: At robertocoin.com.

Keep bugs at bay the natural way—with Malin + Goetz’s bug spray, which includes rosemary, geranium, lemongrass, and citronella. Vegan and DEET-free. $20 for 4 fl. oz. Malin + Goetz: 177 Seventh Ave., 212.727.3777, or malinandgoetz.com.

The luxurious French triple-milled Tuberose soap from Kat Burki contains grapeseed and olive oils to dissolve impurities and cocoa and shea butter to moisturize the skin. $15. Kat Burki: At Space NK SoHo, 99 Greene St., 212.941.4222, or spacenk.com.


Inspired by classic cameras, Persol’s Reflex sunglasses combine vintage appeal with a thoroughly

Ascot Chang makes staying cool

contemporary look. $360 each.

a breeze in this stylish but-

Persol: Available at Sunglass Hut stores

ton-down multi-colored linen

or sunglasshut.com.

shirt. $265. Ascot Chang: 110 Central Park South, 212.759.3333.

Sales from this J.Crew For The High Line vintage train tee, in heather ink, benefit annual maintenance and operations for New York’s beloved downtown public park. $44. Available at jcrew.com and shop.thehighline.org.

Asprey’s sterling silver Classic Ice Bucket completes every gentleman’s bar with a sophisticated sense of cool. $5,400. Asprey: 853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

Prada is the

The Assouline Leather Trunk by Goyard

master of

is the ultimate in chic for the ultimate biblio-

materials and

phile, housing 100 assorted titles from

luxurious lines:

Assouline’s Memoire Collection. $20,000.

kid mohair

Available by calling 888.723.2099 or

coat ($2,320),

emailing customerservice@assouline.com.

Shetland wool sweater ($480), and kid mohair pants ($735). At select Step back in time with a classic sneaker style in Converse’s Jack Purcell sneakers in navy

Prada boutiques and prada.com.

canvas with white trim. $60. Converse: Available at converse.com. AUGUST 2013 95


BUSINESS

ON THE UP AND UP This page: The reception at The Next Step Realty’s office in midtown Manhattan, where clients are

THE NEXT STEP REALTY—A start-up offering apartment-finding services for graduates as they embark on their careers—is revolutionizing the real estate market in New York, as well as in other cities. Enter Blair Brandt, who co-founded The Next Step Realty in 2010 in order to ensure that graduates are well situated before they begin their jobs at a variety of companies, including Christie’s, Goldman Sachs, and Ralph Lauren. The Next Step Realty serves graduates from elite schools like Harvard University, Yale University, Princeton University, the University of Virginia, 96 QUEST

Georgetown University, the University of Richmond, and Trinity College. At The Next Step Realty, graduates work with 13 exclusive, in-house agents from the same backgrounds and networks, thereby establishing a sense of camaraderie—as well as a sense of accountability—that has been proven to ensure success. With such a precedent, The Next Step Realty creates an experience that is positive and productive for everyone who is involved. When Brandt—an alumnus of Deerfield Academy and the University of Richmond ’10—graduated, he returned home to Palm Beach, Florida,

to work for Christian Angle at Christian Angle Real Estate. Soon, realizing the challenges of being a twenty-something agent—as well as the challenges of being a twenty-something in search of an agent—Brandt employed his enterprising spirit to create the company that would evolve into The Next Step Realty. By March 2010, there was a logo: a blue and white giraffe, symbolizing the transition of the graduate. Soon, Jason Briggs—an alumnus of Tabor Academy and Columbia University ’94—invested $100,000 of seed capital, becoming chairman of the board. Within a year, he solidified his commitment to The

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E X T S TE P R E A LT Y; E L I Z A B E T H Q U I N N B RO W N

greeted by their agents.


NEXT STEP

This page, from left: Jason Briggs, Blair Brandt, Michael Fisher, Jr., and Field Hucksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the leadership

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

team at The Next Step Realty.

MONTH 2008 00


Next Step Realty by becoming a dayto-day presence on the team, offering a different, more experienced perspective. “Why I invested is compelling,” he says. “I backed Next Step Realty because I wanted to do something to make my three-year-old proud. At best, he can work beside me in 20 years. I am trying to build this for him. I also have always had an unwavering confidence in Blair and his integrity and work ethic. I was buying into Blair. I had seen him being competitive, playing basketball. I liked his drive and knew it would translate to his company.” Briggs recalls searching for an apartment as a young professional, calling 12 brokers from the classifieds in The New York Times. “Only one person called 98 QUEST

me back and didn’t treat me like a kid,” he says. The Next Step Realty provides a stable of agents like the one Briggs disovered, agents who are eager, rather than inconvenienced, to work with twenty-somethings. “In the end, our brokers aren’t that much different from our clients,” says Brandt. “They’re the same age, their alma maters are the same. We’re matching our clients with like-minded people in our brokers.” Matt Bauman—an alum of Brown University ’10—joined the team from Halstead Property in March. Speaking to what differentiates The Next Step Realty from its competitors, he says: “There’s a level of trust that is inherently created when we, as brokers, look

more like our customers’ peers than their parents. Plus, the process is that much more fun when you get to walk around the city with someone who, whether literally or figuratively, just showed up to New York for the first time with a suitcase, a MetroCard, and a dream. The clients we get are serious about moving, qualified to go on an apartment tour, and excited about working with us. There is an exclusivity behind our brand, and to get paired with a Next Step broker feels more like an honor than a nuisance.” And an honor it is—The Next Step Realty treats its customers who, on average, are paying $1,723.07/month on rent as though they were purchasing multi-million-dollar homes. As

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E X T S TE P R E A LT Y; E L I Z A B E T H Q U I N N B RO W N

At The Next Step Realty, graduates work with 13 exclusive, in-house agents from the same backgrounds and networks.


NBEUXSTI NSETSESP

This page: The Next Step Realty is located at 21 West 46th Street, in the heart of New York, providing the service of three branded vehicles to take customers around to apartments. Opposite page: The compay’s offices host a tight-knit team that is comprised of 20 employees, 13 of whom are agents.

well as a standard of service from its agents, the company offers amenities like branded cars to hunt for apartments in; welcome packages after renting that include branded items like Zagat restaurant guides and benefits with companies like Uber; and monthly customer appreciation events where everyone can mix and mingle. “When clients sign up with us, they feel like they’re part of a club,” says Briggs. The formula is working. In 2011, the company earned $98,000 in revenue; in 2012, the company earned $207,000 in revenue. This year, The Next Step Realty is poised to pull in $2.1 million in revenue, with 20 employees and 13 agents. “You know, it’s the happiness of the customers first, and then we do

Jason Briggs, chairman of The Next Step Realty, with his son, Charlie, at the company’s office.

the math,” says Brandt. Affirming this approach, Bauman says, “The second a customer contacts The Next Step Realty, they are immediately welcomed as a part of our family. This is integral to our success. The apartment search process, especially in New York City, can be so cold and distant; landlords often do not see you as a person. We attempt to mitigate this at all costs to make our customers feel valued. From company cars driving them around to fun swag bags delivered upon moving in, we spare no expense at The Next Step Realty to make sure our customers know how much we truly care about them. Once a Next Step customer, always a Next Step customer.” X MONTH 2008 00


AMERICAN IDYLL BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

100 QUEST


WA R R E N J A G G E R

T R AV E L

PULLING UP TO the Ocean House today, it’s easy to understand why generations of families have been flocking here since 1868, when Jonathan Nash erected the storied property in its original formation. Perched high on the bluffs of Watch Hill, Rhode Island, the Ocean House is a grand, timelessly elegant Victorian-style structure in a most welcoming shade of yellow. Overlooking a private stretch of beach with staggering views of the Atlantic Ocean, the iconic seaside resort is the first and only Forbes Five Star and AAA Five Diamond hotel in the state. From your first steps on the front veranda to your arrival in-room, expect to be swept back in time to a genteel era of travel. Bellhops unload the car with sun-freckled smiles; frontof-house staff expedite an effortless check-in; and dedicated floor valets greet you by name. The effect is instantaneous comfort; even first-time visitors feel like they’re returning home.

And what a home it is. Beautifully appointed, yet casually elegant, the Ocean House is a combination of British Colonial, early American, and seaside styles integrated with modern conveniences everywhere, from high-tech in-room communications and entertainment to state-of-the-art sensory technology. With private beach access and cabana services, championship croquet on the South Lawn, complimentary afternoon drinks and snacks, a 20-meter indoor lap pool, and treatments for all tastes available at the impeccable 12,000-square-foot OH! Spa, it’s hard to do anything but relax at the Ocean House. The OH! Spa features a private line of premium spa products for sale inspired by the beach and local ingredients. Even my sensitive skin yearned for more of the lavender-infused massage cream used during a 60-minute customized treatment. “It’s so natural,” my therapist reminded me, “You could probably eat it.”

At the Ocean House in historic Watch Hill, Rhode Island, guests enjoy an afternoon of sport on the Croquet Court, located on the South Lawn. AUGUST 2013 101


T R AV E L

This page: The Ocean House guest rooms, like the Deluxe King Room (above), pay tribute to the luxurious, Victorian-era seaside hotels while providing every modern convenience; the Tower Suite (below). Opposite Page: The Living Room, with a stone fireplace, provides

Tempting, but with a host of both casual- and fine-dining venues offering classically inspired farm-to-table cuisine of the Atlantic Northeast, I opted instead to try the award-worthy preparations of the culinary team: succulent lobster rolls at Dune Cottage, by the beach; chicken salad at Seaside Terrace, next to the pool; and a not-to-be-missed seven-course chef’s tasting menu overseen by executive chef John Kolesar (complete with wine pairings by wine director Jonathan Feiler and sommelier Gregory Astudillo) at Seasons, the main dining room. The most superb summer pairing—a cucumber soup with crab, mango, and avocado alongside a stunningly crisp and clear 2011 Chablis by Simonnet Febvre—was among the many savory surprises of the courses-long meal. Watching the setting sun over vanilla-bean soufflé, I sighed in relief that this singular sanctuary was saved from disrepair and possible destruction. Thankfully, in 2004, a group of summer residents, led by Charles M. Royce, rescued the site and preserved the Ocean House by faithfully replicating the historic portion. With 49 rooms and 23 private residences, the new Ocean House provides a more spacious retreat. Still—amazingly—all of the resort’s 247 windows remain in their original positions, which gave this guest something to think about as he caught the ocean’s view from just about every corner. X

WA R R E N J A G G E R

a warm welcome (above); an Ocean View Deluxe King Room (below).


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E


OPEN HOUSE

THE SOUND OF SILENCE ARCHITECT JOEB MOORE is reviving the

town of Old Greenwich, Connecticut, with the Spiral House, which is located at 16 Shoreham Club Road. Replacing the Shoreham Club (a summer destination for previous generations) the Spiral House offers an update to the area, a home boasting a modern—even mathematical—design, constructed from materials like western red cedar wood. “The architectural achievement is a brilliant geometric algorithm employing a spiraling formation to optimize the environmental and social dynamics of the property. A continuous juxtapo104 QUEST

sition of exotic woods and concrete, stainless steel and limestone surfaces throughout produces a complement of effects from walls and floors to countertops and built-in cabinet systems,” stated The New York Times. By engaging with the environment— which includes a beach on the Long Island Sound—Moore payed homage to the setting by encouraging natural light and water views. Minimalist in design, the construction is able to embrace and emphasize the beauty of its New England surroundings. The property boasts four bedrooms

and four and a half bathrooms, resting on half an acre overlooking the ocean. The master suite is as spectacular as it is sleek, from its private balcony and panoramic vistas to its amenities like a glass fireplace, personal gym, and walk-in closet. Currently listed at $6.995 million, the Spiral House offers a magnificent experience in a magnificent setting. X For more information on the Spiral House, contact Alison Farn-Leigh of William Raveis Exceptional Properties at 203.667.7832 or alisonfarnleigh@gmail.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F W I LL I A M R AV E I S E XC E P T I O N A L P RO P E RT I E S

A serene four-bedroom home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut, offers views of the Long Island Sound and a design that’s as spectacular as it is sleek.


This page, clockwise from top left: The interior of the Spiral House engages with its surroundings; a glass fireplace decorates the space; the exterior is made of Western Red Cedar wood, reinterpreted from the shingle style; the house features creative outdoor spaces; views of the Long Island Sound are visible throughout; a prime location in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. Opposite page: The Spiral House, at dusk.


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

MONEY MATTERS Chief Client Advocate Wilmington Trust Company

PRUDENT RISK ALLOCATION STILL WORKS BEST IN TODAY’S ECONOMY THE EFFECT OF TECHNOLOGY

What differentiates the wealth management market as it has evolved over the past 70 years? Pure and simple: technology. We have immediate access to so much information that we react too quickly. A client called me from Asia during the financial meltdown in 2008 saying the world was coming to an end and that he had become obsessed with following the financial news on his T. V., his phone, and his iPad. Every time he left home, he was bombarded with screens of financial information everywhere he went. We advised him to simply turn off the devices. He sold out his portfolio and went to cash at 6,600, missing the entire Dow rally back to 15,553, where it stands today. Another result of the changing technology is the instant access to information about companies and the markets and the ability of hedge funds to digest that information to then execute their trades in quant models via high-frequency trading. In 2013, it’s estimated that less than 20 percent of the total worldwide equity market is owned by individuals. So how do self-directed investors compete with a gigantic portfolio manager, whether a bank, an investment firm, or a hedge fund? They don’t. They have waved the 106 QUEST

flag and (especially in the large-cap space) have created the need for billions of dollars in passive investment vehicles, such as exchange traded funds. CRITICAL NEED FOR LEADERSHIP

One of the most exciting developments for our country in 2013-14, and similar to the 1940s, is the return of our soldiers from war—in today’s case, the Afghan war. Recognizing a global lack of leadership, two banks in America have committed to hiring 25,000 veterans. With the plethora of small businesses created every day in America, their next step to success depends on finding someone to manage and provide leadership for growth for their companies going forward. The United States will now have the advantage of deploying thousands of leaders retiring from the military into our workforce and fledgling economy. WHERE ARE WE TODAY?

The financial markets of late have celebrated a good rally in the stock market as a result of the Fed consistently replenishing the punch bowl. And yes, you may lose money in fixed income primarily from a rise in long-anticipated interest rates, but a typical high-net-worth inves-

tor is not so concerned about the value of his or her bond portfolio; they are more interested in maintaining the asset’s credit rating and yield. He or she expects PAR back at maturity, so if bonds are up or down by 2 percent, that’s not much of a surprize or concern. While “cash is trash” with barely any yield, emerging markets have also taken a hit, primarily from a projected reduction in GDP in China and the failing of government structure in many countries across the world. Gold and commodities have been down due to a lack of projected inflation. Private equity and real estate have benefitted from continued low interest rates. ASSET ALLOCATION IS STILL KEY

There has been an adage in the wealth management market for years: Subtract your age from 100 and that will define your risk allocation. For example: 100 minus an age of 65 equals 35 percent allocation to stocks, 65 percent to bonds. Why? Because retirees don’t have their salaries any longer and they need yield (bonds) in retirement. The opposite: 100 minus age of 35 equals 65 percent in stocks. Why? At 35, we are all in the process of building our wealth and obtain yield from our salaries to pay the bills. The biggest issue out there is, “Is this time different? Will my asset allocation provide me the desired growth and income I need for the future, but still protect my risk profile?” With many new financial instruments being created every day, some may try to sell you the latest fad. Take a deep breath. Realize that no, this time still isn’t different; stick to a longterm investment strategy, and please turn off your phone, laptop, and T.V. X For more information visit www.wilmingtontrust.com.

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S ; W I L M I N G TO N T RU S T

PETER E. (TONY) GUERNSEY, JR


T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

Follow the example of the past; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rely too heavily on technology.


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

MONEY MATTERS This page: Banker Mortimer Schiff. Opposite page: Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in 1936.


L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S ; C RY S TA L A N D CO M PA NY

T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

Q: What advice would you give that could apply to both today’s economic climate and during the era of the first Quest 400 List (the 1930s and 40s), and what should people be focused on, no matter the decade? A: Keep a long-term perspective. Wealth is maintained and accumulated over time through careful and prudent risk taking. You should understand what assets are most critical in sustaining your family’s desired life and lifestyle, and then focus your energies in protecting and preserving those assets. Q: What is your current view of the market, and what do you think the future holds for your clients and their assets? Are there any current trends happening now that we should know about, like inverstors diversifying their portfolios into tangible assets such as

JONATHAN CRYSTAL Executive Vice President Crystal & Company

UNDERSTANDING YOUR ASSETS IS CRUCIAL FOR BUILDING WEALTH fine wine or blue-chip art? A: We see our clients’ risk profile shifting as they move from passive investing to more active and direct investing. An increased allocation to “hard assets”(e.g. residential real estate, fine arts, gemstones, precious metals, and collectibles) raises insurance-related issues of physical

protection, as well as valuation, authenticity, title, and security. Meanwhile, private investments in operating business create a whole host of liability and reputational concerns. X For more information call 212.344.2444 or visit www.crystalco.com. AUGUST 2013 109


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

MONEY MATTERS DOMINICK LOMBARDI Director, Investment Management & Trust IDB Bank

LONG-TERM OPPORTUNITIES IN A FRAGILE MARKET

110 QUEST

nities? We believe there are. While Quantitative Easing has inflated equities, the program has also provided liquidity for bank lending and reduced borrowing costs for many consumers

For more information, visit www.idbny.com.

Banker Paul Warburg was an early advocate of the U. S. Federal Reserve System.

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S ; I D B B A N K

THE CALENDAR SAYS the financial crisis of 2008–2009 should be a faded memory, relegated to an economics class discussion or some other historical reference. After all, the recession officially ended four years ago. Yet, for many, the pain lingers. There have been many comparisons to the Great Depression of the 1930s, and while the similarities are few, one holds true. Deleveraging is a slow process with long-lasting effects. Eventually spending and growth will accelerate and the economy will gain momentum. With the benefit of hindsight we know the Great Depression eventually passed and was followed by three decades of strong growth. Of course, World War II, including the post-War recovery, played a significant role in that growth phase and we certainly hope for a different catalyst this time. While no one is forecasting three decades of growth we do believe economic growth will accelerate and, over time, you will profit from a sound investment strategy. Given the current fragile economy and volatile stock and bond markets it’s easy to focus on near-term events and lose sight of long-term opportunities. Growth is sluggish, unemployment remains stubbornly high, and the Federal Reserve is talking about ending its massive Quantitative Easing (QE) stimulus program, which among other things has artificially boosted asset values. So, are there long-term opportu-

and businesses. Both should provide the fuel for increased consumer spending that will translate into increased hiring and higher corporate profits. And, ultimately, it is higher corporate profits that drive stock prices higher. Five years after the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, many questions and challenges remain, but these risks bring opportunities. While the outlook for some asset classes is far less optimistic—namely for bonds and fixed-income securities—we believe that a well-diversified portfolio should produce attractive returns during the remainder of this economic cycle. X


T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon, who believed a strong society was key to a strong economy, signing up for the Red Cross.


400 THE QUEST

Celebrating 20 years of “The List”

that defines the brightest, most influential, and most prominent people

who make society what it is today. WRITTEN BY

PARTIES ARE CELEBRATIONS of one sort or another. They mark time, talent, and lives—the past and the future. They also give form to an aspect of community that we call society. The world is a stage, and the party the life upon it. All great parties in history are theater, portraying the society of the place and its moment. The intent is a constant: to impress the guests (and the hosts) with the fun of it. The results are left to fate and the gods of jubilation, irony, masquerade, bacchanalia, comedy, and even tragedy. Parties serves as important moments in the history of any society, be that of an individual, family, country, or a group of people—the wedding, baptism, anniversary, birthday, the going away, the coming together; the opening of sundry 112 QUEST

splashes of glitter or the closing. The most famous party of the past half century in America was Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball, which was held in 1966 in the grand ballroom of the Plaza Hotel. The guest of honor was media heiress and publisher Kay Graham, a modern grande dame. It was a masterstroke of ballyhoo for the author and host. He was really celebrating his fantastic literary success, In Cold Blood, which was about a family from the American heartland who was brutally murdered by an itinerant couple of thugs passing through on their way to anywhere. The book’s success made the author rich, and the darling of society as well as of Middle America. Life was his party. That is, until the irony of

one’s character stepped in, and then it wasn’t. It was said of him many years later by Phyllis Cerf Wagner, a close friend and early booster of Capote’s talent, that the author never recovered from the tragedy of that story he wrote, and especially that of one of the murderers. His hubris overtook his good sense, and left him stranded on the River Styx. The great parties, such as those displayed within the montage of our annual Quest 400 List, are the sea from which all dramas, all laughter, and all sorrow are drawn. They were all of the things mentioned above, and they were fun. Their concepts of the community, and its culture at the time, were about celebrating this life, and all the ships upon it. X

CO U RTE S Y O F A S S O U L I N E

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA


President of The Washington Post, Katharine Graham, with Truman Capote at his legendary Black and White Ball at the Plaza Hotel in New York City.


1

2 7

Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball 1. Writer Truman Capote and guest of honor Katharine Graham, then The Washington

3

Post president, at the Black and White Ball at the Plaza Hotel in November, 1966; 2. Newlyweds Mia Farrow and Frank Sinatra; 3. One of Capote’s most beloved swans, Lee Radziwill, putting on her mask for the occasion; 4. Radziwill on Capote’s arm, enjoying the party; 5. Capote receiving whispered musings from one of his glamorous coterie; 6. The ballroom at The Plaza; 7. Andy Warhol was said to be overwhelmed by the amount of celebrities there.

4

6 5


A Acquavella, Bill and Donna . . . . . . . . . . Acquavella, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acquavella, Nick and Travis . . . . . . . . . . Adams, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addison, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addison, Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adler, Frederick and Catherine . . . . . . . Adler, Jonathan and Simon Doonan . . . Adolfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aga Khan, Princess Yasmin . . . . . . . . . . Ainslie, Michael and Suzanne. . . . . . . . . Albers, Ruediger and Maggie . . . . . . . . . Allen, Chris and Kate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allen, Joe and Annette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ames, Anthony and Cetie. . . . . . . . . . . . Amling, Jeffrey and Katie . . . . . . . . . . . . Amory, Minot and Victoria. . . . . . . . . . . Annan, John and Hope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony, Silas and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony, Silas Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Araskog, Rand and Jessie . . . . . . . . . . . . Armstrong, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armstrong, Mrs. Thomas (Bunty) . . . . . Arnault, Bernard and Helene . . . . . . . . . Arnon, Ehud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arnot, Courtney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arrouet, Paul and Dylan Lauren . . . . . . Asen, Scott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aston, Sherrell and Muffie Potter . . . . . Aston, Brad and Valerie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aston, Jay and Allison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Atherton, Lily and Tom Hanbury . . . . . Atherton, Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Atkins, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attoe, Stephen and Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auchincloss, Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auchincloss, K.K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auletta, Ken. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ayres, Charlie and Sara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Azqueta, Norberto and Lian . . . . . . . . . Azqueta, Norberto Jr. and Robin . . . . . .

B Bacall, Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baconovic, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bacon, Louis M. and Cynthia. . . . . . . . . Baer, Barrett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bailey, Preston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bahrenburg, Genevieve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, George IV and Anne . . . . . . . . . Baker, Marianna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, Asia and Callie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, Kane and Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, Harold O. and Nancy . . . . . . . . . Balkin, Norman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

400 THE QUEST

Bancroft, Thomas and Barbara . . . . . . . Bancroft, William and Debbie . . . . . . . . Bancroft, Townsend and Brooke . . . . . . Banker, Bindy and Bea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bardes, Brittain and John Damgard. . . . Barish, Keith and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barman, John and Kelly Graham . . . . . . Bartlett, Betsy and A. Jones Yorke . . . . . Bartholomay, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bass, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bass, Sid and Mercedes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basso, Dennis and Michael Cominotto . . Beard, Anson and Deborah . . . . . . . . . . Beard, Anson Jr. and Veronica Miele. . . Beard, Jamie and Veronica Swanson . . . Beinecke, Rick and Candace . . . . . . . . . Beirne, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bell, Joel and Marife Hernandez . . . . . . Bell, Byrdie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benedict, Daniel and Andrew Saffir . . . Benjamin, Bill and Maura . . . . . . . . . . . . Benoit, Mrs. Peter (Nellie) . . . . . . . . . . . Benabib, Roberto and Samantha . . . . . . Benson, Harry and Gigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . Berkowitz, Tim and Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernard, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernbach, John and Violaine . . . . . . . . . Bernhard, Bill and Catherine Cahill. . . . Bernier, Rosamond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betteridge, Terry and Diana Siebert. . . . Bewkes, Jeff and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biddle, Christine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biddle, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biggs, Jeremy H. and Friederike . . . . . . Bilhuber, Jeffrey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black, Andrew and John Auerbach . . . . Black, Lee and Cece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black, Leon and Debbie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blades, John and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blair, William and Deeda . . . . . . . . . . . . Blinken, Alan and Melinda. . . . . . . . . . . Blinken, Donald and Vera . . . . . . . . . . . Block, John and Hilary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bloomberg, Mayor Michael . . . . . . . . . . Boalt, Brucie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blum, Andy and Flis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boardman, Mrs. T. Dennie (Cynthia). . . Boardman, Dixon and Arianna . . . . . . . Boardman, Serena and John Theodoracopulos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bockman, Richard and Gale Hayman . . Bodini, Francesca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bohannon, Kathryn and Felix Schroder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolander, Lars and Nadine Kalachnikoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolen, Alex and Eliza Reed . . . . . . . . . . Bombard, Buddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boren, Reid and Michelle . . . . . . . . . . . . Borynack, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bowles, Hamish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bradfield, Geoffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Braddock, Rick and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . Bradley, Camilla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brady, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Braff, Doug and Meg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Henry and Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Owen and Rhea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bregman, Martin and Cornelia. . . . . . . . Briggs, Jason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brinker, Ambassador Nancy. . . . . . . . . . Brinn, Mildred. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brodsky, Dan and Esty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brodsky, Katy, Alexander and Tom . . . . Brodsky, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brokaw, Clifford and Babette. . . . . . . . . Brokaw, Tom and Meredith . . . . . . . . . . Bronfman, Edgar Sr. and Jan Aronson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bronfman, Edgar Jr. and Clarissa. . . . . . Brooks, Michael and Dede . . . . . . . . . . . Brown, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brown, Matt and Marisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brown, Tina and Harry Evans . . . . . . . . Brown, Cabell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Browne, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brownlow, Girard and Jane Baird . . . . . Brumder, Will and Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . Bryan, Christina and Wilhelmus . . . . . . Buatta, Mario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buckley, Chris and Katy Close . . . . . . . . Buffett, Jimmy and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buhl, Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bull, Bartle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bull, Bartle Breese and Claudia . . . . . . . Bunn, George and Jane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bunn, Palmer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burch, Bob and Dale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burch, Tory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burden, Amanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burden, Mrs. Carter (Susan). . . . . . . . . . Burke, Coleman and Susan. . . . . . . . . . . Burke, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burke, Mrs. Edwin (Virginia) . . . . . . . . . Burnham, Patricia and Bill Brock . . . . . Burns, Brian and Eileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2013 115


1

John and Jacqueline Kennedyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wedding 1. Jacqueline Bouvier at her wedding to John Fitzgerald Kennedy at Hammersmith Farm in Newport on September 12, 1953; 2. The bride descends a staircase in her wedding dress, designed by Ann Lowe; 3. The newlyweds on the sprawling grounds of Hammersmith Farm; 4. John and Jackie cut their wedding cake, a creation from

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Plourdeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery in Fall River, Massachusetts; 5. The stunning Jackie Kennedy in her official wedding portrait.

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4

5


400 THE QUEST

Burns, Richard and Cricket . . . . . . . . . . Burns, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burris, David and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bush, Jonathan and Jody . . . . . . . . . . . . Butcher, Billy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C Calder, Donald and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . Caldwell, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calhoun, Robert and Liza Pulitzer. . . . . Calhoun, Benn and Molly. . . . . . . . . . . . Califano, Joseph Jr. and Hilary. . . . . . . . Callaway, David and Brenda. . . . . . . . . . Cantor, Iris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caravaggi, Robert and Blaine . . . . . . . . . Carduner, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carey, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carney, Mike and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carpenter, Ed and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carroll, Barbara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carson, Bill and Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter, Graydon and Anna Scott . . . . . . Cartter, Jill Warburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cashin, Dick and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Castle, John K. and Marianne . . . . . . . . Cates, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cave, Ray and Pat Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cave, Edward Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chambers, Anne Cox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chantecaille, Alexandra and Olivia . . . . Chisolm, Hugh and Daisy Prince. . . . . . Christman, Roger and Ellen . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lady Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lady Henrietta . . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lord Charles Spencer . . . . . . Churchill, Mrs. Winston (Luce) . . . . . . Clark, Alfred and Querube. . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Fred and Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Stephen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Howard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clinton, Bill and Hillary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Close, Chuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohane, Heather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, Mrs. Robert (Harriet) . . . . . . . . Cohen, Charles and Clo . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, James and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, Richard and Mona Ackerman . . Cohen, David J. and Romy . . . . . . . . . . . Cohn, Charles Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colacello, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Denis and Annabelle . . . . . . . Coleman, Denis III and Merideth . . . . . Coleman, Nicholas and Briggs . . . . . . . . Coleman, Timothy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Payson and Kim . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Chase and Stephanie . . . . . . .

Coleman, Reed and Lindsey . . . . . . . . . . Colhoun, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colley, Bruce and Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collins, Brad and Amy Fine . . . . . . . . . . . Collins, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Columbia, David Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . Colwell, Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comden, Betty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Condon, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connolly, John and Ingrid . . . . . . . . . . . Connor, Ian and Marina Rust. . . . . . . . . Connor, Sassy Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connors, Greg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conroy, Michael G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cook, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cook, Everett and Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooke, Richard and Wendy . . . . . . . . . . Cooper, Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooper, Maria and Byron Janis . . . . . . . Corbett, Andrew J. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corcoran, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cord, Cece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordish, Reed and Maggie Katz. . . . . . . Cormier, Judith and Frank Wisner. . . . . Cowell, Richard Jr. and Erinn . . . . . . . . Cox, Howard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cramer, Douglas S. and Hugh Bush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creel, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creel, Larry and Dana Fentress . . . . . . . Creel, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crespi, Consuelo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crespi, Pilar and Steve Robert . . . . . . . . Cronkite, Kipton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crystal, Jonathan and Darcie . . . . . . . . . Cullman, Edgar and Ellie . . . . . . . . . . . . Cunningham, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cuomo, Mario and Matilda . . . . . . . . . . Cuomo, Gov. Andrew and Sandra Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Curley, Walter and Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . Curry, Boykin and Celerie Kemble. . . . . Curry, Brownlee and Agneta . . . . . . . . . Curtin, Jack and Beth Nowers . . . . . . . . Curtis, Curt and Mimi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Curtis, Ashton and Merrill . . . . . . . . . . . Curtis, Remmington and Tatiana Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cushing, Howard and Nora . . . . . . . . . . Cushing, Howard Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D Dahl, Arlene and Marc Rosen . . . . . . . . Dana, Norma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dance, Andrew and Jennifer Llyod . . . . Dana, Charlie and Posy . . . . . . . . . . . . . David-Weill, Michel and HÊlène . . . . . . Davidson, Marvin and Mary. . . . . . . . . . Davis, Bill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Davis, Christina and Richard . . . . . . . . . Davis, Henry and Belle Burden . . . . . . . Davis, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Davis, Robin and Redington Jahncke . . de Bary, Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Boni, Graziano and Valerie . . . . . . . . de Borchgrave, Arnaud and Alexandra . de Bourbon de Parme, Prince and Princess Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Cabrol, Milly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Caraman, Countess Cristina . . . . . . . de Cuevas, Elizabeth Strong. . . . . . . . . . de Ganay, Dee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Guardiola, Roberto and Joanne . . . . de Koning, Joep and Dixie . . . . . . . . . . . de Kwiatkowski, Lulu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de la Renta, Oscar and Annette . . . . . . . del Nunzio, Paula and Paul F. Balser Sr. de Montebello, Philippe and Edith . . . . de Neufville, Thomas and Carolina . . . . de Neufville, Peter and Joanna Baker . . de Neufville, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Peyster, Ashton and Margo . . . . . . . . de Portago, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Roulet, Lorinda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Sayve, Countess Mona . . . . . . . . . . . . de Vogel, Willem and Marion. . . . . . . . . Dean, Tom and Caroline. . . . . . . . . . . . . Deane, Walter L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dempsey, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dennis, Pamela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desmarais, Paul and Jackie. . . . . . . . . . . Devine, Tom and Alix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Devendorf, Alfred and Bonnie . . . . . . . . deWoody, Beth Rudin and Firooz Zahedi. deWoody, Carlton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . di Bonaventura, Peter and Bridgett . . . . Di Donna, Emmanuel and Christina . . . Diamond, Jay and Alexandra . . . . . . . . . Dick, Hilary Limbocker . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dick, William C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dillard, Rodney and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . Diller, Barry and Diane von Furstenberg . Dodge, John and Lore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donahue, Barry and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . Donahue, Clay and Nevin. . . . . . . . . . . . Donnelly, Shannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donner, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Douglass, Robert Jr. and Whitney . . . . . AUGUST 2013 117


1

2

The Museum of the City of New York Winter Ball 1. The Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Council of the Museum of the City of New York Winter Ball, which is a grand fixture on all social calendars;

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2. Kari Talley, Phoebe Gubelmann, and Ivanka Trump in 2005; 3. Rachel Hovnanian, Allison Rockefeller, and Tara Rockefeller in 1995; 4. The 2010 Winter Ball; 5. Julian Niccolini showers Jamee Gregory with affection; 6. Alexia Pickett, Calvert Saunders, and

9

Mark Gilbertson; 7. Paige Crawford, Kerry Gaines, Nicolas Rohatyn, and Marybeth Gilmartin; 8. Siblings Dylan and David Lauren; 9. Edward Burke; 10. Muffie Potter, Chappy Morris, Joanne de Guardiola, and Doug Leeds in 1991; 11. George Whipple II, Marc Giordano, J. C. Giordano, Candace Bushnell, and Robby Banker in 1990.

3 10 11

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5 7

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400 THE QUEST

Dowling, Peter and Deb Willis . . . . . . . Downey, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drake, Rod and Jacqueline Weld . . . . . . Drexel, Nicky and Jacqueline Astor. . . . Drexler, Millard S. and Peggy . . . . . . . . Driscoll, Sean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Druckenmiller, Stanley and Fiona . . . . . du Pont, Richard and Lauren. . . . . . . . . Duchin, Peter and Virginia Coleman . . . Dudley, Lady Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dudley, Jane and Dwayne Johnson . . . . Duenas, Miguel and Vivian. . . . . . . . . . . Duff, Ted and Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duff, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Tony and Luly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Randolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Robin Biddle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durand, Pierre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durkes, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durkes, Frances and Harriet . . . . . . . . . Durkin, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DuRoss, Kimberly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dwyer, D.R. and Priscilla . . . . . . . . . . . .

E Eastman, John and Jodie . . . . . . . . . . . . Eberstadt, Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ecclestone, Llwyd and Diana . . . . . . . . . Edwards, Philip and Ali . . . . . . . . . . . . . Egerton, Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elliott, Mrs. Osborne (Inger) . . . . . . . . . Ellison, Nancy and Bill Rollnick. . . . . . . Ellwell, David and Christie. . . . . . . . . . . Elson, Ambassador Ed and Susie. . . . . . Embry, Mrs. John W. (Anne) . . . . . . . . . Embry, Tally and Maggie . . . . . . . . . . . . Emmanuel, Nicholas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ercklentz, Cornelia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erickson, Roger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ertegun, Mrs. Ahmet (Mica) . . . . . . . . . Espy, Mrs. John (Polly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Espy, Peter and Amanda. . . . . . . . . . . . . Eubanks, William R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F Fairchild, John and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairchild, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fales-Hill, Susan and Aaron Hill . . . . . . Fallon, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Fanjuls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farias, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farkas, Jonathan and Somers . . . . . . . . . Fernandez, Luis and Lillian. . . . . . . . . . Fekkai, Frédéric and Shirin von Wulffen . Feldman, Justin and Linda Fairstein . . .

Feldman, Richard and Diana . . . . . . . . . Ferrare, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field, Nikki and Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . Field, Dick and Sky. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figg, Jamie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finkelstein, Jimmy and Pamela Gross . . Firth, Edmée and Nicholas. . . . . . . . . . . Firyal, Princess of Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . Fisher, Mrs. Max (Marjorie) . . . . . . . . . . Fisk, Averell and Kirsten. . . . . . . . . . . . . Fitzgerald, Terry and Libby. . . . . . . . . . . Flöttl, Wolfgang and Anne Eisenhower. Floyd, Raymond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flusser, Alan and Marilese . . . . . . . . . . . Foley, Tom and Lesley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Forbeses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Mrs. Henry II (Kate) and Frank Chopin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forsberg, Lars and Kelly. . . . . . . . . . . . . Forsythe, Mrs. Carl (Sabrina) . . . . . . . . . Foster, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foster, Ridgely and Letsy . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank, James and Claiborne Swanson . . Frelinghuysen, Anson and Emma . . . . . Frelinghuysen, George and Nonnie . . . . Frelinghuysen, Peter and Barrett . . . . . . Freitas, Mark and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freund, Hugh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friedberg, Rick and Francine LeFrak . . Fuchs, Michael J.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuller, Gillian Spreckels . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fulton, Flo and Scott Miller . . . . . . . . .

G Galesi, Francesco and Marina . . . . . . . . Gammill, Lee and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gandhi, Meera and Vikram . . . . . . . . . . Gardiner, Robert “Stretch” and Liz. . . . Gardiner, Susan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garrett, Rob and Jacquie . . . . . . . . . . . . Gauntt, Jonathan and Samantha Leas . . Geary, Jack and Dolly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geary, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geddes, Robin and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . Geddes, Max and Missy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geier, Phil and Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geoffroy, Evan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Georgiopoulos, Peter and Kara . . . . . . . Gerry, Ebby and Kitty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerschel, Patrick and Elizabeth. . . . . . . Giard, George and Wendell . . . . . . . . . . Gilbert, Parker and Gail. . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilbertson, Mark F.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilligan, Fernanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilman, Kay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilmour, David and Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Giordano, Mark and Sallie . . . . . . . . . . . Giuliani, Rudy and Judith Nathan . . . . . Givner, Colt and Pamela Fiori . . . . . . . . Glascock, Steve and Barbara . . . . . . . . . Glass, John and Martha . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Goelets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goldberger, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goldsmith, Barbara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodale, Jim and Toni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodbody, Sarah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodman, Chris and Julia . . . . . . . . . . . Goodrich, Jock and Buttons. . . . . . . . . . Gordon, Ellery and Marjorie Reed. . . . . Goss, Jared duPont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gotbaum, Victor and Betsy . . . . . . . . . . Gould, George and Darcy . . . . . . . . . . . Grace, Jack and Sherri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graev, Larry and Lorna . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graham, Ian and Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graham, Stephen and Cathy . . . . . . . . . Grassi, Temple and Ellie. . . . . . . . . . . . . Grauer, Peter and Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . Greenberg, Ace and Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . Gregorian, Vartan and Claire . . . . . . . . . Gregory, Alexis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory, Peter and Jamee . . . . . . . . . . . . Grisanti, Eugene and Gretchen . . . . . . . Griscom, Nina and Leonel Piraino . . . . Gross, Michael and Barbara Hodes . . . . Grubman, Judith Murat . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grunwald, Mrs. Henry (Louise). . . . . . . Gruss, Martin and Audrey . . . . . . . . . . . Gruss, Josh and Shoshanna . . . . . . . . . . Guare, John and Adele Chatfield-Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Billy and Shelley . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Jimmy and Kate . . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Marjorie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Bingo, Phoebe and Tantivy Guernsey, Tony and Eve . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guerrand-Hermès, Valesca. . . . . . . . . . . Guerrini-Maraldi, Antoinette and Hans Kurtiss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Cornelia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Freddie and Carole . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Lisa Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guettel, Henry and Mary Rodgers. . . . . AUGUST 2013 119


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Studio 54 1. Roy “Halston” Frowick, Loulou de la Falaise, Yves Saint Laurent, Nan Kempner, and Steve Rubell; 2. Andy Warhol, Diana Vreeland, and Steve Rubell celebrated Liza Minnelli’s performance in The Act at Studio 54 in 1977; 3. Bianca and Mick Jagger were regulars of the club; 4. Bianca even celebrated her 30th birthday there, making a grand entrance on a horse on May 2, 1977; 5. Studio 54 opened in 1977 at 254 West 54th Street to become one of the most famous clubs in the history of New York City, closing in 1981.

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400 THE QUEST

Gugelmann, Zani. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gumprecht, Ian and Aileen . . . . . . . . . . Gunther, Jack D. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gurley, George and Hilary Heard . . . . . Gustin, Andrew and Braken. . . . . . . . . . Gutfreund, John and Susan . . . . . . . . . . Guthrie, Mrs. Randolph (Bea) . . . . . . . . Gwathmey, Bette Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H Hackett, Monte and Mayme. . . . . . . . . . Hackley, Maria and Sherwood . . . . . . . Haden-Guest, Anthony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halberstam, Mrs. David (Jean) . . . . . . . Halberstam, Julia and Ryan Harvey . . . . Halstead, Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamilton, Ted and Christy . . . . . . . . . . . Hamm, Bill and Candy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton, Mrs. Mark (Duane) . . . . . . . . Hampton, Kate and David Breithbarth . Hanley, Dan and Denise . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hanley, Lee and Allie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harbach, Bill and Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . Hardwick, Bob and Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . Harris, Ira and Nicki. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harris, Patti and Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Bill and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Mai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Walter and Anne Beckos . . . . Hathaway, Philips “Pete” . . . . . . . . . . . . Hatkoff, Craig and Jane Rosenthal. . . . . Hawkins, Ashton and John Moore . . . . Hawks, Kitty and Joe Leiderman . . . . . . Hay, R. Couri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayward, Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayward, Frances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hearst, Anne and Jay McInerney . . . . . . Hearst, Patricia and Bernard Shaw . . . . Hearst-Shaw, Lydia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heinz, Chris and Sasha Lewis . . . . . . . . Heiskell, Marian Sulzberger . . . . . . . . . . Held, Jim and Kenn Karakul . . . . . . . . . Henckels, Kirk and Fernanda Kellogg. . Henderiks, Joy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Herman, Dorothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Herrera, Reinaldo and Carolina . . . . . . . Hess, Mrs. Carl (Ludmila) . . . . . . . . . . . Hess, Marlene and James Zirin . . . . . . . Hess, John and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heyman, Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hickox, Chat and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hickox, Danielle and Kelly Moore . . . . Hicks, Kim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hidalgo, David and Mary Ann Tighe . . . Hill, Tom and Janine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hilliard, Landon and Kiwi . . . . . . . . . . .

Hilliard, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hilson, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hinman, George and Emilie . . . . . . . . . Hirsch, Caroline and Andrew Fox. . . . . Hitz, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoadley, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoagland, Jim and Jane Hitchcock . . . . . Hobbs, Fritz and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hobbs, Nick and Ashley. . . . . . . . . . . . . Hogan, Michael and Margo . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Jim and Casey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Sharon King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Warren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hormats, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Horn, Linda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Horn, Stoddard and Leslie . . . . . . . . . . Horvitz, Michael and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . The Houghtons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hovey, Chandler and Valerie Urry . . . . . Hovnanian, Ara and Rachel . . . . . . . . . . Howard, Pamela and Wynn Laffey . . . . Howard, Philip and Alexandra . . . . . . . Howard-Potter, Jake and Erica . . . . . . . Hoyt, Anthony S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hubbard, Bill and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . Hufty, Page Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Husain, Fazle and Blair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hussein, Her Majesty Queen Noor . . . . Hutchins, Winston and Diane. . . . . . . . Hutton, Punch and John Hodges . . . . . Hvolbeck, Brad and Marijane . . . . . . . .

I Ingham, Joy Hirshon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ireland, Bob and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irwin, Arthur and Kathy. . . . . . . . . . . . . Isham, Mrs. Heyward (Sheila) . . . . . . . . Isham, Chris and Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . Isham, Ralph and Ala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Isles, Philip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ittleson, Tony and Chan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ives, Philip and Caroline . . . . . . . . . . . . Ives, Alexander C.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J Jackson, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jagger, Bianca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jammet, André and Rita . . . . . . . . . . . . .

James, Bob and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James, Tony and Aimee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janjigian, Robert and Tom Cahill . . . . . . Janklow, Mort and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . Janney, Stuart III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Javits, Eric Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennings, Mitch and Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Elizabeth “Libet”. . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Jamie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Richard and Sessa von Richthofen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Woody and Suzanne.. . . . . . . . Jones, Peter and Leslie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jones, Ann Dexter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan, Vernon and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan, Jerry and Darlene. . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph, Ken and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph, Wendy and Jeffrey Ravetch . . . . Jurdem, Ann and Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . .

K Kanavos, Paul and Dayssi . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaplan, Ed and Nathalie Gerschel. . . . . Kargman, Harry and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kassimir, Joel and Robin. . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaufman, George and Mariana . . . . . . . Kean, Roy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keating, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keenan, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keith, Jayne Teagle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keller, David and Avery . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kellogg, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kellogg, Chris and Vicki. . . . . . . . . . . . . Kemble, Phoebe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kempner, Tommy and Ann . . . . . . . . . . Kempner, Tom and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . Kennedy, Michael and Eleanora. . . . . . . Keesee, Konrad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kessler, Howard and Michele. . . . . . . . . Khosrovani, Hashem and Kate. . . . . . . . Kier, Joel and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kirkpatrick, Stuart and Meg. . . . . . . . . . Kissinger, Henry and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . Kivlan, Elizabeth Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Klenk, Clifford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kluge, Samantha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knechtel, Tom and Kerith Davies . . . . . Kneisel, Bill and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Koch, David and Julia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Koch, Bill and Bridget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kopelman, Arie and Coco . . . . . . . . . . . Kors, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korte, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kosner, Ed and Julie Baumgold . . . . . . . Kotur, Alexandra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kramer, Terry Allen and Nick Simunek. AUGUST 2013 121


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Nan and Tommy Kempnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th Wedding Anniversary

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1. Pat and Bill Buckley, with Julio Mario Santo Domingo; 2. Ahmet and Mica Ertegun; 3. Louise and Henry Grunwald; 4. Carolina and Reinaldo Herrera; 5. Nan and Tommy Kempner; 6. Arianna Boardman, Pepe Fanjul, Dixon Boardman, and Samantha Boardman; 7. Deeda Blair and Anne Bass; 8. Andres and Lauren Santo Domingo with Alejandro Santo Domingo and Eugenia Silva; 9. Joy Henderiks and Billy Norwich; 10. Betsy Bloomingdale and Bob Colacello; 11. Ann Slater, John Cahill, and Hamish Bowles; 12. Carol and Earle Mack.

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P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

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10202QQUUEES STT

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M A RY H I LL I A R D

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1. Annette and Oscar de la Renta; 2. Boaz Mazor and Lee Thaw, keeping dry under an umbrella; 3. Robert and Blaine

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Trump; 4. Kenny J. Lane cutting a rug with Sally Albemarle; 5. Sam and Judy Peabody avoiding the rain; 6. Aileen Mehle and Mario Buatta; 7. Jill Cartter, Tony Hoyt, and Peter Maass; 8. “grateful pub” and Taki Theodoracopulos; 9. Nan Kempner in deep discussion with Mark Birley; 10. Helen O’Hagan beaming with David Patrick Columbia; 11. Tommy Kempner and Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman; 12. Emilia Fanjul and Grace Meigher;

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13. Alex Hitz and Brooke Hayward; 14. Pauline Pitt with Hilaire O’Malley; 15. Annette Tapert and the legendary Dominick Dunne.

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P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

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AU MG OU NSTTH 2 20 01 03 8 1 0 20 3


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Mike Todd’s Garden Party 1. Mike Todd threw a party to celebrate the anniversary of Around the World in 80 Days, renting out Madison Square Garden; 2. Approximately 18,000 guests were in attendance; 3. Todd’s wife, Elizabeth Taylor, cut an 11-foot cake; 4. Steve Allen and wife Jayne Meadows; 5. Todd (who used the whistle to cue the orchestra) with emcee George Jessel; 6. Feathered Marchers, a 45-piece band from Philadelphia’s Mummers club, was one of 24 bands and two orchestras that performed that evening.

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400 THE QUEST

Kravis, Henry and Marie-JosĂŠe. . . . . . . . Krementz, Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Krieger, Stephanie and Brian Stewart . . Krim, Dr. Matilda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kroft, Steve and Jennet Conant . . . . . . . Krusen, Will and Elizabeth. . . . . . . . . . . Krusen, Charlie and Kristen . . . . . . . . . . Kushner, Jared and Ivanka Trump . . . . .

L LaForce, James and Stephen Henderson. Lamphere, Lucy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Landrigan, Ward and Judith. . . . . . . . . . Landrigan, Nico and Kimberly. . . . . . . . Lane, Kenneth Jay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langenberg, Margo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langham, Keith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langone, Ken and Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . . Lansing, Mrs. Gerrit (Sydie). . . . . . . . . . Lansing, Gerrit and Patricia . . . . . . . . . . Lapham, Lewis and Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . Lapham, Andrew and Caroline . . . . . . . Lapham, Winston P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Larner, Lionel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Latham, Aaron and Leslie Stahl . . . . . . . Lauder, Jane and Kevin Warsh. . . . . . . . Lauder, Leonard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauder, Ronald and Jo Carole . . . . . . . . Lauren, Ralph and Ricky . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren, David and Lauren Bush . . . . . . Lauren, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence, Jeanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leach, Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LeClerc, Paul and Dr. Judith Ginsberg . LeConey, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leatherman, Bill and Elizabeth . . . . . . . Leeds, Thomas and Heather. . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Richard and Karen . . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Jamie and Caroline Bierbaum. . LeFrak, Harrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lehman, Wendy Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . Leidy, Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leidy, Chris and Robert Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . Leone, Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lesesne, Cap and Briana. . . . . . . . . . . . . Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Esperance, Ros and Fran . . . . . . . . . . . Leventhal, Andrew and Natalie Leeds. . Leviant, Jacques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leviant, Sasha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Levine, Noel and Harriette. . . . . . . . . . . Lewis, Memrie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liberman, Bobby and Barbara . . . . . . . . Lickle, Bill and Renee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lickle, Garrison duPont . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liebman, Pamela. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Limbocker, Derek and Nicole . . . . . . . . Linclau, Joan and Ronald . . . . . . . . . . . Lindemann, George and Frayda . . . . . . Lindemann, Elizabeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindstrom, Pia and John Carley. . . . . . . Lloyd, Ewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Logatto, Jim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Long, Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Long, William Ivey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lorber, Howard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loring, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lowry, Glenn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Love, Iris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lufkin, Dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Luter, Joe and Karin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lyden, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynne, Michael and Nina . . . . . . . . . . . .

M MacGuire, Jamie and Michelle Coppedge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Peter and Becky . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Pierce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Kevin and Sally. . . . . . . . . . . Mack, Ambassador Earle and Carol . . . Mackay, Rory and Francie Leidy . . . . . . Macklowe, Julie and Billy . . . . . . . . . . . MacRae, Cameron and Ann . . . . . . . . . . Maddock, Charlie and Caroline Sylvester. Maddock, Jay and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maddock, Locke and Lily. . . . . . . . . . . . Magrino, Susan and Jim Dunning . . . . . Mahoney, Hillie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mailman, Phyllis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Malloy, Tim and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maltese, Tony and Cynthia . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Charles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Dr. William and Lynn . . . . . . . . Manice, Peter and Celeste . . . . . . . . . . . Manice, Christopher and Elizabeth . . . . Mann, Bill and Anna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mann, Steve and Sharyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manning, Tony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marchessini, Alexander and Genevieve Faure . . . . . . . . . . . Marino, Peter and Jane Trapnell . . . . . . Marlborough, The Duke and Duchess of. Marron, Donald and Catie . . . . . . . . . . .

Martinez, Roman and Helena. . . . . . . . . Martins, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maschmeyer, Troy and Debby . . . . . . . . Mashek, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mason, Alice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mason, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Masson, Charles Jr. and Cristina . . . . . . Maxey, Talbott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maxwell, Ghislaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May, Tony and Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mazor, Boaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mazzola, Alison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McBean, Edith and Hank Lowenstein. . McCaffrey, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCarty, Michael and Kim. . . . . . . . . . . McCarty, Michael R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCarthy, Brian and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloskey, Michael and Holly. . . . . . . . McCloy, Jay and Stewart . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloy, John and Laura. . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloy, Rush and Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . McDonough, Michael and Pandy . . . . . McFadden, Cynthia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McFadden, Mrs. George (Carol) . . . . . . McFadden, Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McGrath, Tom and Diahn . . . . . . . . . . . McHenry, Barnabas and Bannie. . . . . . . McIlvane, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKnight, Bill and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . McMakin, Leigh and Mimi. . . . . . . . . . . McMullan, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McNeely, George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McPherson, Stephen and Tina . . . . . . . . McSweeney, Thayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meehan, Michael J. II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mehle, Aileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mehta, Sonny and Gita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meier, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meiland, Lisa and Andy Martin . . . . . . . Meister, Todd and Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mejia, Alberto and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . Mejia, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melhado, Frederick and Virginia . . . . . . Melhado, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melling, Meredith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mellon, Mrs. Paul (Bunny) . . . . . . . . . . . Mellon, Matthew and Nicole Hanley. . . Melwani, Anjali and Prakash . . . . . . . . . Mercer, Dabney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mercer, Tinsley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Merck, Laddie and Dede . . . . . . . . . . . . Merrill, Dina and Ted Hartley . . . . . . . . Merrill, Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mettler, Mr. John W. II (Speedy) . . . . . . Meyer, Blair and Eliza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mezzacappa, Damon and Katherine Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2013 125


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The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinner Dance 1. Chan Mashek and Donald Trump at the 1986 dinner dance; 2. Kit and Bill Pannill; 3. The Duke and Duchess of Marlborough; 4. Percy Steinhart and C. Z. Guest; 5. David and Julia Koch with Scott Snyder; 6. Pauline Pitt; 7. John Mashek and Hilary Geary Ross; 8. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, Liza Pulitzer,

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and Pepe Fanjul; 9. Lesly Smith, Bill Pitt, and Emilia Fanjul; 10. Nan Kempner, Jerry Zipkin, and EstĂŠe Lauder; 11. Jean Tailer and John Loring; 12. Martin and Audrey Gruss.

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400 THE QUEST

Michaels, Sam and Anita . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Michel of Yugoslavia . . . . . . . . . . Michener, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middleton, Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Millard, Craig and Michelle . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Courtland and Gina . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Don and Muffy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Frank and Betsy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, John and Emily Altschul . . . . . . . Miller, Leverett and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Robert and Chantal . . . . . . . . . . . Milliken, Mrs. Minot (Armene) . . . . . . . Miniter, Sylvester and Gillian . . . . . . . . . Mirabella, Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mirando, Felix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missett, Joe and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mitchell, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mohr, Ian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moinian, Joe and Nazee . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monell, Ambrose and Lili. . . . . . . . . . . . Monell, Ned and Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moore, George and Calvert . . . . . . . . . . Moore, George and Kathie. . . . . . . . . . . Morgan, Alfred and Virginia . . . . . . . . . Morgan, Sue and Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morgenthau, Robert and Lucinda . . . . . Morris, Chappy and Melissa. . . . . . . . . . Morrison, Ham and Mimi van Wyck . . . The Mortimers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mowinckel, John and Cheryl . . . . . . . . . Mowinckel, Nino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mulroney, The Hon. Brian and Mila . . . Murdoch, Rupert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murdock, Pamela and Stephen Stefanou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murphy, Hebe Dowling and John . . . . . Murray, John and Nancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . Murray, Stephen and Muffie. . . . . . . . . . Musso, Tony and Carlos . . . . . . . . . . . . . Musso, Lucy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

N Nederlander, Bob and Pat Cook . . . . . . Nemy, Enid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nesbit, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Newhouses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ney, Ambassador Ed and Pat Wood . . . Ney, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niccolini, Julian and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicholas, Nick and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . Nichols, Mike and Diane Sawyer . . . . . . Nicklas, Brent and Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . Nievera, Mario and Travis Howe . . . . . . Prince Nikolaos of Greece . . . . . . . . . . . Nitze, Bill and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nitze, Peter and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Niven, Fernanda and Mark Henderson. Niven, Fernanda Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niven, Eugenie and Nicholas Goodman . Niven, Ellen and Tris Deery . . . . . . . . . . Niven, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Jacques and Anne . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Eliza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, John and Kay. . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Landon and Shannon . . . . . Norwich, Billy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Novogrod, John and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . Nye, Richard and Francesca . . . . . . . . .

O Ober, David G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ober, Polly Norris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O’Hagan, Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O’Malley, Hilaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Onet, Polly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orthwein, Chris and Binkie . . . . . . . . . . O’Shaughnessy, William and Nancy. . . . O’Sullivan, Ryan and Palmer . . . . . . . . . Otto, Katharina and Nathan Bernstein. . Ourisman, Mandell and Mary . . . . . . . . Ourisman, Nan and Flo . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P Pachios, Chris and Alyson Ross . . . . . . . Paduano, Daniel and Nancy. . . . . . . . . . Page, Blakely and Lindsey . . . . . . . . . . . Pahlavi, Pari-Sima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pakula, Mrs. Alan (Hannah). . . . . . . . . . Palermo, Olivia and Johannes Huebl. . . Paley, Jeff and Valerie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Palitz, Anka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pannill, Bill and Kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papageorgiou, Pavlos and Alexa Hampton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papanicolaou, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . Papanicolaou, Nick Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pardoe, Ted and Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Park, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parsons, Dick and Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . Pattee, Gordon and Dailey . . . . . . . . . . . Patterson, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paull, Harold and Joanne . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Pavlos and Marie Chantal . . . . . Peabody, Sam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Peabody, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pedersen, Mary Quick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pedroso, Alina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peek, Jeff and Liz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peebler, Mrs. Charles (Toni). . . . . . . . . . Pell, Peter J. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennoyer, Peter and Katie . . . . . . . . . . . Perrin, Emmanuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perkin, Mrs. Richard (Leslie) . . . . . . . . . Perkin, Thorne and Tatiana . . . . . . . . . . Perry, Betsy Freund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perry, Richard and Lisa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peruggi, Regina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peters, Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peterson, Holly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peterson, Pete and Joan Ganz Cooney. . Petito, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petrie, Carroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petroff, Di and Dr. Steven Butensky . . . Peyrelongue, Guy and Sarah . . . . . . . . . Pfeifer, Chuck and Lisa Crosby . . . . . . . Pfeifle, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pfeifler, Brian and Emilia . . . . . . . . . . . . The Phippses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pickett, John and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pickett, John O. III and KC . . . . . . . . . . Picotte, Michael and Margi . . . . . . . . . . Pileggi, Nick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pilkington, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pilkington, Robert and Helen . . . . . . . . Pitt, Pauline Baker and Jerry Seay . . . . . Pittman, Robert and Veronique . . . . . . . Platt, Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plimpton, Mrs. George (Sarah) . . . . . . . Plimpton, Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pomerantz, Ernest and Marie Brenner . . Ponte, Stan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ponton, Dan and Stephane Castoriano.. Posen, Zac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price, Brett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price, Peter and Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince, Frederick and Diana. . . . . . . . . . Purcell, Tom and Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . Putnam, Bambi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, Nancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, John and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, John and Melinda Mettler . . . . . . Pyne, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Q Quasha, Diana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Chris and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Tommy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Tricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quinn, Piper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2013 127


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April in Paris Ball 1. Frank Sinatra, Jeannine Levitt, and Tony Bennett at the April in Paris Ball at the Waldorf=Astoria for a glamorous evening; 2. Jacqueline Kennedy, lovely in strands of pearls and long white gloves from La Crasia; 3. The tables at the benefit were always full of interesting people, as evident in this picture, shot from the balcony by Slim Aarons in 1959, which captures a young John F. Kennedy; 4. Some couples would take advantage of the fashionable dance floor and waltz the night away in each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embrace.

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R Radziwill, John and Eugenie. . . . . . . . . . Radziwill, Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radziwill, Phillip and Devon Shuster . . Rafferty, John and Emily. . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafferty, Nick and Caroline . . . . . . . . . . Ramirez, Diane and Sam. . . . . . . . . . . . . Ramirez, Sam Jr. and Fabiana. . . . . . . . . Rapp, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ray, David Warren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rayner, William and Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . Raynes, Patty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reginato, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reeves, Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remnick, David and Esther Fein . . . . . . Retz, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richardson, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richter, John and Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rickel, Annette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Right, Andrew and Zibby . . . . . . . . . . . . Ripp, Joe and Ginny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivers, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Alex and Alexandra . . . . . . . Robertson, Jay and Clare . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Bill and Scarlett . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Julian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Spencer and Sarah . . . . . . . . Robertson, Wyndham and Chuck Whittingham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Rockefellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roehm, Carolyne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rogers, Elizabeth Barlow . . . . . . . . . . . . Rogers, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohatyn, Felix and Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . Romanoff, Princess Alexander (Mimi). . Rondina, William D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Andrew and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Tobie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Teddy and Serena . . . . . . . . . Rose, Alexandra Lind and Louis . . . . . . Rose, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rose, Marshall and Candice Bergen. . . . Rose, Tanner and Ross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosen, Aby and Samantha Boardman . . Rosenthal, Shirley Lord . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosenthal, Mitch and Sarah . . . . . . . . . . Rosenwald, John and Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosita, Duchess of Marlborough . . . . . . Ross, Mrs. Arthur (Janet) . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Burke and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Don and Susan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Nanette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Stephen and Kara . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Wilbur and Hilary Geary . . . . . . . Rosselli, John and Bunny Williams . . . . Rowley, Cynthia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Royce, Chuck and Deborah . . . . . . . . . .

400 THE QUEST

Royall, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rudin, William and Ophelia. . . . . . . . . . Rumbough, Stanley and Janna . . . . . . . . Rutherfurd, Guy and Daisy . . . . . . . . . . Rutherfurd, Winthrop and Mary . . . . . . Ruttenberg, Eric and Perri Peltz . . . . . . Ryan, Baird and Alexia Hamm. . . . . . . . Ryan, Allen IV and Christa. . . . . . . . . . . Ryan, D.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S Saint-Amand, Elisabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Amand, Emilia and Fred Krimendahl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Amand, Nathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saltzman, Ellin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sanchez, Jorge and Serina. . . . . . . . . . . . Sandberg, Bill and Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sanger, Alex and Jeanette . . . . . . . . . . . . Santo Domingo, Mrs. Julio (Beatrice) . . Santo Domingo, Alejandro . . . . . . . . . . Santo Domingo, AndrĂŠs and Lauren . . Scaasi, Arnold and Parker Ladd. . . . . . . Scaife, Frances and Tom McCarter . . . . Scarborough, Charles and Ellen. . . . . . . Schaeffer, Marcia Meehan . . . . . . . . . . . Schaeffer, Georgina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scherer, Allan and Maggy . . . . . . . . . . . . The Schiffs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schlesinger, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schlossberg, Edwin and Caroline Kennedy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schmitz, Jan Patrick and Nathalie . . . . . Schorr, Burwell and Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . Schuler, John and Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schulhof, David and Lesley . . . . . . . . . . Schulhof, Jonathan and K.K. . . . . . . . . . Schwarzman, Stephen and Christine . . . Schwarzman, Teddy and Ellen Zajac . . . Scribner, Charlie and Ritchie . . . . . . . . . Scully, Dennis and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . Scully, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senbahar, Izak and Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . Shapiro, Daniel and Agnes Gund . . . . . Shaw, Claude and Lara Meiland. . . . . . . Sherrill, Steve and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sherrill, Mrs. Virgil (Betty) . . . . . . . . . . . Shields, Mrs. Frank (Didi) . . . . . . . . . . . Shields, Olympia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Shields, Joseph and Maury . . . . . . . . . . . Shuman, Stan and Sydney. . . . . . . . . . . . Sidamon-Eristoff, Anne and Constantine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Siegel, Herb and Jeanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Siegal, Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Silvers, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simonds, Christian and Gillian Hearst. . Simonds, Talbott and Carter . . . . . . . . . Singer, Mortimer and Amy . . . . . . . . . . . Sitrick, James and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slater, Anne and John Cahill . . . . . . . . . Slatkin, Harry and Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . Slonem, Hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Mrs. Earl E.T. (Lesly) . . . . . . . . . Smith, Emily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, John C. and Diane. . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Mrs. Page (Jayne) . . . . . . . . . . . . Snow, Ian and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snyder, Jay and Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snyder, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Som, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sondes, Sharon and Geoffrey Thomas. . Soper, Jared and Linda Lane . . . . . . . . . Soros, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soros, Mrs. Paul (Daisy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . South, Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spahn, Steve and Connie . . . . . . . . . . . . Spahn, Kirk and Bridget Foley. . . . . . . . Spalding, Charles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speer, Ramsey C. and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer, John and Natalie . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer, Steve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stafford, Mimi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stahl, Bill and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stark, Andrea and John . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stark, Candice and Steven . . . . . . . . . . . Stein, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Richard and Renee . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Mrs. Saul (Gayfryd). . . . . . . . Steinberg, Jonathan and Maria Bartiromo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Kathryn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Michael and Joan. . . . . . . . . . Steinbrech, Doug and Jeff Sharp . . . . . . Steinhart, Percy III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stenbeck, Max, Hugo, and Sophie. . . . . Stephenson, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephenson, George and Shelia . . . . . . . Sterling, Mika . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stern, Leonard and Allison. . . . . . . . . . . Stevens, Lesley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stevens, Marti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stevenson, Charles and Alex . . . . . . . . . Stewart, Martha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2013 129


1

2

3

11

10 4 5

9

8 6

The Debutante Balls 1. Ann Pyne, 1969; 2. A “Texas Dip” at the International Debutante Ball, 2004; 3. Sisters Lee and Jacqueline Bouvier came out at the Clambake Club in Newport, 1947; 4. A group of 1938 debutantes, including Katharine Sullivan; 5. A program for the Debutante Cotillion and Christmas Ball, a.k.a. the Infirmary Ball, 1947; 6. Amanda Burden, 1962; 7. The swirl at the International Debutante Ball, 2006; 8. Brenda Frazier—and escorts—at the Infirmary Ball, 1938; 9. Anna Glen Butler Vietor at her presentation to the court of King George VI; 10. Barbara Symmers (Bancroft); 11. The Garland Stroll at the Infirmary Ball.

7


400 THE QUEST

Stewart, Serena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. John, Whitney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stoddard, Alexandra and Peter Brown . Stokes, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stolley, Dick and Lise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stolman, Steven and Rich Wilkie . . . . . . Stover, Jamie and Ellie Berlin . . . . . . . . . Stribling, Elizabeth and Guy Robinson . Strong, Marianne (Mimi) . . . . . . . . . . . . Stubbs, Michael and Ronnie. . . . . . . . . . Stubgen, Patrick and Dana. . . . . . . . . . . Suarez, Raul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sullivan, John and Nonie . . . . . . . . . . . . Sullivan, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sulzberger, Arthur Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summers, Peter and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . Surtees, Willie and Pam . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sutton, Kelso and Jo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Svarre, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swid, Stephen and Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sykes, James W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

T Tadini, Luigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tailer, Mrs. T. Suffern (Jean) . . . . . . . . . Talese, Gay and Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Talley, AndrĂŠ Leon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tang, Oscar and Frances . . . . . . . . . . . . Tannen, Sheldon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tarr, Jeff and Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taubman, Alfred and Judy . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Felicia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Rhetta and Dan Marantette . . . . Taylor, Topsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Zach and Missie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Jack and Barbara Bryant. . . . . . . Ternes, Jim and Marge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry, Walter B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teryazos, Chris and Bellinda . . . . . . . . . Theodoracopulos, Harry and Gail . . . . . Theodoracopulos, Taki and Alexandra . Theodoracopulos, Alexis. . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Andrew and Kathy. . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Rich and Tamie Peters . . . . . . . Tighe, Aaron and Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Tisches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tober, Donald and Barbara . . . . . . . . . . Tomenson, Walter and Virginia Wettlaufer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tompkins, Evelyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tower, Whitney Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Townsend, Alair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Townsend, Chuck and Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . Trafelet, Remy and Lara . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trump, Donald and Melania . . . . . . . . .

Trump, Blaine and Steve Simon . . . . . . . Tuckerman, Roger and Edith . . . . . . . . . Twombly, Alessandro and Soledad . . . .

U Ulmann, Mrs. Edward F. (Priscilla) . . . . Unterberg, Ann and Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . Uzielli, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

V van Amerongen, Lewis and Diane . . . . . van der Mije, Alexis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Van Pelt, Mary and Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . van Rensselaer, Kiliaen D.. . . . . . . . . . . . van Schaack, Gregory and Lucienne . . . van Wyck, Bronson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vanden Heuvel, William and Melinda . . vanden Heuvel, Katrina . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderbilt, Gloria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderbilt, Jean Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderpoel, Wynant and Barrie . . . . . . . Varnedoe, Kurt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vartanian, Annabel and Andrew Jeffries . Veronis, John and Lauren. . . . . . . . . . . . Vietor, David and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . Vittadini, Gianluigi and Adrienne . . . . . von Auersperg, Alex and Nancy . . . . . . von Bidder, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . von der Goltz, Andreas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . von Stade, Skiddy and Elizabeth . . . . . .

W Wadia, Dinyar and Gool . . . . . . . . . . . . Walden, Eric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walker, Liz and Ed Swenson . . . . . . . . . Wallace, Mrs. Mike (Mary). . . . . . . . . . . Waller, Alexis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walsh, Dr. Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walters, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warburton, Tim and Julia . . . . . . . . . . . Ward, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ward, Arthur and Kristina . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Philip and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Philip W. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Christina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Sandy and Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterman, Richard and Lis . . . . . . . . . .

Wathne, Thorunn, Soffia, and Berge . . . Wattleton, Faye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webster, Joe and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webster, Peter and Martha . . . . . . . . . . Weekes, Chris and Lilly Bunn . . . . . . . . Weill, Sanford and Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weintraub, Ronald and Harriet . . . . . . . Weld, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wellner, Karl and Deborah Norville . . . Wells, Linda and Charles Thompson. . . Wenner, Jann and Matt Nye . . . . . . . . . . Weymouth, Lally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitehead, John and Cynthia . . . . . . . . Whitney, Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitney, Mary Lou and John Hendrickson . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitney, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilkie, Angus and Len Morgan . . . . . . . Williams, Gene and Jackie . . . . . . . . . . . Wilmers, Robert G.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilmot, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilson, Kevin and Alexandra Wilkis . . . Wilson, Kendrick R. III . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilson, Jay and Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . Wintour, Anna and Shelby Bryan. . . . . . Wister, Billy and Diana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Witmer, Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolfe, Tom and Sheila . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Natasha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Peter I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wood, Renee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Woods, Ward Jr. and Priscilla . . . . . . . . Wrightsman, Jayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyatt, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyser-Pratte, Vivian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Y Yealland, Mrs. Daniel (Liska). . . . . . . . . Ylvisaker, Jon and Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . Yurman, David and Sybil . . . . . . . . . . . .

Z Zachary, Frank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zacharias, Tom and Clelia . . . . . . . . . . . Zeckendorf, Arthur and Connie. . . . . . . Zeckendorf, Will and Laura . . . . . . . . . . Zenko, John and Jere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zenko, Starrett and Petter Ringbom . . . Zilkha, Bettina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zilkha, Ezra and Cecile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zinterhofer, Eric and Aerin Lauder . . . Zirinis, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zuckerman, Mort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zug, James W. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2013 131


1

400 THE QUEST

In Memoriam A

L

Atkins, Gayle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leidy, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Ethel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lufkin, Cynthia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B Banker, Pam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bateman, Jeff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M

C

Massey, Alyne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKnight, LeBrun Rhinelander. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Crocker, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D

P Preston, Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Durkin, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E Espy, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evans, Betty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F Fiandaca, Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flanigan, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floyd, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forstmann, Teddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fondaras, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frick, Richard T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R Rousseau, Lilly Pulitzer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S Santo Domingo, Julio Mario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soros, Paul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Saul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

U Ulmann, Eddie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G

V

Graves, Ralph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guthrie, Randolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gund, George III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vanderbilt, Jean Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

K Kaiser, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kazmaier, Dick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kikis, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Koch, Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 QUEST

W Wyman, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Y Yealland, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2


4

3

Bradley-Martin Ball 1. Guests looked for costume inspiration in paintings of kings and queens, such as this one of Louis XIV; 2. Or this portrait of Marie Antoinette; 3. Another possible â&#x20AC;&#x153;lookâ&#x20AC;? for Marie Antoinette; 4. The invitation; 5. The Waldorf=Astoria was the backdrop for the lavish costume ball thrown by Cornelia Bradley-Martin on February 10, 1897; 6. King Henry V was yet another costume idea; 7. An illustration shows the 800 members of high society.

5

6

7


NEW YORK’S NARRATIVE

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

134 QUEST


The Marine Air Terminal at LaGuardia Airport boasts a chronological depiction

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

of the history of flight.

MURALS THAT RANGE in style from graffiti to trompe-l’oeil punctuate the New York experience. Independently, the works are cosmetic, decorative— but together, they offer a narrative of the city and its history. And, a new book, Murals of New York City: The Best of New York’s Public Paintings from Bemelmans to Parrish (Rizzoli), showcases 30 examples from the boroughs of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. The selection of murals contributes to the diversity and dynamism for which New York is known. “That so many of the splendid examples of the muralist’s art are in New York is a blessing to anyone who lives in the city,” writes Graydon Carter, in the introduction. “In the pages of this splendid book, they come alive, beckoning in miniature for the reader to make the journey to the sources. As much as

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“The murals come alive, beckoning in miniature for the reader to make the journey to the sources. As much as each painting tells a story, there is a story behind each painting.” —Graydon Carter

The mural at Café des Artistes, at 1 West 67th Street, resulted from an effort by muralist Howard Chandler Christy to save the restaurant from closing during the Great Depression

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

by painting a series of nudes.

each painting tells a story, there is a story behind each painting.” The stories are assorted, demonstrating a spectrum of eras and motivations by both the artists and those who commissioned them. A number of murals are a result of the Federal Arts Program and the Works Progress Administration, initiatives from Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal. Actually, many projects had been haulted in the 1930s, only to be resumed with backing from the government to reflect the themes of the Great Depression—nationalism, progress, and traditionalism. Ben Shahn, a Lithuanian-born artist known for his works on social realism, photographed workers in the southern states for a mural at the Bronx Central Post Office, a 13-panel panorama inspired by Walt Whitman entitled, “Resources of America.” “It was to be a celebration of the nobility of the American worker and a document of the production of raw materials and their transformation into consumable goods,” reads Murals of New York City. “The paintings portray white and black workers as solid women and heroic men with powerfully muscular physiques. These are not poor and huddled masses, but industrious, purposeful, hardworking people.” Another artist employed by the government during the Great Depression was Reginald Marsh, who was tapped to decorate the Alexander Hamilton United States Custom House. He was paid at the same rate as an assistant clerk at the United States Treasury for a commissioned project to which he devoted a period of 14 hours per day for 90 days. In the end, he completed a maritime scene with visuals of Lower Manhattan, Staten Island, and the Statue of Liberty— on one panel, a celebrity rumored to be Greta Garbo is AUGUST 2013 137


Inn and Garden, at 16 Bank Street, feature 43 of Greenwich Villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s VIPs.

138 QUEST

CO U RTE S T Y O F R I Z Z O L I

The walls of the Waverly


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140 QUEST


CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

interviewed disembarking from the Calumet. Of course, the interest in murals existed before—and after— the 1930s and 1940s. In the 19th century, John Jacob Astor IV commissioned Maxfield Parrish to bedeck the bar of his Knickerbocker Hotel with a painting of Old King Cole, since relocated to the St. Regis Hotel. Parrish, a Quaker, was offended by the request to contribute to a drinking establishment, more so by the fact that Astor asked to be rendered as the king. But for the price of $5,000, his services were acquired—and with them, a cheekiness. Parrish depicted Astor passing gas, delivering a spectacular painting with a subliminal message. Then, of course, there’s Bemelmans Bar at the Caryle Hotel, where Ludwig Bemelmans evolved the walls into cartoonish scenes of Central Park throughout the seasons, featuring a monkey in a top hat and rabbits with cigars; Bemelmans, the author of Madeline, also offered his character a cameo. And there’s Monkey Bar, where Charles Vella and Diane Voyentzie contributed drawings of monkeys (to remind customers of their behavior) and Edward Sorel caricatured personalities of the ’20s and ’30s. (Sorel also delivered at the Waverly Inn and Garden, “direct drawing” characters whose faces chronicled the 150 years of Greenwich Village.) New York is rich with many things, but none more than heritage. To digest it in its entirety, one must delve into the city’s establishments, big and small—the writing’s on the wall. X

This page: Ludwig Bemelmans, the author of Madeline, contributed the murals to Bemelmans Bar at the Carlyle (above); the cover of Murals of New York City (below). Opposite: Bemelmans depicted Central Park throughout the seasons on the walls of Bemelmans Bar, trading his work for rent in an apartment at the Carlyle Hotel for a year and a half.

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THE BANDLEADER PLAYED ON B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

LH: After college, how did your career as a bandleader start? AD: I learned a lot around the time I was graduating from a friend, Lester Lanin. We used to go out to dinner once a week for years. After graduating my first job was as the bandleader/singer at El Morocco, which was frequented by café society like Frank Sinatra, then I went to law school. I was doing “divorces during the week and weddings on the weekend.” But then I played a wedding in Jaipur for a former divorce client and, after mentions in various magazines and

on “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,” I was able to turn my avocation and first love into my vocation. LH: How have you seen big-band music evolve since you started 25 years ago? AD: When I started, the formula was Porter–Gershwin–big band for more than half of the evening, then classic rock and motown. Now, we generally play the Great American Songbook and bossa nova just through dinner, then classic rock and motown in the middle of the evening, then more contemporary music the rest of the night. The important thing is to provide a seamless transition between musical eras and to perform each genre with passion and authenticity at the right tempo. LH: What are some songs that will be on this summer’s playlist, This page: Alex Donner, leading his band with one of his singers, entertaining the crowd. Opposite page: The 13-piece Alex Donner Orchestra provided music for the annual Quadrille Ball in New York City, January 2013.

CO U RTE S Y O F A LE X D O N N E R E N T E RTA I N M E N T

ALEX DONNER grew up on the east side of Manhattan, and, as a young boy, accompanied his father downtown to hear jazz. This ignited a love of music that would follow him through his life. Before forming his first band at Princeton University, he performed to the crowds in the Métro in Paris. Since then, he has had a meteoric rise as a bandleader to the stars, playing receptions, weddings, and events for the boldest of bold-faced names. I had the pleasure of chatting with the musician about his past—and present—success.


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This page: George H. W. Bush, Alex Donner, and Ivana Trump at an “I Love New York” event. Opposite page, clockwise from top right: Mayor Rudy Giuliani with the bandleader; CO U RTE S Y O F A LE X D O N N E R E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes enjoyed Donner’s music; Donner with Princeton classmate H. R. H. Queen Noor; a letter that President Bush wrote Donner.

including what you might be playing at this year’s Southampton Hospital Gala? AD: “In the Mood,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “My Girl,” “Brown Eyed Girl,” “Sweet Home Alabama,” “Shake Your Body,” “September,” “Empire State of Mind,” “Sweet Caroline,” “Tom Ford,” “Don’t Stop The Music,” “Don’t Stop Believin’,” “Satisfaction,” “Dynamite.” LH: As someone who is frequently called on to perform for celebrities, have you ever changed your impression of someone by what music they requested? AD: Yes, Andy Warhol once requested “Strangers in the Night.” I was also impressed when Tony Bennett requested and sang an Elvis tune with me at El Morocco. LH: What is one of the most important ways to set up for an evening to make sure it goes well? AD: I really like to reach out to my musicians and give them a warm hello. We are truly a team up there that can take the party to a higher level. As I often tell them, every night for us is an opening night. LH: Are you trying to expand Alex Donner Entertainment? AD: Yes and no. When I first started, I sometimes booked

seven or eight events during a weekend. I quickly realized that you can’t keep quality control that way and your product must be consistently good across the board. So we are smaller now but are increasingly booking a lot of trios and quartets— and even solo musicians—for parties in private homes and in some of New York’s most prestigious restaurants. Musicians who also DJ are in demand and the gay wedding market is also a major growth industry for us. We are recently seeing more bookings in Europe, a development I heartily embrace! I have recently discovered two very hot female vocalists who have been wowing everyone. As Bob Dylan said, “He not busy being born is busy dying.” LH: What are some of your favorite moments in your career? AD: There is something very special about continuity over generations, like playing the wedding of the daughter of a bride I played for many years ago. There is nothing better than that magical moment when the party comes together and you see several generations all out on the dance floor! Performing so many times at the Café Carlyle and the Oak Room at the Algonquin and garnering some good reviews was also a high point for me in my growth as a singer. But most of all, I have had the opportunity to travel, get to know so many fascinating people, and see them at their best. X


AUGUST 2013 145


STATELY HOLDINGS BY DARRELL HARTMAN

ral living to an art form. The glorious houses that anchored that bygone way of life are, these days, mostly dismantled or mothballed as landmarks. But, as writer Darrell Hartman discovers on a three-day driving tour of the English countryside, many of these storied dwellings continue to stand in the grandeur they once did for the noble names that erected them and the guests who were fortunate enough to visit them. Here we present the writer’s daily journal of his drives—and discoveries. Among the stops on the author’s Bentley Mulsanne motor tour of English country homes is a visit to the 19th-century Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire. 146 QUEST

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS, the English aristocracy elevated ru-


B E N T LE Y M OTO R S


This page, clockwise from top left: The corner façade of Broughton Hall; a life-size equestrian statue of Frederick, Prince of Wales, at Hartwell House, which was once occupied by the Right Honorable Sir George Lee, a close friend and adviser to the prince; a painted shield at Hartwell House; an outdoor statue at Hartwell House bears witness to the centuries; the highly manicured garden at Broughton Hall; the Union Jack hangs high at Broughton Hall above the Tempest family crest and Latin motto, Loyowf as thou fynds; carved figures on the main staircase at Hartwell House; artwork on the walls at Hartwell House. Opposite page:

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

The conservatory at Broughton Hall (above) and one of the hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interior rooms (below).

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B E N T LE Y M OTO R S

DAY 1 It is late afternoon on a June day, and the sun sits high over Hartwell House. I’m in a felicitous corner of Buckinghamshire, an hour or so outside of London, gazing up in awe at a biscuit-colored pile that’s been here, in one form or another, for about a thousand years. Lucky me, these are my lodgings for the night. But before I go settling into any armchairs, I decide to walk the grounds. I stroll past a pond, where ducks slide off the banks and a heron takes to the air as this happy American interloper disturbs their idyll. Just north of the house, a manicured path cuts through the trees and dog-legs to a Gothic-style turret that’s surely been the site of a few midnight trysts over the centuries. I find an overgrown churchyard packed with tilting headstones. Generations, it is clear, have lived and died on these grounds, and even if each one has reshaped the landscape slightly—erecting ornaments, planting exotic trees—they inhabited more or less the same beautiful, timeless tableau. Stately holdings don’t get much older than Hartwell House, which listed in the Domesday Book of 1086, the first official survey of English lands. And while Hartwell is a hotel now, an air of exclusivity remains. “Strictly No Sightseeing Cars,” reads a sign at the gate (non-guests aren’t allowed past the spa). And with its giant ceilings, plump furnishings, fine plasterwork, and marble chimneys, it does provide a taste of old-world country living. It’s impossible, in such an atmosphere, not to imagine that you come from finer stock. DAY 2 Waking up to leave, I feel a sense of privilege, not just for having called Hartwell House home for a night, but for another mark of British luxury that awaits me—a Bentley Mulsanne. It is, naturally, the ideal vehicle for an upscale motor tour, and positively glides through the hilly Peak District, with its slopes of dense heather and crumbling stone walls. Chatsworth House comes gloriously into view spikes first, the gold finials lining its roof like glowing candles on a birthday cake. Apart from the portion that’s inhabited by the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, this 300-year-old house is a public attraction—and quite a popular one, by the looks of it. Chatsworth has hosted some ambitious exhibits of contemporary art in recent years, one reason it’s thronged with students and tourbus pensioners. The current titleholder, Peregrine Cavendish, comes from a line of enthusiastic collectors. In a book I discover about the house, the Duchess writes, “Everything is bigger than life-size; the indoor distances, the faraway meals, the long passages and stairs for luggage all add to the complications. A bag put down in a rare bit of house can be lost for months…. It is a terrible place to house-train a puppy.” But life here has its pleasures, too. “Children can roller skate for miles without going out of doors; on a wet day you can walk for hours, be entertained and keep dry; gramophone, piano and loud singers can blast away in the drawing room without fear of waking angry sleepers. And there is always escape from people, even though half a million come here every year.” Finding these passages immensely satisfying, I skip the house tour. But I do make a discovery: the restaurant serves


This page: Another property worth visiting is the medieval-style Peckforton Castle (above), where falconry is still practiced today (below). Opposite page: The stables entrance and clock tower at Chatsworth House, the ancestral seat of the dukes of Devonshire, which has been home to members of the Cavendish family since Bess of Hardwick settled there in 1549.

DAY 3 It’s wet and misty when I pull up to Waddesdon Manor. Built in 1883 as a weekend house for Baron Ferdinand Rothschild, this Oxfordshire property basically qualifies as a new development. It also looks like a Loire Valley chateau. The house is full of treasures—Sèvres porcelain, a desk that once belonged to Marie Antoinette—but its gilded splendor seems a bit try-hardy. Back in London, at the Connaught, I welcome a return to the (comparative) understatement of the English style. Having returned my beloved rental, I sit down to tea on the enclosed terrace—an experience that is the beau ideal, perhaps, of an afternoon in Mayfair. Originally a townhouse, the Connaught resembles a city version of English country living. There’s a buzz about the place, a full staff, and not a speck of dust. In its liveliness, the Connaught brings to mind a glowing Henry James quote that’s been lodged in my mind all week: “Of all the great things that the English have invented and made part of the credit of the national character, the most perfect, the most characteristic, the only one they have mastered completely in all its details, so that it becomes a compendious illustration of their social genius and their manners, is the well-appointed, well-administered, well-filled country house.” X

B E N T LE Y M OTO R S

scrumptious Victoria sponge cake. En route to Skipton, in Yorkshire, I guide my regal Bentley past fields dotted with yellow buttercups. Flags are still draped across town streets, remnants of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. And upon entering Broughton Hall, I’m greeted by the smell— an intoxicating combination—of wood smoke and fresh lilies. There’s a collection of aged walking sticks by the door. The 19th-century conservatory in the back is filled with birdsong. To my delight, my bedroom comes with no key. After dinner, I sit down with Roger Tempest, the place’s 31st-generation heir, who could be mistaken for an aging DJ in his striped polo shirt and jeans. Tempest modestly describes his role: “Completely custodial. No sense of ownership. You attempt to make it a better place and hand it on.” The 20th century was hell for places like Broughton, he adds. “In the sixties, people saw privilege without responsibility, and got chippy about that.” (Tempest may not dress like his ancestors, but he’s certainly got an English aristocrat’s offhand manner.) At one point, stately homes were being demolished or abandoned at a rate of one a week. I realize, as I turn in for the evening, how fortunate it is that Broughton has escaped that fate—even if part of the property has discreetly been turned into an office park.


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APPEARANCES

SOIRÉES OF A LIFETIME BY HILARY GEARY

This page: Silas Chou celebrated his birthday with a performance by Cirque du Soleil; Silas and Celia Chou (inset). 152 QUEST

glittering common thread that ties all fabulous parties together. Of course, the best ones were always great fun with fascinating guests, fine wine, scrumptious food, and dazzling entertainment, but the defining detail is whether decorations and themes are pure theater, truly creative— art forms, really. Just look at the photos of Truman Capote’s “Black and White” ball in honor of Kay Graham. The images clearly illustrate how clever it was to ask the guests to don black and white: Presto! Abracadabra! The guests become the décor; every photo is magical because of that. The whimsical touch of requesting that guests wear masks made it fabulously dramatic, mysterious, and amusing. Anyone who ever was lucky enough to attend one or more of Donald and Fernanda Wanamaker Leas’s dazzling costume parties in Southampton will never, ever forget the experience. Years ago, in the 1960s, “Big Fern” hosted many sparkling dinner dances, one more glamorous than the other. The “A Night in Baghdad” fête with camels (natch) was only possibly topped by “A Night in Bombay” in a pink and white tent attached to the Leas’s grand, Georgianbrick manse, Westerly‚ which is now owned by Tory Burch. It sat on vast acreage rolling down to the water. The glowing tent would have pleased the most

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

OVER THE LAST CENTURY, there is one


This page, clockwise from top left: An invitation to the “Night in Bagdad Masquerade” party in Southampton, Long Island; Ann Johnson’s party

CO U RTE S Y O F B RO N S O N VA N W YC K ; CO U RTE S Y O F S C A R LE T T RO B E RTS O N

designed by Bronson van Wyck; guests congratulate Mrs. Leas at the Bombay party; Charles Amory with his spouse; winners of the “best costume” prize.

discerning maharaja as it was filled with sparkling mirrors, big cushioned poofs, palm trees, pillows, plumes, and flowers in all the vibrant colors of India: bright fuchsia, sapphire blue, tangerine orange, and emerald green. There was even a bejeweled baby elephant and a wonderful orchestra to dance to. The guests went all out and dressed to the nines in gold- and silver-embroidered silk saris, bejeweled turbans, and Nehru jackets— pure maharaja splendor! Another unforgettable bash was her daughter Scarlett Robertson’s Gone with the Wind–themed coming-out party with horse-drawn carriages ferrying us up the very long driveway to Westerly, which had been transformed into Tara with all the gals dressed in “Southern belle” finery with hoop skirts and teeny-tiny cinched waists that rivaled Miss O’Hara’s. Speaking of transformation, the late party designer Philip Baloun decorated the Park Avenue Armory for Steve Schwarzman’s 60th birthday party with blown-up photos of his beautiful Peter Marino–decorated apartment. Afterward, we headed into a “nightclub” to dine and dance the night away to none other than the great Rod Stewart. Another fabulous fête was the Emerald City–themed birthday party for David Koch (he’s from Kansas, after all) designed by Bronson van Wyck, which Julia Koch gave for

her husband in Palm Beach with even a yellow brick road leading us in to the party. Plus we all got to dance to Lionel Ritchie, who is the most fabulous singer and entertainer! Speaking of Bronson van Wyck, another unbelievably beautiful party was the one he designed for the surprise birthday party Charlie Johnson gave for his wife, Ann. His inspiration was Ann’s beautiful collection of blue-andwhite chinoiserie, so inside the Breakers ballroom they placed the prettiest tent that I have ever seen, a version of the Tarta tent at the Château de Groussay outside of Paris. The dance floor was hand-painted with a design that mimicked a favorite piece of Delft china that Charlie had given to Ann years ago. This exquisite decoration was topped off by opera star Ellie Dehn singing, then followed by the one and only Joan Rivers. Oh my, what a truly fabulous celebration! And yes, another terrific party was Silas Chou’s birthday party in NYC a few years back, with a Cirque de Soliel performance depicting Silas’s life. Another stunner of a bash was Sir Philip Green’s 60th birthday celebration in Cancun, Mexico, where he flew in guests from all over the place on private planes for a four-day celebration with nonstop preformers such as Stevie Wonder, Chris Brown, and Carlos Santa. Speaking of fabulous entertainment, it was such a thrill to dance the night away a

few years back to Sir Elton John’s incredible tunes at the birthday party Debbie Black gave for her husband, Leon, at their oceanfront abode in Southampton. Fastforward to London this June and off we went with Lily and Sunny Marlborough to Blenheim Palace, where we dined in the main dining room of the palace at a table that was about 38-strong. Amongst the lucky guests were Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Ann Hearst and Jay McInerney, Wilbur Ross, Gigi and Harry Benson, Joyce and Simon Reuben, Karen and Richard LeFrak (the Marlboroughs had a birthday cake for Karen), Ana Cristina Alvarado, Hilary and Galen Weston, Judy and Alfred Taubman, Audrey and Martin Gruss, Pat Cook and Bob Nederlander, Aliai and Rocco Forte, Prince and Princess Sylvie and Pierre D’Arenberg, newlyweds Ann and Christopher Flowers, and more. We also had a ball at Bob Miller’s 80th birthday, hosted by his wife, Chantal, and his three beautiful daughters: Pia Getty, Marie-Chantal of Greece, and Alexandra Von Furstenberg at Marie Chantal’s beautiful country house in Oxfordshire, England. After dining royally while listening to some wonderfully charming toasts with the Glenn Miller Orchestra, we headed into yet another tent to rock away to a great DJ plus the one and only Diana Ross! How fun is that? X AUGUST 2013 153


RETROSPECTIVE

YGL THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Over the course of a decade, this column—originally, “Generation X-Cellent” —has chronicled pretty young things as they venture out and about in the city. For the 400 issue, we raise a glass (of champagne, of course) to the faces who juggled the personal and the professional in the swirl that is society, while continuing to revel in a jolly good time.

David Grunning, Daniel Benedict, Jackie Astier, and Hud Morgan at a black-tie dinner in Istanbul, Turkey, on September 30, 2006.


Olivia Sandelman and Ashley Platt at the New York Botanical Garden’s Winter Wonderland Ball on December 10, 2010. Edward Barsamian and Georgina Chris Lentz helps Leah

Schaeffer toasted Rachel Roy at Saks

Jacobson out of a

Fifth Avenue on March 21, 2007.

cab and into Marquee on May 10, 2007.

Stephanie LaCava and Paul Johnson Calderon at a Henry Street Settlement Event on October 18, 2006.

Siblings Jack Bryan, Alexis Bryan Morgan, and Austin Bryan at a Vogue-hosted event on August 4, 2005.

Patrick McMullan, Jennifer Latif and Anthony Martignetti at the

Minnie Mortimer and

Central Park Zoo on May 17, 2006.

Ferebee Taube at the New Yorkers for Children gala on September 21, 2005.

Elizabeth Meigher and Amanda Meigher at “Let’s Get Physical” at Doubles on September 26, 2003.

Amanda Hearst, Olivia Palermo, and

Serena Nikkah, Duke Merriman,

Luke Weil at the American Museum of

and Serena Merriman at the Frick

Natural History on February 16, 2006.

Collection on March 13, 2008.

Bee Shaffer and Chris Ford at a dinner

Annelise Peterson at a

hosted by Christian Dior at the Four

Cinema Society after-party

Seasons Restaurant on May 16, 2006.

on September 14, 2005. AUGUST 2013 155


BROWN

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST This summer, staying cool wasn’t easy, but our columnist did her very best as she partied with the PYTs of New York—whether or not there was A/C!

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Girl Most Likely co-stars Darren Criss and Mickey Sumner at Hotel

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Americano on July 15.

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A R.J. King and Sophie Sumner at the Cinema Society screening of Girl Most Likely on July 15.

Guests, like Cory Kennedy, toasted Girl Most Likely with glasses of Kim Crawford wine.

Ryan McKeever and James Marshall at the Cinema Society screening of Girl Most Likely.

Amber Tamblyn and David Cross at a screening hosted by Cinema Society with Brooks Brothers.

Kristen Wiig and Rachel Dratch at a Cinema Society after-party at Hotel Americano.

Amy Fine Collins with her daughter, Flora, at a screening

Johannes Huebl and Olivia Palermo at a

of Girl Most Likely hosted by the Cinema Society.

Cinema Society screening on July 15.

“SHE HAS A LOT TO live up to. And a few things to live down,”

reads the tag for Girl Most Likely. Trite, but yes. Happily, there’s nothing to be lived down after the month of July, except maybe an Instagram or two from an evening at the Racquet and Tennis Club... Oops? On June 25, the Young New Yorkers for the Philharmonic hosted a party at the Racquet and Tennis Club. I arrived, passing a couple of friends from Trinity College as they were departing, post-squash (duh). I beelined to the balcony, where I

enjoyed a white-wine spritzer and the scenery of Park Avenue, as framed by a series of stone arches. I awaited the company of Sam Dangremond and Micaela English, who were Citi Bike-ing to the event, per an assignment from Town & Country. Soon, they appeared—calm and collected, as always—and we joined guests like Christopher Allwin, Katy DeConti, Elijah Duckworth-Schachter, Mark Lewenstein, and Krystian von Spiedel for a concert by cellist Sumire Kudo and bassist Max Zeugner, both of the famed New York Philharmonic. AUGUST 2013 157


Afterward, I dined at what may or may not have been the kiddie table—which was perfect. Lots of laughing, and most of it was laughing out loud. You know, music to my ears, or whatever. On July 10, Persol fêted the opening of the “Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship in Film” exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image. So, it was off to Queens for a dinner attended by Anna Kendrick, Zosia Mamet, Emma Rossum, Liev Schreiber, and Marisa Tomei, a celebration of the brand, and the cinema that echoes the brand’s iconic-ness: Catch Me If You Can, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Requiem for a Dream. On display, there were props from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and masks

Julianna Young, Ludovica Ferme, and Ryan Harper joined the Young New Yorkers for the Philharmonic.

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Racquet and Tennis Club on June 25.

of John Malkovich so that you could “be” John Malkovich. Har, har. On the 15th, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of Girl Most Likely, which stars Darren Criss and Kristen Wiig. I sat with Drew Grant (and her box of popcorn) for the film, which riffs on the scene of the Upper East Side as well as that of the New Jersey shore, with its Backstreet Boys cover bands and its boardwalk. Really, it’s charming—a go-see. Then after the party it’s the hotel lobby at Hotel Americano, where guests like Matt Dillon, Judah Friedlander, Charlotte Ronson, Cynthia Rowley, and Whit Stillman enjoyed the easy, breezy atmosphere while sipping glasses of Kim Crawford wine. X

L I N S LE Y L I N D E C K E N S ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

Alexandra Porter and Max Sinsteden at the


Anthony Martignetti, Tom Martignetti, and Ali Khan at the Racquet and Tennis Club for the New York Philharmonic.

John Thomas and Kingsley Lynch partied in harmony with the Young New Yorkers for the Philharmonic.

Hilary Rhoda at the Museum of the Moving Image for “Persol Magnificent Obsessions.”

Allison Hennessy and Liza Weiner enjoyed a concert by New York Philharmonic musicians on June 25.

Nicolette and John Bosco on the balcony of the Racquet and Tennis Club, overlooking Fifth Avenue.

Bruno De Savoia, Andrew Ward, and Zach Pasanen suppored the New York Philharmonic.

Sam Dangremond, Micaela English, and Stefanos Kasselakis on June 25.

Emma Roberts at the opening of “Persol Magnificent

Waris Ahluwalia at the

Obsessions: 30 Stories of Crafstmanship in Film.”

Museum of the Moving Image on July 10. AUGUST 2013 159


SNAPSHOT

DESPICABLE AND BRILLIANT

IF THE BOWERY WERE TO BE featured in New York Magazine’s Approval Matrix, it would be located at the origin—the thoroughfare is as lowbrow as it is highbrow, as despicable as it is brilliant. In the 17th century, the Bowery connected the city at the south of the island (New Amsterdam) with the “suburbs,” where estates and their farms punctuated the street. In 1654, a group of freed slaves settled on the Bowery, juxtaposing the European wealth and thereby establishing a precedent of high-low culture. By the 1800s, there existed a riotous rivalry between the Bowery Boys (the nativist gang) and the Dead Rabbits (the immigrant gang) as well as an Astor presence—which began when Henry Astor (brother of John Jacob Astor) purchased the Bull’s Head market on the Bowery. After the Civil War, the area catered to soldiers, which encouraged activities such 160 QUEST

as drinking, gambling, and prostitution. McGurk’s Saloon at 295 Bowery represented the area’s abyss, as it was where the most “down and out” in the community went to commit suicide—in 1899, there were six deaths and seven failed attempts at death. Theodore Roosevelt, in 1913, declared, “What infinite use Dante would have made of the Bowery!” Today, the area is revived. Starting with CBGB in the Seventies, the Bowery has experienced gentrification, visible in B Bar then Daniel Boulud’s DBGB, Keith McNally’s Pulino’s, and the Bowery Hotel. That said, the Bowery maintains the ability to house and entertain members of the upper, middle, and lower classes and, perhaps, continues to elicit a playful darkness from all. —Elizabeth Quinn Brown This page: The Bowery, circa 1900, with the Third Avenue El train (above); below, from left: the Bowery in 1888; 1960; 1975; and 2013.


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Quest August 2013