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120

92

CONTENTS 110

THE 400 I SSUE 92

THE QUEST 400

112

Our annual list of prominent figures who have “made it”

is accompanied by photographs of and musings on the families who have shaped the city as we know it today. WRITTEN BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

112

LIFE IMITATING ART

“Monet’s Garden,” an exhibition at the New York

Botanical Garden, celebrates Claude Monet—the artist whose name is synonymous with Impressionism—in a series of floriferous panoramas juxtaposed with artwork by the painter.

120

AN ODE TO EDITH

BY

E LIZABETH Q UINN B ROWN

On the 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton’s birth,

the New York Society Library and The Mount celebrate her worth, while our author considers her place in literary history.

124

TIME OF THE SEASONS

BY

MARC LEWINSTEIN

The annual fluctuations of the city, as illuminated

in The Seasons of New York, from Universe Publishing. BY DALY REARDON


92

76

CONTENTS C OLUMNS

80

22

SOCIAL DIARY

72

SOCIAL CALENDAR

76

HARRY BENSON

78

OBSERVATIONS

80

FRESH FINDS

88

FASHION

136

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR

138

APPEARANCES

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

A chronicle of social happenings about town. BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA Our guide to this month’s events in Manhattan and beyond.

Remembering sunning on a boat with Brooke Shields in 1980. Our columnist urges you to visit Greece.

BY

TAKI THEODORACOPULOS ULOS

Gear up now for fall. BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

J.McLaughlin continues to master American fashion.

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

Dressing for Southampton Hospital’s benefit. BY KAREN KLOPP PP

To Italy, with love—then back to the New York scene. Partying it up with the junior set.

BY

BY

HILARY GEARY

ELIZABETH Q UINN BROWN

How to entertain with elegance, as Mrs. Astor might have.

BY

BRONSON

VAN

WYCK


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Left: Mrs. Astor’s ballroom at 65th Street and Fifth Avenue. Above: Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at a 1975 opening at the Museum of Natural History with its then president, Robert Goelet; the pair graced the cover of Quest’s 400 Issue in 2008.

THIS MARKS THE 18th of Quest’s annual 400 Issue, inspired by the famous list of the late 19th century created by Mrs. William B. Astor (always known in her day simply as “Mrs. Astor”) and her social amanuensis, Ward McAllister. The first list was drawn up in the early 1870s for Mrs. Astor’s private annual ball, held in her brownstone mansion on 34th Street and Fifth Avenue, where the Empire State Building now stands. The original list designated 25 “patriarchs” who would define society as Mrs. Astor and Mr. McAllister determined it. Each “patriarch” would invite four ladies and five gentlemen—a total number of 250 guests. Mrs. Astor would then add to that by including visitors from others cities who were prominent, as well as debutantes. Her choices were entirely personal and arbitrary, thereby establishing her unquestionable authority over social exclusivity in New York for the next two decades. The last quarter of the 19th century, which followed the end of the Civil War, was a time of spectacular new American wealth stemming from the expansion of the nation’s railroad system, the bonanza mining in the West, and the evolving industrial revolution. New York had become the financial center for the national economy and a mecca for the proud possessors of this new wealth, many of whom were striving for a place at the table or in the game. Mrs. Astor’s list upped the ante, so to speak; no matter how much you had, her list determined how much it was worth in the social scheme of things. The list was privately held for its first 20 years and not made public until 1892, when McAllister, who was ending his service to Mrs. Astor, gave the list to the New York Times, thereby cementing its legend. The capacity of the Astors’ ballroom in the house at 34th Street was actually less than 400, but McAllister rounded out the number for simplicity’s sake. And it stuck. In the 1890s, when Mrs. Astor and her son and daughter-in-law (Mr. and Mrs. John Jacob Astor IV) moved into their new double mansion on 65th Street and Fifth Avenue, their new ballroom was much larger. At 20 QUEST

times, the guest lists for their balls numbered as high as 1,000. By the turn of the new century, Mrs. Astor’s glory was fading naturally with age, and it was a new, faster world that was changing radically with the invention of the telephone and the almost sudden appearance of the horseless carriage. Mrs. Astor’s influence was assumed by several New York women whose families’—or husbands’—wealth was even greater than hers. Exclusivity remained a political choice in their adventures, but “fun” mixed with the hauteur was now a serious ingredient in their social choices. Entering into this new circle was a new face, a man without wealth or portfolio, a younger version of the Ward McAllister character, a court jester of a sort, who made steppin’ in society his one and only business. His name was Harry Symes Lehr and, in time, this foppish dandy of the dawning Modern Age became famous in the world of international society as “King” Lehr. His story is told in this issue’s New York Social Diary. Enjoy! u

David Patrick Columbia ON THE COVER: A circa 1907 photograph of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, the onetime head of his branch of the famous Vanderbilt family of philanthropists, who died in 1915 on the RMS Lusitania at the age of 37. Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY Society As He Found It: Harry Lehr and Notes from the End of the Gilded Age. THEY MET one night at the Met. The opera was Lohengrin. She had heard it many times before, but it had already been two years since her husband died and she was glad to have the opportunity to get out of her widow’s weed. She was Elizabeth Wharton Drexel Dahlgren, a mother and widow at 31—and the heiress to a Philadelphia banking fortune. The year was 1900. It was a Monday night with all of New York society in attendance—the Met’s “Diamond Horseshoe”—resplendent with the ladies’ diamonds and emeralds sparkling. She was a guest of Mrs. George Gould, or Edith, who had first entertained at dinner that evening at the Gould mansion at 67th Street and Fifth Avenue. The dinner was long, as was often the fashion, and Mrs. Gould and party arrived during the second act. With everyone quietly taking their seats in the Gould box, the young widow noticed a man she didn’t recognize, sitting in the shadows. She couldn’t see his face but could tell that he was tall and “powerfully built.” When the lights came up, Edith Gould said to Elizabeth, “I want you to meet the most amusing man in New York...” It was, of course, the man in the shadows. Elizabeth was struck by his “vivid blue eyes” 22 QUEST

Ward McAllister

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lehr on their wedding trip, 1901

Mrs. William Astor, the Queen of the “400”

Mrs. George Gould wearing a pearl necklace valued by TIffany & Co. at $500,000


190 YEARS AGO

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

Tennis Tournament at the Newport Casino

Harry Lehr and Grand Duke Vladimir of Russia

with “the very spirit of gaiety.” In the light she could see that the big man was blond with a winning smile. He also had a “pleasant lazy voice, curiously high-pitched.” The first five minutes of conversation with him confirmed what Edith Gould had said. He was the most amusing man. “Conversation rippled around him,” Elizabeth wrote many years later of the night. “It was impossible for anyone to be bored in his company.” His name was Harry Lehr. A young man from a “good family” in Baltimore: a community that prized the decorum of society to which he belonged. However, Harry’s father had suffered a reversal of fortune when Harry was still a teenager, which had changed everything for the boy’s future ambitions. When Elizabeth later asked about him, Edith Gould said that he had “hardly any money, but he goes everywhere,” and that it was “impossible to have a party without him.” 24 QUEST

“Crossways,” Mrs. Fish’s Newport House, now Mrs. Morris de Peyster’s

Mrs. Gould also said that the men didn’t like him very much. “They call him one of ‘the little brothers of the rich,’ but that’s just because they are jealous of his popularity.” The very next day, Harry Lehr came to call, Elizabeth recalled in a memoir, King Lehr and the Gilded Age, published some 30 years later, in 1935. “After that he came many times. I was falling under the spell of his charm…He filled my somber house in West 57th Street with gaiety and laughter…bringing people to see me, arranging parties on the spur of the moment, inviting me out to dine at the house of one or other of his friends.” He told her, “You are far too

young and pretty to remain a disconsolate widow…I am going to wake you up and teach you how to enjoy life again.” Soon she was seeing Harry Lehr very often. One day in late March—several months after their first meeting—returning from a stay with the George Goulds at their Lakewood, New Jersey, estate, he invited Elizabeth to lunch at Sherry’s (the most popular restaurant in New York among the wealthy and the celebrated, and the first restaurant where society women ever went out to eat). On their way to Sherry’s he told her: “You cannot imagine how important this luncheon party is going to be to me.” She was surprised to see

there were other guests: four women: Mrs. Astor, Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish, Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs, and Mrs. Oliver Belmont (the former Alva Vanderbilt). And no men. They were known in New York social circles as “The Big Four,” the most powerful women in New York Society, whose “power” was taken very seriously. Before the lunch was over, Elizabeth overheard Mrs. Oelrichs say to Harry Lehr, “I think she is delightful, Harry. We four are going to take her up. We will make her the fashion. You need have no fear…” On their way home, Harry asked Elizabeth to marry him. “You must have guessed I have been in love with you ever


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Mr. and Mrs. Harry O. Havemeyer, Jr., with John K. Livermore and B. B. Moore

Mrs. Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, previously Mrs. WIlliam Kissam Vanderbilt

Mrs. John Jacob Astor and Harry Lehr in an auto parade in Newport in 1902

since that first evening. I know you don’t love me, but you are lonely, you need someone to take care of you. I believe I can make you very happy...” Three years before he met Elizabeth, Harry Lehr had been introduced to Caroline Astor—the Mrs. Astor—who was also charmed. She had ruled society for decades with her crowning achievement of the “400” ball given in her famous ballroom with the assistance and advice of another man obsessed with society whose name was Ward McAllister. She first entertained at the house on 34th Street and Fifth Avenue and then at the massive double mansion she shared with her son and his wife and children at 65th Street 26 QUEST

Harry Lehr and Charles E. Greenhough wearing twin costumes

and Fifth Avenue, where Temple Emanu-El stands today. Harry Lehr’s charm was his talent to amuse. Although he bore many of the personality traits of Mrs. Astor’s late amanuensis, McAllister, Harry

Elizabeth, Lady Decies in her robes for the coronation of George VI

was much younger, was better looking, and had a highly clever ability to amuse—he was fun. Bored, older, rich women gave him much greater reach, making him far more desirable to have around since he also

“knew” everybody. It would be difficult to find a comparable personality in today’s social circles because, in those ancient times but a century ago, all women lived in a kind of isolation of rules


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PAMELA D’ARC

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AT STRIBLING Q: If three of your clients met at a cocktail party, what would they say about you? A: They would say that they love working with me because I am passionate about what I do, loyal, fun, intuitive, and we have a nice time working together. I am also tenacious about finding the perfect property and negotiating the best deal for my client. Buying a property is an intensely personal experience, and my buyers would say they can confide in me and know their thoughts will remain confidential. Many of my clients have bought and sold with me numerous times; that repeat business speaks volumes.

Mrs. Lehr’s House at 52 Rue des Sts. Pères in Paris

Lord and Lady Decies after their civil marriage on May 25, 1936

Q: What do you think is the secret of your success? A: Well, I’m loathe to give it away! There is not one specific “secret,” but a combination of factors. I provide a superior level of service (24/7) and responsiveness that surpasses my clients’ expectations. My tenacity to uncover every stone in the search process confirms that I am always looking out for their best interests. Many clients find exceptional value in the relationships I have with others in the industry, which often gives me the ability to show properties before they hit the market. Q: Is there a particular neighborhood you are known for? A: Yes, every neighborhood (in Manhattan)! My business is 99% referrals and my buyers tend to be individualistic and have a highly developed aesthetic sense—they don’t want ordinary. So, I know and run to every corner of the city. I grew up on Central Park West and attended The Spence School, so I spent a lot of time on both sides of the park. I have lived Upper East, Tribeca, midtown—and am now back on the Upper West Side—so my knowledge of the city is quite extensive and comprehensive. I am one of the few brokers who works uptown and downtown and knows both markets very well. I have also sold and rented properties in Brooklyn. Pamela D’Arc can be reached at 212.452.4377 or pdarc@stribling.com. 00 QUEST

Mrs. William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr.

and mores unknown today. Women of wealth did have more mobility than their less fortunate sisters; however, because they ruled the social roost, they still lived in a gilded cocoon of wealth and ennui, in a world quite separate from their husbands’ lives outside the home. Mrs. Astor’s power was formidable, however, and both men and women bowed and sometimes even quaked to it. By the time she met Harry Lehr, she was almost 70 and had begun to withdraw from the social scene. So, the near

irreverence of Harry Lehr was like a breeze of fresh air for the aging dowager. She took him up and everyone followed, especially the aforementioned Mesdames Oelrichs, Gould, Fish, and Belmont (and many more). Until he met Elizabeth Drexel, the man earned his living selling his bubbly to his adoring hostesses. He soon learned that his social connections gave him opportunity to gain greater favors from tailors, hotels, restaurateurs, and other merchants whose eyes were on promoting their wares. It was understood that, wherever he might go, he could let drop just where and from whom he acquired his suits, shoes, shirts, ties, coats, hats, watches, rings, and everything else he possessed, all of which was gratis—for him. Society was his business. Restaurants such as Sherry’s were only too happy to let him entertain with dinners and dances that brought in a good number of Mrs. Astor’s “400.” Mrs. Fish saw to it that, through her husband (head of the Illinois


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E S T , J U N E / J U LY 1 9 9 0

Central Railroad), he was given free passes—first class, of course—to travel. One friend named Tom Wanamaker (of the Philadelphia family) happily lent him rooms in his large apartment. Doors opened, carpets rolled out, and the best champagne flowed in Harry Lehr’s life. All he really needed was a lifetime annuity. The secret of his charm is difficult to imagine in today’s sensibilities but, basically, his métier was not unique, even today. He had the ability to “make ’em laugh,” to kind of be “one of the girls.” This was even more valued by women and men of leisure and fortune than by the common man. 30 QUEST

“Samson’s strength lay in his hair. Mine lies in the favor of women,” he used to say when congratulating himself on some fresh social conquest. “All I have to do is to keep in their good graces and everything comes to me.” To this end, he spent all his time in their company, listened to their confidences, gave them—whenever they sought it—his advice with the same careful consideration, whether the problem was planning a dinner or luring an erring husband back to the fold. He chose their dresses for them, planned their house parties, taught them how to manage their love affairs, and found

them husbands. He had a natural ability to ingratiate himself flawlessly into their lives. Elizabeth Drexel did not immediately give Harry Lehr an answer to his proposal. First, she went back to Philadelphia to stay with her widowed mother, inviting Harry to visit in order to meet her. Her mother was charmed too. Elizabeth was in love, as she recorded in her diary. On her birthday, he sent her a rosary of coral and gold in a heartshaped box with the message: “Every good wish to you today from my heart.” Soon after, she accepted his proposal although she recorded in her diary that she was

“rather hurt and disappointed to find that Harry was infinitely more interested in the precise details of the fortune my father had left me more than anything else.” She repeated what must have been the magic words for him: “My dear, you won’t have to worry over money; you know I will give you everything, as much as ever you want,” which included financial arrangements to take care of his beloved mother. It was then he made clear (with a laugh), “I live not on my wits but on my wit. I make a career of being popular.” Elizabeth remained deeply impressed by the power of


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, MARCH 1991

George Plimpton

Griffin Dunne

his compelling charm. They were married in the cathedral in Philadelphia with all the fashionable New Yorkers in attendance. The bride, however, noticed a change in the air on that day. The “gaiety,” she later wrote, “seemed to have gone out of the vivid blue eyes, leaving the spirit of mockery that had once so fascinated me.” She felt a “vague sense of foreboding, as though a cold hand had been laid on me.” He was nervous. After the wedding, the couple traveled to he Stafford Hotel in Baltimore for their wedding night. There, in her suite, she dressed in a rose brocade gown, pinned with a diamond brooch, and awaited her groom to appear from his room. The dining room of their suite had been laid with “sheaves of crimson roses,” filling the room with their fragrance. “Caviar, quails in 32 QUEST

Piedy and Sidney Lumet

Nina Griscom Baker

aspic, his favorite brand of champagne, the cabinet of cigars I had bought for him, along with the gold and enamel watch set besides his plate.” The maid came in, “flushed, eyes downcast…Madame the maître d’hôtel tells me that Mr. Lehr has just given orders to serve him dinner in his own room. He says that you will dine alone.” A few minutes later, Harry appeared. Face pale, laughter gone from his eyes, he sat down, facing his wife…. “There are some things I must say to you and it is better that I should say them now at the very beginning so that there an be no misunderstandings between us. You have heard my orders to the servants, I presume? “Well I intend that they shall be carried out for the rest of our life together. In public I will be to you everything that a most devoted husband

Leo Castelli

Terry McDonell and Peter Fonda

Arthur and Alexandra Schlesinger

should be to his wife. You shall never complain of my conduct in this respect. I will give you courtesy, respect and apparently devotion. But you must expect nothing more from me. When we are alone I do not intend to keep up the miserable pretense, the farce of love and sentiment. “Our marriage will never be a marriage in anything but in name. I do not love you. I can never love you. I can school myself to be polite to you but that is all. The less we see of one another except in the presence of others, the better.” “But why did you marry me?” the bride asked. The groomed laughed. “Dear lady, do you really know so little of the world that you have never heard of people being married for their money, or did you imagine that your charms placed you above such a fate? I must tell you the unflattering truth

that your money is your only asset in my eyes. I married you because the only person on earth I love is my mother. I want above everything to keep her in comfort. Your father’s fortune will enable me to do so. But there is a limit to sacrifice. I cannot condemn myself to the misery of playing the role of adoring lover for the rest of my life.” He added: “After all, at least I am being honest with you. How many men in New York, how many among our own friends have entered their wives’ rooms on their wedding night with exactly my state of mind but they prefer hypocrisy to the truth. If I am never your lover when we are alone, at least I will not neglect and humiliate you in public. What is more, you will actually gain by marrying me. You will have a wonderful position in society. As my wife, all doors will continued on page 38


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34 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 2

36 QUEST


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A be open to you. “If you will try to accustom yourself to the position, and realize from the start that there is no romance and never can be any between us, I believe that we shall get along quite well together. But for God’s sake leave me alone. Do not come near me except when we are in public, or you will force me to repeat to you the brutal truth that you are actually repulsive to me…” And so began the life of Elizabeth Drexel and Harry Lehr. On signing, he was given an allowance of $25,000 a year ($750,000 today) and all living, traveling, real estate, and additional expenses were paid by his wife. Their first summer together they rented a house in Newport where they were fêted by all the society queens.

Newport was the most important social location in America at the time. Although New York was the center, Newport was small enough to make the social restrictions apparent to everyone, including the aspiring newcomers. Harry Lehr soon became the social arbiter as well as the court jester to all who entered. He was generous with his advice to those who wished to be welcomed—and were, in his mind, eligible. He was also generous to young men and women who wanted to marry outside of their social stations, assisting them with advice and mediating between them and the parents in order to make their unions possible. Everything that Harry Lehr did in these relationships only strengthened his position as an arbiter, and friend, to all.

The marriage provided him with the means to live like a rich man, but also provided his wife the social connections that she appreciated—though, she probably could have cultivated everything herself, given her family background and fortune. She abided by his rules and eventually found freedom in them; she was free to come and go as she pleased, and the great variety of relationships that he made both in the U.S. and in Europe seemed to enhance her life. There was a love affair of hers that emerged during the early years with a man she identified only as Mr. X in her memoir. When her mother died, 12 years after she and Harry married, she made the initial moves to divorce him. But, unfortunately, Mr. X died shortly thereafter. After Mr.

QUEST, SEPTEMBER 1993

New York City Ballet Gala at Lincoln Center for the Balachine Celebration

38 QUEST

X’s death, Elizabeth decided to divorce anyway but Harry’s pleading with her not to somehow affected her decision and she remained married. It was, by her account, the way he had explained it on the wedding night. In public, he was caring and solicitous, but when they were alone, he was separate. However, he played the piano, loving to play in the near dark, and his music, she recalled, belied the harsh side that she had been exposed to. By the second decade of their marriage, the couple began spending more time in Paris, where Elizabeth acquired a beautiful house in the Seventh. World War I intruded and Elizabeth became an active volunteer nurse and subsidized an ambulance in her friend Anne Morgan’s amcontinued on page 44


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, SEPTEMBER 1993

40 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1995

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 7

42 QUEST


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A bulance corps. After the war, the couple spent more and more time away from America and Newport. In the mid-1920s, Harry, then in his mid-50s, fell ill with a brain tumor. His affliction changed everything for him including his ability to amuse. All pretenses of joie de vivre were gone. When his wife made attempts to cheer him up, to draw that old sense of

humor out of him, he responded, “No, no, Bessie. La Commedia è finita!” Those would be the last coherent words he ever uttered to her. In the late-1920s, after more than one surgery, he traveled back to Baltimore to Johns Hopkins for medical care. On January 3, 1929, three months before his 60th birthday, Harry Lehr died. His wife was thousands

of miles away in France at the time, staying with Alva Belmont’s daughter, Consuelo Vanderbilt, and Consuelo’s husband, Jacques Balsan. After Harry’s death, Elizabeth found her husband’s diaries, which had always been locked away. In them, she found his truth. “‘I can never love any woman,’ he often said to me. ‘Women are actually repulsive to me…’ It had been true.”

To anyone today, it would be apparent from the beginning that Harry Lehr was gay. In fact, he would have been considered what used to be called before the days of liberation: a “screaming queen.” In the Gilded Age, his behavior was revealing to many men, but the clinical designation of “homosexuality” was not known, especially to women who were used to the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA R R I S H A R T MU S E U M ’ S M I D S U M M E R PA R T Y I N S O U T H A M P TO N

Andrea Glimcher and Chuck Close

masculine pose that excluded women from everything but the sex act and domestic activity. The Big Four, those powerful women who adored Harry Lehr, liked him because he shared their interests and took them seriously. Outside of what the men in their lives could bring them in the way of material goods, Harry’s male 46 QUEST

Beth Rudin DeWoody and Carlton DeWoody

Tripoli Patterson and Jackie McKay

Julie Zeff and Renee Ryan

contribution was far more interesting and engaging than the macho attitude they had to live with. Harry Lehr knew this. It was, in a very real way, his saving grace—and grace it was. Although, somewhere in there, it was his sadness too. Elizabeth Drexel Lehr, despite her protestations in her volume on life with Harry

Lehr, seemed to be comfortable accommodating her husband’s rules and behavior. Her life was interesting and, as it turns out, she was a remarkable social documentarian and writer. Her portraits of that time and players, and her precise description of that world, left her as a kind of Saint-Simon of her era. In

Jan and Randy Slifka

Yung Hee Kim and Patrick McMullan

1936, she remarried to a Lord Decies. He was the widower, coincidentally, of Vivien, Lady Decies, née Vivien Gould, daughter of Edith Gould. Edith Gould had been the lady who introduced Elizabeth Drexel to Harry Lehr, all those years before at the Metropolitan Opera House on that fateful night in 1900. u

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Josy Hamren, Lee Rubenstein and Chloe Richards


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E F E S T I V A L D E L S O L E AT T H E W O L F F A M I LY V I N E YA R D S I N S A N F R A N C I S C O

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T H E S O U T H A M P TO N A N I M A L S H E LT E R F O U N D AT I O N ’ S “ U N C O N D I T I O N A L L O V E ” E V E N T I N S O U T H A M P TO N

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David and Samantha Yanks with Sadie

Carole and Fred Guest 54 QUEST

Cynthia Ott and Jim Coleman

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The Hessler boys: Dashell, Declan and Maclean

Ian Snow with Annabelle

Alexia Ryan with Alexandra

Fiona Bradley and Melissa Biggs Bradley

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE CINEMA SOCIET Y HOSTED AN EVENT FOR TO ROME WITH LOVE W I T H T H E H O L LY W O O D R E P O R T E R A N D P I A G E T AT C A S A L E V E R

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Julianna Margulies and Samantha Mathis 56 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A R I S A N D Q U E ST TO A ST E D A R T AT A P R I VAT E D I N N E R

Judith Pearson and Karen Terrell

Lacey Terrell and Robert Edwards

Tony Terrell and Peggy Mejia 58 QUEST

Lawrence Shindell and Robin Davis

Redington Jahncke and David Koch

Jamee Gregory, Somers Farkas and Barbara Tober

Jim Zirin and Jonathan Farkas

Donald Tober and Michel Witmer

Alberto Mejia and Marlene Hess

George Kauffman, Wendy Lehman and Mariana Kaufman


DISTINCTIVE PALM BEACH PROPERTIES

CRISTINA CONDON

LAKEFRONT MEDITERRANEAN $38,000,000

LAKEFRONT REGENCY $14,250,000

7 Bedrooms, 8 Baths, 5 Half Baths 17,113 ± sq. ft. WEB: 0075170

ISLAND DRIVE GEORGIAN

5 Bedrooms, 7 Baths, 2 Half Baths 8,900 ± sq. ft. WEB: 0075676

CLARKE AVENUE ESTATE

$11,200,000 $10,450,000 5 Bedrooms, 6 Baths, 3 Half Baths 9,316± sq. ft. WEB: 0075514

NORTH LAKE WAY

GOLFVIEW ROAD

MIZNER OCEANFRONT

$26,000,000 14 Bedrooms, 14 Baths, 2 Half Baths 13,539± sq. ft. WEB: 0075653

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$10,900,000 $9,250,00 7 Bedrooms, 7 Baths, 3 Half Baths 8,665± sq. ft. WEB: 0075516

VILLA VACANZA

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$6,250,000 $5,900,000 Restore or Build New 20,909± sq. ft. lot WEB: 0075545

$11,700,000 8 Bedrooms, 9 Baths, 4 Half Baths 23,100± sq. ft. WEB: 0075573

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CHARMING BAHAMA LANE

$3,200,000 $2,950,000 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths 3,013± sq. ft. WEB: 0075092

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PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach 340 ROYAL POINCIANA WAY, SUITE 337, PALM BEACH, FL 33480 T 561.659.3555 F 561.655.2359 CRISTINA CONDON T 561.301.2211 | www.cristinacondon.com Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. is owned and operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, LLC. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A W E E K E N D AT F I T C H ’ S C O R N E R I N M I L L B R O O K

Perrin Martin and Paul DiMarco

Hilary and John Block

Feli and Oakleigh Thorne

Bernadette Murray and Darren Henault

Joan McLaughlin, Kirk Henckels, Jay McLaughlin and Gloria Callen

John Truex and Fernanda Kellogg presented an award to Paige Garson

John Klopp, Angele Parlange and Bob Hottensen with Pam and Eames Yates 60 QUEST

Luis Peyrelongue-Guerra, Celia Fox and Vanessa Peyrelongue-Guerra

Brad Mitchell and Fernanda Gilligan

Ruthie Lyman

Alexandra Kasmin and Karen Klopp

M A RY H I LL I A R D

Penelope Hall and Molly Schaefer


Evans Ridge | Colorado With a sprawling floor plan, ultimate recreational facilities, and breathtaking outdoor spaces, Evans Ridge is nothing short of magnificent. Regally poised on a gently sloped hillside, Evans Ridge spans an incredible 42,000 square feet set upon 70 acres of peaceful and natural surroundings. Designed for large family gatherings, corporate retreats, and grand-scale entertaining, the property provides spectacular vistas of the Rocky Mountains’ Front Range peaks. Framed by towering curved bay windows and glorious rotundas, the 11-bedroom manor abounds with high-end finishes and endless textures, and is a showcase for 21st-Century luxury living. Truly monumental in scale and range, the exceptional appointments include a great room with a beamed ceiling, wraparound windows,

and an inlaid 18th-Century oil painting. Additional highlights include a grand living room, formal dining room, wood-paneled library, gourmet kitchen, and 24 bathrooms. Additional guest quarters, a separate caretaker’s house, 16-car garage, and a state-of-the-art home automation and security system further add to the list of amenities. Akin to a five-star resort, Evans Ridge is replete with premier recreational options. Two dedicated recreation floors feature a theater, exercise room, two-lane bowling alley, arcade, and media room. Outside, the rolling landscaped grounds reveal a Japanese teahouse and trout pond, while the indoor pool provides swimming in all seasons.

Offered at $19,500,000

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Clayton Andrews • +1 312 980 3500

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E M AYO R ’ S F U N D TO A D VA N C E N E W YO R K C I T Y ’ S B E N E F I T AT G R E Y R O O F TO P T E R R AC E

Lyor Cohen and Tory Burch

Liz Smith and Patti Harris

Terry and Tina Lundgren

Yolanda Jimenez, Michael Bloomberg, Tamara Mellon and Michael Ovitz

Megan Sheekey with Susan and Jon Rotenstreich

Christo, Antoni Miralda and Lauren Geller 62 QUEST

Rob and Anne-Cecilie Speyer with Fiona Rudin

Jamie Drake and Rob Bose

Nina Freedman, Diana Taylor and Deborah Krulewitch

Shelby Gaines and Ethan Hawke

CO U RT E S Y O F T H E O F F I C E O F T H E M AY O R

Aby and Samantha Rosen with Bob Tierney


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PHOEBE TUDOR AND GEORGE LANCASTER SALUTED DANIEL C APPELLO’S THE IV Y LEAGUE IN HOUSTON

June Christensen and Priscilla Larson

Becca Cason Thrash

Michael Landrum and George Lancaster

Mary Jane Wakefield with Stephen and Betty Newton

John McClymonds and Daniel Cappello

Robert Sakowitz

Judy Nyquist

Phoebe and Bobby Tudor

Frank Calamari and Ed Gilligan 64 QUEST

Diahn and Tom McGrath

Marjory and Stan Smith

Gillian Mestre and Diana Quasha

F U LTO N DAV E N P O RT / P W L S T U D I O ( A B OV E ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

C A LVA L R Y H O S P I TA L ’ S A W A R D S G A L A AT T H E P I E R R E


Atlantic Highlands, NJ – Only its own magnificent New York City skyline views and sunsets could rival the beauty of this-one-of-a-kind home. Gorgeous interior appointments include cathedral ceilings, stone floors, a wine cellar and many over-sized arched windows. The lush, secluded setting is nonetheless within minutes of the harbor and ferry service to the city. The adjacent buildable lot is also available, with or without the home. $1,800,000

Bedminster, NJ - Revel in the beauty of this country estate home on 5+ acres. English-style architectural detail like crown and dentil molding predominates. 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 4 fireplaces, separate carriage house with 3 car garage, wine cellar, exercise room, and a kitchen/family room area. A great home for entertaining, indoors or out, with a pool & pool house. Minutes to train in nearby Far Hills, for an easy commute to Manhattan. $2,195,000

Michele “Mickey” Rast x6150

Roger Christman x6100

Harding Township, NJ - This magnificent 12.75 acre pastoral estate in the Silver Lake Historic District captures the essence of picturesque New Vernon’s history while affording the peace and tranquility its residents treasure. A landmark 16-room country house built in 1937 with myriad historic architectural details, it sits in a park-like setting just minutes from highways and direct train service to Manhattan. $4,850,000

(Rumson Area) Middletown, NJ - Rare opportunity to own one of the shore area’s most beautiful estates – an exceptional Georgian Revival manor on 10.75 heavenly acres with in-ground pool, orchard, distant river views, and separate 3-BR, 3.5-bath carriage house with its own pool. 13,000 sq. ft of priceless original features and untold luxury. Nearby Ferry to NYC. $4,250,000

James Barry x6105

Joan Picone & Patricia Caruso x6129

Short Hills, NJ - Noted architect John James designed this masterpiece of a shingle-and-stone estate on two secluded acres, with 7 bedrooms, 7.4 baths and 7 fireplaces. Its grandly proportioned rooms provide 15,000 feet of living space under extraordinary beamed ceilings. You can dine al fresco on the large bluestone patio with its outdoor kitchen. Then relax all evening in the entertainment suite before retreating to a marvelous dome-ceilinged master suite with sitting area and fireplace. $6,350,000 Debbie Rybka-Howard x6138

Tewksbury Township, NJ - On a park-like estate of 8+ acres, this five bedroom, six and a half bath colonial is a truly exceptional Williamsburg style residence with flawless 18th century design. The spacious master suite features a sitting room with a fireplace and a luxurious master bath. For the auto-enthusiast, there’s a 4-car attached garage and a detached one, too. Minutes to Rt 78 for commuting to NYC $1,575,000 Roger Christman x6100

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N S O C I E T Y H O ST E D “ T H E C O A STS O F PATA G O N I A” AT T H E C E N T R A L PA R K Z O O

Anne and John Manice

Tom and Ann Unterberg

Linden Wise and Missie Taylor

Tony and Amie James

Gillian Miniter, Melanie Wambold and Jennifer Gould Keil

Fred Krimendahl, Emilia Saint-Amand, Alison Minton and Guy Harley

Christian and Gillian Hearst Simonds

Ward Woods

YO U N G N E W YO R K E R S FO R T H E P H I L H A R MO N I C ’ S S U M M E R B E N E F I T

Adam Kopland and Laura Katherine Smith 66 QUEST

Virginia Powell and Penn Egbert

Maximilian Sinsteden, Sacha Wagle and Mark Gilbertson

Kate Bradbury, Lindsey Harper and Brent Winston

Chris George, Caroline Christman and Andrew Ward

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Doug Kerridge and Susie Oliver Kerridge


WITH GRATITUDE TO OUR MANY HUNDREDS OF SUPPORTERS FOR A HUGELY SUCCESSFUL NEW YORK CITY BOOK LAUNCH AT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN ON MAY 9, 2012.

–MEERA GANDHI AND THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION

$50 HARDCOVER AVAILABLE AT

Chartwell Booksellers • the Corner Bookstore • Crawford doyle Booksellers rizzoli Bookstore • st. Mark’s Bookshop • www.aMazon.CoM

please visit: thegivingBaCkfoundation.net


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA R I S O P E R A B A L L E T ’ S S O I R É E I N T H E D AV I D H . KO C H T H E AT E R AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

Hal Witt, Anne Bass and Helene Alexopoulos

Françoise Gilot

Catherine Farley and Jerry Speyer

Julia Koch

Elizabeth Stribling

Nancy and Henry Kissinger

Lisa Rinehart and Mikhail Baryshnikov

Olivia Flatto

Sharon Kerr 68 QUEST

Jacqueline Berg

Joelle Muso

Shail Upadhya

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

C O C K TA I L S F O R T H E S O U T H A M P TO N A N I M A L S H E LT E R AT S E Q U I N I N S O U T H A M P TO N


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D O U G L A S E L L I M A N C E L E B R AT E D T H E O P E N I N G O F I TS B O C A R ATO N O F F I C E

Felicia Marquez and Andres Fanjul, Jr.

Ashley McIntosh and Steven Presson

Michael Capponi, Susan Whelchel and Ken Gross

Rita Lombardo and Sarah Maynoldi

Marisella Cotilla, Senada Adzem and Vanessa Grout

Kirsten Smith, Candace Jorritsma, Adolfo Cotilla, Pamela Gottfried and Thom Smith

Jane Tobal, William Eubanks, Casey Pickering and Maurice Caster

Chrissy Rault and Gus Jenkins

Alan Wintermute, Anne Goldrach and Colin Bailey 70 QUEST

Isabel Cruz

Collins Ward and Joan Payson

Christina Gerber and Alexandra Garrison

Emily Frick and Lisa Volling

Isan Wardropper and Sarah McNear with Charles and Deborah Royce

J A N I S B U C H E R ( A B OV E ) ; R E D E Y E P H OTO G R A P H Y ( A B OV E ) ; C A R LY OT N E S S / B FA NYC . CO M ( B E LO W )

T H E F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N ’ S G A R D E N PA R T Y


CALENDAR

AUGUST

On August 18, “A Weekend of Coaching” will take place at the Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island. At the event, 19th-century coaches will be drawn throughout the town by teams of horses. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

1

IN HARMONY

The American Friends of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra will host “Summer in the City” at 6:30 p.m. at Hudson Terrace in New York, New York. For more information, call 212.697.2949.

take place at Bartlett’s Farm in Nantucket, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.228.1894.

including a farm with chickens, cows, and sheep, will take place in Riverhead, New York. For more information, call 631.298.5292.

Lecture at 8 p.m. in Nantucket, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.228.1110.

PASTORAL TREASURE

HEAR THE BUZZ

MILLING AROUND

A tour of Hallockville, comprised of 28 acres and 19 historic structures,

Buzz Bissinger will be featured at the Constance Laibe Hays Memorial

3

OLD NEW YORK

The “Landmarks of New York” exhibition will open at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, New York. For more information, call 631.283.2118.

The Southampton Hospital’s summer party, “Grand Prix Monaco,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Wickapogue Road in Southampton, New York. For more information, call 631.726.8200.

The Perlman Music Program’s students will perform at 4 p.m. at Peconic Landing in Greenport, New York. For more information, call 212.877.5045.

GET ANTIQUATED

The Nantucket Historical Association’s antiques show will 72 QUEST

An art show will begin at 10 a.m. at the Water Mill Shoppes in Water Mill, New York. For more information, call 631.726.2777. READY, SET, GO

YOUNG MAESTROS

2

4

WHALE OF A TIME

On September 8, the East End Hospice will auction a collection of box art at 4:30 p.m. at the Ross School Center for Well-Being in East Hampton, New York. For more information, call 631.288.7080.

The Nantucket Historical Association will host a dinner to celebrate its antiques show at Bartlett’s Farm at 6 p.m. at the Whaling Museum in Nantucket, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.228.1894.


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CALENDAR

AUGUST SEPTEMBER 1 CAPTAIN PLANET

Azuero Earth Project’s “Azuero on the Harbor” will take place at 4 p.m. at Cindy Sherman’s residence in East Hampton, New York. For more information, call 212.243.7300. TO MARKET, TO MARKET

Sustainable Nantucket’s market will open at 9 a.m. at the intersection of Cambridge and North Union streets in Nantucket, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.228.3399.

4

THE MADDING CROWD

The “Mad About Art + Design” exhibition will be celebrated at 6 p.m. at the McNeill Art Group Tribeca Project Space in New York, New York. For more information, call 631.838.4834. On August 26, Paddlers for Humanity, a non-profit that donates to children’s programs, will host a three-person, three-mile stand-up paddle race called the Stand-Up Paddle Team Challenge at Fresh Pond Beach in Amagansett, New York. For more information, call 917.834.3888.

9

18

JAWSFEST will open at the Martha’s Vineyard Boys and Girls Club at 3 p.m. at the Edgartown School in Edgartown, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.696.4911.

“A Weekend of Coaching” will include a black-tie evening at the Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

10

19

The National Museum of Racing will hold its ball at 7:30 p.m in Saratoga Springs, New York. For more information, call 518.584.0400.

The Southampton Antiques Fair will be open at the White House in Southampton, New York, at 9 a.m. on alternating Sundays through October 14. For more information, call 631.283.2494.

JAWS WILL DROP

START TO FINISH

11

BREAK A LEG

will host its Stand-Up Paddle Team Challenge at 2 p.m. at Fresh Pond Beach in Amagansett, New York. For more information, call 917.834.3888.

8

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX

An auction to benefit the East End Hospice will feature a collection of box art from one hundred artists. The event will begin at 4:30 p.m. at the Ross School Center for Well-Being in East Hampton, New York. For more information, call 631.288.7080.

GO ANTIQUING

MEET YOUR MATCH

The Newport International Polo Series will host a match between the Newport and Palm Beach teams at 5 p.m. at Glen Farm in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. For more information, call 401.846.0200.

12

TAKE IT IN STRIDE

“Strides for Life” is a three-mile race around Lake Agawam to benefit the Lung Cancer Research Foundation. The event will begin at 8:45 a.m. at the Cultural Center in Southampton, New York. For more information, call 646.290.5199. 74 Q U E S T

SET SAIL

The Opera House Cup Regatta will commence at 12 p.m. in Nantucket Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.325.7755.

25

RAISE THE STAKES

The Travers Stakes will take place at 267 Union Avenue in Saratoga Springs, New York. For more information, call 518.584.6200.

26

KEEP IT FRESH

Paddlers for Humanity, a non-profit that donates to children’s programs,

On August 4, the Nantucket Historical Association will host a dinner in conjunction with its antques show. The event will begin at 6 p.m. at the Whaling Museum in Nantucket, Massachusetts. For more information, call 508.228.1894.


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY AFTER BROOKE SHIELDS made her first film in 1978, the controversial Pretty Baby, many other projects were offered her way. It took some time to choose one because Brooke’s mother, Terry, didn’t want something similar to the first role. I photographed her often at the beginning of her film career, and everywhere Brooke went Terry went too. Brooke was always under Terry’s watchful eye. It made things easy and it was comfortable for me to do my work. Terry and I got along well, and she never interfered when I was taking photographs. Once, I took Terry along to meet Roman Polanski, with whom I had photographed an entire issue for Vogue Paris with another young star, Nastassja Kinski. Roman and Terry had a nice conversation and, afterward, Terry and I went to La Coupole in Montparnasse for dinner. I sensed that Brooke would not be working with Polanski, though Terry and I never spoke about it. In 1980, Brooke was starring in The Blue Lagoon, which meant she had to do a lot of swimming. So, off we went on a boat for some photographs, one of which is shown here. Brooke has always been beautiful, as we all know. But even as a young girl, she never let fame go to her head. She was always on time, always professional, and never difficult; it was a pleasure to photograph her. Brooke probably won’t remember this, but once, when she was about 13, I was photographing her in my studio and she asked if she could babysit my young daughter, Tessa. With Brooke’s busy career that would have been an impossibility, but it was a charmingly naïve request. Although she could look deceivingly sophisticated, to me this proved she was actually a kid at heart! u


Brooke Shields photographed in Long Island, New York, in 1980.

AUGUST 2012 77


TA K I

FALLING FOR ATHENS A VERY LONG TIME AGO, still in my teens, there was a beautiful Athenian girl whose eyes were green and hair golden blond, and she was madly in love with a friend of mine. He loved her just as passionately, but then he went away to school in Switzerland, and you can guess the rest. She got a “Dear John” letter from him and suddenly their romance turned into a Greek tragedy. It sounds a bit opportunistic, even shabby, but I stood by her, listening to her laments late at night. And then, one evening, believe Our columnist remembers romancing a woman at the Acropolis in Athens, Greece, amid the city’s ruins.

it or not, under a moonlit Acropolis, we kissed. She told me she felt bad and guilty for having done it, but on we went—the moon, the ruins, the night’s breezes all encouraging the moment. It was a case of patience and perfect timing. (The retsina also helped.) This brings me to the point I wish to make. Now is the time for all of you to visit Athens. She is down and out, abandoned, and feeling sorry for herself. This means that, like the girl on the Acropolis, she will welcome you with

open arms—and then some. Greek tragedy goes hand in hand with the ever-ready handmaid of Fate. Myth and reality are what the city is all about. The myth that has been filtered through European imagination has allowed the city to reinvent itself time and again. My first memory of Athens goes back to October 28, 1940. I was four years old and woke up to the sound of sirens. War had been declared that night, premier-cum-dictator John Metaxas and King George II having refused an Italian


From left: A collection of retsina bottles; an aerial view of Athens, Greece—a city with a history that is begging to host tourists from around the world.

ultimatum to allow Mussolini’s troops to cross our borders on their way to the Middle East. Athens back then was a magical place: a jasmine-scented city of 350,000 with very few cars, greenand-yellow electric trams, and hundreds of cafés with marble-topped tables and waiters in fitted white jackets and black bow ties. There were some of the widest boulevards in Europe, thanks to the German architects and city planners who had descended on the city 100 years earlier along with King Otto. That’s the city I remember from my Kolonaki vantage point (Kolonaki being a chic residential section of Athens in the foothills of Mount Lycabetus, lined with embassies, exclusive schools, and some grand 18thand 19th-century houses). Mind you, even working-class sections like Pangrati, next to the 1896 marble Olympic stadium, may have lacked sanitation, but from the outside they looked beautiful, freshly whitewashed with tiled roofs and red-andblue painted doors. Inhuman high-rises were 30 years away, as were traffic jams, pollution, overcrowding, and the lowest quality of life in Europe. So why visit Athens now? Why visit a city of close to six million people, with the ugliest modern architecture west of Tehran, a polluted atmosphere that is the equivalent of sticking one’s mouth on the exhaust pipe of a Porsche Targa for at least an hour, and where African, Pakistani, and Albanian drug dealers have the run of the place east of Kolonaki and Constitution Square? Well, again, it’s like that girl on the Acropolis. I, too, went off to school soon after that fateful

evening, came back and heard she was married. I ran into her at parties nonstop, one thing led to another... Oh, well. Once a beauty, always a beauty. And Athens, whether you like smelling exhaust pipes or not, is still one hell of a charming, halfEuropean and part-Levantine place that is as gemütlich at times as old Vienna. As already stated, Athens is in one’s imagination, a place where the past counts more than the present. All the great cafés—Iannakis, Zavoritis, Zacharatos—are gone. Zonar’s remains, but with a different clientele. The Colossus of Maroussi, Henry Miller’s friend, is long gone, as are all the gay expatriates from America, including the great Cole Porter, who used to frequent the cafés across from Hotel Grand Bretagne in order to pick up young men. And yet, late at night, when I return in my cups from some bash at some nouveau riche’s palatial house in the suburbs, I can hear the ghosts ordering ouzo and meze. Watch them argue with their hands, shouting and laughing, their white linen suits freshly pressed, their panama hats lifted every time a lady of the night passes by. But there are some magnificent 19th-century buildings that survive and can be seen without illusions. The university buildings on Panepistimiou Avenue, the national library, the National Archeological Museum of Athens, some very old churches in Monastiraki, Heinrich Schliemann’s mansion, the Byzantine and Christian Museum, and, of course, the new Acropolis Museum with an ugly modern exterior that betrays the treasures collected inside. About three or so years ago, I visited it with my friend

professor Tom Fleming, a classicist and editor of Chronicles magazine. Tom knew more about the antiquities than the guides who, needless to say, got uppity until I made it clear to them that he was a friend and that he was not moonlighting. That’s the modern Greek for you—insecure and feeling hard done by, but reasonable once he has been shown the light. Mind you, no matter how vivid an imagination, it is hard to glimpse the city’s past. Most of the 19th-century private houses have been torn down to make way for ghastly commercial centers and high-rises. My maternal grandmother’s house, a wonderful edifice on Tsakalof Street, now houses some luxury brand’s retail store (I refuse to look the few times I’ve walked by). But if one goes to Plaka, the old city under the Acropolis, one will be quickly charmed by the narrow streets, the shops and restaurants, and the old tavernas like Xynou. The best hotel to stay at is Hotel Grand Bretagne, but there are others that have more charm for far less money. Let’s face it: Athens is always present in the hearts and minds of those educated in the West who did not choose female or transgender studies. Just as we will never really know what the ancients looked like, classical Athens will always be a mystery. But once you start walking the streets beneath the Acropolis, you start to combine dream and reality and, with a little creative illusion, you will see Athens for what she really is—not what the crooks in Brussels say, but a wounded old girl who has lost her looks yet can manage to tell the buggers to sod off. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. AUGUST 2012 79


QUEST

Fresh Finds

BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WE CAN’T THINK OF a more appropriate—or colorful—way to enjoy the last full month of summer than with flowers filling a bell-shaped Hoffmann vase (or few) from the design shop at the Neue Galerie. Equally inspired and delicate in design, why not tie on a new Cartier Trinity pearl necklace? If fall trends are on your mind, we’ve got you covered, from crisp coats for her to checkered suits for him—and a trip or two for the couple.

Cartier Trinity

pearl necklace in 18-kt. yellow, rose, and white gold with freshwater pearls and diamonds. Price upon request. Cartier: 800.CARTIER or cartier.com. The lightweight beauty of these bell-shaped vases, designed by Josef Hoffmann in 1915, will bring a smile to your home. $175-300. Neue Galerie Design Shop: 1048 Fifth Ave. (at 86th St.) or 212.628.6200, ext. 496.

Like a bit of Boulevard St.-Germain on Bleecker Street: Stop into Sandro for this cream wool

and ankle-strap pumps ($425). Sandro: Sandro New York, 646.438.9335, or sandro-paris.com. Conjure nothing but the greatest feelings in the “Feeling” boot by Hermès, made of calfskin. $1,900. Hermès: Available at Hermès stores nationwide, 800.441.4488, or hermes.com. 80 QUEST

H Ü LYA KO L A B A S F O R N E U E G A LE R I E D E S I G N S H O P

coat ($860), white cotton pants ($305),


SPEAKING WITH RICHARD

Q: What differentiates Warburg Realty from other agencies? A: I’ve been with Warburg Realty for more than 20 years. The reason that I’ve been with the firm for so long is because of the way it operates. We’re a boutique firm—individually owned and not part of a large chain of firms. We have a very personal, warm atmosphere. Q: What makes being an agent in New York City different from elsewhere? A: First, the price point in New York City is so much higher than anywhere else in the world. Also, we have to deal with coop boards which is quite different. And, because New York City is considered the world’s Financial Capital, we deal with a lot of international high-end buyers.

STEINBERG

Q: How did you develop your understanding of the marketplace? A: I live my work. I live on the Upper East Side and my friends are my clients. The people that I come into contact with that want to purchase property are people that I feel close to. I work primarily by referral. Q: What trends do you see in the marketplace? Where do you think things will be in 20 years? A: I think the marketplace has shifted dramatically toward an international buyer. Most of the record sale prices that we’re achieving are being fueled by buyers from outside of the U.S., especially from Russia, China, and South America. In a good market, secondary areas are always strong. But the real test of a neigh-

borhood is what happens in a bad market. I think that the Upper East Side and Upper West Side have maintained their stability for centuries. They’re the last markets to decline. And I think Long Island City and Dumbo have become stable areas. Q: What is one of your most memorable sales? A: My most memorable sale was of two floors at One Beacon Court which that were combined to make one spectacular 8,500-square-foot duplex for someone who wanted to house a contemporary art collection. My other most memorable sale was the first of my career: a townhouse on the Upper West Side with an indoor swimming pool. u

To contact Richard Steinberg, please call 212.439.5183 or 917.676.0150 or email rsteinberg@warburgrealty.com.

To view the variety of properties represented by Richard Steinberg, associate broker and executive managing director at Warburg Realty, please visit www.warburgrealty.com.


Fresh Finds

The Oh Squishee® Baby black demiflap pouch by Eric Javits features a turnlock closure, slit pocket, and

Based off of original 1983 designs

chain shoulder strap that unhooks

by Marina Bulgari herself,

for cross-body length. $450.

the Caty reversible earrings

Eric Javits: ericjavits.com.

in honey citrine, gold, and onyx. $15,000. Marina B: Available at Hollis Reh & Shariff in Southampton, 631.283.6653.

Raise a glass to any of Roberto Coin’s cocktail rings, including the square amethyst and diamond ($6,600), oval cognac diamond ($4,900), and round rock crystal and diamond ($7,600) styles. Roberto Coin: 800.853.5958 or robertocoin.com.

All that glitters will be gold when walking in the Darcy glitter heel from alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet. $295. alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet: aliceandolivia.com.

Let Ralph Lauren glam up your wardrobe for fall with this black silk beaded dress ($6,500) and blue shearling scarf ($995). Ralph Lauren Collection: Available at ralphlaurencollection.com. The 18-kt. yellow gold Métiers d’Art Chagall & l’Opéra de Paris—Hommage to W.A. Mozart timepiece features a reproduction of Marc Chagall’s ceiling painting in the Opéra Garnier. Price upon request. Vacheron Constantin: 729 Madison Avenue, 212.317.8964. 82 QUEST


Orchard View - Desirable Stone Hill Road. Beautiful Country House Spruce Hill - Stunning and sophisticated Country Estate. High-end Moddesigned by Livingston Elder with incredible Southern exposure. Bright Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Spectacular Family Room with vaulted ceiling and doors to the Pool. Country Kitchen. Media Room. Office. Four Bedrooms. Incredibly landscaped, level two acres overlooking gentle meadows, flowering fruit trees and abutting preserve.$1,495,000

ern interior with Flos lighting and Boffi Kitchen. Hardwood floors and French doors. Living Room with stone Fireplace. Designer Kitchen. First floor Master Suite. Three additional Bedrooms. Gated drive to incredible four-acre property in top estate area.Terraced gardens down to heated Pool.Spectacular stone work,meditation gardens, reflecting pool and an outdoor terrace with Fireplace. $1,950,000

Breathtaking English Gardens -

Color the landscape! Long drive to the perfect estate setting surrounded by phenomenal flowering gardens and specimen plantings. Classic Country Colonial with rocking chair front porch overlooking the grounds. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Fabulous Kitchen open to wonderful Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms plus Au Pair. Wine Cellar. $1,295,000

Light & Views - Inviting, open floorplan with angled walls, white oak and tile floors and skylights. Water views of Lake Katonah. Wraparound deck for great entertaining. Great Room with vaulted ceiling. Sun-filled Dining Area. Chef ’s Kitchen. Family Room with Fireplace. Dramatic Master Suite. Aerie Studio. Three serene acres with scenic stone terrace, surrounded by ferns. Woodland walking trails. $850,000

Sophisticated Modern -

An Architectural Masterpiece - From the Golden Age. Breathtaking 1914 Colonial Estate with incredible millwork. Long gated drive to private hilltop. Abutting Audubon, nearly eight magnificent acres with ancient trees and distant views. Formal Courtyard. True Center Entrance Hall with Cloak Room. Gracious Living Room. Billiard Room. Library. Formal Dining Room. Wonderful Great Room. Eight Bedrooms. Pool. $3,995,000

Stunning 8200 square feet of exceptional living space. Fabulous light, curved interior and exterior walls, high ceilings and walls of windows with clerestories. Dramatic Living Room. Sleek Varenna Kitchen. First Floor Master Suite. Five additional Bedrooms. Over four Chappaqua estate acres with Shoreline Swimming Pool. Tennis Court. Generator. Smart House technology. $3,995,000

(914) 234-9234

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


Fresh Finds Your wrist will thank you for Get away from it all in

Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual

the lap of luxury at either

Submariner Date timepiece

of two new villas on

in 18-kt. yellow gold with

St. Barts from WIMCO Villas.

rotatable blue ceramic bezel

For more information,

and blue dial. $34,250.

contact WIMCO Villas at

Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX.

800.449.1553 or info@wimco.com.

Look your best in this red shirt from Ascot Chang made with Thomas Mason linen. Ascot Chang: 110 Central Park South, 212.759.3333. Get ready to welcome fall in Etro’s wool and alpaca checkered suit ($2,961), cotton printed shirt ($486), and feather patched vest ($2,756). Etro: 720 Madison Ave., 212.317.9096.

Perfect for gents and ladies alike, J.McLaughlin offers up these oh-too-cute boxer shorts. $38. J.McLaughlin: 1008 Lexington Ave., 212.879.2240.

Keep his feet looking chic in a pair of Mr. Casual lizard calf slip-ons from Belgian Shoes in medium brown with black trim. $375. Belgian Shoes: 212.755.7372.

Attention is in the details, as is proved by J.Crew’s Corgi™ lightweight polka dot socks in two shades of blue. $28. J.Crew: Available at jcrew.com.

84 QUEST


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

COLD SPRING A-frame contemporary, perched high on 5 acres, offers HUDSON RIVER and mountain views. The 3755 square foot home features cathedral ceilings and stone fireplace in living room, new kitchen with granite, three bedrooms and three full baths. The pool, surrounded by decks, is sited to capture the views. Offered at $1,395,000

PUTNAM VALLEY Classic Nantucket shingled lakefront home on Roaring Brook Lake. The architect-designed home features a large living room with fireplace wall, custom designed kitchen and spacious master suite. Over an acre of private, carefully landscaped property offers a shed, new boathouse, new docks and a sandy beach. Offered at $1,125,000

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout the home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000

COLD SPRING Marvel at the spectacular HUDSON RIVER VIEWS from this 3100 SF home on NY ½ acre at village open rooms, country kitchGARRISON, - Courtside . Thisedge. rustic Large stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it2 apart from thehardwood ordinary, hasfloors, been converted into 10,000suite square feet of luxurious en, fireplaces, private master make this home GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from theand ordinary, has been converted into location, 10,000 square feet of luxurious ideal for family entertaining. Perfect huge deck and a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and aoversized tennis court3and gunite pool.add Offered atappeal. $1,650,000 car garage to the Offered at $990,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers

COLD SPRING Charming saltbox combines traditional style with modern amenities andValley, easy maintenance. Classic in large room, retreat onfireplace almost 5 acres. This C. living 1935 home offers Putnam NY - Lovely country 4356 squareceiling feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths,3 2bedrooms working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous vaulted in kitchen, include first floor master Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths,climate 2 workingcontrol fireplaces, system, hardwood floors, and numerous suite. Efficient carincludes detached ground pool with spageo-thermal and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property2also a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond.just Offered at $1,300,000 garage, 3.7 acres, minutes to village. Offered at $675,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a for-

a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

mer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


Fresh Finds Sherle Wagner’s solid brass, gold-plated Cornucopia drop pull is hand-chased and hand-polished—and makes for quite an entrance. At Sherle Wagner: 212.758.3300 or sherlewagner.com.

Discover your inner artist with new one-hour pottery classes for all ages at Casa de Campo’s Altos de Chavon village. Casa de Campo: casadecampo.com.do.

Let Mrs. John L. Strong guide your dinner guests to their seats with the “You

New for fall, but a keeper for life: Asprey’s

Are Seated Next To” place cards. $40

Market tote in saffron python. $5,350. Asprey:

for a set of 12. Available at

853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811.

Saks Fifth Avenue, 9th Floor, 212.753.4000.

Wear a bit of your heart on your sleeve—or

No need to

your wrist—with Montblanc’s Romance

gild the

bangle in silver and white lacquer. $1,540.

lily with Harry

Montblanc: At select Montblanc boutiques

Winston’s

or 800.995.4810.

diamond Lily Cluster pendant, set in platinum. Price upon request. Harry Winston: 718 Fifth Ave.,

There’s no

800.988.4110.

mistaking which is your iPhone with a customized damask iPhone case from Pickett’s Sun-dripped days linger through September, but fur weather isn’t far behind. Head to Dennis Basso’s 765 Madison Ave. boutique for the furrier’s latest looks. 86 QUEST

Press. $48. Pickett’s Press: 1016 Lexington Ave. or pickettspress.com.


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FA S H I O N

GREAT CLASSICS OF AMERICAN FASHION BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

88 QUEST

and 1008 Lexington Avenue). J.McLaughlin distinguishes itself with its flair for bold colors and signature prints. It is perhaps Kevin’s historical appreciation for great American fashion that has guided the brand. What’s more, he has developed an intuition for when to strike. It’s important to know when to move on from something and when to bring another style back, and Kevin knows just how to do it. For instance, “there’s a time when a ’70s print is ‘right,’ and a time when it may be garish,” he says, knowing when to tap into a moment and when to step back. “You just know when it’s there, or when it’s not.” Last November, the privateequity firm JH Partners and the Highland Consumer Fund acquired a majority interest in J.McLaughlin; still, the Brooklyn-based operation is running as it always has. And the acquisition has only helped the team to expand vertically and concentrate on expansion. Today, it’s not just New York and “expected” preppy markets that can enjoy J. McLaughlin. With stores everywhere from Palm Beach to Princeton, Lake Forest to Louisville, the McLaughlin hold on prep is seeping both north and south, and increasingly west. “The marketplace rewards craftsmanship,” Jay McLaughlin says. Apparently so. u This page: The J.McLaughlin storefront at 1311 Madison Avenue in Manhattan. Opposite page, clockwise from top left—from the Fall 2012 collection: Printed crewneck dress; plaid blazer and gingham shirt; Peter Pan collar sweater; 218 Hicks Street in Brooklyn; removable collar dress; spread collar shirt with tailored vest; cropped jacket with knit jodhpur pant; 1008 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan.

CO U RTE S Y O F J . M C L AU G H L I N

BACK IN 1977, when their first shop opened on 74th Street and Third Avenue, brothers Kevin and Jay McLaughlin found themselves with a nearly instantaneous hit that catered to the neighbors. The retail store that bore their name, J.McLaughlin, became a preppy hotspot—the go-to post-brunch destination for the sort of crowd who’d gone to an Ivy League school and dined at J.G. Melon. With an emphasis on a comfortable retail environment—something that felt more like walking into the club than a store—the McLaughlins struck a formula that seemed to work: well-crafted, high-quality staples of the preppy uniform, but with slight variations and nuances that kept them relevant, fresh, and just whimsical enough. Today, J.McLaughlin is synonymous with “inside the know” American prep. Kevin is the creative force behind the brand’s impeccable designs and luxe accessories. Officially the chief creative officer, his taste and design sense (which he attributes to his mother, who used to hand-knit his father’s cashmere sweaters and monogram his clothing herself) continue to guide the collections. Each season, he introduces new pieces that are hailed as instant icons—an amusing detail on men’s swim trunks, or a sassy variation on the best-selling Catalina Print T-shirt for women. Kevin’s brother and chief merchandizing director, Jay, has strategically grown the business into the bustling success that it is today. Along with their president and CEO, apparel maven Steven Siegler, the brothers have expanded into 59 freestanding stores with two flagship locations in Manhattan (at 1311 Madison Avenue, and in the side-by-side women’s and men’s stores at 1004


GEORGIAN ESTATE IN ANDREWS FARM $7,495,000

SPECTACULAR WATER VIEWS

· Please visit: www.AndrewsFarmEstate.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

$5,750,000 · Please visit: www.SpectacularWaterViews.com Exclusive Agents: Laurie Smith / Mary Ann Grabel

HISTORIC BACKCOUNTRY COMPOUND

ELEGANT MANOR IN CHIEFTANS

$3,650,000 · Please visit: www.HistoricGem.com Exclusive Agent: Bonnie Caie

$3,595,000

CHARM ON BEDFORD $2,345,000

BACKCOUNTRY TRANQUILITY

· Please visit: www.CharmOnBedford.com Exclusive Agent: Sally Maloney

G R E E N W IC H

· Please visit: www.ChieftansClassic.com Exclusive Agent: Leslie Carlotti

F I N E

$1,950,000 · Please visit: www.195Bedford.com Exclusive Agent: Sally Maloney

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . JENNIFER BENEDICT . LISA BILHUBER . BERDIE BRADY . ANN BRESNAN . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . LINDA CASTRIOTA . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA CIOFFARI JOSIANE COLLAZO . PATRICIA COUGHLIN . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY DURNIAK . JACKIE EKHOLM . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN JOYCE FOWLER . JANIE GALBREATH . KATHERINE GEORGAS . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . JEANNE HOWELL . MADELINE KEARNS . SHARON KINNEY . ELIZABETH KOLDYKE-BOOLBOL GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . VILMA MATTEIS . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . CINDY MEEKER . JIM MEEKER . ELLEN MOSHER . LAUREN MUSE . LIZ OBERNESSER . MARGARET RYDZIK . MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS . TORY THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGARET VORDER BRUEGGE . JOE WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


CAPTIVATING SETTING ON OLD MILL

CLASSIC BEAUTY ON OAKWOOD LANE

$4,250,000 · Please visit: www.ThreeOldMill.com Exclusive Agent: Sally Maloney

$4,175,000 ·

SHORE ROAD

LIGHTHOUSE LANE

$2,995,000 · Please visit: www.ShoreRoad35.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

$2,395,000

GREAT ESCAPE $1,395,000

Please visit: www.ConvenientOakwood.com Exclusive Agent: Bonnie Caie

· Please visit: www.SevenLighthouse.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

CHARM IN RIVERSIDE

· Please visit: www.CountryCotswold.com Exclusive Agent: Bonnie Caie

G R E E N W IC H

F I N E

$1,295,000 · Please visit: www.23Dorchester.com Exclusive Agent: Tyler Tinsworth

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

191 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . JENNIFER BENEDICT . LISA BILHUBER . BERDIE BRADY . ANN BRESNAN . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . LINDA CASTRIOTA . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA CIOFFARI JOSIANE COLLAZO . PATRICIA COUGHLIN . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY DURNIAK . JACKIE EKHOLM . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN JOYCE FOWLER . JANIE GALBREATH . KATHERINE GEORGAS . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . JEANNE HOWELL . MADELINE KEARNS . SHARON KINNEY . ELIZABETH KOLDYKE-BOOLBOL GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . VILMA MATTEIS . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . CINDY MEEKER . JIM MEEKER . ELLEN MOSHER . LAUREN MUSE . LIZ OBERNESSER . MARGARET RYDZIK . MARIANNE SCIPIONE LEPRE FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS . TORY THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . MARGARET VORDER BRUEGGE . JOE WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


400 THE QUEST

Chronicling the families that have defined society in New York for

generations—from Astor to Vanderbilt. WRITTEN BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

HIS TABLE MANNERS were atrocious. The protruding lower lip loosened progressively with age to the point where dinner guests were likely to see the masticated detritus drooling from his tongue to his napkin, or his lap. He also had the habit of eliminating any catarrh by spitting on the floor around him, wherever that might have been—indoors or out. So people had to watch their step when in the company of John Jacob Astor. He lived well, if not luxuriously, on lower Broadway—which was a fashionable address at the time—and, during the summers, on a farm just a stone’s throw from the East River on what is now East 87th Street. And, although he lacked the personal social ambition of others who later acquired his name, it was important that his offspring marry “well.” It all began with a beaver pelt. He came to the New World from Waldorf, 92 QUEST

Germany, in 1784 at age 21. He was in search of fortune, as were so many of his brethren—at least those who weren’t fleeing the politics and poverty of Europe and Russia. He found it in the Pacific Northwest among the Native Americans in fur trading, selling pelts to the Chinese, who bought them by the thousands. In the first decade of the 19th century, Astor put his profits into New York real estate—a parcel here, a parcel there, along what was an ancient Native American trail that later became known as the Main Stem, or Broadway. Most of it was raw, undeveloped land, especially above 9th Street. Astor bought low and when he sold (which he rarely did), he sold high, only to buy even more. In 1834, he sold his fur business and concentrated on real estate. He was now the richest man in America with holdings estimated at $20 million. Just before he

died in 1848 at age 85, he reflected that if he’d had it to do all over again, he would have bought the entire island of Manhattan. His grandson, William Backhouse Astor, made the marriage that sealed the family’s social position to Caroline Webster Schermerhorn. Caroline (known as Lina to her family and friends) believed that, to be in society, one’s family had to trace its New York lineage back at least two generations. She was way ahead of that, tracing her bloodlines back to the Livingstons, the Van Rensselaers, Peter Stuyvesant, and the founding of New Amsterdam in the 17th century. By the 1860s, with the assistance of her amanuensis, the seriously silly Ward McAllister, Lina crowned herself Queen of New York with a guest list that eventually became legend and myth: “The 400,” or the number of people she allegedly


The Astors Clockwise from top left: John Jacob Astor, born Johann Jakob Astor, patriarch of the family; Hotel Astor, constructed in 1897 by John Jacob Astor IV; Caroline Webster Schermerhorn, wife of William Backhouse Astor; Nancy Astor, or “Lady Astor”; Lady Astor at a memorial at St. Nicholas’ Church in Whitehaven, England, in 1955; Lady Astor, visiting Boston.


The Astors Clockwise from top left: The home of Mr. and Mrs. John Jacob Astor IV, located at 65th Street and Fifth Avenue, was demolished in 1926; Mr. and Mrs. John Jacob Astor VI with their son, William Backhouse Astor III, after his birth on July 19, 1935; Lady Astor, the first woman to sit as a conservative member of Parliament in the British House of Commons; Lady Astor with two of her five children; Brooke Astor, whose third marriage was to Vincent Astor, was known for her philanthropy.

could accommodate in the ballroom of her house at 34th Street and Fifth Avenue and, later, in the double mansion she and her son built on 65th and Fifth, where Temple Emanu-El stands today. Other Astors were not impressed with Lina’s social heights. Her nephew, William Waldorf Astor, who lived nearby on the corner of 33rd and Fifth, where the Empire State Building stands today, was the richest member of the family. He was so incensed by the popular reference to her as the Mrs. Astor (her calling card was simply “Mrs. Astor,” as if there were no others) that he left for England, shortly thereafter attaining a title to establish the English branch of the family that exists today. The most famous English Astor was his daughter-in-law, Nancy Langhorne Astor—also an American—who became the first woman to sit as a conservative 94 QUEST

member of Parliament in the British House of Commons. She was probably the only “Mrs. Astor” who could have given Lina a run for her money. William Waldorf Astor had the last word with Lina, however. He cleverly, and spitefully, replaced his brownstone mansion with a massive hotel, right up to his Aunt Lina’s front doorstep, naming it after himself. There “went the neighborhood,” which is why his aunt vacated her house and moved 30 blocks up the avenue. After the move, Lina’s son, Jack Astor, razed the family brownstone and built another hotel on the rest of the block, calling it the Astoria. Eventually, he and his cousin would merge their properties into the Waldorf=Astoria. In those rigid if palmy days, the opening of the New York social season was set by Mrs. Astor’s annual ball. She

always entertained dripping in diamonds, which included the hairpin that helped keep her big black wig in place. She was so decorated that some said she competed with her ballroom’s chandeliers in lighting up the room. In this simple yet grandiose way, she ruled over family and society. Her daughters did not share her enthusiasm for it and her only son Jack (John Jacob Astor IV, a name which was used in more than one branch of the family) had no interest in it either. He’d made a “good” (and bad) first marriage to a vain and willful Philadelphian named Ava Willing, producing two children: William Vincent and Alice. After the couple divorced, Ava moved to England and married again to Lord Ribblesdale. Alice Astor was always said to be the lovechild of an affair her mother had with a man-about-town named Hatch. She


400 THE QUEST

A

Acquavella, Bill and Donna . . . . . . . . . . Acquavella, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acquavella, Nick and Travis . . . . . . . . . . Adams, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addison, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addison, Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addison, Christina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adler, Frederick and Catherine . . . . . . . Adler, Jonathan and Simon Doonan . . . Adolfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aga Khan, Princess Yasmin . . . . . . . . . . Ainslie, Michael and Suzanne. . . . . . . . . Aitken, Irene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albers, Ruediger and Maggie . . . . . . . . . Allen, Chris and Kate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allen, Joe and Annette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ames, Anthony and Cetie. . . . . . . . . . . . Amling, Jeffrey and Katie . . . . . . . . . . . . Amory, Minot and Victoria. . . . . . . . . . . Annan, John and Hope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony, Silas and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony, Silas Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Araskog, Rand and Jessie . . . . . . . . . . . . Armstrong, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armstrong, Mrs. Thomas (Bunty) . . . . . Arnault, Bernard and Helene . . . . . . . . . Arnon, Ehud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arnot, Courtney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arrouet, Paul and Dylan Lauren . . . . . . Asen, Scott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aston, Sherrell and Muffie Potter . . . . . Aston, Brad and Valerie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aston, Jay and Allison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Atherton, Lily and Tom Hanbury . . . . . Atherton, Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Atkins, Charles and Gayle . . . . . . . . . . . Attoe, Stephen and Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auchincloss, Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auchincloss, K.K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auletta, Ken. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ayres, Charlie and Sara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Azqueta, Norberto and Lian . . . . . . . . . Azqueta, Norberto Jr. and Robin . . . . . .

B

Bacall, Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baconovic, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bacon, Louis M. and Cynthia. . . . . . . . . Baer, Barrett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bailey, Preston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bahrenburg, Genevieve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, George IV and Anne . . . . . . . . . Baker, Marianna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, Asia and Callie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Baker, Kane and Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baker, Harold O. and Nancy . . . . . . . . . Balkin, Norman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bancroft, Thomas and Barbara . . . . . . . Bancroft, William and Debbie . . . . . . . . Bancroft, Townsend and Brooke . . . . . . Banker, Bindy and Bea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Banks, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bardes, Brittain and John Damgard. . . . Barish, Keith and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barish, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barman, John and Kelly Graham . . . . . . Bartlett, Betsy and A. Jones Yorke . . . . . Bartholomay, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bass, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bass, Sid and Mercedes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basso, Dennis and Michael Cominotto . . Bateman, Jeff and Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . Beard, Anson and Deborah . . . . . . . . . . Beard, Anson Jr. and Veronica Miele. . . Beard, Jamie and Veronica Swanson . . . Beers, Charlotte and Billy Beadleston . . Beinecke, Rick and Candace . . . . . . . . . Beirne, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bell, Joel and Marife Hernandez . . . . . . Bell, Byrdie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benedict, Daniel and Andrew Saffir . . . Benjamin, Bill and Maura . . . . . . . . . . . . Benoit, Mrs. Peter (Nellie) . . . . . . . . . . . Benabib, Roberto and Samantha . . . . . . Benson, Harry and Gigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . Berkowitz, Tim and Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . Berlin, Ellie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernard, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernbach, John and Violaine . . . . . . . . . Bernhard, Bill and Catherine Cahill. . . . Bernier, Rosamond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betteridge, Terry and Diana Siebert. . . . Bewkes, Jeff and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biddle, Christine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biddle, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biggs, Jeremy H. and Friederike . . . . . . Bilhuber, Jeffrey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black, Andrew and John Auerbach . . . . Black, Lee and Cece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black, Leon and Debbie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blades, John and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blair, William and Deeda . . . . . . . . . . . . Bland, Robert W.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blinken, Alan and Melinda. . . . . . . . . . .

Blinken, Donald and Vera . . . . . . . . . . . Block, John and Hilary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bloomberg, Mayor Michael . . . . . . . . . . Boalt, Brucie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blum, Andy and Flis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boardman, Mrs. T. Dennie (Cynthia). . . Boardman, Dixon and Arianna . . . . . . . Boardman, Serena and John Theodoracopulos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bockman, Richard and Gale Hayman . . Bodini, Francesca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bohannon, Kathryn and Felix Schroder Bolander, Lars and Nadine Kalachnikoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolen, Alex and Eliza Reed . . . . . . . . . . Bombard, Buddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Borynack, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bowles, Hamish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bradbeer, Jim and Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bradfield, Geoffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Braddock, Rick and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . Bradley, Camilla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brady, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Braff, Doug and Meg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Henry and Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breck, Owen and Rhea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bregman, Martin and Cornelia. . . . . . . . Brinker, Ambassador Nancy. . . . . . . . . . Brinn, Mildred. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brodsky, Dan and Esty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brodsky, Katy, Alexander and Tom . . . . Brodsky, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brokaw, Clifford and Babette. . . . . . . . . Brokaw, Tom and Meredith . . . . . . . . . . Bronfman, Edgar Sr. and Jan Aronson . . Bronfman, Edgar Jr. and Clarissa. . . . . . Brooks, Michael and Dede . . . . . . . . . . . Brooks, Amanda and Christopher . . . . Brown, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brown, Matt and Marisa. . . . . . . . . . . . . Brown, Tina and Harry Evans . . . . . . . . Brown, Cabell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Browne, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brownlow, Gerard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brumder, Will and Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . Bryan, Christina and Wilhelmus . . . . . . Buatta, Mario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buckley, Chris and Katy Close . . . . . . . . Buffett, Jimmy and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buhl, Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bull, Bartle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bull, Bartle Breese and Claudia . . . . . . . Bunn, George and Jane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bunn, Palmer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burch, Bob and Dale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burch, Tory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 95


The Vanderbilts Clockwise from top left: A portrait of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt (1877-1915); members of the Vanderbilt family at the 1914 International Polo Cup in Meadow Brook, Long Island; Cornelius Vanderbilt II built his home in 1882 at 57th Street and Fifth Avenue; Cornelius Vanderbilt covered Harper’s Weekly on January 20, 1877.

went through life fortified with a piece of the Astor fortune and several husbands, living much of her life abroad, always fighting with her older brother, Vincent, who inherited the largest part of the American branch of the family’s fortune. John Jacob Astor IV married for a second time to a much younger woman (he was 49; she was 18) named Madeleine 96 QUEST

Force. She was pregnant at the time they were returning from Cherbourg on the maiden voyage of the Titanic. As the world now knows, thanks to the movies, she survived and he did not. Soon after, she gave birth to John Jacob Astor VI. The infant’s half-brother Vincent (who was 21 at his father’s death) behaved abominably toward his sibling. He never liked mother nor child, and always openly and viciously questioned the legitimacy of the child’s birthright. Congenitally stubborn and temperamentally childish, Vincent saw to it that the child receive only what was stipulated in their father’s will for

any unborn children—approximately 3 percent of the estate. Vincent inherited some $100 million. Vincent married three times, fathered no children, and from early adulthood on, began giving away his inherited wealth— the first Astor to do so—while never compromising his grand style of living. His third wife, Brooke Russell, whom he married in the early 1950s, became his beneficiary when he died in 1959, thereby breaking a family tradition of leaving the fortune to Astor family members. Through his foundation, she dispensed the bulk of his fortune to philanthropic causes in New York over the next three


400 THE QUEST

Burden, Amanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burden, Mrs. Carter (Susan). . . . . . . . . . Burke, Coleman and Susan. . . . . . . . . . . Burke, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burke, Mrs. Edwin (Virginia) . . . . . . . . . Burnham, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burns, Brian and Eileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burns, Richard and Cricket . . . . . . . . . . Burns, Don and Greg Connors . . . . . . . Burris, David and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bush, Jonathan and Jody . . . . . . . . . . . . Butcher, Billy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C

Calder, Donald and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . Caldwell, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calhoun, Robert and Liza Pulitzer. . . . . Calhoun, Benn and Molly. . . . . . . . . . . . Califano, Joseph Jr. and Hilary. . . . . . . . Callaway, David and Brenda. . . . . . . . . . Cantor, Iris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caravaggi, Robert and Blaine . . . . . . . . . Carduner, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carey, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carney, Mike and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carpenter, Ed and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carroll, Barbara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carson, Bill and Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter, Graydon and Anna Scott . . . . . . Cashin, Dick and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Castle, John K. and Marianne . . . . . . . . Cates, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cave, Ray and Pat Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cave, Edward Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chambers, Anne Cox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chantecaille, Alexandra and Olivia . . . . Chisolm, Hugh and Daisy . . . . . . . . . . . Christman, Roger and Ellen . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lady Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lady Henrietta . . . . . . . . . . . Churchill, Lord Charles Spencer . . . . . . Churchill, Mrs. Winston (Luce) . . . . . . Clark, Alfred and Querube. . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Fred and Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Stephen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clark, Howard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clinton, Bill and Hillary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Close, Chuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Codman, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohane, Heather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, Mrs. Robert (Harriet) . . . . . . . . Cohen, Charles and Clo . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, James and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, Richard and Mona Ackerman . . Cohen, David J. and Romy . . . . . . . . . . . Cohn, Charles Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Colacello, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Denis and Annabelle . . . . . . . Coleman, Denis III and Merideth . . . . . Coleman, Nicholas and Briggs . . . . . . . . Coleman, Timothy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Payson and Kim . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Chase and Stephanie . . . . . . . Coleman, Reed and Lindsey . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Virginia Regan . . . . . . . . . . . . Colhoun, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colley, Bruce and Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collins, Brad and Amy Fine . . . . . . . . . . . Collins, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Columbia, David Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . Colwell, Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comden, Betty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Condon, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connolly, John and Ingrid . . . . . . . . . . . Connor, Ian and Marina Rust. . . . . . . . . Connor, Sassy Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conroy, Michael G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cook, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cook, Everett and Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooke, Richard and Wendy . . . . . . . . . . Cooper, Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooper, Maria and Byron Janis . . . . . . . Corbett, Andrew J. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corcoran, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cord, Cece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordish, Reed and Maggie Katz. . . . . . . Cormier, Judith and Frank Wisner. . . . . Corzine, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cox, Howard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cramer, Douglas S. and Hugh Bush . . . Creel, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creel, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creel, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crespi, Consuelo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crespi, Pilar and Steve Robert . . . . . . . . Cronkite, Kipton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crystal, Jonathan and Darcie . . . . . . . . . Cullman, Edgar and Ellie . . . . . . . . . . . . Cunningham, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cuomo, Mario and Matilda . . . . . . . . . . Cuomo, Gov. Andrew and Sandra Lee . Curley, Walter and Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . Curry, Boykin and Celerie Kemble. . . . . Curry, Brownlee and Agneta . . . . . . . . . Curtin, Jack and Beth Nowers . . . . . . . . Curtis, Curt and Mimi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Curtis, Ashton and Merrill . . . . . . . . . . . Curtis, Remmington and Tatiana Smith. Cushing, Howard and Nora . . . . . . . . . . Cushing, Howard Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D

Dahl, Arlene and Marc Rosen . . . . . . . . Dana, Norma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dana, Charlie and Posy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dance, Andrew and Jennifer Llyod . . . . Dana, Charlie and Posy . . . . . . . . . . . . . David-Weill, Michel and HÊlène . . . . . . Davidson, Marvin and Mary. . . . . . . . . . Davis, Bill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Davis, Christina and Richard . . . . . . . . . Davis, Henry and Belle Burden . . . . . . . Davis, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Davis, Robin and Redington Jahncke . . de Bary, Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Borchgrave, Arnaud and Alexandra de Bourbon de Parme, Prince and Princess Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Cabrol, Milly and Jeff Podolsky . . . . de Caraman, Countess Cristina . . . . . . . de Cuevas, Elizabeth Strong. . . . . . . . . . de Guardiola, Roberto and Joanne . . . . de Koning, Joep and Dixie . . . . . . . . . . . de Kwiatkowski, Lulu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de la Renta, Oscar and Annette . . . . . . . del Nunzio, Paula and Paul F. Balser Sr. de Montebello, Philippe and Edith . . . . de Neufville, Thomas and Carolina . . . . de Neufville, Peter and Joanna. . . . . . . . de Neufville, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Peyster, Ashton and Margo . . . . . . . . de Portago, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Roulet, Lorinda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de Sayve, Countess Mona . . . . . . . . . . . . de Vogel, Willem and Marion. . . . . . . . . Dean, Tom and Caroline. . . . . . . . . . . . . Deane, Walter L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dempsey, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dennis, Pamela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desmarais, Paul and Jackie. . . . . . . . . . . Devine, Tom and Alix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Devendorf, Alfred and Bonnie . . . . . . . . deWoody, Beth Rudin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . deWoody, Carlton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . di Bonaventura, Peter and Bridgett . . . . Di Donna, Emmanuel and Christina . . . Diamond, Jay and Alexandra . . . . . . . . . Dick, Hilary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dick, William C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dillard, Rodney and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . Diller, Barry and Diane von Furstenberg Dodge, John and Lore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 97


The Vanderbilts Clockwise from top left: A portrait of Mrs. William Kissam Vanderbilt II; Bergdorf Goodman now occupies the plot that housed this Vanderbilt home; Mr. and Mrs. Goodhue Livingston with Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt; photographers gathered outside of the home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II for the wedding of Count László Széchenyi and Gladys Vanderbilt on January 27, 1908; Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman.

decades. Today, the only remaining direct Astor descendents carrying the name are Jacqueline Astor Drexel and her brother, William B. Astor, the children of Vincent’s despised younger half-brother, John Jacob Astor VI. By the 1890s, the succeeding generation of New York society was elbowing in on Mrs. Astor, including the irreverent Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish, who mocked society while entertaining it. It was she who gave a formal dinner at her Newport mansion for Prince del Drago, who turned out to 98 QUEST

be an actual chimpanzee when the guests arrived in white-tie to meet this “little bit of royalty.” But the straw that broke the back of Mrs. Astor’s power was Alva Smith—a steel magnolia from antebellum Alabama who had married a grandson of Commodore Vanderbilt, William Kissam Vanderbilt. On the eve of her 30th birthday, Alva moved into a mansion on Fifth Avenue with her husband and children, which she had commissioned to resemble a château in the Loire Valley.

Marrying into a family of enormous wealth, Alva was incensed by the snubbing her husband’s family took at the hands of Mrs. Astor, who still reigned as the queen of New York society. Vengeance came with Alva’s housewarming, when she made a point of leaving Mrs. Astor and her daughter Carrie off of the guest list—a crushing blow to the young girl, who naturally wanted to go where the fun was. The snub was too much to bear. Mrs. Astor caved and had her chauffeur leave her calling card (with the corner turned


400 THE QUEST

Donahue, Barry and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . Donahue, Clay and Nevin. . . . . . . . . . . . Donnelly, Shannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donner, Alex and Kate Edmonds . . . . . Douglass, Robert Jr. and Whitney . . . . . Dowling, Peter and Deb Willis . . . . . . . Downey, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drake, Rod and Jacqueline Weld . . . . . . Drexel, Nicky and Jacqueline Astor. . . . Drexler, Millard S. and Peggy . . . . . . . . Driscoll, Sean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Druckenmiller, Stanley and Fiona . . . . . du Pont, Richard and Lauren. . . . . . . . . Duchin, Peter and Virginia Coleman . . . Dudley, Lady Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dudley, Jane and Dwayne Johnson . . . . Duenas, Miguel and Vivian. . . . . . . . . . . Duff, Ted and Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duff, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Tony and Luly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Randolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke, Robin Biddle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durand, Pierre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durkes, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durkes, Frances and Harriet . . . . . . . . . Durkin, Pat and Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DuRoss, Kimberly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dwyer, D.R. and Priscilla . . . . . . . . . . . .

E

Eastman, John and Jodie . . . . . . . . . . . . Eberstadt, Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ecclestone, Llwyd and Diana . . . . . . . . . Edwards, Philip and Ali . . . . . . . . . . . . . Egerton, Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elliott, Mrs. Osborne (Inger) . . . . . . . . . Ellison, Nancy and Bill Rollnick. . . . . . . Ellwell, David and Christie. . . . . . . . . . . Elson, Ambassador Ed and Susie. . . . . . Embry, Mrs. John W. (Anne) . . . . . . . . . Embry, Tally and Maggie . . . . . . . . . . . . Emmanuel, Nicholas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ercklentz, Cornelia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ertegun, Mrs. Ahmet (Mica) . . . . . . . . . Espy, John and Polly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Espy, Peter and Amanda. . . . . . . . . . . . . Eubanks, William R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F

Fairchild, James. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairchild, John and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairchild, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fales-Hill, Susan and Aaron Hill . . . . . . Fallon, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Fanjuls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Farias, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farkas, Jonathan and Somers . . . . . . . . . Fernandez, Luis and Lillian. . . . . . . . . . Fekkai, Frédéric and Shirin von Wulffen Feldman, Justin and Linda Fairstein . . . Feldman, Richard and Diana . . . . . . . . . Ferrare, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fiandaca, Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field, Nikki and Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . Field, Dick and Sky. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figg, Jamie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finkelstein, Jimmy and Pamela Gross . . Firth, Edmée and Nicholas. . . . . . . . . . . Firyal, Princess of Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . Fisher, Mrs. Max (Marjorie) . . . . . . . . . . Fisk, Averell and Kirsten. . . . . . . . . . . . . Fite, David and Danita Lowes . . . . . . . . Fitzgibbons, Alexander and Cristina . . . Fitzgerald, Terry and Libby. . . . . . . . . . . Flöttl, Wolfgang and Anne Eisenhower. Floyd, Raymond and Maria . . . . . . . . . . Flusser, Alan and Marilese . . . . . . . . . . . Foley, Tom and Lesley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fondaras, Elizabeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Forbeses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ford, Mrs. Henry II (Kate) and Frank Chopin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forsberg, Lars and Kelly. . . . . . . . . . . . . Forsythe, Mrs. Carl (Sabrina) . . . . . . . . . Foster, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foster, Ridgely and Letsy . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank, James and Claiborne Swanson . . Frelinghuysen, Anson and Emma . . . . . Frelinghuysen, George and Nonnie . . . . Frelinghuysen, Peter and Barrett . . . . . . Freitas, Mark and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friedberg, Rick and Francine LeFrak . . Fuchs, Michael J.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuller, Gillian Spreckels . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fulton, Flo and Scott Miller . . . . . . . . .

G

Galesi, Francesco and Marina . . . . . . . . Gammill, Lee and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gandhi, Meera and Vikram . . . . . . . . . . Gardiner, Robert “Stretch” and Liz. . . . Gardiner, Susan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Garrett, Rob and Jacquie . . . . . . . . . . . . Gauntt, Jonathan and Samantha Leas . . Geary, Jack and Dolly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geary, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geddes, Robin and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . Geddes, Max and Missy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geier, Phil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geoffroy, Evan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerry, Ebby and Kitty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerschel, Patrick and Elizabeth. . . . . . . Giard, George and Wendell . . . . . . . . . . Gilbert, Parker and Gail. . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilbertson, Mark F.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilligan, Fernanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilman, Kay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilmour, David and Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Giordano, Mark and Sallie . . . . . . . . . . . Giuliani, Rudy and Judith Nathan . . . . . Givner, Colt and Pamela Fiori . . . . . . . . Glascock, Steve and Barbara . . . . . . . . . Glass, John and Martha . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Goelets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goldberger, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goldsmith, Barbara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodale, Jim and Toni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodman, Chris and Julia . . . . . . . . . . . Goodrich, Jock and Buttons. . . . . . . . . . Gordon, Ellery and Marjorie Reed. . . . . Goss, Jared duPont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gotbaum, Victor and Betsy . . . . . . . . . . Gould, George and Darcy . . . . . . . . . . . Graev, Larry and Lorna . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graham, Ian and Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graham, Stephen and Cathy . . . . . . . . . Grassi, Temple and Ellie. . . . . . . . . . . . . Grauer, Peter and Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . Greenberg, Ace and Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . Gregorian, Vartan and Claire . . . . . . . . . Gregory, Alexis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory, Peter and Jamee . . . . . . . . . . . . Grisanti, Eugene and Gretchen . . . . . . . Griscom, Nina and Leonel Piraino . . . . Gross, Michael and Barbara Hodes . . . . Grunwald, Mrs. Henry (Louise). . . . . . . Gruss, Martin and Audrey . . . . . . . . . . . Gruss, Josh and Shoshanna . . . . . . . . . . Guare, John and Adele Chatfield-Taylor Gubelmann, Billy and Shelley . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Jimmy and Kate . . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Marjorie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gubelmann, Bingo, Phoebe and Tantivy Guernsey, Tony and Eve . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guerrand-Hermès, Valesca. . . . . . . . . . . Guerrini-Maraldi, Antoinette . . . . . . . . . Guest, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Cornelia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest, Freddie and Carole . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 99


The Cushings Clockwise from top left: Caleb Cushing, congressman from Massachusetts and attorney general under president Franklin Pierce; Howard and Nora Cushing, Jr., with their sons, Howard and Jamie; a portrait of Thomas Humphrey Cushing from during the Revolutionary War; Harvey William Cushing discovered “Cushing’s Syndrome”; Kate Cushing with Betsey, Bill, Henry Kirke, and Minnie.

down) with Mrs. Vanderbilt, the method of social acknowledgement in New York in those pre-telephone days. The “visit” saved the day. Carrie was invited. The Vanderbilt fortune had been created by the Commodore, born in 1794 on Staten Island, where he lived all of his life. (He also had a house on Washington Square.) By his early thirties, he dominated the local shipping business with a small fleet of sailing vessels. His method was always to undercut, and eventually destroy, the competition. By his early fifties, he was a millionaire. He was in his sixties when the great era of the railroad came along but, within a few years, he was successfully operating rail lines between the city and upstate. When the California Gold Rush came, he controlled the traffic, which was entirely by boat around the Horn, or by foot 100 QUEST

between New York and San Francisco. Vanderbilt’s vision, which became universal, was grounded in the fact that railroads were the future. In a few years, he put together one of the largest railway networks in North America. In his late seventies, he built Grand Central Terminal on the East Side—then considered the déclassé side of Manhattan. He died in 1877 at age 83, leaving a fortune that had surpassed Astor’s: $100 million. Vanderbilt had several children by his first wife, whom he later declared mentally unstable and had incarcerated so that he could marry his second—a woman named Frank. Upon his death, the bulk of his fortune went to his son William H., who also had several sons and daughters. With the Commodore’s passing, the Vanderbilts had a new patriarch in William H. and, with his blessing, his

children embarked on a residential building spree of their own. In 1878, William H. built a double mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue, occupying the entire block between 51st and 52nd streets, which is now part of Rockefeller Center. The northern half went to two of his daughters while he and his wife occupied the southern half. On the next block north, their son, Willie K., and his wife, Alva, built their palace. Right next door to them, another two daughters of William H. built their houses. Across the street, son Frederick built the only Vanderbilt house that is still standing on Fifth Avenue; it is now Versace’s flagship store. Five blocks north, son Cornelius II began a mansion. By 1893, it occupied the entire block between 57th and 58th streets, which is where Van Cleef & Arpels and Bergdorf


400 THE QUEST

Guest, Lisa Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guettel, Henry and Mary Rodgers. . . . . Gugelmann, Zani. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gunther, Jack D. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gurley, George and Hilary Heard . . . . . Gustin, Andrew and Braken. . . . . . . . . . Gutfreund, John and Susan . . . . . . . . . . Guthrie, Dr. Randolph and Bea . . . . . . . Gwathmey, Bette Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H

Hackett, Monte and Mayme. . . . . . . . . . Hackley, Maria and Sherwood . . . . . . . Haden-Guest, Anthony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halberstam, Mrs. David (Jean) . . . . . . . Halberstam, Julia and Ryan Harvey . . . . Halstead, Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamilton, Ted and Christy . . . . . . . . . . . Hamm, Bill and Candy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton, Mrs. Mark (Duane) . . . . . . . . Hampton, Kate and David Breithbarth Hanley, Dan and Denise . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hanley, Lee and Allie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harbach, Bill and Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . Hardwick, Bob and Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . Harris, Ira and Nicki. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Bill and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Mai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Walter and Anne Beckos . . . . Hathaway, Philips “Pete” . . . . . . . . . . . . Hatkoff, Craig and Jane Rosenthal. . . . . Hawkins, Ashton and John Moore . . . . Hawks, Kitty and Joe Leiderman . . . . . . Hay, R. Couri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayward, Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayward, Frances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hearst, Anne and Jay McInerney . . . . . . Hearst, Patricia and Bernard Shaw . . . . Hearst-Shaw, Lydia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heinz, Chris and Sasha Lewis . . . . . . . . Heiskell, Marian Sulzberger . . . . . . . . . . Held, Jim and Kenn Karakul . . . . . . . . . Henckels, Kirk and Fernanda Kellogg. . Henderiks, Joy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Herman, Dorothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Herrera, Reinaldo and Carolina . . . . . . . Hess, Mrs. Carl (Ludmila) . . . . . . . . . . . Hess, Marlene and James Zirin . . . . . . . Hess, John and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heyman, Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hickox, Chat and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hickox, Danielle and Kelly Moore . . . . Hicks, Kim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hidalgo, David and Mary Ann Tighe . . . Hill, Tom and Janine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hilliard, Landon and Kiwi . . . . . . . . . . .

Hilliard, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hilson, Gail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hinman, George and Emilie . . . . . . . . . Hirsch, Caroline and Andrew Fox. . . . . Hitz, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoadley, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hobbs, Fritz and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hobbs, Nick and Ashley. . . . . . . . . . . . . Hogan, Michael and Margo . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Jim and Casey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Sharon King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hoge, Warren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hormats, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Horn, Stoddard and Leslie . . . . . . . . . . Horvitz, Michael and Jane . . . . . . . . . . . The Houghtons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hovey, Chandler and Valerie Urry . . . . . Hovnanian, Ara and Rachel . . . . . . . . . . Howard, Pamela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Howard, Philip and Alexandra . . . . . . . Howard-Potter, Jake and Erica . . . . . . . Hoyt, Anthony S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hubbard, Bill and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . Hufty, Page Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Husain, Fazle and Blair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hussein, Her Majesty Queen Noor . . . . Hutchins, Winston and Diane. . . . . . . . Hutton, Punch and John Hodges . . . . . Hvolbeck, Brad and Marijane . . . . . . . .

I

Ingham, Joy Hirshon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ireland, Bob and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irwin, Arthur and Kathy. . . . . . . . . . . . . Isham, Mrs. Heyward (Sheila) . . . . . . . . Isham, Chris and Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . Isham, Ralph and Ala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Isles, Philip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ittleson, Tony and Chan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ives, Philip and Caroline . . . . . . . . . . . . Ives, Alexander C.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J

Jackson, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jagger, Bianca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jammet, André and Rita . . . . . . . . . . . . . James, Bob and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James, Tony and Aimee. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Janjigian, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janklow, Mort and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . Javits, Eric Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennings, Mitch and Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Elizabeth “Libet”. . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Jamie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Richard and Sessa von Richthofen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnson, Woody and Suzanne.. . . . . . . . Jones, Peter and Leslie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jones, Ann Dexter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan, Vernon and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan, Jerry and Darlene. . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph, Ken and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph, Wendy and Jeffrey Ravetch . . . . Jurdem, Ann and Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . .

K

Kanavos, Paul and Dayssi . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaplan, Ed and Nathalie Gerschel. . . . . Kargman, Harry and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kassimir, Joel and Robin. . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaufman, George and Mariana . . . . . . . Kauffman, Jeff and Christine . . . . . . . . . Kean, Roy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keating, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keith, Jayne Teagle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keller, David and Avery . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kellogg, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kellogg, Chris and Vicki. . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelly, Keith and Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kemble, Phoebe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kempner, Tommy and Ann . . . . . . . . . . Kempner, Tom and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . Kennedy, Michael and Eleanora. . . . . . . Keesee, Konrad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kessler, Howard and Michele. . . . . . . . . Khosrovani, Hashem and Kate. . . . . . . . Kier, Joel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kirkpatrick, Stuart and Meg. . . . . . . . . . Kissinger, Henry and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . Kivlan, Elizabeth Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Klenk, Clifford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kluge, Samantha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knechtel, Tom and Kerith Davies . . . . . Kneisel, Bill and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Koch, David and Julia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kopelman, Arie and Coco . . . . . . . . . . . Kors, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korte, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kotur, Alexandra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kosner, Ed and Julie Baumgold . . . . . . . Kotts, Jacqueline and Allan Li . . . . . . . . . Kramer, Terry Allen and Nick Simunek. Kravis, Henry and Marie-Josée. . . . . . . . Krementz, Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 101


The Guests Clockwise from top left: A painting of Cornelia Guest by Richard Stone Reeves decorates Templeton; C.Z. Guest at a Frick Collection event; a portrait of C.Z. Guest from 1959; Winston Frederick Churchill Guest, husband of C.Z. and father of Cornelia, was a polo player; Cornelia Guest and her mother, C.Z. Guest, photographed by Harry Benson in 1976.

Goodman stand today. The avenue was soon known as Vanderbilt Row. The Vanderbilt houses on Fifth Avenue were only the beginning of residential projects that set a record in grandeur and splendor for any American family. The children of William H. built fabulous houses and estates all over the East Coast of America, for themselves and for their children. They include the Breakers, Marble House, and Rough Point in Newport; the Biltmore in North Carolina; Shelburne Farms in Vermont; and a variety of buildings along the Hudson, in the Berkshires, and out on Long Island, plus several palatial villas in Florida. Money was no object. Furthermore, within eight years of the Commodore’s passing, William H. doubled the value of his inheritance. When he died suddenly on an early December day in 1885, he left more than $200 million. So, the Vanderbilts built their way into 102 QUEST

society with architectural monuments, which they quaintly called “houses” and “cottages.” In 1894, Alva Vanderbilt took it one step further: she merged the name into the Spencer-Churchill family by forcing her only daughter, Consuelo, to marry the 9th Duke of Marlborough, whose ancestral home, Blenheim Palace, outclassed all of the family’s spectacular residences. Continuing to raise the bar, when dispensing invitations to Consuelo’s wedding, Alva also snubbed almost all of the Vanderbilt relatives, who included the father of the bride. He was allowed only to escort his daughter to the altar and immediately thereafter depart from the wedding and the reception. In the 1890s, tired of her husband’s philandering, Alva divorced Willie K. and married an old family friend and Newport neighbor, Oliver H.P. Belmont. Until Alva, no woman in society had survived a divorce. With her new marriage, Alva

left her old mansions behind and built new ones. Then, by the early 20th century, tiring of society, she plunged into suffrage causes and became one of the early feminist leaders in the U.S. In terms of procreation, the Vanderbilts take the dynastic prize. There are thousands of descendents of the Commodore today with quite a few still bearing the name—including Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman, Gloria Vanderbilt, and Alfred Vanderbilt III. Currently, the most famous of the Vanderbilt descendents is Gloria’s son, the CNN news anchor Anderson Cooper. The Whitney dynasty began with the friendship between an ambitious young man from New England, William Collins Whitney, who attended Yale University, and his classmate, another young man from a wealthy Cleveland family named Oliver Payne. Payne’s maternal grandfather had been John Jacob Astor’s


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Krieger, Stephanie and Brian Stewart . . Krim, Dr. Matilda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kroft, Steve and Jennet Conant . . . . . . . Krusen, Will and Elizabeth. . . . . . . . . . . Krusen, Charlie and Kristen . . . . . . . . . . Kurtiss, Hans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kushner, Jared and Ivanka Trump . . . . .

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LaForce, James and Stephen Henderson Lamphere, Lucy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Landrigan, Ward and Judith. . . . . . . . . . Landrigan, Nico and Kimberly. . . . . . . . Lane, Kenneth Jay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langenberg, Margo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langham, Keith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langone, Ken and Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . . Lansing, Mrs. Gerrit (Sydie). . . . . . . . . . Lansing, Gerrit and Patricia . . . . . . . . . . Lapham, Lewis and Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . Lapham, Andrew and Caroline . . . . . . . Lapham, Winston P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Larner, Lionel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Latham, Aaron and Leslie Stahl . . . . . . . Lauder, Jane and Kevin Warsh. . . . . . . . Lauder, Leonard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauder, Ronald and Jo Carole . . . . . . . . Lauren, Ralph and Ricky . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren, David and Lauren Bush . . . . . . Lauren, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence, Jeanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leach, Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LeClerc, Paul and Dr. Judith Ginsberg . LeConey, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leatherman, Bill and Elizabeth . . . . . . . Leeds, Thomas and Heather. . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Denise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Richard and Karen . . . . . . . . . . LeFrak, Jamie and Caroline Bierbaum. . LeFrak, Harrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lehman, Wendy Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . Leidy, Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leidy, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leidy, Chris and Robert Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . Lenz, I. Dolly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leone, Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lesesne, Cap and Briana. . . . . . . . . . . . . L’Esperance, Ros and Fran . . . . . . . . . . . Leventhal, Andrew and Natalie Leeds. . Leviant, Jacques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leviant, Sasha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Levine, Noel and Harriette. . . . . . . . . . . Lewis, Memrie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liberman, Bobby and Barbara . . . . . . . . Lickle, Bill and Renee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lickle, Garrison duPont . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Liebman, Pamela. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Limbocker, Derek and Nicole . . . . . . . . Linclau, Joan and Ronald . . . . . . . . . . . Lindemann, George and Frayda . . . . . . Lindemann, Elizabeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindstrom, Pia and John Carley. . . . . . . Lloyd, Ewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Logatto, Jim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Long, Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Long, William Ivey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lorber, Howard and Thea . . . . . . . . . . . Loring, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lowry, Glenn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Love, Iris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lufkin, Dan and Cynthia . . . . . . . . . . . . Luter, Joe and Karin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lyden, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynne, Michael and Nina . . . . . . . . . . . .

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MacGuire, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Peter J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Pierce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MacGuire, Kevin and Sally. . . . . . . . . . . Mack, Ambassador Earle and Carol . . . Mackay, Rory and Francie Leidy . . . . . . Macklowe, Julie and Billy . . . . . . . . . . . MacRae, Cameron and Ann . . . . . . . . . . Maddock, Charlie and Caroline Sylvester Maddock, Jay and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maddock, Locke and Lily. . . . . . . . . . . . Magrino, Susan and Jim Dunning . . . . . Mahoney, Hillie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mailman, Phyllis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Malloy, Tim and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maltese, Tony and Cynthia . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Charles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manger, Dr. William and Lynn . . . . . . . . Manice, Peter and Celeste . . . . . . . . . . . Manice, Christopher and Elizabeth . . . . Mann, Bill and Anna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mann, Steve and Sharyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manning, Tony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marchessini, Alexander and Genevieve Faure . . . . . . . . . . . Marino, Peter and Jane Trapnell . . . . . . Marlborough, The Duke and Duchess of Marron, Donald and Catie . . . . . . . . . . .

Martinez, Roman and Helena. . . . . . . . . Martins, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maschmeyer, Troy and Debby . . . . . . . . Mashek, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mason, Alice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mason, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massey, Mrs. Jack (Alyne). . . . . . . . . . . . Masson, Charles Jr. and Cristina . . . . . . Maxey, Talbott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maxwell, Ghislaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May, Tony and Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mazor, Boaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mazzola, Alison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McBean, Edith and Hank Lowenstein. . McCaffrey, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCarty, Michael and Kim. . . . . . . . . . . McCarty, Michael R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCarthy, Brian and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloskey, Michael and Holly. . . . . . . . McCloy, Jay and Stewart . . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloy, John and Laura. . . . . . . . . . . . . McCloy, Rush and Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . McDonough, Michael and Pandy . . . . . McFadden, Cynthia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McFadden, Mrs. George (Carol) . . . . . . McFadden, Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McGrath, Tom and Diahn . . . . . . . . . . . McHenry, Barnabas and Bannie. . . . . . . McIlvane, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKnight, Bill and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . McMakin, Leigh and Mimi. . . . . . . . . . . McMullan, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McLaughry, Bill and Nicole . . . . . . . . . . McNeely, George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McPherson, Stephen and Tina . . . . . . . . McSweeney, Thayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meehan, Michael J. II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mehle, Aileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mehta, Sonny and Gita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meier, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meiland, Lisa and Andy Martin . . . . . . . Meister, Todd and Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mejia, Alberto and Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . Mejia, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melhado, Frederick and Virginia . . . . . . Melhado, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melling, Meredith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mellon, Mrs. Paul (Bunny) . . . . . . . . . . . Mellon, Matthew and Nicole . . . . . . . . . Melwani, Anjali and Prakash . . . . . . . . . Mercer, Dabney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mercer, Tinsley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Merck, Laddie and Dede . . . . . . . . . . . . Merrill, Dina and Ted Hartley . . . . . . . . Merrill, Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mettler, Mr. John W. II (Speedy) . . . . . . Meyer, Blair and Eliza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 103


The Warburgs Clockwise from top left: Felix Moritz Warburg (1871-1937); bridesmaids at the wedding of Walter Nathan Rothschild to Carola Warburg in 1916; Mr. and Mrs. Felix Moritz Warburg, S.W. Rosendale, and Edward Warburg; Abraham Moritz Warburg, circa 1900; Frederick Warburg Peters with his mother, Phyllis Rothschild Farley, and daughter, Clelia Warburg Peters; a registration certificate for Siegmund George Warburg, who fled Germany in 1934, emigrating to the United Kingdom.

main competitor in the fur trade. Aside from the frequent speculation that Payne, a lifelong bachelor, was in love with his classmate, Whitney, the friendship led to the marriage of Whitney to Payne’s sister, Flora. Payne left college to join the Civil War, after which he went into business with another Clevelander named John D. Rockefeller. So great was Payne’s wealth by the time his sister married Whitney that he gifted the couple with a mansion on the southwest corner of 57th Street and Fifth Avenue, where they kept an apartment for him. The Whitneys’ first-born son, Harry Payne, grew up to marry Gertrude Vanderbilt, who had been raised in the palace across the street. Whitney was a charmer with political, social, and financial ambitions. After Yale, he got a law degree from Harvard. Through his school connections (and 104 QUEST

Oliver Payne), he made a fortune, mainly as a speculator in mass transit in New York. From 1885 to 1889, he served as Secretary of the Navy under President Grover Cleveland. There was a brief romance with the notion of running for president, which may have been quashed by his reputation for being a philanderer. When Flora died in 1893 after a long, unhappy marriage, her husband soon took up with Edith Randolph, a beautiful widow with two children in her thirties who had previously been the mistress of John Pierpont Morgan. The relationship had its beginnings before Flora’s death. Oliver Payne was outraged by his brother-in-law’s liaison, so much so that he insisted the Whitney children cut their father out of their lives. He succeeded in splitting the children’s allegiance: Harry, the eldest, sided with his father and William Payne (thereafter known as

Payne) sided with his uncle. Ironically, only three years after marrying, Edith Randolph Whitney died a painful and lingering death in 1899 after being thrown from a horse. Her death did not heal the rift between Payne and Whitney, who died five years later in 1904 at age 63, leaving the bulk of his estate to his son, Harry, and daughter, Dorothy. During his lifetime, Whitney acquired thousands of acres of wilderness throughout New England, the Carolinas, and the Adirondacks, which were bequeathed to his son, Harry. The remaining, and still vast, acreage is owned today, a century later, by Marylou Whitney Hendrickson, the fifth and final wife of Harry and his wife Gertrude’s son, Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney. In 1902, Whitney’s second son, Payne, married Helen Hay, daughter of John Hay,


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Mezzacappa, Damon and Katherine Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michaels, Sam and Anita . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Michel of Yugoslavia . . . . . . . . . . Michener, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middleton, Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Millard, Craig and Michelle . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Courtland and Gina . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Don and Muffy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Frank and Betsy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, John and Emily Altschul . . . . . . . Miller, Leverett and Linda . . . . . . . . . . . Miller, Robert and Chantal . . . . . . . . . . . Milliken, Mrs. Minot (Armene) . . . . . . . Miniter, Sylvester and Gillian . . . . . . . . . Mirabella, Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mirando, Felix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missett, Joe and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mitchell, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mohr, Ian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moinian, Joe and Nazee . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monell, Ambrose and Lili. . . . . . . . . . . . Monell, Ned and Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moore, George and Calvert . . . . . . . . . . Moore, George and Kathie. . . . . . . . . . . Morgan, Alfred and Virginia . . . . . . . . . Morgan, Sue and Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morgenthau, Robert and Lucinda . . . . . Morris, Chappy and Melissa. . . . . . . . . . Morrison, Ham and Mimi van Wyck . . . Morse, Tyler and Rebecca. . . . . . . . . . . . The Mortimers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mowinckel, John and Cheryl . . . . . . . . . Mowinckel, Nino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mulroney, The Hon. Brian and Mila . . . Murdoch, Rupert and Wendi Deng . . . . Murdock, Pamela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murphy, Hebe Dowling and John . . . . . Murray, John and Nancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . Murray, Stephen and Muffie. . . . . . . . . . Musso, Anthony and Carlos . . . . . . . . . . Musso, Lucy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Nederlander, Bob and Pat Cook . . . . . . Nemy, Enid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nesbit, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Newhouses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ney, Ambassador Ed and Pat Wood . . . Ney, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niccolini, Julian and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicholas, Nick and Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . Nichols, Mike and Diane Sawyer . . . . . . Nievera, Mario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Nikolaos of Greece . . . . . . . . . . . Nitze, Bill and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Nitze, Peter and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niven, Fernanda and Mark Henderson. Niven, Fernanda Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niven, Eugenie and Nicholas Goodman Niven, Ellen and Tris Deery . . . . . . . . . . Niven, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Jacques and Anne . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Eliza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, John and Kay. . . . . . . . . . . . Nordeman, Landon and Shannon . . . . . Norman, Jessye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Norwich, Billy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Novogrod, John and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . Nye, Richard and Francesca . . . . . . . . .

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Ober, David and Polly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O’Hagan, Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O’Malley, Hilaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Onet, Polly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orthwein, Chris and Binkie . . . . . . . . . . O’Shaughnessy, William and Nancy. . . . O’Sullivan, Ryan and Palmer . . . . . . . . . Otto, Katharina and Nathan Bernstein. . Ourisman, Mandell and Mary . . . . . . . . Ourisman, Nan and Flo . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Pachios, Chris and Alyson Ross . . . . . . . Paduano, Daniel and Nancy. . . . . . . . . . Page, Blakely and Lindsey . . . . . . . . . . . Pahlavi, Pari-Sima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pakula, Mrs. Alan (Hannah). . . . . . . . . . Palermo, Olivia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paley, Jeff and Valerie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Palitz, Anka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pannill, Bill and Kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papageorgiou, Pavlos and Alexa Hampton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papanicolaou, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . Papanicolaou, Nick Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pardoe, Ted and Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Park, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parsons, Dick and Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . Pattee, Gordon and Dailey . . . . . . . . . . . Patterson, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paull, Harold and Joanne . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Pavlos and Marie Chantal . . . . .

Peabody, Sam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peabody, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pedroso, Alina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peek, Jeff and Liz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peebler, Mrs. Charles (Toni). . . . . . . . . . Pell, Peter J. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennoyer, Peter and Katie . . . . . . . . . . . Perrin, Emmanuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perkin, Mrs. Richard (Leslie) . . . . . . . . . Perkin, Thorne and Tatiana . . . . . . . . . . Perry, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perry, Richard and Lisa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peruggi, Regina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peters, Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peterson, Holly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peterson, Pete and Joan Ganz Cooney. . Petito, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petrie, Carroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petroff, Di and Dr. Steven Butensky . . . Peyrelongue, Guy and Sarah . . . . . . . . . Pfeifer, Chuck and Lisa Crosby . . . . . . . Pfeifle, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pfeifler, Brian and Emilia . . . . . . . . . . . . The Phippses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pickett, John and Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pickett, John O. III and K.C. . . . . . . . . . Picotte, Michael and Margi . . . . . . . . . . Pileggi, Nick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pilkington, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pilkington, Robert and Helen . . . . . . . . Pitt, Pauline Baker and Jerry Seay . . . . . Pittman, Robert and Veronique . . . . . . . Platt, Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plimpton, Mrs. George (Sarah) . . . . . . . Plimpton, Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pomerantz, Ernest and Marie Brenner Ponte, Stan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ponton, Dan and Stephane Castoriano. . Posen, Zac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price, Brett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price, Peter and Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince, Frederick and Diana. . . . . . . . . . Purcell, Tom and Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . Putnam, Bambi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, Nancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, John and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pyne, John and Melinda Mettler . . . . . . Pyne, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Q

Quasha, Diana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Chris and Ann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Tommy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quick, Tricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quinn, Piper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 105


The Brokaws Clockwise from top left: Clare Booth Luce was married to George Tuttle Brokaw from 1923 to 1929; Mr. and Mrs. Howard Crosby Brokaw with daughters Julia, Edna, and Peggy; the Brokaw home at 984 Fifth Avenue; Lucile Brokaw, wife of Irving Brokaw; Alfred “Chappy” Morris, a descendant of the Brokaws; William Gould Brokaw founded Brokaw Brothers Clothing.

Abraham Lincoln’s personal secretary and later ambassador to the Court of St. James under Grover Cleveland and secretary of state under Teddy Roosevelt. The Hays were Clevelanders and old friends of the Paynes. Helen and Payne Whitney had two children: Joan, born in 1903, and John, or “Jock,” born in 1904. They were brought up at 972 Fifth Avenue in a house that still stands, designed by Stanford White and given as a wedding present by Uncle Oliver. In 1917, Oliver Payne died, leaving the bulk of his estimated $178 million fortune to his favored nephew. Thanks to his uncle, Payne Whitney lived a “gentleman’s life,” raising thoroughbreds and maintaining estates in Manhasset, Long Island; Louisville, 106 QUEST

Kentucky; and Thomasville, Georgia. Well-liked, he was a frequent—often anonymous—contributor to educational and charitable institutions, which included Yale, New York Hospital, and New York Public Library, to which he contributed the enormous sum of $12 million in 1923. He died young—in 1927 at age 51— leaving an estate of $127 million, then the largest ever probated in the U.S. Helen Hay Whitney became the exemplar of “Old Society,” albeit quietly, eschewing fanfare, splitting her time between 972 Fifth Avenue and Greentree, the family estate in Manhasset, until her death in 1944. In her later years, she was an obsessive baseball fan who liked nothing better than sitting and listening to the games on the radio. It rubbed off;

her daughter Joan Whitney Payson was the founder of the New York Mets. The third generation of Whitneys, with Cornelius Vanderbilt, his sister Flora, their cousins Joan and Jock, were glamorous New York socialites with their own racing stables, country estates, houses in town, multiple business and cultural interests, and celebrated friends. Jock was the quintessential “gentleman” of the 20th century: rich, fun-loving, and generous. After World War II, he started a company to invest in start-ups created by returning vets. The project was initially called Adventure Capital, from which the term “venture capital” was sprung. In the 1930s, Jock married the Philadelphia beauty Elizabeth “Liz” Altemus and formed a production


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Radziwill, John and Eugenie. . . . . . . . . . Radziwill, Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radziwill, Phillip and Devon Shuster . . Rafferty, John and Emily. . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafferty, Nick and Caroline . . . . . . . . . . Ramirez, Diane and Sam. . . . . . . . . . . . . Ramirez, Sam Jr. and Fabiana. . . . . . . . . Rapp, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ray, David Warren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rayner, William and Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . Raynes, Patty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reginato, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reeves, Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reid, Brandon and Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . Remnick, David and Esther Fein . . . . . . Retz, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richardson, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richter, John and Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rickel, Annette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Right, Andrew and Zibby . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivers, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Bill and Scarlett . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Wyndham and Chuck Whittingham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Julian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robertson, Spencer and Sarah . . . . . . . . Robertson, Jay and Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Rockefellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roehm, Carolyne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rogers, Elizabeth Barlow . . . . . . . . . . . . Rogers, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohatyn, Felix and Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . Romanoff, Princess Alexander (Mimi). . Rondina, William D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Andrew and Jill . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Tobie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roosevelt, Teddy and Serena . . . . . . . . . Rose, Alexandra Lind and Louis . . . . . . Rose, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rose, Marshall and Candice Bergen. . . . Rose, Tanner and Ross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosen, Aby and Samantha Boardman. . Rosenthal, Shirley Lord . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosenthal, Mitch and Sarah . . . . . . . . . . Rosenwald, John and Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosita, Duchess of Marlborough . . . . . . Ross, Mrs. Arthur (Janet) . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Burke and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Nanette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Stephen and Kara . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross, Wilbur and Hilary Geary . . . . . . . Rosselli, John and Bunny Williams . . . . Rousseau, Lilly Pulitzer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rowley, Cynthia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Royce, Chuck and Deborah . . . . . . . . . .

Royall, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rudin, William and Ophelia. . . . . . . . . . Rumbough, Stanley and Janna . . . . . . . . Rutherfurd, Guy and Daisy . . . . . . . . . . Rutherfurd, Winthrop and Mary . . . . . . Ruttenberg, Eric and Perri Peltz . . . . . . Ryan, Baird and Alexia Hamm. . . . . . . . Ryan, Allen IV and Christa. . . . . . . . . . . Ryan, D.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Saint-Amand, Elisabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Amand, Emilia and Fred Krimendahl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Amand, Nathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saltzman, Ellin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sanchez, Jorge and Serina. . . . . . . . . . . . Sandberg, Bill and Betsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sanger, Alex and Jeanette . . . . . . . . . . . . Santo Domingo, Beatrice and Julio Mario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Santo Domingo, Alejandro . . . . . . . . . . Santo Domingo, AndrĂŠs and Lauren . . Saunders, Andrew and Colleen . . . . . . . Scaasi, Arnold and Parker Ladd. . . . . . . Scaife, Frances and Tom McCarter . . . . Scarborough, Charles and Ellen. . . . . . . Schaeffer, Marcia Meehan . . . . . . . . . . . Schaeffer, Georgina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scherer, Allan and Maggy . . . . . . . . . . . . The Schiffs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schlesinger, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schlossberg, Edwin and Caroline Kennedy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schmitz, Jan Patrick and Nathalie . . . . . Schorr, Burwell and Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . Schuler, John and Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schulhof, David and Lesley . . . . . . . . . . Schulhof, Jonathan and K.K. . . . . . . . . . Schumacher, Joel and Barbara Cirkva . . Schwarzman, Stephen and Christine . . Schwarzman, Teddy and Ellen Zajac . . . Scribner, Charlie and Ritchie . . . . . . . . . Scully, Dennis and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . Scully, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senbahar, Izak and Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . Shapiro, Daniel and Agnes Gund . . . . . Shaw, Claude and Lara Meiland. . . . . . . Sherrill, Steve and Kitty . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sherrill, Mrs. Virgil (Betty) . . . . . . . . . . . Shields, Didi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shields, Olympia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shields, Joseph and Maury . . . . . . . . . . . Shuman, Stan and Sydney. . . . . . . . . . . . Sidamon-Eristoff, Anne and Constantine Siegel, Herb and Jeanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Siegal, Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Silvers, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simonds, Christian and Gillian Hearst. . Simonds, Talbott and Carter . . . . . . . . . Singer, Mortimer and Amy . . . . . . . . . . . Sitrick, James and Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slater, Anne and John Cahill . . . . . . . . . Slonem, Hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Mrs. Earl E.T. (Lesly) . . . . . . . . . Smith, Emily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, John C. and Diane. . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smith, Mrs. Page (Jayne) . . . . . . . . . . . . Snow, Ian and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snyder, Jay and Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snyder, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Som, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sondes, Sharon and Geoffrey Thomas . . Soper, Jared and Linda Lane . . . . . . . . . Soros, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soros, Paul and Daisy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South, Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spahn, Steve and Connie . . . . . . . . . . . . Spahn, Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spalding, Charles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speer, Ramsey C. and Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer, John and Natalie . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer, Steve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stafford, Mimi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stahl, Bill and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stark, Andrea and John . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stark, Candice and Steven . . . . . . . . . . . Stein, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Richard and Renee . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Saul and Gayfryd. . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Jonathan and Maria Bartiromo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Kathryn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinberg, Michael and Joan. . . . . . . . . . Steinbrech, Doug and Jeff Sharp . . . . . . Steinhart, Percy III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stenbeck, Max, Hugo, and Sophie. . . . . Stephenson, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephenson, George and Shelia . . . . . . . Sterling, Mika . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stern, Leonard and Allison. . . . . . . . . . . Stevens, Marti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stevenson, Charles and Alex . . . . . . . . . Stewart, Martha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 107


The Bakers Clockwise from top left: George Fisher Baker (1840-1931); Edith Brevoort Kane, on a horse, married George Fisher Baker, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. George Fisher Baker, Jr., walking together; sisters Callie and Asia Baker, members of the Baker family.

company with his cousin, Sonny, called Pioneer Pictures, which backed the first Technicolor feature, Becky Sharp. Whitney, who partnered with David O. Selznick to produce some of Hollywood’s classics, had the foresight to buy film rights to an unpublished novel called Gone With The Wind. Such investments expanded Jock Whitney’s inheritance greatly. In 1940, divorced from Liz Whitney, Jock married Betsey Cushing Roosevelt, daughter of Dr. Harvey Cushing (America’s first brain surgeon) and ex-wife of James Roosevelt (son of Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt). The three Cushing Sisters, as they were known, were famous for their marriages. Betsey wed a Roosevelt and a Whitney, Minnie (the eldest) wed Vincent Astor, and Barbara, or “Babe,” wed the patrician Stanley Mortimer and William S. Paley, founder of CBS. Cleveland Amory, in his best-selling Who Killed Society?, opined that society was “killed” by publicity or what he called “publiciety,” and people like the Cushing sisters who were always in the news. By then, however, society had also bifurcated into the old families and “café society,” a term probably invented in the 1930s by Maury Paul, a society columnist who wrote under the nom de plume of Cholly Knickerbocker for Hearst Corporation. William S. Paley was first a member 108 QUEST

of the latter group, but then divorced his wife of 15 years, Dorothy Hart Hearst, and married Barbara Cushing Mortimer. Their union imbued the socially ambitious Paley with a sense of equal footing to Astor and Whitney. Paley, who died in 1990 at age 89, outlived them all, except for his first wife and his sister-in-law, Betsey Whitney. Jews were mainly excluded in those so-called glory days of New York society. A rare exception was August Belmont, who came from Europe in the mid-19th century as the agent for the Rothschilds. He avoided any outward reference or practice of worship to his birth family’s religion and his son, Oliver H.P. Belmont, later married Alva Vanderbilt. By the end of the 19th century, a number of enterprising and entrepreneurial Jewish businessmen had acquired great prominence and financial power in New York. Still ignored socially—but not business-wise—by their Christian brethren, these families formed what was privately referred to as “Our Crowd,” as

noted by author Stephen Birmingham. In many ways, these families were far more culturally and intellectually sophisticated than their non-Jewish counterparts. Otto Kahn, for example, practically single-handedly kept the Metropolitan Opera alive for decades even though he was not allowed to own an opera box for many years because he was Jewish. (When given the opportunity, he declined, preferring his seat in the orchestra.) Their philanthropic activities far exceeded almost all of their financial peers with the exception of John D. Rockefeller and Vincent Astor, setting the tone for modern charity in New York. Most notable among these families were the Warburgs, members of the centuriesold banking family from Hamburg, Germany. They became one of the most philanthropic families of the 20th century, up there with the Rockefellers in influence and impact on the community. Two of five brothers, Felix and Paul, came to this country in the 1890s and forged relationships through business


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Stewart, Serena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. John, Whitney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stoddard, Alexandra and Peter Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stokes, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stolley, Dick and Lise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stolman, Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stribling, Elizabeth and Guy Robinson Strong, Marianne (Mimi) . . . . . . . . . . . . Stubbs, Michael and Ronnie. . . . . . . . . . Stubgen, Patrick and Dana. . . . . . . . . . . Suarez, Raul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sullivan, John and Nonie . . . . . . . . . . . . Sullivan, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sulzberger, Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summers, Peter and Ann . . . . . . . . . . . . Surtees, Willie and Pam . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sutton, Kelso and Jo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swid, Stephen and Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sykes, James W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

T

Tadini, Luigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tailer, Mrs. T. Suffern (Jean) . . . . . . . . . Talese, Gay and Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Talley, AndrĂŠ Leon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tang, Oscar and Frances . . . . . . . . . . . . Tannen, Sheldon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tarr, Jeff and Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taubman, Alfred and Judy . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Felicia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Rhetta and Dan Marantette . . . . Taylor, Topsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Zach and Missie . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor, Jack and Barbara Bryant. . . . . . . Ternes, Jim and Marge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry, Walter B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teryazos, Chris and Bellinda . . . . . . . . . Thaw, Mrs. Harry (Lee) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theodoracopulos, Harry and Gail . . . . . Theodoracopulos, Taki and Alexandra. . Theodoracopulos, Alexis. . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Andrew and Kathy. . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas, Rich and Tamie Peters . . . . . . . Tighe, Aaron and Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Tisches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tober, Donald and Barbara . . . . . . . . . . Tomenson, Walter S. III . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tompkins, Evelyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tower, Whitney Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Townsend, Alair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Townsend, Chuck and Jill. . . . . . . . . . . . Trafelet, Remy and Lara . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trump, Donald and Melania . . . . . . . . . Trump, Blaine and Steve Simon . . . . . . .

Tuckerman, Roger and Edith . . . . . . . . . Twombly, Alessandro and Soledad . . . .

U

Ulmann, Edward and Priscilla . . . . . . . . Unterberg, Ann and Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . Uzielli, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

V

van Amerongen, Lewis and Diane . . . . . van der Mije, Alexis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Van Pelt, Mary and Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . van Rensselaer, Kiliaen D.. . . . . . . . . . . . van Schaack, Gregory and Lucienne . . . van Wyck, Bronson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vanden Heuvel, William and Melinda . . vanden Heuvel, Katrina . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderbilt, Gloria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderbilt, Jean Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanderpoel, Wynant and Barrie . . . . . . . Varnedoe, Kurt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronis, John and Lauren. . . . . . . . . . . . Vietor, David and Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . Vittadini, Gianluigi and Adrienne . . . . . von Auersperg, Alex and Nancy . . . . . . von Bidder, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . von der Goltz, Andreas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . von Stade, Skiddy and Elizabeth . . . . . .

W

Wadia, Dinyar and Gool . . . . . . . . . . . . Walden, Eric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walker, Liz and Ed Swenson . . . . . . . . . Wallace, Mrs. Mike (Mary). . . . . . . . . . . Waller, Alexis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walsh, Dr. Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walters, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warburton, Tim and Julia . . . . . . . . . . . Ward, Liz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ward, Arthur and Kristina . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Philip and Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Philip W. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Christina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warner, Sandy and Patsy . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterman, Richard and Lis . . . . . . . . . . Wathne, Thorunn, Soffia, and Berge . . . Wattleton, Faye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Webster, Joe and Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webster, Peter and Martha . . . . . . . . . . Weekes, Chris and Lilly Bunn . . . . . . . . Weill, Sanford and Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weintraub, Ronald and Harriet . . . . . . . Weld, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wellner, Karl and Deborah Norville . . . Wells, Linda and Charles Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wenner, Jann and Matt Nye . . . . . . . . . . Weymouth, Lally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitehead, John and Cynthia . . . . . . . . Whitney, Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitney, Mary Lou and John Hendrickson . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitney, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilkie, Angus and Len Morgan . . . . . . . Williams, Gene and Jackie . . . . . . . . . . . Wilmers, Robert G.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilmot, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilson, Kevin and Alexandra Wilkis . . . Wilson, Kendrick R. III . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wilson, Jay and Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . Wintour, Anna and Shelby Bryan. . . . . . Wister, Billy and Diana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Witmer, Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolfe, Tom and Sheila . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Natasha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wolff, Peter I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wood, Renee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Woods, Ward Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wrightsman, Jayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyatt, Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyser-Pratte, Vivian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Y

Yealland, Daniel and Liska. . . . . . . . . . . Ylvisaker, Jon and Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . Yurman, David and Sybil . . . . . . . . . . . . Yurman, Evan and Ku-Ling Siegal. . . . .

Z

Zachary, Frank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zacharias, Tom and Clelia . . . . . . . . . . . Zeckendorf, Arthur and Connie. . . . . . . Zeckendorf, Will and Laura . . . . . . . . . . Zenko, John and Jere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zenko, Starrett and Petter Ringbom . . . Zilkha, Bettina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zilkha, Ezra and Cecile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zinterhofer, Eric and Aerin Lauder . . . Zirinis, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zuckerman, Mort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zug, James W. Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUGUST 2012 109


400 THE QUEST

In Memoriam A

Aaron, Roger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B

Bohannon, Kathryn Macpherson . . . . .

C

Capehart, Lucien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cohen, Robert B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coleman, Leighton, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E

Ephron, Nora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F

Flynn, Amy Mazzola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H

Hadley, Albert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harris, Leonard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hetherington, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hitchens, Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J

Jobs, Steve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

K

Kaplan, Zelda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

L

Lauder, Evelyn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

N

Newcomber, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R

Read, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ribicoff, Casey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rochas, Helene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S

Sendak, Maurice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

W

Wallace, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webster, Roger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winslow, John G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 QUEST


The Whitneys Clockwise from top left: Marylou and Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney; Mr. and Mrs. Cornerlius Vanderbilt Whitney in Saratoga, New York; Marylou Whitney in Hollywood; a painting of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney by John Everett Millais; Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, an artist herself, founded the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1931; Harry Payne Whitney; William Collins Whitney in 1885; Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney; Gertrude, again.

and marriage with the Loebs, the Schiffs, the Seligmanns, the Lehmans, Otto Kahn, Jules Bache, and other prominent Jewish families in New York. The Jewish Museum on 92nd Street and Fifth Avenue was the home of Felix and Frieda Schiff Warburg. The Warburg descendents married almost entirely outside their religion—another progression in social relationships and what became of “society” in New York. Caroline Astor wouldn’t recognize the society that exists in her New York, a century after her death. Moving with

the speed of light, today’s world wouldn’t recognize her either. The dictum of who was and wasn’t “in” was a provincial holdover reflecting old Christian-Judaic traditions. It still exists in remnants that are almost entirely political in purpose, but it lacks the foresight that explains the dynamic of the society that is New York. Lina Astor’s rival and successor, Alva Vanderbilt, trumped her there also, turning to what became the liberating force for everyone. It was Alva, after all, who divorced a Vanderbilt and married a

man with Jewish origins. It was Alva who, in the late 1920s, mentored the young aspiring playwright Clare Boothe Brokaw to forsake society and pursue her personal ambitions. Within a few short years, the young divorcée summed it all up in a hit play called The Women and married Henry Luce, a rising publisher who became the titan of American media. And it was Alva who marched in the front of the parade for women’s independence and their right to vote, which changed everything for all of us, forever. Fait accompli. u AUGUST 2012 111


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N

This page: A pair of water lilies; the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden (inset). Opposite page: A photograph of Claude Monet on his bridge.

LIFE IMITATING ART BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


AUGUST 2012 113


This page: Foxgloves bloomed in the glasshouse at the New York Botanical Garden in May and June. Opposite page: “The Artist’s Garden in Giverny,” by Claude Monet, from the Yale University Art Gallery, is on display at the Rondina Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library.


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N

“I PERHAPS OWE having become a painter to flowers,”

said Claude Monet (1840-1926), the artist whose name is synonymous with Impressionism. The artist—and the artist’s subjects—are being celebrated in “Monet’s Garden,” which opened on May 19 at the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden. Curated by professor Paul Hayes Tucker, the exhibition is a study of the scenery in Giverny, France, supplemented by the works of Claude Monet, among other items. Impressionism is defined as “a theory or practice in painting especially among French painters of about 1870 of depicting the natural appearances of objects by means of dabs or strokes

of primary unmixed colors in order to simulate actual reflected light.” Claude Monet was a master of the technique, creating pictures that evoked the tenor of the scene without acting as a replica. In “Monet’s Garden,” the juxtaposition of the actual flora with the artist’s realization of them is illuminating. Visitors are beckoned to participate in the process, digesting nature and its lushness just as an Impressionist would. Sun ripples across the exhibition, which is decorated with the same species of plants that Claude Monet himself tended. And, like the artist’s garden, it changes seasonally. In May and June, delphiniums, foxgloves, irises, poppies, and roses brightened the greenhouse as bamboo shoots, flowering AUGUST 2012 115


Botanical Garden; preparing the Conservatory Courtyard Pools for water lilies; Claude Monet, photographed with a palette like the one on display in the exhibition; climbing roses, in a variety of colors; dahlias, nasturtiums, and sunflowers will greet visitors in September and October; an installation of the artist’s bridge; a photograph of Claude Monet in his garden in Giverny, France.

shrubs, and willow trees were on view around installations of the artist’s bridge and “grand allée;” in July and August, the Conservatory Courtyard Pools featured a variety of water lilies encircled by dahlias, nasturtiums, and sunflowers; and, in September and October, chrysanthemums and salvias will grace the grounds. “The Artist in the Garden,” which speaks to the connection between artist and subjects, includes two paintings in the Rondina Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library: “Irises,” from a private collection in Switzerland, and “The Artist’s

116 QUEST

Garden in Giverny,” from the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition also features Claude Monet’s palette and a series of black-and-white photographs that captured him and his gardens. “The gardens remained a constant in his life,” says Tucker of Claude Monet’s relationship with the greenery. “He tended to them lovingly and with plenty of money and with hired hands. So they became something larger than themselves. And his efforts right up to his death in 1926 to be able to paint their poetry, their prose, their splendor reminds us not only of his diligence, duty, and discipline, but likewise of his devotion to something that is larger than all of us.” “Monet’s Garden” is a comprehensive accomplishment, between the colorful, floriferous panoramas and the grayscale depictions inherited from the turn of the century—a vibrant visit to the 19th-century Europe that inspired Claude Monet, accessible from New York City through October 21. u

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N

These pages, clockwise from top left: An exterior view of the New York


MONTH 2008 00


118 QUEST CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N


“The gardens remained a constant in his life. He tended to them lovingly and with plenty of money and with hired hands. So they became larger than themselves.”

This page: “Irises,” by Claude Monet, from a private collection in Switzerland, is on display at the Rondina Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library at the New York Botanical Garden. Opposite page: Different flowers bloomed with the seasons in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.


AN ODE TO EDITH

This page: Edith Wharton in New York City. Opposite page: The New York Society Library is honoring the author with an exhibition called “Edith Wharton’s New York City: A

BY MARC LEWINSTEIN

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Backward Glance.”


This year marks the 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton’s birth. And, from her home at The Mount to the New York Society Library, celebrations abound for this much-admired author.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E M O U N T; CO U RT E S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K S O C I E T Y L I B R A RY

I HAVE LIVED MY LIFE through Edith Wharton’s eyes, or, at the very least, through a pair of eyes that have spent much time looking upon the same views as hers, largely unchanged over the last 150 years. The scenes I spy from my windows are mostly the same as those Wharton, as my New York and Newport next-door neighbor—separated by more than a century in time but a matter of yards in geography—gazed upon at the turn of the last century. The human comedy that plays out upon the streets of Gramercy Park and the lawns fronting Cliff Walk is much the same, although modified for an age where Rose Bar stands on the site of Edith’s drawing room and Facebook is making inroads on the Social Register. Edith Newbold Jones was born into a family with which everyone wanted to keep up (yes, those Joneses), and from which she herself wanted to get as far away as possible. She rejected the strictures of her day, a time when genius was “of small use to a woman who does not know how to do her hair.” She helped to revolutionize the stuffy Victorian interior decoration of her youth, authoring The Decoration of Houses with Ogden Codman, and illuminated

burgeoning female independence by bringing the scandalous Madame Olenska into sharp relief with her guileless cousin May Welland in The Age of Innocence. For her Newport house, she sought a location as far away as possible from her mother and so far away from the bustling social center that “Land’s End” was the only fitting name for it. Writing in the first decades of the last century, Wharton cast a gimlet eye on the society in which she was raised. Nineteenth-century New York, spurred to growth by a civil war, was rapidly fading as a world war erased its vestiges and a mechanized 20th century accelerated the pace of life from afternoons of operettas, musicales, and calling cards to automobiles, airplanes, and skyscrapers. Wharton wrote without nostalgia or sentimentality for the proscriptions of decades past and laid bare the hypocrisies that led to tragic consequences for those who did not conform to the era’s mores. Much as she sought to escape the suffocating insularity of New York and Newport Society with a capital S by seeking refuge in Europe and at The Mount, in the Berkshires of Lenox, Massachusetts, New York’s milieu provided her with endless material. In honor of Wharton’s 150th birthday, the New York Society


This page: A portrait of Edith Wharton as a child, 1865—a gift from Louis Auchincloss to The Mount—is on view at the New York Society Library (above, left); the New York Society Library on East 79th Street (above, right); a Christmas gift to Wharton in 1872 (below). Opposite, clockwise from top left: George Frederic Jones,

Library, in “Edith Wharton’s New York: A Backward Glance,” has assembled a collection of Wharton’s books, letters, photographs, and portraits that give a glimpse into her family, life, and time. Drawing upon materials on loan from her family and from the collection at The Mount, the library delineates the arc of her life, from a childhood during which her father would borrow books from the Society Library to her years as a young married, wearing the whalebone corsetry of the day. It ultimately reveals her life as a Pulitzer Prize-winning author living in France. The exhibition features several original copies of her own works, as well as books that her family borrowed from the library. Also on view is correspondence between Wharton and her family around the time of World War I. Wharton’s New York roots reach back to Colonial times. In many ways, the New York that knew Wall Street as its boundary remained unchanged as its perimeter extended northward to 14th Street, then 23rd Street, then 96th Street, and beyond. For a certain kind of New Yorker, New York is not an escape from another world, whether one is 122 QUEST

in the mold of a Holly Golightly, a Vito Corleone, or merely an innocuous, hardworking immigrant from abroad or from west of the Hudson. It is about home, with all its welcoming pleasures and chafing constraints. Although the wily newcomer occasionally succeeds at gaining a foothold in the firmament, Wharton’s world, as much as any clan, rarely opens itself to outsiders. As Wharton wrote in The Age of Innocence, “In reality they all lived in a kind of hieroglyphic world, where the real thing was never said or done or even thought, but only represented by a set of arbitrary signs.” The network of families, societies, and clubs still exists; the hieroglyphs are still learned and interpreted; and the stories that unfold behind the walls of these gatherings are timeless, making Wharton’s observations of her contemporaries and antecedents as relevant today as they were upon first publication. The exhibition and The Mount’s collection serve as much as a window on our time as relics of a prior era, and Wharton’s relevance remains strong, even 150 years after her birth. u For more information on the New York Society Library or The Mount, please visit nysoclib.org or edithwharton.org.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E M O U N T; CO U RT E S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K S O C I E T Y L I B R A RY

Wharton’s father and a member of the New York Society Library; a historic photo; the exhibition on Edith Wharton runs through the end of the year.


C H A R LE S J . Z I G A / CO U RTE S Y O F U N I V E R S E


TIME OF THE SEASONS B Y D A LY R E A R D O N

TOM WOLFE said: “One belongs to New York instantly;

one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years.” In New York, the transition between seasons is less about the changing leaves and fluctuating temperatures and more about how those who inhabit our metropolis change and connect with the city at any given time of year. Both native New Yorkers and passing visitors alike understand that it’s not just the beauty of the city that makes each of the four seasons so special here. Rather, it is something about the distinct feeling that comes along with a change in weather. Spring brings with it a sense of hope; summer, a feeling of excitement and youth; fall, a feeling of warmth and unity; and winter bursts with joy and merriment. In his “picture-book for adults,” The Seasons of New York (Universe), designer and photographer Charles J. Ziga Summer in the park: children play on the remarkable Alice in Wonderland statue in Central Park, a favorite spot in warm-weather months. AUGUST 2012 125


Spring blooms on the avenue: a sign of spring to any New Yorker, bright orange tulips play off the yellow taxis on Park

C H A R LE S J . Z I G A / CO U RTE S Y O F U N I V E R S E

Avenue at 50th Street.


Winter on ice: skaters glide across a rink next to a Christmas tree and pop-up shops, all of which are installed in Bryant Park for the holidays. 128 QUEST

C H A R LE S J . Z I G A / CO U RTE S Y O F U N I V E R S E

demonstrates the oft-quoted edict that a picture is worth a thousand words—or, perhaps more accurately, a thousand feelings. This book offers an intimate portrait of New York City, showing some of the most well-known landmarks in a unique light and revealing some off-the-radar spots from throughout the five boroughs. Ziga’s magnificently colorful images capture the city in such a way that, no matter where you are, you can experience that distinctly “New York” sensation—that feeling of being at the center of it all. u


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

Presented By TRADITIONAL HOME Benefiting SOUTHAMPTON HOSPITAL

Showhouse Dates SUNDAY, JULY 22 - MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 LOCATION: 80 FLYING POINT ROAD, WATER MILL, N.Y. HOURS: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Sunday ADMISSION: $30. Admission fee includes a Journal HOUSE PROVIDED BY: GRANDE DESIGN RESIDENTIAL INC. Children under six, infants, strollers, and pets are not allowed in the Showhouse.

From the East: Take Route 27 West and make a left at the intersection at County Road 39 in Southampton onto Flying Point Road. The house is the first one on the left. From the West: Take the Long Island Expressway to exit 70. Use exit road onto Sunrise Highway; it becomes County Road 39 in Southampton. At the intersection, continue straight and the street will become Flying Point Road. Continue to 80 Flying Point Road. By Hampton Jitney: Frequent Daily Buses run to and from Southampton. For bus reservations and NYC pick-up locations, call: (800) 936-0440 or (631) 283-4600.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E CO R CO R A N G RO U P

Directions to 80 Flying Point Road, Water Mill, N.Y.:


484 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10022 Y 212-838-0650 Y WWW.EBRAUNNEWYORK.COM


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

THE 2012 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE

THE 2012 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE will take place

this summer in Water Mill, N.Y. The Showhouse will be open daily until Labor Day, Monday, September 3. Proceeds will benefit Southampton Hospital, Southampton, N.Y. Mr. Mario Buatta is the Honorary Showhouse Chairman. Mr. Jamie Drake and Ms. Alexa Hampton are the Honorary Design Co-Chairmen. The Showhouse is happy to announce that Traditional Home magazine is the the 2012 Presenting Sponsor. Barlow Tyrie; Circa Lighting; Dacor; Gloster; Hinkley Lighting; Juliska; Karastan; Lillian August; LX.TV Open House NYC; Natural Decorations, Inc.; Pearson; Pratt & Lambert Paints; Raymond Vineyards; The Rug Company; Schumacher; Serena & Lily; Stanton; and Thibaut are the 2012 Sponsors. The Hampton Designer Showhouse, now in its twelfth year, is a showcase for America’s premier design talent. Approximately 25 top

interior designers and decorative artists will turn a lavish shingle-style home into a decorating masterpiece. This year’s Showhouse, located at 80 Flying Point Road in Water Mill, N.Y., has been generously provided by Grande Design Residential Inc. “The summer season is rich with tradition. We are delighted that one of our own traditions includes partnering with the Hampton Designer Showhouse,” says Ann Maine, Editor in Chief of Traditional Home magazine. “This incredible project is a marquee destination on our annual Showhouse Tour. We are privileged to work with the talented designers and generous sponsors of this event to benefit Southampton Hospital year after year.” For more information on the hospital, please visit: southamptonhospital.org.

For more information on the Showhouse and to purchase tickets, please visit: www.hamptondesignershowhouse.com or call (631) 353-3167. For press information, please call Mitchell Manning Associates at (212) 980-1711 or email: info@mitchellmanning.com. All proceeds raised from The Hampton Designer Showhouse will benefit Southampton Hospital. The event is open to the public Sunday, July 22 - Monday, Sept. 3.

Ric Barbatelli

Gretchen Fuss

Tony Manning

Jennifer Mabley

Keith O’Hea

Timothy Brown

Amanda Price

and Stephanie Barbatelli

and Kate Singer

and Janice Langrall

and Austin Handler

and Libby Langdon

and Cesar Gaviria

and Mario Buatta

Steven Stolman, Judy Hadlock

Diane Guariglia

Mario Buatta, Danielle Barr,

Sara Rossi, Jon Walker, Blaire Rzempoluch,

and Louis Renzo

and Mark Guariglia

Robert Passal and Tony Parrotta

Jordan Schaefer and Vicki Hubbard

PATRICK MCMULLAN

THE RUG COMPANY HOSTED A KICKOFF PARTY FOR THE 2012 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE AT THE RUG COMPANY STORE LOCATED AT 88 WOOSTER STREET IN NEW YORK


PRESENTED BY

TRADITIONAL HOME

THE 2012 HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE

THE HAMPTON DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE Foundation, Inc. is led and operated by a

dynamic team of experts from the worlds of marketing, public relations, fundraising, and special events production. This is the 12th year they have combined their talents to produce what is now recognized as one of the country’s most successful showhouses. Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corporation. Anthony Manning is the Showhouse marketing chairman and also president of Mitchell Manning Associates, a full service public relations and marketing agency with a special focus on the home furnishings industry. His realm is the creation of the full-scale public awareness campaign that has propelled the Hampton Designer Showhouse to national prominence in three short years, with phenomenal coverage in local and national newspaper media, home design magazines, and television. He has also directed the packaging and sales of various sponsorships that have linked the Showhouse to a variety of corporations in the publishing, banking, home design, and related fields. The administration of the 1,001 details that comprise the planning and day-to-day man-

Tony Manning; Mary Lynch.

agement of the Showhouse is under the control of the highly talented Mary Lynch, whose background as the director of special events at Southampton Hospital for 12 years makes her uniquely qualified to administer the myriad complexities involved in running a Showhouse. These range from supervising the rejuvenation of the house to coordinating the diverse needs of the designers creating their individual “fantasy space” within the Showhouse. The Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation, Inc. has produced the Hampton Designer Showhouse benefiting Southampton Hospital for ten years, The Designer Showhouse of New Jersey benefiting The John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center for four years, The Greenwich Designer Showhouse benefiting Greenwich Hospital in spring 2007, The Orchard Hill Designer Showhouse benefiting Old Westbury Gardens in spring 2008, and Holiday House benefiting the Greater New York City Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. With this skilled, focused, and hardworking “Dream Team” behind it, the stage is set for this year’s Hampton Designer Showhouse to once again be a spectacular design tour de force.

2012 SPONSOR Traditional Home As the largest upscale shelter magazine in America, Traditional Home celebrates the union of timeless design with modern living inspiring five million design lovers to reinterpret classic elegance in a thoroughly personal way. From home, garden and green living to beauty, entertaining and travel, the magazine is a tribute to quality, craftsmanship, authenticity and family – a trusted resource that respects the past, lives in the present and embraces products designed for the future. Please visit us online at www.TRADhomemag.com or www.traditionalhome.com.


2012 PARTICIPANTS AUDIO COMMAND SYSTEMS INC.

KATE SINGER HOME

PARROTTA DESIGN MANAGEMENT

BAKES AND COMPANY

KATIE LEEDE & CO.

PATRIK LÖNN DESIGNS

CAST CLASSICS

LEE NAJMAN DESIGNS

ROBERT PASSAL INTERIOR & ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

COURLAND DESIGN, INC.

LIBBY INTERIORS, INC.

STEPHEN MOONEY INTERIORS

DYFARI INTERIORS

LILLIAN AUGUST

TAMMY CONNOR INTERIOR DESIGN

GREG MCKENZIE DESIGNS

LUCILLE KHORNAK PHOTOGRAPHY

TARA SEAWRIGHT, INC./INTERIOR DESIGN

HOUSE OF HONEY

MABLEY HANDLER INTERIOR DESIGN

THE LEE W. ROBINSON COMPANY

JEFF LINCOLN INTERIORS, INC.

MARK HUMPHREY GALLERY

TIMOTHY BROWN STUDIO

JENNIFER MCCONNELL

OLD TOWN CROSSING

SHOWHOUSE BOUTIQUE – DELUXE

sponsored by


KLOPP

WHAT THE CHAIRS WEAR Karen Klopp, founder of What2WearWhere.com, revved up this fabulous Formula 1-inspired ensemble for Grand Prix Monaco, Southampton Hospital’s 54th annual Summer Party, in this month’s installment of What The Chairs Wear.

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, start your engines—on August 4, Southampton Hospital hosts its 54th annual Summer Party, Grand Prix Monaco. Benefit chair Laura Lofaro Freeman and executive vice chairs Andrea Greeven Douzet, Tania Higgins, Mary Kathryn Navab, and Marion Piro, as well as their brilliant committee crew, have put together an absolutely winning evening inspired by Monaco’s prestigious Formula 1 race. The attendees at this exciting event will arrive at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy high-octane cocktails, then accelerate to a delicious dinner with dancing to support the Jenny and John Paulson 136 QUEST

Emergency Department. Sponsorship is superbly steered by Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate and Graff Diamonds. With music by the Alex Donner Orchestra, catering by Robbins Wolfe Eventeurs, and design by Steven Stolman, the event will be the premier victory lap of summer soirées. The Jenny and John Paulson Emergency Department provides emergency care to more than 25,000 patients annually. u For more about Southampton Hospital, please contact Kathy Lucas at 631.726.8700 or klucas@southamptonhospital.org.


Vroom, vroom! Engines will be racing as you enter the circuit in this vibrant, Ferrari-red, jewel-shouldered dress from Notte by Marchesa (1). Take the hairpin turns with abandon by accessorizing with these glittering Tiffany & Co. diamond earrings (2) and stunning Tiffany & Co. diamond bracelet (3). Then put the pedal to the metal in your Jimmy Choo “Vamp� strappy sandals (4) and sparkling clutch (5). The Triple Crown of racing will be yours for the taking!


APPEARANCES

LIVIN’ LA DOLCE VITA BY HILARY GEARY OFF TO ITALY, to set sail on the good

Dara Frost showed her work with Garrett Chingery at an exhibit called “Cut and Paste.”

ship Athena for a spin around the glorious Amalfi Coast. You really can’t go wrong in Italy, especially in June, when it is not at all too crowded and the weather is absolute perfection. We headed off with a very jolly group in tow: Anne Hearst and Jay McInerney, Lily and Sunny Marlborough, Robin and John Pickett, and Michele and Howard Kessler. First night, we landed in Naples to stay right in the port at Hotel Vesuvio (recommended by our pal, senator Mario D’Urso, the most popular Italian on earth). This hotel has a wonderful terraced restaurant on the roof overlooking the city and the port, a perfect place to recoup from jetlag. Now, food is always on my mind so I armed myself with a list a restaurants from Allison Stern, who has sailed on her and Leonard’s beautiful Feadship, Lady Allison, up and down the coastline more than anyone I know. Plus, I had recommendations from Susan Telesco and from Kristy and Jim Clark, Athena’s owners, so this trip was really a foodie’s dream! I have to say, Athena is a beauty, nothing short of spectacular—a graceful, brilliantly designed vessel in great taste with a wonderful crew. First night we dined at La Cantinella in Naples, chosen by Jay, who is not only a wine expert (he just penned The Juice: Vinous Veritas and writes a column about wine for the Wall Street Journal), but is also extremely knowledgeable about


Clockwise from left: Wilbur Ross, Lily Marlborough, Anne Hearst McInerney, and Sunny Marlborough aboard Athena; the owner of Quattro Passi with Robin Pickett; Giovanni Russo relaxes outside with a cigar; Harry’s Bar in London, England.

food. Next day, we hopped on the boat and sailed to heavenly Capri to have lunch at Il Riccio, a divine open-air restaurant decorated in blue and white overlooking the water near the Blue Grotto. We poked around Capri and, the next night, headed to dinner at the twostar Ristorante Quattro Passi by Marina di Cantone, with wonderful food and an extremely serious wine cellar. Next stop was lunch with Giovanni Russo and his houseguest Julian Schnabel on his private island—really and truly a paradise—Li Galli. There, we dined al fresco on homemade pasta, grilled fresh fish, and so much more. On to Ravello, where we dined at another two-star treasure: Rossellinis at Palazzo Sasso. The last stop was an old favorite, Il San Pietro de Positano, where we dined on the glorious terrace that looks like it’s right out of a movie set. We said goodbye to Athena and flew to London, which was rocking more than any boat I’ve ever been on! We hit the ground running and went to a beautiful wedding reception for Mariela Tsavliris and Stavros Livanos. Next day, we had lunch at a new hotspot named 34 on Grosvenor Square with Karen and Richard LeFrak and Harry LeFrak before we headed to the hit musical Matilde, which we loved! Next night, Carol and Earle Mack had a big cocktail party at the Ritz with a “Sixties Reunion” theme while Michael Goedhuis opened

an exhibition called “INK—the Art of China” at Saatchi Gallery. Afterward, we had a dinner at Harry’s Bar. Next day, we dined at another terrific new private-member’s establishment, 5 Hertford Street, which has a nightclub in its basement called Loulou’s. This space with multiple floors was created by Robin Birley, son of famed tastemaker Mark Birley. It’s a great big hit! We dined with the LeFraks and spotted David Tang, Larry Gagosian, Diana and Philip Herrai, Michel of Yugoslavia, Leo and Grega Daly, Taki Theodoracopulos, Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner with Annabelle and William Astor, and lots more. Speaking of the Astors, the next day they took us to lunch at the House of Lords. Oh, if those walls could talk! Another night we dined at Lita and George Livanos’s glorious house with its luscious garden filled with white flowers. We also laughed nonstop at One Man, Two Guvnors, danced the night away at Catherine and Nico Kairis’s dinner dance at the Dorchester, and more. There was the Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation festivities, Sunny Marlborough’s picnic, and Lady Bamford’s luncheon. Don’t forget Wimbledon, the Masterpiece Fair and kick-off party, Elton John’s White Tie and Tiara Ball, and more. Back to our shores in Southampton, where the fun was just getting started on July 4th. Pamela Gross and Jimmy

Finkelstein kicked off the celebrations honoring Lally Weymouth’s birthday with a big dinner followed by a little dinner given by Joanne and Roberto de Guardiola at their wonderful house— so beautifully decorated by Joanne, natch! Seems like everyone is wearing short summer dresses in Southampton, probably because of the heat, so Joanne was a star in Dolce & Gabbana and Karen LeFrak looked lovely in white eyelet Oscar de la Renta. After sipping cocktails, it was into their renovated barn to feast on gazpacho, grilled Australian leg of lamb, grilled local vegetables, summer corn salad, and yummy Sip ’n Soda vanilla ice cream with strawberryrhubarb pie! Among the guests were newlyweds Don Graham and Amanda Bennett, Mike Bloomberg and Diana Taylor, Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, Judy and Rudy Giuliani, Wilbur Ross, Richard LeFrak, Georgette Mosbacher, and more. Speaking of Lally, the following night was her fabulous annual summer party that we all look forward to. It is always the party of the year, every year! After sipping cocktails in an oval tent, we headed into a brown-andwhite striped tent created by Bronson van Wyck and a scrumptious buffet by Glorious Food. All in all, a blast! Must mention the party Billy Norwich gave to celebrate “Cut and Paste,” Dora Frost’s wonderful exhibition of her paintings alongside Garrett Chingery’s work. u AUGUST 2012 139


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST From the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens to the heart of Manhattan—the Central Park Zoo—our columnist makes the most of her summer, snagging a pair of Carrera sunnies on the way... BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Jaime King, Zoe Saldana, and Diana Agron at a Persol event.

A


ANA Zachary Quinto and Fione Byrne at a Cinema Society after-party at Hotel Americano on June 25.

Erin Heatherton, sporting sunglasses from the Carrera 6000 collection.

Adrian Grenier and Christine Teigen at the “Celebrate Summer Solstice” event.

Dominic Cooper at an event sponsored by Solstice Sunglasses and Safilo Group.

Elizabeth Banks and Chris Pine at the Cinema Society

Terry RIchardson and Twin Shadow at

screening of People Like Us on June 25.

the Museum of the Moving Image on June 13.

GETTY IMAGES; PATRICK MCMULLAN; SARA JAYE WEISS/STARTRAKS

“I’M CRACKING MY cinnamon gum like a whip, jangling my

house keys around on my wrist. ‘How Will I Know’ is playing on the radio,” writes Cat Marnell in her column for VICE magazine. You know, I’ve fallen for Cat Marnell. Maybe because I, too, chew cinnamon gum and listen to Whitney Houston, albeit from my coworker’s computer... On June 13, Persol opened “Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Crafstmanship in Film” at the Museum of the Moving Image. (Oh, yes—the Young and the Guest List does Queens!) Patricia Clarkson, Todd Haynes, and Arianne Phillips were honored at the Michael Conner-curated exhibition, which explores the “obsessive” 30-step process at Persol. Guests such as Peter Davis, Nate Freeman, and Ariel Moses enjoyed catering by Fat Radish and music by Terry Richardson and Twin Shadow before returning to Manhattan.

On the 14th, the Wildlife Conservation Society hosted “The Coasts of Patagonia” at the Central Park Zoo. The event honored Dr. Juan Castilla and Dr. Steven Sanderson, celebrating the organization’s commitment to conservation in Argentina and Chile. Wearing corseted Reem Acra with appliqués—cherry red, and delicious—I texted Drew Grant: Where you at? We connected at the Sea Lion Pool, posing for Patrick McMullan before sitting with Jean Shafiroff for a South America-themed meal. The conversation ranged from stories of traveling to Jamaica (Drew), China (Jean), and Costa Rica (me) to “Why doesn’t anyone dress up anymore?” At the after-party, F.E. Castleberry, Carson Griffith, Derek Hester, Emily Hottensen, Maggie Lawrence-Dwyer, Cooper Ray, and John Shaddock danced to DJ Cassidy before dipping into Dorrian’s for the after-after-party. On the 20th, Solstice Sunglasses hosted the “Celebrate SumAUGUST 2012 141


mer Solstice” event with Safilo Group, launching the Carrera 6000 collection. At noon-ish, I arrived at the Gansevoort Plaza, catching up with Alex Taylor before selecting some black-and-white sunnies—ready, set, Instagram! I felt so cool that I was thinking about approaching Adrian Grenier with my number. Later, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of To Rome With Love with Piaget. At the theater, I spotted David Patrick Columbia before snagging a seat in the first row with a girlfriend (and a box of Gummi Worms). Nearby, Scott Adsit of 30 Rock, Rachel Dratch, and Kate Flannery of The Office were gabbing. NBC lineup, I heart you. At the after-party at Casa Lever, Woody Allen, Calvin Klein, Ralph and Ricky Lauren, John Legend and Lauren Davenport, Bella Slagsvol, Patrick McMullan, and Ascanio Serena di Lapigio danced to DJ Cassidy at “The Coasts of Patagonia.”

at the Central Park Zoo on June 14.

Christine Teigen, Dylan McDermott, and Elettra Wiedemann sipped Italy-themed Disaronno cocktails: Paparazzo, Operetta Disaronno, and Trastevere Sour. On the 25th, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of People Like Us with Linda Wells and Allure. (Elizabeth Banks, who acted in the movie, is on the magazine’s June cover.) At the after-party at Hotel Americano, Gina Gershon, Henrik Lundqvist of the New York Rangers, Callan McAuliffe, Coco Rocha, and Nicole Trunfio mixed over Grey Goose “Cherry Noir” cocktails. Now, I look forward to the end of summer, completing my tan before saying goodbye to iced coffee... Yay for everything about a cashmere-filled fall! u

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Elizabeth Kern and Kylie Gattinella partied for the Wildlife Conservation Society


Alexandra and Mattias Schouteden after the Cinema Society screening of To Rome With Love on June 20. Elissa Niemiera, Charlie Bakke, and Amy Pompea at the Central Park Zoo on June 14.

Zachary Pasanen and Katie Straut at the Central Park Zoo on June 14.

Lauren Powell and Ted Gushue at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s event, “The Coasts of Patagonia.”

Sims Lansing and Jack Fennebresque supported the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Kate Schell attended a Cinema Society after-party at Casa Lever on June 20.

Kelsey Breining, Alex Cecil, Emma Greenberg, and Jason

Anne de la Mothe Karoubi and Brian

Ehrlich at the Central Park Zoo on June 14.

Atkinson at “The Coasts of Patagonia.” AUGUST 2012 143


SNAPSHOT Good music goes a long way. The band or singer you choose (I like Bruno Mars) reflects on your style and taste—and carries the mood for the entire evening.

Later in life, even Mrs. Astor grew tired of waking up to the mess of a party from the night before. So she built the St. Regis Hotel and entertained in the ballroom, which is still a popular choice today. I tend to favor outdoor spaces—on the High Line, in a tent, or on a rooftop.

I’m a sucker for a great invitation, and I keep every single good one that I have ever received. Get the best paper you can afford. Use thick, dark, rich ink. Bevel the edges and then gild them. And, if you’re lucky enough to receive an invitation like this one by legendary stationer Mrs. John L.

THE FAIREST OF AFFAIRS BY BRONSON VAN WYCK NEW YORK DOESN’T HAVE a Mrs. Astor today. I’m sure that some people miss her, because it takes more than a good name to get on the list now. The fact is, mixing is what New York is really about. It’s what it’s always been about. And luckily, it’s what it’s best at. So while we reflect on the fact that, in the 21st century, inclusion—not exclusion—will define our famous parties, we can also return to a simple truth: some things never go out of style. And graciousness and generosity are at the top of the list. Great hostesses still care about how they make their guests feel. They entertain for the joy and pleasure of it. They give parties that are about the perfect moment—the sheer delight of existing in a certain place at a certain time with certain people. It’s a privilege to be there because the gift is such an ephemeral one, and one you won’t be able to read about anywhere the next day. With that—and Mrs. Astor’s memory—in mind, here are some essentials of a worthy affair for today’s times. u

E R I C S T R I F F LE R ( TE N TE D E V E N T )

Strong, I only have one word for you: reply.

Bal de la Chasse

R.s.v.p. to M rs. Montague mrs montague@vanwyck.net  (212) 675-8601

Messieurs: tenue de la chasse Mesdames: masques d’animaux

Use the freshest, most seasonal blossoms you can lay your hands on. They don’t have to be expensive. Use leaves if you have to, but make them look like you went outside and picked them from

Visit the event firm of Van Wyck & Van Wyck at vanwyck.net. 144 QUEST

your own garden. Here’s what you can accomplish with 8,000 ferns.


AN ENGLISH ARTS & CRAFTS COTTAGE AND GARDENS ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE DESIGN BY WADIA ASSOCIATES

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