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THE DESIGN ISSUE

THE BOWLING ALLEY AT THE FRICK COLLECTION

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Dimitry Gerrman

EST. 1870

ART WALLY FINDLAY

Dimitry Gerrman was born in 1955 in Gomel, Belarus in the Soviet Union. He became interested in sculpture at a very early age and in 1970 graduated from the sculpture department of the Glebov Art College in Minsk. In 1978 he completed his first commission, a monumental relief on a public building in Gomel dedicated to the Russian Revolution. In 1980, at the age of 24, Gerrman moved to St. Petersburg and enrolled in the prestigious Mukhina Academy of Art and Architecture. He graduated in 1985 with a Master of Fine Arts degree in monumental sculpture. The following year he became a member of the Artists Union of the USSR. Gerrman remained at the Mikhina Academy as a Sculpture and Composition teacher until 1989. His commissioned work throughout Russia included the Monument of Victims of World War II in Siberia, a composition of eight life-size figures for a Sports Complex, as well as a life-size equestrian statue in St. Petersburg. In 1990, Dimitry Gerrman arrived in the United States. In 1993, he was commissioned to create a sculpture for the Lester Levy Humanitarian Award, first awarded to U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski. In 1994, Gerrman created the sculpture Crying Violin, which became an International Elie Wiesel Holocaust Remembrance Award. It was presented to Steven Spielberg for his movie Schindler’s List. In 1996, Gerrman became a member of the National Sculpture Society. Gerrman’s oeuvre reflects his philosophical point of view. He constantly searches for self-expression by exploring variations on different themes and compositions, and by experimenting with plasticity of form and sense of rhythm. All the while, Gerrman’s Russian cultural heritage combined with classical tradition underlies his work.

We are honored to represent Gerrman on an exclusive basis in America since 2003. His sculpture can also be seen in museums and public places including the State Russian Museum (St. Petersburg, Russia), the United States Senate (Washington, DC), the Zimmerli Art Museum of Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ), the Ministry of Culture of the USSR (Moscow, Russia), the Museum of Natural History (St. Petersburg, Russia), the Kolodzei Art Foundation (Moscow, Russia), and the Alexander Raydon Foundation (New York, NY).

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GorgaptnearHiLine.LRwdbl-hghtceils,vus,csmtwndws, 2balcs,rfterrw360˚vus,kitwtopapplis,W/D.24-hrDM, grdn.$7.5M.Web#3747141.M.Cashman646-613-2616

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FiDi. Luxurious Philipe Stark design 2,028SF sprawling light lofty. Huge master suite, 6 custom clsts, 2 full baths + 2 sleeping areas/ OFlCE "OSCH&ULL TIMEDOORMANWITHPOOL  gym, roof deck. $1.875M. WEB# 3481381. Brahna Yassky 212-906-0506

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Park Avenue. High ceilings and oversized windows give this 3BR, 3.5 bath corner condo an airy feel. The formal dining, eat-in kitchen, and large living make it a comfortable home. $8.995M. WEB# 3728386 Frans Preidel 212-906-0507

Brooklyn heights. Impeccably renovated 5,500SF on best block in Brooklyn Heights. -USEUMQUALITYCONDITION MARBLElREPLACES  6BR, 6.5 bath, 5 zone CAC, garden, gym, temp control wine cave. $8.25M. WEB# 1271606. Kenneth Mandelbaum 718-858-4887

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CONTENTS THE D ESIGN I SSUE 98

UNDERNEATH IT ALL

Quest ventures down to the bowling alley in the subbasement of

the Frick Collection—the opportunity of a lifetime, and one not offered to the average museum-goer. PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN, PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALIZA ELIAZAROV

106

A FOREVER GREEN THUMB

124

In Forever Green (Pointed Leaf Press), the designs of landscape

architect Mario Nievera are displayed in all of their glory. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

112

THE DISCERNING EYE OF A TASTEMAKER

Mark Birley, one of London’s most fêted

club owners, had impecable style and vision, as seen in his personal collection of art, furniture, and trinkets.

118

BELOW GROUND

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

The technology to bring natural sunlight underground exists, and

James Ramsey dazzles us with his ideas for the Lowline.

124

FINDING BEAUTY IN THE DETAILS

BY

ALEX R. TRAVERS

Phillip Dodd reveals the big world of small

flourishes, examining classical detailing in contemporary design.

130

THE UNIVERSE OF DESIGN

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

The Museum of Modern Art’s exhibit, “Applied Design,”

shows off the practical side to conceptual designs.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

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CONTENTS 78

C OLUMNS 24

SOCIAL DIARY

70

SOCIAL CALENDAR

74

HARRY BENSON

76

OBSERVATIONS

78

FRESH FINDS

80

THE REAL MAD MAN

82

MUSIC IN THE HEART OF THE CITY

84

GRACIOUS HOME

Gracious Home, the go-to design store, tell us about their hot new items for Spring.

86

MONEY MATTERS

Quest consults its advisers on issues of finance and more, on the behalf of our readers.

138

APPEARANCES

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

Spring is busting out all over, but especially in New York. BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA Our guide to the ins and outs of the scene during the marvelous month of April.

Our columnist remembers Bill Paley, founder of CBS, and his appreciation for art. A run-in with the creator of Downton Abbey leaves a bad taste. BY TAKI THEODORACOPULOS

How to wear the latest styles with aplomb.

BY

DANIEL CAPPELLO

AND

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Edward Noonan Ney lived the life that inspired the AMC series. BY CHUCK PFEIFER “Spring for Music” welcomes a series of orchestras to Carnegie Hall.

This month, our columnist sprung forward—and did so with pep in her step. BY HILARY GEARY Out and about, like for red meat and rosé in Brooklyn. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

The legacy of Raymond Loewy is pervasive, from Coca-Cola to Lucky Strike.

BY

LILY HOAGLAND

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DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

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EDITOR’S LETTER Clockwise from top left: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2002, London, England, designed by Toyo Ito; the White U-House Ito designed in 1976 for his older sister, who had just lost her husband to cancer; the Tama Art University Library in Tokyo, Japan.

IF WE’RE TALKING ABOUT DESIGN, the Pritzker Architecture Prize needs to be mentioned. The equivalent of the Pulitzer for journalism or the Oscar for acting, the Pritzker honors a living architect whose work demonstrates not only talent, but also a contribution to humanity and the environment. This year, the winner of the Pritzker prize was 71-year-old Toyo Ito, a Japenese architect whose achievements were recognized by the judges as “conceptual innovation with superbly executed buildings.” His designs are modern while still being timeless. His use of public areas, his appreciation for the environment, and his understanding of the need for private space earned him a place in the pantheon that includes Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, and Zaha Hadid. Congratulations, Mr. Ito; we can only hope to one day while away the hours in your beautiful structures. But design is so much more than architecture. It’s about interiors, as Phillip Dodd teaches us with his look at the art of classical design. It’s about exteriors, as Mario Nievera demonstrates with his lush garden landscapes. It’s the beauty of the past, as the secret bowling alley underneath the Frick Collection can attest to. It’s the promise of the future, as the potential for the “Lowline” in New York City is coming to fruition. Still, these are all semantics because, at heart, design affects so much of our daily life—more than we usually stop to contemplate. In searching for a quote that would accurately encompass 20 QUEST

this incredibly vast world of design, I stumbled across many gems. There’s the erudite: “At a meta level, design connects the dots between mere survival and humanism,” Erik Adigard states. The call to action: “Design must be an innovative, highly creative, cross-disciplinary tool responsive to the needs of men. It must be more research-oriented, and we must stop defiling the earth itself with poorly-designed objects and structures,” according to Victor Papanek, a strong advocate of socially and ecologically responsible design. The cheeky: "Everything is designed. Few things are designed well,” in Brian Reed’s opinion. And naturally, there’s the old saw about how a camel is a horse designed by a committee. But the one that resonated with me is the following, from a designer named Robin Mathew. “Design is where science and art break even.” X

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: The Frick Collection’s subbasement bowling alley, which is not accessible to the public. The wooden lanes are strictly manually operated, and work by relying on physics rather than electricity. Produced by Elizabeth Quinn Brown and photographed by Aliza Eliazarov.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY WELL, SPRING HAS finally sprung, but don’t get your hopes up about the weather. The forecasters gave us plenty of snow warnings this winter but very little of it made its way to ole Manhattan. Nevertheless, the witch hazel has bloomed in the park near my apartment and the forsythia has followed suit. By the time you read this, the tulips and the daffodils will be in the mood and April showers will bring may flowers. The beatings of March doldrums. The New York Post reported in the last week of the month that Anthony Marshall, the son and only child of the late Brooke Astor, has lost the

appeal of his 2009 conviction for trying to steal $60 million from his mother. Evidently, Marshall, who appeared in court in a wheelchair last December, “begged the court to spare him jail time given his age, health, military service, public service, and lack of prior criminal history.” Justice Darcel Clark of the New York Appellate Court responded, “We are not convinced that as an aged felon Marshall should be categorically immune from incarceration.” Marshall will be 89 at the end of May. “The lack of a criminal history is an ordinary circumstance that does not vitiate

Brooke Astor, in her heyday 22 QUEST

a prison term for obtaining millions of dollars through financial abuse of an elderly victim,” the judge declared (and the Post reported). And so ends The Final Act of The Tale of Roberta Brooke Russell Kuser Marshall Astor, daughter of an on-duty marine commandant born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 111 years ago. She died six years ago this August in her mansion at Briarcliff Manor in New York, a wisp of her former self at 105 and woebegone. And it is a saga, but it has yet to be told. I did not buy the story the way it was presented in the media. The public-relations

strategy beginning with the innuendo accusing the son of elder abuse was entirely untrue and an outright smear. As much as its proponents reveled in it, they besmirched the memory of the mother. There were several forces operating and all, obviously, in their own interests—the son and his wife notwithstanding. It may be that Mr. Marshall fiddled with the facts of his mother’s will. This is not an unusual circumstance but, yes, it is illegal. Wills are wars and are often fought to the death after the original death. Furthermore, the mother had made more than 30 different wills in her life and each of

Anthony Marshall, son of the late Brooke Astor, was found guilty in 2009 of siphoning money from his mother’s estate.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A them saw substantial changes in the terms of the bequests and the bequeathed. So, it remained a power tool for the lady—as well it should have. Stories about wills always remind me of a story that took place years ago in Los Angeles with the will of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer mogul Louis B. Mayer’s first wife, Margaret. When she made out her Last Will and Testament, she had left $100,000 to a niece among her bequests. That sum was substantial in those days, like $4 or $5 million in today’s currency. The niece was also a contemporary of Margaret’s daughters, Edith Mayer Goetz and Irene Mayer Selznick. That said, the daughters were left the bulk of their mother’s estate, which was considerably more than the bequest to the niece. The bequest to the niece

was a final thank you for her love and loyalty, which had been crucial in the latter years of Margaret. Her adored Louis had abandoned home and hearth and divorced his wife after many years of marriage for a much younger, more glamorous woman. Margaret was heartbroken. She withdrew into a deep depression. Margaret’s daughters loved their mother but were too active—and too self-centered—with their young lives and marriages to spend much time comforting their mother. Their cousin, the niece, made up for their absence (and the sisters were pleased that she had become their mother’s companion). However, after Margaret’s final will was drawn up, the sisters, who had access to the will, were offended by their mother’s generosity to the niece. Irene, who was one

to draw lines about where people fit into her scheme of things, regarded her cousin as, among other things, N.O.C. (or “not our class”). A small fortune seemed like an awful lot of money to give to a “poor” cousin. According to Edie Goetz, who told me the story one afternoon three decades later in her mansion in Holmby Hills while recalling her family history, Irene talked her into seeing their mother’s lawyer, who was a very famous West Coast lawyer at the time. They would ask him to change the will. And so they did. Edie, in the telling, allowed the fact that she thought it wasn’t right but, “You know Irene!” And so their mother’s grateful bequest was cut substantially to be more within the realm of what Irene thought her cousin was deserving of. Or worth. The mistress and the maî-

tresse. Years later, that same lawyer who had accommodated the sisters’s wishes over his client’s directive, was, coincidentally, married to a famously wealthy American woman. It was a second marriage for both. To the outside world, it looked to be ideal. More than 20 years down the road, however, the wife happened to pick up the phone to make a call one day and accidentally overheard her husband talking to a woman he obviously knew quite well. The women, it turned out, was his longstanding mistress, which was unbeknownst to the wife before then. The affair had existed for almost as many years as the lawyer and his wife had been married. It so happened that the wife was in very ill health when she made this wrenching discovery, only to die several months later. Her will, however, gave

J O H N A N D M A R I A N N E C A S T L E H O S T E D A D I N N E R FO R R O S I TA , T H E D U C H E S S O F M A R L B O R O U G H

Donald and Margo Stever and Marianne Castle

William Bologna, Jim Mitchell and Carol Butcher 24 QUEST

Grace Meigher

Donald Calder

Annette Rickel and Max Field

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

John Castle and Rosita, the Duchess of Marlborough


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E A M E R I C A N C A N C E R S O C I E T Y P L AYE D G O L F AT T H E B R E A K E R S I N PA L M B E AC H

Robert and Carol Garvy

no indication of her knowledge. Everything, including her multimillion-dollar collection of 18th-century French furniture, went to her husband. Being a lawyer, his wife had trusted him with her estate. He inherited millions; her children—not a candlestick. Ironically, her husband (again, Irene and Edie’s willaltering lawyer) was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s within a few years. He had married his mistress and she inherited “his” fortune, which had been “left” to him by his previous wife. Yet, the saga of Tony Marshall and his mother is more compelling because of the history of a mother-son rela26 QUEST

Michel Witmer

Mark Cook and Jack Flagg

tionship. Despite the reams of adverse and often fabricated publicity about his treatment of his elderly and infirm mother, he had been a dutiful son for all of his 82 years. He possessed a boy’s loyalty, despite the fact that she was neither an emotionally nor a physically accessible mother for much of his childhood (not the first of her kind) and he remained attached to her wishes and commands. He was her only child, born of a traumatic marriage made when she was 17. When she extracted herself from that relationship, she was a very young woman. She married again; this time to a man whom

Davis Love III and Jamie Zahringer

Reid Boren

Danielle Moore with Wally and Betsy Turner

she claimed was the love of her life. It was a second marriage for both and she gave her son a new last name. The son went wherever she took him or sent him. He was not favored, which was apparent to anyone who might want to notice. But he was dutiful and he grew up to be a presentable young man, someone who wouldn’t embarrass her. He served in the marines in the Pacific during World War II, leading a platoon in the Battle of Iwo Jima. Afterward, he was promoted to lieutenant and awarded the Purple Heart. Returning from the war, he went to Brown. In the late ’50s, he served

as a member of the United States consulate in Istanbul. In the first Administration of Richard Nixon, he served as ambassador to the Malagasy Republic, and then to Trinidad and Tobago, and then to the Seychelles Islands under President Gerald Ford. As Brooke got older, and was now long-widowed, her son became a more valuable working ally, someone she could put out there as her company, watching over her. A good escort, very important when needed. She admitted that she wasn’t especially maternal, something that is not as unusual as we’d like to think.

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Tom Quick and Richard Connaughton


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H E R M È S O F PA R I S H O ST E D “ J E U X D E H E R M È S ” I N PA L M B E AC H

Vincent DePaul

She was helpful to him professionally, but she also quietly boasted openly about the political contribution she made that got him an ambassadorship under Richard Nixon. She made it sound like she “bought” it for him, apparently unaware that ambassadorial posts always come with price tags in one way or another. She did not especially like her third daughter-in-law. She was openly vocal about this among friends in the summer colony of Northeast, where they both lived. She could see that her son was crazy about her, and that annoyed her, too. She looked upon it, as mothers can do, as if the relationship was the result of feminine wiles playing on a foolish heart. She believed that her daughter-in-law had been 28 QUEST

Campion Platt

Linda Salandra-Dweck, Tatiana Platt and Diana Salandra

after the money that Tony would presumably inherit. She expressed this at times. Mothers and daughter-inlaws are often a bad combination. Charlene Marshall’s mother-in-law situation was formidable. Perhaps Charlene was attracted to Tony’s wouldbe inheritance, but in the world of Brooke Astor, practically everyone knew what was going on, and always bore that sort of thing in mind when considering any relationship. The world of Brooke Astor was a Money world. It was all about the money. This holds true for anyone who inhabited it, in one way or another. This sort of thing is the nature of the way we live. For some, it is an albatross, for others an accomplice. For others still, it’s freedom. Greed is an addictive accomplice, no matter the situation, and is

Brian Pates, Andrew Ferrerra and Bryan Walsh

Hoola-hooping on the beach

always hanging around. Even Brooke Astor’s own arrival at the Astor fortune came from her strategy in gaining notice from the man who would become her last husband and her vanished benefactor in the latter-day world of society and philanthropy. The achievement of having obtained fortune and public stature did not come easily to her. From the beginning, Vincent Astor was considered by the women in his crowd to be obnoxious and someone to avoid as much as possible. These same women also regarded the widow Brooke as a woman who was in it for one thing and one thing only. She wasn’t exactly an interloper, but she wasn’t the top of the crop either. She knew this: she knew how that world worked, especially for a woman who had

Todd Poindexter

Merit Lari and Jennifer Antilla

no money of her own. Edith Wharton territory. Marrying Vincent Astor would change all that. She was seizing victory from the jaws of defeat. The price she paid was dear. She would have to wait. In the meantime, she became almost a virtual prisoner of her deeply insecure and tyrannical husband—even in his demanding that she separate herself entirely from her son. Time was on her side, however: Vincent Astor died after little more than five years of marriage. After the death of Vincent, almost a half century passed in the Life of Brooke Astor, philanthropist and national figure of poise and matronly elegance. She came into her own. It was a role that she cleverly and intelligently wrote for herself and relished, and it was her greatest role. Her son was there forever after, doing

C H R I S J O R I A N N P H OTO G R A P H Y

Kate Spencer and Rachel Ward with Frances Leidy and Rory Mackay


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A her bidding, following her wishes. That was his role. We can guess why. It wasn’t for the money, at least not at the end of the day. But that was then. Now she’s gone, and so, too, is the Astor fortune in America. Paradoxically, that was what Vincent Astor really wanted out of life, to rent that legacy for himself. Unlike the four generations that preceded him, he was the first Astor not to leave the fortune to an Astor relative. For some reason, he showed no sentiment of affection or respect for the members of his birth family. Now we have left the aged and besieged only child, Marshall, facing a possible jail

term in the 90th year of his life, for something that he did not achieve, even if he had intended to as many believe— falsely or not. And we have the memory of that mother he served for the first eight decades of his life, her departed image now stuck in the mud of history and the politics of the rialto in a dark season. Pass the passementarie, company’s coming… I went to a book party hosted by Christy Ferer, Barbara Liberman, and Christiane Amanpour for their friend Cécile David-Weill, who has just published her third novel here in the United States: The Suitors. The Suitors was first published in France and is the second of her five

books to be published here. It was also chosen for the recommended reading list of Oprah’s magazine, a golden feather for her cap. Cécile is a daughter of a very famous and socially prominent French banking family. As a novelist her subjects have included stories of such families—fictional ones, of course. That said, the reader naturally thinks “fictional—wink, wink.” And why not? The Suitors is about one of those families, and the way its members live. To an American, the way the French live— if they’re rich—is the same as the way the Americans live. Yes and no. The Suitors is the second of Cécile’s novels to

draw controversy in France. Scandale and all that. Because she says it like it is. Rich people at love and play—a situation a lot of us poor slobs wouldn’t mind considering as our dilemma. This one is about the Old Money families, which is a sore subject in France. Unlike the American culture, where a great number of rich practically take out ads and hire public-relations flacks to get the word out, in France the word is always non. I should add: to be technical, there are many American rich who live like their French compatriots: quietly. They’re not interested in being “known” or publicized.

T H E P R E V I E W O F T H E A R MO R Y S H O W AT P I E R 9 2 / 9 4 W I T H A N A F T E R - PA R T Y AT MOM A

Beyoncé Knowles 30 QUEST

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Yung Hee Kim and Maria Rom-Schmidt

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Jessie Ryan and Chris Edgar


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E H O U STO N B A L L E T B A L L AT T H E W O R T H A M T H E AT E R C E N T E R

Bobby and Phoebe Tudor

The French (I mean the ones who live like kings and duchesses in their impeccable chateaux and les hôtels particuliars) never speak of money, I’ve been told. They never utter the word, let alone describe the loot they’ve acquired with it. Mais jamais! It’s not only considered gauche, but also politically dangereux. Remember Monsieur Guillot’s famously efficient execution device and the French Revolution. Once down that road was enough for several lifetimes and then some. The author and I are acquaintances through mutual friends. She has a quiet personality, although neither dif32 QUEST

Kelli Fein

Jamie and Mark Loveland with Jim and Jo Furr

fident nor shy. She loves New York and chooses to live here in a convenient and comfortable yet funky part of town compared to Park or Fifth avenues. (She also recently became a grandmother for the first time, though she doesn’t look old enough.) Many of these book parties are staged simply to sell books, which makes sense. This one was simply a celebration staged by friends. Every guest received a book, so the sale was accomplished before the party. Christy Ferer’s apartment is in one of those big, old Fifth Avenue co-ops with the high ceilings and the baro-

Soraya and Scott McClelland

Nick Florescu and Dominique Sachse

nial atmosphere. There were about 30 guests when I arrived an hour into the reception at 7 p.m. Several waiters were passing delicious hors d’oeuvres for us obsessivecompulsive party-noshers. People were having a good time, chatting and seeing old friends and new acquaintances. I stayed for about an hour enjoying the fare de Ferer. After I was home and at my desk, I opened it up at the prologue, just to see what was what. It starts with the (fictional) family’s summerhouse, which was called L’Acapanthe. I don’t know where it was exactly but I could imagine that it might be in the South of

Rose and Harry Cullen

France, maybe by the sea— like the author’s family’s summerhouse. David-Weill got me right away with her description of the property. I’m taking the liberty of reprinting a few opening paragraphs because they explain the setting of the novel with such a sense of perfection that you know there will be trouble ahead. There just has to be. After all, it’s French, and they’re rich, which allows for any number of things along the path of luxury, disillusion, deception, sensuality, carnal knowledge, and all things that money can’t buy, or protect the Self from. In the prologue, she writes

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E P A L M B E A C H AT L A N T I C U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S “ W O M E N O F D I S T I N C T I O N ” L U N C H E O N

Michele Kessler and Gail Cooney

in detail of the life of that house and what it entailed—its raison d’être—and what it provided to its proud possessors. Now, remember this is fiction but built entirely on the rock of unadorned reality. Of the house, she writes: Because for us, L’Agapanthe was a haven of happiness. Sheltered from time, it was a world of its own, one of luxury and lighthearted enjoyment. We spoke of it with pride, the way other people talk about the family eccentric or some colorful character they feel privileged to know. L’Agapanthe was not the ordinary summerhouse of rose-colored childhood, con34 QUEST

Eileen Burns, Kate Ford and Anita Michaels

Alicia Blodgett and Frances Fisher

juring nostalgia and memories… No. During the summer months, just like an ocean liner, the house required birds of passage and a large staff. In short, it was what is properly referred to as a ‘bonne maison.’ This shameless, snobbish understatement referred to the handful of houses around the world on that same grand scale, combining luxury, perfect taste, and a refined way of life. In the same way they would have said “grandes familles” or “grands hotels,” the servants in such houses referred to them as “grandes maisons” and without describing them or defining what they had in common,

Amanda Schumacher and Helen Ross

Wanda Jenkins and Denise Hanley

these experts could have rattled off a list on Corsica, in Mexico, in Tuscany, or on Corfu, an inventory far more private than the host of palatial European hotels touted everywhere in travel guides and magazines. These houses always had: dumbwaiters; walk-in cold rooms; bellboards for the upstairs rooms; vans for grocery shopping; cupboards for breakfast trays; a kitchen (for the cooks); a pantry (for the butlers); a laundry room with linen closets; a room with a copper sink for arranging flowers and storing vases; cellars; storerooms; and extensive servants quarters.

From these houses were banished all dishwashers, microwave ovens, televisions lounges, T.V. dinners, easygoing informality, and any form of casual attire. One of the chief criteria of “a good house” was the beauty of the place, from which the patina of time must have effaced all triviality, a requirement that disqualified even the grandest of modern houses. Not even historical monuments were allowed into the fold, those stately homes whose owners, rarely wealthy, often found themselves the guardians of traditions it was their duty to uphold, even at the

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Gail Coniglio and Joyce Sang


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A cost of bankruptcy. For unlike a chatelain, the master of a “good house” devoted his culture, his fortune, and his savoir vivre to the pleasure he offered his guests. His objective? To make them forget all material cares and thus freely enjoy the beauty of his house, his works of art, his bountiful table, and sprightly conversation in good company. Plainly put, in a “good house,” chambermaids unpacked and repacked—with a great flurry of tissue paper—the suitcases of guests, who found

their rooms provided with pretty sheets, mineral water, fruit, flowers, and a safe, as well as matches, pencils, and writing paper all embossed with the name of the house. But most important, the guests were not obliged to do anything – not to play sports, or go sightseeing, even though all that and more was available and easily arranged, should anyone wish it. The only compulsory ritual was mealtime, like prayers at a lay convent where one’s thoughts were otherwise free to roam at will.

And L’Agapanthe curiously fit this long and curious definition of a “good house,” so handsomely did this magical place succeed in halting the passage of time, which hung suspended in a bygone age of breathtaking yet unpretentious luxury. Yes, all that and more… Those luxurious lives with all the trimmings; good, very good, and bad, very bad. The French, right now, if you’ve been reading the papers, are (like a lot of the world) in a bad way financially. They are not alone and the com-

plaints are coming from every direction. Most notable to the American reader: the French who are rich are about to be taxed at a rate that has led many to apply for citizenship outside their Dear Old France. Many are leaving. This isn’t the first time something like this has happened. When François Mitterrand became president and took over the private banks by buying them, there were many (including Marie-Helene and Guy de Rothschild) who

T H E O P E N I N G O F “ C H I N A ’ S T E R R AC OT TA W A R R I O R S : T H E F I R ST E M P E R O R ’ S L EG AC Y ” AT T H E A S I A N A R T M U S E U M I N S A N F R A N C I S C O

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moved to New York. BrieďŹ&#x201A;y. Eventually the Rothschilds gave up their New York home and returned to France, evidently very happy to be back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The rich are different from us,â&#x20AC;? an observation said to have been made by F. Scott Fitzgerald to Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, inclined to have the last word replied: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, they have money.â&#x20AC;? Meaning, to this writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way of thinking, money makes you different, in the eyes of everybody, most especially in the eyes of The Selfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;swathed in the faux conďŹ dence of luxury and service. CĂŠcile David-Weill writes about it with a certainty that can only have come from experienceâ&#x20AC;Ś The winds of March that make my heart a dancer were here on time, although the social scene was rather tepid. The weather patterns kept New Yorkers home or off to sunnier climes. But there

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A the social photographers to catch all of those smiling faces. On that score, it was a tidal wave of fashion designers and style gurus: Bobbi Brown, Rachel Roy, Fern Mallis, Dennis Basso, and James Kaliardos. Kelly Rutherford chatted with Julie Macklowe, Matthew Settle chatted with Vanity Fair’s photographer of the rich, the chic, and the shameless, Jonathan Becker, who has a new book out, Jonathan Becker: 30 Years At Vanity Fair—a must-have for your collection of the fashion and celebrity of these times. Many of Alina’s fellow anchors and reporters dropped by, including co-host of Good Day New York Rosanna

Scotto, Maurice DuBois, and Robert Zimmerman. Even Demsey’s mother, Renée, and his daughter, Marie-Helene, were there to wish him a happy birthday. Hors d’oeuvres served on fish-shaped platters came from Demsey’s friend Cornelia Guest’s company, Cornelia Guest Events. Then there were those schools of marine creatures: handfuls of Swedish Fish, gummy sharks, and multicolored gummy octopi waiting helplessly like chickens of the sea in small fish bowls around the house. International models navigated (it was packed—another plus about Demsey parties) around the patio and the

upstairs terrace: Tiiu Quik, Michelle Buswell, and Heidi Mount. Also, interior designers Howard Slatkin, Milly de Cabrol, and Bibi Monnahan; artist Will Cotton and Rose Dergan sipping cocktails and chatting with Jennifer Creel, Debbie Bancroft, and Andrew Roosevelt; Ann DexterJones, who now has a line of jewelry and is writing a book on her life in the fast lane of rock ‘n’ roll and international society. Moving around the room: Bettina Zilkha, Warner Music Group’s Rob Wiesenthal, Alison Mazzola, George Farias, Janna Bullock with Couri Hay, Laura Slatkin, Kelly Bensimon, Somers and Jonathan Farkas, Bobby Fo-

mon and Jill Fairchild, Liliana Cavendish, Caryn Zucker, director James Signorelli, Tim Schifter, Pamela Gross, and Jimmy Finkelstein. Journalists and media moguls couldn’t resist stopping by just to see who was in the swim, including Hearst Magazine’s president, marketing, and publishing director Michael Clinton, Elle Décor’s Michael Boodro, Vanity Fair’s Edward Menicheschi, DuJour’s Jason Binn, W’s Jane Larkworthy, Glamour’s Cindi Leive, Self’s Elaine D’Farley, George Ledes, Page Six’s Emily Smith and Stephanie Smith, Niche Media’s Samantha Yanks, and Patrick McMullan capturing the entire evening with his

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ubiquitous lens. You get the picture: everybody—and even his mother—having a New York good time. The party was scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m., but it was long after that that the last of scores of guests disappeared into the night. They just couldn’t tear themselves away from the Piscean pool of New York social life. A happy birthday to all. Then, on another glorious night at the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, the School of American Ballet held its annual Winter Ball with a dinner followed by a performance by the students. This is always a special evening reflecting how special the

school is. It brings out the best in everybody, including the donors and supporters. The school was founded 79 years ago by Lincoln Kirstein and George Balanchine. Kirstein was an intellectual, an impresario ex-officio of the arts of his age, and Balanchine was the recently emigrated choreographer, a man from soviet Russia who joined Ballet Russes as a choreographer. Diaghilev had made him ballet master and encouraged his choreography. He was a contemporary of many of the giants of arts of the first half of the 20th century, such as Ravel, Debussy, Erik Satie, Rouault, Matisse, Picasso, and Stravinsky.

Lincoln Kirstein, son of a wealthy Boston retailer who was well-educated and already an arts patron, persuaded Balanchine to come to New York. This was in 1933. A year later, the School of American Ballet was born with the assistance and financial backing of Kirstein and another contemporary, Edward M.M. “Eddie” Warburg, a member of a distinguished New York family of international investment bankers. Warburg was also a force in the establishment of several cultural ventures and institution, including the Museum of Modern Art. It was Balanchine who insisted that, before they could have a ballet company—the

New York City Ballet, as it would turn out to be—they needed to have a school to develop ballet dancers for it. And so it was, S.A.B. Both men were glamorous, cutting-edge, “with it” figures in that turbulent time. Balanchine was made even more glamorous by the fact that he had five wives, all great dancers: Tamara Geva, Alexandra Danilova, Vera Zorina, Maria Tallchief, and Tanaquil LeClercq. He was a guy who loved ’em and left ’em—for another. Kirstein, who was gay, had a rich intellectual life, was a great art connoisseur and writer, and was very much a part of the cultural movements of New York (and the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A world). It was a great collaboration and its effects are still operating, 80 years later. It’s always a beautiful evening when you go to Lincoln Center, no matter what theater you enter. The campus of these houses separates you from the quotidian part of your life, and transports you. The night’s SAB gala was black-tie. The décor, by Ron Wendt Designs, was inspired by Van Cleef & Arpels (sponsor of the evening) and Alexis de Rede’s “Le Bal Oriental,” which was held in 1969 in the ballroom of his apartment in the Hotel Lambert on the Île Saint-Louis in Paris. It so happens that George Balanchine and Claude Arpels, the founder of the famous jeweler, were friends, having met through the great violinist Nathan Milstein. Balanchine later cre-

ated a ballet called Jewels. The two men became lifelong friends. S.A.B. is of course the premiere ballet school in the U.S. As I’ve written here before, even a non-balletomane like myeself (who nevertheless enjoys the performance) was deeply impressed with the work of the school. Not all of its students go on to careers in the ballet. And even those who do most often experience the relative shortness of a dancer’s career. The school, however, with its curriculum, bolsters the students’ experience by learning to dance. They are hardworking, focused, dedicated, and disciplined. Those four qualities are more than half the battle in and on any stage in life. S.A.B. does that for all of its students. Just a few of the great danc-

ers of classical ballet who are S.A.B. alums include: Jacques d’Amboise, Suzanne Farrell, Darci Kistler, Sara Mearns, Benjamin Millipied, Jock Soto, and Wendy Whelan. Marge Van Dercook, the executive director, told the guests that they raised more $1 million. The funds are used for scholarships and state-ofthe-art studios and residence halls, and also offer vital student programs beyond the studio. The evening’s program was a performance by the students that was choreographed by a recent graduate, Silas Farley. Farley pointed out that the funds raised that evening will make it possible for many people to attend this school and experience the opportunity and the power of its excellent education. Would that all of our educational systems could

be so all encompassing. Another aspect of these Lincoln Center galas, is that they are black-tie and women dress for them. It’s another pleasant departure, albeit a brief one, from the day-today. The Winter Ball’s honorary chairs were Coco Kopelman (who attended S.A.B. as a child), Elizabeth R. Miller, Liz Peek and Betsy Pitts. Chairs were Diana DiMenna, Julia Koch, Jenny Paulson, and Laura Zeckendorf. The corporate chair was Nicholas Luchsinger, chairman of Van Cleef & Arpels. The Young Patron chairs were Amanda Brotman, Brie Bythewood, Ann-Marie MacFarlane, and William Yang. The “Encore Chairmen” (I don’t know what that means) were Cassel Lessinger, Ann Channing Redpath, Emma Riccardi, and Moregan Richardson. X

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Ryan Jones, Sara Pritchard, Jeffrey Caldwell and Brooks Huston

Stephanie Seymour and Peter Brant 48 QUEST

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Evelyn Tompkins, Edgar Batista and Elizabeth Ballard

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U VO C R AC Y . C OM H O ST E D A PA R T Y AT G L A S S H O U S E S I N N E W YO R K

Roger and Sloan Barnett

Lottie Oakley and Julie Macklowe

Maud Cabot and Stephanie Hirsch

Gigi Mortimer, Kate Betts and Jennifer Nilles 50 QUEST

Kalliope Rena and Christine Schwarzman

Carlos Mota and Kelly Rutherford

Tory Burch and Alix Toub

Ashley Wick

Amy Hoadley and Amanda Taylor

Eva Lorenzotti and Jill Fairchild

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Shoshanna Gruss and Marcie Pantzer 52 QUEST

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Eugenie Goodman, Amanda Waldron and Mary Kathryn Navab

Melissa Meister and son

Leslie Heaney and Kathy Thomas

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Allison Aston and children

Eleanor Ylvisaker and daughter

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S C H O O L O F A M E R I C A N B A L L E T W I N T E R B A L L AT T H E D AV I D H . KO C H T H E AT E R

Matthew Bronfman

Mary Snow

Will and Laura Zeckendorf 54 QUEST

John and Jenny Paulson

David and Julia Koch with S.A.B. dancers

Brad Comisar and Dana Stubgen

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S A LVATO R E F E R R A G A MO S P O N S O R E D T H E B OYS ’ C L U B O F N E W YO R K ’ S A N N UA L PA L M B E AC H L U N C H EO N

Mary Baker and Jennifer Creel

Hilary Geary Ross and Diane Halle

Hillie Mahoney, Jessie Araskog and Leezy Sculley 56 QUEST

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Emilia Fanjul and Lourdes Fanjul

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Elaine Langone

Whitney Douglas and Alexia Hamm Ryan

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Wilder Regalbuto and Allison Bishop

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO’S MID-WINTER GALA

Marissa Mayer

Kate Clammer and Alec Perkins

Kathryn and Bo Lasater 58 QUEST

Patrick and Melissa Barber

Becca Prowda and Daniel Lurie

Lindsay Bolton

Tatum Getty

Trevor and Alexis Traina

Stephen Jenkins and Vanessa Getty

Katie Traina

Bryan and Jenna Hunt

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A R EC E P T I O N FO R T H E B A L P O U D R E W I T H M A R I N A B AT T H E B R E A K E R S

Caroline and Tom Forrest

Paul Lubetsky and Susan Malloy with a group of Marina B models

Dana Koch and Kelly Hopkins 60 QUEST

Danielle Moore, Jim Taggart and Mieke van Waveren

Susan Cushing and Catherine Carey

Sterling and John McCracken

Gigi and Harry Benson with Susan Lloyd

Sterling Kenan and Bill Davis

Tracy and Matt Smith

L I L A P H OTO

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A MO Ë T & C H A N D O N H O ST E D A L U N C H EO N AT J U L I E T T E L O N G U E T

Caroline Phitoussi

Erica Frontiero and Farah Dib

Sylvia Hemingway

Robin Kassimir and Juliette Longuet

Annabel Vartanian

Wendy Sarasohn and Katie Ryser

Lauren Roberts

Stephanie Foster and Natalie Kaplan

Noreen Buckfire and Deborah Cogut

Dayssi Kanavos, Muffie Potter Aston and Gillian Miniter

Alexis Clark, Lydia Fenet and Elyse Newhouse 62 QUEST

Lilliana Cavendish and Anne Hearst

Daisy Soros, Claudia Overstrom and Michelle McMaster

CO U RT E S Y O F M O Ë T & C H A N D O N ( A B OV E ) ; A N D R E W W E R N E R ( B E LO W )

A L U N C H FO R T H E C H A I R S O F S P R I N G E V E N TS AT T H E C R O W N I N N E W YO R K


THE WORLD STILL ASTOUNDS YOU IN THE HAMPTONS Considering how well we know the area, it doesn’t surprise us. However, it does open new vistas for your family which we will help navigate. Since we’ve lived and worked out here longer than any other realtor, we know the difference between a house and a home. Yet astoundingly, the big conglomerates just don’t seem to get it. We will provide the efficiency and technology of a global giant, yet be intimate enough to know what’s truly important, and to protect your interests, both tangible and intangible. Reach out to your friends at T&C soon. The rest of your life starts today.

Owned and Operated by Town & Country Real Estate of the East End LLC

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A FO U N TA I N H O U S E ’ S B R E A K FA ST AT L E C I R Q U E

Janet Gaffney and Jennifer Oken

Chiara Edmands and Dara O’Hara

Jackie Morriss and Hannah Swett

Eliza Nordeman, Kathleen Kocatas and Erin Berger 64 QUEST

Kristi Swartz

Fiona Rudin, Lief Stiles and Kate Allen

Florence Guerra

Shari Lusskin and Lorna Graev

A N N I E WAT T

Karen Glover


INTRODUCING THE GIVING BACK **Ê 9Ê ,Ê Ê FEATURING -8/9Ê*,/ ,-Ê Ê -*,/" -Ê"Ê/ ÊGIVING BACK FOUNDATION

YOU ARE INVITED TO INNOVATE AND DONATE IN THIS HEARTWARMING APP, WHICH FEATURES: UÊ"6 Ê Ê 8*  Ê6 "-Ê"Ê ,/ UÊ"6 Ê Ê 8*  Ê-/Ê UÊ- ," Ê/ 8/Ê "1/Ê ,/ -Ê Ê--" UÊ -*,/" Ê+1"/ UÊ1-

UÊ1 "Ê"Ê ,Ê  UÊ-" Ê /7", ]Ê/7// ,]Ê Ê ""Ê  Ê"**",/1 / -Ê /"Ê" Ê ,/ -Ê Ê 1- -]Ê/,"1Ê/ GIVING BACK FOUNDATION UÊ, Ê

--Ê6Ê/1 -Ê" Ê* -


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S O C I E T Y O F T H E FO U R A R TS I N PA L M B E AC H TOA ST E D I TS N E W W I N G

George and Edith Dixon

Lisa and Jimmy Dobbs 66 QUEST

Edward and Susie Elson

Tom and Melinda Hassen

Susan and Rip McIntosh

Harry Elson with Betsy and George Matthews

Pat Cook and Bob Nederlander

Lynn and John Pohanka

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Heather and Patrick Henry


PHILANTHROPY IS ALWAYS IN FASHION ...

SHOP POSH

®

40TH ANNIVERSARY

The hottest sale for designer and vintage pieces at sizzling prices! ®

POSH SALE Sneak Peek • May 2, 2013 Opens to the Public

May 3–5, 2013

For tickets, call (212) 821-9445 or e-mail pfarmer@lighthouse.org Kick off the hottest sale with ...

A POSH AFFAIR ®

Dinner

May 2, 2013

Honoring Visionaries

Alex Hitz Author

Lorry Newhouse Fashion Designer Hope Gimbel Solinger POSH Co-founder ®

Julie Wainwright Founder and CEO, The RealReal

For tickets, call (212) 821-9428 or e-mail poshaffair@lighthouse.org POSH MEDIA PARTNER

40 YEARS OF FASHIONABLE PHILANTHROPY® ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT

DEDICATED TO HELPING PEOPLE OF ALL AGES OVERCOME THE CHALLENGES OF VISION LOSS. MANY THANKS TO BIL DONOVAN FOR HIS POSH ILLUSTRATIONS


CALENDAR

APRIL

On April 16, the Salvation Army will host its “Reflections on Style” event at the River Oaks Country Club, which will include a fashion presentation and a sale of second-hand accessories and clothing to benefit charity. For more information, call 832.201.8023.

2

4

Publicolor’s “Stir, Splatter, and Roll” event will be chaired by Michael Kors and Fern Mallis at 6 p.m. at the Martin Luther King, Jr. High School at 122 Amsterdam Avenue. For more information, call 212.213.6121.

Career Transition for Dancers, an organization with locations in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York, will host “Heart and Soul” at 6:30 p.m. at Club Colette. For more information, call 561.329.9932.

IN LIVING COLOR

FROM YOUR HEART

WINE AND DINE

Henry Street Settlement will honor Reed Krakoff and Alexandra Lebenthal at a dinner dance at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

5

God’s Love We Deliver will host its “Authors In Kind” lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Metropolitan Club. For more information, call 212.294.8162. ALL THAT GLIMMERS

The South Florida Science Museum’s gala will take place at The Breakers. For more information, call 561.832.1988.

The Glimmerglass Festival’s gala will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Club. For more information, call 607.547.0700.

7

15

Daniel Boulud will celebrate the 20th anniversary of Restaurant Daniel to benefit Citymealson-Wheels at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.687.1290.

The “Gray Matters” lunch will support the Coumbia University Medical Center’s research at 11 a.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 212.304.7227.

8

16

The International Women’s Health Coalition will hold a benefit at 6:30 p.m. at The Pierre. For more information, call 212.463.0684.

The Salvation Army’s “Reflections on Style” event will be at 10 a.m. at the River Oaks Country Club. For more information, call 832.201.8023.

HEAR ME ROAR

68 QUEST

JOIN THE CLUB

DOWN TO A SCIENCE

A TOAST TO TASTE

On May 11, the Southampton Historical Museum will host a tour of Southampton homes from 1 to 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at Sant Ambroeus Southampton. For more information, call 631.283.2494.

9

BRAIN FOOD

IN ST YLE


CALENDAR

APRIL HOCUS POCUS

City Harvest will host An Evening of Practical Magic at 6:30 p.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street. The event will honor Marc Murphy, chef and owner of Benchmarc Events and Benchmarc Restaurants. For more information, call 646.412.0647.

17

FUTURE GENERATIONS

The Child Center of New York will celebrate its 60th anniversary at Guastavino’s. For more information, call 212.675.9474. FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD

The Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) will hold a lunch at 11 a.m. at Cipriani 42nd Street. FARE was founded in 2012 after the merger of the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network and the Food Allergy Initiative. For more information, call 212.980.1615. TO ROME WITH LOVE

The American Academy in Rome will host its Tribute Dinner at 7 p.m. at The Plaza. For more information, call 212.751.7200.

18

HIGH SOCIET Y

The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NYSPCC) will hold a lunch at 12 p.m. at The Pierre. NYSPCC is the world’s first child-protection agency. For more information, call 212.463.0684.

On April 22, the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s Spring Ball will take place with Shelley Carr, Julia Koch, and Karen LeFrak acting as chairs. For more information, call 212.639.2103.

19

TO GO OR NOT TO GO

The Adirondack Shakespeare Company will present 1 Henry VI at 7:30 p.m. at the Queens campus of St. John’s University. And on the 21st, it will present Richard III at 2 p.m. For more information, call 518.326.8468.

22

HAVE A BALL

The Society of MSKCC will host its Spring Ball at 7 p.m. at the

Metropolitan Museum of Art. For more information, call 212.639.2103.

ART FOR ART’S SAKE AMAZING ANNIVERSARY

The Bronx High School of Science will celebrate its 75th anniversary at 6:30 p.m. at the Waldorf=Astoria. For more information, call 212.763.8599.

27

PARIS, JE T’AIME

The Dixon Gallery and Gardens of Memphis will toast the opening of its “Bijoux Parisiens” exhibition. For more information, call 901.210.0054.

30

UNDER ONE ROOF

The Fountain House’s symposium will speak on “Mental Illness and the Family” at 11:15 a.m. at The Pierre. For more information, call 212.874.5457. HOPE FLOATS

The Hope Funds for Cancer will present its awards for research at 6:30 p.m. at 1000 Fifth Avenue. For more information, call 401.847.3286. EAST MEETS WEST

On April 7, Daniel Boulud—one of the country’s most accomplished and beloved chefs—will celebrate 20 years of Restaurant Daniel at 60 East 65th Street. For more information, call 212.687.1290.

MAY 1

The New York School of Interior Design will honor Geoffrey Bradfield at the Asia Society. For more information, call 212.452.4197.

The Society of the Four Arts will host its “Dos de Mayo” event in the Society’s garden. For more information, call 561.655.7227. LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN

The preview for the Art and Antique Dealers League of America’s show will happen at 5 p.m. at the Park Avenue Armory. For more information, call 800.587.7632.

2

LEAD, DON’T FOLLOW

The Young Women’s Leadership Network will spotlight its CollegeBound Initiative at Jazz at Lincoln Center. For more information, call 212.481.5005.

6

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS

The “Spring for Music” series will take place at Carnegie Hall through the 14th, with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra performing on the 8th. For more information, call 212.247.7800.

11

A PLACE TO CALL HOME

A tour of Southampton homes to benefit the Southampton Historical Museum will begin at 1 p.m. For more information, call 631.283.2494. APRIL 2013 70


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC

Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

GARRISON, NY  In addition to stunning Hudson River views, this spacious home, a mix of traditional and contemporary style, offers peace and privacy on 9.12 acres. The open living/dining room features 20 foot ceiling, a soaring stone fireplace and wall of windows. The generous kitchen includes a more informal dining area and access to the screened porch. The huge first floor master suite, added in 2005, plus three upstairs bedrooms provide ample space for family and guests. Outdoors, expansive decks provide the ideal spot to relax and enjoy the calming mountain and river views. Offered at $2,900,000.

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


H A R RY B E N S O N

Bill Paley, founder of the CBS empire, photographed at home in New York City in 1985 beside Pablo Picasso’s Boy Leading a Horse.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY WILLIAM S. “BILL” PALEY had an amazing life, and an amazing career. Starting with a string of small radio stations in 1927, he built the radio and television giant CBS during the most interesting time—the transition from the reign of radio to the beginning and then dominance of the television era. His news division included the legendary greats Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite. The shift from radio to black-and-white television and then to color T.V. is, to me, a most fascinating part of the history of broadcasting, and Paley was instrumental in every step of the way. He left behind an incredible and powerful legacy, and he remained active as chairman of the board until his death in 1991. Mr. Paley was most charming and personable when I photographed him in 1985 at his 820 Fifth Avenue apartment, standing next to one of his most famous paintings: the 1906 masterpiece Boy Leading a Horse, by Pablo Picasso (estimated to be worth over $100 million at the time of Paley’s death). He left his vast collection of paintings to the Museum of Modern Art. With his elegantly beautiful second wife, Babe, they became the society couple to emulate—she on the best-dressed list and social circuit, and he as head of CBS, president of the Museum of Modern Art, and a major philanthropist. But to me the most fascinating thing about Bill Paley was his contribution to the 20th century in the form of the CBS network. The historic events he lived through and that were chronicled by CBS make for an incredible legacy that will never be forgotten. X 72 QUEST


TA K I

Julian Fellowes, who

MIND OVER MANNERS

created Downton Abbey, also writes on the necessity of manners, like he did in his book Snobs: A Novel.

THIS IS FOR any of you who are fans

of Downton Abbey, the addictive BBC series that runs on PBS and just finished its third season. The creator of Downton Abbey, Julian Fellowes—recently elevated to Lord Fellowes on the basis of his T.V. success—is a bald, rotund chap whom I sat next to a long time ago during a lunch at my London club. He could not have been nicer, though slightly insecure, since he mentioned his wife’s title about three times during the meal. This was long before Fellowes struck it rich with Gosford Park and Downton Abbey, both of which he wrote. I didn’t know of him or anything about him so I stuck to the usual platitudes about St. James’s Club life and how much it had changed. Men now work too hard to spend all day in their club, hence more and more unsuitable people are elected, with unfortunate results. Fellowes agreed before going on to tell me about Edwardian and Victorian life and the utter bliss he would have felt had he been born back then. After lunch, we shook hands and I never saw him again, although now I certainly hear about him nonstop. After he rose to the peerage, he and his wife wrote a silly article about table manners. And it was one that I felt needed a response. Basically, what they said was that when they see someone using a fork and knife in the manner with which one


This page, from left: The servants of Downton Abbey, a T.V. series about early 20th-century England; Lord and Lady Fellowes.

holds a pen, they instantly dismiss the person as the wrong sort. Although I take a back seat to no one where manners are concerned, the idea that I would refuse to converse with, say, a great writer because he didn’t know how to hold a utensil seemed as outrageously snobby as it gets. Conversely, the idea of sitting next to an upper-class, boring, freeloading twit who uses his knife correctly is almost as unappealing. I wrote about this in my Spectator column and later heard from a friend that Lord and Lady Fellowes had hurt feelings. Well, I guess that’s too bad for them. What I didn’t bother to write were a few truths about the Victorian and Edwardian periods in grand country houses—as far as the “downstairs” crowd was concerned. The England that I got to know during the Sixties was a far more class-ridden society than it is now. Even as recently as 40 years ago, millions of English people despised one another for no better reason than their accents, ethnic origins, or the way that they held cutlery. Out in the countryside, it was still an upstairs-downstairs world. Sixty years before that, let’s say at the turn of the century, it was more Les Misérables than Downton Abbey, with its cricket matches between servants and masters. For example, the Duke of Devonshire, who regularly flies over to these shores looking for funds to upkeep his beloved Chatsworth house, had a grandfather

who had 200 personal servants. The form back then was to never thank, address, or acknowledge the exhausted underlings. Meanwhile, ladies had nothing to do but lie on a sofa and read novels all day. No master ever opened a door, which were operated by footmen wearing white gloves and white powdered wigs. If a man had a late night assignation with a lady, his personal butler would accompany him to her room and wait outside until his master had finished the brutal business. (It never lasted too long.) And, of course, the landed gentry never worked, for to earn one’s living was considered very vulgar. Not only was manual labor abhorred, but doctors and lawyers were looked down upon and seldom received socially. Wellconnected army officers and the higher members of the clergy were often invited as company, but anyone linked with the arts, the stage, trade, or commerce could never be asked for the weekend or for dinner. I remember as recently as 1979 bringing a journalist to a party given by an English swell. I was told the next day not to do it again. “Not our sort, people who scribble,” said the host. In 1900, there were four million maids in British households, often recruited from orphanages. A cook earned £10 a year, a parlor maid £5 per annum. Apart from lighting the fires, cleaning the ranges, filling the coal scuttles, and scrubbing the steps, a maid also had to iron the newspa-

pers and her master’s shoelaces, and wash the loose change. Kitchens, which were full of ants and beetles, were conveniently situated as far away from the main dining and sleeping areas as possible and ladies never spoke to their servents directly if they could help it. At Belvoir Castle (pronounced “beaver” castle), seat of the Duke of Rutland, there were four servants whose only job was to light and put out the candles. Servants were not allowed to get sick, nor were they encouraged to dress above their station. There were no pensions. One died on the job. So, dear readers, the next time you run into Lord Fellowes, be sure you hold your knife and fork correctly. And the next time you watch Downton Abbey, ignore the badinage that goes on between the master and his butler, as well as the intimate secrets exchanged between Lady Mary and her personal parlormaid. Most important of all: the next time your hired help takes a threeday holiday while you’re lying in bed ill with the flu, make sure you read them this essay. They’ll most likely strangle you, but what the hell. You’ve made your point. The British working classes have been doing just that ever since World War I, refusing to work, getting drunk, and loathing anyone with a posh accent. Everything comes around. X For more Taki, visit takimag.com. APRIL 2013 75


THE REAL MAD MAN BY CHUCK PFEIFER OVER THE LAST 50 YEARS, the names Rosser Reeves, Phil

Dusenberry, David Ogilvy, and Mary Wells have continually surfaced as some of the most innovative leaders in advertising. All the aforementioned came from the creative ranks. Yet, another leader, Edward Noonan Ney, a management personality, also rose to international prominence. Management aside, he had an appreciation for creativity, which helped make Young & Rubicam the most celebrated advertising agency in both size and elegance. Unquestionably, Young & Rubicam was the most stylish of all the big advertising agencies worldwide. That style was what numerous clients sought out in trying to keep and enlarge their marking platforms. After Ed took over as Chief Executive Officer in the New York bureau, his trusted lieutenant, Alex Brody, was given the responsibility of maintaining the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s international presence. Ed refers to the multi-lingual Brody as his best lieutenant. When asked what country had the best marketing know-how, Ed said the United Kingdom had no peer, and he also refers to David Ogilvy, a Brit, as the best ever in advertising. 80 QUEST


PROFILE

This page, from left: Edward Noonan Ney in the September 2012 issue of Adweek magazine, photographed circa 1977; Ney meeting with President Ronald Reagan. Opposite page: “The real mad man” in Manhattan (above); Edward and his wife, Patricia Murray Wood (below).

But who is Ed Ney? An Amherst graduate, Ed immediately took charge. He was a very popular personality at Amherst and was elected editor of the college newspaper. After Amherst, he nurtured his leadership skills as a U.S. naval officer. He subsequently went to Young & Rubicam as a junior account executive for General Foods—package goods are the most lucrative for a big ad agency, and Ed excelled on the account. His performance abilities at General Foods led to his title of CEO of Young & Rubicam International. I met him shortly thereafter and his presence and accomplishments inspired me. In a relatively short time, he was regarded at Young & Rubicam and by his competitors as a wunderkind in the business. He soon became CEO of the entire shooting match. Over his Young & Rubicam tenure, he won nearly every award in the business and became a legend in his own time. Furthermore, Ed was extremely handsome and had a Sean Connery/Cary Grant persona, but better looking. His voice commanded respect with its husky tonality; he could easily

have been a movie star, but was too smart for that. He’s been married three times and I will only comment on his current wife, Pat Ney, one of the most beautiful grand dames of New York and Southampton. She was the most pleasant and generous personality to match her beauty. Finally, and most importantly, during the George W. Bush administration, the president asked him to be our Ambassador to Canada. He accepted the assignment and improved the neighborly relationships ten-fold in the economic area. Former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney cites Ney as having been the most effective U.S. Ambassador to Canada in modern times. Ed Ney is an American treasure. Recently at Michael’s, a well-known haunt in midtown, I mentioned at the front desk that Chris Meigher and I had just finished an interview with Ed Ney. At least four women in my immediate presence wanted to talk about him and then all asked how he was doing. My interview capped a 43-year period since I was first interviewed by him in 1970. I am proud to be his friend. X APRIL 2013 81


ONCE AGAIN, classical music fans have the opportunity to en-

joy six concerts by a range of unique North American orchestras at the “Spring for Music” festival next month at Carnegie Hall. The festival was established to highlight orchestras performing creative, stimulating, and adventurous programs. This year’s festival will run from May 6 to the 11th—one week and six concerts from five orchestras, with tickets starting at $25. For residents of New York, the festival offers a menu of some of the accomplished talent at work in other cities. This year’s festival highlights the National Symphony as well as the Baltimore Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, and Albany Symphony. A mid-week highlight comes on Wednesday, May 8, when New York-native JoAnn Falletta returns with the Grammy Award-winning Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. After all, 82 QUEST

The New York Times has named her “one of the finest conductors of her generation.” Trained at the Mannes School of Music and the Julliard School, Falletta is the recipient of many of the most prestigious conducting awards in existence, including the Seaver/ National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award, a coveted honor from the Stokowski Competition, and the Toscanini, Ditson, and Bruno Walter awards for conducting, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra League’s prestigious John S. Edwards Award. Ms. Falletta is internationally celebrated as a vibrant ambassador for music and an inspiring artistic leader. An effervescent and exuberant figure on the podium, she has been praised by The Washington Post as having “Toscanini’s tight control over ensemble, Walter’s affectionate balancing of

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E B P O ; M . D E LL A S T R A F F I C E A S T. CO M ( J O A N N FA LLE T TA )

MUSIC IN THE HEART OF THE CITY


MUSIC

inner voices, Stokowski’s gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein.” Falletta is invited to guest conduct many of the world’s finest symphony orchestras. This year, she will make return engagements with the Krakow Philharmonic in Poland and the Goettingen Symphony in Germany. She’ll also debut with the Czech Philharmonic and Croatia National Philharmonic. The Buffalo Philharmonic plans two Russian works which are quite opposite in style: Giya Kancheli’s “Morning Prayers” from Life Without Christmas and Reinhold Glière’s Symphony No. 3 “Ilya Muromets.” The internationally acclaimed Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the fourth-oldest of its kind in the United States, commands the stage for two nights on May 9 and May 10. The Detroit Symphony is known for its trailblazing performances, visionary maestros, collaborations with the world’s foremost musical artists, and an unwavering commitment to Detroit. While many Rust Belt cities have struggled economically in recent decades, this year’s “Spring for Music” lineup shows classical music remains vibrant, even in the nation’s older industrial cities. “Where industrialists were instrumental in founding and supporting the early development of many of these symphony orchestras, it’s been important for the corporate leaders in today’s more service-based United States economy to maintain support for these cultural gems in their communities,” said Peter Eliopoulos, chief marketing officer

of M&T Bank—a major sponsor of the Buffalo Philharmonic. “Cultural institutions contribute so much to the quality of life in these North American cities, and they’re important civic assets when you’re trying to recruit new medical doctors, research professors, and business leaders to town.” According to the website for “Spring for Music,” the festival operates on the belief that an orchestra’s fundamental obligation is to lead and not follow taste, and that imaginative programming will advance, and not just satisfy, expectations. “Spring for Music” provides a laboratory, free of the usual marketing and financial constraints, for an orchestra to be creative with interesting, provocative, and stimulating programs that reflect its beliefs, standards, and vision. Creative programs also reflect each orchestra’s particular characteristics of sound, ensemble, and style, as determined by its musicians, music director, and tradition. Its philosophy comes from the belief that an artistic point of view must be infused into everything an orchestra does. Great programs have imaginative, meaningful, and deliberate thought behind the selection of pieces, the sequence of pieces, the program structure, and the presentation of pieces. The festival clearly provides an opportunity to celebrate classical music through a range of unique performances. X For additional information about “Spring for Music” and tickets to the event, please visit www.springformusic.com.

This page: The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra will perform at “Spring for Music” at Carnegie Hall. Opposite page, clockwise from left: JoAnn Falletta, an acclaimed conductor; the horn section of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; the strings section.


DESIGN

GRACIOUS HOME: TRANSCENDING FORMULA

84 QUEST

with an artistic touch; but you can also find basic whites and blues—all able to create exquisite place-settings for your dining room. Gracious Home prides itself on working with the new and talented designers. Other fantastic new products include the unique Suki Cheema pillows and throws, John Robshaw’s beautiful bedding and decorative textiles, and Waylande Gregory’s many wonderful accessories. These amazing and stylish treasures are a testament to Gracious Home’s dedication to only carry the best in quality and design. With its roots as a neighborhood hardware store, Gracious Home keeps up with the latest trends and continues to instill the best in customer service. This April will mark the launch of their registry program, where each couple can have a personal registry consultant who can perfectly tailor their combined taste into

a custom-crafted home. Also available is the personal gift registry for any and all occasions. The consultants will formulate the registry according to your personality and unique decorative style. With interior design services of custom window treatments and drapery, custom headboards, fabrics, wall coverings and bespoke rugs (hand-knotted in Nepal, with over 100 naturally dyed colors to choose from) the staff can help turn your design dreams into a tangible reality. Gracious Home improves on its client relationships by having knowledgeable specialists. There is nothing that they can’t help with. Stop in and see for yourself. X This page: Octagonal plates from various Oscar de la Renta Dinnerware sets—the perfect accessory for the dining room. Opposite page: One of the new Spring 2013 introductions from Osborne & Little, featured in the Gracious Home Interior Design Department.

CO U RTE S Y O F G R AC I O U S H O M E

YOU HAVE TO hand it to Gracious Home—the go-to destination for all things design-driven in the home world. Not many stores have the ability to carry an impressive array of products without feeling like a labyrinth. Curating its showrooms with a magical touch, creating an inviting environment for everyone who walks through its doors, Gracious Home has something for designers and design enthusiasts alike. Textiles, bedding, furniture, lighting, housewares, and cutting-edge cutlery only begin to describe what this dazzling, one-of-akind store has to offer. Also among the popular products at Gracious Home are the new Oscar de la Renta dinnerware sets. Marked by their octagonal shapes and warm colors, the plates hit on the latest design trends. Some of the styles evoke the look of ancient Chinese porcelain, while others have cloud-like atmospheres topped


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

JONATHAN CRYSTAL Executive Vice President Crystal & Company

INSURANCE NEEDS IN AN EVER-CHANGING ECONOMIC CLIMATE WHEN WORKING with a client we con-

sider his or her lifestyle and overall financial objectives first and foremost. They have worked hard to get to a point where they can enjoy life’s rewards. A trend we have noticed recently is a move for clients to invest more heavily in real property, such as homes, fine art, jewelry, and rare wines, rather than the markets. This can be a prudent way to structure a portfolio and this allows the client to invest in their passions. One of our clients recently decided to liquidate $50 million from his security portfolio in order to purchase some rare Asian art. He is an avid collector and felt that not only were they beautiful pieces he would enjoy having, but they were also a stable investment. Our discussion with him focused on how he could insure these items as well as ways to protect his investment and avoid potential issues regarding title and authenticity. We have also seen clients take a more active role in managing their existing collection. We have a lot of conversations around proper documentation and valuation. Art values fluctuate over time, so having an up-todate appraisal and a record of items is crucial in the event of a loss. Our recommendation to keep values updated goes beyond art as well. It’s important to make 86 QUEST

sure that homes and other tangible assets are properly protected and appraisals are kept current. Uncertainty also means we field more questions from clients regarding the financial security of their family. Affluent individuals have the means to set aside emergency funds but often turn to us for ways to make sure their loved ones

Trading days of yore: Wall Street in the 1920s.

are protected. Every client’s situation is different, so having conversations and revisiting key planning assumptions is something we try to do every few years, or as life events or business results dictate. Reviewing estate planning documents and examining clients’ existing and desired plans is central to the discussions. Many of our clients have come to view life insurance as both a strategic wealth transfer planning solution as well as an attractive, tax-efficient alternative asset category for their low-yielding safe money. Philanthropic commitments are also a growing concern. Now more than ever we are hearing from clients wanting to know how they can make sure that, no matter what happens, they are able to continue to fund the causes they care about. Using life insurance as part of their charitable contributions or to support their planned giving commitments is an option we advise them to consider. Changes in tax and health care laws have also brought long-term care to the forefront of people’s minds. The emotional strain of caring for an aging family member can affect an individual’s finances. Advanced planning for end of life events and determining if longterm care insurance is an appropriate choice to help protect one’s family can help alleviate some difficult decisions down the road. There are so many factors, both in today’s environment and in the future for our clients to worry about. It’s important for us to make them feel secure and protected and do what we can to help them manage potential risks. At the end of the day, we want them to be confident in the decisions they have made for themselves and their families. For more information call 212.344.2444 or visit www.crystalco.com.

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

MONEY MATTERS


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A trader on the ďŹ&#x201A;oor of the New York Stock Exchange.


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The faรงade of the New York Stock Exchange circa 1900.


T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

MONEY MATTERS

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

IT HAS ALWAYS been our contention

that good communication between the client and advisor is the key to reaching goals. Since the fall of 2012, we have been actively contacting our clients to reevaluate their goals to ensure that we can properly prepare for the risks ahead. While the current political environment could cause an economic slowdown and/or a decline in stock prices, we do not believe it would be comperable to the magnitude of the decline realized in 2008. Financial markets have been extremely volatile since the 2007 crisis, and many advisors spent time trying to calm the fears of clients. Over the last few months, investors have again been thrown into choppy seas, first with the fiscal cliff and now with the budget sequesterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just as the U.S. economy appears to be building momentum, and equities are breaking through to all-time highs. While this period of uncertainty has again elevated risk levels, it is important for investors to remember that these periods have historically also represented opportunity. Despite the issues over China, Europe, and the fiscal cliff last year, the U.S. economy continued to gain momentum. We believe that successfully navigating through the current political environment will require a focused, organized process. There are the major geo-political risks that we believe could influence economic growth. The current budget sequester will have more of a negative economic impact the longer it remains in place, and we will continue to adjust our valuation models as more time passes without a budget deal. Both GDP and corporate earnings growth have accelerated the last couple of years as a result of the actions taken by the Federal Reserve. The low interest rate environment has allowed corporations and individuals to reduce debt, improve balance sheets and deploy capital to other areas. This fall, it is unclear whether or not the Federal Chairman will remain in his role, which could have a significant impact on economic activity, while the ongoing crisis in Europe and uncertain growth prospects for China remain on the radar. While there is evidence sup-

DOMINICK LOMBARDI Director, Investment Management & Trust IDB Bank

COMMUNICATIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VITAL ROLE IN A VOLATILE MARKET porting the idea that political uncertainty could have an effect on economic growth, it is equally important to look at asset valuations. Regarding fixed income, rates remain at historically low levels, and we believe that on a valuation basis there is a negative risk/reward ratio. We have been actively reducing our maturities and investing in quality, believing that the long-term inclination is for interest rates to increase. Equity prices are off to a strong start in 2013 with the S&P 500 increasing almost 10% year-to-date, however, valuations are beginning to get stretched and we would not rule out a price decline. Real asset prices have been mixed this year as global economic growth remains suspect but we would keep some exposure as a means to reduce overall portfolio volatility. Given this outlook we would advise clients on the basis of two time horizons. For those clients with a short-term time horizon of less than three years, our advice would be to limit exposure to the equity markets. These clients donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the time to withstand the expected volatility of at least one full economic cycle, which is always a possibility. Given our outlook for the fixed income markets, we would generally recommend implementing a shorter-term laddered maturity schedule that utilizes high-grade corporate or taxable municipal securities. For those clients with longer time horizons, we would advise varying allocations to both fixed income and equity securities. There is empirical data, evidenced by the Callan Historical Asset

Return Chart, which suggests that balanced portfolios produce a more consistent return over time. We would advise clients with a heavier fixed income weighting to remain with shorter maturities to take advantage of any weakness in equities as a means to increase exposure, or invest in shorter maturity assets only where duration and quality could be controlled. For those clients with a higher exposure to equities, we would use this environment to ensure that there is diversification among the various equity classes and/or take some profits to either go back into stocks at lower prices, or increase fixed income holdings utilizing shorter maturities. We advise our clients not to time the markets, but rather structure a diversified portfolio of liquid assets that, when combined, can produce a desired return over time. The key to any successful financial plan is the constant communication with our clients to ensure that the portfolio is in sync to meet their long-term goal. This information is intended to assist investors. The information does not constitute investment advice or an offer to invest or to provide management services. Prior to making any investment, a prospective investor should consult with its own investment, accounting, legal, and tax advisers to evaluate independently the risks, consequences, and suitability of that investment. For more information, call 212.551.8500 or visit www.idbny.com APRIL

2013 89


NAME

V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

MONEY MATTERS JAMES MEANY President Sabadell Bank & Trust

A STRATEGY FOR HOW TO HANDLE YOUR INVESTMENTS BE CAREFUL! When you look back through history, uncertain times are the norm, not the exception. The most recent example is the “fiscal cliff” at the end of 2012. Mainstream media strongly suggested that the markets would dramatically fall due to higher taxes on capital gains and dividends. We now know that through the second week of March, 2013, just the opposite occurred with equity markets up sharply and the DOW reaching record highs. The political nature of risk today means investors need to change the way they think about potential downside risks to their portfolios. Pure economic data and market trend information is too shallow of an analysis to understand real risk and reward. Understanding the implications of political actions is key to assessing value in asset classes and markets. We must break down both the fundamental economic risks and the political risks (macro and micro) facing client’s portfolios into smaller components and consider that political risk plays an equally important role in managing one’s wealth. Investing when political risk is high can be troublesome as short-term volatility can destroy an investor’s future investment appetite. Investors and advisors should maintain an open dialogue to better navigate political risk instead of not investing. Financial advisors should take into consideration the on/off nature of political risk so that an individual’s investment portfolio can survive through different political outcomes. 90 QUEST

Markets can take a sharp turn based on what politicians say. Taking into consideration the abundance of political risks the global economy is facing, we are carefully watching what government and politicians do, in addition to what they say. As recently as last fall, we saw stock markets surge on the promise of monetary easing from the Federal Reserve Bank. While this action finally happened, it is important for investors to be conscious of the underlying risk of investing on political promises. With regard to Europe, investors have been excited by the many promises made but the policy follow through by European

governments has been lacking. Advisors and investors remain inherently nervous, with the scars from the events of 2008 a long way from healed. This, in and of itself, has led to a greater emphasis on the analysis of risks, including geopolitical ones. At the inception of a client relationship with Sabadell, we establish a strategic plan based upon our firm’s investment outlook and the client’s needs, goals, and risk tolerance. We go to great lengths to show clients the worst case scenario (“a shock test”) as well as the more likely scenario over periods ranging from one year to five years. This process helps us arrive at the proper strategic asset allocation and investment selection while significantly reducing the likelihood of client fear and uncertainty. Having a well-reasoned strategic plan and sticking with that plan is the best way to accomplish one’s investment goals. Investors will benefit from a close relationship with their advisors as active management and proper asset allocation will be key in 2013. X For more information, call 800.280.8186 or visit www.sabadelltrust.com

The “Charging Bull” of Bowling Green in downtown New York City.


NAME

T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

Senator Henry B. Steagall, of the Glass-Steagall Act, with Secretary O.K. Weed in 1937.


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UNDERNEATH IT ALL PRODUCED AND WRITTEN BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALIZA ELIAZAROV 96 QUEST


This page: This two-lane alley for bowling, located in the subbasement of the Frick Collection, was installed by the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company in 1916. Opposite page: Woodwork in the subbasement echoes that of the floors above.


THE FRICK COLLECTION presides at 1 East 70th Street,

serving as a sentinel to an era defined by the Industrial Revolution and its meritocracy. Designed by the architects at Carrère and Hastings in 1913-1914, the structure was commissioned by Henry Clay Frick, the aristocrat who earned his name by investing in institutions like the Carnegie Steel Company. Today, visitors are welcomed to the space, which features an enhanced version of the collection that was assembled by Henry Clay Frick. On view, a capsule of Western works from a variety of periods in 16 galleries, including three of the 30-some paintings by Johannes Vermeer in existence. In 2014, the Frick Collection will observe its 100-year anniversary—elegantly, of course. While the structure has expanded since 1914, with additions in 1931-1935 (when the east side of the house with the Garden Court was erected), 1977, and 2011 (when the Portico Gallery was installed), the

98 QUEST


This page: A view of the two-lane alley for bowling, with decorative moulding on the ceiling. The system is made of maple and pine. Opposite page: An engraved fixture on the walls of the subbasement.


interior remains as it was. And sometimes, especially at events where champagne is served and women wear dresses that dust the floor—like the Young Fellows Ball on April 4—one may hear a whisper from the past. The softest whisper, however, emanates from downstairs where, in 1916, a two-lane alley for bowling was installed in the subbasement of the house by the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company—a patented project made from maple and pine that was priced at $850 at the time. The system is operated without electricity, and the ball is returned to the bowler with the use

This page: Pins at the end of the alley and, in the foreground, the track that returns the balls to the bowlers. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Detail on the scoreboard for the billiard table; a Jacobean-inspired engraving on a door; the scoreboard uses “innings” when bowling; the original light switches. 100 QUEST

of physics: a person at the pin end positions the ball on a track, propelling the equipment one hundred feet back to the bowler via a series of angles working in conjunction with gravity. In 2009, The New York Times mused, “Every now and then in New York City, you will come across a thing so perfectly useless it reminds you of an old idea you managed to forget: Superfluous things are often beautiful, and beautiful things are generally superfluous in the end.” Perhaps, but to Henry Clay Frick, the alley was added with purpose; it provided an alternative to the activities he and his family enjoyed, such


as golf, swimming, and tennis. Also, bowling was de rigueur at the beginning of the 20th century, when “bowling saloons” attracted the lower classes and private alleys were a luxury exclusive to the upper classes. The detailing—moulding, woodwork, and more—echoes that of the rooms above, but without replication. The furnishings are an amalgamation of Chippendale, Jacobean, and William and Mary styles in mahogany and walnut, and an intercom system connects the subbasement with rooms like the pantry. The space also houses a table for billiards or pool, designed

This page: The billards table, which converts into a pool table, is carved from walnut, originally priced at $1,750. Opposite page: A view from the hallway alongside the alley shows original fixtures such as the intercom system and light switches.

102 QUEST

in walnut and priced around $1,750 at the time. In 1920, following the death of her father in 1919, Helen Clay Frick established the Frick Art Reference Library in the alley. There, she endeavored “to encourage and develop the study of the fine arts, and to advance the general knowledge of kindred subjects” by researching the works of the collection. While the library relocated in 1924, the alley continues to serve as a resource (n.b. most people are not permitted to visit the space). It offers a glimpse into the past—a story with an emphasis on artisanship that continues to resonate today. X


A FOREVER GREEN THUMB Landscape architect Mario Nievera demonstrates the diversity of his design talents in the pages of his book, Forever Green. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN 104 QUEST


106 QUEST

pool is encircled by beachy shades, designed to be seamless with the scenery provided by Shinnecock Bay. Also in the Northeast—in Southampton—a simplified version of the Hampton aesthetic sees a home enveloped in a diversity of shrubbery: blue spruce, plum, and holly. The result is a property that is more bucolic, less manicured. According to Nievera, the challenge of the Northeast rests in the seasons: “Landscaping in the Northeast of the United States is difficult, since most clients desire gardens with interest all year long.” For a residence in Connecticut, he addressed the concern with boxwood, yews, spruce, purple-leaf plum

CO U RTE S Y O F P O I N T E D LE A F P R E S S

Press), Nievera’s work is showcased with photography by Michael Stavaridis. Since 1996, when Mario Nievera Design was established, the landscape architect has consulted on hundreds of gardens. (In 2011, the company was renamed Nievera Williams Design to include partner Keith Williams.) While Nievera has been hired for projects throughout the world, he predominantly serves the East Coast—from the elegance of Connecticut to the extravagance of Florida. In the Northeast, a shingle-style estate presides over the Atlantic Ocean, conveying the romance of a rolling property that is trickled with color from hydrangeas and lavender. The


“I fantasize about perfect landscapes, driving down long, winding roads, seeing a rustic gated entrance, getting out of my car with the gravel crunching at my feet, walking through more gates into walled courtyards with gurgling fountains.”

This page, clockwise from top left: A pool nestled into the landscape of a Connecticut yard; Nievera collaborated with Mario Buatta, an interior designer, on this rooftop overlooking Carnegie Hall in New York; a Palm Beach home features a pool surrounded with colorful bougainvilleas and palms. Opposite page: Nievera collaborated with David Neff of Neff Architecture on transforming a plot in Connecticut into a home.

trees, azaleas, rhododendrons, and birch trees. In Florida, a Georgian-style house, which was designed by Marion Syms Wyeth in 1938, deserves a garden to complement its aesthetic. The owner requested “Tropi-deco”—a combination of the Art Deco architecture and the tropical climate—which was achieved with a renovated entrance decorated with cycads, gingers, jasmines, and elephant ears as well as coconut palms and foxtail palms. At the Royal Poinciana Chapel in Palm Beach, the design encourages churchgoers to participate with the landscape. A fountain features a crossshaped walkway, allowing one to “walk on water”—a hidden


visual autobiography of the life of its owners. I am certain that our outdoor rooms would never have been such an integral part of our visual story without Mario Nievera.”

maze of paths promotes meditation and self-reflection. Annette Tapert relocated to Palm Beach with her husband in 2001, purchasing a home in need of renovation: “‘Garden’ is much too grand a word for what we inherited. The space was a swimming pool surrounded by a large paved deck reminiscent of an outdoor recreational area at a motel.” Enter Nievera, who transformed the ¾-acre plot with greenery (e.g., agaves, bougainvilleas, gardenias, and palms) and a sensational sense of proportion. Tapert applauds the landscape architect by saying, “A garden, like a house, is a visual autobiography of the life of its owners. I am certain that our outdoor rooms

CO U RTE S Y O F P O I N T E D LE A F P R E S S

“A garden, like a house, is a


This page: A pool area in Long Island features earthy tones of wood and stone so as to blend into the environment it’s surrounded by. Opposite page: The fountain at the Royal Poinciana Chapel in Palm Beach (which was founded by Henry M. Flagler at the end of the 19th century) features a cross- shaped walkway, allowing one to “walk on water.”

would never have been such an integral part of our visual story without Mario Nievera.” Over the years, Nievera has enjoyed a career stemming from his attraction to design—and a successful one, at that. As a child, he recalls dreaming of center-hall Colonial houses and the Tudor-revival style; as an adult, his dreams are his reality. He became enamored with The Official Preppy Handbook by Lisa Birnbach and Love Story, starring Ali MacGraw and Ryan O’Neal. Today, Nievera works with the Manhattanites, the New Englanders, and the Palm Beachers who defined decorative sophistication and simplistic glamour. Forever talented, forever green. X APRIL 2013 109


THE DISCERNING EYE OF A TASTEMAKER B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

the dress code at Annabel’s, the exclusive membersonly club in London. Their names were Paul, John, George, and Ringo. Anyone less than the Beatles at the height of their fame had to don a coat and tie. This was the edict of the founder, Mark Birley, who insisted on keeping up the standards of impeccable manners and class, even in his incredibly jazzy nightclub. Birley was, to many, the ultimate example of English refinement and taste, coupled with an obsessive attention to detail. His London home of nearly 30 years, Thurloe Lodge, was eclectically decorated with classic works of art interspersed with whimsical pieces and personal mementoes, which created a sense of luxurious comfort with every small element. His perfectionism led him to commission a backgammon board with a tapestry playing surface, because he could not stand the rattle of dice on a standard board. Each piece of furniture, picture, and accessory was chosen with the same amount of care, whether a large glass chandelier or a small opaline finger bowl. One of the most famous anecdotes surrounding Birley is that he came up with the idea of wrapping lemon wedges in muslin to contain their pips, demonstrating his creative ability for elegant solutions. Fifty years after after Annabel’s opened its doors, 110 QUEST

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ONLY FOUR MEN ever managed to be excused from


This page: A portrait of Lord Essendon by Sir Oswald Birley, one of the many beautiful works in Mark Birleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection offered for sale by Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Opposite page: A hat, coat, and umbrella stand by W. Smee & Sons.


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This spread, clockwise from top left: “Jockeys Dressing, Cheltenham” by Henry Koehler; a carved pine sculpture of a Rhodesian Ridgeback by Nicholas Johnson; a silver table bell; “Three Spaniel Puppies,” an oil painting from the 19th century; “Louis, Manager of Annabel’s” by John Ward; a Victorian oak library table; a pencil drawing by Max Beerbohm, 1923; model of a schooner; a set of Art Deco bath taps.

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and six years after Birley’s death, Sotheby’s is holding an auction of almost everything from Thurloe Lodge. Birley’s daughter, the artist India Jane, is keeping only a few pieces, including a self-portrait of her grandfather and several small bronzes by Bugatti. The proceeds of the sale will go to her son, Eben, Mark Birley’s only legatee after an acrimonious family rift effectively disinherited India Jane’s older brother, Robin. Birley had abruptly sold all of his clubs, Annabel’s included, before he died, reportedly to keep Robin from having control over them. Robin has since become a successful club owner in his own right. The Sotheby’s collection is Birley’s remaining legacy. One of Birley’s close friends, Sir David Tang, sees the auction as an incredible opportunity for many reasons. “Those of us who knew him should rush forward to retrieve some indelible memories of our shared moments with Mark; and those who did not know him would do well to begin understanding what a true visionary in interior designs is all about.” These personal effects are the testaments to the life of a renowned arbiter of taste. X


This page: A 19th-century British colonial bookcase made of carved zebrawood. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: A Bergère armchair from the first quarter of the 19th century; a drop-dial wall timepiece by Samuel Wilkes, circa 1840; a George III mahogany Canterbury, circa 1800.

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TREASURE BELOW GROUND BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

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SOMETIMES A CREATIVE TYPE can make you believe an impossible idea and connect you to something just because they truly believe it. James Ramsey, the principal of RAAD Studio and creator of the Lowline, is one of those miracle workers. And you should listen to him. Sharp fellow, Ramsey. Studied at Yale, where he won a Bates Fellowship to explore cathedral design in Europe. Became a satellite engineer for NASA. After NASA, went on work at both small and large architecture firms. In 2004, he founded his own practice. RADD Studio was born. Something fascinating happened to Ramsey: he created the proprietary Remote Skylight, a system that channels sunlight through fiber-optic cables, filtering certain types of light,

while still allowing photosynthesis to take place. In short, Ramsey uses a solar collection dish to create natural sunlight underground. It’s ground-breaking. Here’s what else you should know: The Williamsburg Trolley Terminal, which lies below Delancey Street in New York’s Lower East Side, hasn’t been in service since 1948. Ramsey plans to turn it into a public park. And his technology makes this possible. “We focus from the bottom up,” says Ramsey, who is as articulate with his design processes as his words, “not the top down.” Ramsey teamed up with Dan Barasch, whose background spans across the public, private, and non-profit sectors, where the duo, using funds raised from a Kickstarter campaign, showed the public its first glimpse of

This page: An imagination of what the underground Lowline park would look like, once completed. Opposite page: A shot from the first room of the “Imagining the Lowline” exhibition, which took place in September 2012.


This page: A hypothetical tree grows underground. Opposite page: A closeup of the solar panels on a Remote Skylight built by Ramsey and RAAD Studio (above); a family enjoying the Lowline underground park. Many of the original details of the Trolley Terminal are left in tack (below).

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The exhibition, entitled “Imagining the Lowline,” also highlights the Williamsburg Trolley Terminal. There are some incredible features, including remnant cobblestones, crisscrossing rail tracks, and vaulted ceilings. Capturing both modern technology and the Trolley’s old-world charm, the dizzying exhibition is proof that the Lowline is ready for its new title: the first ever underground park. For now, “the focus is on getting the political chess pieces in order to execute this,” states Ramsey. “The Lower East Side was the first stop for our parents, or their parents”— his statement interrupts my thoughts about the political and

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the Lowline. In fact, they ended up raising a lot more than they expected. In the former Essex Market warehouse on the Lower East Side, a Remote Skylight was built. Picture the scene: thriving plants drinking actual underground sunlight—sunlight coming from a complex array of solar panels rather than a skylight. The light has a unique glow and changes as you watch it. “It was sort of a sociological experiment,” Ramsey tells me. The Lowline team wanted to gauge the public’s reaction. Comic relief—not that the project needs it—arrives with a praying mantis nestled in a mossy knoll, sitting on this remarkable design creation.


This page: Viewers admiring a glowing map of the NYC transit system at the “Imagining the Lowline” exhibition in the old Essex Street warehouse. Opposite page: An image of the Williamsburg Trolley Terminal in its current state (above); children play in an imagined section of the Lowline (below).

hard for investors to compare it to other ideas that have been successful and received high praise. The first project that comes to mind is the Highline in Chelsea. This aboveground park, which showcases the urbanity of the city on an old elevated train track, has helped revive the neighborhood and is now a true New York destination. It’s a huge success. And the Lowline can be one too. Sure, funds must be raised and city, state, and federal approval must be granted. But it’s Ramsey and Barasch—pushing the creative envelope in the technology-nourished 21st century—who know how to make their audiences an offer they can’t refuse. X

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technical details of the project. I can sense Ramsey’s pride for the neighborhood, and realize the Lowline could be a major force in repairing the area’s urban fabric. “We’re using future technology to re-connect with the past.” A bigger question: When will the Lowline actually happen? Ramsey and Barasch certainly go beyond the call of duty. And with many of the pieces in place, the Lowline looks as if it’s ready to spring. “It could be five or more years,” Ramsey chimes in. While the exact date is not set, the determination in Ramsey’s voice is confirmation enough that this project will come to light. Since the project is highly original, it’s


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This page, clockwise from top left: The design for an Ionic capital, inspired by those at the Erechtheion in Athens; pilasters with Corinthian capitals; Phillip Dodd. Opposite page: A Hollywood Regency–style home combines painted wall panels with an intricate parquet floor.

FINDING BEAUTY IN THE DETAILS

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IF LOOKING CLOSELY were an art form, Phillip

Dodd would be a grand master. Where most people would see a doorway, he sees the culmination of centuries of meticulous craftwork. In his latest book, The Art of Classical Details (Images Publishing Group), Dodd examines how flourishes and styles from classic architecture are used in contemporary design. As decorator David Easton says, “The details are what matters, because that is where education and the practice of these [classical] principles ensure the art still survives.” Classical architecture is not a single style, but, rather, refers to the principles of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. Most children are taught the basic classical orders in relation to columns: Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite. These styles are still considered to be the epitome APRIL 2013 123


This page: A Palm Beach residence with carved stone (above); paneled walls and details continued from one room to another make a piedà-terre seem larger (below). Opposite page: Details in a Los Angeles home (above); a craftsman applying wax to an entablature (below).

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of excellence, and contemporary designs can often benefit from using the enduring details from that period. Examining the theory behind these designs is a monumental undertaking, so Dodd gathered essays by architects, scholars, and craftsmen to discuss the many different ways classical architecture has affected each successive generation as well as various industries and arts. “The language of the orders has a grammar that is quite as complex as that of musical notation,” writes David Watkin. “We can analyze the west front [of a building] in the same way that we can analyze a fugal composition by Bach.” With subjects ranging from traditional-versus-modern design, the craftmanship associated with intricate detailing, to the evolution of the style, these essays bestow an in-depth education about the importance of the classical. “The essence of Classicism,” according to Robert Chitham, “is the freedom of boundless variation within an overriding framework of discipline,” a definition that could apply not only to the wide scope of topics but to the intellectual rigour of the essays as well. Since theory needs to be put into practice to be fully understood, Dodd then presents 25 contemporary yet classically designed homes. A new country house in Hampshire, England, is adorned with Greek-inspired anthemion leaves, one of the predominent natural forms found in classical decoration. A Park Avenue apartment is restored with highly embellished moldings, cornices, and hand-painted Italian wallpaper. Greek geometric patterns decorate both the inside and outside of a pool pavillion in

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The essence of classicism is the freedom of boundless variation within an overriding framework of discipline.â&#x20AC;? APRIL 2013 125


This spread, from left: The bespoke wood fireplace in the dining room of a Georgian country house. A restored staircase curves gracefully, allowing the hosts to make a grand Hollywood entrance.

Houston, Texas. Seeing all of the sophisticated details in situ affords an understanding of why these small touches can make such a considerable difference. All of that painstaking work, particularly when done by hand, transforms the space into something timeless. Gil Schafer explains that “the classical language of architecture has endured for thousands of years precisely because it can be reinterpreted and reinvented in every age, but it still retains fundamental principles of proportion and detail within each transformation.” The Art of Classical Details puts a magnifying glass to all of the corners, columns, and features that might otherwise go unnoticed—though their effect is still felt, even if unknowingly. These designers and architects must balance drawing on tradition while still creating something new, which can be precarious, but also full of potential. “Classical design can be a source of endless joy and fascination,” affirms Digby Harris. “If some of that pleasure comes through into the finished building, we can count it as a success.” How interesting to discover that, often, the pleasure comes through in these small and unexpected places. X 126 QUEST


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THE UNIVERSE OF DESIGN FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION, as the architectural principle dictates. A recent exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art examines how far that form can be pushed, pulled, and played with while still serving its function. In “Applied Design,” objects are examined for what purpose they serve and how we interact with them, without losing sight of the role their aesthetics play. Kate Carmody, the curatorial assistant in the Architecture and Design department, was one of the people to compose the exhibition. When asked about what attracted her to the concept behind the exhibit, she said, “We were thinking about how diverse the field of design has become with the advent of digital technology. When the department was founded, curators mainly looked at furniture, industrial design (products and manufactured goods), and graphic 128 QUEST

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This page: Massoud Hassani’s “Mine Kafan wind-powered dem iner,” made from bamboo and biodegradable plastics. Opposite page: The “ Applied Design” exhibit at the

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Museum of Modern Art.

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example of a high-concept design that can also help save lives. Keeping up with the times, the museum also added 14 video games to their collection as examples of dynamic and interactive design. Classic titles include “Pac-Man,” “Tetris,” and “SimCity.” While some critics might balk at the idea of this form of popular entertainment being put side-by-side with art, they could not deny the impact that these designs have had on popular culture. Alfred H. Barr, Jr., the founder of MoMA, did explicitly include design in the museum’s mission, so that people could realize how design and art are constantly intertwined. The exhibit also reveals that design impacts the world around us without our conscious awareness. According to Carmody, everything around us is designed with either a lot of conscientious intent and research behind it or as a quick fix, and part of the museum’s mission is to bring awareness about design to the public. “Things can look nice, and they can function, but someone thought about this—from the way you grip a ballpoint pen to the city that you live in, everything has been planned, objects just dont spring into being—and every single one has a story and a process that can teach us something.” The future functions of these forms demonstrate the powerful ideals behind the art of design.X

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design (mainly posters). The study and collecting of design for the digital realm has been happening for over 40 years, and we are constantly evolving as scholars and collectors as to how to handle it—the creativity of designers now does not neatly fit in a box, which is good! You can be a designer today and work on anything from services and systems to games to digital space and research. We see design going in so many different directions—the title was meant to reference how the field of physics has been divided in both theoretical and applied. The laws of physics apply everywhere whether we can see them or not—the same is true of design.” Clearly, design affects more that just what something looks like. It affects how we as people value, use, and interact with it. One of the exhibit’s main pieces, “Mine Kafon” by Massoud Hassani, is a dandelion-shaped mine detonator, equipped with a GPS, designed to roll through mine fields. Made from bamboo and biodegradable plastics, the object can encounter a landmine, detonate it, and will only be partially destroyed so that the remaining pieces can be salvaged and reassembled into a new specimen, ready for deployment. The idea stems from the artist’s own childhood in war-torn Afghanistan, where he witnessed many people close to him ravaged by mines. This is a perfect

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This page: A display of furniture pieces including Louis Campbell’s “Veryround Chair,” Chris Kabel’s “Mesh Chair,”

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and Marcel Wanders’s “Knotted Chair” (above); Dirk Vander Kooij’s “Endless Flow Rocking Chair” (inset). Opposite page: Markus Kayser operating a solar 3-D printing machine in the Moroccan desert; two bowls produced by a computerdriven SolarSinter machine (inset). MONTH 2013 00


For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/wildmedicine


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The country’s original, largest, and most important venue for authentic garden antiques — newly titled Garden Sculpture and Antiques Fair: 1750–2013 — has been refreshed to include many new and exciting dealers specializing in sculpture, ornament, and furniture for the garden, and garden-related art and objects for the home. Bold and refined, contemporary and classic — and more engaging than ever — the Fair will run from April 26 through April 28, 2013 at The New York Botanical Garden. Explore unique antiques and classic through contemporary sculpture from the mid-18th century to the present, including fountains, sundials, statues, birdbaths, benches, botanical prints, and more. The Fair takes place in an expansive tent surrounded by flowering trees and plants adjacent to the landmark Enid A. Haupt Conservatory and is essential for collectors and designers as well as buyers seeking expert advice. More than 30 leading exhibitors plus contemporary artists specializing in outdoor sculpture offer their finest pieces. America’s most celebrated venue for garden ornament will inspire you to enhance your home or garden with works from the United States, France, England, Belgium, Sweden, and Italy.

Chairmen Michael Bruno Mrs. Coleman P. Burke Barbara Israel Barbara Cirkva Schumacher Mish Tworkowski Bunny Williams Designer Chairmen Mario Nievera Emma Jane Pilkington Renny Reynolds Collectors’ Plant Sale Chairmen James Benenson, Jr. Peter R. McQuillan Marjorie G. Rosen Joseph Singer Carmen Thain

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The Fair opens with a Preview Party on Thursday, April 25, from 6 to 8 p.m., and allows enthusiasts and collectors the first opportunity to peruse the modern and contemporary offerings as well as a remarkable array of fine antiques. Preview Party guests are able to make early purchases while enjoying cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. The evening includes a Silent Auction with one-of-a-kind items and experiences, and a Collectors’ Plant Sale that features rare and exotic plants. Sponsored by 1stdibs

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Proceeds from the benefit directly support the horticultural programs and work of the curators and gardeners who are responsible for making NYBG one of the most important horticultural showplaces in the world. Tickets to the Preview Party begin at $200. For more information or to order tickets, please call 718.817.8773 or e-mail cbalkonis@nybg.org

For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/antiques-fair

1. Julie Graham, Barbara Israel, Patti Fast 2. Susan Burke, Friederike Biggs 3. Gigi Mortimer, Tory Burch 4. John Schumacher, Barbara Cirkva Schumacher 5. Gillian Steel, Martha Stewart 6. Katherine Nichols, Mish Tworkowski, Dawn MacNaughton 7. Bunny Williams, Gregory Long 8. Charlotte Frieze, Jill Joyce


Native Plant Garden Grand Opening May 3–5 & May 11–12 The Native Plant Garden is a gift of the Leon Levy Foundation.

In early May, The New York Botanical Garden debuts its new Native Plant Garden, a cutting-edge, 3.5-acre installation with a dramatic 230-foot-long water feature as its centerpiece. It is the most contemporary garden design ever created at the Botanical Garden. The Native Plant Garden was designed by Oehme, van Sweden, landscape architects specializing in the New American Garden style, to harmonize a stunning designed terrain with the diversity of microclimates across the site. The layout, in the middle of the Botanical Garden’s historic grounds, is both sustainable and visually inventive, a radical blend of modern sensibilities along with environmentally friendly elements. Built to inspire and teach visitors about the beauty of native flora throughout the seasons, it also illustrates how native plants can be used to produce attractive and imaginative gardens. Environmentally friendly, locally sourced, and recycled materials are used in many parts of the garden. Benches and buildings are constructed of salvaged, recycled, and sustainably harvested materials. The enclosed facility features a central pool, fed by recycled stormwater captured on site and filtered by aquatic plants that cascades over stone weirs. A promenade of broad boardwalks made from black locust, a native hardwood, and intimate paths lead visitors through a range of settings, from the shaded woodland to the dry open meadow and lush wetlands featuring nearly 100,000 plants. The garden has as its framework a dramatic set of heritage oak trees and is bursting with native trees, shrubs, ferns, grasses, and wildflowers. A covered outdoor classroom pavilion offers a venue for school groups and others to learn about native plants and the birds and insects they sustain. Shelby White, Founding Trustee of the Leon Levy Foundation and Vice Chairman of the Board of the Botanical Garden, commented, “The New York Botanical Garden is one of the great green treasures of our city. The Foundation has been a longtime supporter of its continuing development. Not only will the new Native Plant Garden celebrate the beauty of native plants, it will also serve as an important laboratory for plant study and conservation.”

For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/native-plants


Programs Celebrate the New Native Plant Garden Symposium Friday, May 3; 10 a.m.–12 p.m., Ross Hall Dr. Robert Naczi, the Garden’s Arthur J. Cronquist Curator of North American Botany, explains how plant populations are responding to environmental change. Dr. Douglas Tallamy, Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, discusses the essential role native plants play in sustaining native birds and insects. Author and photographer Rick Darke speaks about using native species to create vibrant designed landscapes. Native Plant Garden lead designer Sheila Brady reveals her vision for creating the new garden. After the dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony following the symposium, tour the garden.

Opening Weekend Celebration

The Native Plant Garden highlights the beauty, diversity, and ecological importance of plants native to northeastern North America.

Saturday and Sunday, May 4 & 5; 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Learn about the Native Plant Garden and its plants to appreciate the importance of these species. Guided tours provide an exploration of the splendor of the natural site. Sample wine, enjoy music, join family scavenger hunts, and more. Visit Shop in the Garden to choose from a wide selection of plants to take home. Visitors also have the chance to explore the history, flora and fauna, and importance of native plants with many organizations in the city such as Audubon New York, Torrey Botanical Society, Native Plant Center, Butterfly Project, and others during talks and workshops. Complementary Adult Education classes are also offered throughout spring and summer.

Mother’s Day Weekend Garden Party Saturday and Sunday, May 11 & 12; 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Continue the celebration of the opening of the Native Plant Garden and treat mom to a beautiful green retreat. Play lawn games, fly a kite, and have a picnic among the spectacular spring blooms. A professional photographer will be on hand to snap pictures to take home. Kids can enjoy hands-on nature activities and create a greeting card for the occasion. On May 12, take in a Bronx Arts Ensemble Family Concert, an interactive performance of the classic tale Jack and the Beanstalk.

For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/native-plants


Edible Academy Family Garden Picnic

Melanie Dunea

June 10, 4–8 p.m. Join Mario Batali for a delightful and delicious picnic, designed by the culinary master himself. Fun activities abound, including learning how to grow vegetables, face painting, tree climbing, and crafts, followed by a booksigning and exciting cooking demonstration by Mario and friends. Then enjoy a festive reception with signature Mario-inspired cocktails and culinary treats. All proceeds benefit The New York Botanical Garden’s Edible Academy, hub of the children’s vegetable gardening program.

For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/familypicnic


Four Seasons in the Conservatory Courtyard May 18–October 27 Four Seasons, in the Conservatory Courtyard, is an installation of four sculptures, each standing more than 15 feet high—Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter—by contemporary American artist and filmmaker Philip Haas. Haas was inspired by the 16th-century Italian Renaissance artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who painted eccentric, yet scientifically accurate, composite heads composed of flowers, ivy, moss, fungi, vegetables, fruit, bark, and branches.

For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org/fourseasons


APPEARANCES

SPRING FORWARD BY HILARY GEARY

FEBRUARY AND MARCH may be bitterly cold in New York, but there is lots going on to keep you toasty warm! A highlight ’twas truly a family affair—the perfect event to take your kiddies to. All the yummy mummies, adorable dads, and doting grandparents headed uptown to El Museo del Barrio to see the debut performance of Bark! In the Park, which was written with music by my very talented 138 QUEST

pal Karen LeFrak. This enchanting ballet for children with choreography cleverly done by Chase Brock was a sold-out performance and it was followed by a party with face painting, games, balloon making, dance lessons, cupcakes, child-size treats, and more! “The British were coming...” so it was back to Palm Beach for more fun. A lot of our English pals had arrived in town and

everyone threw nonstop parties! Darcy and George Gould had a festive dinner for Lily and Sunny Marlborough with two round tables set up and a peacock theme for color and fun! Among the guests were Alfred and Judy Taubman, Grace and Chris Meigher, Bill Pannill, Sunny’s brother Lord Charles SpencerChurchill and Sarah Goodbody, Robin and John Pickett, Kate Ford and Frank

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This page, from left: Wilbur Ross with Darcy and George Gould in Palm Beach; Suzie Gaynor at Jerry Seay and Pauline Pitt’s home.


Chopin, Pauline Pitt and Jerry Seay, former Palm Beach mayor Lesly Smith, Joanne and Roberto de Guardiola, Dr. Jim Walsh, and more. Another night, Pauline Pitt and Jerry Seay opened up their house for a delightful dinner to toast their pal Duncan McLaren, who was visiting over to from London like Charles Spencer-Churchill and Sarah Goodbody. Must say: it was really a treat to walk into a room filled with friends that I have known well over 20 years—oh, how time flies! After sipping cocktails inside, as it was a nippy 60-something degrees (which is considered cold in this town), we sat down to a scrumptious dinner of cannelloni, tenderloin, and a heavenly chocolate dessert. Among the group were Suzie and Vere Gaynor, Polly Peabody and Harry Wulson, Kate and Jimmy

porters of the organization: the beloved late Evelyn Lauder and Alyne Massey. The evening provided an opportunity to toast two women we miss very much. As always, the very talented designer Scott Snyder did not disappoint and created the party’s sensational decoration with a fabulous “Russia in winter” theme, topped off with two towering seven-feettall polar bear ice sculptures. The mouthwatering menu followed the theme as well, with a chilled Stoli vodka shot and vodka-cured gravlax, blinis with caviar and crème fraîche, and tournedos of beef Rossini followed by a dazzling dessert: an edible Fabergé egg with strawberry mousse, fresh sliced strawberries, and flourless chocolate cake. After dancing the night away to Bob Hardwick’s tunes, guests headed home with terrific “loot,”

nization’s dinner dances—from the first dinner dance in 1982 to last year’s 30th anniversary one. A big group of loyal supporters escaped the snow storm in the Northeast to arrive in Palm Beach in time for the Boys’ Club of New York’s Salvatore Ferragamo fashion show. The young and fun spectacle took place in the luscious Brazilian court garden and was followed by a seated lunch at the heavenly Café Boulud. After dining on a perfect light lunch of salad followed by salmon and then strawberry sorbet, everyone scooted off to their tennis or golf games. The Boys’ Club of New York’s president of the women’s board, Sarah Ayres, applauded all of the loyal supporters, including Muffie Miller, Binkie Orthwein,

This page, from left: Talbott Maxey and Alexia Hamm Ryan at a Salvatore Ferragamo-sponsored event; Duncan McLaren and Tina Fanjul in Palm Beach.

Gubelmann, David Ober, Britty Bardes and Johnny Damgard, Kiwi and Landon Hilliard, Becky and Loic de Kertanguy, Tina Fanjul, John Mashek, and more. A Palm Beach “must” is always the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach County’s dinner dance, which was brilliantly chaired this year by Diana Ecclestone. The party was dedicated to the two great ladies who were loyal sup-

including a divine collectable Estée Lauder jeweled compact, Van Cleef & Arpels perfume, a Stubbs & Wootton embroidered pouch, and a Paola Quadretti key ring. Plus, everyone took a wonderful trip down memory lane with a special edition hardcover book created by the Preservation Foundation featuring over 400 photographs on 146 pages that document the history of the orga-

Grace and Elizabeth Meigher, Barbara Smith, Emilia and Lourdes Fanjul, Jessie and Eileen Araskog, Barbara Smith, Anne Harrison, Pauline Pitt, Christine Schwarzman, Ali Hanley, Annette Allen, Karin Luter, Kate Khosrovani, Alexia Hamm Ryan and Candy Hamm, Anne Johnson, Melinda Hassen, Kate Pickett, Susan Burke, Mai Harrison, and more. X APRIL 2013 139


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Brrr... It was cold in March! But our columnist kept moving, with the Big Apple Pond Hockey Classic and a series of “spirited” dinners about town.

Chas McLaughlin, and Chester Patterson repped Grey Lady, the L.E.S. restaurant, on March 2 and 3.

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Jordan Leventhal, Dave Starr,

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“Hong Kong Chinese Food,” the winners of the Big Apple Pond Hockey Classic, with Grant Hewit.

Bruce Burnett with Oliver Horovitz at the book party for An American Caddie in St. Andrews. Lucas Nathan and Lauren Scala with Veuve Clicquot at Peter Luger Steakhouse.

Matt Monath and Rachel Mednick at the Scottish-themed shindig for the book An American Caddie in St. Andrews.

Erica Domesek and Rebecca Minkoff toasted to Veuve Clicquot with glasses of rosé.

Twenty decanters of Legacy by Angostura exist in the

Hannah Bronfman and Erin Fetherston caught

world, with each costing $25,000.

up at Peter Luger Steakhouse on March 11.

“WHY IS A PUCK called a puck? Because dirty little bastard was taken,” said Martin Brodeur, goaltender for the NHL’s New Jersey Devils. Other things that merit such a description? The month of March. Like, seriously. Can the weather be warm? On March 2 and 3, the Big Apple Pond Hockey Classic welcomed 24 teams to Bryant Park. With names like "Moves Like Jagr" and "Pond Scum," they competed three-on-three for the championship: a prize of pride and honor, and Vineyard Vines ties. The event, which was presented by Grant Hewit's Streak-

er Sports, attracted a crowd of spectators to midtown—like the saturday game from Mystery Alaska, but with more athleticism and less Russell Crowe. On the 5th, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of Oz the Great and Powerful with Gucci. The after-party saw a swirl of good witches and bad witches at Harlow, where Andie Arthur, Harry Brant, James Franco, Kristian Laliberte, and Emmy Rossum mixed over Grey Goose and hors d’œuvre. If only leaving the shindig had been as easy as clicking my heels and APRIL 2013 141


repeating, “There’s no place like home”... On the 11th, Veuve Clicquot hosted a multiple-course meal at Peter Luger Steakhouse, so it was down the rabbit hole (read: the subway) and over to Wonderland (read: Brooklyn). I arrived to join Peter Davis, Brendan Fallis, Kelly Framel, Catherine Malandrino, and Tara Rasmus for an hour or two of red meat and rosé. (The pairings included Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame Rosé 2004, Veuve Clicquot Vintage Rosé 2004, and Veuve Clicquot Rosé.) A night that was anything but medium-rare, from the appetizer of bacon to the doggie bags that Juliet Izon and I requested for our “boyfriends.” On the 13th, I commenced at Asprey and continued at The Crown, where guests toasted Legacy by Angostura—the world’s most expensive blend of rum at $25,000 per bottle. The spirit, housed in decanters by Asprey that require 10 craftsmen and

at the Four Seasons Restaurant.

56+ hours to create, was as decadent as the evening. Between the uova da raviolo and the company of Sam Dangremond, Mark Byrne, and Stephanie Wu, I was treated like royalty. On the 14th, the New York Observer toasted to 25 years of public personalities and pink pages. A scene if there ever was one, between Michael Bloomberg, Georgina Chapman, Peter Kaplan, Leandra Medine, Tamara Mellon, Peter Martins, and Lauren Santo Domingo. ’Twas perfect, simply to be there and, you know, observe. On the 20th, Oliver Horovitz fêted his book, An American Caddie in St. Andrews, at the home of his sister, Rachael Horovitz. Themed parties are the best parties, especially when there is lots of scotch (and maybe just a tad of haggis). X

Derek Blasberg, Evan Yurman, and Sebastian Nicolas toasted to 25 years of the New York Observer on March 14.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

Hilary Rhoda, model and scenester,


Carson Griffith and Billy Gray caught up at a New York Observer event at the Four Seasons Restaurant.

Kate Foley attended an event at the Four Seasons Restaurant on March 14.

Genevieve Morton at the Cinema Society after-party, co-hosted by Gucci at Harlow.

Charlotte Ronson, John de Neufville, and Ali Wise at a Cinema Society after-party.

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump celebrated the 25th anniversary of the New York Observer on March 14.

Julia Loomis, who graced Questâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s March 2013 cover, at the Four Seasons Restaurant.

Matthew Kassel and Thomas Leveritt mixed and mingled

Lauren Remington Platt at a New York

over cocktails at the Four Seasons Restaurant.

Observer event on March 14. APRIL 2013 143


SNAPSHOT

A GRAND DESIGN EVEN STEVE JOBS does not measure up to Raymond Loewy in his efforts to streamline daily life. Loewy's impact on modern industrial design cannot be overstated, as LIFE magazine acknowledged when they selected him as one of the 100 most influential Americans of the 20th century. Coca-Cola bottles, cigarette packs, electric razors, refrigerators, locomotives, cars, and buses were all subject to his aesthetic. He summarized his design philosophy with an acronym, MAYA, meaning "most advanced, yet acceptable," which translated into products that were both functional and dynamic. American consumer culture was indelibly stamped by Loewy, as American society was entranced by the Parisborn jet-setter who had houses everywhere from Manhattan to southern France. He proved true his motto: "Between two products equal in price, function, and quality, the betterlooking will outsell the other." â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Lily Hoagland

144 QUEST

This page, clockwise from top left: a clock designed by Raymond Loewy; a coffee shop in the Idlewild terminal he created; his WWII Lucky Strike logo lives on today; the 1946 Greyhound bus that changed modern transportation; Loewy created an icebox for the CocaCola bottles, which he also modernized; Raymond Loewy.


THE ENTRANCE HALL AND FLANKING GALLERIES OF A NEW HOME DESIGNED AND DECORATED BY WADIA ASSOCIATES

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN ~ INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION ~ LANDSCAPE DESIGN (203) 966-0048 ~ WADIAASSOCIATES.COM

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Quest April 2013