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$5.00 DECEMBER 2019

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

NORTH SHORE LADIES AT RYNWOOD, A 1927 GOLD COAST ESTATE questmag.com


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33 sunset avenue, westhampton beach 33 sunset avenue, westhampton beach 14 main street, southampton village 14 main street, southampton village

2287 montauk highway, bridgehampton 2287 montauk highway, bridgehampton 26 montauk highway, east hampton 26 montauk highway, east hampton

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architectural gem gem architectural

Designed by Francis Fleetwood and masterfully constructed with the Designed by Francis Fleetwood and masterfully constructed with the + finest materials, craftsmanship and attention to detail. This 12,300 /- sq. ft. finest materials, craftsmanship and attention to detail. This 12,300+/- sq. ft. estate is sited on 2.2 beautiful acres and features an infinity-edge pool and tennis. estate is sited on 2.2 beautiful acres and features an infinity-edge pool and tennis.

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124 132

CONTENTS The holiday i ssue 100

QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

From brocade to bracelets and coffee presses

to cufflinks, it’s holiday shopping time.

114

by

KaThryn Maier

RYNWOOD: THE ICONIC GOLD COAST ESTATE

The North Shore Land Alliance

emphasizes the importance of preserving historic sites, in collaboration with Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty. by elizabeTh Meigher

124

THE GREAT AMERICAN SONGBOOK

A bandleader reminisces on the beloved

and enduring songs and songwriters of yesteryear. by alex donner

128

HI-TECH COURTS HIGH SOCIETY

The merger of Compass and Stribling

turns out to be a powerful union of heritage and innovation. by KaThryn Maier

132

HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY

The world’s leading academic medical

center dedicated to musculoskeletal health will open a facility in West Palm Beach.

136

RALPH’S 50-YEAR RISE

A new book looks at Ralph Lauren’s life, career, and

influence on the fashion and lifestyle realms. by KaThryn Maier

136


98

144

CONTENTS 100

C oluMns 26

SOCIAL DIARY

80

HARRY BENSON

82

TAKI

84

AT THE CAFFE

The process of choosing a new home-away-from-home.

88

DAISY PRINCE

Quest visits Charlottesville and confirms that Virginia is for wine lovers.

92

ACCESSORIES

94

RETAIL

Third Street South is the glamorous shopping destination in Old Naples, Florida.

96

BOOKS

Event planner Bronson van Wyck shares hospitality know-how.

98

SOCIAL CALENDAR

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

’Tis the season to be jolly—at holiday parties. by david PaTriCK ColuMbia Our photographer captures the great Judy Garland in an unscripted moment.

Art Deco apartments and real-estate reminiscenses.

by

T aKi T heodoraCoPulos by

MiChael T hoMas

Aranyani’s handbags are inspired by Indian crafts and artistry. by KaThryn Maier

by

KaThryn Maier

Our guide to the greatest galas and events this holiday season. Another month of the social circuit. by brooKe Kelly

Jacqueline Kennedy’s hand-painted Christmas cards.

by

daniel CaPPello


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL DEPUT Y EDITOR

ELIZABETH MEIGHER SENIOR EDITOR

KATHRYN MAIER GRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION MANAGER

TYKISCHA JACOBS F E AT U R E S E D I TO R

BROOKE KELLY CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN ALEX HITZ BILL HUSTED JAMES MACGUIRE CHUCK PFEIFER LIZ SMITH (R.I.P.) TAKI THEODORACOPULOS MICHAEL THOMAS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN NICK MELE ANNIE WATT


CORNWALL, CT

WARREN, CT questmag.com PUBLISHER AND C.E.O.

S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

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ext .

106

2 Abutting Separately Deeded Properties. Stone & Clapboard House, Barn/Garage with Guest Apartment & Pond. Converted Barn, Cottage & Pool. Beach Rights. 39± Acres. $2.232.500. Roger Saucy. 860.868.7313.

Totally Renovated 2 Bedroom Cottage. Detached Garage. Horse Barn. Paddock. Pond. Sweeping Views. Central Location. 118± Acres. $1.975.000. Graham Klemm. 860.868.7313.

NEW MILFORD, CT

ROXBURY, CT

Renovated Barn-style Home. 4 Bedrooms. 2 Fireplaces. Patio. Barn. Waterfalls. Views. Excellent Location. 7.35± Acres. $1.100.000. Maria Taylor. 860.868.7313. Claudine McHugh. 203.263.4040.

Private & Pristine Colonial. 4 Bedrooms. Chef's Kitchen with Fireplace. Pool. Stone Terrace. 5-car Garaging. Professional Landscaping. 2.53± Acres. $1.050.000. Joseph Lorino. 860.868.7313.

PA L M B E AC H & M I A M I

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TIMOTHY DERR 847.615.1921 HONG KONG

BINA GUPTA 852.2868.1555

Newly Built Custom Colonial. 3 Bedrooms. Heated Pool. 2-car Detached Garage. Privacy. Views. Idyllic Setting. 4.52± Acres. $1.475.000. Tim Tierney. 860.868.7313.

MILAN

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KLEMM REAL ESTATE LITCHFIELD COUNTY’S PREMIER BROKERS

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JED H. GARFIELD ELIZABETH STRIBLING-KIVLAN KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS ELIZABETH STRIBLING WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2019. All rights reserved. Vol. 33, No. 12. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Clockwise from left: Libba Stribling, Rory Golod, and Elizabeth Ann Stribling-Kivlan; the Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty team at Rynwood; Michael Thomas; Alan Flusser; Daisy Prince; Julie Skarratt.

24 QUEST

to Flusser, a bespoke genius himself. Lastly but hardly least-ly, is a huge hug for the talented, ubiquitous, lovely, and loyal Julie Skarratt, Quest’s Photographer at Large. Needless to say, our Rynwood cover story is 100% pitch-perfect Julie, whose camera can make clouds lift and rain stop...all on cue! As stated earlier, Quest is dependent on the steadfast support of our advertisers and faithful readers. But it would not get to press without the professional and indefatigable efforts of our core team. To James, TJ, Brooke, Kathryn, Kathy, Elizabeth, Rob, and DPC too, my admiration is great and my thanks too few. You have elevated the quality and reach of Quest to a higher bar, of which I know you are deservedly proud. I hope, dear readers, that you agree. Sending you our best wishes for a happy Christmas, joyful holiday, and a healthy new year. u

Chris Meigher

ON THE COVER: Ladies of Locust Valley support the North Shore Land Alliance at Rynwood. L-R: Emily Schaible, Vaughn Dorrian, Kirsten Benjamin, Ashley Dooley, Kimberly Bohner, Liz Swenson, Nitika Moran, Michelle Cuddeback, and Christin Rueger.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; J U L I E S K A R R AT T

IT’S CHRISTMAS AT QUEST, and we couldn’t be merrier about, nor more grateful for the year just ending. Thank you, our loyal readers and our generous advertisers alike, for making 2019 the most successful in Quest’s 33-year history! We jump into our December number with an expansive feature on Rynwood, the grand yet remarkably intimate estate situated in the distinguished hamlet of Old Brookville. Quest traveled out to Oyster Bay in mid-November to photo shoot the dedicated young stalwarts of the North Shore Land Alliance, and to take a firsthand look at this fabled 1927 manor house that still reflects the charming opulence of Long Island’s Gold Coast era. On this page, pictured above, is the brain trust from Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty who are expertly representing the sale of historic Rynwood. Also found in this Holiday Issue is the culinary sensibility of Michael Thomas, the most erudite of Quest’s learned columnists, whose exacting palate has recently transitioned its “go to” gastronomic allegiances. Caffe dei Fiori is now Michael’s new Manhattan “fav,” although he leaves Le Veau with the fondest of memories. Time will tell! And we welcome back the always brilliant Daisy Prince to our pages with her intoxicating report on the ever-improving vineyards of Charlottesville, Virginia. This artful piece launches a new column appropriately titled, “Quest Visits…” and we’re delighted that Daisy will serve as our voice and tour guide while we explore emerging communities up and down the Eastern Seaboard. For all of the well-deserved hoopla and celebrations surrounding Ralph Lauren’s 50th Anniversary (my favorite moment was watching Ralph himself take the mound at Yankee Stadium and throw a first pitch strike!), Alan Flusser’s new book, In His Own Fashion, might be the most “insidery” look at Ralph’s legendary ascension. Plus, we get to peek into the early years in never before seen photos of the original Polo gang, including Buffy and Carter and movie-star-stunning Ricky in their truly formative years. It’s a terrific tribute and tome, and kudos go out


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY AS WE ENTER the final days of the holiday season and the year’s end, the New York social calendar has been bursting with activities, many of which have been major fund-raisers for some of the most prominent philanthropies and institutions of the city.

Today’s Social Diary features are excellent examples of what social life in New York looks like now. Remember those black-andwhite photos of an earlier era of socialites in nightclubs: women in jewels and men in black tie or well-tailored suits looking like “social-

social. It’s about purpose. It’s about ideals. It’s also about getting out and going to a party and having your picture taken. And seeing something or meeting someone. That’s New York today. The actual “holiday” activities begin with the Thanksgiving holiday and end with

ites”? Not any more. We don’t look like that anymore, just as they didn’t look like the Victorians who came before them. The costume has changed, as it always does. And the events have changed with it. We’re living in a philanthropic culture that is yet identifiably

O P E N I N G N I G H T O F T E FA F N E W YO R K AT T H E PA R K AV E N U E A R MO R Y

Caroline and Tom Dean 26 QUEST

Jennifer James, Betsy Pitts, Kate Allen, Marco Felci, Libby Fitzgerald, Lisa McCarthy and Nina Carbone

Molly and Sam Moorkamp

Aerin Lauder and Jo Carole Lauder

Sela Ward and Elizabeth Callender

Kate Richards

B FA

Liz Gardner


T H E

F I E L D

T E A M

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y ' S FA L L L U N C H EO N I N N E W YO R K

Carol Mack and Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos

Kate Davidson Hudson and Lauren Kenny

the celebrations of the incoming New Year number by the score. And aside from the annual, traditional holiday celebrations, a number of the major charities and the city’s cultural institutions raised many millions in the process. On a Thursday fairly early in the season, I went down to the New York Hilton on Sixth and 54th for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s annual Symposium and Awards Luncheon. The symposium, which began at 10:30 a.m., was moderated by BCRF Co-Scientific Directors Dr. Larry Norton of Memorial Sloan Ket28 QUEST

Jo Carson and Greice Vieira-Harroff

Gigi Stone Woods and Amanda Richman Wurtz

tering Cancer Center and Dr. Judy Garber of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The panelists included Dr. Eric Winer of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dr. Dawn Hershman of Columbia U n i v e r s i t y, and Dr. Neil Iyengar of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The actual luncheon began at noon. The Hilton ballroom is enormous, and it was jammed with tables of ten. Since its

Vanessa Eastman and Margo Nederlander

Norma Dana and Isabel Rattazzi

creation, BCRF has raised and awarded $800 million in grants for breast cancer research! This year alone, there were $66 million in grants to 275 “investigators” from around the world. About 200 of them were in attendance. I’ve been attending these annual luncheons and galas since the mid-’90s, when Evelyn Lauder, its founder, launched the Breast Cancer Research Foundation

(BCRF). Mrs. Lauder was the force—a kind of dynamism in action. It was “dedicated to ending breast cancer by advancing the world’s most promising research.” Since its inception, BCRF-funded investigators have been deeply involved in every major breakthrough in breast cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and metastasis. The luncheon was hosted by ELLE magazine’s Editor in Chief, Nina Garcia, who had her own run-in with the disease four years ago, when she discovered she had a gene mutation that put her at a high risk for breast can-

B FA

Blair Husain, Laurie Costantino and Ainsley Earhardt


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A cer. Thanks to research, she had options. The Jill Rose Award, named for one of the early supporters who lost her life to the disease, was presented by Dr. Larry Norton to Eric Winer, MD. Then Myra Biblowit, head of BCRF since 2000, introduced NBC’s Anne Thompson, who briefly talked about her two breast cancer afflictions (both from which she recovered). She introduced Roslyn Goldstein (or Roz to anyone who’s been attending these events). Mrs. Goldstein is a long-time major contributor throughout the history of the foundation; this year Roz was out to raise $50,000, which she

would match. This was done by cellphone, in the room, in a matter of minutes. William Lauder, son of the founder, then took the podium to introduce Donna Karan, who spoke briefly about how before the founding BCRF, the disease was never mentioned in conversation. She recounted how back in the late 1960s, when she was assistant designer to Anne Klein—then a hugely successful sportswear designer—Klein was taken by the disease when they were finishing a collection that would be her last. Karan presented the annual award to Vera Wang. Wang is casually elegant in

person, as is her manner of speaking. It’s a kind of intelligence that is easy on the eye as well as the ear. “I have always been drawn to BCRF,” she told the guests, “in no small part due to its founder, the inimitable Evelyn Lauder, a woman I so admired. In a way, this award today both reflects and belongs to her.” It was Evelyn Lauder who had an idea for the good of all, and found a route to actualizing it for the benefit of everybody. Everybody. On a one-to-one, Mrs. Lauder was gracious, assertive, and naturally empathic—a woman’s trait, but not really. Aside from her philanthropy, she personally

helped many women—including many she knew only through other social connections—connecting them to doctors. She facilitated, and even took them to the doctors, following up on their progress, keeping in touch, and kept moving on in her own life. The luncheon ballroom was like being in a shrine of a woman who continues to demonstrate to us that it can be done. For good; many things. Honorary co-chairs of the event included Kinga Lampert, Leonard A. Lauder, and William P. Lauder. Event co-chairs included Madelyn Bucksbaum Adamson, Roberta M. Amon,

D R A M A L E A G U E ' S A N N UA L G A L A AT T H E P L A Z A I N N E W YO R K

Teagan Earley, Ellie Heyman and Aaron Siegel 30 QUEST

Paul Kushner and Barbara Nichols-Kushner

John Metzner and Stan Ponte

Sutton Foster and Bonnie Comley

Jamie deRoy and Gio Messale

Aki Harimoto and Stewart Lane

A N N I E WAT T

Georgia Stitt and Jason Robert Brown


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A F R E N C H H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y TO A STS T H E S E I N E I N N E W YO R K

Pamela Wright, Susan Baker and Patricia Shiah

Anne H. Bass, Amy Goldman Fowler, Roslyn Goldstein, Dee Ocleppo Hilfiger, Gail Hilson, Shelly Kivell, Elyse Lacher, Aerin Lauder, Marigay McKee, Wendi Rose, Arlene Taub, and Simone Winston. BCRF is the largest private funder of breast cancer research worldwide. If you would like to support BCRF’s mission, visit bcrf. org to learn more. One Monday night shortly thereafter had much happening: The Frick Collection held its annual Autumn Dinner; God’s Love We Deliver held their annual dinner honoring Mayor Pete and 32 QUEST

Ann and Bill Van Ness

Kathy Irwin, Mai Hallingby and Marli Hinckley

Elaine Sciolino and Guy Robinson

John Demsey; Americans for the Arts were holding their annual dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street, where they were celebrating the achievements of: San Francisco-based artist Luchita Hurtado, actor-singer Ben Platt, singer-songwriter Ben Folds, philanthropist Earle I. Mack, and The Country Music Foundation. Presenters included Alec Baldwin, country music singer Chris Young, former governor George Pataki, musician Jon Batiste, and actress Zoe Saldana. I attended the Frick dinner, which is always black-tie and held in the main gallery,

Friederike Moltmann and Jennifer Herlein

with its green velvet walls and Rembrandts and Turners and astounding Old Masters. Serene is the word, with weight, to describe its effect upon entering. My place at table was right across from Rembrandt’s self-portrait. I had interesting dinner partners for conversation, but I found myself looking at Rembrandt and him looking at me, as if he could tell me something I needed to hear. Something wise but real. Now that’s not an art historian’s view, I know, but it’s the view, the pleasure. I also wondered also how it had a lasting effect on its collector, Mr.

Elizabeth Stribling and CeCe Black

Paul Stuart Rankin

Frick, when it was, after all, in his house. The evening’s honoree was Stephen Schwarzman, who has been an active benefactor of the Collection in the past two decades. After dinner he was introduced by Ian Wardropper, the Frick’s director. When the honoree took the podium, he told us how he hosted a dinner dance celebrating his engagement to his now-wife, Christine. It was big news at the time, because no one had ever held a private party in Mr. Frick’s house. I’m not sure if Steve had known at the outset that there had never been a pri-

A N N I E WAT T

Stanley Weisman and Odile De Schietere-Longchampt


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A vate party held there, but he soon found out. But what did transpire thereafter is that the host became involved with the museum and eventually presided over its board of directors. He lent his talents to the museum and its financials, to the great advantage of the Frick. In recounting the evening, he recounted the wonder that he personally felt on that night, entering this same great gallery where we were dining. He sat down on a bench under a Turner, and looking across the room to another Turner, he was overtaken by the same powers of artistic communication that touched me sitting there

across from the Rembrandt: wonder. Reminiscing about that wonderful night, he told us how his wife-to-be—who was present on this evening and wearing the gown that she wore on that starry night back in 1995. He then introduced her so that everyone could see his then-bride-tobe. It was a very sweet evening, a kind of surprise for an institutional dinner. At that moment, I think we all felt at home in Mr. Frick’s house. Also, last Monday night, the God’s Love We Deliver dinner brought 800 attendees. It was the 13th Annual

Golden Heart Awards. The Awards are presented to honor the contributions of individuals, corporations, and foundations to the organization’s cause. Funds raised help ensure that no person in the metropolitan area suffers the dual crises of hunger and life-altering illness. They make a major difference in people’s lives. This year’s dinner honored the mayor of South Bend, Pete Buttigieg; John Demsey, on behalf of his work with MAC VIVA GLAM Fund; and supermodel, entrepreneur, and philanthropist Iman. The sold-out evening raised $2.9 million in sup-

port of the urgent mission of providing life-sustaining meals and nutrition counseling for people living with severe illness. It began with an Italian market experience curated by Eataly. Playwright and screenwriter Matthew Lopez presented Mr. Buttigieg with the award for Outstanding Leadership and Public Service. Fashion model Winnie Harlow presented John Demsey and MAC VIVA Glam Fund with the award for Outstanding Volunteerism and Community Leadership. After dinner, Michael Kors took the stage to present Iman with the Michael Kors Award for Outstanding Community

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N AT I O N A L I N ST I T U T E O F S O C I A L S C I E N C E S H O STS C O C K TA I L PA R T Y I N N E W YO R K

Michele Jeffery and Edith De Montebello

Service. If you didn’t know: God’s Love We Deliver cooks and home-delivers nutritious, medically tailored meals for people too sick to shop or cook for themselves. Founded in 1985 as a response to the AIDS pandemic, it now serves individuals living with more than 200 different illnesses, and their children and caregivers. With a community of more than 15,000 volunteers, they deliver 1.9 million meals annually. All services are free to clients and full of love. For more information, visit godslovewedeliver.org. Then there’s always Hal36 QUEST

Pepita Serrano, Alexa Rodulfo and Caroline Brown

Philippe De Montebello and Fred Larsen

loween. One night at Doubles, the private club in the Sherry Netherland, was the Spooktacular Soiree where Wonder Woman (Wendy Carduner, the club’s director, in the costume) awarded prizes to Nicole Noonan and Steve Knobel as Matador and Bull; Lucia Gordon as Nefertiti; Duncan Sahner as Mozart; Marisa Rose and her table of Vikings, and to Maria and Kenneth Fishel for Best Decorated and Best Costumed guests. You had to be there. Among the other guests (costumed or not) were Barbara and Donald Tober, Daisy Soros, Alexander Lari,

Fred Larsen, Sharon Hoge and Judith Hernstadt

Peter Gelb and Yanna Avis

Sharon Bush, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Patty Raynes, Paola and Arnold Rosenschein, Chris Cicala, Denise Deluca, Kathy Springhorn, Jenny and Geoffrey Symonds, and many, many more. Keeping on calendar, one Wednesday, I had lunch at Michael’s (vegetable japchae; sweet potato noodles, my new favorite—you can get it with bulgogi hanger steak, or chicken, or salmon) with Blair Sabol, who is on her annual visit to her old stomping ground—Noo Yawk and the northeast. We were joined by Patricia Bosworth, the author,

Cathy Shraga and Jonathan Piel

an old friend of Blair’s. The two worked together back in the ’70s at the Village Voice and New York magazine, and there was some off-hand reverie about the people they worked with—admiration and respect. I’d met Ms. Bosworth before, in passing, but I knew about her work as an author: acclaimed biographer of Montgomery Clift, Jane Fonda, Marlon Brando, and Diane Arbus—all of whom she knew and wrote about as real people rather than as movie stars and legends. Earlier in her life, Patty, as her friends know her, was an actress. Her father,

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Bartley Crum, was a famous Hollywood lawyer in the mid-20th century. He was, for example, Montgomery Clift’s lawyer. He became famous to the general public in the 1950s, when he was hired as lawyer for the “Hollywood Ten”—a familiar but now-forgotten political outrage that occurred in this country back then. When Patty began pursuing her career as an actress, her father advised her to change her name from Crum, suggesting that if she ever got a bad review, it might affect a critic to write about the “crumb crumb” performance of Patricia Crum. So taking her father’s sage ad-

vice, the daughter took her middle name, her mother’s maiden name: Bosworth. Growing up in San Francisco, as a child she lived briefly here in New York and attended Chapin, the private girls’ school. She went to Sarah Lawrence, after which she worked as a fashion model and studied at Actors Studio under Lee Strasberg and appeared in several Broadway shows, including Mary, Mary and Inherit the Wind, toured in The Glass Menagerie with Helen Hayes, and worked regularly in TV. She left the stage in the early 1960s, when she took up the pen and wrote several pieces focusing on Broadway

for New York magazine and went on to become an editor at McCall’s, managing editor at Harper’s Bazaar, then executive editor of Viva, Bob Guccione’s foray into (erotic) women’s magazines. During that time, she also reviewed books for the New York Times, and art pieces for them as well as Time/ Life. She was later an editor at Mirabella and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. She’s also written two memoirs, Anything Your Little Heart Desires: An American Family Story and The Men In My Life: A Memoir of Love and Art in 1950s Manhattan. Besides all that, she has been a faculty member of the

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism as well as Barnard College. At lunch she was telling us about a script she’s completed on the dramatic relationship of Paul Robeson with J. Edgar Hoover. I report all of these details because Patty has the energy of a woman a quarter of her age. At 86 (she has the same birthday as Barbara Streisand, although a few years her senior) she still works non-stop and is also dating an older man (they love traveling the world together); he’s 94. Back to the social season. On the same Wednesday, I went to the fourth annual

H O P E FO R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N ' S L U N C H EO N I N N E W YO R K

Jay McInerney, Bettina Zilkha and Robert Zimmerman 38 QUEST

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Jamee and Peter Gregory

Margo Langnberg and Annabelle Mariaca

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K L A N D M A R K S P R E S E R VAT I O N FO U N D AT I O N ' S A N N UA L " L U N C H AT A L A N D M A R K " AT T H E MO R G A N L I B R A R Y

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Hope Rising benefit dinner at the Pierre for the Association for Frontotemporal Dementia (AFTD). You may not have heard about it. It’s relatively new (four years), but a very important project. FTD is an umbrella term for a diverse group of uncommon disorders that primarily affect the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, and cause irreversible changes in a person’s behavior, personality, language, and/ or movement, while leaving memory relatively preserved. Currently there are no approved disease-modifying treatments for FTD. The disease affects more 40 QUEST

Mariana Kaufman and Gail Hilson

Peter and Judy Price

than 60,000 people in the United States. I first heard of it four years ago, when Donald Newhouse and his family organized the first Hope Rising dinner in honor of his wife, Susan Newhouse, and his brother Si, both of whom died of the disease. Since then, I’ve personally known two men who died of it. It often affects people under 60. Early onset creeps up on its victim. In the beginning the signs are vague changes of behavior. Coupled with delays in diagnosis, this often results in devastating damage to family relationships and financial health.

Paula Zahn and Christina Davis

Aby Rosen and Coco Kopelman

Among the speakers at the dinner was a young woman whose father was its victim. It struck in his 40s. In the beginning, there was only a subtle change in his naturally good-natured personality. It was barely detectable except for moments of self-expression that were perplexing to those around him. As it deteriorated, although his natural good nature was still there, he was soon unable to work or to conduct himself in any kind of personal relationship. He soon needed a full-time caregiver to watch over him. Eventually the family had to find a special home away

from the family. His children were still young when he died. When his daughter married and was pregnant, she learned that the likelihood of her offspring being genetically susceptible was 50%. Other speakers that night included Rome Hartman, producer for 60 Minutes; Benefit Chair Mr. Newhouse, and AFTD’s CEO, Susan Dickinson. Mr. Newhouse told the guests, “My lovely Suzy and my brother Si had a variant of FTD, and I am committed to doing what I can to advance AFTD’s mission so that those affected by the disease, and their care-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A givers, will not suffer.” More than 550 were attending the event. They honored Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan with the Susan Newhouse and Si Newhouse Award of Hope in recognition of Bank of America’s sustained philanthropic commitment to AFTD’s mission. Unlike so many benefits where the crowd’s conversation often obliterates speeches, this was a room of listeners. For good reason. Among the guests were people living with FTD, care partners, health professionals, researchers and philanthropists—all with the common goal of a world

with compassionate support, effective care, and a future free of FTD. The evening began with $1.916 million raised. In accepting his award, Mr. Moynihan surprised the room by pledging an additional $100,000 in Bank of America support, raising the benefit’s total to more than $2 million, the most successful fundraising event in AFTD’s history. Paula Zahn hosted the event for the fourth year in a row. Since 2016, the Benefit has raised nearly $8 million in support of AFTD’s mission. One hundred percent of the funds raised go directly to support AFTD’s mis-

sion, thanks to the generosity of the evening’s leadership. Then on a Friday, I went to a luncheon at the Pierre for The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation. I tend to avoid Friday luncheons, social or otherwise. It’s my day off. But there are exceptions to the rule, and ADDF is one of them. This organization was launched by the Lauder Brothers—Leonard and Ronald—several years ago. I’ve been following it ever since, partly because the Brothers Lauder, Estée’s boys, do things and get things done. I think it was Ronald who came up with the idea of

starting a foundation to fund research for Alzheimer’s. He told his brother and the idea was launched. Their personal contribution was covering the management and expenses of running the foundation, including the fundraising expenses. All funds raised go directly to fund research. This luncheon was one of those fundraisers. The luncheon was preceded by ADDF’s Annual Fall Symposium, Hope on the Horizon. It has raised nearly $10 million for Alzheimer’s research over the past decade. This year’s event welcomed over 400 guests and has raised $1.2 million for Alzheimer’s research.

N E W YO R K - P R E S BY T E R I A N ' S A N N UA L L I G H T U P A L I F E E V E N T AT C H E L S E A P I E R S

Lizzy Quick with Dara and Haden Quinlan 42 QUEST

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Longtime ADDF friend and board member, Paula Zahn again was emcee. Paula’s mother has Alzheimer’s. A mother of four, a professor who spoke four languages, leading a vital life, is now confined to a chair and knows nothing and no one. Paula talked about not only the deep sadness of witnessing her mother’s suffering, but the profound effect the sadness has on all of the family members. Paula introduced Ronald Lauder. As ADDF co-founder and co-chairman, Ronald S. Lauder seems optimistic to this listener. He noted that there is hope in drug discovery. The ADDF has long been committed to diversifying drugs in development for Alzheimer’s, so it is very encouraging to us to see more and better drug targets in Alzheimer’s clinical trials. The symposium that day focused on

Julia Dunn, Hal Witt and Marie-France Kern

repurposing drug research for Alzheimer’s. It was led by Dr. Howard Fillit, who is the executive founding director and chief science officer of the ADDF. It featured three distinguished panelists: Dr. Krista L. Lanctôt, Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute; Dawn C. Matthews, MS, MBA, CEO, ADM Diagnostics, Inc.; and Dr. Ana Pereira, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience, and Laboratory Head, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Mr. Lauder presented the Charles Evans Award to Pamela Newman, for her dedication and unstinting support of Alzheimer’s research. Guests at the event included Carol Haarmann Acunto and Steve Acun-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A to, Gigi and Harry Benson, Carol Seabrook Boulanger, Renée and Robert Belfer, Joyce B. Cowin, Mark Anthony Edwards, Bonnie Pfeifer Evans, Paul Fribourg, Stephanie Ginsberg, Nancy Goodes, Marjorie Reed Gordon, Susan Gutfreund, Jane Hertzmark Hudis, Chris Johnson, Veronica and Ray Kelly, Deborah Krulewitch, Laura and Gary Lauder, Bonnie Englebardt Lautenberg, Laurence Leeds, Jr., Susan and Tom Lowder, Heidi and Tom McWilliams, B. Michael, Donald Newhouse, Walter Raquet, Liz and Randal Sandler, Tom Scanlan, Alice Shure, Sha-

ron Sager, Hadley and John Scully, Ambassador Teuta Sahatqija, Lynn Tishman, Laurie and Steve Toma, and Wendy Wilshin. Then on a Monday night, there was the Library Lions annual gala at the New York Public Library, held in the Reading Room of the library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. This is perhaps the most prestigious of the major social/fundraising events of the autumn season. The building itself is an architectural treat and honor for anybody to enter, even if they’re not interested or inclined to read books. Its grandeur never-

theless represents something precious to all of us: the written word revered. It does not disappoint. The guest list is made up mainly of those philanthropic supporters of the Library and their guests, as well as former “Lions,” and a host of artists and mainly writers. It’s a black-tie affair, and the women sparkle particularly and intentionally. The cocktail hour is on the third floor in room of portraits, across from the Main Reading Room. About eight o’clock, guests began moving to the Reading Room, where the tables are used daily (and have been for more than a cen-

tury) by writers and readers and students. On this night, they were beautifully set for dinner. The vast four-story room—always magnificent, thanks to its architects, Carrere and Hastings—is always decorated theatrically for this dinner. This year’s décor was gigantic, beautiful floral images projected onto the walls and ceiling. As guests first entered, there was an orchestra set against the entry wall, playing from the American songbook. With their music, the floral images did the rest: spectacular. An atmosphere was created for the entire evening. It began with welcoming

PA L M B E AC H F E L LO W S H I P O F C H R I ST I A N S & J E W S H O STS R EC E P T I O N AT T H E S O C I E T Y O F T H E FO U R A R TS

David and Connie Thomas

Debora Weinstein, Kirk Blouin and Maggie Zeidman 46 QUEST

Nina Paul and Marc Hopin

Nancy Marshall and Mina Hyman

Elizabeth Rogers and Gloria Rodriguez

Rich Anderson and Danielle Moore

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speeches. At times, some go on a little too long—which only encourages many of the adult guests to talk among themselves. Because of the din of all that chatting it’s not always clear what the speaker is saying. (If you happen to be one who is listening.) People talking while the speeches are going on is epidemic at all of these events these days. One gets used to it. Sort of. After the speeches there were videos of the 2019 “Lions”: Elizabeth Alexander, Jill Lepore, Jamaica Kincaid, and Frederick Wiseman, “in recognition of their outstanding cul48 QUEST

Jessica Bendig and Eric Mourlot

Maggie Bult and Jean Christian Agid

tural contribution.” We were then presented with a performance by Wynton Marsalis and members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Then came the main course, at the long tables set for 20—all of this year’s “Lions” were seated at the dinner also. The awards were presented, one at a time, amd announced by Tony Marx, the library’s CEO, from the dais, with a spotlight on the honoree as they were presented their Lions medal. Those tables of 20 (10 on each side) were quite closely seated. Conversation

Franck Laverdin

Bernadette Lejeune and Prince Dimitri of Yugoslovia

Mai Halllingby and Helmut Koller

abounded as a result. After the main course and the presentations, guests rose and began to amble down to the Astor Hall entrance of the building, where desserts were being passed around and books were being signed by the authors and personally inscribed— gifts to the guests. It was an evening of words in the most solemn yet heavenly atmosphere that is the Library, and what it represents to all humanity. The year 2020 is the 125th anniversary of the New York Public Library’s founding in 1895 (its main building at 42nd and Fifth

was completed in 2011, after the razing of the reservoir). Keep on keepin’ on. One Wednesday night began for me with a 25th anniversary party for Michael’s restaurant in New York (there’s an older Michael’s restaurant in Santa Monica). It began at 6 p.m., and I got there on the dot, since I had another commitment afterward. The place was already crowded. By 6:15, it was mobbed, a tribute to the popularity of the place with its regular customers. Mind you, the reward for the guests was a lot of familiar faces, including the famous ones, excel-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A lent cocktails and drinks of your choice, and fabulous hors d’oeuvres and tasty bites that for not a few was the equivalent of a great dinner. I couldn’t stay because it was also the 26th Living Landmarks Celebration in the (Landmarked) Plaza Ballroom. This year’s honorees were: longtime head of the Metropolitan Museum Emily Rafferty; New York Life Insurance Company’s CEO (and restorer in chief), Ted Mathas; Carole Bailey French, who is responsible for exterior restoration of Saint Barthomews on Park Avenue; H. Carl McCall, the multi-tasking

distinguished public servant (State Assembly, Ambassador to the UN, etc), and educator; Mark Morris, the choreographer and dancer; and Barbara and Donald Tober, who are here, there, and everywhere (and equestrians on the weekend), totally ubiquitous New Yorkers who do much and give much and enjoy much of New York. They drew laughter and applause as they became “Living Landmarks.” The evening raised almost $1.3 million. Choreographer Mark Morris said he had earned the title because “I’m sturdy, well built, and I’m not going anywhere.” Several

past honorees attended, including Liz and Jeff Peek, Patsy and Jeff Tarr, Barbara Taylor Bradford, John Rosenwald, Robert A.M. Stern, Mary McFadden, Louise Kerz Hirschfeld, Marica and Jan Vilcek, and former mayor David Dinkins. For years, the event was hosted by the late, great Liz Smith who amused, introduced, and always opened the evening. I was asked to take the reins last year, and this year as host for the evening—my job was to introduce each nominee to the guests— with Roberta Fabiano, guitarist and songstress of the Peter Duchin Orchestra, and I saluted the nominees

by singing Cole Porter’s “You’re the Top.” (“You’re an O’Neill drama, you’re Whistler’s mama, you’re Camembert!”) The New York Landmarks Conservancy inaugurated the Living Landmarks Celebration in 1994 to recognize the extraordinary New Yorkers who give so much back to the city we love. The Living Landmarks Celebration supports the Conservancy’s efforts to preserve New York’s magnificent art, architecture, and history. And so it was, with a cast of thousands! Happy Holidays and Happy New Year to all! u

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Naomi Campbell and Mark Bradford 50 QUEST

Benjamin Millepied, Princess Michael of Kent, Elizabeth Segerstrom and Nigel Lythgoe

Betye Saar and Alfonso Cuarón

Nicole Avant and Ted Sarandos

John Legend and Michael Govan

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MICHAEL'S STILL STRONG AT 30! 1. Michael McCarty and Jay McInerney

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2. Michael McCarty and Drew Nieporent 3. Michael McCarty and Henry Schleiff 4. Michael McCarty and Charlie Scheips 5. Michael McCarty and Paige Peterson

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6. Michael McCarty and Joan Kron 7. Joan Jakobson and Michael McCarty 8. Alan Patricof and Michael McCarty 9. Michael McCarty, Susan Magrino Dunning, and Jim Dunning 10. Michael McCarty and Prudence Inzerillo 11. Bob Friedman, Michael McCarty and Steve Millington

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1. Michael McCarty and Keith Kelly 2. Michael McCarty and Jane Hartley 3. Michael McCarty and Kim McCarty 4. Michael McCarty, Hilary Quinlan and Bryant Gumbel 5. Michael McCarty and

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Mickey Drexler 6. Sessa von Richthofen, Michael McCarty and Richard Johnson 7. Steve Kroft, Michael McCarty and Jennet Conant 8. Michael McCarty and Matt Blank 9. Michael McCarty and

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Pamela Fiori 10. Michael McCarty, Rikki Klieman and William Bratton

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M U S E U M O F A R TS A N D D E S I G N ' S A N N UA L B A L L AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T I N N E W YO R K

Brett Robinson and Jacquelyn Jablonski

Barbara and Donald Tober

Courtney Smith and Michelle Hellman 54 QUEST

Virginia Fields and Michele Cohen

LaVon Kellner and Anna Sui

Ubah Hassan and Rachel Hilbert

Olga Sorokina and Polina Proshkina

Chris Scoates and Darci Spasojevich

Larry Milstein and Elizabeth Kurpis

B FA

David and Sybil Yurman


al Fresco Pizzeria • Ristorante • Bar 2345 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD. AT THE PAR 3 GOLF COURSE PALM BEACH 561.273.4130 • ALFRESCOPB.COM

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O C I E T Y O F M E MO R I A L S LOA N K E T T E R I N G ' S FA L L PA R T Y I N N E W YO R K

Walter and Virginia Tomenson

Kim Nemser, Rachel Blumenthal and Jeff Raider

Jane Keltner de Valle, Jessica Sailer Van Lith and Colleen Tompkins 56 QUEST

Ali Edwards and Amory McAndrew

Alex Acquavella, Christie Fennebresque, Sarah Hoover and Mollie Ruprecht Acquavella

CeCe Barfiled Thompson and Erin O'Connor

Rickie De Sole Webster

Lucinda and Theodore May

Jenny Vorhoff and Mimi Ritzen Crawford

B FA

Eve Lehrman and Austen Cruz


For those who have big plans

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580 Park Avenue, PH D

1010 Fifth Avenue, Apt 9A/F

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O. Neulist 212.606.7707, G. Kuhlenkamp

Serena Boardman 212.606.7611

Meredyth Hull Smith 212.606.7683

800 Park Avenue, 10th Floor

135 West 52nd Street, Apt 29B

165 Charles Street, Apt 5/7

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00114071 | $9,500,000

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00114111 | $5,325,000

165CHARLES5-7.COM | $4,650,000

Serena Boardman 212.606.7611

Yi Chen 212.606.7621

E. Sample 212.606.7685, B. Powers

25 Columbus Circle, Apt 53F

188 East 70th Street, Apt 6BC

655 Park Avenue, Apt 5D

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00114073 | $4,100,000

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SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00114032 | $3,000,000

B. Powers 212.606.7653 , E. Sample

The AMM Team 212.606.4129

A. Koffman 212.606.7688, J. Janssens

NEW YORK CITY BROKERAGES | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/NYC Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A M E R I C A N F E D E R AT I O N O F A R TS H O STS A W A R D S D I N N E R AT G UA STAV I N O ’ S I N N E W YO R K

Sharon Bush and Stephanie Whittier

www.CCPHP.net 56 QUEST

Michele Chammah and Betsy Pinover Schiff

Miller Gaffney, Craig Thomas and Margery King

Janis Gardner Cecil, Pauline Willis and Terry Skoda

Sabrina Hahn and Richard Armstrong

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Give the Gift of Health

Aleksandra Cragg, Merrill Mahan and Chris Mahan


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P U N K T . H O STS G R A N D C L A S S I C S S C R E E N I N G O F T H E K I N G O F C OM E DY I N N E W YO R K

Amanda Demme and Amy Sacco

Emma Ishta and Daniel McCabe

Naeem Juwan and Sterling Spencer 60 QUEST

Genevieve Jones

David Schwimmer, Katrina Pavlos and Petter Neby

Kyleigh Kuhn and Sabine Heller

Gina Gershon and Liev Schreiber

Chiara Clemente

Josh Hamilton and Jessica Thorne

B FA

Ann Dexter-Jones and Mark Ronson


LIVE PASSIONATELY. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. © 2019. BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI AND COMPANY LIMITED. RUMS – 40% ALC. BY VOL.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ST . J O H N ' S O F L AT T I N G TO W N ' S O P E N I N G N I G H T PA R T Y I N L O C U ST VA L L E Y

Tom Gimbel with Vicki and Bruce Fox

Kimberly Bohner and Elise O'Connell 62 QUEST

Brenda van der Mije and Alexis McAndrew

Stephanie Clark and Mark FitzHugh

Meg Morris and Charlotte Snyder

Alison Aston

Hanna Robinson, Susan Moore and Leah Butler

Kitty Dwyer, Jennifer Curry and Justine Pilkington Keithline

Jackie Powers and Pia Murphy

JASON JABOIN

Meg Braff


58 South Battery | South of Broad | Downtown Charleston, SC | $4,950,000 4 Bedrooms | 4 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms | Approximately 5,029 sq. ft. | Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

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Midtown | 843.727.6460 285 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29401


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A D AY W I T H T H E FO U R - I N - H A N D C L U B AT W E T H E R S F I E L D I N M I L L B R O O K

Donald and Barbara Tober

Charles Kashner with Timothy and Sharon Butterfield 64 QUEST

Frances and Wayne Baker

Members of the Millbrook Hunt astride

Kirk Henckels and Fernanda Kellogg

Karen and John Klopp with Bill and Daphne Richards

Charles Kashner

Jamie O’Rourke in charge

John P. White with his white team

A N N I E WAT T

Two perfectly matched Morgans in harness


the store at M

2 Columbus Circle, NYC | 212.299.7700 thestore.madmuseum.org | @thestoreatmad

Shop MAD retail this holiday.

Sun, Mon: 10 am – 6 pm Tue, Wed: 10 am – 7 pm Thu: 10 am – 9 pm Fri, Sat: 10 am – 7 pm


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H B O ' S N E W YO R K P R E M I E R E O F V E R Y R A L P H AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A R T

Karlie Kloss and Lily Aldridge

Georgia Fowler and Hilary Rhoda 66 QUEST

Bruce Springsteen and Ralph Lauren

David Lauren and Lauren Bush Lauren

Ruby Aldridge, Taylor Hill and Tyson Beckford

Dylan Lauren and Paul Arrouet

Mary Randolph Carter and Jaci Judelson

Jerry Lauren, Buffy Birrittella and Lisa Will-Kaess

Tory Burch and Ricky Lauren

Patrice Louvet, Daniela Kamiliotis, John Wrazej and Michael Rider

Camilla White and Ansel Elgort

B FA

Andrew Lauren and Natasha Schuetz


G R AC I O U S A N D G R A N D O N PA R K AV E N U E 911 Park Avenue, 7B | $7,200,000 | Rare opportunity to purchase a 4-bedroom, 5-bath offering divine proportions, 10-ft ceilings throughout, a large living room, formal dining room, library, kitchen with butler’s pantry, breakfast room, and staff room. This 12-room pre-war home is ideal for casual living or endless entertaining. Web# 3988647

ANNE GRABER Lic. Assoc. R. E. Broker O : 212.891.7101 M: 917.561.5120 agraber@elliman.com

elliman.com/newyorkcity

575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000 © 2019 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N ' S AU T U M N D I N N E R I N N E W YO R K

Younghee-Kim Wait and Christian Keesee

Luz Mary Harris and Ian Wardropper

68 QUEST

Emily Frick

Irene Aitken and Emerita Helen Clay Chace

Lee and ChloĂŤ Rubenstein with Paul Arnhold and Melissa Gokhvat

Katherine Reibel and Brooke Lampley

John and Jenny Paulson

Xavier F. Salomon and Alexis Light

Marina Kellen French and Emily Rafferty with Philippe and Edith de Montebello

Monika McLennan, Cole Harrell and Laurel DeVore

B FA ; C H R I S T I N E A . B U T LE R ; G E O R G E KO E LLE

Christine and Stephen Schwarzman


DREAM HOME

It’s not about the community; it’s about the true sense of place. Join our magnificent paradise community in a Caribbean villa and step into an authentically Dominican lifestyle of relaxation, excitement and understated elegance. Our privately owned Punta Cana International Airport enables home owners to access a private terminal and VIP Lounge that ensures a quick and seamless journey from the terminal to your front doorstep. THE ESTATES Grupo Puntacana celebrates 50 years committed to sustainable tourism in the Dominican Republic. Puntacana Resort & Club and THE ESTATES are registered trademarks of Grupo Puntacana © 2019. All Rights Reserved. www.theestatesatpuntacana.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O S P I TA L FO R S P EC I A L S U R G E RY ' S AU T U M N B E N E F I T I N N E W YO R K

David and Anne Altchek

Mary Francina Golden and Kenneth Handal 70 QUEST

Lois and Bryan Kelly

Todd and Barbara Albert

Han and Regina Jo Kim

David Mayman and Alana Serota

Chris Kreider and Louis Shapiro

Andrew Pearle, Robert Yaffa, Tammi Schneider and Katherine Pearle

Mary Crow

D O N P O LL A R D ; RYA N B RO W N

Bill Cowher and Veronica Stigeler


Unobstructed River to River Vus, Priv Terr, DM Condo 252 East 57th Street 59A. $7.8M Shari Cohen 917.743.7896

Glamorous, Light-filled 8 Room Prewar Co-op

Spectacular PH, Views, Sunny, Wrap Terrace

Stunning & Renovated Eleven Room Prewar

730 Park Avenue 4A. $4.2M. Christine Miller Martin 917.453.5152. Deanna Lloyd 757.572.0107

340 East 72nd Street PH. $5.8M Carol Mann 917.848.9187

1120 Fifth Avenue 3A. $9.75M. Lorraine Dauber & Cornelia Zagat Eland 212.570.4014

compass.com Compass is the brand name used for services provided by one or more of the Compass group of subsidiary companies, including Stribling & Associates. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST HOSTS MONICA VINADER ON MADISON AVENUE BENEFITING THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

Joannie Jakobson

Karen Klopp and CeCe Black 72 QUEST

Whitney Hawkings

Stephanie Lang and Rebekka Grossman

Jan Wysocki and Sabrina Forsythe

Ann Nitzi

Kathy Irwin with Kevin and Barbara McLaughlin

Barbara Tober

Nicole Hanley Pickett

Evelyn Tompkins

A N N I E WAT T

Monica Vinader and Susan Lloyd


FIRST WEEK

benefiting SECOND WEEK


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T E AC H I N G M AT T E R S H O STS A N N UA L N E W YO R K L U N C H EO N

Mary Dillow, Sara Lipman and Dana Creel

Ellie Manko and Laura Tanne

74 Q U E S T

Erica Samuels and Anya Shiva

Diana Colgate and Lawrence Creel

Lise Evans and Raymond McGuire

Helen Comfort, Shirin von Wulffen and Ana Laffont

Cory Laverack and Wendy Van Amson

Betsy Pitts, Jill Roosevelt and Lisa McCarthy

Lauren Santo Domingo and Crystal McCrary

Eva Dubin and Beth Dozoretz

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Catherine Chadwick and Alee Garcia


LIVINGSTON BUILDERS, INC. New York - Greenwich - Palm Beach (212) 355-3261 or (561) 833-3242 www.livingstonbuilders.com info@livingstonbuilders.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K P U B L I C L I B R A RY ' S L I O N S D I N N E R

Elizabeth Alexander and David Remnick

Jacqui Safra, Jean Doumanian and Tony Marx

Kathy Rayner and Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos 76 QUEST

Jay McInerney

Chuck and Deborah Royce

Agnes Gund and Craig Starr

Julie Chrystyn Opperman, John Studinski, Joanne Mason and Robert Newlen

Roy Blount, Jr. and Joan Griswold

Stephen Schwarzman, Peter Marino and Jane Trapnell

B FA

Diane Sawyer


Model treated with JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC in the cheeks, JUVÉDERM® XC in the lines around the nose and mouth, and JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC in the lips. Results may vary.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Do not use if you have a history of severe allergies/allergic reactions, or are allergic to lidocaine or gram-positive bacterial proteins used to make these products. The safety of use while pregnant or breastfeeding has not been studied. The safety for use in patients with excessive scarring or pigmentation disorders has not been studied and may result in additional scars or pigmentation changes. Unintentional injection into a blood vessel can occur and, while rare, could result in serious complications which may be permanent. These include

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E H O R T ' S FA L L L U N C H EO N AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B I N N E W YO R K

Randall Gianopulos and Kristen Swenson

Sheila Stephenson and Sean Moran 78 QUEST

Peter Lang and Barbara Cates

Laura Turner Seydel and Martha Stewart

Barbara de Portago, Jared Goss and Lily O'Boyle

Suzanne Rheinstein and Jim Druckman

Chris Spitzmiller and Frances Schultz

Lucy Lamphere and Elisabeth Saint Amand

Warrie Price and Marcia Schaeffer

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

George Stephenson and Liz Gardner


LIFE IS BETTER IN THE COUNTRY. COME PLAY WITH US! BEDFORD POUND RIDGE 914-234-9234 914-764-2424

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H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY JUDY GARLAND... Words that come to mind when you mention her name: Legend. Star. Superstar. Tragic. Iconic. Downward spiral. Brilliant. Incomparable. I could go on. Frank Sinatra called her “the greatest entertainer of all time,” which says a great deal from someone who has been called that himself. When Judy married her fourth husband, Mark Herron, aboard a freighter off the coast of Hong Kong in 1964, it was Hollywood news, as she was legally still married to Sidney Luft at the time. Herron, an actor, had been the tour promoter on her disastrous 1964 Australian tour. I caught up with them in their hotel room in Copenhagen in November 1965, after they had legally become husband and wife. Judy was very personable and friendly, and when I asked her what her favorite song was, she immediately 80 QUEST

started singing “Over the Rainbow.” She continued to sing several more songs, which delighted not only Mark Herron and me, but Judy herself. An incredible private concert! Today, she remains an icon for her many loyal fans. Renée Zellweger, who portrays Garland in the current film Judy, depicts the downward spiral of her troubled life. My wife, Gigi, was quietly sobbing during the gut-wrenching closing scene. We turned to each other and said, in unison, “Zellweger will win the Academy Award next year.” u Opposite page: Judy Garland, photographed in Copenhagen in November 1965, shortly after her wedding to Mark Herron— who is lighting her cigarette in the photograph.


TA K I

GONE ARE THE GOLDEN DAYS From above: The Chrysler Building; 740 Park Avenue, designed by architect Rosario Candela.

I LIVE ON the Upper East Side part of the year and have recently noted that no one speaks English any longer. In the street, that is. I hear Spanish, Chinese, even Russian, but no English. I’m not complaining; after all, America is supposedly a land of immigrants, but I do miss hearing English at times. I’m also told that pointing this out is politically incorrect, and I’ll be seen as a bigot, so I’ll drop the subject and write about something I know nothing about: buildings in the Bagel, as I call the Apple. Here goes: The prewar aesthetic of the Bagel’s storied past was one of grandeur, beauty 82 QUEST

and power. The buildings still stand out as a bygone romance with elegance, as opposed to the ugly cutting edge of Jean Nouvel and Frank Gehry’s modern monstrosities. A recent coffee table book about how the upper classes lived back when there was still something called class lists some of these edifices, my present abode having made the cut. 998 Fifth Avenue, 720, 740, and 778 Park included. The Deco era’s most famous architect was Rosario Candela, in whose greatest jewel I now spend my days and nights. After the children departed, I sold my townhouse, the staff having been in open revolt about climbing stairs. I


TA K I

From left: One of Jean Nouvel's modern buildings in West Chelsea; people sitting beside the lake at

CO U RTE S Y O F G E T T Y I M A G E S ; W U RTS B RO S . M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W Y O R K , W U RTS B RO S . CO LLE C T I O N ; M A J O RY CO LL I N S

Bethesda Fountain in Central Park in 1942.

then bought 720 Park and came to the conclusion that after a certain age only Nepalese Sherpas live vertically rather than horizontally. I now have more energy for karate and the occasional nighttime pursuit of the fairer sex than before. Yippee! Buildings made of brick and stone seem to endure forever, and the city’s Golden Age remains only in such buildings and their enduring appeal. For some of us, that is. Most nouveaux riche opt for glass and height, for cubes, not to mention for interiors that make 19th century French brothels look ascetic. Limestone is timeless, livable and elegant, and looks different from office towers and commercial hubs. For me, Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building are the two most representative of the city’s Golden Age, the Empire State coming in third. Rumor has it that there’s a backlash against glass, especially in areas with a residential character, but I’m not so sure. Bad taste and bad manners are ubiquitous in the city, so why suddenly should good taste prevail in putting up buildings? Further south from where I live on Park Avenue, a very vulgar type I actually went to school with, has put up a horror where once upon a time the elegant Delmonico’s used to be. When it first went up I called it an undulating middle finger to good

taste, but the place sold out in no time. What I don’t get is how people with lotsa moolah wish to live in glass houses that move—as a safety measure, that is—way above the rest of us, without materials meant to project warmth or intimacy? I’ll tell you: Because they don’t live in them. On Billionaire’s Row, as the once beautiful Central Park South and West 57th Street are now called, glassy thin behemoths nearing 1,500 feet and selling in the tens and hundreds of millions lay empty, their mostly Chinese owners busy back home stealing western technology. My, oh my, the city has really gone to pot when the tallest cloud-scratchers lie empty. Salesmanship language of these behemoths match their bad taste: One reads or hears things like “We are offering a far more sophisticated experience—rich and layered both inside and through the concierge services.” I think it's a Chinese Communist plot. Nevermind. For those of us raised on movies of the 1940s and 1950s, Central Park West’s great beaux-arts and art deco apartment towers were the backdrop to our vision of city glamour. Being driven away to school after each holiday, that vista was the last thing I saw before depression set in on my way to regimentation and studies. As I walk in the park nowadays, I remember how

those towers used to signify freedom. Eight years of boarding school chain gangs turned me into someone incapable of working a nine-to-five job, or ever getting out of bed before midday. Now it’s too late to change habits. And speaking of Central Park, which I actually prefer to London’s Hyde Park and Paris’s Bois de Boulogne because of the more open vistas, it has now turned to hell because of bikers. These bums ignore pedestrian paths, which incidentally are one-third the size of bike paths, so one has to dodge speeding thugs on two wheels. Last week one such jerk brushed by me, and when I said he should stick to bike paths, he answered in a typical Bagel manner: “Suck my d---, bitch.” He and his buddy then stopped at a hotdog stand and I went up to him, grabbed him by the lapel, and asked him to repeat it. He shouted at his friend, “Look at what this guy’s doin’...” The jerk turned out to be humorless, earnest, and offered to shake hands once I let him go. He was a typical snowflake. My parting shot was to wish him good luck, but shaking hands was a bit too much, even for a democrat like myself. He then rode away giving me a middle finger salute. Welcome to the Bagel. And a very happy Christmas to you. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. DECEMBER 2019 83


AT T H E C A F F E

FINDING A NEW HOME AWAY FROM HOME BY MICHAEL THOMAS

WHEN CATHY TREBOUX told me she was selling Le Veau d’Or, the restaurant on East 6oth Street that she and her late father bought in 1986, it made me sad. For Cathy of course, who after her father died fought a valiant battle against city bureaucracies, unreliable utilities, and the endless importuning of real-estate types, but also for myself. On and off for almost 65 years, since as a teenager I was first taken to Le Veau by my parents, I had been something of a regular there; les Treboux were my third set of owners. In the past two decades, however, since I moved back to Brooklyn from Sag Harbor, the restaurant has been the culinary star I steered by. If I made the perilous crossing of the East River to lunch or dine with friends, business associates, or fellow journalists, and the choice of venue was up to me, it was to Le Veau that I headed. Period. It was my “go to” place, my gastronomic home away from home, my “onlie beloved.” The restaurant is now being taken over by the owners of 84 QUEST

Frenchette, the fashionable West Broadway establishment that is very du moment, a magnet for the Manhattan food crowd that clamors to be where it’s at, whatever “it” is. I’ve eaten at Frenchette twice; their wine guy, Jorge Riera, is an old acquaintance from a restaurant in Red Hook that my now wife and I frequented in my early days in Brooklyn. The cooking is estimable, although the first meal I had there, a dinner, was somewhat compromised by the noise, which has become an essential part of the modern restaurant aesthetic, if you will. Seated a few feet apart, across a booth, Tamara and I couldn’t hear what the other was saying. The next time I ate at Frenchette, guest of a cousin who has become a formidable habitué of the place, it was clear that an effort had been made to mitigate the noise factor, and the wine and food were admirable. But Frenchette’s assumption of the mantle of Le Veau, or vice versa, depending how one sees things, won’t fill the giant hole that’s opened up in my life.


This page, clockwise from top left: Le Veau d’Or was valued for its timelessness; Marlene Dietrich’s entry in the binders of old house accounts; the rack of lamb at Caffe dei Fiori; the bar at Caffe dei Fiori; Jacqueline Onassis was a frequent patron when she was a book editor at Doubleday. Opposite page: Robert Treboux, whose daughter Cathy took over Le Veau d’Or upon his death in 2012. DECEMBER 2019 85


AT T H E C A F F E

Here’s the thing. When I visit a restaurant, what’s on my plate isn’t as important to me as the atmosphere of the place, of which a central component is the sort of people I find myself dining among. I’m too old to care about placement; give me a table next to the men’s room and I’m perfectly happy—as long as the crowd passes muster. I’m past the point in life where one judges oneself in terms of the deference of headwaiters. I don’t suffer from FOMO—Fear Of Missing Out—nor do I calculate my existential (or any other kind of) worth by the boldfacedness or reported wealth of the names I see elsewhere in the room. Chances are, the more fashionable a place is, the less it will appeal to me. I’m one of those old goats who says things like “When ‘21’ was still ‘21’ ” as the eyes of younger companions at table glaze over. And I don’t care how great the food in a place is said to be, or how many stars Pete Wells allotted it in the Times, I’m not going to stand in line or loiter for an hour on the sidewalk so as to be able to eat a famous hamburger or whatever at the bar. Never have, never will—although if you’re 83, “never” carries a different, more ominous connotation than it once did. What this all means is that I will need a new “go to” Manhattan restaurant. Uptown in Manhattan, that is. As nice as their downtown version is, and notwithstanding that the Frenchette people are going to preserve Le Veau’s incomparable slice-out-of-time dining-room, I rather doubt that the makeover will suit me—or I it. The cooking will surely be admirable, more Instagrammable than its predecessor’s cuisine, and more talked about. In some quarters, it was fashionable to deprecate Le Veau’s menu, but when I took one of this city’s leading food critics there for lunch, he remarked that the tripe was as good as he’d had anywhere. It was all very straightforward: the wine list consisted of a handful of reds, a smattering of whites, a bubbly or two and a decent rose. Not for Cathy a carte des vins resembling the Book of Kells in size and priceyness—but that seems to be what people today want. Dining today is like so much else; it’s supposed to be “an experience” to be memorialized in one’s phone and circulated on Instagram and Facebook. And “experiences” draw crowds; just think of that famous recent photograph of the throng packing the final runup to the summit of Mt. Everest. So: what are the qualities that my “go to” restaurant must exhibit? Not crowded and never a line. Decent food. Room to talk and think; a minimum of noise. The right look: A French 86 QUEST

bistro like Le Veau should look as if Emile Zola’s about to walk in; an Italian place—like Frankie’s 457 Spuntino, my Brooklyn “go to”—should be spare, straightforward, and modern: no straw-wrapped fiaschi and bad watercolors of Portofino. Away from Midtown would be a must. My orthopedic circumstances have eliminated the MTA from my travel arsenal; I depend on Uber and its like to get from Brooklyn to Manhattan and back. At 60th between Lexington and Park, Le Veau is on the upper border of possibility for me. I was in the market for something a bit further uptown. Of course, wherever I ended up would be a change from Le Veau’s essentially clublike spirit. We regulars knew each other; many of us were of an age, and manifested similar social tastes and inclinations. Table-to-table conversations were frequent. With the restaurant’s closing, the old gang will have scattered; there are reports that the new owners have a VIP list that will include a number of Veau regulars, but overall the crowd is going to be discernably different, exemplars of a socioeconomic order for which I don’t qualify—even if I aspired to. I knew my search would be serendipitous; I couldn’t exactly trek up and down the East Side trying one place then another. So it was through a dinner invitation from a dear friend that I discovered Caffe dei Fiori, at 973 Lexington. The food was delicious—and original without being idiotic. The atmosphere was cordial; the noise level negligible. I liked the people who worked there, and the other diners seemed the right sort: no smartphone brandishing or other type of “foodie” showing-off. And there’s a nice bench outside where I can do my old-boy-on-a-stoop routine, and just sit and watch the city go on its frazzling way. Caffe dei Fiori is just up the avenue from Sette Mezzo, a more famous, reported-upon hangout—Sunday dinner especially—of the rich and famous. It’s a nice place, with good food and agreeable staff, but for me it’s just too…well…too… oh, you know what I mean. And a bit further down Lexington is Brasserie Cognac, a welcoming French restaurant with OK cooking, but its tables are awfully close together. So for the nonce at least, I’ll be giving Caffe dei Fiori a “go to” run-through. So far, the auguries are promising. I’ve given lunch to a number of different friends, including a French chum famous in the realm of the senses, and all have enthused. So far so good, then—and in today’s world, who can ask for more than that? u


This page: Scenes from the Caffe dei Fiori, the author’s new gastronomic home away from home. Opposite page, from left: Jacqueline Onassis’ house account at the Veau d’Or; the dining room at the Veau d’Or.


DAISY

QUEST TRAVELS TO CHARLOTTESVILLE

FIFTEEN MINUTES outside of Charlottesville, Virginia, lay some of the East Coast’s most pastoral landscapes. Where tobacco plantations once dotted the rolling hills around Monticello— Thomas Jefferson’s Neoclassical estate—a different kind of agricultural crop has now taken root. Vineyards are springing up everywhere, producing good wines and bringing together locals and visitors to enjoy history, music, food, and sports in what may be America’s most bucolic countryside. Owners of Virginia vineyards are as varied as the terroir. Musician Dave Matthews of the Dave Matthews Band bought Blenheim Vineyards in 1999, and Guy and Lizzy Pelly (among Prince William and Prince Harry’s oldest friends) have just bought Merrie Mill Farm, a 400-acre farm right next to Castalia, philanthropist Paul Manning’s estate. And of course there is Trump Vineyards, the 2,000-acre estate Patricia Kluge famously bankrupted herself trying to save. The estate is still making wine, albeit with much larger gold let88 QUEST

ters on the labels. But more than the famous and notso-famous people who live there, a visit to Virginia wine country is as much about a peek into the country life of the locals as it is about wine tastings. Murdoch Matheson and his wife, Susie, have lived on a farm just outside Charlottesville for years. “It’s about supporting local businesses and enjoying country life,” says Susie from the back of the horse she rides every day into the hills behind her house, accompanied by at least six dogs of various shapes and sizes. Virginia locals have always understood that the combination of great music, rich history, easy access to the outdoors, and the intellectual prestige of the University of Virginia made Charlottesville a great place to live. Recently, wine tours have started enticing weekend visitors from much further afield. Once thought of as barely drinkable, Virginia wines have gone through a renaissance in the last 10 to 15 years. “They’re apples and oranges,” says

George Hodson, CEO of Veritas Vineyards, when describing the differences between Virginia wines and those of Napa, America’s more famous wine-growing region. Virginia wines, according to Hodson, are more akin to old-world wines, refined and austere, and more similar to Burgundy than to Bordeaux. Due to Virginia’s variable climate, the growing season there is shorter than California’s, resulting in wines with less sugar content than their Napa Valley counterparts. Improvements to the product have come through trial and error; early attempts to plant five acres here or there of cabernet sauvignon grapes did not succeed. But viognier, petit verdot, and cabernet franc have thrived in the region. “When we try to imitate Napa Valley, we fail,” says Hodson. “We try to be our own thing and dial in our own viticultural practices. Now, we’ve found our lane.” One of the practices that Virginia wines has been experimenting with is a new collective local label called

A LL I M A G E S CO U RT E S Y O F T H E R E S P E C T I V E V I N E YA R D S

BY DAISY PRINCE


This page, clockwise from top: The patio at King Family Vineyards; a bottle of King Family Vineyards Meritage; working the harvest at King Family Vineyards; a polo match at King Family Vineyards. Opposite page: An illustration of the King Family Vineyards property.


True Heritage. Spearheaded by George Hodson and his sister, Veritas’ vintner Emily Pelton, True Heritage is a way for the small-time wine grower to acquire name recognition and branding in stores and restaurants outside their immediate local area. Because premier restaurants often won’t stock wines they might run out of, smaller labels often are passed over in favor of better-known wines. “The True Heritage idea came out of trying to get a bunch of these boutique farms together in order to meet the demand of enough wine for restaurants or distributors. The idea was to have a master brand, ‘True Heritage,’ and underneath that have a Castalia, Merrie Mill, or Ben Coolyn label, so we can sell to the high-end restaurants,” says Paul Manning, one of the founding members of True Heritage and whose 424-acre farm, Castalia, was named after the sacred spring of Delphi, Greece. Once the owner has put in the vines and planted the grapes, True Heritage will harvest them, make the wine, design

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the label with the name of the farm, and market the product locally and nationally. The goal is to put Keswick Valley Wines on the map, similar to New Zealand’s Marlborough District or California’s Napa Valley. And like Napa Valley, the Virginia wine-tour experience aims to cater to an affluent crowd. Five-star places are popping up, like the 48-room Keswick Hall, opening in 2020, which will provide the perfect base from which to venture out to explore the area. Golf, horseback riding, and hiking are just a few of the activities in the nearby area. Polo matches are held at King Family Vineyards on Sundays in the summer, where spectators can watch games while sipping rosé under shaded tables. But no matter how high-end parts of wine country become, Virginia’s vineyards hope to retain their relaxed vibe. On my way to the airport, I stopped at Chisholm Vineyards, owned by Andrea Chisholm and her husband Charles Matheson; Andrea inherited the property from her grandmother through an

ancestor who migrated to the U.S. in 1730. Chisholm Vineyards hosts tastings, and also hosts live music every weekend. The ambiance is informal and fun. “People are very friendly,” says Andrea. And there is another reason why local winemakers are keen to foster the degree of community spirit that tastings encourage: The vineyards bring all different kinds of people together. After the protests and the deadly car attack in 2017, Charlottesville was devastated. Many of the winemakers brought up the tragedy during our conversations. Tourism in Charlottesville was badly affected, and while visitors have drifted back, the emotional wounds the event inflicted touched everyone. As Manning tells me, “That was a tragedy for this beautiful place. I’ve traveled a lot and people do mention it to us. The community is healed and healing. The wine businesses are helping people come here, because they are trying to let that go a little and recover from it.” u

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DAISY

This page, clockwise from above: The winery at Veritas Wines; grapes at Veritas Wines; a view of Veritas Wines’ vineyards; Susie and Murdoch Matheson; George Hodson of Veritas Wines. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: A few of the wines produced by Chisholm Vineyards; hot air balloons float above Chisholm Vineyards; the stone barn at Castalia; a view across the vineyards to Castalia’s barn.


ACCESSORIES

INDIAN ACCENT IN HINDUISM, ARANYANI is the goddess of the forests. In fashion, Aranyani is the soul of India rendered in leather, metal, semiprecious stones, paint, and embroidery to create high-end handbags inspired by the country’s ancient traditions of artistry and craftsmanship. “It all started with the vision to create something to tell the story of what India is about,” says Haresh Mirpuri, the company’s founder and creative director. During the days of the Silk Road trade, India was known for its artisanal crafts—its fabrics and embroidery, its paintings and sculptures—and the country’s maharajas were every bit as fashionable as Europe’s royals. In modern times, however, that history has largely been lost and forgotten; people looking to buy luxury goods are more likely to turn to France and Italy than to India. Mirpuri is looking to change that, to represent India’s royal history and remind consumers of India’s long tradition of luxury, now interpreted in a contemporary aesthetic. The bags’ designs reflect Mirpuri’s deep interest in Vedic philosophy. Each piece in the Stone Drops line, for instance, is accented with semiprecious stones from the Aravalli mountains, India’s oldest mountain range, and each stone is thought to have a spiritual property: Tiger eye protects its wearer; moonstone harnesses and nullifies negative feelings and emotions; black onyx safeguards from negative elements. “The stones were not seen as jewelry,” says Mirpuri “because they were always part 92 QUEST

of nature; all the semiprecious stones have to do with some form of well-being. So while we consider these a luxury, luxury was actually a necessity in those days.” Other lines incorporate colorful painting and embroidery. That Vedic philosophy also comes into play with the brand’s use of leather. “We are conscious that we are using a live skin,” Mirpuri says. “We respect that and we want to make it into a beautiful piece. It’s part of nature; it’s got to be beautiful.” To ensure that the bags are, indeed, beautiful—to ensure they’re of an international luxury standard—Mirpuri, when he founded the company about three years ago, sent five of his workers (there currently are nine) to Milan to train for 16 weeks with a master craftsman who has worked with “all the best brands you can imagine in Italy.” The result is a combination of the best of traditional Indian artisanal crafts with the finest European leathercrafting skills. But it’s how his workers have been treated since their return from Milan that Aranyani’s founder is most proud of: He pays them fairly and also pays for their children’s education. The company plants trees in its surrounding neighborhood and ensures access to clean drinking water for locals; it works with an orphanage and supports a music school. “The Vedic philosophy of life,” says Mirpuri, “is basically about inclusive growth. We all rise together.” u

A LL I M A G E S CO U RT E S Y O F A R A NYA N I

BY KATHRYN MAIER


This page, top to bottom: Aranyani’s Bikaner Bauletto Bag; Haresh Mirpuri, the brand’s founder and creative director; the Nizam Classic Briefcase. Opposite page: An onyx- and blue chalcedony-accented bag from the Stone Drops collection.


RNEAT M A IEL

THIRD STREET SOUTH, a remarkable shopping and dining area in the heart of Old Naples, Florida, began at the turn of the 19th century as a sporting destination. After World War II, a wealthy and internationally sophisticated heir to a major American fortune brought several excellent shops that suited his family and friends to Third Street South. The next generations of his family have continued to uphold the highest standards, and Third Street South is now a destination in the tradition of Worth Avenue, Jobs Lane, and other Eastern resorts. Enhanced by carefully tended landscaping, plazas, and fountains, part of the pleasure of Third Street South is its very pet-friendly attitude. Dogs of all shapes and sizes are welcome and wanted, including at the nationally recognized Third Street South Farmer’s Market every Saturday. There are also many choices for excellent shopping and dining. Marissa is a store known nationally for its designer bou94 QUEST

tiques, superb shoe collection, and irresistible accessories, including jewelry from top vendors. John Craig, cited by Esquire as one of the country’s best men’s shops, specializes in bespoke suits, clothing from Peter Millar and other fine labels, shoes, and accessories to please any gentleman. Gattles has supplied clients from across the country with the finest linen brands, including Porthault, for well over three-quarters of a century, and continues to do so. A Mano is the source for the best porcelain (including three exclusive French lines available nowhere else in America), as well as crystal, glassware, gifts of many kinds, and women’s casual clothes, jewelry, and accessories. Gretchen Scott has her own brightly colorful eponymous designs for women, with interesting antiques and accessories sprinkled throughout the store, while Sara Campbell’s attractive clothes flatter and enhance. The well-known Eileen Fisher, J.McLaughlin,

CO U RTE S Y O F T H I R D S T R E E T S O U T H

GLAMOUR AND GOOD TIMES IN OLD NAPLES


Leggiadro, Lilly Pulitzer, Tommy Bahama, Relax, and Sequin are situated on Third Street South, as well as Charlotte Kellogg, whose beautifully cut clothes can also be found in Palm Beach and Newport. If you’re looking for a meal, there are seven excellent restaurants, some nationally recognized in their categories. Campiello is superbly Tuscan; Sea Salt offers deliciously innovative Venetian-inspired food; The Continental specializes in the best of meats; and Ridgway’s has been well known for its mouth-watering French-American food for decades. Barbatella is an Italian trattoria with, among many other options, a mozzarella bar and delicious gelato. Jane’s provides the best breakfasts for miles and is a highly desirable spot for lunch, and The Old Naples Pub, with its cozy wood-paneled old Florida bar, has been pleasing customers for more than three decades. Third Street South truly has it all: sophistication, beauty, excellent service, and a multitude of shopping and culinary delights. What are you (and your puppy) waiting for? u

This page, clockwise from above: The terrace at D’Amico’s The Continental, a national award-winning restaurant; Third Street South welcomes all dogs; one of several fountains and courtyards on Third Street South; cooling off in the 19th century Italian fountain. Opposite

For more information, visit thirdstreetsouth.com or call 239.649.6707.

page: The late famous couture designer Michael Vollbracht created the Third Street South logo, modeled here. DECEMBER 2019 95


BOOKS

THE LIFE OF THE PARTY “HOSPITALITY IS THE KEY that unlocks all the secrets of entertaining well,” writes party planner extraordinaire Bronson van Wyck in his debut book, Born to Party, Forced to Work (Phaidon, 2019). And he should know: Van Wyck & Van Wyck, the event-planning company he formed 20 years ago with his mother, has thrown celebrations for clients such as Beyoncé, Madonna, multiple presidents, Mercedes Benz, and Chanel. In his book, van Wyck illustrates how he brings his philosophy of hospitality to life. He provides an insider’s look at how he pulled off some of the most unforgettable and imaginative parties of the past two decades, from Sean Combs’ 40th birthday party at The Plaza to a Homeric ball on Mykonos, plus weddings, fundraising galas, holidaytime happenings, extravagant corporate events, and more. It’s all accompanied by 350 photos of the grand soirées he’s planned, conveying the visual excitement of 00 9 6 QUEST

the events. The book also includes van Wyck’s musings on topics such as dress codes and invitations. Known for a style of entertaining that combines tasteful sophistication with the gracious warmth of his southern upbringing, van Wyck takes a humble approach to his role, writing “What is it that we do? Actually, nothing revolutionary. We are taking part in a tradition as old as man, using the same tools to create the same feelings of welcome, of being appreciated, of being taken care of, and of being loved.” But entertaining on such a grand scale is indeed an art, and van Wyck has accumulated two decades’ worth of wisdom to impart. Born to Party, Forced to Work is a perfect guide to throwing memorable fêtes that are as enjoyable to give as they are to attend. After all, as van Wyck says, “We give parties because we want to express appreciation for people we care about. And also because we want to have fun.” u

A N D R E A S WA L D S C H U E T Z ; M E L A N I E AC E V E D O ; B I LLY FA R R E LL / B FA . CO M ; S A R A B E T H T U R N E R

BY KATHRYN MAIER


This page, counterclockwise from above: At the wedding of Mimi van Wyck and Ray Hamilton Morrison, in Charleston, South Carolina in 2007; a scene from the Whitney Museum of American Art Studio Party in 2011; Bronson van Wyck with his mother, Mary Lynn van Wyck, and his sister, Mimi van Wyck, at the wedding of Alana Frankfort and Dovid Spector in 2017. Opposite page, from top: A scene from the wedding of Alessandra Brawn and Jon Neidich, in Pisa, Italy, in 2014; the cover of Born to Party, Forced to Work.


CALENDAR

DECEMBER

On December 6th, Casa de Campo Resort & Villas will kick off its holiday season with a tree lighting ceremony in Altos de Chavón. Throughout the month, the village will host a number of festivities, including fireworks at Plaza Chavón. For more information, visit casadecampo.com.do.

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WINTER CINEMA

Through December 31st, reservations for screenings at the rooftop Winter Cinema at The Berkeley hotel in London will be available. As London’s only private rooftop cinema, the pine-lined outdoor theater accommodates eight visitors per viewing. The setting welcomes guests to snuggle in wooden huts with blankets and enjoy a full menu of food and Champagne while watching Christmas classics like Home Alone. For more information, visit the-berkeley.co.uk.

Island will be open through December 27th. For more information and hours, call 516.627.1731.

For more information, visit palmbeachsymphony.org.

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ADOPT-A-FAMILY

SEASON OPENING

The Palm Beach Symphony will host a cocktail party to open its season at Club Colette at 6 p.m.

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Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches will hold its annual tree lighting ceremony at the Sailfish Club. For more information, visit adoptafamilypbc.org.

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New Hope Charities will host its annual Holiday Bazaar at the Beach Club in Palm Beach at 6:30 p.m. through midnight. For more information, visit newhopecharities.org.

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The Nantucket Historical Association will hold a preview party for its annual Festival of Trees event at 6 p.m. The Festival of Trees is a holiday tradition that kicks off the Nantucket Chamber of Commerce’s Stroll weekend and transforms the Whaling Museum into a winter wonderland for December. For more information, visit nha.org.

Nashville’s renowned holiday drive thru light and music show, The Dancing Lights of Christmas, has returned to Tennessee through January 4th. For more information, visit thedancinglightsofchristmas.com.

The Findlay Galleries pop-up at Americana Manhasset in Long

HOLIDAY BAZAAR

NANTUCKET TREES

LIGHTS OF CHRISTMAS

FINDLAY POP-UP

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CHRISTMAS AT CASA

On December 10th, the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will hold its Ballinger Award Luncheon and Award Presentation at The Breakers. For more information, visit palmbeachpreservation.org.

Casa de Campo Resort & Villas will kick off its holiday season with a tree lighting ceremony in Altos de Chavón. Throughout the month, the village will host a number of festivities, including fireworks at Plaza Chavón on New Year’s Eve.


CALENDAR

Palm Beach County will hold its Annual Archival Evening honoring Iris Apfel at Club Colette. For more information, visit hspbc.org.

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YORKVILLE NUTCRACKER

Dances Patrelle will present “The Yorkvile Nutcracker” (featuring Abi Stafford and Ask La Cour, courtesy of New York City Ballet) at Hunter College through December 15th. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit dancespatrelle.org.

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HOLIDAY RECEPTION

Palm Beach Civic Association will host its annual Holiday Reception at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center at 6 p.m. For more information, visit palmbeachcivic.org. Through December 31st, reservations for screenings at the rooftop Winter Cinema at The Berkeley hotel in London will be available. For more information, visit the-berkeley.co.uk. For more information, visit casadecampo.com.do.

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GARDENS OF SHALIMAR

The Society of Four Arts in Palm Beach will host a reception and dinner honoring major donors and the host committee for the “Gardens of Shalimar” dance at Findlay Galleries at 5:30 p.m. For more information, visit fourarts.org.

STAR OF EDUCATION

South Florida PBS will host its Stars of Education dinner dance at Club Colette at 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit southfloridapbs.org.

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ARCHIVAL EVENING

The Historical Society of

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MARVELOUS BIRTHDAY

Rachel Brosnahan of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel will take center stage at The Breakers when MorseLife Health System celebrates its “Marvelous 36th Birthday Celebration” at The Breakers at 7 p.m. The evening will feature cocktails, dinner, dancing, and dessert. For more information, email events@morselife.org or call 561.242.4661.

JANUARY 1 CHAMBER MUSIC

The Associated Chamber Music Players (ACMP) will announce its 2020 season. For more information, visit acmp.net.

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FURTHERING EDUCATION CATHOLIC CHARITIES

Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Palm Beach will kick off the Caritas Dei Bishop’s gala with a Christmas reception at Findlay Galleries. Established in 1984 as the social service arm of the Palm Beach Diocese, Catholic Charities implements the charitable vision of Most Reverend Gerald M. Barbarito, Bishop of the Diocese of Palm Beach. For more information, visit ccdpb.org.

Leaders in Furthering Education will hold its 26th Annual Lady in Red Gala at The Breakers at 6 p.m. For more information, visit life-edu.org.

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MEDICAL FORUM

The Bascom Palmer Eye Institute will host its Annual Palm Beach Medical Forum at Mar-a-Lago at 11:30 a.m. For more information, visit umiamihealth.org.

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BALLINGER AWARD

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will hold its Ballinger Luncheon and Award Presentation at The Breakers at noon. For more information, visit palmbeachpreservation.org. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

The International Society of Palm Beach will host its Centennial Celebration black-tie dinner dance at The Beach Club. For more information and reservations, call 561.863.5500.

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SAINT EDWARD CHURCH

The Saint Edward Church will hold its annual Christmas Gala at The Breakers at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.0400.

The Findlay Galleries pop-up at Americana Manhasset in Long Island will be open through December 27th. For more information and hours, call 516.627.1731. DECEMBER 2019 99


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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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BY KATHRYN MAIER

’TIS THE SEASON for decking the halls...and for getting decked out. We’ve rounded up our favorite picks to make everyone’s holiday merry and bright.

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1. Vhernier’s Freccia bracelet in 18-kt. pink gold, cornelian, and rock crystal ($20,100) and Freccia Mini ring in 18-kt white gold, diamonds, and mother of pearl ($5,600), both at Vhernier: 783 Madison Avenue. 2. Stuart Weitzman’s Rosalita 95 in Chile. $475 at stuartweitzman.com. 3. Bacardi’s Gran Reserva Diez has been expertly blended and barrel-aged for at least 10 years under the Caribbean sun. Bacardi.com for more. Opposite page: 1. Brocade Ball Gown by Theia. $895 at theiacouture.com. 2. Oval Ruby & Diamond Halo Earstuds made for Betteridge, available at Betteridge Greenwich. $5,100; betteridge.com for more. 3. David Webb Diamond and Ruby Lioness Bangle Bracelet (estimate $30,000 to $50,000) and David Webb White Enamel and Diamond Pegasus Clip-Brooch (estimate $10,000 to $15,000), to be auctioned December 12 by Doyle; doyle.com for more.

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1. Wempe’s Sensual Safari BY KIM rings in 18-kt. rose gold. $4,395 each at Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000. 2. Take a seasonal escape to the shores of Ocean House, in Rhode Island: 888.552.2588. 3. Rolex Day-Date 36 in yellow gold. $34,550 at Rolex retailers; rolex.com for more. 4. Veronica Beard’s Lilya Dress. $795 at veronicabeard.com. 5. Monica Vinader Alta Capture Necklace and Siren Shore Set. $990 at monicavinader.com.

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 5

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1. Stubbs & Wootton’s Bowood slipper from the Colefax & Fowler Collection. $550 at stubbsandwootton.com. 2. Calèches et Cavaliers Près du Bois de Boulogne (gouache on paper) by Jean Dufy (1888-1964), $59,000, at Findlay Galleries’ Pop-Up Gallery in Americana Manhasset, open through December 27: 516.304.5326. 3. Charlotte Kellogg’s Olivia Top in green silk. $250 at charlottekellogg.com. 4. Ralph Lauren’s Floral Cotton Canvas Ricky Bag. $3,250 at ralphlauren.com. 5.

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Roberto Coin’s Pois Moi Luna single row diamond pavé ring in 18-kt. white gold ($5,900), wide ring in 18-kt. rose and white gold with diamonds ($3,700), wide ring in 18-kt. yellow gold ($2,500), and wide diamond pavé ring in 18-kt white gold ($10,500); robertocoin.com for more.

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1. Flor et.al’s Depeche Jumpsuit. $695; similar styles available at neimanmarcus.com. 2. Quaker Marine’s Swordfish hat in recycled performance sailcloth. $68 at quakermarine.com. 3. Banniere’s Paris silk scarf. $250 at banniereco.com. 4. Verdura’s Stardust Bracelet in 18-kt. white gold set with sapphires and diamonds. $193,500; verdura.com for more. 5. The best gift a golfer could receive is a few rounds at Casa de Campo’s Teeth of the Dog. To reserve: casadecampo.com.do. 6. Manolo Blahnik’s Odette. $1,195 at manoloblahnik.com.

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3 1. Fabio Angri’s Angelfish Cufflinks in 18-kt. yellow gold and black diamonds. $4,450 at fabioangri.com. 2. Got a loved one who’s hard to shop for? Lock in a lifetime of memories with a Barton & Gray membership, offering unlimited access to a fleet of Hinckley yachts, from Miami to East Hampton: 617.728.3555. 3. Jonathan Adler Whiskey Decanter ($198), Vodka Decanter ($148), and Gin Decanter ($168), all at bloomingdales.com. 4. Marchesi Antinori Solaia 2016. $390 at Astor Wines & Spirits, astorwines.com. 5. Smythson’s Satchel Messenger Bag in Dark Petrol suede. $2,695 at smythson.com. 6. Michael Kors Metallic Puffer Jacket ($298) and Brooklyn Logo Stripe Jacquard Backpack ($398), both at michaelkors.com.

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4 1. The Dior Sessions (Rizzoli), text by Alexander Fury, photographed by Nikolaï Von Bismark. $125: rizzoliusa.com. 2. 1950s In Vogue (Thames & Hudson), by Rebecca C. Tuite. $95: thamesand hudsonusa.com. 3. Near & Far: Interiors I Love (Vendome Press), by Lisa Fine. $60: available at barnesandnoble.com. 4. A Booklover’s Guide to New York (Rizzoli),

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by Cleo Le-Tan. $30: rizzoliusa.com. 5. Fortnum & Mason: Christmas & Other Winter Feasts (HarperCollins), by Tom Parker Bowles. $35: harpercollins.com. 6. The Style of Movement: Fashion & Dance (Rizzoli), by Ken Browar and Deborah Ory. $75: rizzoliusa.com.

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7. Street: Photographs (G Arts), by Phil Penman. $75: glitteratieditions.com. 8. The Musso & Frank Grill, by Michael Callahan. $40: mussoandfrank.com/shop/.

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HOMELESS NO MORE… The Need is Now

Coming Fall 2020! Help Save Twice as Many Lives – There is Still Time to Support the Campaign for the NEW Pet Adoption & Humane Education Center at Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League! To learn how you can support this campaign, please return the form below today.

HOMELESS NO MORE… The Need is Now 3 Yes! I want to know more about the campaign for the NEW Pet Adoption Center. Name: Address: City:

State:

Phone Number: Email Address: PeggyAdams.org

Zip:

Send to: Rich Anderson, Executive Director/CEO Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League 3200 N. Military Trail West Palm Beach, Florida 33409 561.472.8844 R.Anderson@PeggyAdams.org


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1. Ludo bracelet featuring rubies, coral, and diamonds, set in 18-kt. rose gold, by Van Cleef & Arpels. $60,500 at vancleefarpels.com.

QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

2. A Hinckley yacht, like the Hinckley Sport Boat 40x shown here, makes for a spectacular gift. To inquire, visit hinckleyyachts.com. 3. Jennifer Garrigues has unique finds for home décor, including this mini porcelain vase. $125 at Jennifer Garrigues: 308 Peruvian Ave., Palm Beach, 561.659.7085. 4. J.McLaughlin’s Ross Pant, $178 at jmclaughlin.com. 5. A coveted piece of furniture makes a thoughtful gift, and designer Gil Walsh will shoot a photo of the item and gift-wrap it for under-the-tree giving. Visit gilwalsh.com for more. Give the gift of Regi! Regi—short for regimen— is Allergan’s first-ever digital

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platform for booking aesthetic treatments including Allergan-branded medical aesthetics like Botox and CoolSculpting, as well as spa treatments such as facials, waxing, eyelash and eyebrow tinting, laser hair removal, and massages. Whether in New York, Los Angeles or Dallas, the e-gift provides access to 100+ salons, spas, and wellness studios. The best part is… recipients will have access

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to Regi’s personalized Concierge Team for treatment recommendations, locations and bookings! Regi e-Gift Cards… • Can be purchased exclusively online at TryRegi.com • Never expire and any unused amount can be applied toward a future beauty service (Injectable and Body Contouring treatments do not apply) • Are available in the following U.S. denominations: $25, $50, $100, $150 and $200

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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1. Christofle’s Mood Party 24-Piece Stainless Steel Flatware Set with Storage Capsule ($985) and Stainless Steel Mood Party Tray ($985), at christofle.com. 2. Bodum 34 oz. Chambord Coffee Maker. $50 at bloomingdales.com. 3. The Colony is the perfect Palm Beach getaway. To reserve: thecolonypalmbeach.com. 4. Kenneth Jay Lane’s Pavé Rose Bracelet. $750 at kennethjaylane.com. 5. Purdey’s

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Ladies Toscana Coat. £2,195 at purdey.com.

DECEMBER 2019 109


1. Winter is the time to lock in your summer plans at Villa Erossea on Santorini, offering panoramic views across the Aegean Sea. For more, visit wimco.com. 2. Graziela earrings in 18-kt. rose gold and diamonds. $12,750 at grazielagems.com. 3. Chateau d’Esclans’ Les Clans 2017 Côtes de Provence. $85 at wine.com. 4. Aranyani Darjeeling bag. $1,320; aranyani.com for more. 5. Halston’s Georgette Overlay Sequined Jumpsuit. $525 at halston.

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com. 6. Gucci Cat-Eye acetate sunglasses. $565 at gucci.com.

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1. Elmo Backpack by Isaac Mizrahi Loves Sesame Street. $80 at bloomingdales.com. 2. Leta Austin Foster is tops for interior design, so natrally she has the best dollhouse at her boutique, too. Maileg Dollhouse, $298 at Leta Austin Foster Boutique, 64 Via Mizner, Palm Beach. 3. Petite Plume’s Imperial Tartan Robe ($58) and Classic White Pajamas with Red Piping ($58), at petite-plume.com. 4. Stella McCartney Kids 50mm Square Sunglasses. $140 at nordstrom.com. 5. Baghera Rider Toy Car. $190 at bloomingdales.com. 6. The Hogwarts Express Electric Train. $430 at hammacherschlemmer.com.

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 5

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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1. Hit the links at Puntacana Resort & Club in the Caribbean. To reserve: puntacana.com. 2. Krug Grande Cuvée. $165 at Astor Wines & Spirits, astorwines.com. 3. Asprey Oak Leaf Bangle in 18-kt. white gold and pavé diamonds. $40,000 at asprey.com. 4. Zadig & Voltaire’s Lena Suede Glitter Boot. $598 at zadig-et-voltaire.com. 5. Rely on National Car Rental for superior service during the holidays: nationalcar.com.

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 2 3

4 1. Linda Horn offers unique home decor items, like this large standing heron rendered in brass and copper by artist and sculptor Sergio Bustamante. $2,350 at Linda Horn: 1327 Madison Ave. or lindahorn.com. 2. Nouvel Heritage ring in 18-kt. rose gold, ruby, and spinel. $2,300 at nouvelheritage.com. 3. A donation to charity in the gift recipient’s name is always a welcome present. We suggest the Hope for Depression Research Foundation, hopefordepression.org. 4. Pretty Rugged Gear’s Black Faux Fur Reversible Bomber Jacket. $220 at prettyruggedgear.com. 5. Panthère

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de Cartier sunglasses, $995 at cartier.com.

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PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

RYNWOOD: THE ICONIC GOLD COAST ESTATE

From left to right: Kirsten Benjamin, Kimberly Bohner, Jennifer Carson, Stephanie Clark, Heather Van der Mije, Nitika Moran, Emily Schaible, Vaughn Dorrian, Michelle Cuddeback, and Christin Rueger stand on the steps of Rynwood, a 1927 Gold Coast Estate. DECEMBER 2019 115


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The group of community-minded leaders who met us at Rynwood are each involved with and dedicated to the North Shore Land Alliance (NSLA), a robust local land trust that is passionately supported by both private and public funding to protect and preserve the cherished open spaces of Long Island’s North Shore (see page 120 to learn more about the NSLA). Quest listened to and saluted this dedicated group of still youthful yet highly accomplished women, and we photographed them in the courtyards, outbuildings, and gardens of this baronial residence. One cannot help but especially notice the spectacular library (seen above) that is a wing of Rynwood onto itself. Yet for all of its obvious grandeur, the triple-width fireplace and patina-perfect paneling add natural warmth and comfort to this near-chapel-like space (think “inviting”). As we gathered up, reluctantly, to leave Rynwood, I was reminded of a conversation I

CO U RTE S Y O F DA N I E L G A LE S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

ON A CRISP late afternoon in mid-November, Quest ventured out to Old Brookville, Long Island, to meet with the female smart set in this fabled village, who have helped to reinvigorate the North Shore community with restored commitment and dedication. Our setting was Rynwood, the vintage 60-room estate that sits upon 51 landscaped (and forested) acres that still recalls the opulent age of Long Island’s renowned Gold Coast. This Tudor-inspired mansion was the vision of Sir Samuel Agar Salvage, who was referred to in the 1920s as the “father of the rayon industry” (think “nylon”). And even with its vaulted ceilings, English oak paneling, stained-glass medallions and long-sounding corridors, this recently restored manor house is perfectly scaled and charmingly livable (think “cozy”). And it’s for sale! It is also worth noting that Rynwood is situated on Cedar Swamp Road, which several historians claim is the oldest road in America!


Counterclockwise from top right: Jessica Crowley and Thomas J. Calabrese; Deborah Hauser and Dana Forbes; guests enjoy a selection of Banfi wines while learning more about Rynwood and the NSLA; Jennifer Carson and Kirsten Benjamin; Stephanie Clark smiles beside a stone balcony at Rynwood; Robert Whiting and Emily Johnson enjoying Banfi wines. Opposite page: Massive oak trusses span the cathedral ceiling of the library at Rynwood; Deirdre O’Connell, CEO, and Debra Quinn Petkanas, Associate Broker, of Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty (inset).

11.20 HR in Place. New image. Clean up as Necessary, Hold Mood Hold detail. hold white color detail on lady white sweater.


Above: A lovely stone bridge leads toward Rynwood’s baronial main residence, courtyard and gardens. Below: Aileen and Ian Gumprecht with their two beautiful daughters, Lilly and Nina, seated on the steps of one of Rynwood’s many stone courtyards. Opposite page: Abby Sheeline and Katherine Cirelli stand before one of Rynwood’s two striking sets of Yellin wrought iron gates.

recently had with Sir Samuel Agar Salvage’s grandson, Silas Anthony Jr., who lived at Rynwood with his father and mother (née Magdelaine Salvage) when he was a very young boy. Said Si to me, reflectively: “I have fond memories of my grandfather, who would take me by the hand and walk the grounds of Rynwood, pointing out the hills and vales that still exist today. But what I most remember is the workmen in their cars winding down the long driveway, when they would leave the house at the end of a day’s work. There were a whole lot of cars.” u For more information regarding Rynwood, contact Debra Quinn Petkanas of Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty at 516.359.3204 or debrapetkanas@danielgale.com.


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PROTECTING THE LAND & WATER THAT SERVES THE PEOPLE

“As I look back at the last 16 years, I am incredibly grateful for the support of our local community. Working together, we have accomplished a lot and ensured that many of our most emblematic places will

THE NORTH SHORE LAND ALLIANCE is a nationally accred-

ited, 501(c)(3)non-profit land trust formed to protect and preserve, in perpetuity, the green spaces, farmlands, wetlands, groundwater and historical sites of Long Island’s north shore for the enhancement of quality of life and benefit of future generations. The Land Alliance’s designated area reaches from the southern boundary of the Northern State Parkway to the shore of Long Island Sound, and from the western boundary of Nassau County to the western boundary of Brookhaven Township. In the late 1990s, inhabitants of numerous Long Island communities expressed concern about how quickly the landscape was changing. Critical natural resources like beaches and forests, fields and meadows, were disappearing before their eyes. With the increased subdivision and sale of large estates and productive farms for dense development, pristine beaches and bays grew more polluted every year. Moreover, both the quality and quantity of the groundwater were declining. Several volunteer initiatives were already underway. In 1998, Carter Bales and Larry Schmidlapp formed the Centre Island Land Trust. Also in 1998, the Oyster Bay Cove Land Trust was formed with: Rosemary Bourne, president; John Bralower, vice president; and Lisa Ott, secretary. In 1997, Julie and Luis Rinaldini and Roy Zuckenberg purchased Groton Place, a hundred acre estate in Old Westbury. Understanding the value of conservation, they sought to protect 120 QUEST

the land from development by placing a conservation easement on their property. When they were unable to locate a local organization with the ability to hold an easement, they searched elsewhere for help. At that time, the mission of The Nature Conservancy was adopting a more landscape-scale, global focus. The Conservancy was no longer able to acquire small, local parcels. Paul Rabinovitch, then executive director of The Nature Conservancy, saw a need for a local organization to take on this role. Patsy Randolph and Nancy Douzinas of the Rauch Foundation saw this need too. In 2002, they all gathered together around a table and formed the North Shore Land Alliance. The Nature Conservancy applied to the Rauch Foundation for a $20,000 grant to fund initial set-up of the 501 (c)3 not-for-profit organization and hired Lisa Ott as a part-time executive director. Since then, the community has embraced the concept of saving land, creating parks, and protecting natural resources and critical habitat. The NSLA has added thirty well-respected community leaders to its board and built a growing membership and able corporation of volunteers. Get involved and read more about the Land Alliance at https://www.northshorelandalliance.org/ Lisa Ott, president and CEO of the North Shore Land Alliance. Opposite page: Jenny Einhorn and Liz Swenson.

C R A I G RU T T LE / N E W S DAY. CO M

still be here for our children and grandchildren to enjoy.” Lisa Ott, NSLA president & CEO


Clockwise from top left: Emily Schaible, Christine Bowe, Nitika Moran, Liz Swenson, Jenny Einhorn, Vaughn Dorrian, Michelle Cuddeback, Christin Rueger, Kirsten Benjamin, Stephanie Clark, and Jennifer Carson stroll through Rynwood’s gardens; one of Rynwood’s many charming stone embellishments; sisters Lilly and Nina Gumprecht share a hug beneath the vaulted ceilings of Rynwood’s light-filled loggia; Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty’s Marshall May, Debra Quinn Petkanas, Deirdre O’Connell, Abby Sheeline, and Katherine Cirelli; a round dovecote, a structure typical of old English estates, lies nestled between Rynwood’s main flower garden and a walled-in rose garden; Ian Gumprecht and Asia Baker Stokes stand beneath a tapestry in Rynwood’s foyer; Ashley Dooley (center). Opposite page: Emily Schaible and Heather Van der Mije explore Rynwood’s majestic gardens.

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THE GREAT AMERICAN SONGBOOK

THE FIRST TIME I ever sang with a band was in 1972, in the freshman dining hall at Princeton. “Without a song, the day would never end…,” I sang. “When things go wrong, a man ain’t got a friend…without a song.” Singing those Great American Songbook tunes with a band spoke to me, and I’ve been privileged to sing this repertoire professionally for more than 30 years. So what is this Great American Songbook? It consists of about 500 songs that were melodically simple and harmonically much more complex than former popular songs, written by a group of composers who worked in teams from about 1920 to 1960. Rodgers and Hammerstein, Kern and Hammerstein, Rodgers and Hart, Dietz and Schwartz, and Johnny Burke and Jimmy van Heusen had their names prominently displayed on marquees. This golden era of music all started with the piano and mass-market publishing. In the late 19th century, the smaller and less-expensive upright piano began to replace the grand piano. The earlier standard fare of classical music and hymns was replaced by more crowd-pleasing pop songs. New printing 124 QUEST

presses made possible mass market sheet music. Then came World War I. The day after the United States declared war against Germany, George M. Cohan composed “Over There,” a simple patriotic march. It was recorded by singer Enrico Caruso, and it sold an unprecedented two million sets of sheet music and one million records. The government formed a new agency called the Committee On Public Information to drum up support for the war effort, and 75,000 speakers fanned out across the country to churches, town halls, bandstands, and gazebos. Liberty Bond rallies were replete with marching bands and singers performing the new patriotic songs like “Over There.” Many attendees went home to play and sing these tunes on their new uprights. The Roaring Twenties followed the end of the war, with Prohibition passing and women garnering the vote in 1920. Speakeasies sprang up, the races mixed as never before, and there was an increased openness to black female vocalists like Bessie Smith and musicians of color like Louis Armstrong. The

W I LL I A M G OT T L I E B F O R T H E WA S H I N G TO N P O S T , CO U RT E S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L P O RT R A I T G A LLE RY ) ; D O N A L D S O N CO LLE C T I O N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; CO U RTE S Y O F A LE X D O N N E R

BY ALEX DONNER


This page: Ella Fitzgerald performing with Ray Brown playing upright bass, while trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and vibraphonist Milt Jackson look on; Charlie Bennett, Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, and Lionel Hampton in a scene from the 1948 movie A Song Is Born (inset). Opposite page: The author, pictured with his band, the Alex Donner Orchestra, has been singing the Great American Songbook professionally for more than 30 years.


Just as the music of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven will always have a special jazz age was on, and the jazzy swing bands helped promote the new standards, which were written for singers but were also played as extended instrumental versions in speakeasies. In 1927, Al Jolson’s The Jazz Singer inaugurated the “talkie” era of movies. The Busby Berkeley extravaganzas followed, along with the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers films featuring the music of Berlin, Kern, and Gershwin, presaging the Bob Hope and Bing Crosby films of the Forties. There was big money in all of this, but even more in those songs that were taken out of their original film context and proved to have “legs.” Depression came in the early Thirties, and the country found escape with popular music played on new, affordable Victrolas. Annual record sales went from 10 million to 50 million. Radio began large-scale broadcasts and soon replaced sheet music as the way most Americans first heard a song. And rather than just play the record at home or listen on the radio, Americans wanted to go out and dance to that band and see that singer. Benny Goodman’s 1938 Carnegie Hall concert loosely marks the end of the swing era, replaced by the big band era. Ensembles of up to 18 musicians plus singers that played strictly orchestrated arrangements rather than improvised swing became the rage. They were broadcast live on radio across the country from ballrooms like the Roseland, the Cotton Club, and the Savoy in New York, and others in Chicago and Kansas City. The Big Band leaders of the era, like Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Tommy Dorsey, and Benny Goodman, became celebrities. Some married socialites or Hollywood actresses and had cameo roles in major films. Some of these powerful bandleaders were also instrumental in the beginning of American desegregation, as they integrated top black musicians into their ranks. Before amplification, a singer had to virtually shout to be heard in the back of the hall. Bing Crosby became the first singer to employ the new microphone technology, which enabled him to whisper jazzy phrases that previously would have been unintelligible, adding a sense of intimacy to his recordings and performances. Crosby became the best-selling recording artist of the 20th century, and his recording of Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” is still the biggest-selling single of all time. Pearl Harbor was attacked in December of 1941. America’s men, including a lot of musicians and even bandleader Glenn Miller, went off to war. This, coupled with a musicians strike and other union issues, opened up an opportunity for Frank Sinatra. The Big Band format had been a full instrumental chorus or two of the band, with the singer finishing up the song with a 126 QUEST

vocal chorus. Singers played second fiddle to the bandleaders and some of the solo musicians. But Sinatra changed all of that. Having started in 1939 with big band leader Harry James, in 1940 Sinatra moved on to the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. In July 1940, they had a number-one hit with “I’ll Never Smile Again.” In 1942, Sinatra struck out on his own. At his first solo concert on December 30, 1942, Frankie performed to the shrieks of 35,000 bobby-soxers at the Paramount Theatre in Times Square. American songs were becoming known all over the world just as the United States was taking its postwar place as a global power. Broadway also entered its “golden era” following World War II, with Rodgers & Hammerstein cranking out hit after hit and Cole Porter penning a number of successful musicals. Many of these songs had “legs” and were performed by a multitude of talented and charismatic singers, including Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett, Perry Como, Bobby Darin, and Dean Martin. Having started in radio, almost all of these newly popular singers were now hosting and guest-starring in the fast-developing new medium of television. Many were cast in major films. The Great American Songbook was firing on all cylinders. A show would open on Broadway, and then the best songs would be sung live on television and radio. A singer like Sinatra would record the song, which would then be played on the radio and performed at high-profile nightclubs. The song would then be reprised on the various pop-singer television shows. Soon the cover versions would come out, and you would start to hear the song played in corner bars and cabarets. Presto, a new standard was born. So when did it end? The number of radio plays for the standards that make up the Great American Songbook had started to drop off drastically beginning in the mid-’50s. Broadway shows no longer produced as many hits with legs. Sinatra was considered past his prime. The romance of the Great American Songbook was overtaken by the music known as rock ‘n’ roll. But just as the music of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven will always have a special place in our culture, the Great American Songbook will continue to be performed. Recent recordings by pop stars, like Lady Gaga’s duets with Tony Bennett, are bringing the music to a new audience. Dance orchestras like mine now perform everything from Gershwin to Gaga, and Berlin to Beyoncé. But there will always be a special connection with the audience for a singer performing the Great American Songbook. As Vincent Youmans wrote in 1929, “I only know, there ain’t no love at all, without a song.” u

DAV I D R E D F E R N ; L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S ; E D WA R D E LC H A / M I C H A E L O C H S A R C H I V E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

place in our culture, the Great American Songbook will always be performed.


This page, from above: Duke Ellington conducts his big band at Granada Studios, Chelsea, 1963; Frank Sinatra, 1964; Enrico Caruso with a Victrola phonograph, 1913. Opposite page: Blues singer Bessie Smith poses for a portrait circa 1922 in New York City.


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+ = WHEN IT WAS FIRST ANNOUNCED last April, the merger of the white-shoe Stribling with the tech king Compass shook the entire residential property world. Uptown, sophisticated, old-school Stribling hooking up with the downtown cool-kid startup Compass seemed a very odd pairing. What common ground could these two companies possibly find? wondered industry seers. But as they say, opposites do attract. And that certainly continues to build with these two powerhouse firms. Six months after joining forces, both Compass and Stribling are near-giddy about the outcome. “We see it as a marriage of heritage and innovation” is a phrase that was used by the heads of both teams. Stribling, of course, bears the heritage, and Compass represents innovation. Each company has brought an element to the match that the other one lacked, yielding a truly complementary pairing—a genuine yin and yang. Libba Stribling, the founder of Stribling & Associates, admits she went through the typical stages of grief following the sale of 128 QUEST

her company to Compass. But she got through it, having quickly seen the benefits this merger brought to her employees. “It perhaps looked like an unlikely marriage at first,” she says. “But I knew that the advantages that Compass would bring to my brokers, which has made this transition an optimistic period for me.” Libba and her daughter, Elizabeth Ann Stribling-Kivlan, the president of Stribling & Associates, are particularly excited about such programs as Compass Concierge, which fronts sellers the funds for home-improvement services and which StriblingKivlan calls “a game-changer.” And there’s a new loan program that helps Compass clients bridge the gap between buying a new unit and selling their existing home. Plus the Collections technology, called “the Pinterest of real estate,” a virtual workspace that allows agents and clients to collaborate in real-time. With Collections, agents and clients can easily organize homes, centralize their discussions, and monitor the market by receiving immediate status and price updates. Additionally, Compass Markets is the first mobile app that puts real-time residential

A LL P H OTO S CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

HI-TECH COURTS HIGH SOCIETY: A POWERFUL UNION


= This page, clockwise from top: The dining area of one of Compass’s contemporary-style listings; a screenshot of Compass’s available properties in the New York area; the exterior of a current Stribling at Compass listing; the courtyard and the library of another current Stribling listing. Opposite page, from left: Elizabeth Ann Stribling-Kivlan and Elizabeth (“Libba”) Stribling; Robert Reffkin, cofounder and CEO of Compass.


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real estate data at an agent’s fingertips, allowing them to instantly access the most recent transaction data as well as historic sales trends. “We’re in an iPhone world,” says Stribling-Kivlan, “where we expect everything within a nanosecond. I think for the first time, a real estate company has put their money behind creating a world that allows the consumer to do that.” “One of the most exciting things,” adds Libba, “is seeing how the Stribling brokers use all the advantages of Compass’s technology and tools. It’s been very rewarding and, in some ways, much easier than I expected.” Libba Stribling brings nearly 40 years of experience to the new entity. “As a company, Stribling holds a reputation for excellence and a longstanding heritage reputation,” says Libba, pointing out that she started her business in 1967, before computers or faxes or iPhones. She’s seen enormous transition in the industry and has weathered several bad downturns in residential real estate. “I think that sheer knowledge counts for a lot,” she says. “I think it adds great substance to the new firm.” Rory Golod, Compass’s regional president of New York, says, “Stribling has a number of brokers who have been in this business a long time and who have proven to be incredible advisors to their clients. Collectively, they have built Stribling’s reputation as a company of elegance and sophistication and integrity.” Stribling, of course, has an exceptional presence on the Upper East Side, the New York City neighborhood where Compass was still working to establish a foothold at the time of the merger. Compass had already made plans to open two Upper East Side offices—a larger one at 71st and Madison, and a smaller space at 66th and Madison—and will be keeping Stribling’s four offices open as well. Stribling will provide its new parent company with unparalleled exposure in the Upper East Side market, where Compass had been lacking. “They give us an opportunity to build the Compass brand in a really important part of Manhattan that otherwise might have been a steep climb for us,” says Golod, “so we’re excited about that.” Fundamentally, the two companies are far more similar than they might appear. A key trait these two companies share is 130 QUEST

ing news about a broker who had been at their firm. “It showed me first-hand how important their agents were to them,” says Golod, “to see their reaction and how thoughtful and caring they were; you could tell it transcended business. It was more about being a family. And that’s how we think about our company. I left feeling like these are exactly the kind of people I want to work with.” For Libba Stribling, the “aha” moment came at a conference, some time after her daughter initially had encouraged her to meet with Robert Reffkin, founder and CEO of Compass. “I went to a real estate conference,” Stribling says, “and I heard about all the technology that was about to be launched. Basically the speakers were saying, ‘Watch out! You don’t know which technology is coming!’ And then I realized that the other national firms seemed quite threatened by this new company called Compass. I went to a breakout session of my fellow leaders, and I said, ‘Let me ask you a question: What if you marry real professional brokerage knowledge with fabulous technology?’ Everybody around the table looked at me, and not one person said a word. They clearly were dumbfounded. I got up from the table and went over to Elizabeth Ann and said, ‘Let’s call Compass. Let’s do the deal.’ It was clear to me that if you could have such a marriage, you would have the best of the best.” The Compass team is equally pleased with the match. “I think the future is incredibly bright for us,” Golod says. “I think a lot of people looked at this marriage and thought, ‘This is a little odd; these two companies are too different.’ I think we’re proving to people is that actually we’re quite similar, and I think people will look back and say, ‘Wow, that really was a successful idea.’” u

A LL P H OTO S CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

a strong focus on their agents. “From the outside looking in, it appears as if our cultures are different,” says Golod, “but I think at their core, they’re quite similar.” Golod tells the story of having breakfast at the River Café in Brooklyn with Libba and Elizabeth Ann, both of whom he describes as “incredibly talented, respected, and dynamic leaders in this business.” This was well before merger discussions had started, and it was the first time the three had really connected. “I remember leaving that breakfast,” Golod says, “thinking that these are people I would love to work with every day. Not just people that I could learn from, but people I would genuinely want to spend time with.” During that breakfast, Golod says, the Striblings had received some shock-


This page, from top: The foyer of a property listed with Stribling; a screenshot of a current Stribling listing; the midcentury modern living space of a Compass listing. Opposite page: Elizabeth Ann Stribling-Kivlan and Libba Stribling talking with Rory Golod, general manager of Compass’s New York region; a screenshot of Compass’s website.


embraces high demand in South Florida 132 QUEST

H E A LT H A R C H I TE C T U R E / H O S PI TA L F O R S P E C I A L S U R G E RY

World’s leading academic medical center dedicated to musculoskeletal health

CO U RTE S Y O F C A P E H A RT A N D E N V I RO N M E N TS F O R

HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY TO OPEN FACILITY IN WEST PALM BEACH


This page: HSS Florida will be located at 300 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard in West Palm Beach. Opposite page: Kendrick R. Wilson III and Louis A. Shapiro at the construction site in 2019.

IN EARLY 2020, South Florida will have a new option for highly specialized orthopedic care. Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS)—ranked number one in the nation for orthopedics for the past 10 straight years by U.S. News & World Report—is putting the finishing touches on a state-of-theart, 54,000-square-foot facility in West Palm Beach. HSS Florida will offer comprehensive care, including physician

consultations, advanced diagnostic and imaging services, high-level rehabilitation, ambulatory surgery, and sports performance programs. HSS is nationally recognized for the highest standards of care, outstanding outcomes, and leading-edge research. Its hundreds of thousands of successful patient outcomes include more orthopedic surgeries than any other hospital in


its doors in early 2020; the exterior of HSS Florida in West Palm Beach. Opposite page: Johanna returns to horseback riding after two surgeries at HSS.

the U.S., and athletes from more than 80 elite sports teams worldwide. HSS has the lowest readmission rates in orthopedics and among the lowest infection rates in the nation. From preventative care to complex surgical procedures, people travel to HSS from all 50 states and more than 100 countries. “HSS is coming to Florida to make what is by far the highest quality of musculoskeletal care more convenient for some of the most discerning people in the world,” said Louis A. Shapiro, CEO and president of HSS. Area resident and HSS chairman emeritus Kendrick R. Wilson III added, “This community is keenly aware that quality matters, quality varies, and HSS quality is the best in the world for a lot of good reasons.” When choosing a doctor and hospital for an orthopedic injury or painful condition, the right care can mean the difference between a life of limitations and living life to the fullest, according to Dr. Bryan T. Kelly, surgeon-in-chief and medical 134 QUEST

HSS Florida will open its doors at 300 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard in West Palm Beach in early 2020. For more information, contact the main office at 561.657.4600 or visit hss.edu/hss-florida.asp.

CO U RTE S Y O F E N V I RO N M E N TS F O R H E A LT H A R C H I T E C T U R E A N D J O H A N N A FA R I C E LL I / H O S PI TA L F O R S P E C I A L S U R G E RY

This page, from above: The interior of HSS Florida, which will open

director of HSS. “The correct diagnosis and treatment by highly trained, specialized health professionals provide the best chance for a good outcome,” he says. “The same expertise, best practices, and knowledge that we offer in New York will be available to our Florida patients.” Over the years, thousands of Floridians have traveled to the New York City hospital to receive care. Johanna Faricelli is among them, and she credits HSS physicians with enabling her to live the life she loves. As a professional equestrian, a very active lifestyle had taken a terrible toll on her hip and spine. Despite severe arthritis in her hip, a previous doctor told her she was too young for hip replacement surgery, although at that point, she could barely walk. “I finally said, ‘Life is too short to live in pain, and not be able to move.’” Ms. Faricelli went to HSS for a second opinion and received the highly specialized care she needed to get back in the saddle—literally. “I wanted to go where I was confident in the doctors, confident in the hospital. Surgery is a big decision, so I was going to find the very best.” Within months of successful surgeries, she was thrilled to be riding her beloved horses once again. “It’s kind of like my body got a reset,” said Ms. Faricelli. Dr. David Altchek, co-chief emeritus of the HSS Sports Medicine Institute, is among the specialists who will be seeing patients at the HSS Florida location. “It’s exciting to have the opportunity to share our expertise in sports medicine and other orthopedic specialties with discerning health care consumers in Florida,” said Dr. Altchek, who also serves as medical director for the New York Mets. “We expect to treat a wide range of ages and conditions, and we are delighted to become a part of this active, vibrant community.” u


RALPH’S 50-YEAR RISE BY KATHRYN MAIER


This page, clockwise from above: The cover of Ralph Lauren: In His Own Fashion (Abrams, 2019); Ralph in his early teens; Ralph, Jerry Magnin, and Bill Loock in 1971 in front of the self-standing store on Rodeo Drive. Opposite page: Ralph and his

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E L AU R E N FA M I LY

CO U RTE S Y O F L AU R E N FA M I LY A R C H I V E ; CO U RT E S Y O F T H E M A G N I N FA M I LY;

wife, Ricky, whom he calls “my muse.”

RALPH LAUREN: designer, businessman, American icon. As the founder of one of the most successful fashion brands in the world, his name is so synonymous with a certain type of Americana that one sometimes forgets he’s a real—living!—person, and not a fictional persona invented to embody the brand. But real, he is. And on the occasion of his eponymous brand’s 50th anniversary comes Ralph Lauren: In His Own Fashion (Abrams, 2019), a book celebrating the life of the designer through the lens of his cultural and fashion impact. Alongside more than 350 photographs, style expert Alan Flusser traces Lauren’s trajectory through the worlds of men’s fashion, women’s fashion, and home décor, starting, of course, with his childhood in the Bronx and continuing on through his beginnings in the retail world as a tie salesman and ultimately his status as a global fashion and lifestyle superpower. “With his landmark stores gracing the capitals of Europe and Asia, his rainbow of polo shirts dotting the beaches from Brazil to Bora Bora, and his restaurants serving classic American fare in capitals around the world, Ralph Lauren may be the foremost ambassador of the American Dream,” Flusser writes. Through remembrances from everyone from Ian Schrager (who was a camper in the Catskills while Lauren worked as a counselor) to the president of Henri Bendel at the time Lauren DECEMBER 2019 137


This page, from top: Ralph Lauren in fittings; Ralph with assistant Buffy Birrittella in 1986. Opposite page: Ralph’s polo coat became one of the brand’s staples and signature classics. 138 QUEST

C A RTE R B E R G ; T H E N EW YO R K T I M E S / R E D UX

debuted a Polo by Ralph Lauren outpost in the store, Flusser creates an intimate portrait of Lauren’s life and work. The hundreds of compiled photographs include Lauren as a boy, intimate family portraits, photos of his homes, and images of Lauren’s designs in runway shows and advertising campaigns. They demonstrate the breadth of Lauren’s design range over half a century, with collections so varied that any uniting theme, beyond the clothes’ classic timelessness, is a sense that the styles often were inspired by various equestrian pursuits—from cowboy-style ranch work or tweedy foxhunts to, yes, polo. Flusser convincingly presents his argument for Lauren as the modern age’s premier arbiter of style. “Here I propose Ralph as not only our generation’s preeminent tastemaker but also the leading guardian and ultimately the savior of high-class taste and style,” he writes. “As his roots deepened and his influence widened through the globalization of the Polo brand, Ralph forged a bulwark against the culture’s deteriorating taste level by championing time-honored style over fashion’s more provisional solutions. Reinvigorating the public’s interest in well-bred taste and quality, he ended up democratizing it more profoundly than any of his peers—and maybe more than anyone in modern history.” u


K E L LY

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY Ashley Haas and Heather Aboff at the New York premiere of Noelle.


Clockwise from top left: Kingsley Ben-Adir at the Cinema Society’s afterparty for the premiere of Noelle at The Standard; Keytt Lundqvist and Sophie Sumner; Jill Martin and Eric Brooks; Jaime Cepero and CarinaKay Louchiey; Christmas carolers at the entrance of the Boom Boom Room.

CINEMA SOCIETY’S NEW YORK PREMIERE OF NOELLE

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

IN HOLIDAY SPIRIT, the Cinema Society hosted a screening for

Disney+’s new comedy, Noelle, at SVA Theater. The cheerful film, which stars Anna Kendrick as Kris Kringle’s daughter Noelle, centers around her frantic search for her brother who was expected to take on the responsibilities of Santa this season. Keeping with the evening’s theme, Kendrick donned a mini dress decorated with a giant bow that resembled gift wrapping, while many guests wore Santa hats that were handed out upon arrival. And the holiday mood continued at

the afterparty at the Top of the Standard, where partygoers were greeted by carolers and welcomed into the Boom Boom Room adorned with Christmas decorations and serving festive cocktails like spiked cider. The lounge also played seasonal favorites like Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You.” Guests included Kingsley Ben-Adir, Billy Griffith, and Gracie Lawrence from the film, as well as Kim Director, Jill Martin, Eve Plumb, Ashley Haas, Alex Lundqvist, Sophie Summer, and Timo Weiland, among others. D E CM EO MN BT EH R 22 00 11 95 10401


Lizzie Tisch’s holiday preview at The Regency; Jamie Tisch, Lizzie Tisch, and Elizabeth Callender; Kelly Ripa.

▲ HOLIDAY SHOPPING WITH LTD BY LIZZIE TISCH

▼ ASSOULINE’S DINNER AT INDOCHINE

LIZZIE TISCH held a preview party for her style venture’s annual holiday market last month at the Regency, offering guests—including Kelly Ripa, Ali Wentworth, Aerin Lauder, David Burtka, Jamie Tisch, and Marjorie Gubelmann—a chance to purchase selections from her favorite brands before it opened to the public the following day. LTD’s curated pop-up showcased unique finds from brands across many categories, including the new Dear Annabelle stationery, cashmere accessories from A Love Moment, handcrafted dolls by Frowny Faces, contemporary jewelry by Lynn Ban, and more.

LAST MONTH, Assouline hosted an intimate dinner with Nord-

Left to right: Nicholas Braun and Ariel Schulman at Assouline’s dinner with Nordstrom at Indochine to celebrate Interview: 50 Years; Nicky Hilton Rothschild; Derek Blasberg and Julio Torres. 142 QUEST

strom to celebrate its new coffee table book, Interview: 50 Years, which chronicles the magazine’s notable columns and photography over time. Originally launched in 1969 by Andy Warhol, Interview is known for its prominent pop culture coverage, and Indochine—one of Warhol’s old favorite downtown haunts— offered the perfect setting for the anniversary celebration; the restaurant’s exotic décor and modern prints of pop culture artists (including one of Warhol himself) reflected Interview’s position in New York’s history. Guests included Bob Colacello, Derek Blasberg, Ellen von Unwerth, Owen Wilson, and others.

B FA

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Left to right: Ali Wentworth at LTD by


Clockwise from top left: Bill McCuddy was the emcee of the Rescue Dogs Rock gala at 583 Park Avenue; Zoe Bullock; Sonja Morgan of Real House-

wives of New York; Lili Buffett and Alex Hamer; Lara Trump and Georgina Bloomberg, the gala co-chairs.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

RESCUE DOGS ROCK’S 2ND ANNUAL GALA AT 583 PARK AVENUE LATE OCTOBER, the nonprofit Rescue Dogs Rock hosted its second annual gala at 583 Park Avenue to raise funds for animals in need. The evening, which was co-chaired by Georgina Bloomberg and Lara Trump, began with a cocktail reception and silent auction before emcee Bill McCuddy officially welcomed guests and kicked off the main presentation. Rescue Dogs Rock co-founders Jackie O’Sullivan and Stacey Silverstein took to the stage and discussed the

organization’s mission of saving homeless animals that have been abandoned throughout the country while guests dined. The speeches were followed by dancing and a live auction that raised critical funds for the charity. Guests—many of whom brought their furry friends along—included Lizzie Asher, Pamela Morgan, Leesa Rowland, Randi Schatz, Sydney Sadick, Sonja Morgan, Justina Valentine, and Jesse Watters, among others. u DECEMBER 2019 143


SNAPSHOT

Jacqueline Kennedy’s 1963 paintings “Glad Tidings” and “Journey of the Magi,” which were produced by Hallmark as Christmas cards to raise funds for the National Cultural Center (eventually the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts); President and Mrs. Kennedy in the Blue Room with the 1961 White House Christmas tree.

144 QUEST

ed the two paintings seen here: “Glad Tidings” and “Journey of the Magi.” Hallmark produced them as Christmas cards later that year, with proceeds going toward the development of the National Cultural Center, which she helped envision. Ironically, her joyful cards took off just as her husband’s life and administration came to a shockingly abrupt end. Still, her dream for a national arts center would eventually be realized, and named the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. She “brought the arts to the center of national attention,” Ted Kennedy said. “Today, in large part because of her inspiration and vision, the arts are an abiding part of national policy.” This holiday season, 56 years after she first painted them, may her Christmas scenes serve as a reminder not just of her artful legacy, but of her artful life. —Daniel Cappello

P R E S I D E N T I A L L I B R A RY & M U S E U M

“NO ONE ELSE looked like her, spoke like her, wrote like her, or was so original in the way she did things,” commended Ted Kennedy of his former first lady sister-in-law. To be sure, Jacqueline Kennedy was an American original—in her every manner, thought, and approach. She cherished and championed the arts, but few knew that the woman who restored and elevated the president’s home, established the White House Historical Association, and helped save from destruction such monuments as Grand Central Terminal and the 13th-century B.C. temples of Abu Simbel, was herself an artist. In fact, she was quite a talented painter: the people and animals she depicted were graced with elegantly long figures; her style was dreamy and romantic, colorful and decorative—bearing a hint of Raoul Dufy. In the summer of 1963, Mrs. Kennedy complet-

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E J O H N F. K E N N E DY

Merry Christmas from Mrs. Kennedy


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The Holiday Issue

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The Holiday Issue

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