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$5.00 DECEMBER 2016

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

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124

100

CONTENTS The holiday i ssue 100

IN THE SPIRIT OF GSTAAD

We peruse the winter-themed pages of Mandolyna

Theodoracopulos’ In The Spirit of Gstaad, which features a foreword by her father—and our columnist—Taki Theodoracopulos. by elizabeTh Meigher

106

INTIMATE MEMORIES OF FERNCLIFF

112

We explore a new book about the

Hudson Valley, Our Time at Foxhollow Farm, which chronicles the tale of Vincent Astor.

112

by

david PaTrick c oluMbia

SHOOTING HISTORY

A new documentary, Harry Benson: Shoot First,

showcases all that our beloved columnist has captured over his incredible lifetime.

118

by

lily hoagland,

PhoTograPhy by

DAVID MONN’S MASTER TOUCH

harry benson

Event-planner extraordinaire David Monn

has created some of the most memorable celebrations of our time. This season, he debuts a new book—and a holiday collection. by daniel caPPello

124

THE ART OF WINDOW DRESSING

A look at the long history and current

spectacle of New York City’s famous holiday windows.

128

21 AND OVER

by

kaTe gubelMann

Stories from the evergreen club. by david PaTrick coluMbia

106


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84

80

CONTENTS c oluMns

84

22

SOCIAL DIARY

64

SOCIAL CALENDAR

66

BALLYHOO AND CRY

68

FOOD & LIFESTYLE

70

PROFILES

74

REAL ESTATE

76

ART

80

WATCHES

82

OPEN HOUSE

84

GIFT GUIDE

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

Our columnist is on the social scene at the best parties.

by

david PaTrick coluMbia

Our guide to the greatest galas, luncheons, and events this holiday season. Donald Trump has unexpected people to thank.

by

Taki TheodoracoPulos

Remembering Christmas 1991 at the eminent Kennedy Center Honors. by alex hiTz

Talking jewelry and expansion with Wempe’s CEO, Kim-Eva Wempe.

by

alex Travers

The Sword Gate House is truly one of Charleston’s most beautiful historic masterpieces.

The New York Botanical Garden’s current exhibit honors Bunny Mellon.

by

Marcia s chaeffer

The Rolex Oyster, the world’s first waterproof wrist watch, turns 90 this year. by alex Travers Melanie Delman continues a tradition of exceence with Lila Delman Real Estate.

From rosé Champagne to rose gold, it’s holiday shopping time. by daniel caPPello A month in the life of the PYTs. by elizabeTh Quinn brown

Remembering “Suzy,” the inimitable Aileen Mehle. by david PaTrick coluMbia


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Clockwise from top left: One of the beautiful holiday windows that New York is famous for; women sunbathing in Gstaad by Slim Aarons; legendary Aileen Mehle, who wrote under the pen name “Suzy,” covered

“As wave is driven by wave And each, pursued, pursues the wave ahead, So time flies on and follows, flies, and follows, Always, for ever and new. What was before Is left behind; what never was is now; And every passing moment is renewed.” u

CONGRATULATIONS on making it through 2016—this year has been a bumpy ride. Now it’s time to give yourself a pat on the back, and a coupe in the hand, for still having the spirit to celebrate this holiday season. We all deserve to wrap up these twelve months with glad tidings, good cheer, and all the other warm clichés that still manage to do the trick and spread smiles. If you’re in a giving mood, take the reins of your personal sleigh and deliver joy to those who need it most, because this is as vital a time as any to make sure that loved ones and communities feel taken care of and appreciated. The Quest Holiday Issue is here to do its part, of course. We give you slaloming in Gstaad, with the red noses and hot chocolates that come afterwards; David Monn lays out more than just a fine table, but also how to create the perfectly welcoming atmosphere for entertaining this season; Kate Gubelmann peeks into the history and current spectacle of New York’s holiday window dressing; and many more 20 QUEST

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: President Johnson and family; John F. Kennedy and family; the Obamas; President-Elect Donald Trump with his family; the Nixons; President George H.W. Bush, President George W. Bush, and family; Ronald and Nancy Reagan, Christmas 1983; the Eisenhowers. QT1216_Cover.indd 1

11/21/16 5:59 PM

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E LB J P R E S I D E N T I A L L I B R A RY; G E T T Y; R E U T E R S ; E R I C D R A P E R / W H I TE H O U S E V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ;

stories to read by the fire while Bing Crosby croons “White Christmas” in the background (though my personal favorite version of the song will always be Otis Redding’s). Finally, let’s end this year with Ovid’s Metamorphoses:

CO U RTE S Y O F N I XO N P R E S I D E N T I A L L I B R A RY A N D M U S E U M ; R E A G A N L I B R A RY / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; E V E R E T T CO LLE C T I O N H I S TO R I C A L / A L A MY.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY NOVEMBER IN THE city was about events and traffic. There were many galas, book parties, receptions, and dinners to cover and crowded roads to battle on your way there.

One early afternoon, I made the “metro-trek” from my door on East End and 83rd Street to Seventh Avenue and 27th Street. When it’s midday, the time of arrival is up for grabs for

on Second Avenue before a right on 27th Street. I share this because these are the little details that please a New Yorker immensely. I had a very smart driver from India. He knew

one reason or another—no matter the method of transportation. Howbeit, I took a cab. We traveled down the FDR Drive to the 34th Street exit, taking a right at 39th Street and, then, a left

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Carlos Souza and Anne McNally

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about the traffic of the area as well as of the hour. I often suggest the route I want but, on this particular day, I wasn’t as familiar with the path from Point A to Point B. So, I asked the driver what he thought. He thought the route he took for me was the wisest—and the fastest. He was right. Seventh Avenue and 27th Street, on the west side of two blocks, is occupied by F.I.T. and the Museum at 24 QUEST

CeCe Black and Victoria Wyman

Guy Robinson

Alexis Mersentes, Jean Shafiroff, Lee Black and Penny Grant

F.I.T. Personally, the most important thing about the institution is that it attracts serious, ambitious, willingto-work, creative young men and women who almost all go on to prosperous and interesting careers. (Would that more college educations could offer that…) F.I.T. is a “prep” college: its students attend to prepare for the life/profession they want to make. I was there that day for a

lecture by Caroline Weber, a friend of mine at the museum. The museum is currently exhibiting “Proust’s Muse, The Countess Greffulhe,” featuring extraordinary fashions from the legendary wardrobe of Élisabeth, Countess Greffulhe—who was “celebrated for her ‘aristocratic and artistic elegance.” It described the countess as a fashion icon would could be compared to Daphne Guinness. Countess Greffulhe lived

Ann Van Ness and Elizabeth Stribling

Svetlana and Herb Wachell

through the end of the second empire of Napoleon III, the existence of two French republics, La Belle Époque, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, and both the World Wars. She was said to have been the most beautiful woman in Paris, in both body and spirit. Caroline’s lecture was just one of a daylong academic symposium at the museum, entitled “Proust’s Muse.” I was particularly interested

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Louis and Caroline Brownstone


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A because Caroline’s “Queen of Fashion; What Marie Antoinette Wore to the Revolution” was an insightful history with an angle that interests me: the presages of fashion. For Marie Antoinette (the tragic figure of that history) all of her good news became bad, even horrifying, news. Her wardrobes, one of her few real freedoms before her great fall, tracked the French Revolution to the point where its occurrence is often blamed on her. Her fashion, however, was “the message” seen only in retrospect. That is, incidentally, my opinion, not Caroline’s (although I know she would agree, somewhat).

Caroline is in the process of completing a new book: Swann Song: In Search of Marcel Proust’s Duchess. It will include several individuals who were fashioned into characters in Marcel Proust’s masterpiece, À la recherche du temps perdu (or, Remembrance of Things Past). The duchess in Caroline’s history is Countess Greffulhe, the inspiration for Proust’s character of Duchesse de Guermantes. She told us in her 20-minute talk that the countess was born in 1860 (although, by middle age, she had shaved eight years). When she was 18, she was married off to the Henri, Count Greffuhle,

who was said to be the richest man in France. He was also 12 years older and one of those guys who was arrogant with his wife and nasty and entitled, as only the wealthy can be. From the beginning, he spent a lot of his time, even on his honeymoon, in the company of his mistress and other sexual partners. Henri couldn’t get enough and poor Élisabeth couldn’t get anything. Already, you get the drama. It’s classic and, not infrequently, it’s also a fashion story. The young countess turned to vanity to survive. In another generation, she would have left Henri with a nice settlement in hand, ven-

turing out into the world to make a life for herself with her talents. As it was, her talent was fashion and, from the 1880s through World War I and the 1920s and 1930s, the countess was held in regard. Fashion-wise, she was without peer. Proust was fascinated by the countess. She was a source for his imagination and an insight into his times. He was 11 years younger and from a world that was outside the realm of the countess, who was the reigning queen of Parisian society. By the time Proust was a young man, his relationship with her was a key to a world where she reigned at the cen-

D I N N E R AT T H E A M E R I C A N M U S E U M O F N AT U R A L H I STO R Y

Steven Martin, Kristen Wiig and Martin Short 26 QUEST

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tina Fey and Jane Krakowski


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O N O R I N G W A R R E N B E AT T Y AT M U S E U M O F T H E MO V I N G I M A G E

Candice Bergen and Marshall Rose

ter. It is known now as La Belle Époque. La Belle Époque was an era in Western European history covering four decades between two wars: from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the start of World War I in 1914. It was thought of (in retrospect, anyway) as a Golden Age not unlike its American counterpart, the Gilded Age, and its British counterpart, the Edwardian Age. Riding back uptown after Caroline’s tempting and alltoo-brief lecture about the countess—a woman who was obsessed with her beauty and the beauty of her gowns—it 28 QUEST

Peggy Siegal and Cindy Adams

Chuck Close and LInda Janklow

occurred to me that such a character could never fascinate in quite the same way anymore. Today, it’s the Kardashians. I’m serious. They are huge fashion arbiters. And just as it was with the Queen of France and with the Countess Greffulhe and with Babe Paley, the Kardashians reflect a woman’s life in this age of ours—of us. I was also, as you can see, thinking of Babe Paley, who was an authentic fashion icon of the mid-20th century in this country. She was celebrated and held in awe for her talent to dress. She was an artist with her costume and widely praised and ad-

Angela Janklow

mired for it. She also had an ill-fated marriage (for her) that brought her great sadness. Her fashion was her greatest achievement. Had she been born just one generation later, she would (like her daughters, today) have had her own independent life for pursuing her artistry for her own ends. Pursuing Charity. On a Monday, the American Cancer Society’s New York chapter hosted its 21st annual “Mothers of the Year” awards luncheon on the roof of the St. Regis. They honored Laura Forese, MD, and actress Karen Walsh while honoring the memory of Su-

Warren Beatty and Annette Bening

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick

zanne Wright. This is a very popular luncheon that my friend Diana Feldman has been working on and co-chairing for as long as I can remember. This year, she was co-chair with Cricket Burns and ambassador Brenda L. Johnson. The vice chairs were Blythe Danner, Robert Downey MD, Charlotte Ford, Diane Forese, James Forese, Frances J. Freawley, Louise Merriman, Lily Safra, Jayne Sosland-Swersky, Bob Wright, Katie Wright, and Maggie Wright. There is also a huge benefit committee that brings out the best, too, filling the room and raising the goals,

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Alden Ehrenreich, Lee Grant and Mandy Patinkin


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A YE L L O W STO N E PA R K FO U N D AT I O N ’ S A N N UA L B E N E F I T

Caroline Shumway and Jessica Gimbel

as well as attending. What originally was mainly a ladies lunch now has a large percentage of men attending. Paula Zahn was emcee. This is not a festive affair, considering the subject matter, but thanks to Diana, her co-chairs, and the honorees, it’s a very touching, forward-looking event that brings out the best in everyone attending. So, in that way, it’s a pleasure. Suzanne Wright would have been honoree in life but she died this past July of pancreatic cancer. She was a major advocate for autism and co-founder in 2005 with her husband Bob Wright of 30 QUEST

Alex Manfull and Arielle Patrick

Elsa Pfaff, Saunders Ketcham and Gussie Bryan

Autism Speaks, after their grandson was diagnosed with autism. Since its founding, Autism Speaks has grown into the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization. Mrs. Wright’s devotion to the subject led the United Nations to establish April 2 as World Autism Day, calling for all nations and faiths to “walk next to the 70 million children, teens, and adults with autism around the world everyday. Dr. Forese is executive vice president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian, with operational responsibility that comprises more than

Meg Niemann, Carolyn Niemann and Patty Niemann

Jackie Rooney and John Tass-Parker

$6.5 billion in total operating revenue and 3,500 hospital beds throughout Manhattan. An orthopedic surgeon herself, graduating summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Princeton, she was also a full-time faculty member for ten years at Columbia University, and mother of three children with her husband, Dr. Downey. She is also a breast cancer survivor, and spoke with great affection and gratitude for her father and her late mother who had fought the disease for 15 years. The third honoree Karen Walsh is currently standing in for is Mary-Louise Parker

in Heisenberg on Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club. The mother of two, ages seven and three, and married to Todd Rullman, Ms. Walsh was also diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer last year two weeks after her 40th birthday. Ironically at the time she was also producing an American Cancer Society benefit honoring her late friend, actor James Rebhorn. During the past year she has approached her chemo treatments creatively, referring to them as “healing treatments” and gaining international attention. Her friend Blythe Danner, who presented her with her award, spoke with

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Adair Landy, Tyler Seeger and Alice Ryan


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ONE EAST END AVENUE, APT 6/7B | $5,750,000 | WEB: 00110220, sothebyshomes.com Located in one of Manhattan’s most prestigious cooperatives, One East End Avenue, this 11-into-nine room Pre-War duplex is flooded with light and offers majestic views of the East River with hardwood herringbone floors throughout.

STAN PONTE Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 212.606.4109 | stan.ponte@sothebyshomes.com EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE 38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065 Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A wonder of Walsh’s enthusiasm. Homes of the brave. So despite the grim subject, which confronts so many millions of people across the world, the word HOPE remains steadfast in the hearts and minds of all of these women and their families. That’s what we left the St. Regis Roof with on Monday afternoon. Meanwhile, way out west in Hollywood at the Sunset Gower Studios this past Sunday, GOOD+ Foundation Founder Jessica Seinfeld hosted the organization’s inaugural Halloween Bash, raising $230,000 to benefit the Foundation’s work to help lift families out of pov-

erty in the Los Angeles area. An extension of GOOD+ Foundation’s New York City Bedtime Bash, the L.A. Halloween Bash hosted nearly 600 guests—including families the Foundation serves from LIFT Los Angeles, Youth Policy Institute and Children’s Institute, Inc.’s Project Fatherhood—spent the afternoon enraptured in an array of activities and Spooky Storytelling featuring ABC’s “Blackish” stars Marcus Scribner, Marsai Martin, and Miles Brown. GOOD+ Foundation works with approximately 50 sites in the greater Los Angeles area, working within its three program focus areas:

Supporting New Mothers, Investing in Early Childhood, and Engaging Fathers. The organization integrates donations with the transformational services of its partner sites to help give incentive parents to meet goals like getting a GED, taking parenting or anger management courses, or finding employment to help break the generational cycle of poverty. A quarter of all children in Los Angeles live in poverty, as reported by the U.S. Census Bureau. Guests at the party included Kimberly and James Van Der Beek, Gwyneth Paltrow, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Sterling K. Brown,

Dan Bucatinsky and Don Roos, Ian Ziering, Bill Horn and Scout Masterson, Sean Patrick Thomas and Aonika Laurent, Tiffani Thiessen and Brady Smith, Majandra and David Walton, and Mary Kitchen and Jon Orszag. Co-hosts included Bruce Bozzi and Bryan Lourd, Stacey Bendet Eisner, Crystal Lourd, and Jamie Tisch. On the weekend before Halloween, Alex Beard, son of writer and editor Patricia Beard and Sam Beard, hosted his Chelsea solo exhibition “On Camel Safari” at the George Billis Gallery. They were also celebrating the launch of Beard’s “A Brush with Nature”—a monograph

P R AT T I N ST I T U T E ’ S M A R C R O S E N F U N D SYM P O S I U M AT W H I T N E Y M U S E U M O F A M E R I C A N A R T

Juan Montoya and Kathleen Beckett

Tes and Tom Schutte with Annette Green 32 QUEST

Juliana Terian and Marc Rosen

Michele Oka Doner

Shining Sun

Pamela Vaile, Kate Greene, Catherine Russell and Rose Eckert

ANDREW WERNER

Fern Mallis and David Rockwell


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A of the artist’s work recently released by Glitterati. Mr. Beard, a passionate conservationist and nephew of African wildlife photographer Peter Beard, created more than 20 new works for this show. A portion of the proceeds from art and book sales are being donated to the Watering Hole Foundation, founded by the artist in 2012, to raise funds to support endangered wildlife and their environments. In the crowd were proud

mama Patricia Beard (former editor at Town & Country, Elle, and Mirabella), Sam Beard (co-founder of the Jefferson Awards), Anson Beard (Wall Street executive), and Hillary Beard Schafer (executive director of the Jefferson Awards), and over a hundred friends and collectors including Norah O’Donnell (of CBS’s “This Morning”), Geoff Tracy (Chef Geoff’s), celebrity stylist Emily Ford, Edwin and Lorna Goodman (of

Bergdorf Goodman), Joyce Cowin, Bartle Bull, Philae Knight, Mark Schafir, Maggie Gilliam, and Anna Beth Goodman (wife of actor John Goodman). On a Monday night, the American Friends of the Oxford Philharmonic Orchestra launched its U.S. Premier Concert at the Metropolitan Club conducted by Maestro Marios Papadopoulos. The evening featured a performance by world-renowned violinist Maxim Vengerov.

Maestro Vengerov is widely regarded as the greatest violinist of our time, and the pride of the Russian classical music world. The American Friends was formed to bring the orchestra to this country. An established concert series will begin in 2018. The evening orchestra’s Royal Patrons, Prince Michael of Kent and Princess Michael of Kent came over from London to attend the especially lovely evening co-chaired by Baron

OX FO R D P H I L H A R MO N I C ’ S P E R FO R M A N C E AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

Beatrice von Haagenfels

34 QUEST

Prince Michael of Kent and Princess Michael of Kent with Ambassador Matthew Rycroft

Donna Laikind and Ofra Meitar

Kari Tiedemann

Elihu and Susan Rose

Frederick Koch and Margo Langenberg

Teresa and Antonio Madero

Saundra Whitney

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Ian Calderon and Karen Karpowich


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C R ISTI NA CON D ON G L O B A L R E A L E S TAT E A D V I S O R | 5 6 1 . 3 0 1 . 2 2 1 1 CRISTINA.CONDON@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM CRISTINACONDON.COM PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480 | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Patten of Barnes and James Sherwood. Dinner Vice Chairmen were Dafna Meitar-Nechmad and Ann Nitze. Among the 150 guests attending were Noreen and Kenneth Buckfire, Jackie Drake, Emily Frick, Mai Harrison, Ambassador and Mrs. Andrew Jacovides, Christian Keesee, Lady Kenny, Patricia Kluge, Margo Langenberg, Fred Koch, Spiros Milonas, Diana Quasha, His Excellency Ambassador and Mrs. Matthew Rycroft, Susan and Elihu Rose, Sana Sabbagh, Daisy

Soros, Barbara and Donald Tober, and Saundra Whitney. The calendar full to the brim. On a Tuesday night at Pier Sixty of the Chelsea Piers, the Museum of Arts and Design hosted its Mad Ball 2016. They were celebrating its 60th Anniversary Diamond Jubilee. They honored Charles Cohen of Cohen Brothers Realty, architect Zaha Zadid, honored in memoriam with a Lifetime Achievement Award; the fabulous Italian fashion house Missoni as Design Honoree;

and Yinka Shonibare, MBE as artist nominee. Simon Doonan was Master of Ceremonies, and artist Tom Sachs designed the Award. A very good time was had by all. Events Chairs were Iris Apfel, Andi Potamkin Blackmore, Cecily Carson, Jerome Chazen, Michele Cohen, Shari Siadat Loeffler, Linda Plattus, and Ralph Pucci. Lead Corporate Sponsor was KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. The indefatigable Barbara Tober was Journal Chairman. The host committee says it all about the museum’s

supporters: Chris Antemann, Barry X. Ball, Feliz Burrichter, Wendell Castle, Leslie and Dale Chihuly, Jane and James Cohan, Ellie Cullman, Rafael de Cardenas, Lauren and Richard Dupont, Sebastian Errazuriz, Richard Estes, Sir Norman Foster, Milton Glaser, Leila Heller, Holly Hunt, Chris Jones, Lauren Kalman, Garrow Kedigian, Amy Lou, Juan Montoya, David Nosanchuk, Ebony G. Patterson, Katharina Plath, Karim Rashid, David Rockwell, Arlene Shechet, Jill Spalding, An-

M U S E U M O F A R T A N D D E S I G N ’ S M A D B A L L AT P I E R S I X T Y

Lewis and Laura Kruger 36 QUEST

Barbara Tober and Wendell Castle

Anna Cleveland, Francesco Missoni and Pat Cleveland

Anne-Rose and Stephen Fredericks

Ursula and Lawrence Neuman

Simon Doonan and Michele Cohen

B FA . CO M

Angela Missoni, Rosita Missoni and Luca Missoni


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C E L E B R AT I N G S C I E N C E AT R O C K E F E L L E R U N I V E R S I T Y

Valerie and Wright Ohrstrom

drew and John Stark, Stefano Tonchi, Paul Travis, and Marcel Wanders. And was it a resounding success, filling Pier Sixty to the rafters? I can assure you, yes. And did they have fun? Ditto. Then on a Monday night, mid-month at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building of the New York Public Library, the annual “Library Lions” honored Harry Belafonte, Hilary Mantel, Javier Marias, Peggy Noonan, and Colm Toibin. This annual event, which is one of the most prestigious events of the autumn season in New York for the past 35 years, has been honoring outstand38 QUEST

Kathryn Murdoch, Amanda Waldron and Jennifer Mascarenhas

Eden Williams and Anna Chapman

ing individuals who have a lasting impact on the world around them. This year, there was a special performance by the great Jessye Norman. The evening also commemorated the 50th anniversary of Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball. The Truman Capote Archive is part of the New York Public Library’s collection. The black-tie dinner was held again in the newly refurbished Rose Reading Rose Main Reading Room. The Gala honored the memory of Elizabeth F. Rohatyn— Library Chairman Emeritus who was, for 15 years along with her husband Felix Ro-

Michael Chorske, Tom Bradley and Blair Enders

Robin Neustein and Barry Coller

hatyn, co-chairman of the evening. This year’s co-chairs were HRH Princess Firyal, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Schwarzman, Mr. James S. Tisch and the Honorable Meryl H. Tisch, Mr. and Mrs. Egar Wachenheim III, Mrs. John. Weinberg, Mr. Boaz Weinstein, and Mrs. Tali Farhadian Weinstein. On a Wednesday, the New York Landmarks Conservancy hosted its 22nd Living Landmarks Celebration at the Plaza Hotel. This year’s honorees were acclaimed author and film producer Barbara Taylor Bradford, OBE and Robert Bradford,

Claudia Overstrom and Randall Burkert

financier and philanthropist Larry Leeds, musician and composer Wynton Marsalis, physician and media executive Mary Lake Polan and Frank Bennack, and Zagat co-founders Nina and Tim Zagat. This was the Conservancy’s largest and most successful gala, welcoming over 370 guests and raising more than $970,000. There is probably no other place on the planet that highlights philanthropies and charities as New York—and no other place that annually raises so many millions (in the nine figures) as New York. Barbara Taylor Bradford remarked on

S COT T RU D D

Richard Lifton with Judy and Russ Carson


West End Ave High Floor 8 Rm 3-4BR, 3 Bath West End Ave High Floor 8 Rm 3-4BR, 3 Bath

3-4 BRs, 3 baths, wood paneled music rm, LR w Hudson River 3-4 BRs, 3 baths, wood music LR wco-op. Hudson River views, glorious DR, EIK, paneled 10' ceilings, fullrm, service Price views, gloriousWeb DR, EIK, 10' ceilings, service 212.585.4527 co-op. Price upon request. 15701597. Lindafull Maloney upon request. Web 15701597. Linda Maloney 212.585.4527

Fifth Avenue 3 Bedroom, 4 Bath Fifth Avenue 3 Bedroom, 4 Bath

Low 70s. Open city views. LR & DR w WBFPs, library, sun Low Open city views. LR & DR wglove WBFPs, library, sun room,70s. eat-in kitchen, laundry. White prewar co-op. room, eat-in kitchen, laundry. White glove prewar co-op. $8.25M. Web 15744427. Jacqueline Garrett 212.452.4379 $8.25M. Web 15744427. Jacqueline Garrett 212.452.4379

Classic 8 at River House Classic 8 at River House

Appx 2500 square foot, mint 2 bedroom prewar condo, Appx 2500 kitchen, square foot, mint bedroom prewar condo, open chef's 3 bath, 17'2ceilings, open views. open chef's 3 bath, 17' ceilings, open views. $6.2M. Webkitchen, 15009146. Pamela D’Arc 212.452.4377 $6.2M. Web 15009146. Pamela D’Arc 212.452.4377

LR w WBFP, eat-in kitchen. Large windows, prewar details. LR w WBFP, eat-inco-op. kitchen. Large windows, prewarMaureen details. W/D. Full service $5.25M. Web 15733151. W/D. Full service co-op. $5.25M. Web 15733151. Maureen McCarron 212.585.4565/Kirk Henckels 212.452.4402 McCarron 212.585.4565/Kirk Henckels 212.452.4402

Park Avenue Renovated 8 Park Avenue Renovated 8

Sparkly River views, fireplace, FDR, EIK, paneled library, 2BR + Sparkly River FDR, EIK, $5.1M. paneledWeb library, 2BR + study, 3.5 bth.views, CAC, fireplace, 4 expos. FS co-op. 15751463. study, 3.5 bth. CAC, expos. FS co-op. $5.1M. 15751463. Anna Hargraves Hall4212.452.4421/James HallWeb 212.585.4557 Anna Hargraves Hall 212.452.4421/James Hall 212.585.4557

Bond St Duplex Penthouse w Private Roof Space Bond St Duplex Penthouse w Private Roof Space

Park Avenue 8 Room 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath Park Avenue 8 Room 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath

Architect designed 16th floor co-op with skyline views, Architect 16th 3BRs, floor co-op with skylinekitchen, views, expansivedesigned LR, FDR, den, state-of-the-art expansive LR, FDR, den, 3BRs, state-of-the-art kitchen, 3 bths. $5.85M. Web 15615447. Marcy Sigler 212.452.4432 3 bths. $5.85M. Web 15615447. Marcy Sigler 212.452.4432

Stunning West Village Townhouse Stunning West Village Townhouse

20 foot wide mixed use. Strong income-producing 20 wide mixed Strongto income-producing withfoot additional FAR use. or convert single family. $7.995M. with or convert single family. $7.995M. Webadditional 15710218.FAR Tracie Golding to 212.452.4394 Web 15710218. Tracie Golding 212.452.4394

Triple Mint 6 on East 65th Triple Mint 6 on East 65th

Designer renovated 4BR, 3.5 bath. LR/DR, eat-in kitchen w top Designer renovated 4BR, 3.5space, bath. LR/DR, kitchen w top appliances, private outdoor 3 expos.eat-in FS condo. Price appliances, private space, 3 expos. FS condo. Price upon request. Weboutdoor 15744009. Alexa Lambert 212.452.4408 upon request. Web 15744009. Alexa Lambert 212.452.4408

The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. Stribling Private Brokerage is the Stribling & Associates marketing division for properties valued Stribling Private Brokerage is the Stribling & Associates marketing division for properties valued in excess of $5,000,000. It provides services on the level of “private banking” and intensive, in excess of $5,000,000. It provides services on the level of “private banking” and intensive, customized marketing for luxury properties and discerning clients on a global basis. customized marketing for luxury properties and discerning clients on a global basis. STRIBLING.COM · UPTOWN 212 570 2440 CHELSEA 212 243 4000 TRIBECA 212 941 8420 BROOKLYN 718 208 1900 · EQUAL HOUSING OPPTY STRIBLING.COM · UPTOWN 212 570 2440 CHELSEA 212 243 4000 TRIBECA 212 941 8420 BROOKLYN 718 208 1900 · EQUAL HOUSING OPPTY

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this phenomenon in her award speech at the Living Landmarks. It was one of the reasons she gave as to why she thinks New York is the greatest city in the world. Indeed. The evening’s host was Living Landmark Paul Binder; the music was provided by Peter Duchin and his Orchestra. Living Landmarks Philip J. Smith and Robert E. Wankel served as Honorary Co-Chairs for the evening. This dinner dance is traditionally held in the Grand Ballroom of the Plaza Hotel, which itself is landmarked thanks to the Landmarks Conservancy. It is the only private organization that provides both financial and technical support in this effort. Since its founding more than 40 years ago, the Conservancy has loaned and granted more than $40 million to help people

save their homes and communities including cultural, religious, and social institutions. There is no other group engaged in such a hands-on way in sustaining our city’s rich architectural heritage. Among those attending: Christopher Forbes, Geoffrey Bradfield, Bernadette Castro, Gordon Davis, Carole Bailey French and John French III, Barbara and Peter Georgescu, Veronica and Ray Kelly, Janet C. Ross, Barbara and Frank Sciame, Elizabeth Stribling and Guy Robinson, Barbara and Donald Tober, Lindsay Wagner, Sandra and Stan Warshawsky, Sue Ann Weinberg, E. John Rosenwald, Jr., Daryl and Steven Roth, Susan and Robert Summer, Gioietta and Alberto Vitale, Mica Ertegun, Linda Wachner, Robert A.M. Stern, and many more. u

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Cheryl Hines and Bobby Kennedy, Jr.

Darlene Love, Brian Sawyer and Bette Midler

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Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue 00 QUEST

Adrienne and Dan Lufkin with Anna and Bo Polk

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K L A N D M A R K S C O N S E R VA N C Y ’ S A N N UA L D I N N E R AT T H E P L A Z A

Lloyd Zuckerberg and Peg Breen

Mason and Kim Granger 42 QUEST

Helen and Robert Wankel

Wynton Marsalis and Paul Binder

Lweis and Louise Cullman

Melie and John Spofford

Janet Ross and Gordon Davis

H A L H O RO W I T Z P H OTO G R A P H Y

Barbara Bradford, Lindsay Wagner and Robert Bradford


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A FO U N TA I N H O U S E H O ST E D I TS FA L L F ĂŠ T E

Fabiana and Sam Ramirez

Lorna Graev and Angela Clofine

James and Tracy Florak

Lil Phillips, Mark Gilbertson and Elisabeth Saint-Amand

John and Amy Rudic

Will Deitrick, Elizabeth Meigher and Whitney Stroh 44 QUEST

Oliver Singer and Elizabeth Pyne

Kat Cohen and Katie Zorn

Richard Zorn and David Rhodes

Matt Brown and Todd Gergen

Polly Onet and Bill Manger

Paul Dalio and Kristina Nikolova

A N N I E WAT T

Alex and Kate Holderness


11'-6"

11'-6" 11'-6" 11'-6"

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700 NE 23rd Street Miami, FL 33137

TWO ROADS DEVELOPMENT 314 Clematis St. Suite 200 West Palm Beach, FL 33401

ARCHITECT OF RECORD

2900 Oak Avenue Miami, Florida 33133 305.372.1812 305.372.1175

www.arquitectonica.com

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER:

----------

M.E.P. ENGINEER: ---------

CIVIL ENGINEER:

11'-6"

LANGAN

15150 NW 79th Ct #200 Miami Lakes, FL 33016 786 264-7200

I T S TA RTS W I T H A N IDE A

11'-6"

11'-6"

11'-6"

www.langan.com

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER

11'-6"

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14'-8"

11'-6"

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT:

10'-2"

14'-8"

Witkin Hults

307 South 21st Avenue Hollywood, Florida 33020 954 923 9681 954 923 9689

10'-2"

10'-2"

www.witkindesign.com

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SEAL / SIGNATURE / DATE

10'-2"

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649'

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OFFICE REGISTRATION #: AA C000465

10'-2"

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Issue Date / For

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Issue #

10'-2"

10'-2"

10'-2"

After evolving for 20 years Miami is crossing a threshold to being one of the great gateway cities of the world – in league with Paris, London, New York, Tokyo, Buenos Aires and Sao Paolo. From art, culture and economy to location, activities and a diverse international community Miami meets the criteria of a first class destination. 10'-2"

10'-2"

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AR 95074

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ALFONSO JURADO

10'-2"

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Project No.:

10'-2"

Drawn by:

PA, JS

Approved by:

21'-9"

3246.00

Two Roads’ contribution to this process is to raise residential quality to a level so far found only in the top cities. AJ

21'-9"

SHEET INDEX

3 1'-7 16" 12'-8"

649'

---

12'-8" 3 1'-7 16"

OVERALL ELEVATIONS

SCALE: 1/32"

= 1'-0"

For Elysee Two Roads assembled a best-in-class team that includes world-renowned designer Jean-Louis Deniot and A.201 world-renowned architect Bernardo Fort-Brescia to envision and create a bespoke residential experience that sets a new standard for Miami. From five star services and amenities to oversized residences with exceedingly luxurious finishes, Elysee residences are not only the best in Miami, but among the best in the world. 2

EAST ELEVATION 1/32" = 1'-0"

1

SOUTH ELEVATION 1/32" = 1'-0"

© 2014 ARQUITECTONICA INTERNATIONAL, INC.

E AST E D G E WAT E R' S O N LY LU XU RY WAT E R F R O NT B O UT I Q U E C O N D O M I N I U M W I TH 2 U N I TS P E R F LO O R EVE RY U N I T H AS D I R E CT 2 70 ˚ BAY V I E WS O N LY 100 U N ITS

SALES GALLE RY: 254 N E 30TH ST., M IAM I, FL 33137 (305) 767-1414 | I N FO@E LYSE E M IAM I.COM WWW.E LYSE E M IAM I.COM

EXCLUSIVE SALES & MARKETING

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. These materials are not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy a unit in the condominium. Such an offering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (offering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, offer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in, or to residents of, any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. All plans, features and amenities depicted herein are based upon preliminary development plans, and are subject to change without notice in the manner provided in the offering documents. No guarantees or representations whatsoever are made that any plans, features, amenities or facilities will be provided or, if provided, will be of the same type, size, location or nature as depicted or described herein. This project is being developed by 700 Miami Partners LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which was formed solely for such purpose. Two Roads Development LLC, a Florida limited liability company (“Two Roads”), is affiliated with this entity, but is not the developer of this project.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L Z H E I M E R ’ S D R U G D I S C O V E R Y L U N C H EO N AT T H E P I E R R E H OT E L

Ronald Lauder

Juliette Feffer and Carolyn Maloney

Phyllis Grann and Bonnie Pfeifer Evans

Lori Tritsch and William Lauder

Leonard Lauder and Donald Newhouse

Judy Glickman Lauder, Paul Fribourg and Paula Zahn

Howard Fillit with Renée and Robert Belfer

C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y ’ S “AU T U M N ” D I N N E R

Henry and Susan Johnson with Douglas Blonsky

Tracey Huff, Julie Richardson, Neda Navab and Diane Chachas 46 QUEST

Meggie Kempner, Sam Dangremond and Lucinda May

Taylor Jackson

Michael and Kristen Swenson

Rick Cotton and Betsy Smith

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; B FA . CO M ( B E LO W )

Gillian and Sylvester Miniter


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ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. Restaurants or any operators are subject to change at any time and no representation is made hereby for reliance and except as the offering materials provide the use of the commercial spaces will be in discretion of their purchasers and there is no assurance that they will be used for any specific purpose or with such operators. These materials are not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy, a unit in the condominium. Such an offering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (offering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless not made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, offer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in, or to residents of, any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising, marketing and sales program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, sex, religion, handicap, familial status,or national origin.


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Jamie Niven and Beatrice Stern

Caroline Nype and Adam Parker 48 QUEST

Rachel and Alex Stern

Billy and Katherine Rayner

Hannah Motley and Sims Lansing

Paisley Kadison

Nick and Jackie Drexel

Peter Pennoyer, Katie Ridder and Gillian Steel

Anne Sidamon-Eristoff and John Sare

Agnes Gund and Jack Shear

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Colin Bailey and Mariana French


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A M E R I C A N F R I E N D S O F B L E R A N C O U R T AT N E W YO R K YAC H T C L U B

Lady Mary Holmes and Baroness Didi d’Anglejan-Chatillon

Sandra Jones and Jay Paul

Alexandre Seilliere and Giulio Cipollini 50 QUEST

Noelle and Philip Auerbach with Michelle Auerbach

Elizabeth Meigher and Michael Lorber

Tinsley Mortimer

Eugénie Anglès

George and Jeri Sape

Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Pierre Durand and Reinaldo Herrera

A N N I E WAT T

Sonja Morgan, Miles Morgan and Quincy Morgan


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A:

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Susan de Franca and Camille Douglas

Felicia Taylor and Alex Hitz

Howard Lorber and Cornelia Bregman

Richard LeFrak and Audrey Gruss

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00 QUEST

Cece Cord and Geoffrey Bradfield

Carl and Gigi Grimstad


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L E N OX H I L L N E I G H B O R H O O D H O U S E C E L E B R AT E D W I T H C O C K TA I L S AT O S C A R D E L A R E N TA

Diana Quasha and Frank Lavondsky

Kathy and Othon Prounis 54 QUEST

Holly Phillips with Michael and Perry Parkes

Elizabeth Pyne and Noble Black

Dana Schiff and Greg Camp

Christine and David Nosin

Mary Van Pelt, Lydia Tower, Mark Dorfman and Emily Leonard

Katherine Tekworth-Porter and Andrea Culliford

Jay and Betsy Wainwright

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Blake Hubbard and Nicole Sexton


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Q U E ST TO A ST E D V H E R N I E R W I T H A L U N C H EO N AT D O U B L E S

Lorna Graev and Regina Greenvan

Cristiana Vigano

Gigi Benson and Cathy Irwin

Jeanne Lawrence

Barbara Tober and Melinda Blinken

Joan Jakobson and Grace Meigher 56 QUEST

Margo Langenberg and Stephanie Krieger

Wendy Carduner and Pamela Howard

Mai Harrison and Linda Hickox

Webb Egerton and Sabrina Forsythe

Liz Peek, Emilia Saint-Amand and Susan Braddock

Judith Cox and Bambi Putnam

Ann Barish and Jane Murray

Hilary Geary and Sharon Hoge

Eleanora Kennedy and Clelia Zacharias

Alexia Hamm Ryan and Muffie Potter Aston

Alexandra Lind Rose and Jamee Gregory

A N N I E WAT T

Martha Glass and Michele Heary


INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIONS. L O C A L I N S IGHT S . Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.

740 PARK AVENUE, APT 6/7A | $29,500,000 12 RM/4 BR/6.5 BA | WEB: 00111198 Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611 Jeremy V. Stein, 212.431.2427

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875 PARK AVENUE, APT 4B | $7,250,000 8 RM/3 BR/4 BA | WEB: 00111165 Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611

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5 RM/2 BR/2.5 BA | WEB: 00111196 Anne Aransaenz, 212.606.7645

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5 BR/6 BA/2 HF BA | WEB: 00110192 Elizabeth L. Sample, 212.606.7685 Brenda S. Powers, 212.606.7653

955 FIFTH AVENUE | $10,600,000 8 RM/4 BR/4 BA | WEB: 00111203 Lois Nasser, 212.606.7611

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S O C I E T Y O F M S K H O ST E D I TS FA L L PA R T Y AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

Blair Trader and Allison Stein

Rickie de Sole and Jessica Sailer van Lith

Meredith Melling

58 QUEST

Dani Stahl

Tabitha Simmons

Charlotte Ronson

Veronica Swanson Beard

Twist and Shout

Ferebee and Brook Taube

Joanna de Neufville and Alexandra Amorosi

B FA . CO M

Beth Day, Ali Wise and Mae Grennan


A Taste of Telluride - Jaw-dropping interior. Phenomenal Great Room 19th Century Schoolhouse with floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace, 35’ ceiling and wet bar. Wall of folding doors to 65’ heated, covered porch with outdoor fireplace. Den with exotic fish tank. Recreation Room with wet bar. 10-seat Theater. Yoga/Meditation Room with fireplace and coral reef tank. His and Her Spa Baths with steam room and sauna. Over three, landscaped acres with salt-water swimming pool. $3,200,000

Designed by McKim, Mead & White. Impeccably renovated with keen attention to detail. Raised paneling, coffered ceilings, hardwood floors, dumbwaiter and two fireplaces. Dramatic Entrance Hall with beautiful curved staircase. Paneled Library. Fabulous Great Room with Fireplace. Octagonal Breakfast Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Foremost estate area. Remarkable landscaping. Pool. $2,000,000

Pound Ridge Perfection -

Long drive to peaceful setting. Over three beautifully landscaped acres. Traditional Country Colonial with hardwood floors, French doors and substantial millwork. Perfect for entertaining and everyday living. Two Story Entrance Hall. Stunning Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen with Breakfast Area. Family Room with Fireplace. Office. Private Master Suite with bath. Four additional Bedrooms plus Au Pair. Pool and Pool House. $1,499,000

Landmark Greek Revival -

Over Nine Acres -

Peaceful Setting - Over five acres off of desirable Chapel Road, one of

Long drive to peaceful privacy. Stunning Country House perfectly positioned to take in woodland views. Nearly 3700 square feet with hardwood floors, walls of windows and an open floor plan. Two Story Entrance Hall. Sunken Living Room with Fireplace. Dining Room. Sun Room. Country Kitchen. Dramatic Family Room with soaring ceiling and fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Recreation Room. Deck and hot tub. $799,000

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Columned front porch, antique wideboard floors, period millwork and four fireplaces. Elegantly appointed living space. Front Parlor. Reception/Music Room. Sun Room with door to Boxwood garden with fountain. Formal Living and Dining Rooms. Butler’s Pantry. Country Kitchen. Library with Corinthian columns and classic key molding. Four Bedrooms. Landscaped grounds with a number of fine trees. Garage and Studio. $1,875,000

Waccabuc’s finest country roads. Gracious Country Colonial with sun-filled rooms, hardwood floors, French doors and four fireplaces. Formal Entrance Hall. Living Room with doors to Office. Formal Dining Room. Stunning Country Kitchen. Open Family Room. Four Bedrooms. Gorgeous grounds with rolling lawns, flowering trees and specimen shrubs. $995,000

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S I LV E R H I L L H O S P I TA L ’ S G I V I N G H O P E G A L A AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

Ken and Barbara Kleban

Mike Doyle, Janine Powell and Sig Ackerman

Daman and Sant Chatwal with Vikram Chatwal and Safira Chatwal

Jeanine Anaya and Larry Haynes

Barbara and Walter McNulty

Ceci Cleary and Darcy Haskins

Maria Klinga, Alli Lees, Jen Spahr and Deb Fox

D I N N E R FO R “ N E W YO R K AT I TS C O R E ” AT M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K

Maryanne Quinton and Zibby Tozer 60 QUEST

Jippe and Annette Hiemstre

Bruno Quincy, Susan Madden and Jamie Dinan

Susan and Elihu Rose with Whitney Donhauser

Steve and Stephanie Hessler

Jim and Heidi Handley

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

Ronay Menschel with Newt and Polly Merrill and Alex Merrill


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A 2 0 1 6 L I B R A R Y L I O N S G A L A AT N E W YO R K P U B L I C L I B R A R Y

Salman Rushdie and Gin Boswick

Carolina Herrera and Princess Firyal

Bharati Mukherjee 62 QUEST

Tom and Sheila Wolfe

Calvin Trillin

Harry Belafonte

Charles Gross and Joyce Carol Oates

Peggy Noonan

Henry Louis Gates and Joan Clark

Tony Marx, Roxanne Robinson, Jean Strouse and Louis Begley

Elyse and Michael Newhouse

Stephen and Christine Schwarzman

Zadie Smith and David Remnick

Joseph Cohen and Lally Weymouth

Chris Noth and Javier Marias

Ethan Hawke

B FA . CO M

Chuck Schumer amd Iris Weinshall


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CALENDAR

DECEMBER

On November 30, the 2016 Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree will be lit for the first time. There will also be live performances from 7–9 p.m. at Rockefeller Plaza, located between West 48th and West 51st streets and Fifth and Sixth avenues. For more information, call 212.332.6868.

GIVING TO THE “GLADES”

New Hope Charities will host its 23rd annual Holiday Bazaar at the Beach Club (755 North County Road) at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.366.5093.

2

STRONG VALUES

IMPROVING AWARENESS

The Autism Project of Palm Beach County will hold its Renaissance Dinner at Mar-a-Lago. For more information, call 212.921.9070.

5

GREAT FOOD, GREAT FUN

The 19th Annual Food Allergy Ball, benefiting Food Allergy Research

and Education (FARE), will take place at the Waldorf=Astoria at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.980.1711.

Ristorante (290 Sunset Avenue) at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.833.3883.

TRUFFLE SEASON

FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS

The Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts will host its Palm Beach Wine Auction and White Truffle Dinner at Trevini

MorseLife, a charitable organization dedicated to enhancing the lives of seniors, will hold a dinner dance at Mar-a-Lago at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.471.5111.

TO THE RESCUE

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM

Midnight at the Oasis—the Saint Louis Art Museum’s annual holiday gala—will take place at the museum at 6 p.m. For more information, call 314.795.5097.

4

STAGE LEFT

64 QUEST

Daughters of the American Revolution, Palm Beach Chapter, will hold their annual Christmas Cabaret gala at The Colony (155 Hammon Avenue) at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.5430.

8

3

New York Stage and Film will celebrate its Winter Gala at The Plaza at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.463.0684.

7

On December 29, the 62nd International Debutante Ball, featuring young women of distinction from the U.S. and abroad, will take place at The Pierre. For more information, call 212.901.8011.

The Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League will celebrate its 45th annual Christmas Ball at the Sailfish Club (located at 1338 North Lake Way) at 7 p.m. The event will support the Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League’s mission of helping homeless, neglected, or injured dogs and cats. Pauline Pitt, a dedicated League supporter and board member, will serve as this year’s chairwoman. For more information, call 561.472.884.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

1


CALENDAR

effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. For more information, call 561.832.2600.

18

Sailors’, Marines’, Coast Guard and Airmen’s Club, a home away from home for the military and their families. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

A STRONG FOUNDATION

The Bone Marrow Foundation will host its 60th annual Gold and Silver Ball at 583 Park Avenue at 8 p.m. The Silver Ball will include senior, junior, and sophomore attendees from New York City private schools and boarding schools. The event, which is black-tie, will help raise funds for the Bone Marrow Foundation’s Lifeline Fund. For more information, call 212.972.2268. On December 9, the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will hold its Membership Luncheon and Ballinger Award Presentation at The Breakers at noon. For more information, call 561.832.0731.

9

CULTURAL HERITAGE

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will hold its Membership Luncheon and Ballinger Award Presentation at The Breakers at noon. The Foundation is a private, nonprofit membership organization dedicated to the preservation of the historic, architectural, and cultural heritage of Palm Beach, Florida. Through advocacy initiatives, educational programs, architectural resources, and cultural events, the Foundation’s goal is to encourage the community to learn about and save the historic buildings that truly make Palm Beach special. For more information, call 561.832.0731.

research. For more information, call 561.863.5500.

14

LET IT SNOW

The Palm Beach Junior Assembly (PBJA) will celebrate its Snowflake Ball at Mar-a-Lago. The PBJA is an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women, and improving communities through the

29

TAKE A BOW

The 62nd International Debutante Ball will take place at The Pierre. Young women of distinction from the United States and abroad will make their bow to society at the dinner dance. Each debutante will be accompanied by her own escort in white tie and tails—and a military cade who will carry the flag of the country or state which she represents. Sponsored by Piaget, the Ball benefits the International Debutante Ball Foundation Charities which Foundation supports numerous charities including The Soldiers’,

JANUARY 7 MEN IN BLUE

The Palm Beach Police Foundation, Inc.’s 11th annual Policemne’s Ball will take place at Mar-a-Lago at 7 p.m. The organization exists to support the Town of Palm Beach Police Department and its employees through the acceptance, management, and disbursement of tax-deductible gifts and contributions For more information, call 561.820.8118.

8

SHOWING SUPPORT

The Hanley Center Foundation will host its Palm Beach Dinner at the Beach Club. The Hanley Center Foundation’s mission is to provide scholarships for patients who could not otherwise afford addiction treatment. In addition, the foundation provides substance abuse prevention and education programs for parents, caregivers and school-age children. For more information, call 561.841.1000.

10

A POOLSIDE RECEPTION

The Salvation Army will hold its Under the Sea Palm Beach gala at Mar-a-Lago at 7 p.m. The Salvation Army is a Christian church and international charitable organization structured in a quasi-military fashion. For more information, call 561.503.6403.

13

PALM BEACH PARTY

The International Society of Palm Beach will host its Holiday Gala dinner dance at the Beach Club at 6:30 p.m. Founded by Herme de Wyman Miro and her husband Rene de Wyman, the Society contributes to our community through scholarships and grants supporting the arts, fostering education, furthering medicine

On December 8, the Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League will celebrate its 45th annual Christmas Ball at the Sailfish Club at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.472.884. DECEMBER 2016 65


TA K I

BALLYHOO AND CRY This page: President Elect Donald Trump might have certain publications to thank for his success in the polls. Opposite page, from left: One of the New Yorker’s cover during the election; the New York Times headline announcing Trump’s win; Vogue condemned him as well.

EVEN BY MODERN, cataclysmically hysterical standards, the post-election histrionics by the losers take the proverbial cake. Poor Graydon Carter. He wrote things about the Donald that I would not dream of writing about an African-American hero like O.J. Simpson. I advise my friend Graydon to drink some retsina, that awful Greek wine that is known to calm down the volatile Greek character even when the name Angela Merkel is mentioned. 66 QUEST

But the one that really won it for the Donald was Vogue magazine. I kid you not. When those preening and mincing idiots followed their Führer Wintour and denounced Trump, something like 10 million undecided voters switched to the man from Queens. If those witches are against him, he must be doing something right, was the line of the undecided. The ones that are cheering, of course, are the shrinks. I spoke to Dr. Klinghoffer,

resident psychiatrist at a midtown looney bin, and he was rubbing his hands with pleasure and anticipation. In a heavy German accent he told me that gay people in general and transgendered people in particular are very offended by the electoral results and fearful that the U.S. will revert to pre1967 Britain, when homosexuals were arrested on sight while billing and cooing, and nine-tenths of the Conservative party’s members of Parliament were in


jail for homosexual acts. Oy vey! The only ones that have not been at all traumatized by Adolf Hitler’s, sorry, Donald J. Trump’s victory, are the three main networks, the New Yorker and the New York Times. Nicholas Kristof, a Times columnist who gives the impression when writing that being a white American man and a Zonder Commando in Dachau are one and the same, attempted some mea culpa in a post election column, but he’s as credible as those who promise seventy virgins and lots of pilaf to the idiots who blow themselves up. My favorite Times columnist are two of the biggest bullshitters ever, Roger Cohen and Paul Krugman. The former

articles non-stop and continue to do so until their next colonoscopy (which should clear their heads for a while.) And now a few words of advice for our Muslim friends cowering under their beds waiting for the Gestapo. Relax, eat some rice and kebab, and make sure you pray facing Mecca 63 times a day, and 64 times at night. Move into Trump tower—it is a strategic move to say the least. Keep eating your dates and you’ll be fine. Do not, I repeat, do not hire Chelsea Clinton at five million per, her sell-by date has expired. That’s about it, dear Quest readers. What won it for the Donald was the fact that most people are intelligent

very dangerous thing. Full disclosure: I met Donald J. Trump only once. I was seated next to Melania at a grand dinner about 15 years ago and we spoke about Bill Clinton’s catastrophic decision to bomb a Christian country in order to establish a Muslim belt in the Balkans. She agreed. That’s when some jerk from the Times sitting across rudely put in his two cents in a very uppity and condescending way. I told him to mind his own business and that he would be sucking on his gums if he did not. (He shut up rather quickly.) After the dinner I saw a large orange figure approaching me with a big smile on his face calling me the greatest. It was the soon to be

compared a possible Trump victory to that of Adolf Hitler in 1933. The latter wrote that it was “favorable coverage by the media that won it for Trump.” My advice to both men is to seek immediate help from Dr. Klinghoffer and also drop some acid. Their brains have been so fried, the acid might actually help. And as far as the New Yorker writers are concerned, I think they should be forced to read their long and tedious

and can tell a phony when they see one. Phonies like the media and the Times, that is. Better yet, people who go to college nowadays are brainwashed by political correctness that has them believe their brains are up their crotch and vice versa. This can be very traumatic and puts their thinking process out of kilter. Hence those who did not have their brains located up their ass voted for the Donald, and the rest for Hillary. A little knowledge can be a

45th president of the United States. Melania obviously had said some nice things about me. I’ve never seen him since, but I was the first to endorse him in the American Conservative in June 2015. (And predicted that he would never make it.) And now that we can say Merry Christmas again, merry Christmas to you all out there, even Times readers. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. DECEMBER 2016 67


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DECEMBER ’91: CHRISTMAS AT THE KENNEDY CENTER HONORS

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago—and writing this I can’t believe it’s been that long—my stepfather, Robert Shaw, the prolific choral and symphonic conductor whom I’ve written about before in these pages, won the Kennedy Center Honor. It’s the highest honor for a performing artist in America to receive, and the splashy weekend of celebration was one of those pinch-yourselfI-just-can’t-believe-this-is-happening 68 QUEST

moments that only come along every so often in a lifetime, if at all. 1991 was a big year for our family: Carnegie Hall turned 100 years old and RS had served as a board member and frequent conductor there, so there were lots of celebrations and concerts about all that. As well, RS turned 75. To top it off with the Kennedy Center Honor, this was truly a banner year. We flew from Atlanta to Washington,

D.C., on a Friday and checked in to what was then The Ritz-Carlton, although it has since been de-flagged. The celebration for the Kennedy Center Honorees didn’t start till Saturday night with a splendid reception and dinner in the Period Rooms of the State Department—a museum of American furniture and paintings, and the original hand-signed U.S. Constitution, under glass. I loved seeing the Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore silver—not

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Opposite page: President and Mrs. Bush at the White House with the 1991 Kennedy Center Honorees, including the author’s stepfather, Robert Shaw (far left). This page, from top left: Fellow ’91 honorees the Nicholas Brothers; the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, home to the annual show; ’91 honorees Betty Comden and Adolph Green; the ceremonial Period Rooms at the

KM P H OTO G R A P H Y; S A N F R A N C I S CO G ATE ; U . S . D E PA RTM E N T O F S TATE ; J E W E L S A M A D / A F P / G E T T Y I M A G E S

U.S. Department of State, where honorees are fêted the evening before; the view from a more recent Kennedy Center Honors ceremony.

quite the start of but still early on in my fetish—and the dinner for 200 people was lit by candles alone. The menu? American absolutely everything: the wines, the foie gras, the duck, the chocolate. The very best of what our country had to offer. Leontyne Price made a dramatic turbanned entrance with her brother, whom she referred to as either The Captain or The Colonel—I can’t remember which because he was a decorated war hero—in uniform. I sat next to Betty Comden, a fellow honoree that year, and fell in love instantly. Other honorees that year? Betty and her writing partner, Adolf Green, were legends on Broadway. Gregory Peck was a movie star who needs no introduction—and his son Tony, with wife Cheryl Tiegs, left the room breathless when they made their entrance. The Nicholas Brothers were 1930s movie dancers who’d spearheaded civil-rights issues in tap shoes, and country star Roy Acuff, a Grand Ole Opry blockbuster. At the State Department that night, Isaac Stern, the violin virtuoso and emcee of the evening, played “Danny Boy,” and the entire room melted in tears. The next day, Sunday, there was a

brunch at The Jockey Club in the RitzCarlton Hotel, the headquarters for the weekend. It was a clubby, intimate restaurant, and at 22, this was my first experience meeting legends like Lauren Bacall, Katharine Hepburn, Anthony Hopkins, and Walter Cronkite in person. Heady, no? That afternoon, we went in blacktie to a fully decked-out-in-Christmas White House for a reception. The actual awards ceremony took place in the East Room, with an incredible buffet and cocktail reception in the State Dining Room, but beforehand, we’d been invited by President and Mrs. Bush to see the private quarters. Among the Pecks’ guests were M. et Mme. Jacques Chirac, and Mme. Chirac spoke very little, if any, English, so my mother—as fluent in French as she was in English—was corralled to serve as translator. The Bushes were affable and charming. The President wanted to mesmerize us with some technology on his fab TV but couldn’t get it to work, and Barbara Bush showed my aunt, Laura, every detail of a splendid needlepoint rug of wildflowers she’d made out of squares she’d done on the campaign

trail—one square at a time—and then had them assembled. The First Lady wryly cautioned us on the importance of picking one’s own portrait painter as she motioned to a portrait of some 19th-century First Lady who’d had no say in hers, and whose image had a beard. After The White House, we went to the Kennedy Center for the incredible show for 2,000 guests. That’s the one you’ve seen on television—all singing, all dancing. It’s splendidly produced—one of a kind—and like nothing else that’s ever been televised. Jean Stapleton presented Robert with his award that night, a surprise for him, because she’d sung in one of his choruses in the late 1940s. The show’s producers had flown up the entire Atlanta Symphony Chorus to sing for Robert—another surprise. The whole evening was one wow after the other, and the exhilaration, dopamine, and adrenaline of that night were, thus far, unparalleled in my life. Another memory: earlier that afternoon, walking into the White House, Kitty Carlisle Hart—alone in her emeralds—asked my family, “Mind if I walk in with you?” For sure we didn’t. u DECEMBER 2016 69


WEMPE’S BRILLIANT WOMAN BY ALEX TRAVERS

KIM-EVA WEMPE’S first diamond was shaped like a heart. “It was a tiny little ring,” she remembers. “A gift from my father. Around .45 carats.” Mostly, she kept it as a pendant, this dear charm dangling around her neck, with her at all times. Back then, her father, Hellmut Wempe, was busy expanding the family watch business. The Wempe brand dates back to 1878, when a watchmaker named Gerhard Diedrich Wempe, Kim-Eva’s great grandfather, opened a shop in the small northern German town of Elsfleth. At his workshop, he repaired and sold watches. But unlike other stores of the time, Gerhard Wempe took particular pride in his displays. The tactic helped usher in customers off the street, and business was good. As time passed, the company remained in the family, growing with each generation, and today Wempe operates 32 stores in seven countries. 70 QUEST


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When Kim-Eva joined the company after studying business management, Wempe—now synonymous with fine timepieces—embraced jewelry, separating it from other watch boutiques. It was a hit pretty much right out of the box. According to Kim-Eva, who launched Wempe’s BY KIM line in 2000, there wasn’t much jewelry on the market that gelled with the watches Wempe was selling. It was either too trendy or too old-fashioned. “If there would have been brands to buy,” she says, “I would have done it.” Her way worked fine. Kim-Eva put a design team together, providing them with their own workshop. “I’m not the designer,” she admits. “I’m the entrepreneur. But I was too into the jewelry: as a woman, I know what I want to wear.” She gave input to the design team, suggesting price points and ideas, and in just a few years, the jewelry had an international following. One of the things you notice upon first encountering KimEva Wempe is the way she wears her own jewelry. Whatever she’s wearing radiates off her like a bloom of gilded flowers. It’s some kind of chemistry thing that’s compounded by her enthusiasm, energy, and big, frequent smiles. She’s here today

at Wempe’s U.S. flagship store, helmed by Rüdiger Albers, which was recently expanded. Perhaps that’s putting it mildly. Wempe New York, which has called Fifth Avenue home since the 1980s, is now about three times the size it once was, giving the Peninsula Hotel’s retail space on Fifth Avenue an impressive, homogenous look. Its carefully curated selection of watches and jewelry is flawlessly executed, offering a fully renewed, rich ambience. Wempe has even made a special watch to celebrate the new store. But unlike before, it’s the BY KIM jewelry you see in the windows just before you reach the large glass door, not the watches (they are displayed along Fifth Avenue). In this cozy alcove, there are engagement rings, necklaces, bracelets, earrings. “We have a goldsmith atelier here in New York,” she points out, and explains that Wempe is also able to create one-of-a-kind pieces. “One customer had a pair of sapphires, and our jewelry manager, Michaela Kesselman, had them transformed into a stunning pair of earrings.” Her delight in all this seems total. Toward the end of our conversation, Kim-Eva tells me that her jewelry is designed to outlast short-lived trends. She also mentions that she still wears a necklace with a heart pendant, although this one has a four carat cinnamon diamond. Then she is off to celebrate the grand opening of the new Wempe store, to greet guests, leaving her jewelry to shine in the window display and for anyone walking by to hope that it one day holds the same significance of her first heart-shaped diamond ring. u


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This page: A selection of Wempe’s BY KIM jewelry. Opposite page: Wempe New York’s redesigned interior; a special edition Wempe watch, created to celebrate the recent store renovation (inset). Previous spread: Wempe New York, the brand’s U.S. flagship store, is located at 700 Fifth Avenue in New York City; Kim-Eva Wempe.

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R E A L E S TAT E

THE SWORD GATE HOUSE has served many different purposes since its construction in 1803. A private residence, a tannery, a prestigious girls’ school, and an inn account for its most notable uses. Many who pass by marvel at the privacy offered by the tall wall and famous “sword gates” that line the property. 32 Legare Street is truly one of Charleston’s most beautiful historic masterpieces. Around the early 19th century, two waterfront merchants are believed to have begun construction on 32 Legare Street— what is known today as the Sword Gate House. In 1819, the property was sold to Andrew Talvande who converted the residence into an all-girls school. The school was operational for nearly 30 years and housed many notable names such as Mary Boykin Chesnut, the author of A Diary From Dixie, which became one of the most revealing civilian accounts of the South during the Civil War. The property underwent a variety of improvements and additions over the years, and even survived one of the worst earthquakes to ever strike an American city. In 1930, the property was sold to Mrs. Jessie Lincoln Randolph (a granddaughter of President Abraham Lincoln) who lived in Washington, D.C. and planned to use the Sword Gate House as a seasonal residence. 74 Q U E S T

The home was operated as an inn for over 40 years beginning in 1952. Henry T. Gaud was the owner at the time and made a variety of repairs to allow for public occupancy and use. While Gaud owned the property, he divided it into five parcels, making separate lots out of the front garden as well as dividing the house itself with a new interior wall. Ultimately, the property was combined once more into a single parcel in 1998. The current owners have utilized the property as a single-family residence as was originally intended. They went to amazing lengths to ensure the home was restored properly, consulting the best local preservationists, architects and designers along the way. The Sword Gate House is currently listed for sale for $19,500,000 by Charleston-based luxury real estate firm, Handsome Properties, Inc. Located on one of the largest lots in Charleston’s historic district, the property sits on .87 acres and has 9 bedrooms, 13 full and 2 half baths. The main house combined with its outbuildings consists of approximately 17,142 square feet. u For more information about the listing or its history, contact the listing agent and broker-in-charge, Debbie Fisher with Handsome Properties at 843.727.6460.

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This page, clockwise from above: The magnificent Sword Gate House offers Southern charm at its best; the magical dining room; the gates to the historic property; each of the nine bedrooms is a masterpiece of comfort and class; relax on the veranda surrounded on all sides by a collection of the most charming gardens Charleston has to offer. Opposite page: One of the property's many impressive and charming settings, making each vista a delight.


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ART This page: Gold stem, nephrite leaves, diamond seed centers with asbestos fibers, in a crystal vase in the style of Peter Carl Fabergé. Opposite page: Bunny Mellon in the Oak Spring Garden Library, May 1982 (above); Le jardin fruitier (1821) by Louis

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Claude Noisette, a favorite of Mellon’s.

MUCH HAS BEEN written about the amazing library assembled by Rachel Lambert Mellon at Oak Spring Farm in Upperville, Virginia, but recent developments demonstrate her firm commitment to make the contents available to scholars and students. These developments include: the establishment of the Oak Spring Garden Foundation; naming a director of the foundation; and the New York Botanical Garden’s current exhibition honoring their former trustee for her important contribution to horticultural study. In 1976, Mrs. Mellon established a foundation to honor her father, Gerard B. Lambert, an acute businessman and avid

yachtsman, who had a library filled with maps, architecture, and archeology books that greatly influenced her life. Mrs. Mellon grew up on the family’s large estate in Princeton, New Jersey, watching the Olmstead Brothers firm create the landscape, while she experimented in a large square plot her father had given her to plant. A self-taught gardener, Mellon was inspired by early childhood garden classics and depended on collecting and referencing books from that time forth. In 1970, as her books were scattered throughout many residences, her husband, Paul Mellon, commissioned Edward Larrabee Barnes to collaborate with Mrs. Mellon in DECEMBER 2016 77


ART

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This page: Still life with a quince, an apple, lemons, and three Chinese blue-and-white cups by Christofo Munari, ca. 1700. Opposite page: Bunny Mellon

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working in her garden of espaliered fruit tress, May 1982 (above); manuscript on vellum attributed to Simon Benning, 1524 (below).

designing the Oak Spring Garden Library building (completed in 1981); an additional wing by Thomas Beach was completed in 1997. When the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation proposed digitizing a rare book from the collection in 2000, Mrs. Mellon chose Henri Louis Duhamel du Monceau’s Traite des Arbres Fruitiers (a 1768 two volume book on the fruit trees) because it would be a pivotal reference for various professions. Another favorite was Louis Claude Noisette’s Le jardin frutier (1821), affirming her interest in espalier, topiary, and French garden design. Of the library’s 16,000 objects, 10,000 are books and 3,500 comprise the rare book collection. Librarian Tony Willis, who worked with Mrs. Mellon for 30 years amassing the collection, oversees these treasures. The Chronicle of Philanthropy once wrote “her financial legacy will be a boon to the study of horticulture.” Of the $411.3 million in her estate, $401 million went to the Lambert Foundation to establish an educational center for the study of botany and horticulture. On June 30, 2016, Sir Peter Crane was named director of Oak Spring Garden Foundation. Sir Peter had been director of the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, a professor in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, and the dean of the Yale School of Forestry and Environ-

mental Studies. An avid researcher, his notable work over the years involves the paleontology of flowering plants. The collaborations of the Oak Spring Garden Foundation and the New York Botanical Gardens brings us the exhibition “Redouté to Warhol: Bunny Mellon’s Botanical Art” (on view until February 12) and offers a glimpse into the diverse wonders of Oak Spring Garden Library that we might not be able to otherwise view. Said Gregory Long, CEO of the New York Botanical Garden, “At NYBG, we are deeply honored to be exhibiting some of the very greatest treasures from the botanical art collection of Mrs. Paul Mellon. Mrs. Mellon and her library have been associated with the Garden in many ways over the years, and we are delighted that New Yorkers now finally have this opportunity to enjoy these sumptuous objects.” Included in the objects carefully chosen by the curators is an oil painting by Cristoforo Munari and a Fabergé-style dandelion, exemplifying the varied and personal nature of the collection. Describing a garden she noted, “Its greatest reality is not reality, for a garden, hovering always in a state of becoming, sums its own past and its future.” So, too, the legacy of Rachel Lambert Mellon and the Oak Spring Garden Foundation. u DECEMBER 2016 79


THE ROLEX OYSTER TURNS 90 THE ROLEX OYSTER is one of the most recognizable watches in the world. It was the first waterproof wristwatch, aptly blending scientific achievement and beauty. And it all started with Hans Wilsdorf, a man with a passion for excellence. Wilsdorf was born in Germany in 1881. He came to Switzerland in the early 1900s to begin a career in watchmaking. In those days, pocket watches kept better time than wristwatches, which were considered to be jewelry items, more popular with women than men. Wilsdorf hoped to change that and set out to create a precise, waterproof, and robust instrument— one that could be worn on the wrist. With his business partner, Alfred Davis, Wilsdorf founded a watch distribution company in London in 1905. Three years later, he created the Rolex name—short, pleasant sounding, easy to pronounce and remember, and possible to inscribe on the dial and movement of a watch. 80 QUEST

The operations moved to Geneva in 1910. By then, Rolex had proved that wristwatches could be just as precise as pocket watches. Later that year, Rolex obtained the first certificate in the world granted to a wristwatch by the Official Watch Rating Centre in Bienne. In 1914, a Rolex wristwatch was awarded the “Class A” precision certificate by the Kew Observatory, one of the highest honors for chronometer testing. The next challenge, however, was making the watch waterproof. In order to keep water and dust from penetrating into the case, Wilsdorf patented a structure that consisted of a screw-down bezel, a caseback, and a winding crown. Then, he hermetically sealed the movement within the case. The first model, finished in 1926, featured an octagonal case with a round bezel and dial. He called it the Oyster. To prove its abilities, Wilsdorf outfitted swimmer Mercedes

© RO LE X / J E A N - DA N I E L M E Y E R

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Gleitze with an Oyster as she swam across the English Channel in 1927. The watch was submerged for a full 10 hours. When Gleitze surfaced, it was in perfect working order. And yet, Wilsdorf strived to make even more improvements. There was the issue of winding: Each time the watch had to be wound, the owner had to unscrew the crown, affecting the hermetic seal. Pocket watches were capable of self-winding, but there was not yet an accurate system for wristwatches. After years of work and research, Rolex soon issued patents for a self-winding mechanism with a free rotor (the “Perpetual” rotor) that wound the watch when the wearer moved his or her wrist. Today, this remains the standard for the wristwatch world. u This page, clockwise from left: Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay wore Rolex Oyster Perpetuals when they became the first explorers to reach Everest’s summit; the “Perpetual” rotor; an ad in the Daily Mail; Oyster Perpetual, 1953. Opposite page: Hans Wilsdorf; the first Rolex Oyster, 1926 (inset).


A THIRD “RHODY AWARD” FOR LILA DELMAN REAL ESTATE INTERNATIONAL

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across from the Providence River near a new pedestrian bridge that will link the East Side with downtown Providence. "It is important for us to live and work in buildings that reflect our boutique international brand and the important properties we represent," said Melanie Delman, president of Lila Delman Real Estate International. Lila Delman Real Estate International worked with J. Michael Abbott of Northeast Collaborative Architects to reimagine the space and Jeremy Sherer, president of Suburban Renewal, Inc., was the general contractor. This was the second award-winning collaboration between Lila Delman Real Estate International and Suburban Renewal: Jeremy also worked on the restoration of the corporate office in Narragansett, which was originally a private men’s club, the Reading Room. The Rhody Award for Historic Preservation honors Rhode Island’s community leaders who invest in the preservation, restoration, and sustainability of key structures around the state. In 2009, the commission teamed up with advocacy group Preserve Rhode Island to honor those who make such investments as they bring Rhode Island’s proud history to life. u For more information, contact Melanie Delman of Lila Delman Real Estate International at 401.284.4820 or melanie.delman@liladelman.com.

J OYC E G E RVA S I O

THE RHODE ISLAND–BASED Lila Delman Real Estate International has earned the prestigious “Rhody Award” for historic preservation from the state’s Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission—an honor bestowed because of their investment in a 232-year-old landmark in Providence. On a recent beautiful evening at Rosecliff, Melanie Delman accepted her third "Rhody Award" with her team at Lila Delman Real Estate International. This is the third Rhody Award the company has won for its preservation efforts, an accomplishment that is unprecedented in Rhode Island. (In 2010, Preserve Rhode Island honored Lila Delman Real Estate International with a Rhody Award for restoring its offices in Newport and Narragansett). Lila Delman Real Estate International was also presented with the first Doris Duke Historic Preservation Award, given by the Newport Restoration Foundation, for its Newport building. “Location is everything in the real estate business, and no one knows the value of an eye-catching property better than Melanie Delman,” commented Valerie Talmage, executive director of Preserve Rhode Island. Lila Delman Real Estate International purchased the building at 369 South Main Street—which had been the Earle Warehouse, built in 1784—and restored it with modern amenities to create the brokerage’s new Providence location. The office is sited


R E A L E S TAT E

This page, clockwise from above: Lila Delman Real Estate International’s offices in Providence, Rhode Island; Newport, Rhode Island; and Narragansett, Rhode Island. Opposite page: Melanie Delman, accepting her third “Rhody

G R E G A R A K E L I A N ( N E WP O RT O F F I C E )

Award” with her team at Lila Delman Real Estate International.

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’TIS THE SEASON to be jolly, and nothing gets us in a better mood than shopping for the ones we love. From rosé Champagne to rose-gold razors, we’ve found gifts of all scales and sizes for everyone on our list, be they naughty or nice.

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1. Stuart Weitzman’s Bunnylove sandal in smoke and nero with two-tone mink fur. $498 at stuartweitzman.com. 2. The Akoya 32-inch

QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

cultured pearl special edition strand by Mikimoto. $6,990 at mikimoto.com. 3. Faux-fur throw in lynx and cashmere. $1,250 at Scully & Scully.

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4. When the occasion calls for bubbly, reach for Ruinart Champagnes: Blanc de Blancs ($74.95) or RosĂŠ ($79.99). Opposite page: 1. Offthe-shoulder silk organza gown by Marchesa with crystal and beaded embroidery. $6,495 at nordstrom.com. 2. Baroque Jacquard Ricky handbag by Ralph Lauren. $3,500 at ralphlauren.com. 3. The Estate Regner 18-kt. gold, ruby, and diamond spray brooch, available at Betteridge Jewelers. $8,500: betteridge.com or 203.869.0124.

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1. The Bulgari Bulgari Roman Sorbet Pendant in white gold, pink tourmalines, and amethysts. $3,300: bulgari.com. 2. Multi-color embroidered cocktail dress by Carolina Herrera. $6,490

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at Carolina Herrera, 954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552. 3. Nirav Modi’s Slim Embrace rings with diamonds in 18-kt. white gold ($6,800) and 18-kt. rose gold ($7,100). 4. Enchanted Lavender ring from Graziela Gems in amethyst, diamonds, and white gold. $3,390 at grazielagems.com. 5. Lalique Rêve d’Infini is a scent for the season. $125 at neimanmarcus.com. 6. Sevda London’s silk British Tulip Garden scarf in violet. $270 at sevdalondon.com. 7. Ella McHugh’s Corinne II Cloud clutch in white, blue, and gray python. $1,595 at ellamchugh.com.

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1. The best gift an avid golfer could ask for is a few rounds on Teeth of the Dog. As a bonus, it’s never winter at Casa de Campo, so play on: casadecampo.com.do. 2. Circa-1970 necklace in coral, onyx, boar tusks, and diamonds, from Eleuteri. $26,000: 646.649.5769. 3. Lifesaver frames by MYKITA for Morgenthal Frederics in patented unbreakable Mylon technology. $695 per pair: 212.966.0099. 4. Glass dome paperweight over hand-engraved owl motif from Connor. $95 at Barneys New York. 5. Creme Cycles’ Caferacer Doppio in red, handmade in Poland. $1,299.99 at mikesbikes.com. 6. Manolo Blahnik’s Ligurta heel. $745 at Neiman Marcus. 7. Original Moustache Bubble Umbrella in bright coral from Hunter. $60 at us.hunterboots.com.

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1. 12 years does the trick with Dewar’s 12 Blended Scotch Whisky. $29.99. 2. Spruce up your bar cart with the Snowe Spirits Decanter. $50 at snowehome.com.

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3. Layer in luxury with James Purdey & Sons’ 100% finely knitted cashmere v-neck sweaters. $365 at purdey.com. 4. Stubbs & Wootton’s Epaulet slipper in burgundy velvet. $495 at stubbsandwootton.com. 5. Manolo Costa’s limitededition ’70s-inspired shearling coat is as warm as it is chic. $3,995: 212.889.2625. 6. Frank Clegg python travel duffel in cognac. $3,000 at frankcleggleatherworks.com. 7. Smythson’s handsome Maddox 6 card wallet in lambskin with contrasting panels. $335 at smythson.com.

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3 1. The limited-edition Patek Philippe Ref. 5711/1P Nautilus in platinum marks the 40th anniversary of the Nautilus. $113,400 at patek.com. 2. When it comes to holiday travel, trust National Car Rental: nationalcar.com. 3. Vilebrequin’s Atlas snow sweater makes après-ski fun. $200 at vilebrequin.com. 4. Modern tailoring and luxury fabrics define every Jeffrey Rüdes design: jeffreyrudes.com. 5. Hit the links with Johnnie-O’s golf bag with stand. $150 at johnnie-o.com. 6. With a supercharged V6 engine and floating roofline, the technologically advanced Jaguar XJ is the pinnacle of sports sedans.

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From $74,400: visit jaguarusa.com. 7. Harry’s shave set with 18-kt. rose gold–plated razor. $95 at Barneys New York.

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1. Start your day with Bodum’s Eileen white French press coffeemaker. $40 at crateandbarrel.com. 2. Moroccan Frost Tray by artist Dawn Sweitzer, available at the Store at MAD. $208: thestore.madmuseum.org. 3. Michael Aram special-edition chess set in oxidized nickelplate and marble. $1,800: 212.242.4219. 4. White glazed Nancy porcelain clay freeform bowl. $495 at Jennifer Garrigues, Inc.:

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561.659.7085. 5. Perfect to mix or match: the all-new cut-crystal Nachtmann Highland tumblers in aqua, smoke, amber, and reseda (green). $19.90 each: riedelusa.net. 6. The Umbria vase in deep indigo from Calvin Klein Home comes in 8-, 10-, and 12-inches. $350–650: Calvin Klein Collection, 212.292.9000.

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AUDREY GRUSS PHOTOGRAPHED BY HARRY BENSON

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THE REAL ESTATE ISSUE

GENEVIEVE BAHRENBURG IN RALPH LAUREN

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$5.00 SEPTEMBER 2016

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$5.00 OCTOBER 2016

$5.00 FEBRUARY 2016

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¡HOLA MIAMI!

KATHERINE PARKER-MAGYAR, PATRICK MCGOWAN, PAIGE CORBIN, WESLEY WYNNE, ALEXANDRA PORTER, AND JOANNA SCHOLTZ IN GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT questmag.com

THE SUMMER ISSUE

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NICOLE HANLEY MELLON ABOARD SUKANIA IN ST. BARTH’S

FALL FASHION ISSUE

THE DOWNTOWN ISSUE

$5.00 JULY 2016

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ELYSEE MIAMI OVERLOOKING THE SHORE OF BISCAYNE BAY

$5.00 DECEMBER 2015

ARIANA ROCKEFELLER IN VALENTINO AT GRAND CENTRAL FARM questmag.com

MINNIE CUSHING AT BAILEY’S BEACH, NEWPORT, RI, BY SLIM AARONS, 1965

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

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ALLISON ASTON ON LOWER FIFTH AVENUE IN RALPH LAUREN CASHMERE questmag.com

THE WEDDING ISSUE CAMILLA BRADLEY AND JOSEPH ALEXANDER BARDENHEIER IV, IN BIG SKY, MONTANA

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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6 1. Cozy up by the fire for the perfect holiday getaway at Rhode Island’s 5-star, 5-diamond Ocean House: oceanhouseri.com. 2. Personalized notecards in sets of 50 by Thornwillow Press: $285 or $385 (with return address), at thornwillow.com. 3. J.McLaughlin has your festive threads: his Nathan sweater ($145) and Earl pant ($235), her Catalyst dress ($215) and Valerie clutch ($198). 4. Leica’s D-Lux now comes packaged in an Explorer Kit, with auto lens cap and red cotton strap. $1,145 at us.leica-camera.com. 5. Brora’s cashmere guazy stripe scarf. $195: brorausa.com. 6. Protect your lips the natural way with John Masters Organics Lip Calm Collection. $22 at johnmasters.com. 92 QUEST


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1. Uenai Couture’s Tribe skirt ($125) and hand-quilted Gold Fly jacket ($250), at uenaicouture.com. 2. Yikes Twins cotton terry dog slippers. $28 at Barneys New York. 3. Carry all your kids’ needs with California Baby’s Eucalyptus Ease Tote. $24.99: californiababy.com. 4. Burt’s Bees Baby reversible kids hoodie. $29.95: burtsbeesbaby.com. 5. Zuny faux-leather dachsund bookends. $134 at Barneys New York. 6. The Little Mermaid (Louisiana Museum of Modern Art) by Hans Christian Andersen & Yayoi Kusama. $45: artbook.com. 7. RH Baby

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& Child vintage army plane scoot. $189: rhbabyandchild.com. 8. Oscar de la Renta’s Fair Isle sweater ($175), velvet short ($125), and ribbed tights ($60), at oscardelarenta.com.

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QUEST HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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QUEST 2 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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1. James Taffin de Givenchy’s high-jewel creations are on display in Taffin (Rizzoli). $150. 2. The Impossible Collection of Wine (Assouline) culls the 20th century’s greatest vintages. $845. 3. The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Masterpiece Paintings (Skira Rizzoli). $75. 4. James Stourton delivers the definitive biography of the brilliant title polymath in Kenneth Clark: Life, Art, and Civilization (Knopf). $35. 5. Taste la dolce vita in Gelasio Gaetani d’Aragona Lovatelli’s The Italian Dream: Wine, Heritage, Soul (Assouline). $85. 6. Brian Van Flandern’s Tequlia Cocktails (Assouline). $50. 7. The Smithsonian’s History of America in 101 Objects (Penguin) is a journey through America’s collective memory. $35. 8. Bob Eckstein’s Footnotes from the World’s Greatest

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Bookstores (Clarkson Potter) invites us into the heart of communities—bookstores. $22.


OUT NOW

GIVING

THE NEW FRAGRANCE BY MEERA GANDHI

AVAILABLE AT: WWW.GIVINGBACKFRAGRANCE.COM, THE FOUNDATION WEBSITE: WWW.GIVINGBACKFOUNDATION.NET AND AT PRIVATE EVENTS


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1. Rolex’s 28-mm. Oyster Perpetual Lady-Datejust with 18-kt. yellow gold fluted bezel and Oyster bracelet. $8,500: rolex.com for retailers. 2. For the opera buff: Met gold chain opera glasses from the Met Opera gift shop. $55: metoperashop.org. 3. Brittany evening bag by Hayden Lasher. $1,300 at haydenlasher.com. 4. Shake things up with the gold pig snowglobe from CB2. $19.95: cb2.com. 5. Vhernier’s Giunco cuff in 18-kt. gold and diamonds.

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$70,100 each: 783 Madison Ave. 6. The metallic Midinette slipper from Belgian Shoes in gold and silver. $390: 110 E. 55th St. 7. Charlotte Kellogg handwoven silk evening jacket. $750: charlottekellogg.com.

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2 1. Phoung Dang’s “Untamed” eau de parfum with notes of honey, cedarwood, and vanilla. $650 at Barneys New York. 2. The Instax Mini70 camera ($149) with gold chain strap ($28) from Michael Kors, at michaelkors.com. 3. Robert Mondavi’s Private Selection Bourbon Barrel–Aged Cabernet Sauvignon uses the Southern tradition of bourbon aging for an incredibly bold Cabernet expression. $13.99: robertmondaviwinery.com. 4. Escada’s leather belt with glass embellishment. $695: escada.com. 5. Box of 5 mini candles from diptyque. $78 for set: diptyqueparis.com. 6. Marisa Witkin’s open-sleeve cableknit sweater ($2,200) and high-waisted wool trouser ($990), at marisawitkin.com. 7. Golkonda’s Open Flower ring. $2,500 at golkonda.com.

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6 3 1. ASHA by Ashley McCormick’s Waverly tote in navy. $395 at ashabyadm.com. 2. Escape to AAA Five Diamond luxury at Tortuga Bay Puntacana Resort & Club in the Dominican Republic: tortugabayhotel.com. 3. The Peabody Pines Playing Cards can be personalized with zip code, initial, or monogram. $75 at pickettspress.com. 4. Tutti Frutti Art Deco cuff by Kenneth Jay Lane. $500 at kennethjaylane.com. 5. Rescue your locks with Fekkai’s PrX Reparatives Instant Repair Leave-In Conditioner. $20 at fekkai.com. 6. Jimmy Choo’s silk and wool scarf in blue. $465 at us.jimmychoo.com. 7. Filling Pieces’ pink and gray leather sneakers. $250 at Barneys New York.

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Samson

Because every animal deserves a second chance.

Buttons

Happy

Donate today at PeggyAdams.org/donate Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League 3200 N Military Trail West Palm Beach, FL 33409 561-472-8842


BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER NO ONE KNOWS GSTAAD better than Taki Theodoracopulos,

who has spent every winter in Gstaad from the age of eight years old to nearly eighty! Many consider Taki to be one of the last great playboys, from a Camelot era of chivalry and manners. Taki’s background brims with such intrigue and glamour that one might think it was written about a fictionalized James Bond character rather than a real person. The grandson of a former prime minister of Greece and the heir to a shipping fortune, Taki boasts a host of achievements: he’s been a member of the Greek Davis Cup team, a former captain of the Greek karate team, an Olympic tennis player, and the oldest life member of Gstaad’s exclusive Eagle Ski Club (which he joined in 1958). Taki is also an accomplished journalist, having written for National Review, London Spectator, the London Sunday Times, Esquire Magazine, 100 QUEST

Vanity Fair, the New York Press, and Quest, among other publications. In 2002, he founded The American Conservative with Pat Buchanan and Scott McConnell. Taki is currently the publisher of British magazine Right Now! and writes for Taki’s Magazine, described as a libertarian webzine of “politics and culture.” It’s little wonder, then, that Taki’s daughter, Mandolyna, is also intimately familiar with Gstaad. She started her career as a writer for Hamptons magazine, has written for Gstaad Life, and is the Editor of Taki’s Magazine. She is also a full-time interior designer, decorating private homes for young executives in the film and music industries. Mandolyna recently wrote a stunning book, In the Spirit of Gstaad (Assouline), the photos of which accompany this article. She dedicated the book appropriately to her dear and daring father. u

T H I S PA G E : CO U RTE S Y 1 6 B A R R E S TAU R A N T. O P P O S I TE PA G E : CO U RT E S Y O F G S TA A D PA L AC E .

IN THE SPIRIT OF GSTAAD


This page: Green Go nightclub at the Gstaad Palace, 1971. Opposite page: The sunterrace at the Bergrestaurant Wasserngrat.


102 QUEST O P P O S I TE PA G E : © D U K A S / TO P F OTO

T H I S PA G E : U N I V E R S A L / R E X / S H U T T E R S TO C K ;


This page: Brigitte Bardot and her husband, Gunther Sachs, walk their dog through the streets of Gstaad, 1967. Opposite page: Audrey Hepburn starring in Charade, 1963.


F R E I , H OTE L B E R N E R H O F, G S TA A D ; G E T T Y.

G S TA A D S A A N E N L A N D TO U R I S M U S ; T H O M A S


CO U RTE S Y 1 6 B A R R E S TAU R A N T; CO U RT E S Y

G S TA A D L I F E ; CO U RT E S Y G S TA A D PA L AC E .

This page, top to bottom: A view from the Bergrestaurant Wasserngrat; Taki Theodoracopulos and his wife, Alexandra, in Gstaad photographed by Raphael Faux; A bedroom at Gstaad’s 5 star Palace Hotel. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Swiss cows drinking from the trough on the Gstaad high street; An alpine view of Gstaad during Spring; the book cover of In the Spirit of Gstaad (Assouline); Jackie Kennedy sledding with her daughter, Caroline, during a family trip to Gstaad, 1966.


Vincent Astor

Helen Astor

INTIMATE MEMORIES OF FERNCLIFF B Y D A V I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A I RECENTLY ACQUIRED a wonderful new book called, Our Time at Foxhollow Farm: A Hudson Valley Family Remembered by David Byars. This remarkable book is made up entirely of photographs taken by Tracy Dows, the man who built the farm at the beginning of the 20th century. In his serious avocation, Dows recorded with his camera not only his beautiful property but those who lived and visited there—including Thomas Wolfe, who wrote his Look Homeward, Angel while staying as a guest there. Dows also documented his neighbors’ estates, including Springwood (and its family, the Roosevelts) as well as Ferncliff: the Astor family’s property that functioned as the destination for Astor scions right up through the last of them, Vincent Astor. 106 QUEST

Vincent Astor and Helen Dinsmore Huntington married on April 30, 1914, at Hopeland House, the Staatsburg, New York, estate of her mother and father, overlooking the Hudson River. The bride was 21 and the groom, whom she had known all her life, would be 23 on his birthday on November 15. The New York Times reported that the wedding of Huntington and “the richest young American” was held in the “utmost simplicity and informality.” The guests included only immediate relatives and a few intimate friends, numbering about 50 (with 1,800 wedding announcements to be mailed the next day). Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Tracy Dows of Foxhollow Farm. Dows photographed the wedding of his friends.


Ferncliff in Rhinebeck, New York

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

“The Huntington dogs, about 10 of them, all pets of the bride, were let loose from their kennels... Their collars adorned with streamers of white satin ribbon.” The occasion was held in the “strictest privacy,” the Times also reported, with guards “posted at the several entrances to the Huntington estate” so that no one could gain admittance except those “whose credentials were unquestioned.” It was also reported that the groom had had a recent illness, although “guests saw nothing to indicate that Mr. Astor had just passed through a serious illness” except for his “certain pallor.” (Years later, it was claimed that he had had the mumps which had made him sterile and unable to father children.) Alice Astor’s third husband, David Pleydell-Bouverie, once described his brother-in-law, Vincent, as “low voltage” sexually. The only “unusual feature” of the day was “when all the Huntington dogs, about 10 of them, all pets of the bride, were let loose from their kennels, after a morning of mysterious imprisonment to them, and allowed to enter the house. Their collars [...] adorned with streamers of white satin ribbon.” They ranted down the long room, “never pausing until they found their mistress, who welcomed them in her bridal finery.” It may have been the highlight of the bride’s day.

It was an early afternoon wedding with the bride and groom leaving under a hail “of rice and old slippers” at 4:30 p.m., when “they were whirled away in a closed motor through a rear exit from the estate to the state road on their way to Ferncliffe [sic], Mr. Astor’s estate at Rhinebeck, New York, where they will remain until Mr. Astor has entirely recovered.” What may have looked to an outsider like an ideal marriage would last 26 years, although the majority of those years the couple tended to live separately—he in one place, she in another. In the last decade of the marriage, he spent most of his time with his mistress, Minnie Cushing, whom he married right after his divorce from Helen. It was said of his marriage to Helen that young Astor was anxious to cement his relationship with the bride’s father, whom he admired as a “father figure.” In the early days of their marriage, they were living in an environment that was familiar and comfortable to both, surrounded by family (hers) and friends who are portrayed by Dows’ photographs in Our Time at Foxhollow Farm. Wintertime meant the pleasures of snow DECEMBER 2016 107


lanes and sleighs and horses to ride them. Then came the holidays, which were festive and, thanks to Helen, with family. This was the only real comforting experience that Vincent ever had with family. Throughout his childhood, both his father and mother were absent much of the time. When his mother was present, she was volatile and could be coldly cruel to the boy who recalled and recounted some of her maternal antics many times for the rest of his life. Three years after Vincent’s birth, the young couple moved into a Richard Morris Hunt–designed Italianate double mansion at 840 Fifth Avenue (at 65th Street, where Temple Emanu-El stands today). When the little boy was taken by his father to see the excavations, which filled the 10,000-square-foot lot, and was told that this was where he would one day live, he

This page, clockwise from top left: Helen Huntington Astor in her horsedrawn sleigh, preparing to visit her sister-in-law, Alice Astor Obelensky, on another part of the estate; Serge Obelensky, who remained friends with Vincent Astor long after Alice Astor divorced him (for years, he ran the St. Regis Hotel); Helen, out on the property with one of her dogs. 108 QUEST

became hysterical: he thought he was going to have to live in a hole in the ground. In a way, he wasn’t that far off the mark. Vincent was often alone in the huge house, except for the 20 servants. His earliest memory (which was recounted many times, even to people he’d only just met) was from age four in 1896. His nurse had brushed his curls and dressed him in a sailor suit, which was the fashion for the little princes of Edith Wharton’s New York. She then took the boy by his tiny hand and walked him down the grand marble staircase to the drawing room, where his mother was taking tea with her lady friends. As he entered the enormous room with its gilded, pale green boiserie off-setting the works by Rosa Bonheur and William-Adolphe Bouguereau, its wide, tall windows overlooking the newly paved Fifth Avenue, his nurse nudged the shy, little child toward his mother. Ava Willing Astor—a tiny yet legendary Edwardian beauty who was still in her early twenties, boasting perfectly coiffed hair and a pink and porcelain complexion while being ever bejeweled, cinch-waisted, and perfectly coutured—took one look with eyes blazing and, rolling her “Rs” (as was her affectation), shrilled: “He looks too frrrrrightful! Take him away!” And the child was removed. Humiliation is perceived early on, and its mark is left and rarely ever forgotten. A second clearer and often repeated memory of Vincent was of the day when his mother, who was in her dressing room and preparing to go out for the day, shoved him into a closet and locked the door to get him out of her hair. (She was already habitually annoyed by her child’s presence.) She then promptly left and forgot she’d left him there. When the child realized he was trapped in the dark, he started shouting and kicking and beating on the door with his tiny fists and feet. But it was to no avail: No one in the vast house could hear him. He remained there for hours, long after the unheard screams had turned to tears, and the tears to whimpering. When John Jacob Astor IV died in the sinking of the Titanic in April 1912, he left an estate reported to be several billions in today’s currency. His son was almost the sole heir. At age 20,


Vincent Astor now owned whole blocks of business property in the Wall Street area and in the Broadway area as well as on 14th, 15th, 26th, 33rd, 34th, 42nd, 43rd, and 44th streets and all the way up on 150th Street. He inherited the land on which the Empire State Building would be built, four hotels (including the St. Regis), entire blocks of apartment houses (including The Apthorp at 79th Street and Broadway, which is still standing), hundreds of tenements and warehouses, and dozens of raw acreage on the Upper East and Upper West sides of Manhattan and into the Bronx. He was also proprietor of the 3,000-acre Ferncliff in Rhinebeck; the oceanfront cottage; Beechwood, in Newport, Rhode Island; and two yachts, the Noma and the Nourmahal. When his father was alive in the first decade of the 20th century, the Astor estate owned hundreds of acres around Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens (in Astoria) that, today, would be worth in the hundreds of billions. The Ferncliff estate was originally acquired in 1858 by Vincent’s great-grandfather, William B. Astor, the eldest son of the original John Jacob Astor. The main house was built in 1860 by his son William B. Astor, Jr., father of John Jacob Astor IV and grandfather of the new groom. All three loved the property all their lives. Coincidentally, none of their wives liked it, and avoided it as much as possible. That said, it may have been somewhat different for Helen because she, like her husband, had lived in the area since childhood. In 1902, Colonel Astor had built a large playhouse known as the casino not far from the main house. The architect was Stanford White. The inspiration was the Grand Trianon at Versailles. It was a private athletic facility with an indoor tennis court, squash quarts, a bowling alley, a barbershop, and arguably the first private indoor swimming pool in America. It was really like a private men’s club, where women were allowed. When Vincent inherited it, he changed very little. When his sister Alice married her first husband, Prince Serge Obelensky, her brother gave her 500 acres of the property and, on it, built her a rambling stone mansion.

This page, clockwise from top left: Helen, admiring the flowers in the garden; Vincent and Helen playing tennis indoors at the casino with Alice and another friend; Friends enjoying the indoor pool of the casino; outside the casino, which Minnie later turned into a private residence to replace the original mansion. DECEMBER 2016 109


Vincent was fond of trains and built three-quarters of a mile of tracks on the property for a miniature train that was equipped to carry up to 20 passengers. He later duplicated the train and rails at his house in Bermuda. He also had an elaborate system of electric toy trains in his Manhattan apartment, which he often played with after dinner. He also kept his yacht, the Nourmahal, as well as a large motorboat anchored at the river’s edge. In the first two decades of the 20th century, cars were still referred to as “motors” or “machines.” Vincent loved race cars and would race them on his mile-long driveway, winding through the property. At one time, he kept 30 cars in his garage in Ferncliff. He preferred to be called “V. A.” and had vanity plates on his cars: VA 1, VA 2, VA 3, etc. He rode around New York in a nine-passenger, custom-built limousine with an especially high roof (so that he could wear his top hat when seated) and a chrome likeness of a penguin on the tip of the hood. He had a whimsical fixation when it came to penguins and he decorated the family coat of arms, his planes, his trains, his matchbooks, his stationery, and even his bespoke cigarettes (which he chain-smoked at the rate of 50 per day) with the image of a penguin. He loved planes and bought his first plane, an amphibian, in 1915, when he was 24. For the rest of his life, he commuted up the Hudson River and elsewhere with his own pilots. His greatest boyhood romantic love was the sea. In the mid-1920s, he profited from his investment of the original MGM film of Ben-Hur (1925), which was the most expensive silent film ever made—it was between $4 and $6 million. He commissioned a new Nour110 QUEST

mahal, featuring 264 feet, with 11 staterooms, a library, a dining room for 18, a special operating room in case of emergencies, and cabins for all the officers of the 42-man crew. It had a cruising range of 20,000 miles. Vincent and guests would cross the Atlantic Ocean and travel the world, often for months at a time. Sometimes, he would play host to the man he most admired in the world: his Dutchess County neighbor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, whose half-brother, James Roosevelt, Jr., was married to Vincent’s aunt Helen Schermerhorn Astor, making them half cousins. After F.D.R. was elected president, Vincent put the Nourmahal at his disposal. When the United States entered World War II, he turned it over to the U.S. Navy. By the time he was in his thirties, people who knew him socially referred to him as “Ghastly” Astor, among other names, while making faces behind his back. He was, to many, like a spoiled child with a gruff voice and without a scintilla of charm. He had a predilection for practical jokes and would go to great effort and expense to play them on unwitting victims. A favorite involved hiring an actor to pose as a waiter, spill soup on a chosen guest, and then insult him, which drove the guest into a rage. (It may have been pretty funny if the guest was enough of a stuffed shirt.) Victims, however, found it obnoxious at best. Others felt like slugging him. But they didn’t, and they wouldn’t—partly because he never chose a victim more hapless than himself. He was strange, but not consciously cruel. Mostly, he escaped massive retaliation because he was Vincent Astor, as royal as a New Yorker could be; he owned the town.


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

During the Second World War, when he was married to Minnie, he gave permission to his wife to have the main house that his grandfather had built demolished. It was old, out of style, and she hated it. When Vincent returned from his service and saw the land now empty yet with its stone entrance steps still there, he felt as if he were looking at his grave. The casino was revamped so that they could live there. Vincent continued to use Ferncliff for the rest of his life, leaving it to his third wife, Brooke, who sold the land holding the casino and donated the other part of the land to conservation. That was a century after the first William B. Astor acquired it. One hundred years later, nearly all of the Hudson River Valley real estate has been sold, broken up, or reduced in size in the hands of new people. The society that acquired, built on, and celebrated its beauty and their personal luxury had disappeared from the scene, also. u This page, above: The wedding of Alice Huntington Marshall to Buddy

Pictures courtesy of the Dows Collection, from Our Time at Foxhollow Farm by David Byars (State University of New York Press).

Marshall. Later, Buddy would become the second husband of Brooke Kuser— who went on to marry Vincent Astor and become Brooke Astor. DECEMBER 2016 111


SHOOTING HISTORY B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY BENSON

THERE ARE FEW people who can say “I was there” as often as Harry Benson, and the best part is, he has the pictures to prove it. Introduced to fame as the man who shot the Beatles’ first tour in America, the Scottish shutterbug has been capturing extraordinary moments of history throughout his life. It’s his combination of charm and honesty—as well as a quick trigger finger—which makes everyone from royalty to reclusive ge112 QUEST

niuses feel like they can trust him to reveal something true and intimate. Benson’s unflinching eye also captured incisive photojournalism and shocking instances like Robert F. Kennedy’s assasination. On December 9, these iconic stories will be shared with the world in a new documentary, Harry Benson: Shoot First, about the 86-year-old photographer who can claim to have seen it all—and have the statement ring true. u


This page: In 1984, Harry Benson caught the glamorous Nancy and President Ronald Reagan dancing, proving that theirs was a true White House love story. Opposite page: Paul McCartney palling around with his friend Benson on the road in 1976.


This page: Benson was behind the scenes on the Beatles’ first appearance on the Ed Sullivan show on February 9, 1964, which is considered the beginning of the British Invasion in music (above); Dolly Parton’s famous silhouette tells a story of its own, 1976 (left). Opposite page: A young Kate Moss was already a star in 1993, but this iconic photograph taken by Benson in Paris helped solidfy her reputation as one of the greats.


DECEMBER 2016 115


This page: “The Hardest Working Man In Show Business” James Brown performing for the camera and friends in Augusta, 1979 (above); two fresh-faced young men, Benson and John Lennon, who don’t yet know what incredible wonders the world has in store for them, January 1964 (below).


This page, clockwise from above : Princess Caroline of Hanover, the eldest child of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, and American actress Grace Kelly, 1986; a beautiful smile from Jacqueline Kennedy in London, 1962, shows the First Lady at her most stylish and vibrant; in 1976, Benson captured with his lens the reclusive Greta Garbo swimming at Antigua, in the Carribean seas. “Garbo didn’t even know I was there.”


DAVID MONN’S MASTER TOUCH

BRIAN DORSEY

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


FOR 12 YEARS, David Monn’s magical way of seeing the world has brought beauty to hundreds of clients through his eventplanning firm here in New York City. A state dinner at the White House, a Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Gala, once-in-a-lifetime birthday celebrations—every lucky guest knows there aren’t many parties quite like a David Monn party. Once dubbed the “architect of style,” Monn uses sound, sight, scent, touch, and taste to design events that, according to him, are meant to be “shared, lived, and felt” by everyone there. A new book, David Monn: The Art of Celebrating (The Vendome Press), invites readers to experience 26 fabulous events created and orchestrated by the master himself. On the heels of the book’s publication, Quest sat down to talk with Monn about his career, the events that have defined him, and how we can all improve upon our holiday entertaining. DANIEL CAPPELLO: How did your career come to be? DAVID MONN: I have always known my calling is to take a space and make it beautiful. I have always been attracted to good design; in fact, I originally began my career wanting to be the next best fashion designer. I soon found out I was not so good at that, so I switched to interior design and really enjoyed that process. As life often takes off in different directions, I left interior design to help grow a jewelry business into a multimillion-dollar company. I left that environment and wanted This spread: Event designer David Monn, the so-called “architect of style,” sets an elegant table for dinner. Monn stresses the importance, in everything one does, of his three favorite words: authenticity, scale, and detail.


This spread: A winter wedding at the Pierre Hotel with centerpieces of painted-gray fruit made to look like bisque and brilliant crystal-blossomed trees.

120 QUEST


LY N N S AV E R E S E


This page: To evoke the season, Monn used a white weather balloon and branches in a snowy winter landscape illuminated by candlelight (above); the cover of David Monn: The Art of Celebrating (The Vendome Press), with more than 200 never-before-seen photographs of some of Monn’s most celebrated events, meant to inspire and guide readers (inset). Opposite page: Frosted fruit makes a stunning central focus for a dinner table at a winter party.

DC: What was your “break-out” moment? DM: That would have been designing the opening of the Time Warner Center in 2004. DC: What do you love most about your job? DM: I love the creative process with the client: imagining what the experience should be for them and their guests, how to tell their story, and, of course, the design. DC: Can you walk us through how you plan an event? DM: It all begins with authenticity. We like to focus on stories that are true to the client, space, corporation, not-for-profit organization, etc. What I mean by that is, if someone comes to our office to design an event by a theme that has nothing to do with their actual life or company branding, we want to steer them in the direction of what inspires them and what gives them real joy—then build from that. 122 QUEST

DC: What’s your most memorable event? DM: My time working in the White House was the most memorable. Because it was about something far greater—it was a level of entertaining that represented our country. DC: Any tricks of the trade for us at home? DM: Use the seasons—the flowers in season, colors found outside your window—to inspire design. Also, massive amounts of candlelight! DC: Can you tell us a little about your upcoming holiday projects and products? DM: I am so excited to have been a part of a collaboration with Bergdorf Goodman on their first-floor interior holiday decor. I have also partnered with Home Shopping Network and launched a line of holiday entertaining items. DC: In the spirit of the season, is there any advice you can offer on how to make holiday parties and family dinners more special? DM: At the conclusion of my holiday dinners, we say what each person is thankful for. (Have the tissues on hand.) u

RO B E RT B LO O M ; B R I A N D O R S E Y

to pursue creativity again. The first party I planned was the wedding of my best friend Gayfryd Steinberg’s stepdaughter Laura Steinberg to Stafford Broumand.


THE ART OF WINDOW DISPLAY BY KATE GUBELMANN

IS IT VISIONS OF SUGAR PLUMS or a sighting of a bedecked storefront that gives you the thought that Santa is readying his sleigh? When the Christmas tree gets lighted at Rockefeller Center, the department stores trim their windows and the excitement of the season begins. The invention of large paned glass in the 19th century, coupled with Edison’s invention of the electric light in the 1880s, created an innovative opportunity for the newly developed department stores. Their decorated storefronts became both advertising and entertainment to the passerby. L. Frank Baum, a theatrical man most noted for his Wizard of Oz series, was the first president of the National Association of Window Trimmers. He considered this newly developed craft a “business window:” a presentation created to draw in a potential buyer. These stores employed artists and technicians to create magic, and nothing was more spellbinding than what was conjured up for Christmas. Mechanical animals, Santas in grottos, and circus figures were used to delight generations of parents and children as they toured the Christmas sights. Perhaps these windows became a precursor to television, as people would stare into a giant boxed store window of fantastic entertainment. In 1939, Bonwit Teller (no longer existing on 57th street) 124 QUEST

hired the Surrealist Salvador Dali to visually excite potential customers. He overachieved this with his interpretation of “Day” and “Night.” These windows were considered too risqué for the Bonwit clientele, and, unbeknownst to Dali, changes were made to conform to the norm. The artist could not accept the revision, reviled at “having my name associated with typical window dressing,” and created a stir, which resulted in jail. A lesser sentence for disorderly conduct was given and a performance artist was made. Bonwit Teller continued the trend to hire artists for window installations. By 1955, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, calling themselves Matson Jones, used cyanotypes, as well as their personal work, as backdrops for displays. James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol trimmed windows, too, but Bonwit closed in 1979, ending the store’s more avant-garde view. Gene Moore, who worked at Bonwits before his 39 year career at Tiffany’s, continued the high quality of window dressing. His holiday designs had most viewers wishing that Santa would bring them that diamond bracelet so artfully displayed. Robert Ruffino, who began his career at Henri Bendel’s, came to Tiffany’s after Moore. His idea was to create a storyline that made people dream. These windows were designed to


This page: In New York City, at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street, the corner made famous by Tiffany & Co.’s flagship store, designers prepare for the annual unveiling of windows that marks the start of the gift-giving season. Opposite page, from left: Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns called themselves Matson Jones when designing Bonwit Teller’s holiday windows; Salvador Dali setting up his own display, which he later destroyed; one of Rauschenberg’s windows for Tiffany’s.


126 QUEST

have the response of awe and WOW that became a sort of a Christmas card to the world, delighting the eye with vignettes of “could be…” Simon Doonan, renowned creator at Barney’s, looked at trends for inspiration. Early to see the public’s fascination with personalities, he fashioned windows about Cher, Celebrity Chefs, Warhol, (“Have a WarHOLIDAY”), and contemporary topics like ecological sustainability. As he says, he was more about the carney: creating attention to bring in the costumers to hawk the wares. Today, David Hoey and his crew at Bergdorf Goodman are continuing the tradition of delighting the crowds with elaborate high camp feats of artistry. This year’s “Destination Extraordinary” has taken a year to achieve. His seven-person staff increases to 100 of freelance artists, technicians, and fabricators. A large collaborative effort of artisans give the passerby the awe, the hopes, the dreams, and the joy the season can bring. Today, we have evolved into a world where people tend to look at their phone as they walk down the street. The Internet has changed the way we shop. Perhaps the heyday of window dressing has passed, but if we can’t get nostalgic at holiday time, when Santa can make a dream come true, and there is magic on display in every window, then when can we? u


This page, clockwise from top left: A snowy winter wonderland from Bergdorf Goodman; Lady Gaga’s boudoir fantasy decorates Barney’s; a vintage Lord and Taylor window reflects the style women used to don; one of Simon Doonan’s celebrity-inspired windows, with musician Prince as the centerpiece; the Christmas decor that decorated Saks Fifth Avenue in 1940. Opposite page: An early holiday window, then filled with simpler (and Santa-ier) designs, delighted passers-by (above); now, the scenes are more dramatic to grab the modern pedestrian’s eye (below).


128 QUEST


QUEST ARCHIVE: DECEMBER 2004


Vienna to Versailles International Red Cross Ball February 4, 2017 The Mar-a-Lago Club Palm Beach, Florida

White-tie and tails. Diamond tiaras. Couture gowns. As one of the most anticipated social events of the year, the International Red Cross Ball promises an enchanting evening with classic entertainment, global diplomats, and an elite guest list. The magnificence and formality of the evening honor the importance and significance of the cause it grandly supports: the American Red Cross.


Brownie McLean, who attended more than fifty Red Cross Balls—starting with the first Red Cross Ball in 1957.

“It was a very exclusive event, always beautifully and elegantly done, and invitations were much sought after. Marjorie Post, Mary Sanford, Theresa Anderson, Marylou Whitney and all the other top ladies 'dressed to the nines' (I wore Lanvin for some years, as I recall ) and got their tiaras and other major jewels out of the vault for the occasion.” —Mrs. John R. “Brownie” McLean


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C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y; CO U RT E S Y O F H I LLWO O D E S TAT E , M U S E U M & G A R D E N S ( M M P )

Marjorie Merriweather Post

Retrospective: International Red Cross Ball PALM BEACH IS RENOWNED as the home of the world’s most prom-

inent families and titans of industry, featuring a social season replete with legendary galas. In 1957, dignitaries and socialites first gathered in a glittering ball room at the behest of Marjorie Merriweather Post to support her favorite charity, the American Red Cross. Post brought down ambassadors from Washington and filled the guest list with social register names. Post was known for her humanity as well as for her impeccable style and grace, so it is no wonder that the Red Cross Ball had become one of the most coveted invitations in Palm Beach. Six decades after the Red Cross Ball was founded, the charity’s chairwomen continue to embrace the famed generosity of Palm Beach philanthropists for their mission. It is an evening that is meant to be as much about atelier as it is about altruism. Women like Estée Lauder, Mary Sanford, and Rose Kennedy were among the names who would don their finest gowns in a fabled time of elbow gloves and sartorial splendor. In 1967, the event entered an era of international importance as Fay Lavan, then Palm Beach Red Cross chair, made the evening about diamonds as well as diplomats by introducing the first "ambassadorial procession," which to this day is the grand kick-off to the ball. During the Richard Nixon administration, meticulously dressed ambassadors and their spouses would attend bedecked in tiaras, whitetie, and medals—including U.S. Ambassador to Denmark Guilford Dudley and his lovely wife, Jane Dudley, who graced the red carpet wearing a diamond replica of the taira that Napoleon had given to Josephine. Year after year, these balls ushered in success for the cause. Throngs of famous guests, including Lyn Revson and Palm Beach doyenne Brownie McLean, ventured from across the globe, cutting an elegant figure in couture.

As with any undertaking, any great success comes with great vision and the Palm Beach Red Cross has been fortunate to have many diligent and inventive chairs at the helm of its committee. The woman to hold that title the longest was the late Listerine heiress, Sue Whitmore. The effervescent hostess treated the world’s elite to many unforgettable nights in the Venetian Ballroom at the Breakers, from 1963 until 1993. In 1980, she was once notably escorted by the legendary actor, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Bernd Lempke (formerly of the Breakers and now the managing director of Mar-a-Lago) collaborated with Whitmore for almost all of the Red Cross Balls she chaired. He remembers Whitmore fondly: “The planning of the Red Cross Ball at the Breakers was always a memorable occasion due in part to her organizational skills and decisiveness. I was so impressed by her exacting nature. She actually brought her own crystal and gold candelabra to go with the red and gold tablecloths. Working with her was a distinct pleasure.” The end of the century saw several new chairmen who aimed to continue the tradition of glamourous balls, international coalitions, and millions raised for the mission. In the mid-1990s, publishing heiress and four-time chairwoman, Betty Scripps, reached out to friends across the pond to secure the presence of a British Red Cross chairwoman, Angela, Countess of Limerick, as well as Princess Jeanne de Chantal of France. Guests wore tiaras, including Marylou Whitney, who wore a tiara that belonged to Empress Elisabeth of Austria. And most of "embassy row" danced to the likes of Vic Damone and Peter Duchin. Even in the 1990s, when the extravagance that defined the 1980s went by the wayside, the Red Cross Ball still strived to hold the torch first lit by the grand balls of Europe. Over the years, movie stars like Arlene Dahl and many celebrities have graced the red carpet alongside the ambassadors.


Patrick Park

Janet Cafaro

When Mr. and Mrs. William D. Rollnick chaired the 50th Red Cross Ball, Nancy Rollnick wore a specially designed tiara from David Morris International and danced on the arm of actor Pierce Brosnan. Most recently, philanthropist and Red Cross Ball Chair Patrick Park honored the likes of William Shatner, Shirley MacLaine, and Wayne Newton. His theme of “Around the World in 80 Days” highlighted the ball's notable connection to the diplomatic community. The Red Cross Ball has seen many themes and even more celebrities, but its 60th anniversary calls for a truly unique sense of occasion and a creative vision from the chairmen. This year’s International Red Cross Ball Chair, Janet Cafaro, shares: “It is my honor and privilege to be serving as the chair of the Diamond Centennial Red Cross Ball. Please join us as we continue the tradition of Marjorie Merriweather Post’s first Palm Beach Red Cross Ball 60 years ago and celebrate the event of the season. We will recreate the excitement of the grand balls of Europe, the exuberance of the Riviera with fireworks, and the elegance of Princess Grace of Monaco and her ‘Bal de la Croix-Rouge.’” Cafaro steps into the role effortlessly. The Palm Beach socialite has made philanthropic efforts and awe-inspiring events a hallmark of her entertaining expertise. An enthusiast of fashion, art, and preservation, she is an avid supporter of the American Friends of Versailles and the American Friends of Blenheim Palace. In addition to hosting presidents and dignitaries for more than 30 years in her glittering Washington, D.C., ballroom, she truly understands the importance of incorporating tradition, elegance, and protocol into her endeavors. Cafaro has assembled a distinguished Diamond Centennial Red Cross Ball committee, helmed by honorary international chairs, The Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and Lady Henrietta Spencer-Churchill, along with the national committee: Mr. and Mrs. Martin Gruss, Susan Gutfreund, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Ross. Assisting chair Cafaro this year will be Park (Honorary Centennial Chair) and

Patty Myura

Patty Myura (Honorary Diamond Chair). Park states: “We look forward to an evening where the world comes together in support of one common goal. The International Red Cross Ball has established a legacy for diplomacy, goodwill, and philanthropy—and I am delighted to lend my support to this year’s ball. Our goal is to raise awareness and to promote more goodwill to our constituents around the globe.” Longtime Red Cross supporter Herme de Wyman Miro is particularly thrilled for this year's “Vienna to Versailles” theme. She enthuses: “This visually-stunning and unforgettable event will transport us to the romantic and magical era of old-world Europe, which we can only dream about today. It promises to be an exquisitely unique ball. I have attended many outstanding and memorable Red Cross Balls over the years and I look forward to this exciting and creative masterpiece from the minds and efforts of the outstanding chair Janet Cafaro and her committee.” This year’s celebration will be unique in that it will encompass three days of events for prominent benefactors and sponsors: Friday, February 3, will be an elegant diplomat dinner for ambassadors and dignitaries; Saturday, February 4, will be the Diamond Centennial International Red Cross Ball; and Sunday February 5, will be a celebrity polo match and champagne brunch. Needless to say, this is a highly anticipated event as we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the International Red Cross Ball and 100 years of Red Cross service in South Florida. The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. u For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.


International Red Cross Ball PHOTOGRAPHED BY: CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

Mr. and Mrs. Albin Holder (1982)

Estée Lauder and Carola Mandel (1980)

Dorothy and Charles Munn (1964)

Marjorie Merriweather Post

Mary Howes and Bernard Gimbel (1965)

Lesly and Earl E.T. Smith

Betty Scripps and Arnold Scaasi


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International Red Cross Ball PHOTOGRAPHED BY: CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

Colonel Michael Paul with Jane Dudley

Mary Sanford, Ted Kennedy

Barton and Walter

Owen and Celeste

and the Honorable Guilford Dudley

and Rose Kennedy (1972)

Gubelmann

Cheatham (1969)

Mary Sanford with Candy and James Van Alen

Colonel and Mrs. Howard Cox (1982)

Jean and Suffern Tailer (1981)


This is how you say it’s going to be okay. Every 8 minutes the American Red Cross responds to a disaster and makes this promise. This holiday season, you can help us keep it.

Donate today at redcross.org


YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

This page: Bruce Weber and Marion Cotillard at the Cinema Society screening of Allied on November 15. 140 QUEST

B FA . CO M ; H A N N A H T H O M S O N ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

BROWN


Clockwise from left: Ariana Rockefeller and Elizabeth Kurpis; Coco Rocha and Olivier Fremont; Marcelo Gomes and Daniel Cappello; Alexandre Assouline and Jason Wu; Bettina Brentice, Sofia Sanchez de Betak, Misha Nonoo, and Kate Bosworth, at the debut of Idole de Christofle at Bergdorf Goodman on October 27.

DEBUT OF NEW CHRISTOFLE COLLECTION AT BERGDORF GOODMAN ’TIS THE SEASON FOR SPARKLE—a fact that was fêted by

Christofle, the famous French brand of silver, on October 27. Olivier Fremont, the president of Christofle, and Kate Bosworth invited the chicest of shoppers (including: Sofía Sanchez de Betak, Zani Gugelmann, Juliette Longuet, Misha Nonoo, Bettina Prentice, Coco Rocha, and Indré Rockefeller) to Bergdorf Goodman's BG Restaurant for the debut

of Idole de Christofle. Between canapés, guests admired the pieces from Idole de Christofle (the new collection featuring silver as well as diamonds and gold) which was exhibited on models dressed in Brandon Maxwell and Christian Louboutin. The event, which boasted the glittering-est of the glitterati, received its spark from the most effervescent of elixirs: Ruinart (another product of France). DECEMBER 2016 141


Donna D’Cruz and Genevieve Jones; Sebastian Stan; Rose Durgen and Will Cotton, at the Cinema Society screening of Allied on November 15.

▲ THE CINEMA SOCIETY SCREENED ALLIED

▼ OPENING OF “EXHIBITIONISM”

MARION COTILLARD (the alluring French actress and, also,

THE ROLLING STONES— Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, and Ronnie Wood—introduced their show, “Exhibitionism,” at Industria on November 12. There, the band was welcomed by their fans (including: Jimmy Fallon, Tommy Hilfiger, Marc Jacobs, Lorne Michaels, Anna Sui, and John Varvatos), who were eager to experience the expansive show, which features a film from Martin Scorsese. This columnist saw “Exhibitionism” at Saatchi Gallery in London. The show includes art by Shepard Fairey and Andy Warhol and a rainbow of costumes—so, perhaps, you can always get what you want.

the inspo for Lindsay Lohan’s new accent) and director Robert Zemeckis hosted a premiere of Allied. On October 15, the Cinema Society screened the film with Paramount Pictures—a party that was continued at The Tuck Room (11 Fulton Street). (Allied, which stars Brad Pitt as well as Lizzy Caplan, Matthew Goode, and Jared Harris, chronicles a thrilling romance between Cotillard’s and Pitt’s characters in the middle of World War II.) The evening was as exciting as the film, but with less espionage...

From left: Lorne Michaels and Jimmy Fallon; a fan; Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger, and Charlie Watts, at the opening of “Exhibitionism” on November 12. 142 QUEST

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

YGL

From left: Valentino Garavani and Donna Karan;


Clockwise from left: Lyman Carter and Princess Beatrice of York; Fulvio Pierangelini and Caggie Dunlop; Keren Craig and Zanna Rassi; Irene Forte and Lydia Forte; Zani Gugelmann, Waris Ahluwahlia, and Nicky Hilton, at a dinner prepared by the team at Irene Firenze at Hotel Savoy in Florence, Italy, on November 16.

B FA . CO M ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

DINNER WITH THE FORTE SISTERS AT VANESSA VON BISMARCK’S HOME LYDIA FORTE AND Irene Forte, the sisters who are reenergizing their father Sir Rocco Forte’s collection of hotels (including Brown’s Hotel in London), were toasted at the home of Vanessa von Bismarck. On November 16, an international roster of VIPs—Waris Ahluwalia, Caggie Dunlop, Joshua Jackson, Princess Beatrice of York, Princess Eugenie of York, Nicky Hilton Rothschild, and Bettina Santo Domin-

go, and Neville Wakefield—were treated to a multi-course sensation from Fulvio Pierangelini, the chef behind Irene Firenze at Hotel Savoy in Florence, Italy. The exclusive event was perfected with bottles of our fave brand of Franciacorta, Ca’ del Bosco. It was an evening that—from hors d’oeuvres to desserts—embraced the best of the Mediterranean with a decidedly English flair. u DECEMBER 2016 143


SNAPSHOT

Clockwise from bottom left: Aileen Mehle, who wrote under the pen name “Suzy,” dressed the part for covering high society; with Pepe Fanjul at a 2008 American Ballet Theatre gala; photographed in a mansion off Fifth Avenue for Vogue in 1973; with Reinaldo Herrera at a gala in 2009.

AILEEN MEHLE, the ultimate chronicler of the lives of what used to be international society in the last half of the 20th century, died on November 11 here in New York. She was 98. I first read her in 1959 when she joined the New York Daily Mirror under the nom de plume “Suzy.” My father, born and bred in Brooklyn, got the Mirror and the News every day. By the time I was eight or ten, I was reading them too. Walter Winchell was in the Mirror, and so was Suzy, who wrote about the magical world of New York (especially to this kid growing up in a little New England town). They were a team: she gave the glitz and the shimmer while he supplied the nitty-gritty. She was a working girl in a glamorous-looking job, and she wore it to the hilt. She sparkled whenever she was out in public. She was very popular with both the men and women of society. In her own right, she had a very real kind of power in the world of the elite. It was her wit and charm, smartly packaged in a woman who had the common touch. 144 QUEST

Social writers and journalists have been popular in America since the early 19th century, when the country and its traditions were still taking shape. By the late 19th century and the days of the Mrs. Astor, the great wealth of this city bred what we called Society. It appeared to be an amusement, a showering of accouterment, an entertainment—fantasy presented as reality. There have been other successful female columnists in her field, but Suzy had the longest run and the winning popularity. She was very competitive, not surprisingly. It was not unlike her to request of a hostess to not invite certain other media people to affairs. By the time I came along, late in her career, I was one of those other media people. Although I was obviously disappointed not to share in her presence, I understood; business is business, and it was her territory. In reality, she never had competition and never will. She was all those things that her millions of readers loved about her: an original. And she was lovely to look at. —David Patrick Columbia

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