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114

CONTENTS 122

A rts & C ulture Issue 104

NEW KID, OLD BLOCK

128

It’s where galleries bloomed: SoHo was a melting pot of

artistic ambitions and groundbreaking ideas. But, of course, times change. And as gallerists now vie to plant their flags in today’s hotspots—Chelsea, Brooklyn—art dealer Georges Bergès goes against the grain and takes his business back to where it all started.

110

MAKING MAD

by

PAul JeromACk

The Chairman Emerita of the Museum of Arts and Design,

Barbara Tober, reveals everything she has learned in her 15 years as chairman, seeing the museum through both a name and location change. by lIly HoAglAnd

114

SEVEN ART SHOWS TO SEE THIS FALL

122

DRAWING THE ALGONQUIN

Don’t miss a single one.

by

120

Alex trAvers

Quest revists The Algonquin by reminiscing at the

hotel with illustrator Hilary Knight, who produced The Algonquin Cat (1980) with Val Schaffner. by elIzAbetH QuInn brown

128

PLATING THE TOWN RED

Alireza Niroomand, the general manager of Sant Ambroeus

SoHo, has created an art series with the restaurant’s chic regulars. by lIly HoAglAnd.

134

A COLLECTION TO BEHOLD

Jackie Weld Drake opens her home to Quest,

sharing the collection of American illustrations that she assembled—and cherished— with her husband, Rodman L. Drake. by elIzAbetH QuInn brown

134


OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40

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64

70

CONTENTS

76

C olumns 22

SOCIAL DIARY

64

HARRY BENSON

66

A TRIBUTE TO YOUNG LOVE

68

FOOD & LIFESTYLE

70

ART

74

CANTEENS

76

FRESH FINDS

82

RETAIL

La Perla, synonymous with Italian lace and luxury, is led in the right direction by Suzy Biszantz.

86

AUDAX

A look at the pioneering programs of the brilliant scientific minds at Whitehead Institute.

88

ART

90

EVENTS

92

ART VENICE

94

REAL ESTATE

A house designed by Marcel Breuer in Litchfield, Connecticut, is an artistic delight.

96

OPEN HOUSE

A Wallis Howe–designed manor house rests on the waterfront in Bristol, Rhode Island.

98

REAL ESTATE

A home at One East End Avenue dazzles with Zuber-inspired panels in the dining room.

102

SOCIAL CALENDER

140

YOUNG & THE GUESTLIST

144

SNAPSHOT

Our columnist says that book parties are where it’s at.

by

DaviD PatriCk Columbia

The enigmatic chess champion Bobby Fisher, out on the lava fields of Iceland. There’s nothing like it.

by

t aki t heoDoraCoPulos

Remembering a Texas dinner with all the right elements of surprise. by alex hitz

The incredible tour de force of painting, the one and only Catharine Warren. Two years after its move, Le Bilboquet is going stronger than ever.

by

by

kate Gubelmann

Daniel CaPPello

Everything from Jaguar coupes to layers for fall. by Daniel CaPPello anD elizabeth meiGher

With Assouline, Adria de Haume releases a catalogue raisonné showcasing her vast work of crosses. The Silver Hill Hospital annual Giving Hope Gala draws crowds for fun and support. A trip to the Biennale di Venezia offers a glimpse into the future of art. by meera GanDhi

A list of our favorite fall events and galas, and the places to see and be seen. Keeping up with the PYTs as they roam the streets. by elizabeth Quinn brown

For our city that never sleeps (or ceases to inspire), a Quest playlist dedicated to the Big Apple.

76


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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EDITOR’S LETTER

From left: An artistic cross by Adria de Haume; one of Jackie Weld Drake’s illustrations; a plate decorated by JR with a picture of the general manager of Sant Ambroeus SoHo; the current Algonquin cat and Hilary Knight, who is celebrating the 35th anniversary of his illustrated book about the feline.

LET’S KICK OFF our Arts & Culture Issue with one of Dorothy Parker’s many famous lines, shall we? When asked to use the word “horticulture” in a sentence, the clever woman zinged back, “You can bring a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” The quote is relevant not only for the subject matter (the culture part obviously—don’t be rude), but also the speaker, as these pages contain an illustrated peek at her old hang out, the Algonquin Hotel. Thirty-five years ago, Hilary Knight drew the adventures of a residential feline weaving his way through the legs of the literary greats of the Algonquin Round Table, saddled with the equally literary name of “Hamlet.” Alas, poor rodent. We catch up with Knight and the hotel’s current cat-in-residence, Matilda. Then, it’s a grand tour of the city and all of the fantastic, whimsical, captivating, unexpected, experimental, wondrous places and people it has to offer. We pop in to see Georges Bergès in his new eponymous gallery in SoHo; grab a coffee with Alireza Niroomand at the nearby Sant Ambroeus restaurant; head on up to the East Side for a housecall chez Jackie Weld Drake to check out her collection; make a quick stop by the Museum of Arts and Design to say hi to Barbara Tober; and to end the night, invigorated rather than exhausted, we gallery-hop in and around Chelsea, remarking on how terrible the crosstown traffic this time of year. 20 QUEST

Entre nous, rumor has it that the real reason you always see the Pope jumping out of his car is that, in fact, he just tends to get very impatient sitting in congestion for too long and prefers to leg it the rest of the way. We sympathize. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Contemporary art dealer Georges Bergès at his eponymous Georges Bergès Gallery at 462 West Broadway in SoHo.Opened in June this year, the gallery is channeling the classic muse of Leo Castelli. From the cover story by Paul Jeromack, “New Kid, Old Block.”


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY THE LAST DAYS of summer—

the back-to-school time—it was very warm in New York. And humid. The weatherman predicted big humidity and, unfortunately, this time he got it right. Anyone who could get out of town did. Although, the weather often followed devoutly. Out Hamptons-way,

the heat of the social scene was increasing along with the breezes that Mother Nature was providing on those last days. Summer’s Swan Song. Most Hamptonites were sated and quenched. Gallons of Southsides and rosé poured, lobsters cracked, and peonies

posed. Camera-ready and getting a little sleepy from all those parties and events and galas and kick-offs. Then along comes George Farias. George, who lives in Manhattan, had spent his last 15 summers in Beverly Hills, decided to stay closer to home this year. A friend found him

the “perfect house” to rent on Lily Pond Lane in East Hampton. Then, at the very end of the season, he gave a large dinner party on the beautiful property. He’s famous for his end-ofseason parties out in Beverly Hills. They all came running. Even Nancy Reagan made one

N E W YO R K E R S FO R C H I L D R E N AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N I C O L E H A N L E Y M E L L O N H O S T E D C O C K TA I L S FO R E N R I Q U E R OT T E N B E R G AT T H E P I E R R E H OT E L

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of her rare outings. George likes beauty, luxury, and harmony. He provides an eclectic group of guests, works with a top designer (this time it was David Monn), hires a top caterer (Glorious Food) from the city; and he adds a bit of surprising and engaging entertainment, all served up impeccably. Sound simple? It is if you know what you’re doing, and you like people. But is it something you find everywhere, especially the Hamptons? No, not really. George likes people, so he makes a point of making it perfect, but fun, amusing, and interesting—for everyone. It’s a talent to amaze. It was a perfect evening weather-wise. Fri24 QUEST

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day. Cocktails were held on a knoll overlooking the ocean as well as the pavilion that Monn had designed and constructed for the occasion (in case of rain). After 45 minutes of cocktails, guests were alerted by the harmonizing in the pavilion: of The Whiffenpoofs, from Yale, George’s alma mater, all turned out in white-tie to serenade the guests to dine. Monn’s pavilion had an Alberto Giacometti–inspired chandelier, created for the party, hanging 27 feet above the tables. Monnfound white plaster vases at Ines de la Fressange’s shop in Paris that were also reminiscent of spare, clean, Giacommeti-esque works. Everyone found their

Elizabeth Meigher and Georgina Schaeffer

William Force and Olympia Drexel

seats by looking for the white plaster charger plates with each guest’s name engraved. (After everyone was seated, the plates were whisked away and returned to each guest individually, beautifully wrapped, as they were departing at the end of the evening.) Everyone seated, the host explained that this was the first summer he’d spent on the East Coast in 15 years. George has an unerring eye for a beautiful atmosphere, as he demonstrated year after year to the L.A. crowd. This year, back on the East Coast—which is really his home—he wanted to have a real American summertime dinner evening out by

Ann Dexter Jones and John Goldstone

the beach. After the Whiffenpoofs sang “Something,” “The Boxer,” “Operator,” and “House of the Rising Sun,” Peter Duchin supplied the wonderful singer who followed the boys. It was a very special evening for all the guests. It marked the end of a beautiful summer in a lovely atmosphere, presented with an easy yet impeccable taste. It was not only a comfort, but it was amazing for its ease and simplicity on a beautiful night under the August moon in East Hampton. Sharing in it all: Kathy and Billy Rayner, Michael Shnayerson and Gayfryd Steinberg, Alison Mazzola, Susan Stroman, Robert A.M. Stern,

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Serena Boardman and Johnny Theodoracopolous, Caryn Zucker, Anne Hearst and Jay McInerney, Dan and Estrellita Brodsky, Lauren and John Veronis, Teresa Melhado, Bob Colacello, Debbie Bancroft, Peter Duchin and Virginia Coleman, Kathy and Rick Hilton, Lauren King, John Studzinski, Lally Weymouth, Robert Zimmerman, Milly de Cabrol, Lisa Fine, Nathalie Kaplan, Ivana Lowell and Howard Blum, Ophelia and Bill Rudin, Alex Papachristidis, Kathy and Rick Hilton, Chip Conlan, Nicole

Miller and Kim Taipale, Jeffrey and Marjorie Rosen, Nancy Marcus, and Harry and Laura Slatkin. First full week in September: Very hot in New York, like we were in a room full of furnaces right up into late evening. The season had begun; summer was over, temperatures excepted. One night, there were only two events on my calendar but the first was enough that I missed the second. Jackie Weld Drake hosted a cocktail reception along with Aileen Mehle and Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia in hon-

or of John Bernbach and Veronique and Bob Pittman. The occasion marked their receiving the Casita Maria Gold Medal of Honor. Bernbach and the Pittmans, along with director Baz Luhrmann, will be honored at the Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education’s annual “Fiesta,” which will be held Tuesday, October 13, at the Plaza Hotel. Mehle, Prince Dimitri, and Drake are the gala’s co-chairs. I went first down to the NoMad Hotel on Broadway and 28th Street to a party for Erica

Jong on the publication of her new novel Fear of Dying. Erica’s party was hosted by Barbara and Ken Follett and brought out the literary and publishing crowds. Despite the heat, the canopied penthouse terrace provided a little bit of coolness (from a light breeze), and so it was very comfortable for the guests, who included Judy Collins and Louis Nelson, Julie Taymor, Ed Victor (Erica’s literary agent), Jane Friedman (who has published Erica’s Fear of Flying electronically), Lynne Meadow of the Man-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A hattan Theatre Club and her husband Milt Wilson, Daphne Merkin, Erica’s daughter Molly Jong-Fast, and Molly’s father Jonathan Fast, Tracey Jackson and Glenn Horowitz, Susan Cheever, E. Jean Carroll, Erica’s editor Jennifer Enderlin of St. Martin’s Press, and Erica’s husband Ken Burrows, and—of course—Jill Krementz, newyorksocialdiary.com’s associate editor, who was busy photographing the scene and the players. The title of Erica’s new novel closely reminds me of her first novel, Fear of Flying, which was published 47 years ago. At the time of publication, her editor (who was also editor for

Saul Bellow and Philip Roth, among other greats) told her they’d be happy if she sold a projected 3 thousand copies. The book sold 27 million. Fear of Flying was about a young woman’s life going out into the world. This flight deals with a woman’s life four decades later. Erica’s fiction borrows liberally from her own life, which makes it even more interesting (she’s lived). I was curious to see the “how” and the “what” when I first opened it to read. The first chapter deals with the main character, Vanessa Wonderman, who is now a veteran stage and film actress living in New York. She is going to visit here nonagenarian

parents who live nearby. The parents are both in failing health but, nevertheless, have all their wits about them. We get the picture: endings. However, almost from the first page and the introduction of her mother, I burst out laughing at the whole scene. Enter the father: more laughter. And the two sisters in attendance provoking historical family disagreements: more laughter. I thought of Woody Allen. Not so coincidentally, I learned at the party that night when reading the blurbs on the back of the published copy (I’d been reading the galley at home), that Woody, indeed, read the book and even agreed

to write a blurb for it (a first for him) in which he stated: “How Erica Jong is able to deal with all these sensitive issues and still make the book funny is amazing. I loved reading it.” Ditto; same here. It’s just wonderful and real, and sometimes at some of the most unlikely moments, hilarious. Only Erica; brilliant. Take it from Woody (or me), Fear of Dying will leave you laughing, even thinking about it after you’ve finished. Bravo! On an oppressively hot and humid Wednesday I went over to Lincoln Center for the annual Couture Council luncheon, which benefits the Museum at the Fashion Insti-

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Maria Pucci and Geordy Maish 28 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A LUNCHEON WITH DANA HAMMOND STUBGEN IN SOUTHAMPTON

Lisa Jackson

tute of Technology (Museum at FIT). This year they were honoring Manolo Blahnik. The Couture Council of the Museum at FIT launched this luncheon 10 years ago. I don’t know if they were the first cochairs, but Liz Peek and Yaz Hernandez and Charlotte Moss got it off and running. The first year, it was held at Brasserie 8 1/2, the subterranean restaurant at 9 West 57th Street. Ralph Rucci (an FIT grad) was the honoree. Peek told me that, in the beginning, they were “terrified that no one would come.” But they sold out. They were so impressed by its success that they decided 30 QUEST

Dana Hammond Stubgen and George Melas

Joel Kassimir and Remy Kassimir

Charlotte Stubgen and Somers Farkas

to go for the Rainbow Room the second year (more money requiring a bigger turnout). They asked Alber Elbaz, the legendary designer from Lanvin, to be the honoree. The morning of the luncheon, Elbaz was named by WWD as the Designer of the Year. He was mobbed at the luncheon by paparazzi. Everybody witnessed the hullabaloo. New York’s a small town; word gets around. The luncheon was now in the big time. They held it on a Wednesday, the day that kicked off “New York Fashion Week” (only because that was the only day that Alber could attend). It happened to be a perfect

relationship. Charity for fashion holds the fundraiser on the official day of fashion week. Like Katherine Hepburn said, describing the secret of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: “She gave him sex and he gave her class.” When the tents moved from Bryant Park to Lincoln Center a few years ago, so too did the Couture Council luncheon. So now they “own” the date, and are on the social “calendar.” In recalling, Peek said “It’s been such fun, and we’ve had the opportunity to celebrate Valentino Garavani, Oscar de la Renta, Karl Lagerfeld, Carolina Herrera, Michael Kors, Dries van Noten,

Bettina Zilkha

Danielle Ganek and Ann Barish

Ralph Rucci, Alber Elbaz, and others. Amazing—and just terrific for FIT—raising millions of dollars for the museum, a great boon to our students.” And to the public. Eleanora Kennedy, who was my hostess at the luncheon, told me the proceeds from the event will pay for the next three annual fashion exhibitions that the museum produces annually. For the past several years, when the Fashion Week tents were at Lincoln Center in Damrosch Park,the luncheon was held in Avery Fisher Hall. This year, they moved it to the Promenade in the David H. Koch Theater. The tents are no longer, as Fashion Week is

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Henry and Leila Heller


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A occurring all over town. Co-chairs were Carole Divet Harting and Darcy Rigas. Honorary co-chairs were Joan Juliet Buck and Amy Fine Collins. Everybody was happy about Blahnik being there. Valerie Steele, director of the museum at FIT, pointed out that “It was Manolo who kicked off contemporary fashion’s obsession with shoes, as viewed on Sex and the City.” Olivier Cheng catered the three-course luncheon that was presented in such a way that it seemed that Cheng was

a bit of a fashion designer in his kitchen. The redoubtable events designer Bronson van Wyck did the tables and the flowers. The luncheon was underwritten by the tourism board of Spain. Uma Thurman presented Blahnik with his award. After being introduced, he told us how much he liked New York City and how he found his customers inspiring (in so many words). From the looks of him, he could be a European banker with some flair. But when he speaks—direct-

ly, succinctly, and economically—you see that he is an artist: very sensible, practical, clever, witty, and all business (when business is the topic). So when it came to his expressing his appreciation for the award, he said: “Thank you.” A relief for all, and a very pleasant experience. Fashion Week had begun that day. Lisa Perry was at our table and was the first to leave because she was having her runway show at 3 p.m. Alec and Hilaria Baldwin were there, as was Anna Win-

tour as well as Camila Alves, Petra Nemcova, and Martha Stewart (who was taking a lot of pictures for her daily blog). Usually, the costumes the ladies wear on this occasion is the work of the designer being honored. This year it had to be the shoes, no? New York Fashion Week ran through the rest of that week, and into the Jewish holidays (Rosh Hashanah). The city was a bit quieter because of the holiday and yet busier for the fashion crowd, meaning the industry, the media, the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S H O P P I N G W I T H S A M E S K Y AT T H E TO P P I N G R O S E H O U S E I N B R I D G E H A M P TO N

Jacqueline Stahl

social ladies, the retailers, etc. They were at the shows. For years, when I was first paying attention to it, the important designer shows were almost all in the tents at Bryant Park. For observers such as myself, it was like going to the theater. Because it is high New York theater—reflecting the energy of the town at its quintessence. Then, several years ago, they moved it all to Lincoln Center, which was a bit “uptown” for the industry, but it was O.K. It seems that, within a couple of years, however, a lot of designers were moving away from the “tents” idea and showing in their own chosen venues. I don’t know if it was a matters of economics but I do 34 QUEST

Browsing

The Topping Rose House

know it created a great inconvenience for the people who go to the shows for a reason, i.e. business. As much as they are theater to me, they are all about: What can they sell? And to whom? And for how much? That is the essence of the fashion business. Chosen venues are now the name of the game. There are exceptions showing in a less aesthetically desirable version of the tents. I haven’t been there but the talk is not favorable. There was a time, for decades, when fashion designers and manufacturers held their runway shows in their working quarters in the Garment District: Seventh Avenue south of 42nd Street, and running

Francine LeFrak and Richard Friedberg

Dennis O’Connor

down to the high 20s. The idea of the tents at Bryant Park gave the industry a real boost in terms of public interest. It spawned a lot of dreams among the young being exposed to the idea of fashion. I’ll bet there are any number of people in the industry today who were drawn to it, young and starry-eyed, when they first saw the activity and arrivals outside those tents. The view, even from the street, was magic. And for people watching, it was the best. I don’t know the reasons why it changed but it did and now the shows are all over the lot. I did go one night, however, to the Oscar de la Renta show. Their venue was the ballroom of the Prince George

Janet Malpeso, Lauren Roberts and Danielle von Schneiner

Keisha Saddler and Emma Ball

Hotel on East 28th Street. The Prince George Hotel was built in 1903 when that area of town was bustling with social and commercial activity. It was uptown for many New Yorkers. As the city began moving farther north, the area in the 20s (even around Fifth Avenue, itself) became more commercial and less traveled by the hoi polloi. The hotel is now back in its glory as the whole area south of 42nd Street has flourished. There was a specially built entrance with “Oscar de la Renta” written across the entry. There was a crowd waiting to get in and a crowd waiting to see, spread out even onto the street. On entering, the ballroom had been trans-

CO U RTE S Y O F S A M E S K Y

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M I C H A E L H A F F T K A P R E S E N T E D H I S “ R EC O N C I L E D ” E X H I B I T I O N AT G EO R G E S B E R G È S G A L L E R Y

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formed into a double runway. The walls and the floor were covered in a soft, pearl-ish, ivory fabric and carpeting. It was a very good-looking room and it reflected the taste and image of the late designer: a kind of sophisticated cool, but centered. I was first invited to this show years ago by Boaz Mazor, who has long been the fashion ambassador and director of sales for the brand. He and I met about 25 years ago at a reception at the house of a mutual friend, Billy McCarty-Cooper, in Los Angeles. We’ve been friends ever since. Mazor is highly popular, a man-about-town (whatever town that might be when he’s traveling the world 36 QUEST

Mia Solow and Michael Hafftka

with the collections). He has a bon vivant’s personality and an enormous capacity for work. Boaz also has the personality to bring out the ladies. They all love him. And for good reason. As the world knows, Oscar died last October after a spectacular career that spanned six decades. He left a deep imprint in terms of taste and style. He left his business to his family, whom he trained to continue the legacy and the style that he created. Now, international designer Peter Copping has joined them as the designer for Oscar de la Renta. Books and Books and… The book party has replaced the “cocktail party” as one of the great little get-togethers

Elizabeth Gaffin

Martine Ali and Aliex McConey

that city people love. It’s a chance to get out (of the house or the office or the studio) and see some people. And being “book parties,” they take on a little bit of gravity (depending on the book, of course). One Tuesday night, up on Central Park West Paige Peterson hosted a party for her friend Jesse Kornbluth and his novel Married Sex. The proverbial “hot novel”—“hot” as in steamy—to put it in conventional terms, it is (as Kornbluth put it) “…. not cheating if your wife’s there.” Hollywood thinks it’s hot, too. He even sold the film rights before the publication rights. He’s written the screenplay already for Griffin Dunne to direct. There were about a hundred friends

jammed into Peterson’s apartment. He loves giving parties and filling her apartment with friends, including lots of old friends. This one was a bit bigger than most. It was a warm night and the apartment -- which overlooks the Park -- isn’t wired for A/C. Or so someone said. Doesn’t bother me but there were others who were getting a little hot under the collar (and they hadn’t even read the first chapter yet). Seventy were invited and more than a hundred showed up. At one point, Jesse got up to address the guests about Married Sex and thank them for coming. He repeated a story, “possibly true” (which means it’s so good it doesn’t matter) about Erica Jong

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A meeting Philip Roth. “Erica is said to have gushed: ‘Oh, Philip, the themes in our books, the way we write about sex….’ Roth held up his hand: ‘But Erica… Enough about you.’ Jesse then said, ‘I hate authors talking about their books, so enough about me, too.” With that, everyone resumed their conversations. This wasn’t a party where they sold books. Brian De Palma and Griffin Dunne were trading notes about casting. Garland Jeffreys, the rock legend, talked with filmmaker Gretl Claggett about making a documentary. Kay Salter, widow of James Salter who was the greatest influence on Kornbluth’s writing,

was there and told me she represented “the two of us.” On the first day of Autumn, it was clear, cloudy, and breezy with temperatures around 70 by day and dropping down in the low 60s by mid-evening. Ahh, relief—a beautiful day in New York, enhanced by the pearl grey clouds moving through. This was the week of the Pope Francis I in New York, even though he didn’t arrive until that Friday. Living in the city, you were really aware of it, and had been for the past several days. The security was reported to be greater than ever before for a visiting dignitary. The numbers of police force, streets blocked off, etc.

was impressive. The world that apparently demands it is depressive. The idea that anyone would harm His Holiness seems incredible. But so do many other things about this world we’re living in. It is always difficult for New Yorkers, especially in Manhattan, when we’re visited by the President simply because any blockage on the grid that was laid out 208 years ago, causes gridlock and bottlenecks. Midday Manhattan is all business. Even the tourists are all business with millions passing by and passing through. When it doesn’t move it’s a problem for everybody. This particular visit had been so anticipated and talk-

ed about, however, that many had already made a sort of a mental adjustment to it. Which was: don’t go anywhere you don’t really need to go for the next few days. While here in New York, His Holiness stayed at the 20 East 72nd Street residence of the Vatican’s Permanent Observer to the United Nations. The mansion (completed in 1895) was built for former mayor Hugh J. Grant (1889– 1892). Grant was 31 when he took office, the youngest mayor in the city’s history. Son of a barkeep and real-estate speculator with strong political connections, young Grant was orphaned as a boy and was heir to his fa-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A N C E R R E S E A R C H I N ST I T U T E P R E S E N T E D I TS A W A R D S AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

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ther’s $500,000 fortune (which is approximately $15 million in today’s currency). As a young man, he was a member of Tammany Hall, the Democratic party’s organization that was the power in city politics. In 1883, at age 25 he was elected Sheriff of New York County. And in 1889, he became mayor. He served two (two-year) terms, though in 1890, a probe into political corruption in the City of New York by the New York State Senate exposed the mayor to, among other things, some questionable exchanges of a very large amount of cash ($25,000, which is approximately $150,000 in today’s currency) from the mayor to the daughter of the head of Tammany Hall. 40 QUEST

Beth and Ronald Dozoretz with Cynthia Yorkin

Christine Castle and Christoph Huber

The probe damaged his reputation and he did not run for reelection. His administration was denounced from the (protestant) pulpits. One fiery critic declared that Grant and his political colleagues were “a lying, perjured, rum-soaked, and libidinous lot” of “polluted harpies.” Another sunny day in little ole New York! Nevertheless, Grant prevailed. In the following election cycle, he ran again, but was defeated. That same year, in 1894, he married Julia Murphy, daughter of Senator Edward Murphy, a wealthy businessman from Albany. As a wedding gift he bought his bride 20 East 72nd Street. Five stories, 11,000-square-feet. The Grants had three children

Hilary Geary and Jim Zirin

to occupy the mansion. Only 15 years later, in 1910, Grant died suddenly of a heart at age 52. He left an estate to his wife estimated between $9 and $13 million (which is $250 million in today’s currency). It had been acquired from extensive real-estate investments enhanced by his father’s legacy. Julia was a devout Roman Catholic. The house at number 20 contained many religious objects and, four years after her husband died, she had a private chapel built in the residence. She named it the Chapel of the Holy Spirit. Shortly after Grant died, Julia attended a Midnight Mass at the Loyola Chapel on Park Avenue and 84th Street. Just before the service, she met with

Ken Langone and Lauren Veronis

Perri Ruttenberg and Lynne Harmer

Father David Hearn, S.J., presenting to him a sealed enveloped containing a certificate on the Central Trust Company for $500,000, (which is $30 million in today’s dollars)— the amount her husband left for her own absolute disposal. The gift was delivered with a request to start a school to educate Catholic boys. She stipulated that it be a Jesuit high school with free education for those boys who could not afford a Catholic private school education. Regis was established in 1914 on East 84th Street next door to the Church of Saint Ignatius Loyola on Park Avenue. Julia’s identity was kept “secret” for many years, although a portrait of her hung

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A in the entry hall. She died in 1944 but, up until the early 1960s, the Grants fully funded its tuition-free mission. It remains tuition-free today, with approximately $13 million in annual operating expenses. Regis is the only tuition-free Catholic high school in the United States. In 1975, Hugh J. Grant, Jr., sold the house at 20 East 72nd Street to the Vatican to be used as a residence for the Vatican’s Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations. Alice F. Mason, the redoubtable, now-retired private residential real-estate broker in New York, represented the Vatican in the sale. That block on East 72nd Street is entirely posh, bordered on Madison Avene by the Ralph Lauren women’s store, and the Félix Candela–designed co-op at 19

East 72nd Street on the north corner. In 1895, when the Grants moved into their new home, 19 East 72nd Street was then occupied by an enormous mansion designed by Stanford White for Louis Comfort Tiffany, built 10 years before in 1885. It was a brand new neighborhood, a real-estate development of the Gilded Age in New York. That same year, 1895, the house next door (still standing), 18 East 72nd Street, was purchased by Jacob Schiff as a wedding gift to his daughter Frieda Schiff in her marriage to Felix Warburg. (Twelve years later, the Warburgs moved to a much larger C. P. H. Gilbert–designed mansion in the early French Renaissance style from the period of Francois I. Frieda’s father objected to the size and style of the house, believing

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A that it was too ostentatious and bad for their family’s reputation and potentially inciting anti-Semitism. Thirty-two years later, in 1944, she donated the house as a permanent home for the Jewish Museum, which occupies the property today.) Just across the way from where the Pope stayed is the 45,000-square-foot mansion of the Emir of Qatar. That house, designed by Carrère and Hastings for Henry T. Sloane of the W. & J. Sloane furniture and carpeting con-

cern, was completed the year after the Grants moved into their house. Sloane’s wife, née Jessie Ann Robbins from Brooklyn, held a housewarming party in January 1897 with a list gilded by her guests, which included the Mrs. Astor; Mrs. Astor’s son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Jacob Astor IV; Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish; Mr and Mrs. Ogden Mills; and Willie K. Vanderbilt. Sloane was not present, as he had learned shortly before the house was ready for occupancy that his

wife had been having a torrid affair with Perry Belmont, son of August Belmont—the Rothschilds’ agent in the United States, and grandson of commodore Matthew Perry. Sloane moved into a hotel and divorce proceedings were begun à la scandale. The divorce was finalized three years later in 1899 and, five hours after the decree was granted, Jessie married Perry. Although the house had been given by Sloane to his wife, the new groom insisted his wife give it back to Sloane.

Sloane never lived in his house. He rented it to Joseph Pulitzer, the newspaper publisher. Two years later, it was sold to James Stillman, a bachelor banker who lived there alone. Later, it was owned by John Sanford, another rug tycoon, and even later it was the private school Lycée Francais. The Emir of Qatar, I have been told—true or false— acquired it so that his wife would have some place to stay when she came to New York to see her children who are in school here. u

D O N N A K A R A N P R E S E N T E D G R A Z I A FO R T U N A AT U R B A N Z E N

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Veronique Pittman and Christine Schwarzman

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Catherine Cahill with Alberto and Annabelle Meriaca 46 QUEST

William Ivey Long and Sharon Bush

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Steve Schwarzman and Jackie Weld Drake

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Alice Ross and David Ford

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G E R A L D D . H I N E S C E L E B R AT E S H I S 9 0 T H B I R T H D AY I N H O U S TO N

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S U M M E R F E ST AT T H E S O U T H A M P TO N A R TS C E N T E R

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O P E N I N G O F T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N O P E R A

Taylor Hackford and Helen Mirren

Jessica Chastain and Patricia Clarkson

Jessica Joffe and Margarita Levieva 54 QUEST

Ildar Abdrazakov and Bette Middler

Lance Bass and Lilliana Vazquez

Helena Christensen

Drew Barrymore and Will Kopelman

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Diane von Furstenberg

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Pepe and Emilia Fanjul with Marita and Alfonso Fierro

Melanie Holland, Steven Stolman and Judy Hadlock

Martha Glass with Peter and Diane Chapman

Ellin Saltzman and Helen O’Hagan

Georgette Farkas

Randi Tabor and Rich Wilkie

J I M M I T C H E L L H O ST E D A D I N N E R AT P R I MO L A

Diana Feldman 56 QUEST

Marianne and John Castle

Grace Meigher

Jim Mitchell

Frances Scaife

Pia Lindstrom

A N N I E WAT T ( A B OV E )

Hans Kertess and Ginny Burke


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Rita Simonini, Nicola Luisotti and David Gockley 58 QUEST

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Karen Richardson and John Rubinstein

Karen Caldwell and Cynthia Kaley

Dede Wilsey

Boaz Mazor

Richard and Hilary Clark with Elizabeth and David Birka-White

D R E W A LT I Z E R

Mary Beth Shimmon


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A K I C K - O F F FO R C A R E E R T R A N S I T I O N FO R D A N C E R S AT T H E VA N N E S S R E S I D E N C E

Alfred Kaltman and Bunny Grossinger

Michael Byars and Susan Krysiewicz

Tom Bell and Rachael Venner

Joe Benincasa, Cynthia Fisher and Chris Templeton 60 QUEST

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A N N I E WAT T

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C O U T U R E C O U N C I L L U N C H EO N H O N O R I N G M A N O L O B L A H N I K AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

Carol Mack and Caryn Zucker

Linda Fargo and Alec Baldwin

Camila Alves 62 QUEST

Carolina Herrera

Manolo Blahnik and Uma Thurman

PJ Pascual, Fe Fendi and Josie Natori

Simon Doonan and Glenda Bailey

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Bobby Fischer in Iceland for the 1972 World Chess Championship.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 64 QUEST

BOBBY FISCHER was actually the opposite of what I expected. The impression everyone had before meeting him was that he was effete and small, but the chess genius was actually tall, standing 6’2�, a strong, healthy man who worked out regularly and drank nothing but orange juice. His actions were big and lumbering until, amazingly enough, he touched his chess pieces with the softness of a wand. He would pick


H A R RY B E N S O N

them up and put them down gracefully with no fanfare, no banging of the board. When I was with him, Bobby wanted to talk about sports constantly: Joe Namath, the New York Jets, and Mohammed Ali. I’m sure that’s why we got on together— along with the fact that I knew nothing about chess, which he liked. I knew not to discuss chess as he considered those who approached him with questions or theories, including the Grandmasters, to

be, in his own words, “morons.” While in Iceland during the World Championship match in 1972, we would go out walking on the lava field, and occasionally he would stop in the middle of a conversation, go into his inside pocket, take out a mobile chessboard, look at it, make a couple of moves, and then return it to his pocket without saying a word. After our walks, we would go back to the hotel, have an early breakfast, and

Bobby would take a nap before the day’s chess match. Every day before the match, he would laugh and tell me, “I’m going to crush him.” And he usually did. Bobby and I would walk in the lava fields each night around 3 a.m. in the midnight sun, as there was less than an hour of darkness each night. One night, several wild horses in the distance came toward us. At first, Bobby was slightly apprehensive, until a white horse came over to Bobby and started to rub his cheek. “He likes me, Harry, he really likes me,” Bobby said, surprised. I also had the pleasure of telling Fischer he was the new world champion. That day, before the match began, I was to photograph the Russian chess champion Boris Spassky at the Saga Hotel where he was staying. Spassky and I walked into the lobby at the same time. He came over to me and said, “There is a new world champion: Robert James Fischer,” and I replied, “I am going for a walk in the fresh air.” I rushed over to Bobby’s room at the Loftleider Hotel and gave him the news. I then went to the hall where they were supposed to play the match. The New York Times reporter was there, and I told him Fischer was the new champion. My story made the front page of the Times the next day. The reporter told me I had gotten “the exclusive of the summer.” It was the end to an incredible summer that remains unforgettable. ◆ OCTOBER 2015 65


TA K I

A TRIBUTE TO YOUNG LOVE LAST WEEK I DREAMT of a girl I met in the summer of 1953 in Greece. I had never dreamt of her before. We spent two months together and had a platonic love affair. She got married and died soon after. She was older than I, but not by much. I had turned 16 that summer and had been to bed with a couple of “nice” girls by then, but the rest had been mostly hookers. Her name was Maria Agapitou, and she was a rare beauty, at least in my inexperienced eyes. The ghastly but undeniably brainy fraud Sigmund Freud defined love as overvaluing the object but undervaluing reality. Freud was a complex-ridden smartypants who probably never experienced the sudden glow, the chemical effect that random attraction is all about. He was, nevertheless, taken seriously by many, so he’s got a lot to answer for in these psychobabbling times. Mind you, Freud and the summer of ’53 have nothing to do with each other. That time is all about the flickering ecstasy of a long-ago memory, and the impression that a young woman made on a teenager. An inner voice tells me to beware of nostalgia—after all, I last saw Maria 62 years ago—but at my age the past is richer than the future, so here goes. We met in a park in a northern resort of Athens, where I was sitting on a bench and reading Tender Is the Night. She took the bull by the horns, so to speak, and hinted in perfect English that the book I was reading would inspire me to lead a dissolute life. “I sure hope so,” I answered. That did


it. We started to meet every day in that beautiful jasmine-scented park among the pines. She was taller than me by an inch, had light brown curly hair and blue eyes, and would be described as pre-Raphaelite, a term I didn’t know existed back then. We went to “the flicks,” as we called them, at an outdoor cinema, where she caught me looking at her sideways and told me to look at the screen. I also tried to hold hands right away, but she pulled hers away. Most of the time she wore a black dress, but one day she wore white at a party given by some friend. She knew everyone there, a crowd aged mostly 20 and over. “I see you brought your Americanaki,” said the hostess (“the little American”). No one bothered to speak to me, so I proceeded to get very drunk—so drunk, in fact, that I had to lie down on a sofa near the entrance where I passed out. Later on, I found out that my father and some friends had dropped in and seen me asleep. The old boy was rather proud, apparently. Go figure, as no one said back then. We didn’t see each other for some time after that—I didn’t dare go to the park— but then she walked into my life once again as I sat around there pretending to be reading. What I didn’t know then (but had more or less figured out) was that beauty is founded upon romance and romance is founded on mystery. Maria would repulse every pass I made. I would say nothing and hide for a couple of days, hoping against hope that my disappearance would make her change her mind, and then the saga would start all over again. Whether she was a prude, a virgin, or an experienced woman who liked to torture, I never found out. She treated me like both a child and a lover. Young love can be as traumatic as hell, and I was really traumatised. All I did was think about her. I stopped playing tennis, stopped going to the brothels, stopped seeing my friends. My mother noticed I wasn’t eating but blamed it on Greek cuisine. That love is a disease we all know and agree upon. Young love, of course, is ten times worse. As the summer drew to a close, I became more and more desperate. She also seemed upset. We kept meeting and then feeling desperate. There’s nothing like unrequited love to drive one over

This page: Tender Is The Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald, which our columnist’s young love warned him would inspire a dissolute life. Opposite page: Sigmund Freud.

the top. But was it unrequited? Sixty-two years later I can remember perfectly the look she used to give me. She also spoke beautifully, in a language I wasn’t used to, using torrents of adjectives when talking about literature, and in sensuous phrases that left me thinking about them long after she and I had parted. Looking back, there was nothing of Emma Bovary about her, nothing needy or wanting. She spoke in a cool, almost lyrical tone, in what, to me, sounded like superbly crafted sentences. The end was too painful to recall. One moment I was talking to her and shyly trying to avoid her gaze, the next I was on an airplane flying back to school

and prison-like conditions. I did not take her address or write to her from prison, but over Christmas I remember my mother telling me that she had gotten married. Then, the following spring, I heard that she had died. Was it true that she had got married, and then died? I should have realised what a moral coward I was because I never wanted to find out. Was it my mother’s way of making me forget about her? Could she still be alive? Basically, I don’t want to know. But I did dream about her last week. And it upset me. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. OCTOBER 2015 67


F O O D & L I F ESTY LE

ONE THURSDAY NIGHT AT ANN’S BY ALEX HITZ ANN BARBIER-MUELLER is a Texas girl through and through. She grew up riding horses and fishing trout on a cattle ranch. She’s blonde and slender with big pools that are blue eyes, and I smile when I see her. Ann married young into an aristocratic European family, and has, let’s just say, seen the elephant.

Still, she has all the things money can’t buy—charm, an easy laugh, beauty, intelligence, and warmth, and whenever I see her widely smiling face I’m reminded of Kipling’s great line: “Though she’s walked with Kings, she’s never lost the common touch.” Everybody loves Ann. How could you not?

At a dinner one night in Dallas, which she hosted for me, we were 15 at a table set up in her entrance hall. There were low white calla lilies simply arranged in the center, framed by various colors and shapes of dried Mexican beans laid directly on the table. Really chic. The glam guests were dressed infor-


This page, clockwise from left: Mariachis descending midway through dinner were a festive surprise element; CeCe Armstrong, Lisa Fine, Chris Bettis, and Jeanne Cox; Alex Hitz and Ann Barbier-Mueller; Heather Furniss and Brad Kelly. Opposite page: Guests at Ann Barbier-Mueller’s exquisitely set table.

mally—Mexican cotton blouses and the like—just right for the 95-degree day that turned into a 78-degree evening, and there were votive candles flickering everywhere, stylishly. Her 1940s brick house is a collector’s house: African masks; Japanese warrior armor, if it’s not off at its worldwide tour through the great museums; excellent 18th- and 19th-century European wooden furniture; and Native American clay pots and prayer rugs mix with plain but perfectly upholstered, comfortable pieces. Ann and Gabriel’s house is a feast for the eyes. They accomplish the incredible, more-often-than-not fugitive look that only a seasoned pair with perfect taste and sure hands can: THE MIX. They actually live with their collection, as do their children, dogs, housekeeper, and those lucky enough to be their friends and guests. Gloria is Ann’s friend. And her housekeeper, confidante, aide-de-camp, baby

nurse, and maîtresse de maison, and, not to mention, fabulous cook. She’s lived with the Barbier-Muellers for the last 31 years. Gloria cooked for us that night—simple, delicious food from her native Mexico: guacamole, corn tortillas with shredded beef and cilantro, enchiladas, a green salad with “avocado” dressing—something new just for me— along with chiles rellenos, refried beans, and on and on into the night! Elegant French wines were poured by Victor, and Gloria enlisted two other friends to help her in the kitchen, all of them in matching black skirts and brightly colored peasant blouses with brilliant embroidery. From the first step inside the house, I knew this would be a joyous night of relaxed, cozy fun and delicious food. You can always tell. Never underestimate the element of surprise. Midway through the main course, something happened that I never would’ve imagined. A group of

ten handsome mariachis appeared on the staircase above where our table was, in cigarette pants and bolero jackets, carrying their instruments. You heard me, ten. It was a WOW moment, the element of unexpected delight and forethought confounding all of us. Those mariachis had been upstairs the whole time we’d been having drinks and the first part of our dinner. We shouted the titles of songs: “Quando Caliente el Sol,” “Guantanamera,” and on and on, and they played and played. Gloria and her friends danced with all of us at the table while Victor took Ann and some others for a twirl. A celebration—just because it was Thursday. When the mariachis finished playing for us, they went to the kitchen to serenade Gloria and the girls while they washed up the dishes, and we all ended up in the kitchen singing and listening for what must have been hours and hours, but the time passed as quickly as the blink of an eye. u OCTOBER 2015 69


ART

CATHARINE WARREN TOUR DE FORCE BY KATE GUBELMANN

70 QUEST


TODAY, WHEN YOU look at a painting, do you know what you are seeing? If you lived before the 19th century, you did. In those times, paintings were categorized into genres: historical or religious paintings were the highest form, which then descended into portraiture; scenes of everyday life (called “genre paintings,” confusingly); and still life. Starting in 1863, with the Salon des Refusés, these categories were challenged by the change brought on by the move to modernity in Western civilization. Artists reflected these advancements in technology and times with new artistic definitions: Impressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, Surrealism, and eventually, Expressionism. These “isms” became the new orders of painting. Recognizable objects were sidelined by artists seeking reality through an abstract vision. The viewer needed a new vocabulary to understand these out-

pourings, and Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944) and Paul Klee (1879–1940) were just the ones to give new definitions to looking at art. Both, as teachers at the Bauhaus, codified an artistic expression that is still useful today. Kandinsky and Klee influenced many artists, among whom is Catharine Warren. Catharine, a painter since Sarah Lawrence, is in her studio every day. There, she creates images instilled by what has impressed her. As she says, “It’s no good if I’m inspired while in Bloomingdale’s. I need to be in the studio…to stab into the This page: Catharine Warren’s bold paintings echo the works of Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, while creating her own unique style and language. Opposite page: Warren crafts lively and spirited paintings that “belie the human hand.” OCTOBER 2015 71


72 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F K AT E G U B E L M A N N

canvas.” Her images are very lively and full of energy. Colors swirl, zigzag, drip and blob across the canvas. Catharine cuts and pastes papers onto the canvas for further dimension. These beautifully organic images belie the human hand, yet the physicality of them is impressive. It is sheer creative essence expelled on to a canvas. How Catharine creates these intense swirling surfaces is amazing, especially considering her lithe being. Perhaps there is a connection to Van Gogh and his intensely worked canvases from Saint-Rémy-deProvence, where Warren also lives. When we look at Catharine’s work, we see nature in its most exuberant form. Happily for New York, these wonderful paintings are now on view at Gerald Bland, located in the Fine Arts Building at 232 East 59th Street. Gerry, a veteran of showing us what delights the eye, has a new gallery. From October 13, you can see how well Warren’s paintings dovetail with the chic decorative arts collected by Bland. A great example of this is a screen created by Catharine. Her experience in printmaking is evident with her use of multiple images. Two separate pieces are joined to form one whole artwork. Gerry has done something similar with his showroom. Here, he combines two forms of art, fine and decorative, and creates perfect environments. All you have to do is move in… u


ART

This page: The swirling colors of Warren’s work give a sense of the organic way in which each painting is approached. Opposite page: Gerald Bland with one of Warren’s works, which will be displayed at his gallery beginning October 13 (above); painter Catharine Warren (below). OCTOBER 2015 73


CANTEENS

LE BILBO, BETTER THAN EVER

A FUNNY THING happened on the way to Barneys. Not just once, but lately, on several occasions, an Upper East Sider or few have been walking along 60th Street when suddenly they’ve spotted a familiar face standing at the door of an unmarked bistro. “I thought you disappeared!” they’ve shouted. (Or, something to that effect.) In fact, that convivial face at the door hasn’t gone away—it’s just strayed, by a mere few blocks. They’d be talking about one of the lively, accented servers from Le Bilboquet, the beloved Upper East Side French dining spot. Bilbo, as it’s affectionately known, was nestled for years on the north side of 63rd Street, between Madison and Park avenues. The block was your typical movie-set version of residential Upper East Side life: tony town74 Q U E S T

houses, preppy Park Avenue types walking their dogs at night, a crowd of casual but finely dressed patrons gathering outside the door on smoking shifts. The block felt quiet and homey, and Le Bilboquet could be counted on for an equally at-home ease, albeit tuned up a French notch or two. There, the 30 tables were packed so tightly you sometimes literally crawled over other guests to get to the bathroom, and the clatter of animated European accents and waspy lockjaw drawls made you feel like you couldn’t get any more Upper East Side than this. The food—unwavering French bistro fare—made moules frites the equivalent of mac ’n cheese comfort food for the zip code. It’s understandable, then, that many were saddened two years ago when Bilbo’s doors seemed to close for business.

DA N I E L K R I E G E R

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS Alas, Le Bilboquet had only moved, three blocks south to East 60th Street. News spread by word of mouth, but still, some are only now discovering—to their delight—that the institution never went away. In fact, the new Bilboquet is a bigger, grander, even more boisterous version (if such a thing is possible) of its former incarnation. Here, the street is slightly more commercial (in fact, the restaurant fittingly shares the same building as FIAF, the French Institute Alliance Français), yet the interior, by Carolina Von Humboldt of CV Interiors, is like a blown-out version of the former space, nearly quadrupling the size. The décor, in a decidedly understated French manner, takes second seat to

Still, the menu has changed, with the introduction of five daily specials as well as more seasonal updates, including, for fall, coq au vin, by executive chef Julien Jouhannaud, who’s also introduced a much-asked-for burger (crafted here with primegrade beef and foie gras, bien sûr). There’s also a new tartare worth risking a deviation from the tuna and salmon standards for: dorade, done up with jalapeños. Wines are now complemented by a new cocktail list, featuring eight versions of classic, elegant drinks worthy of the Upper East Side but with slight enhancements to remind us we’re in foodie times. A stiff martini is served to perfection, lemon twist and all, but if spice is calling

the social scene: simple tables covered in white paper allow for the post-modern art on the walls to stand out, and also serves as a nice blank background for the uptown fashions on display. You’re still sandwiched in elbow-to-elbow, but that’s why you’ve come here. There’s a comforting intimacy, if on adrenaline. Philippe Delgrange, the owner (investors include Ronald Perelman, Eric Clapton, and Steve Witkoff), is still the heartbeat of the house, gliding from table to table to chat with guests. The menu looks almost exactly the same, with relied-upon staples like crab-avocado salad, steak tartare, profiteroles for dessert, and, perhaps most famous of all, Le Poulet Cajun, a surprisingly moist Cajun chicken that’s also knife-and-fork friendly. It’s not suprising, then, that they serve 700 plates of it per week.

your name in more places than just the dorade tartare, try the A La Grandé, their version of a spicy margarita. A margarita at Le Bilboquet, you may ask? Is this really the same place? Then the lights go down as the crowd bursts out singing over a sparkler-splashed birthday cake being paraded across the room, and suddenly you know you’re home again. u This page, clockwise from top left: Tuna tartare is a staple among the starters; flowers adorning the bar; chocolate-drenched profiteroles; the bustling scene. Opposite page: Owner Philippe Delgrange personally greets guests. Le Bilboquet: 20 East 60th Street (between Madison and Park avenues). Open daily from 12–4 p.m. for lunch, 5:30–11 p.m. for dinner. Reservations: 212.751.3036; website: lebilboquetny.com. OCTOBER 2015 75


QUEST

Fresh Finds

BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R WHILE THE LEAVES on the trees may start to turn color come October, Oscar de la Renta knows that some leaves—like the ones you’ll want to fasten to your favorite fall jacket or sweater—are best left the perfect shade of gold. This month, we’ve gone shopping with fall on our minds. We’ve also picked up some products whose sales go to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month. So, shop away...

Pick up and go with Tomas Maier’s Granada/Antique bag in black and dark brass for all of life’s occasions. $1,195. Tomas Maier: 956 Madison Ave. or tomasmaier.com. Pin this on for size: Oscar de la Renta’s Russian gold ivy brooch. $390. Oscar de la Renta: At Saks Fifth Avenue.

With versatile pieces perfect for layering or standing on their own, Veronica Beard has every working woman and gal-abouttown covered. Visit veronicabeard.com for complete fall styles.

76 QUEST

Tabitha Simmons knows how to give you that extra lift with the black kidsuede Lucette heel. $795. Tabitha Simmons: At tabithasimmons.com.


Serene & Private - A truly enchanting setting! Nearly 18 breathtaking acres with a private six-acre lake. Gently rolling lawns with flowering Apple, Pear and Cherry trees. Circa 1910 Farmhouse, fully renovated. Over 4500 square feet of living space with imported English Conservatory. Two Bedroom Guest Cottage. Sparkling Pool, Tennis Court and Putting Greens. An incredible offering. $3,200,000

Historic 1800’s Federal - Part of Pound Ridge’s Past! The Solomon

Lockwood House, a majestic early-19th Century Country Estate rich in period details. Impeccably rebuilt and restored—the perfect marriage of old and new. Exquisitely finished and finely appointed 6700 square feet with six bedrooms and six baths. Nearly three spectacular acres with level lawns, Boxwood Gardens and stately trees. Pool with Pool House. Guest Cottage with fireplace. $3,999,999

Dramatic Modern - Featured in New American House 2 and Moun- Step Into the Past tain Houses, stunning Modern Estate designed by two architects formerly of Gwathmey Siegel. Distinctive 7500 square foot residence with airy rooms with walls of windows to usher in light and views. Edge green Maple floors, Lutron lighting, skylights, high ceilings and extensive built-ins. Over three private acres overlooking a scenic pond. Six car garages plus additional garage with lift and dynometer…..perfect for the avid auto enthusiast! $1,850,000

Remarkable Pre-Revolutionary Colonial dating back to the 1740’s. Rich in period detail with antique hardwood floors, incredible millwork, period moldings and six fireplaces. Center Entrance Hall. Front Parlor. Beautifully scaled Living Room with French doors to Screened Porch. Formal Dining Room with original cooking fireplace. Country Kitchen open to Family Room. Five Bedrooms. Four Car Garage with Accessory Apartment. Gated drive to seven estate acres with Tennis Court and Swimming Pool. $2,195,000

All That is Bedford -

Breathtaking Views -

Circa 1910 Colonial brimming with grace and character. Beautifully detailed rooms with hardwood floors, period millwork and extensive built-ins. Sun-filled Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Chef’s Kitchen. Cozy Den. Private Master Suite. Nursery/Bedroom. Two additional Bedrooms. Gym. Wine Cellar. Central air. Over two gorgeous acres with specimen trees,gardens and Pool.Estate location on the Riding Lanes.$1,775,000

(914) 234-9234

Sophisticated Country Colonial perfectly sited to take in the phenomenal distant view. Ten main rooms with detailed millwork, crown molding, gleaming hardwood floors, French doors and two fireplaces. Center Entrance Hall. Living Room with Fireplace and French doors to side porch. Great Room with Dining Area and Sitting Area with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Four estate acres with sparkling pool. $1,795,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


Fresh Finds

Larkspur & Hawk’s one-of-a-kind

Discover the moisturizing secret every beauty expert counts on for both hair and skin: 100% Argan Oil from John Masters Organics, adding instant glow

Caprice earrings in 18-kt. rose gold, green amethyst, tsavorite, and demantoid garnets make for a totally unique gift. $12,500 by special order at Fred Leighton, 212.288.1872.

and shine. $38 per bottle at ulta.com.

Barton Perreira’s Ascot shades in matte “heroine chic” with custom red mirrored lenses ($455) are beyond chic—and exclusive to Barneys New York.

We’re placing all bets on Kotur’s “Winning” Espey hand-printed satin clutch with Swarovski crystals. $650 at koturltd.com.

Keep a low waist in high style This season, Burberry has ventured well beyond the house’s iconic check print and finds inspiration even in Durham quilts. For a selection of fall dresses, visit us.burberry.com. 78 QUEST

with Brunello Cucinelli’s 3-cm. low-waist skinny belt in gold and silver monili and calfskin leather. $1,145. Brunello Cucinelli: 683 Madison Ave., 212.813.0900.


LEDGEWOOD ON THE HUDSON

Hyde Park | $4,900,000 | Set amid the grand historic mansions along the Hudson River, this one-of-a kind estate is steeped in American history. Graced with all the grandeur of a bygone era, this passionately, fully-restored mansion exudes both sophistication and comfort while showcasing spectacular Hudson River views from all the principal rooms. Grand yet immensely inviting, the main residence offers 7 bedrooms, 7 baths and formal dining and living rooms that flow out to a stone terrace and extensive decking – the perfect venue for entertaining or simply relaxing and enjoying the blissful river views. Additional highlights include a fabulous kitchen designed to accommodate events of all proportions, a richly-paneled presidential library that serves as a focal point of the home and a garden level game room and den. A pool and hot tub is adjacent to the pool house featuring a kitchenette and a bedroom suite for guests or staff. A newly resurfaced lighted tennis court adds to the spectacular 9-acre setting comprised of beautifully landscaped, fenced grounds enhanced with lush gardens. In the heart of the scenic Hudson Valley, this remarkable estate is convenient to all area attractions as well as New York City, approximately 80 miles away. Web# 4523852.

MARGARET HARRINGTON

Lic. Assoc. R. E. Broker 83 Katonah Avenue, Katonah, NY 10536 C: 914.572.7395 | O: 914.572.7395 margaret.harrington@elliman.com 101 KING STREET, CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514. 914.238.3988 | © 2015 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


Fresh Finds The bespoke St. Regis Saber by Christofle merges two iconic luxury brands, and their shared passion for celebratory sabrage. Certain St. Regis pro-

No gentleman’s

perties will also be offering

wardrobe is

sabrage master classes.

complete without

For more, visit

Prada’s handsomely

stregis.com/rituals.

patterned leather document holder. $1,590 The L.B.M. 1911 check wool

at select Prada bou-

blazer ($875) and pants

tiques and at prada.com.

($250) are produced by Lubiam, the oldest continuous men’s clothing company in Italy. Available at Ziani: 1400 Broadway, 212.302.3661.

He’ll get wrapped up in Miansai’s Noir Brummel hook bracelet, perfect alone or stacked with others. $95 at When the occasion calls for

miansai.com.

bubbles, be sure you’re pouring into Riedel’s Superleggero Champagne wine glass, the first-ever Champagnespecific shape from any glassware brand. $139 per glass as riedelusa.net.

Powerful, agile, and distinctive, Jaguar’s F-Type is a sports car engineered for high performance with Intelligent Driveline Dynamics. From $65,000. Visit jaguarusa.com for more.

Discerning palates know the luxury of Taittinger’s Prélude “Grands Crus,” balancing Chardonnay mineral notes with the aromatic strength of Pinot Noir. $100 per bottle at Sherry-Lehmann or Flatiron Wines and Spirits. 80 QUEST


Casa Claridge’s has debuted as the guesthouse of Faena District Miami Beach, a new neighborhood in Miami with art and culture at its core. For more information or to book a stay, visit faena.com/casa-claridges.

Hello, Kitty! Keys are easy to find on Kitty Joseph’s tricolor pompom key ring in powder blue, hot pink, and dusty pink faux fur. Handmade in the United Kingdom. $92 at kittyjoseph.com.

Add a sophisticated splash of color to your next evening out by carrying Edie Parker’s diagonal striped clutch in acrylic. $1,295 at edie-parker.com. You’ll flip for the trapeze silhouette of Erdem’s Cosima dress in pale pink organza embroidered with

From October through December, $25 of each sale of Marimekko’s Galleria scarf will be donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. $129 at Marimekko stores and us.marimekko.com.

multi-colored floral motifs. $3,829 at erdem.com.

Ralph Lauren’s Pink Pony Fund continues to support all aspects of breast cancer, from diagnosis and awareness to patient navigation, and 25% of sales from Pink Pony products, like this legging ($88) and racer-back tank ($68), available at ralphlauren.com, go toward the cause.

The 39-mm. Lady Fabergé in 18-kt. rose gold with pink opalescent enamel dial on an alligator strap is every lady’s new best friend. $32,500. Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave., 646.559.8848. OCTOBER 2015 81


FROM MASOTTI TO MADISON:

LA PERLA’S EVOLVING LOOK

This page: La Perla’s Desire bustier in Neoprene ($2,304). Opposite page: An array of sleepwear and lingerie in solid tones of red, black, and white from La Perla’s current Fall-Winter 2015 collection (bottom row); La Perla’s Floralia bodysuit in black, which retails for $608 (inset). 82 QUEST


R E TA I L

CO U RTE S Y O F L A P E R L A

Even from its early days, La Perla has demonstrated a remarkable flexibility in terms of adapting to the times and creating products attuned to the needs of its clientele. IN 1954, Ada Masotti, a talented Italian woman, began the journey toward her dream: creating an atelier of corsetry in the name of the best Italian tradition. Beginning in a small workshop in Bologna, the Italian town renowned for its storied tradition of silk factories and textile manufacturers, Masotti used her expertise as a skilled corset-maker to create articles of clothing that, more like works of art, enhanced feminine beauty. She liked to present her creations in boxes lined with velvet as if they were precious jewels, which led to the name La Perla, or “pearl,” representing the most feminine and harmonious gem. Even from its early days, the company demonstrated a remarkable flexibility in terms of adapting to the times and creating products attuned to the needs of its clientele. The Swinging Sixties gave birth to a generation of young people looking for a fresh, sexy, and unconventional style. New fashion icons emerged to the rhythm of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, and The Who. Brigitte Bardot became legendary, as did models like Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton. The ideals of peace, love and “flower power,” as championed by the hippie generation, swept a wave of profound change. La Perla launched a new concept of lingerie: it introduced more colorful collections with multicolored floral, plaid, and checked patterns alongside its more traditional white, black, or nude creations. Masotti was aware that fashion was being revolutionized and lingerie could not afford to lag behind. In the fabulous Sixties, speed was of the essence.

La Perla has managed to keep up speed ever since. After being stripped of its seductive and feminine allure during the women’s rights movement, lingerie managed to rebound at the end of the ’70s and into the ’80s. Under Masotti, La Perla ushered in a return to the enticing glamor of lace, silk, and transparent fabrics—and thus, the wheel of fashion came full circle once again. Today, La Perla is evolving even further, especially outside of its Italian birthplace and Europeandominated market. Since the Spring-Summer 2014 season, the La Perla advertising campaigns have become provocative stories in their own right, led by artistic director Fabien Baron who, with photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot, was chosen to represent a decisive change in La Perla’s strategy and communications. By creating portraits of women, the company has steadily delivered through visual messages the fact that there are multiple styles of femininity, as evidenced through each La Perla collection. It also doesn’t hurt to have a leader as creative and adaptable as Ada Masotti herself. Since 2008, the major driving force behind the label’s presence and expansion outside of Europe has been Suzy Biszantz, CEO of La Perla North America. Biszantz, whose previous positions as CEO of Reebok/Adidas and then the Greg Norman Collection sharpened her already instinctive acumen, has successfully persuaded American customers to be more open-minded about luxury lingerie. She’s slowly evolving the American attitude toward La Perla’s product, from that of a strict utilitarian necessity to a more nuanced, personal experi-


R E TA I L

ence and form of expression. She’s helped forge collaborations with fashion labels such as Jason Wu in order to make the usually hidden world of lace a part of the fabric of outward fashion. She’s also emphasizing the brand’s lesser-known non-lingerie items, like in-and-out pieces and accessories, in order to stretch the imagination of the American consumer. From underwear and sleepwear to swimwear and men’s collections—yes, even men’s—La Perla is being showcased through finely executed advertising campaigns and runway shows, bringing the world of undergarments into plain sight—as fashion in their own right. Markets like Miami and Southern California are seeing a surge in demand—and an expansion in retail real estate—and right here in New York the La Perla customer is being reawakened in part through the retail experience. Earlier this year, La Perla’s historic boutique on Madison Avenue was reopened with an entirely new look, created by Roberto Baciocchi, the architect responsible for Prada and Miu Miu stores. “We knew that, for years, we’ve had a premier location with a loyal client base on Madison Avenue, and embraced the opportunity to stay in the same space with a fully redesigned boutique,” explains Biszantz. That new design calls attention to the influences of great Italian architecture over a dedicated two floors containing La Perla’s increasingly diverse collections. “Upon entering the renovated La Perla Madison Avenue Boutique,” Biszantz tells us, “our clients will immediately sense the luxurious shop-

ping environment that’s been created. The Roberto Baciocchi design features precious fabrics and marbles, blended with the iconic arches of Italian architecture.” On the second floor, an espace privé has been created for VIP customers, where exclusive services and products are provided, such as the new Made to Measure collections and the Atelier collection, presented last January during the Haute Couture fashion week in Paris. One of the main features of the new La Perla project—a nod to the brand’s raison d’être—is the gateway in front of the fitting rooms, marking a space devoted to exclusive intimacy. Another surprise is the metal grating feature that recalls ancient confessionals, and a “Service” bell for calling a member of the sales staff. “We’ve placed an emphasis in the boutique on brand extensions including men’s wear, footwear, loungewear, sunglasses, and new fragrances,” Biszantz says. That private VIP suite, she tells us, is also used for bridal parties and other events. “I’m thrilled the project has been completed and the initial response has been terrific.” The new look of the Madison Avenue flagship is part of a wider program of new openings and new looks for existing boutiques across the United States. Four new boutiques have already opened in San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston, and Chicago. In Miami Bal Harbour, the La Perla boutique has moved to a two-level, 2,700-squarefoot flagship location. Biszantz, not unlike Ada Masotti herself, is proving that lace—and the feminine form—is sometimes stronger than its marble house. u

CO U RTE S Y O F L A P E R L A

“For years, we’ve had a premier location with a loyal client base on Madison Avenue, and embraced the opportunity to stay in the same space with a fully redesigned boutique.” —Suzy Biszantz


This page, clockwise from top left: Suzy Biszantz, CEO of La Perla North America; interior and exterior views of the La Perla flagship at 803 Madison Avenue. Opposite page, inset: Sailor Stripes non-wired swimsuit ($354). Opposite page, bottom row, left to right: Maison bodysuit ($894) and robe ($1,753); Neoprene Desire underwired bra ($464) and silk Essence long pants ($324); Neoprene Desire longline bra ($1,458) and long pants (price upon request); Sailor Stripes underwired triangle bra ($248) and high-rise bikini briefs ($234).


AUDAX

WHITEHEAD INSTITUTE:

NOT SAFE, NOT SORRY

RALLYING SUPPORT for America’s space

program in the early 1960s, President Kennedy famously said, “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do other things not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” The same spirit animates scientists at Whitehead Institute, who have always known that the most impactful pursuits are often the riskiest. An independent teaching and research institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Whitehead Institute operates pioneering programs in cancer research, developmental biology, genetics and genomics. It was founded in 1982, through the generosity of Jack Whitehead, to create a new kind of research institution: one that would exist 86 QUEST

outside the boundaries of traditional academia, yet through a teaching affiliation with MIT offer all the intellectual, collegial, and scientific benefits of a leading research university. Whitehead Institute gives outstanding young investigators broad freedom to pursue new ideas and avenues in basic research that accelerate scientific discovery. They are guided by a world-renowned faculty, who are selected through a joint appointment process with the MIT biology department. These “Members,” as faculty are called at Whitehead, include three recipients of the National Medal of Science, nine members of the National Academy of Science, five members of the Institute of Medicine, seven members

of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a winner of the MacArthur Prize Fellowship. Whitehead is home to more than 300 scientists focused on biology’s most fundamental questions. These include developing new platforms for the use of stem cells in precision medicine; mapping the complex pathways of cancer metastasis; investigating the biological mechanisms of aging: modeling the origins of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and autism spectrum disorders; and exploring the reasons for varying disease susceptibility between men and women. Dr. David Page, Whitehead’s director, says, “Whitehead was founded on the belief that basic, biomedical research

CO U RTE S Y O F W H I TE H E A D I N S T I T U TE

This page, clockwise from top left: Whitehead Institute; sequencing the human genome; pioneering advances in stem cell science.


offers the best hope for improving human health. Our credo: Tackle the most difficult questions in biology and cure the devastating diseases of our time.” Whitehead Institute often takes an unorthodox approach to achieve its goals. For example, it has been a major player in plant biology, as opposed to animal biology, for more than a decade, hiring cutting edge scientists like Mary Gehring, who studies how plant-derived products can be effective in treating human diseases. Counter-intuitive initiatives and the willingness to take risks have yield-

final outcome will be.” Veteran investigator Gerald Finks says, “When I first decided to work on yeast, there were only 20 labs in the world doing so. Now there are several thousand. This has happened because yeast allows you to answer questions rapidly, which has been important for the development of biofuels and for the manufacture of drugs in yeast.” Of her research on the tiny plant Arabidopsis thaliana, Mary Gehring says, “We are betting that a simple weed will allow us to gain insights into epigenetic

demic medical centers like the Duke University School of Medicine, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies like Johnson & Johnson and Agios Pharmaceuticals the world over. “There are 23,000 genes in every one of our 30 trillion cells,” says Joel Kassimir, M.D., a prominent New York City physician. “The discovery of oncogenes (cancer causing) by the modest Bob Weinberg, the mapping of the Y chromosome by David Page, and other monumental discoveries by Whitehead Institute have and will continue to enhance and extend our

This page, from left: Whitehead Institute Director Dr. David C. Page; Dr. Mary Gehring uses plants to study genetics; Dr. Robert Weinberg.

ed countless honors and rewards for Whitehead. Last April The Scientist magazine announced that Whitehead was named #1 in its “Best Places to Work,” ranking for the third consecutive year. David Bartel’s lab has recently overhauled our understanding of RNA translation rates. “Developing a new method can be difficult,” he says, “But it’s a real thrill when that method works, and a previously inaccessible aspect of biology is suddenly revealed.” Iain Cheeseman’s lab studies cell division. “With more than 30 trillion cells in the human body, cells must divide countless times to generate each person. On a daily basis, we’re making research decisions where we don’t know what the

inheritance not only in plants, but more broadly in all multicellular organisms.” Rudolf Jaenisch has had a distinguished research career for over half a century. Recently, he used a novel gene-editing technique called CRISPR/Cas to change forever the way mice can be genetically altered to model human disease. “When I applied for my first grant to produce transgenic mice 40 years ago, it was funded immediately. That’s a project that would never be funded today. There can be no risk involved now. That is not what drives science.” The results of this philosophy speak for themselves. Today, Whitehead alumni are running elite research institutions such as the Koch Cancer Center, aca-

lives in unimaginable ways.” Whitehead Institute is proof that with risk can come tremendous rewards, which has been a good thing in today’s challenging funding environment. Today, only 25-30% of Whitehead’s revenue comes from federal research grants, down from 52% a decade ago. The rest comes from increasing royalty and license fees, grants from private foundations, and corporate support. “This is not a top-down organization,” director David Page told the Boston Globe last year. “I consider Whitehead to be a sort of chaotically creative artists’ colony.” And one that, refusing to play it safe, is rewriting the future of medical science, day by exciting day. u OCTOBER 2015 87


ART

SYMBOLS OF LOVE AND HOPE WHEN ADRIA DE HAUME was 10 years old, she’d often slip out the door of her Detroit home and ride her bicycle to a place she cherished, a place where few would ever expect to find the daughter of two Jewish parents. When she’d arrive, the Detroit Gesu Catholic Church was usually quiet, a sanctuary where de Haume could be alone and assign meanings to the objects she cherished. Her favorite was the cross. To this curious girl, it was a symbol of love and hope. Many years later, in 1982, de Haume, who had spent much of her professional life in the fashion industry, created her first cross. Her friend Nellie May Cox, a Baptist minister, had become ill and was suddenly hospitalized. Things did not look good. Cox was allowed no visitors, no flowers. In a desperate attempt to help, de Haume fashioned a small cross out of two mixing sticks, painting them with vibrant colors and tying the center with red silk. Since Cox was being treated at Catholic hospital, a nurse agreed to place it on the wall across from where she slept. After Nellie May Cox recovered, she contacted de Haume and told her that glimpsing the cross gave her the sign she needed to live. Ever since then, Adria de Haume has been making crosses of all kinds. Many have even been exhibited in galleries and museums. Cataloging de Haume’s work was the idea of her old art history professor at University of Michigan, Diane Kirkpatrick. Kirkpatrick and de Haume frequently kept in touch after college. She’d often come to New York to see de Haume’s latest pieces. “When Diane said she wanted to write [my] book,” says de Haume, “I didn’t have a catalog of my crosses or pictures and I had to borrow them back [from collectors] just to assemble an archive to give her. It was so much work. I didn’t realize what this entailed, but she was so adamant that the book be done.” The book, Cross Purpose (Assouline), featuring large images of her works and essays by art historians, was published earlier this fall. It is dedicated to her son, Will. Once Cross Purpose hit stores, de Haume felt terribly vulnerable. “It was a really big step for me to let this book come out because it is so personal and dear to my heart.” But releasing the book, which reveals much about her life and work as an artist and jewelry designer, was a chance to push those feelings of doubt and fear away. “We have to heal the world,” she tells me. “We have to make it a better place. If my book does anything I pray that it will help people feel that’s there’s a higher good and a bigger picture. Whether it helps them through humor or it helps them through playfulness and joy, then it will have been worth everything.” To the passive observer, her goals may sound ambitious, unattainable even. Maybe nothing, no matter the efforts, can be done to fight all the horrid wrongs in the world. And maybe it was rest and medicine that helped her dear friend Nellie May Cox recover back in 1982. But that kind of thinking would only warrant one more victory for logic, one more victory for those of us who never really tried. u 88 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F A S S O U L I N E

BY ALEX TRAVERS


ART

This page: Adria de Haume’s “22nd Birthday Cross—Audrey Panel” (2014) in acrylic, oil stick, glitter, and plastic collage on archival paper, mounted on Dibond. Opposite page, counterclockwise from top left: Artist and jewelry designer Adria de Haume; de Haume’s book Cross Purpose (Assouline); “Karma Cross Panel” (2014) in acrylic, glitter, metallic ink on photo, printed on archival paper and mounted on Dibond. OCTOBER 2015 89


EVENTS

ON NOVEMBER 16, Silver Hill Hospital will hold its annual Giving Hope Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street. For such a grand and well-attended affair, it is amazing to realize this is only its sixth—it wasn’t until 2010 that the non-profit hospital made its mark on the charity circuit, when longtime supporters and former co-chairs Michael Cominotto and Dennis Basso spearheaded its first Gala. Silver Hill—a picturesque 42-acre property in New Canaan, Connecticut—has long been recognized as a top tier psychiatric hospital, and its boldfaced-named supporters love every occasion to celebrate it. The Silver Hill gala has helped a tremendous amount of people as well. “Thanks to the generosity of our community of supporters, Silver Hill Hospital’s Giving Hope Gala has raised more than $4.5 million in the last six years. These funds go directly to patient scholarships for individuals who would benefit from our long-term treatment programs but cannot afford the costs,” explains Silver Hill Hospital President and Medical Director Dr. Sigurd Ackerman. “We want to make sure every person struggling with mental illness or addiction has an opportunity for treatment, no matter their financial situation. Our expert and compassionate treatment programs 90 QUEST

are focused on helping our patients get better and inspiring hope. Our goal is simple, yet crucial: The more money we raise, the more people we can help. We want every person we treat to return home to their families and friends with renewed hope and health.” The evening is filled with incredible talent as well, thanks to one of this year’s honorees, Jonny Podell, a Silver Hill alum and legendary music agent, and friends like Colin Quinn, this year’s master of ceremonies. “The care I got saved my life,” Podell says. “I wasn’t just a faceless patient receiving boilerplate treatment. This gala is to raise funds for people like me who don’t have the resources I did to pay for treatment.” This year’s other honoree, Dr. Marsha Linehan, is the founder and director of the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics at the University of Washington, and will be receiving the 2015 President’s Award. Anna Bulgari serves as the 2015 Gala chairperson. All proceeds from the Giving Hope Gala directly benefit the Silver Hill Hospital Financial Aid Fund. u For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit www.silverhillhospital.org.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

SILVER HILL HOSPITAL GALA SHINES BRIGHT


This page, clockwise from top left: Dr. Sigurd Ackerman, president and medical director of Silver Hill Hospital; Dennis Basso, Cyndi Lauper, Michael Cominotto, and Jonny Podell, 2013; 2011 honoree Carrie Fisher with daughter Billie Lourd; Carol Mack, 2011; Coco Rocha, 2012; Joan Collins, 2010; Neil Sedaka, 2010. Opposite page: Alex Hitz, Amy Fine Collins, Mark Gilbertson, and Nina Griscom.


ART VENICE

LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA, the 56th International Art exhibition, kicked off on May 5 with openings all over Venice. (The Biennale Arte officially runs from May 9 through November 22.) The theme of the exhibition this year is “All the World’s Futures.” My friend Sundaram Tagore insisted that I go to the Biennale for myself and I am glad I did! My three days in Venice were filled with mind-opening insights into how humans and humanity have evolved—and the prospects for the future of our planet. It was interesting to see that the Asian countries (Korea, Japan, Pakistan, India) and the Middle Eastern countries (Iran, Uzbekistan) had vibrant and bold political statements presented through their art. In contrast, the Nordic exhibits were reflective of the peace amidst global chaos. Hong Kong artist Tsang Kin-Wah’s “The Infinite Nothing” rebelled against age-old beliefs. Originally a devout Christian, Tsang began to question religious values when he came under the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche’s existentialist philosophy. Tsang’s video oeuvre can be characterized as a constant search for meaning and purpose in life: “Are we not straying as through an infinite nothing?” he asks. The art exhibits varied in theme. One presented the idea of a “perfect future,” which featured a 22nd-century world that was super efficient, climate controlled, and instantly connected to everything in the world. The perfect human specimen walked a rotating rim to keep fit, and water and food were provided in a measured amount to each human. Quite different were the graffiti-like installations in the Azerbaijan pavilion, offering a medley of peace, mental confusion, unity, and chaos that screamed from the extreme cross section of art at the Biennale. The Japanese exhibit was perhaps the most talked about at the Biennale. Artist Chiharu Shiota’s “The Key in the Hand,” curated by Hitoshi Nakano, had hundreds of keys hanging by red wool. The impact was mesmerizing as I walked under the cavern of red. The boat in the center signifying the navigation of the journey through life was really quite special! The “My East is Your West” opening, with Shilpa Gupta from India and Rashid Rana from Pakistan at Palazzo Benzon, was fantastic. The emphasis on the breaking of barriers and social commentaries of injustice asked such questions as, “Will it be alright if we win?” Cloth installations in meters measured the barriers between India and Bangladesh. Rashid was in Lahore and talked to every guest at the opening party via a video chat projected onto an entire wall to everyone’s delight. Most of the Biennale exhibits are located at the Giardini and the Arsenale, both close to the center and St. Mark’s Square, 92 QUEST

while other exhibits can be found at Tutti i Giorni, Al Tramonto, Zattere, La Fondamenta ai Gesuati, and Ponte Longo. My tip: Lilya Pavlovic-Dear is an artist to watch! Lilya lives between New York and Paris, and was born in the Ukraine. Her work at the Biennale was serene; I liked it very much. Camille Norment’s “Rapture” at the Nordic Pavilion was a “site specific sculptural and sonic installation” for which the American-born Oslo-based artist composed new music on a glass armonica, a legendary 18th-century instrument that creates ethereal music from glass and water that sounded a lot like an “Omm” chant to me! It’s interesting to note that the glass armonica—once played by Mozart and Marie Antoinette—was first celebrated for curing people with its entrancing music, but later banned because it was thought to induce states of ecstasy and arouse sexual excitement. Camille Norment comments: “Sound, by its nature, permeates borders—even invisible ones. Throughout history, fear has been associated with the paradoxical effects music has on the body and mind and its power as a reward-giving de-centralizer of control.” I thought this was a special exhibit to see for anyone visiting the biennale. I was fortunate to bump into American photographer Hugo Tillman (of “Beijing Series” fame), who then toured the central pavilion with me where there were many New York–centric art installations—all “must-sees” for New Yorkers, as we will understand the subtle nuances best! A favorite was the “Nelson Rockefeller 1958 Ballot” installation. Nelson Rockefeller resigned from federal government in 1956. In the state election of 1958, he was elected governor of New York by over 600,000 votes, defeating the incumbent, multi-millionaire W. Averell Harriman (even though 1958 was a banner year for Democrats elsewhere in the nation). A highlight on the walk from the Giardini to the Arsenale included the Serra dei Giardini Greenhouse that was built in 1894, the oldest permanent structure of the whole original system of the Biennale. Adel Abdessemed’s work showed in the same space with Nympheas’s “Grouping of Knives.” Another notable was Matthias Schaller’s “Das Meisterstuck,” also featured in last month’s New York Times. Matthias has photographed the art pallets of masters like Picasso, Monet, Cezanne, Kandinsky, Bacon, and Twombly, which offered pure revelation into the various artist’s minds and creativity. I left inspired by the Biennale’s “All the World’s Futures.” Art is truly the best reflection of reality, and the future is looking good! u

M E E R A G A N D H I ; CO U RTE S Y O F S U N DA R A M TA G O R E G A LLE RY

BY MEERA GANDHI


This page, clockwise from top left: Devika Bhise, Meera Gandhi, and Swati Bhise; Chiharu Shiota’s “The Key in the Hand”; a bridge next to the Serra dei Giardini Greenhouse (photo by Meera Gandhi); inside La Fondamenta ai Gesuati; the “My East is Your West” opening party.


R E A L E S TAT E

MARCEL BREUER’S STILLMAN HOUSE PRIVATELY NESTLED ON three acres

within the historic borough of Litchfield, Connecticut, less than two hours from Manhattan, the listing offers a main house, a guest house, and a pool which Architectural Digest characterized last year as possibly “the best pool in New England.” The Breuer-designed pool features a floating staircase and a landing platform in the likeness of Breuer’s Whitney Museum entrance (recently renamed The Met Breuer), a complete 360º infinity edge which factors among the earliest gunite pools in Connecticut. The home originally featured a 22-foot pool wall mural painted by Alexander Calder in 1953, featuring a geometric design which he himself painted after his

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first submission to the Stillmans (a group of nude figures) was deemed too racy. By the 1980s, due to element exposure, the wall needed to be rebuilt, and as result the mural has represented a facsimile of the original artworks ever since. Cited for preservational integrity by Docomomo U.S. and the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation in 2014, the Stillman House features prominently within Breuer’s architectural career and remains as futuristic and inspiring today as it did in 1950—the Litchfield town’s first modern house. Featuring Breuer’s signature use of glass, color, and natural materials, the main house has two living areas, four bedrooms, and two baths. The guest house offers


This page, clockwise from above: A view of the Stillman house’s famous pool; the futuristic décor; interior of separate studio; warm up by the fireplace; the modern layout from the back. Opposite page, clockwise from above: Marcel Breuer designed a cutting-edge façade; iconic Breuer staircase; wake up and walk out onto an open patio; the

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beautiful mural by the pool; Marcel Breuer’s signature use of materials.

a second full kitchen, another bath, garage, and a large sunken living area with 13-foot ceilings and wall-to-wall glass. The main house and the guest house overlook the pool experience and acres of meadow that lead to a private rolling hillside and Litchfield’s land trust of nature preserves. Documentation on the Stillman House is maintained by the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art and Syracuse University, and the house has been featured in books and publications all over the world, ranging from the cover of Interiors (October 1953) to Architectural Digest (August 2014) to the upcoming issue of Departures (July/August 2015). The home’s restoration lasted four years,

extensively leveraging archived drawings and photo material. The current owners purchased the home directly from the Stillman family in 2009. Klemm Real Estate was established in 1986 and has built a reputation both nationally and internationally as the number one leader of luxury property rentals and sales throughout Litchfield County, Connecticut. It is staffed by 40 associates with offices in Washington Depot, Woodbury, Litchfield, Roxbury, Lakeville/Salisbury and Sharon.u For more information, contact Graham Klemm of Klemm Real Estate at 860.868.7313 or graham@klemmrealestate.com.


OPEN HOUSE

A PEACEFUL ESCAPE POINT PLEASANT is an English-inspired country estate gracing 12 acres of waterfront land on the private, gated peninsula of Poppasquash, with an adjacent 13 waterfront acres available for purchase. Families such as Brown, Herreshoff, and Rockwell valued this particular place on Poppasquash for its exceptional views of the Bristol Harbor and the shipping channel stretching to the southernmost tip of Narragansett Bay to Newport. This iconic estate holds a significant place in the landscape and history of Bristol. The Poppasquash peninsula is a gated natural sanctuary that stretches along the western hip of Bristol. Driving along Poppasquash Road, you will enjoy pockets of salt ponds, colonial farmland, and summer estates, among them Case Farm, the revered home of actor Anthony Quinn. For over 100 years, Point Pleasant Farm was the homestead of the Brown-Herreshoff clan, whose creative genius was nurtured by the farm’s unique coastal topography. After the 1938 hurricane devastated the Herreshoff Manufacturing Facility, the family’s dear friend, Charles Rockwell Jr., purchased land 96 QUEST

on the homestead and commissioned renowned architect Wallis Howe to build a 10-bedroom home for his family. As an industrialist, Mr. Rockwell brought the construction of this home to a new level. Using new, state-of-the-art techniques of the time—including a highly advanced electrical system designed by the firm used in the New York World’s Fair—the house has a steel substructure, clad with brick and stone. This exceptionally built English Tudor Revival style home also showcases the expert craftsmanship of local talent including the Herreshofftrained boatwrights. Qualities of strength and endurance are evidenced by the currently superb condition of this home. Inside, one is struck by the dynamic play of refined beauty of the interior and large windows capturing vistas of the exquisite natural coastline. While swaths of blue and green from the views of the bay and lawn take center stage throughout this house, the thoughtfully scaled collection of rooms lend a sense of repose and quiet while enjoying the grandeur of an estate. Milled walls, libraries, coved ceilings, and long runs of mahogany and buttonwood floors are features of this gracious interior.

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This Wallis Howe–designed manor house rests on the waterfront of the private Poppasquash peninsula in Bristol, Rhode Island.


This page, clockwise from above: The expansive front hallway spans the width of the house; an aerial view of the property and its many waterfront acres; the tennis courts are just one of many recreational amenities. Opposite page: Charles Rockwell, Jr. commissioned noted architect Wallis Howe to design the exceptionally built English Tudor Revival style manor house, which is on the market for $6.5 million with Lila Delman Real Estate.

A long front hallway spanning the width of the house offers exceptionally milled English Oak walls, while pockets of sunlight spill in from the collection of east facing rooms which open to the expansive vistas of water, lawn, and sky. At the south end of the hall, an enormous window frames the unique view of the long run of Narragansett Bay to Newport, with passing glimpses of Aquidneck and Prudence Islands. While an elevator is available, the alluring delicate staircase made of iron and steel invites you upstairs to the seven en suite bedrooms. Views of the harbor and lawns are captured by balconies and long banks of windows. The third floor features two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room that opens out to the rooftop deck facing south. A finished basement holds a large home gym, recreational retreat, wine cellar, and laundry facility. An expansive terrace overlooks the large pool and Bristol Harbor. A tennis court, bocce court, and two moorings offer additional outdoor enjoyment for family and friends. Outbuildings include a small studio, a gardeners shed featuring

a root cellar, a four-stall barn, generator facility, and garages. Views of Bristol Harbor are bordered by the historic Bristol townscape. A variety of architectural forms, as well as the mooring field of the Herreshoff Marine Museum which, in the summer, showcases magnificent museum-quality classic yachts, offer infinite interest for the senses. From time to time, the soft sound of distant church bells remind you that you are part this wonderful community, rich in history and beauty. Point Pleasant is a sublime retreat. However, in just a few short minutes by boat, car, or bicycle, you can be plunged into this vibrant town resplendent with superb architecture and friendly people. Home to Roger Williams University, Bristol has become a vibrant haven of superb restaurants and shops. Just 45 minutes to Boston and 20 minutes to Newport, Point Pleasant is a timeless lifestyle to enjoy for generations to come. u For more information, contact Melanie Delman of Lila Delman Real Estate at 401.284.4820 or melanie.delman@liladelman.com. OCTOBER 2015 97


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I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

WHILE MANY OF New York’s finest residences have walls adorned with art, the formal dining room of this duplex apartment at One East End Avenue has walls that literally are art! The four walls of this elegant room (which features a fireplace) are a series of Zuber-inspired panels depicting a 360-degree panorama of late–19th century New York City. From the head of the table facing south, there is a “direct artistic view” of the Wall Street ferry terminal. And on the northeast wall of the room is Gracie Mansion—just as it would be if the walls were made of air. Zuber panels are wooden panels of printed, panoramic scenes that are created to look like a wallpaper. Zuber & Cie, founded as Jean Zuber et Cie, is a French Manufacture de Papier Peints et Tissus (which translates to: manufacturer of painted wallpaper and fabrics). It claims to be the last factory in the world to produce woodblock, printed wallpapers, and furnishing fabrics. The intricate and time-consuming process of making a series of panels— encompassing approximately eight months—begins with the assembly of the hand-carved woodblocks that were made between

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A ROOM WITH AN ARTISTIC VIEW


This spread: A Zuber-inspired panel depicts Gracie Mansion, at One East End Avenue; the entrance to the residence, which is located between 79th and 80th streets (inset).


1797–1830, when the company employed 50 in-house woodcarvers. Next, it takes four people per month to hand-brush a base dégradé surface—the rich graduated color background characteristic of a Zuber mural. And next, the artisans create the scene building layer upon layer of overlapping designs and colors (about 2,030 unique paint formulas, to be exact) from formulas that are as old as the woodblocks. One East End Avenue was built as an apartment building in 1929 for about $2.1 million by the architectural firm of Pennington & Lewis. The New York Times wrote: “Walking past the back of One East End Avenue, there is a still whiff of the ambition of the place. An elegant set of marble stairs leads down to what was originally a yacht landing. Now it is simply the leftover dream of a different era.” 100 QUEST

In fact, what is now the back of the building (facing the East River) was originally the main entrance. The yacht landing was added by the early financiers of the city who called these grand apartments home. Boating was a convenient way to commute to their offices on Wall Street. The other eight rooms of this “classic eleven-intonine room” cooperative are flooded with light. Most of them offer majestic views of the East River with beautiful hardwood, herringbone floors throughout. On the first level, the public rooms are located off the entrance gallery with an elegantly curved staircase creating an ideal layout for grand entertaining. The 28-foot, wood-paneled living room allows for multiple seating areas with tall ceilings, a wood burning fireplace, and five eastern-facing windows (including beautiful floor-to-ceiling bow windows reminiscent of the great luxury ocean liners. Adjacent to the living room is a wonderful library with two French doors, opening onto a wrought-iron Juliet balcony. Built in 1929, One East End Avenue lives on as one of the premier, full-service, white-glove buildings in Manhattan with a rich history that will live on through the ever-changing Manhattan skyline. Elegance and style, thankfully, never go out of fashion! u For more information, contact Stan Ponte of Sotheby’s International Realty at 212.606.4109 or stan.ponte@sothebyshomes.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

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This page: One East End Avenue boasts a variety of views, including some of the East River (above); the dining room is spectacular, decorated with Zuber-inspired panels (below). Opposite page: The staircase in the duplex; a Zuber-inspired panel depicts the Wall Street ferry terminal (inset). One East End Avenue is on the market with Sotheby’s International Realty for $6.2 million.


CALENDAR

OCTOBER

On October 21, American Ballet Theatre will kick off its fall season with a special opening-night performance, highlighted by the premiere of a new work by Mark Morris with music by Johann Nepomuk Hummel and costumes by Isaac Mizrahi. For more information, call 212.477.3030.

GOOD OL’ GLAMOUR

The junior committee of the Alzheimer’s Association will host its Old Hollywood benefit at the Broad Street Ballroom (41 Broad Street) at 9 p.m. For more information, call 312.335.8700.

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DO YOU WANNA DANCE?

The Wooster Group, a company of artists that makes works for the theater, will hold its 2015 benefit at the Performing Garage at 6:30 p.m. Co-chairs will include Laurie Anderson and Wes Anderson For more information, call 212.527.7531.

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The 30th Annual Sports Legends Dinner, benefitting the Buoniconti Fund, will take place at the Waldorf=Astoria at 5:30 p.m. The Pointer Sisters will preform live at the event. For more information, call 305.243.4656.

City Harvest’s Bid Against Hunger tasting event and auction will be held at 299 South Street. For more information, call 646.412.0646.

TOUCHDOWN PASS

JUST KEEP WALKING

The National Eating Disorders Association Walk will begin at Foley Square at 9 a.m. For more information, call 973.897.1261.

Spain’s Great Match will celebrate its Food and Wine event at the IAC building at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 646.561.2242.

The East Harlem School fall benefit, honoring the van Wyck family, will take place at the Tunnel at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.876.8775.

PROMOTING RESILIENCE

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FORK IT OVER

UPTOWN FUN

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Voices of September 11th will host its Always Remember gala at Guastavino’s at 6 p.m. Broadcast journalist Lesley Shtal will serve as emcee and former FBI director Robert S. Muller will be presented with an award. For more information, call 203.966.3911.

UP FOR GRABS

LUNCH AT A LANDMARK

On October 20, the Women’s Sports Foundation will celebrate the most accomplished women in athletics (and those they inspire) at Cipriani Wall Street at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.921.9070.

The New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation will host a lunch at the Hearst Tower at 12:15 p.m. For more information, call 646.412.0646.

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CALENDAR

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DOYENNES OF MEDIA

The International Women’s Media Foundation will hold its Courage in Journalism awards luncheon at Cipriani 42nd Street at 11 a.m. For more information, call 212.514.3700.

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HEIGHTENED AWARENESS

The Skin Cancer Foundation will hold its annual gala at the Mandarin Oriental at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.725.5176. On October 8, the New York Botanical Garden will hold its Rockefeller Rose Garden dinner at the Garden Terrace Room at 6 p.m. For more information, call 718.817.8774.

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LET THE MUSIC PLAY

New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College will celebrate their Cabaret event at the Park Avenue Armory at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 914.235.1490.

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ALL THAT JAZZ

The Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education’s Fiesta 2015 will take place at The Plaza. For more information, call 718.589.2230.

MAMA KNOWS BEST

The Mothers of the Year luncheon will take place at the St. Regis (2 East 55th Street) at 11:15 a.m. For more information, call 212.237.3902.

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YOUNG LEADERS

The Fountain House Associates Fall Fête will take place at Max Mara (cocktails) and the Racquet and Tennis Club (dinner and auction) at 6:30 p.m. Jacket and tie are required. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

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SOMETHING SPECIAL

The Hospital for Special Surgery will host its autumn benefit at Guastavino’s at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 917.359.3939.

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GOOD OLD BOYS

The Boys’ Club of New York, the nation’s oldest boys’ club, will celebrate its fall dance at The Plaza at 7 p.m. Offering academic support, mental health services, health and fitness education, and work-readiness programs, all proceeds from the event will be donated to boys and young men, ages six to 21. For more information, call 212.353.2122.

NOVEMBER 3 JOINING FORCES

The International Women’s Health Coalition will celebrate its 2015 gala at the Metropolitan Club at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

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FALL FOLIAGE

The Central Park Conservancy will host its annual Autumn in Central Park fundraiser at Naumburg Bandshell, under a clear ceiling tent, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.446.2242.

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KEEPING OUR CIT Y GREAT

The 22nd Living Landmarks celebration will take place at The Plaza at 7 p.m. The Conservancy strives to assure that our historic neighborhood and buildings survive intact. For more information, call 212.921.9070. INTERNATIONAL TOUR

To celebrate their opening night at Carnegie Hall, the American Friends of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra will host the association’s New York gala at Carnegie Hall (concert) and the Essex Hose (dinner) at 7 p.m. For more information, call 914.834.2868.

HOUSEKEEPING

James Lenox House and Carnegie East House will host their Autumn Leaves gala at the University Club at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.588.5886.

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OUT TO SEA

Mystic Seaport will honor Nathaniel Philbrick at the 10th Annual Sea Award gala at the Metropolitan Club at 6 p.m. For more information, all 212.752.2920.

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ANIMAL LOVE

The ASPCA young Friends benefit will be held at the IAC building at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 646.741.4449.

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A WOMAN’S WORK

The Women’s Committee luncheon will be held at the Mandarin Oriental. For more information, call 212.310.6675

On October 21, the Big Apple Circus will return to the Big Top tents at Lincoln Center with the world premier of its new show, “The Grand Tour.” For more information, call 800.922.3722. OCTOBER 2015 103


NEW KID, OLD BLOCK

CO U RTE S Y O F G E O R G E S B E R G È S G A LLE RY

BY PAUL JEROMACK

“WHY AREN’T YOU in Chelsea or Brooklyn? I hear that a lot,” says contemporary art dealer Georges Bergès. “People are somewhat incredulous that I’ve opened a gallery in SoHo. Can you believe that?” He laughs and shakes his head. At only 39 years old, the baby-faced Bergès looks far younger than that. With his mop of Caravaggio-dark curls and big circular-framed glasses, he looks more like a refugee from graduate school than one of the fastest rising and busiest dealers in contemporary art. Georges Bergès Gallery, at 462 West Broadway, has only been open since June and already its proprietor is creating quite a buzz. “Sure, Chelsea—and especially Brooklyn—are the hot places

now, but I didn’t want to get lost in the shuffle. Historically, SoHo was the area for contemporary art, but in the last decade or so, they were crowded out by boutiques and retail stores. I wanted to help bring it back. There’s a lot of history in the area I want to feel a part of.” The neighborhood’s most legendary denizen is the late Leo Castelli, the dealer who introduced Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol to the world, and whose This page: The Georges Bergès Gallery, at 462 West Broadway in SoHo, opened in June this year and has already attracted attention from art lovers everywhere. Opposite page: Georges Bergès, the contemporary art dealer. OCTOBER 2015 105


gallery. Bergès chose this particular neighborhood for his gallery because of its history in contemporary art, with dealer Leo Castelli and artists like Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol having a large impact on the area.

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This spread: The interior of the SoHo


SoHo galleries (opened in 1971) were instrumental in helping to revitalize the area. Castelli died in 1999, and while Bergès never met him, Castelli is both his idol and business model. “Leo was deeply involved with his artists,” says Bergès. “He visited them all the time. They were part of his extended family. He took time to encourage their development. Once a week, he opened his gallery just for artists to come show their works to him. Artists would be lined up down the block! He’d look at what they had and decided what he liked, what artists needed to do more work, what he did not respond to.” Bergès admits he’s not quite there yet. He is pretty much a one-man operation, and before he decided to put down fresh gallery roots, he dealt via a suitcase and passport. “I’d do popups in places like Shanghai,” he says “I’d rent a floor space for a month, fill it with my artists, hopefully sell a few things, then wrap up and move on by the end of the month. I didn’t like the idea of being a shopkeeper.” What Bergès specifically did not want was to be a contemporary art dealer, model 1995. “In the ’90s, the world economy and, by extension, the contemporary art world, was elevated by the dot-com bubble. Art was considered little more than a commodity—the artist was secondary. He was considered a supplier of inventory. He rarely saw clients. He’d get a check every few months or so, then a new contract to sign or a notice of termination. It was a very cold way for doing business. And for a lot of collectors, I think purchasing art was more of a lifestyle thing than a commitment. Today, that system is broken.” Bergès wanted to be different. “I wanted to do very much what Leo did: find the artists whose work I most responded to and work with them closely. I want them to feel that I’m committed to them and that they are valued. I come from a family of artists, and from when I was a kid, there was nothing I loved more than to hang out with artists. Visiting studios is still my favorite way to spend an afternoon.” Because of this hands-on approach, Bergès’s stable of artists is small. “I only have nine artists I deal in,” he says “I just took on Emma McGuire, who makes lithographs of cage fighters that look like Greek gods. We are doing a show of her works this coming May. The Duke of Devonshire introduced me to her work.” His solid client base is likewise select. “I’ve sold to a couple hundred people, but I have a solid group of about 25 collectors, most of them overseas. I find a lot of people don’t have the patience to discover emerging artists. Anyone with a checkbook can buy a Picasso, but with someone like McGuire you have to have a little bit more commitment.” Bergès’ desire for intimacy is reflected in his gallery layout. “My gallery is divided into two spaces. The first floor is open to the public, while the downstairs is more of a salon. You could OCTOBER 2015 107


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even call it a living room with comfy chairs and a bar that’s a mingling place for clients and artists to get better acquainted and see new works in a relaxed atmosphere. It’s also a bit of a testing ground to see if a work of art holds up after I live with it for awhile. Artists are always welcome there. I want everyone to be relaxed and comfortable.” Paradoxically, the energetic Bergès eventually hopes to open permanent galleries (no more pop-ups!) overseas in places like Beijing and Mexico City. “I haven’t given up my wanderlust,” he says cheerfully. “I’m not exactly a homebody. I go to China three or four times a year, for instance. I recently spent time in an artist’s commune in Mongolia. I’m always looking for new works to excite me. If you are running a gallery and not having any fun, you’re doing something wrong.” u This page: The gallery will really be two galleries in one—the first floor will be a traditional gallery exhibiting artists within its network and the second floor will be a private salon style gallery; “Dancer,” a watercolor by Michael Hafftka (inset). Opposite page: Bergès hopes that his gallery will introduce emerging artists to broader audiences. OCTOBER 2015 109


Chairman Emerita of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) Barbara Tober joined the board in 1988; West 53rd Street, just down the road from the Museum of Modern Art, was MAD’s first home.

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This spread, from left:


MAKING MAD B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D


LILY HOAGLAND: After being editor-in-chief of Brides for 30 years, how did you become chairman of the museum? BARBARA TOBER: In the early 1980s, I joined—for $100— their Associates Committee. I liked what I was seeing, what I was learning about, and I kept my eye on the ball. In 1993, someone said to me, “You should be chairman.” I thought that sounded kind of terrific. So I went to Si [Newhouse] and said, “I love you, I love Condé Nast, but I love the art world and I’m going to be chairman of this museum.” My going-away party was at the museum, which at that time was on 53rd Street—the whole thing was mostly a staircase. It was ridiculous. LH: What was your first objective? BT: Nobody knew of it. People would ask me what kind of museum it was. I thought, “Well, I’ve got a job to do here: make sure people know about it.” So I badgered everybody that I knew, constantly, telling them all about the museum, what was going on there, and inviting them to various things. It’s never been huge, especially when it was the American Craft Museum. LH: What prompted the name change? BT: It was obvious we had to change our name, but it took five years. People were betting on the fact that we would never do it. The word “American” didn’t work because we had artists from all over the world. On my first day, I walked into an exhibit of Icelandic art and design, and there was the president of Iceland. We were, in fact, really international and I wanted to nurture that. Then the word “Craft”—this is a very snobby city. People 112 QUEST

don’t like the word “Craft.” You can get away with “Craft” in Chicago, Minneapolis, Houston—not here. David McFadden, who was the chief curator, came up with the idea of the Museum of Arts and Design, and we thought we could have a little fun with it. Call it the MAD museum! LH: You also had a long wait before MAD’s move to 2 Columbus Circle, when the proposed renovation of the building touched off a heated battle over its landmark status and preservation. BT: City council members and community heads had told us, ‘‘You’re accessible, you’re affordable, you’re understandable, you’re everything we want in that building.” So we got it. Then we had to wait. Everybody had to work hard to keep this place, but it was our building and we were going to make it ours. Three years went by. Finally, the place was ready…in 2008, in the middle of the worst recession. It was such a sign of trust in the future that we just went ahead. LH: Do you feel like you still need to convince people that craftsmanship is art? BT: Yes. But look at Sondra Gilman, who’s on the board of the Whitney [Museum of American Art]. She asked them for years to collect photography, and they kept saying, “Photography’s not art.” Today, who would argue that photography’s not art? Art is changing, and we must change with it. The kind of artists we are dealing with now come from a full range of work in various materials and process, and craftsmanship is terribly important. We need to show how it is made: there is a great deal of romance in how something is constructed. If you are really very good at what you do, you are a craftsperson. You are an artist. LH: What did you learn in your 15 years as chairman? BT: To me, this is a world of discovery, a world of invention, a world of really exciting, rewarding delight. I have a philosophy about things: Every day you’re going to have a triumph and a tragedy. When we were going through all the lawsuits [to renovate 2 Columbus Circle], we would get some bad news and I’d start laughing. People would ask me, “How can you be laughing at a time like this?” I’d say, “Because it is so ludicrous, so nonsensical!” First you laugh, then you solve the problem. u

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BARBARA TOBER DOESN’T just break the mold of every role she takes on. She pulverizes it, gathers the rubble, and has the pieces made into tasteful decorative artwork for her mantle. Her quick wit, sharp determination, and expressive joie de vivre have served her well in life, whether running a magazine or a museum—in this case, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD). As its chairman for 15 years, she saw the museum through changes of both name and address, and convinced people that they should look closer at unexpected places for art. Over a glass of iced tea, she revealed all she experienced in that time:


This page, clockwise from above: Aileen Osborn Webb (far left), who established MAD, then called the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, in 1956; architect David Campbell, who converted the Museum’s brownstone; installation image of “Craftsmanship in a Changing World,” 1956. Opposite page: Barbara Tober helped give MAD its current name and address (left); the Victorian brownstone on West 53rd Street (right).


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SEVEN ART SHOWS TO SEE THIS FALL They’re bold. They’re thought-provoking. And they’re some of the most ambitious exhibitions we’ve come across this year.

JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY 513 West 20th Street and 524 West 24th Street; 212.645.1701

A N D J AC K S H A I N M A N G A LLE RY, N E W Y O R K

© E N R I Q U E M A RT Í N E Z C E L AYA ; CO U RT E S Y O F T H E A RT I S T

BY ALEX TRAVERS

Enrique Martínez Celaya’s two-part exhibition “Empires: Sea” (513 West 20th Street) and “Empires: Land” (524 West 24th Street) at Jack Shainman Gallery features a body of works that seem to share meanings, even though they are spatially separated. One of the draws of the show is the artist’s use of space and color. Dark blue-gray waves below a midnight sky appear to glow in the moonlight. In the series, land becomes a metaphor for what is familiar while the sea—sometimes painted in improbable blues, other times portrayed by beautiful, wispy lines of lilac, saffron, and azure—blankets the secrets that swim underneath its surface. Celaya seems to be inviting us to dive in. This spread: An installaton view of Enrique Martínez Celaya’s “Empires: Land” at Jack Shainman.


HAUSER & WIRTH 511 West 18th Street; 212.790.3900. It’s freakishly fun. Mike Kelley’s sprawling exhibition at Hauser & Wirth’s 518 West 18th Street space is the gallery’s first show devoted to the artist. Based on images from Kandor, the capital of planet Krypton (yes, Superman’s birthplace), Kelley’s resin cities and lenticular panels are visually mesmerizing. In the main space, there’s an “exploded fortress of solitude” you can walk into and explore. Once you’ve been in there, you wonder why, despite the lines, people wouldn’t go. And although I have still never figured out exactly why some visitors keep returning, it may be because I have now joined the ranks of those who can’t seem to find the words to explain the show’s draw but know it will always offer a new experience—at least until October 24.

This page: Mike Kelley’s “City 7,” 2007–2009; Hauser & Wirth is located at 511 W 18th Street (inset above);

CO U RTE S Y O F H AU S E R & W I RT H ( G A LLE RY FA Ç A D E )

“Kandor 4,” 2007 (inset below).

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M A RY B O O N E G A LLE RY A N D B RYC E WO L KO W I T Z G A LLE RY, N E W Y O R K

© PA R L Á S T U D I O S / A RT I S TS R I G H TS S O C I E T Y; CO U RTE S Y O F

MARY BOONE GALLERY / 541 W 24th Street; 212.752.2929 It’s easy to get lost in the glowing chaos of José Parlá’s abstractions and wild compositional interruptions. For his latest show, “Surface Body / Action Space,” at Mary Boone Gallery’s West 24th Street location, we see heavy textures and bold colors pop off the canvas. In the center of the gallery space are sculptures that look like war-battered pieces of wall, defaced first by weapons and then vandalized by the artist’s graffiti-like attacks. According to Parlá, it is simple human impulse to leave a record of our presence. (In addition to the works at Mary Boone Gallery, on view through October 31, Parlá also has a concurrent show at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery and an outdoor installation at the Standard High Line Plaza.) This page: An installation view of “Surface Body / Action Space,” featuring works by José Parlá, on view until October 31 (above); José Parlá’s “Nuevo Rumbo,” 2015 (below).

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This page: An installation view of Trevor Paglen’s current exhibit at Metro Pictures; “NSA-Tapped Fiber Optic Cable Landing Site, New York City, New York, United States” (2015).

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Today, we’re almost used to being monitored, gladly sharing our personal information with everyone from our cellphone companies to the social media apps we can’t stop feeding. But how do we feel when that information gets into the wrong hands? For his second show at Metro Pictures, Trevor Paglen continues to explore the machinery used in covert operations. Paglen’s images can be haunting. Included in the exhibition are photographs of sites where the N.S.A. taps transcontinental communications cables, images of transoceanic cables, a sculpture connected to the Internet-anonymizing Tor network, and a dual-channel video installation comprising material Paglen filmed for Citizenfour. Spooky stuff.

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METRO PICTURES / 519 West 24th Street; 212.206.7100


This page: Enoc Perez’s “One World Trade Center” (2015), oil on canvas; an installation shot of “One World Trade Center,” on view at Peter Blum Gallery through November 14 (inset).

P E TE R B LU M G A LLE RY, N E W Y O R K

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PETER BLUM GALLERY / 20 West 57th Street; 212.244.6055 Enoc Perez’s first solo show at Peter Blum Gallery—titled “One World Trade Center” and on view until November 14—features 10 vertical oil paintings (roughly 80 by 60 inches) of the recently constructed Freedom Tower. At its heart, “One World Trade Center” isn’t really about the building itself. It’s more about the power of pop culture and evolution. Each Warholian image of the building is overlapped by another in a different hue, smuggling away the tower’s inherent stability. It’s as though Perez is fairly certain that the future, even with all its bright and bold promises, holds no definitive answers. But that, I suppose, is not his predicament alone. OCTOBER 2015 119


This page, from top to bottom: Dana Schutz’s “Shaking Out the Bed” (2015); Schutz’s “Glider” (2015); the façade of Petzel Gallery.

PETZEL GALLERY / 456 West 18th Street; 212.680.9467

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On view at Petzel Gallery through October 24 is a unique collection of paintings and works on paper by Dana Schutz. Her show, titled “Fight in an Elevator,” seems to share the Synthetic Cubism–like style of Picasso’s work around 1920, where figures struggled in their highly disordered environments. Here, one of Schutz’s subjects finds itself trapped in the mouth of a lion. Another, as the show’s title suggests, is brawling in an elevator. The image shows their worlds shattered and perhaps becomes a loose representation of how the disparate pieces were put back together. Sometimes, it’s not so pretty. But, hey, that’s life.

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This page: Installation view of Idris Khan’s “Overture” at Sean Kelly, New York (above); Khan’s “Numbers,” 2015 (below).

SEAN KELLY

© J A S O N W YC H E ; CO U RTE S Y O F S E A N K E LLY, N E W Y O R K

475 Tenth Avenue; 212.239.1181 Idris Khan’s “Overture” (on view through October 24) tackles the subjects of displacement and conflict. At first, the notion that numbers and words are used to represent the refugee crisis appears hazy, but Khan intentionally made it seem so; he skillfully overlaid thousands of lines of text until the words blurred, obscuring any direct reading of the original manuscripts. Still, as Khan’s orbit widens, perhaps his deeper subject hasn’t changed so much at all. One of Kahn’s strengths is his sharp sense of creating a haunting narrative. “Overture” has only helped to prove that disturbing issues can easily disappear from our minds, even when they’re right there in front of us. u OCTOBER 2015 121


DRAWING THE ALGONQUIN Hilary Knight, through illustration, has defined the legacy of the Algonquin—as he did for the Plaza. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

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HILARY KNIGHT—THE MAN who drew Eloise—has collaborated with a variety of authors, like Val Schaffner, who wrote the story for The Algonquin Cat (1980). The book is a treasure to be discovered (or rediscovered), chronicling the adventures of Hamlet, who since his arrival at The Algonquin, “had spent most of his time sleeping. That is not to say he was idle. Cats sleep as much as they do because they prefer to concentrate on their dreams.” That is, before he is called to assist guests (including Cyrus Mandrake, a character based on John Barrymore) with his talents of sleuthing. Hamlet completes his tasks, such as locating the Mandalay Blue diamond, while wandering the hotel, “where, like the ancient cats for whom temples were built when men had an inkling of their wisdom, he affably received the tokens of respect he was offered daily, such as anchovies and morsels of herring, which nourished his brain power, and luxuriated in a mnrhnh glow of admiration. He was lionized, and like a lion he dreamed glorious things.” Marking the 35th anniversary of The Algonquin Cat, Quest met with Hilary Knight at The Algonquin, where there is, indeed, a cat in residence. (She’s the eleventh since 1922.) Here, our conversation about the book and the hotel—and their legacies: ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN: What was your experience with The Algonquin, before being approached about The Algonquin Cat? HILARY KNIGHT: I knew the hotel from the time I was a child. It is very interconnected with The Plaza, because I grew up in New York and we came here. My mother and father were both artists and writers, so they knew everybody. I went to school with the sons of Franklin Pierce Adams, who was part of the Algonquin round table, at City Country School. I mean, my life was so connected. The Oak Room at The Algonquin was a wonderful place to see people. There is no such thing anymore. It is so diminished. I’m 88 now, and my view of things is so

different than peoples’ today. I’m really interested in everything that’s going on around me, and people today are not. EQB: Why were hotels like The Algonquin and The Plaza so attractive to creatives? HK: The thing about New York was that it was a very different time for entertainment. I came to see people. That’s how I met Kay Thompson, the author of Eloise, because she was performing in what was called the Persian Room at The Plaza. We’re talking about the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s. It was a time when clubs were very big, and there were big, big performing stars. And they brought in tons of people. Television came along and diminished that and really finished it off and they all closed. I miss the kinds of people who were here. It was a very select crowd, a much more sophisticated crowd. I don’t want to categorize people but it was a different. They were interested in different things. I’ve always been a crazed fan of people that I thought were interesting and I became obsessive, when I was about 16, about Lena Horne. Because she was exotic and beautiful and she had just started in movies. She was a giant star. She was a black woman who was accepted by everyone. It was a little different if you were really fantastically beautiful, it helped a lot—and she was that and also very talented. EQB: What about Dorothy Parker and the founders of The New Yorker, who established The Algonquin round table? HK: I think they were all extraordinary, witty, sarcastic people. I guess that still exists. On television, we have wonderful, similar kinds of people, but they’re interested in far different things. Dorothy Parker, I don’t think she would exist today. She could say things that were outrageous and they were funny and clever. I think Dorothy Parker was a bitch from everything I’ve heard. This page: The dedication to “D.P.L.,” as illustrated by Hillary Knight; The Algonquin Cat (1980), a story by Val Schaffner with drawings by Hilary Knight. OCTOBER 2015 123


EQB: How did you come to work with Val Schaffner? HK: I did not know him until this all got going and he was a friend of the editor, Eleanor Friede, and it was her idea to do the book originally in 1980. And so we got together and I met Val and Val has the most unbelievable background—the literary involvements. His father, Robert, was a very famous book agent, a massively important agent. He was married to a woman who came from a very illustrious, literary, British family. I think that he is such an interesting man and it was all his writing of this book that got me involved with it and interested in it.

EQB: Why did you choose The Algonquin Cat? HK: They offered me a lot of money, which always is nice. Because of Eloise, I was well known as an illustrator. I got lots of offers from writers who had written about a dog at a hotel but this seemed different because Val’s approach to it was very different. But it was still the same because it was a something that

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EQB: And you both have cats! HK: I’m a big cat person. I’ve always had cats. I’ve always been interested in animals and we always had cats and dogs and birds.


This spread: The illustrations, by Hilary Knight, follow Hamlet, “The Algonquin Cat,� as he navigates the hotel,

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passing the grandfather clock (upper left); the front desk (lower left); and the 44th Street entrance (upper right).


This spread: The illustrations, by Hilary Knight, depict the creatives—the performers and the writers—who frequented the Algonquin, with a cast of characters (right) inspired by figures like John Barrymore and Dorothy Parker.

was attached to a famous hotel. There were lots of reasons to do it, but I had a feeling for the hotel—an attachment to it. EQB: What was your process? HK: I came here and did drawings and photographs. I did a lot of research, as I did at The Plaza with Eloise. I lived there, literally—almost. I never had a room there but I spent a lot of time. I’ve always done it with every book.

EQB: What do you miss about The Algonquin? HK: It was like what I drew. The sconces were a big part of the look of it. I’m not completely sold on these chandeliers. The restaurant, the Rose Room, was always full of people. They served breakfast and I think you could have coffee. It was much more divided, as I remember, with high-back sofas. I gather they’ve redone the rooms, they had to have. They were the strangest little things. Also, have they put a john upstairs yet, or do you have to go down that staircase? A few drinks going down and up that staircase was a challenge. It was to everyone’s cost. u For more information about The Algonquin, visit algonquinhotel.com or autographhotels.com. The Autograph Collection Hotels celebrate a collection of independent leaders in film, art, and literature by curating travel experiences at 86 luxury-lifestyle hotels.

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EQB: Did the cat approach you while you worked? HK: Never. It had nothing to do with me. I barely saw it.


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This spread, from left: Alireza Niroomand, general manager of Sant Ambroeus in Soho; plates have been decorated by artists like Curtis Kulig (immediate left) and shoe designer Brian Atwood

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(immediate right).

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“REALLY, WE HAVE about 80 percent of regulars…ah, one

second, please.” Alireza Niroomand, the general manager of SoHo’s Sant Ambroeus, pops out of his seat. With a gazelle’s shuffle, he crosses the marble floor of the restaurant and intercepts a young Dorothy Dandridge–type on her way out. He teases her about her new boyfriend, with whom he had dinner in Paris last week. “He’s someone special, I know it!” Behind them, two young women (smart money betting that they’re entrepreneurs in something like “fashion technology”) are sitting at the bar, one rebuking her laptop 130 QUEST

in Italian while the other sweetly asks for another refill of cappuccino—not their first, judging from the remains of the insalata centocolori long pushed aside. A person might be tempted to peek out the window to make sure they hadn’t made a wrong turn on Spring Street only to magically end up in Europe. The authentic café culture that too often evades New York has made its way to the corner of Lafayette and Prince. This is what we talk about when we talk about Caffé Greco and Goethe, Liszt, Stendhal. This is what we picture when we imagine Les Deux Magots with de


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Beauvoir and that headache of a boyfriend Sartre. Ali comes back to the table, and is handed his new cup of espresso. He had sent back the previous one with kind but firm perfectionism. “We are very picky here about our espresso,” he says, laughing at himself. He has the selfeffacing charm of a guileless rascal, and it’s easy to see him winning over even the toughest customer. His approach? “The first thing I do is I pull up a chair, whether I know them or not, and I sit with them—it makes the interaction so much easier. Another thing I always do is crack a joke. If you

This page: The dining room of Sant Ambroeus Soho; a plate designed by the milliners at the nearby House of Lafayette (inset). Opposite page: The collection began when an artist by the name of Bäst, at Alireza Niroomand’s request, drunkenly drew on several pieces of china. OCTOBER 2015 131


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establish an atmosphere like that, people will forgive your mistakes. You made them laugh.” Every woman on the Upper East Side knows the name Sant Ambroeus. The Madison Avenue location has become shorthand for asking each other to lunch (though it ends up technically being a late breakfast more often than not). One such friend recently sent me in request, “Sant Ambroeus?” My downtown heart rejoiced in replying, “Sure. SoHo?” When investing in this outpost, the restaurant group wisely understood that while they could attract their usual clientele with their name alone, they needed a “cool factor” to their formula if they were to succeed in a neighborhood where models stalk down the cobblestone streets like runways. Luckily, they persuaded the gregarious Ali to man the helm, and he was able to create a space that welcomes the social set, the fashion crowd, and the art world alike. The tangible proof of that is an incredible wall of plates, each decorated by a Sant Ambroeus regular or beloved friend. It’s called “The Sant Ambrose Art Series,” and has resulted in what is likely the biggest Instagram following a collection of plates could have. Designers, photographers, writers, jewelry makers, graffiti artists, illustrators—the roster of creative types who have contributed to the project reads like the guest list for the chicest downtown party you could throw. The collection is eclectic, colorful, and unique; each plate a symbol of someone who discovered the magic of the place and wanted to add their own special touch. Before I leave, Ali takes a moment to have a few words with a stocky guy carrying a large bag. “He’s an old-school graffiti artist in New York,” Ali tells me. I ask under what name the artist tags. “Blast” he says, his French accent curling around the “a,” his eyes shining with delight at mixing the crème of dissimilar crèmes. u


This spread: The wall of plates has its own significant social media following; illustrator Charlotte Le Bon plays on the phrase “on a marché sur la lune” (we walked on the moon) to read

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“we ate on the moon” instead (insert).


A COLLECTION TO BEHOLD Jackie Weld Drake presents her Palm Beach–based collection of American illustrations, which she evolved with her husband, Rodman L. Drake.

JACKIE WELD DRAKE—chair of Casita Maria, whose “Fiesta 2015” is being hosted at the Plaza Hotel on October 13—exudes an energy that is emblematic of her heritage (part Uruguayan and part Venezuelan). And her passion extends beyond her commitment to Casita Maria (which has served Hispanics in New York since 1934) to her Palm Beach–based collection of American illustrations that she assembled and cherished with her husband, Rodman L. Drake. Here, Drake offers her knowledge on the subject of American illustrations, as an expert who has lectured at the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach: 134 QUEST

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN: What prompted you and your husband to collect American illustrations? JACKIE WELD DRAKE: We’ve been collecting for, I would say, 20 years. It started because I’m an inveterate flea-market person. I love going and scrounging around fairs. One day, I was wandering through the flea market at 78th Street and Columbus Avenue and I saw these beautiful drawings that were under a table. And because I used to draw and had wanted to be an artist, I could tell a good drawing. They looked to be fashion illustrations and they were signed “W. G. Ratterman.” They were $15 a

B FA . CO M ; CO U RTE S Y O F J AC K I E W E L D D R A K E

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


This page: Jackie Weld Drake, at an event she hosted for the Pachenga Committee of Casita Maria. Opposite page: An illustration by James Montgomery Flagg (1936), for “Double Indemnity”—a story that appeared in installments in Liberty Magazine.


piece so, for $60, I bought my first four illustrations. My husband wanted to know more about the illustrator, so we went to a place called Illustration House. We got hooked on the whole era and what they call the Golden Age of American illustrations. EQB: What is the Golden Age of American illustrations? JWD: For many people, American illustrations are the American art. Because of events like the advent of the railroad and the end of the Civil War (which unified the country and provided a big market) as well as the passing of laws for universal education (which meant you had a reading public), magazines and other publications became the entertainment for many people. Illustrations became their first understanding of art. Our collection spans from around 1898 to 1943. EQB: What were the publications? Who were their illustrators? JWD: There were story illustrations, and people would look forward to the next installment the way people now look forward to episodes of Game of Thrones. These appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, Collier’s, and Ladies’ Home Journal. Life is particularly amusing because it started off as a humor magazine and they hired a young guy called Charles Dana Gibson because he could render an image in two hours. He loved poking fun at old geezers and young women. Gibson and James Montgomery Flagg were “society” illustrators—they illustrated society as insiders, as celebrities who were invited to the White House. You had an era where the artist was a celebrity. Gibson was married to one of the Langhorne sisters, who were famous beauties. One of them became the Mrs. Astor, who was famous for her 400.

EQB: What about Norman Rockwell? JWD: Many people think of Norman Rockwell—he’s the best known. Only now is he coming to some kind of recognition by the mainstream and by art historians. But he followed a long list of illustrators. He worshiped J. C. Leyendecker, for example. He followed him around and waited for him in the train station in Larchmont, New York, because he became hugely famous and had his own limousine and lived in a castle. RockThis page: An unpublished 1931 cover for Raggedy Ann in Cookie Land by Johnny Gruelle (above); a cover illustration by Porter Woodruff for the January 11, 1928 issue of British Vogue (below). Opposite page: “School Days” by Stanley Massey Arthurs is an advertisement for Cream of Wheat (1908). 136 QUEST

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EQB: Who else? JWD: Some illustrators were reporters who were trained to go out and render the image very quickly. George Bellows, William Glackens, and John French Sloan were newspaper reporters and they developed the visual ability to retain the image and go back and render it and put it in the next edition of the newspaper. N. C. Wyeth was sent out west as a sort of reporter. He was illustrating America to America. He would go out and render images of cowboys and however they were idealizing the west. Instead of photographs showing people the way, it was the imagination and interpretations of these illustrators.


well cornered his brother to give him the secret of his paint. Rockwell comes after that long line and reaps the rewards. Things change to a narrative when you reach Rockwell. I find the earlier ones more interesting.

EQB: What are your plans for continuing your collection? JWD: My focus now is in preserving it. So much of this collection became personal to my husband, and he really loved it. He loved to wake up in the morning and look at his things. I have a wall of fashion illustrations in Florida and he just enjoyed being around it. He was very happy when he was in the presence of beauty. What actually gives me the greatest pleasure is that I think we have a historically complete collection—and I think that was very important to my husband. I think he essentially achieved his vision for the collection. It gives me pleasure because it reminds me so much of my husband, frankly. This was something we both liked. It gave us a focus of something we collected together and enjoyed together and are both really proud of. u 138 QUEST

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EQB: What is the legacy of these American illustrations? JWD: I would say the images we have in our heads today of what a movie star should look like or what Captain Hook should look like was created by these illustrators. And actresses like Katherine Hepburn and Grace Kelly were popular, in part, because they were personifications of the “Gibson” girl, who was sporty and adventurous. There is a huge sense of nostalgia when it comes to these images. They are in our subconscious without our really knowing where they came from.


This page: “Woman with Puppy” by Walt Otto (circa 1950) was published as a calendar. Opposite page, clockwise from above left: “Elegant Party” by Leon Gordon (1920), which was an advertisement for a haberdashery like Kuppenheimer; the Arrow Collar Man by J. C. Leyendecker, which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post in the 1920s; an illustration by Adrien Etienne Drian (1919)—the father of fashion illustration.


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN Neil Rasmus, Billy Farrell, Dan Otero, fĂŞting the five-year anniversary of BFA.

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David Prutting and Joe Schildhorn,


Clockwise, from left: Erika and Jonathan Bearman; Stephanie Brag and Nedenia Craig; Andreja Pejic; Zani Gugelmann, Coralie Charriol Paul, and Christine Mack; Annelise Peterson, Wes Gordon, and Indre Rockefeller.

NEW YORKERS FOR CHILDREN PARTIED AT CIPRIANI 42ND STREET ON SEPTEMBER 16, New Yorkers For Children hosted its gala

to benefit youth in foster care at Cipriani 42nd Street and the event—honoring Maya Haile, Steve Pemberton, and Marcus Samuelsson—succeeded to raise $1.25 million. Chloé served as sponsor, and the children who attended through the organization were treated to clothing from Macy’s and styling by Vênsette. The chairs of the event (Vanessa and Henry Cornell, Lise and Michael Evans, Christine and Richard Mack, and Shirin

von Wulffen and Frédéric Fekkai) greeted guests in the Italian Renaissance–inspired structure, including Stefania Allen, Erika Bearman, Georgina Bloomberg, Alina Cho, Wes Gordon, Kate Davidson Hudson, and Leandra Medine. It was a sight to be seen—as is the case when you pair Cipriani 42nd Street with the dazzle of the social set. And New Yorkers For Children continues to be among the chicest of the charities (which, of course, is why we featured them in our Philanthropy Issue!). OCTOBER 2015 141


Casey Neistat and Candice Pool; Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis; Nas, Billy Farrell, and Maxwell.

FIVE YEARS OF BILLY FARRELL AGENCY

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO MARY ALICE HANEY

TEAM BFA, started by former PMc-ers Billy Farrell, David

THE ICONIC EDEY MANSION—the new flagship for the John

Prutting, Neil Rasmus, and Joe Schildhorn, fêted their fiveyear anniversary with hundreds of their BFFs. The event was hosted on September 8 (a.k.a. pre-Fashion Week) at the top of the Standard: a tribute to those who have rooted for BFA, which is, well, everyone. From Rebecca Minkoff and Nas to Hannah Bronfman and Scott Lipps—and Quest, of course!—the whole team was bleep-ing there. The space was decorated with BFA’s archive of 1.6 million pictures, but the icing on the cake? A confection presented by Amirah Kassem of Flour Shop. Cheers!

Barrett salon, which is relocating from Bergdorf Goodman— was buzzing with VIPs on September 12. (The Edey Mansion is located at 10 West 56th Street, and was home to Elizabeth Taylor.) The event was hosted by Jim Hedges (C.E.O. of John Barrett) to celebrate his cousin, designer Mary Alice Haney. Among those at this exciting (and exclusive) affair: Hamish Bowles, Jill Fairchild, Claiborne Swanson Frank, Celerie Kemble, Christian Leone, Natalie Leeds Leventhal, Chloe Perrin, Mary Alice Stephenson, Veronica Swanson, Alexis Traina, Katie Traina, and Bronson van Wyck.

From left: Chassie Post and Jimmy Hedges; Elizabeth Tuke and Bobby Dake; John Barrett and Mary Alice Haney; Claiborne Swanson Frank and Vanessa Traina. 142 QUEST

B FA . CO M ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

From left: Stretch Armstrong, DJ Ruckus, and Jus Ske;


Clockwise, from left: Nancy Meyers and Anne Hathaway; Andrew Saffir and Scott Currie; Jack Johnson and Richard Johnson; Timothy Kellepourey and Derek Hester; Mary Giuliani, Lidia Fenet, and Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos.

THE CINEMA SOCIETY SCREENED THE INTERN WITH RUFFINO ON SEPTEMBER 22, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of

The Intern (directed by Nancy Meyers and starring Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway, and Andrew Rannells) with Ruffino. The film chronicles the story of a 70-year-old intern, who starts to work at a fashion-centric website. (Nancy Meyers, of course, is the goddess among women who created Something’s Gotta Give, with quotes like: “Erica, you are a woman to love.” and “I just have one question: What’s with the turtlenecks? I mean,

it’s the middle of summer.”) The screening was followed by a party at the Chef’s Club, where guests like Gerard Butler, Olivia Chantecaille, Pat Cleveland, Anh Duong, Prabal Gurung, Gilles Mendel, and Martha Stewart were spotted as they mixed over glasses of prosecco. And the award for best Instagram of the evening goes to Page Six’s Mara Siegler, who captured a close-up—and, also, complimentary—snap of Anne Hathaway on the red carpet... u OCTOBER 2015 143


SNAPSHOT

NEW YORK PLAYLIST

ty Ci rk t Yo lis

1. New York, New York. Written by Leonard Bernstein for On the Town. 2. Drop Me Off in Harlem, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong 3. 59th Street Bridge Song, Simon and Garfunkle right, we present a list of our 4. Manhattan. Written by Rodgers and Hart. Performed by Mickey Rooney. favorite odes to the city. Pictured 5. Downtown, Petula Clark are, top row, from left: Duke 6. Angel of Harlem, U2 Ellington and his band; songwriter 7. Lullaby of Broadway, from 42nd Street. Performed by Doris Day. Cole Porter by his piano; Bono 8. Uptown Girl, Billy Joel from U2. Second row, from left: Frank 9. The Boy from New York City, Manhattan Transfer Sinatra; Ella Fitzgerald performing; 10. Diamonds on the Souls of Her Shoes, Paul Simon Simon and Garfunkel; Bobby Short breaking 11. Puttin’ on the Ritz. Written by Irving Berlin. Performed by Harry Richman. from his performance to talk to Dina 12. New York State of Mind, Billy Joel Merrill. Third row, from left: Leonard 13. Autumn in New York. Written by Vernon York. Performed by Ella Fitzgerald. Bernstein writing lyrics; 14. New York, Freddie Mercury Billy Joel; Rodgers and Hart. 15. Arthur’s Theme (The Moon and New York City), Christopher Cross 16. New York, New York, Ryan Adams 17. New York City, John Lennon 18. New York, New York, Frank Sinatra Countless musicians have been

inspired by New York. Here, at

BONUS TRACK: Sweet ’n Low Down, from My One and Only. Performed by Tommy Tune and Twiggy. 144 QUEST


A neighborhood s teeped in his tor y welcomes a contemporar y architec tural

s tatement made of light and air. 24 full and half floor residences from one to three bedrooms,

ranging from $1 to $8 million. Sales by appointment begin Summer 2014.

2 1 2 . 3 8 1 . 2 5 1 9 1 9 P P T R I B E C A .C O M

The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. CD13-0284. All rights to content, photographs, and graphics reserved to ABN Realty, LLC. 3D illustrations courtesy of McAuley Digital. Artist renderings and interior decoration, finishes, appliances, and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only. Artist renderings reflect the planned scale and spirit of the building. Sponsor reserves the right to make substitutions of materials, equipment, fixtures, and finishes in accordance with the terms of the offering plan. Equal Housing Opportunity.

21 FLO ORS FACING THE FUTURE

E XC LU S I V E M A R K E T I N G & S A L E S


“ I N T H I S FA S H I O N H O U S E , YO U M A K E T H E R U L E S . WO R T H N E W YO R K I S L U X U RY FA S H I O N S O L D E XC L U S I V E LY WO M A N T O WO M A N S O YO U C A N S H O P W H E N , W H E R E A N D H OW YO U WA N T. D I S C OV E R A N E F F O R T L E S S , P E R S O N A L I Z E D WAY

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Quest October 2015  

Arts & Culture Issue

Quest October 2015  

Arts & Culture Issue

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