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$5.00 SEPTEMBER 2014

FALL FASHION ISSUE

AMANDA HEARST WITH FINN IN OSCAR DE LA RENTA AT THE HIGH LINE HOTEL

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CONTENTS Fall Fashion i ssue 90

A DAY OF FASHION WITH FINN

Amanda Hearst wears her heart on

her sleeve for puppies in need with her charity, Friends of Finn. produced and styled by photographed by

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daniel cappello

and

JOHNNY BE TOO GOOD

“Made In Italy: Una Visione Modernista,” at the

Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia, Rome.

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elizabeth Meigher,

Julie skarratt

LA REINA SUPREMA

by

elizabeth Quinn brown

Carolina Herrera, the queen of American haute couture,

is photographed on the eve of a special award by the king of the camera, Harry Benson.

114

by

ON SAVILE ROAD

elizabeth Meigher

and

daniel cappello

One Savile Row: Gieves & Hawkes, The Invention of the

English Gentleman (Flammarion, 2014) captures the rich sartorial history of England.

118

by

alex r. travers

FROM AUDITIONS TO APERTURES

An interview with Julie Skarratt, who takes

us from her modeling days to her success as a photographer. by lily hoagland

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SNEAKING IN FOR THE SHOT

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HOLLYWOOD IN A WHOLE NEW LIGHT

The original paparazzo. by daniel cappello Claiborne Swanson Frank’s second

book captures Hollywood’s new establishment. by daniel cappello

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CONTENTS c oluMns 26

SOCIAL DIARY

62

HARRY BENSON

Legendary designer Giorgio Armani, photographed in his studio in 1998.

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OBSERVATIONS

The world’s most exclusive club, the venerable Pugs.

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ENTERTAINMENT

68

FRESH FINDS

76

RETAIL

78

AUCTIONS

80

ART

84

TELEVISION

86

OPEN HOUSE

88

SOCIAL CALENDAR

148

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

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SNAPSHOT

The best of fashion and society, over the years.

by

david patrick coluMbia

by

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taki theodoracopulos

A new, entertaining game tests your knowledge of New York.

by

alex r. travers

It’s back to school—and back to fall fashion. by daniel cappello and elizabeth Meigher

Ralph Lauren opens a first-ever flagship dedicated entirely to his iconic Polo line. by daniel cappello Auctionata, an online auction house, is changing the way people can buy, sell, and bid.

The work of Ludwig Bemelmans, creator of Madeline, at the New-York Historical Society. by lily hoagland “Reverse Course” is a new live-action show that takes farm-to-table to the extreme. by alex r. travers The exquisite residences at 234 East 23rd Street embody the charm and comfort of Gramercy. All the September events that will help ease the transition from summer to fall. Summer’s end leads to fall’s fun parties.

by

e lizabeth Q uinn b rown

Grace Kelly’s shining gold gown was a bright moment in fashion history.

by

elizabeth Quinn brown


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EDITOR’S LETTER

From far left: Finn strikes a pose; Amanda Hearst, in Ralph Lauren, takes a break from our shoot to check her phone; Carolina Herrera, featured in this issue.

THE INDUSTRY OF fashion is often dismissed as a cold, unfeeling place where aesthetics are the only currency of value and something like a conscience will only be a burden. While there is abundant evidence of that in every Project Runway episode, there is also plenty to prove that the best in the business know how to use fashion to reveal their own humanity. The Tin Man will be the first to tell you that his accessories line took off only after he got that heart. This month’s cover girl, Amanda Hearst, is one such humanitarian. Because of her last name and good looks, she has always attracted attention, but rather than use it to promote herself, she raises the conversation around her to a higher purpose: animal rights. On top of being a long-time advocate for the Humane Society of the United States, she started her own organization, Friends of Finn—Finn being this month’s “cover dog.” Since its founding in 2010, Friends of Finn has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to stop puppy mills. For those who don’t know, puppy mills are commercial breeding facilities where females are bred continuously, puppies are taken from their mothers too early, and the dogs are often kept in squalid conditions. (Unfortunately, those cute little rascals you see frolicking in the front window of West Village pet shops often come from puppy mills.) Thanks to Friends of Finn, there has been increased awareness of these 24 QUEST

mills, and Hearst herself has gone in and rescued dogs from these horrible conditions. So while you flip through the gorgeous glossy pages of our cover shoot and see Finn’s cute little face peering at you, consider becoming one of his friends. Donate to Friends of Finn. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Amanda Hearst—in an Oscar de la Renta dress; Harry Winston earrings, bracelets, and necklace; Van Cleef & Arpels ring; and Fabergé ring—with her dog, Finn, at the High Line Hotel for our cover story, “A Day of Fashion With Finn,” photographed by Julie Skarratt.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY THIS IS FASHION “month” in New York, when New Yorkers that got away this glorious summer come back to town, and everything lights up again. (And jams up again too—like the traffic and the social calendar.) September brings New York Fashion Week, when

many of the designers show their Resort 2015 and Spring 2015 collections at the tents in Lincoln Center as well as at lofts and showrooms all over town. The “week” is a commercial promotion of the industry and it’s big business. Last year, there was talk that it had gotten too big and out of

control, that maybe it was finished. It wasn’t. Memories of a fashion sightseer: I’m not a fashion maven, per se, but following the world of fashion is inevitable if you’re writing a social column in New York. And I have been following since my early days in the city, fresh

out of college. I eventually bumped into it, gaining personal experience. The city was a fascinating place to this country boy—it was unlike anything I’d ever known or imagined: challenging, knowledgeable, shrewd, sophisticated, wildly creative, and rife with tons of interesting people

This page, from left: Jackie Kennedy, in her marriage to Aristotle Onassis, continued to flourish as an icon of style; the society women of New York in the 1930s admired the fashion of actress Constance Bennett. 26 QUEST


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M U S E U M B A L L AT T H E N AT I O N A L M U S E U M O F R AC I N G I N S A R ATO G A

Blythe and Robert Clay

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to meet and know. I was anxious to become a New Yorker. I first heard about the world of fashion through a girl I was dating (and would come to marry). She was working as a stylist for William Helburn, a major fashion photographer in New York. She was still in college so she worked for him as a summer job. She loved the job and talked frequently about the work, the shoots, the models, and the other stylists. She named people such as Ali MacGraw, who was the most talked about stylist of all, working for Melvin Sokolsky. Fashion photographers had their own style and look, which was fairly easily identi28 QUEST

Roy and Gretchen Jackson with Stella and Bronson Thayer

Staci and Arthur Hancock III

fiable upon seeing their work. They were celebrities among the art set, including the artists and models as well as certain society women who liked the somewhat bohemian and cool world. Helburn, Sokolsky, Jerry Schatzberg, Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, David Bailey, and Francesco Scavullo, to name but a few of the stars of that world. Their models, the girls who wore the fashions in the magazines, were the young glamour girls of New York. In 1966, Michelangelo Antonioni made a film, Blow Up, with Vanessa Redgrave and David Hemmings, about the life of a fashion photographer. It was

Sally and James Hill

very cool, and hip, and semiweird and fucked up (to use the term that had come into the parlance and has stayed). Around that time in my life, I had made friends with a married couple a few years older than I. They were starting out in fashion photography (and commercial advertising), thus advancing my knowledge of that side of the fashion. The photographers, as a group, were a major force in that world, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. From the late 19th century through the middle of the 20th century, Paris had been the center of fashion to the American eye. Although

Theresa Behrendt

Paris continues to remain an important influence today (as does Milan), the American customer started to look to New York beginning in the 1940s and 1950s, after World War II. The United States had become very prosperous after the terrible decade in the 1930s with the Great Depression followed by the anxiety and industry during World War II. Fashion began to take on a modern sensibility. It was not an overnight transformation. The Garment District, or Seventh Avenue— where much of the industry was located, and still is—has existed since the second half of the 1800s. In the 1930s, the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P I A G E T C U P W I T H S T . R E G I S ’ S N A C H O F I G U E R A S AT T H E E Q U U L E U S P O L O C L U B I N B R I D G E H A M P T O N

Rachel Zoe and Rodger Berman with Skyler

talkies of Hollywood (which was a new industry) became a major influence on American fashion. American women wanted to dress like the movie stars, or sincerely try to. Many women couldn’t afford the designer clothes on the sales rack back then, so they bought the patterns put out by Vogue and others (under the direction of Condé Nast, himself) and made their own “designer” clothes. It was the business of patterns that saved Condé Nast’s business more than once in the 1930s. The late Dorothy Hirshon (1908–1998), a member of Eleanor Lambert’s original “best-dressed list” in 1940, 30 QUEST

Allison Kelley and Avril Graham

Anson and Veronica Miele Beard

once told me that in the 1930s, the younger women in the social set aspired to the look of the movie star Constance Bennett. She, of all the stars, represented high style, self-confidence, and glamour for American women. The fashion market expanded after World War II, when the Americans (after the high employment of the wartime years) had money to spend. The influence of French designers on American manufacturers was reborn with

Hermann Elger, Cristina Cuomo and Simon Neggers

Delfina Blaquier and Nacho Figueras with Gabby De Felice

Christian Dior, who created a postwar sensation in 1947 with his “new look” (pictured)—a term coined by Carmel Snow, the editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar. Paris was the ultimate, once again. American designers mainly worked under the relative anonymity of a label. The age of the popular designer that exists today was still just looming in the 1950s. There were few who had their own label such as the aging Norman Norell and Donald Brooks and the very young

Laura Nicklas

Arnold Scaasi and Luis Estevez. Usually, when designers had their names on the label, it was in association with the manufacturer (e.g., Bill Blass for Maurice Rentner or Oscar de la Renta for Elizabeth Arden). A young man from Indiana, Roy Halston Frowick got a job as a milliner for Bergdorf Goodman in the late 1950s. Women still wore hats for everyday occasions. The young talent was soon very popular with the smart set. In 1960, he created “the pillbox hat” for his client Jackie Kennedy to wear at her husband’s inauguration. Every season, Bergdorf Goodman would buy Paris de-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A signs and receive them as muslins made from the patterns to recreate for the American customer. Halston (who was now using his middle name as a single name) began to learn about constructing dresses by studying the muslins. Jackie Kennedy made Halston famous with the pillbox hat, which became a musthave for women all across the country. She also became an early customer of his first dresses, going on to become the greatest individual fashion influence in the United States during the 1960s. She was in her thirties then, with a strong sense of style and self. Jackie Kennedy had moved to New York with her two

young children after the death of her husband. She was a familiar figure on the streets of Manhattan and in the restaurants, although she never gave interviews and was very skillful at graciously withdrawing herself from the prying of a curious and admiring public. So it came as a great surprise—a shock, even—to Americans when, in 1968, on a weekday afternoon, there was a brief, formal announcement to the press by Mrs. Hugh D. Auchincloss: her daughter, Jacqueline, would marry Aristotle Onassis, the Greek shipping tycoon (a man who was 23 years her senior). Onassis had been married once before to Tina Livanos, mother of his

son and his daughter, whom he divorced in 1960. At the time of the announcement, the gossip columns still thought he was having a long affair with opera diva Maria Callas. Marriage to Onassis seemed to bring out the shopper in the new wife. Little was known of their private relationship except that they often lived apart—she in New York with her children and he on his yacht, the Christina, in the Mediterranean or wherever he wished. (In those days, it wasn’t unusual to be driving on the West Side Highway and see the large ship anchored at the West 79th Street Boat Basin.) Women’s Wear Daily had

become, in those years, the bible of American fashion. A decades-old trade paper, the son of its founder, John Fairchild, had turned the publication into an entertainment for the public interested in fashion, style, and society—while continuing to serve as an excellent daily journal for the burgeoning industry. Women’s Wear Daily, along with Interview, Andy Warhol’s sort-of-downtown magazine rag, were innovatively redefining marketing and branding in fashion, as well as within the realms of arts and culture and society. Jackie Kennedy’s shopping forays were probably nothing new to the woman who was America’s “best-dressed”

C A R E E R T R A N S I T I O N FO R D A N C E R S H O ST E D A L U N C H EO N W I T H R O L E X AT S A R D I ’ S

Joe Tremaine 32 QUEST

Alessia Fendi and Fe Fendi

Stewart Wicht and Anka Palitz

Victor Elmaleh, Mercedes Ellington and Cynthia Fisher

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A N N I E WAT T

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A when she was First Lady, but Women’s Wear Daily kept a reporter’s close eye on her wardrobe choices. Even in the White House days, it was rumored that her wardrobe ran $100,000 per year. Today, that number would be at least a couple million. She had become the fairy godmother for retail and the garment industry. In about 1969—when almost all the fashionable women in New York were wearing pants and jackets—there was a moment when Jackie Kennedy was photographed wearing a

thick, cable-stitch, Eisenhower-style sweater jacket with a lush fox collar. It was a sensation (pictured). Within weeks, that jacket was seen all over town. The manufacturers must have sold tens of thousands of its popularity spread across the country. Interestingly—although she was a beautiful woman, slender and well-formed, with a

warm, friendly smile, a mane of dark hair and an erect posture to smartly carry her clothes, always regarded as “best-dressed” and a boon to the entire industry—Jackie Kennedy was always an admirer of her elder fashion peers, including C. Z. Guest, Babe Paley, Gloria Guinness, and Gloria Vanderbilt. Nevertheless, she had a young eye for what was new.

Pants on women were not entirely new. They were just never considered to be “fashion.” During the years of World War II, when women went to work in factories because so many men were in the armed services, they wore pants to work. They called them slacks or trousers. After the war, they became popular for women who were young mothers and housewives because they were practical and comfortable. But it wasn’t until the early days of the Women’s Libera-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U N C H E O N F O R H O LY T E R R O R : A N D Y W A R H O L C L O S E U P B Y B O B C O L A C E L L O AT L E I L A H E L L E R G A L L E R Y

Jonathan Becker

tion Movement in the 1960s when pants came in as a given for business and for eveningwear. When worn with a jacket, the look became a pantsuit. This seemed revolutionary at the time, and so it became controversial. The better restaurants in New York disallowed women who wore pants. One night, Jackie Kennedy, then a young widow, appeared at Henri Soule’s Le Pavilion with her escort. She was denied seating because she was wearing pants. The ordinance was not rescinded, even for the world’s most famous beauty. She somehow found a skirt or a coat in the house, which she donned, and so she remained for her 36 QUEST

Bob Colacello and Jane Sarkin

Pamela O’Connor and Audrey Gruss

very chic dinner. Accompanying the introduction of pants, hemlines that were rising above the knee. They were called “mini” and, as things progressed, “micro-minis.” Half of a century before, women’s hemlines ran at least to the ankle. Legs were never seen. By the early 1970s, even very short pants (or no pants) became the fad. They were called hot pants (pictured, on Brigitte Bardot). Then, during the protest movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the costume of young people began to

Alexander Heller and Leila Heller

Amin Jaffer and Karl Wellner

change radically. It evolved with rock ’n‘ roll, with the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Moby Grape, Chicago, Pink Floyd, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, the Mamas and the Papas. The style was a combination of the music and the protest cultures and it was called, in a word, “hippie.” We men grew our sideburns and hair long like the Beatles and the Stones. We grew moustaches and beards and wore tiedye T-shirts and bellbottom jeans or corduroy or glitter costumes. The real rock ’n‘

Tiffany Dubin

rollers hung out down on the Lower East Side, where on Second Avenue and 10th Street (or thereabouts), the Fillmore East had become the mecca for new bands. A friend of mine, Colette Harron, along with her friend Catherine Millinaire, the daughter of the Duchess of Bedford, opened a shop around the corner from the Fillmore East, selling suede and leather with fringe as well as cottons and silks and scarves for men and women. Jimi Hendrix was a big customer and he changed his whole look in that shop. Far from French fashions, and even most Seventh Avenue designers, the shop attracted the rock ’n‘

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Youssef Nabil, Sarah Senbahar and Thomas Arnold


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A roll world and eventually the Hollywood world. Finally, it moved uptown and across the land. Everybody wanted to be hip. (Modified, of course, toned down to a middle.) But the era was about pushing the envelope for transformation. The “hippie” fashion—a more relaxed, informal, casual approach to dressing—has had a lasting influence on the way men and women around the world dress today. Concurrently, at the same time that “hippie” fashion was changing the daily costume of Americans (and millions and millions across the world), the designers of Seventh Avenue,

such as the aforementioned Mr. Blass and Mr. de la Renta as well as Calvin Klein, Perry Ellis, and scores more, were developing their own labels. In the late 1960s, a very savvy designer in her forties named Anne Klein launched a new company under her own name making what was termed designer “sportswear” for women. She was offering jackets, pants, blouses, and dresses at a moderate to moderately high price. Anne Klein’s designs were both classic and current. They were smart looking, feminine, flattering, and comfortable. In retrospect, it seems only natural but it was a girl

from Brooklyn (born Hannah Golofski to marry a manufacturer named Ben Klein, with whom she started a company to serve the so-called “junior” market) who was revolutionizing the way American women dressed. Anne Klein revolutionized fashion for American women and thereby revolutionized the industry. She died of breast cancer at 50 years old, just a few years after founding her business and at the peak of her creative powers. The business was continued under her assistant designers, a young woman named Donna Karan and a young man named Louis

Dell’Olio. By the mid-1970s, the American economy was in bad shape: the cities were suffering from a lack of tax revenues and, although the war in Vietnam was finally ending, Watergate was giving America a dose of reality. Rock ’n‘ roll was here to stay, Jackie Kennedy was a working woman (as an editor), and pants were also here to stay—jeans even more so. Hippies were gone, but the single pierced ear, the ponytails, and the avoiding of any kind of formality in dress weren’t going anywhere. Today, we see men in their forties and older, alas, dressed

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A E N G L I S H - S P E A K I N G U N I O N AT T H E B E L L E H AV E N C L U B I N G R E E N W I C H

Regina and Mario Gabelli

without being self-conscious in belly-over-the-belt droopy drawers, Bermuda shorts, and a T-shirt that is incapable of covering the belly-over-thebelt. At the same time, we are also seeing a return to a little more formality, with a suit or jacket. Which brings us to Ralph Lauren (pictured). To the rescue. In those days, I used to buy the clothes I needed at Brooks Brothers at 346 Madison Avenue, where the look was classic, uninteresting but presentable, and lasting. At $45, a good pair of loafers with tassels at Brooks Brothers were expensive in 1967, but if you took care of them—like I did—you could have them for forever. Today, the same pair of loafers with tassels at Brooks Brothers is more than $350. It’s called inflation, no matter what the financial news tells you. 40 QUEST

Michael Kovner and Michael Scully

Cissy Ix and Ann DuBois

All through that aforementioned period of the 1960s, there was this guy Ralph Lauren who started out in the necktie business. I first heard about him when my wife told me that there were some very nice neckties at Bloomingdale’s by the designer. They were a little more expensive than Brooks Brothers, because they were $5. They were also a little wider than the conventional Brooks Brothers tie and they came in solid color silks: navy, British racing green, gray, and brown. I went to have a look as I was working in the brokerage business and wore a tie to the office every day. They were all great. I bought the British

Barbara Robinson and Barbara Reibel

Jeffrey and Diane Jennings

Bess Ames and Joan Beer

racing green one. It was cool. A couple years later, or thereabouts, Ralph Lauren went into the menswear business under the name Chaps, selling suits, pants, and the like. Very good-looking and stylish, like Brooks Brothers in the New World by giving everything a little (understated) panache. That was the beginning. Everyone knows what happened to this American designer who has maintained the classics and brilliantly embraced the lifestyle differences for his customer. He turned a necktie into a billion-dollar empire. The changing fashions of the 1960s reflected the changing world and the emphasis

on changing our lifestyles. In 1971, my wife and I, along with another couple, rented a large house for the summer in southern Connecticut. One day, while driving around the countryside, we discovered a shopping area called Scott’s Corners in nearby Pound Ridge, New York. A quaint little village with many old houses, there was one red barn on the side of the road that someone had turned into a clothing store. The sight of it gave me an idea that was as whimsical at the moment as it seems in retrospect: Why not have a store? It would mean moving out of the city and starting a new life—a popular idea at that time among my generation. I showed my wife the store in this quiet, almost pastoral area and the idea appealed to her also. Mind you, we really had no idea what we’d do with

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Ralph McDermid and Hollister Sturges


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P E R L M A N M U S I C P R O G R A M C E L E B R AT E D I T S 2 0 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y I N E A S T H A M P TO N

Toby Perlman

Renée and Richard Steinberg

a store, although a popular commercial retail [ad]venture in those days was what were known as “head shops,” or stores that catered to the hippie-ish crowd with merchandise such as jeans, T-shirts, corduroy pants, and drug paraphernalia such as pipes, bongs, and rolling papers. We were too conventional and conservative for the paraphernalia supplies part, but decided to go with the clothing. Shortly after deciding to embark on this new path, we visited a real estate broker in Pound Ridge. She seemed impressed with us and our idea and told us that there was “a little red barn” down by the 42 QUEST

Jim Blauvelt and Annette Cumming

Elijah Duckworth-Schachter and Katherine DeConti

side of the road on the way to New Canaan that would be available in a couple of months. Eureka! That was the barn that had inspired this entrepreneurial thought. We made a deposit. The barn had been built in 1839 as a basket factory by Mr. Selleck, a man who made baskets for the Fulton Fish Market in Manhattan. Right across the road were a white frame one and a half-story house that had also been built in the 1880s. The property was occupied by Mr. Selleck’s granddaughter, a woman in her sixties. She met us and approved. The rent was $200 a month for two rooms, each heated by a gas stove.

We had no idea how to start a business or where to get the merchandise, but one of the secretaries in my office had a boyfriend who had done the same thing in the Bronx and he served as our advisor. By the end of the year, we were open for business. We called it Whipsnade’s. A “head shop,” in those days, had a “clever” name and this one was so clever that, when mentioned, the common response was: “whip-what?” Whipsnade’s. W.C. Fields had a famous film called Never Give a Sucker An Even Break in which he played the role of Larson E. Whipsnade. Slightly obscure, but clever.

Morgan Stark and Itzhak Perlman

Eleanora and Michael Kennedy

The move changed our lives. We moved out of the city—which was less than an hour down the Merritt Parkway—and rented a small house in the area. Once or twice a week we’d go into town to buy merchandise and look for new things to add to our inventory. We bought an old display case from some store going out of business. With a friend, I built racks to hold the merchandise and created a display window where there had been a second door. We knew nothing about the business but soon we were learning. The area, which was between New Canaan, North Stamford, and Bedford, was

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Hannah Pakula and Alan Alda


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A a high-rent residential district that attracted a great variety of New York–oriented people like bankers, lawyers, corporate executives, theatrical personalities, producers, and artists. And so it was surprising when women would stop by to have a look and remark that $3 for a T-shirt was a bit much, throwing it back down on the counter. The business limped along for the first year. In retrospect, it is clear that not knowing what we were doing in the first place was a major deterrent from success. By the second year, although we

loved our new neighborhood for living and had begun to make friends, fashion was not fulfilling our dreams (or whims). It was also not helping our marriage of eight years. Impatience and eeking out a tiny living selling expensive $3 T-shirts added pressure everywhere. The following year saw the end of our marriage. With little to share in the breakup, my wife left the business (which, by then, was practically no business). I had grown very used to the new life outside an office—no neckties or suits, just jeans and jackets—and so

I decided I’d keep the lease on the little red barn, figuring I could at least come up with the $200 monthly and sleep in the place if I had to. Youth needs no security. Late in 1973, we divorced. One Sunday, I was having brunch with the couple we’d shared the summer house with. The husband was an executive in the fashion business, running a major division of a larger garment manufacturer. Over brunch, he asked about my business. When I told him of its sorry state, he said, “Why don’t you sell off-price designer sportswear? It’s doing very

well these days.” I had no idea what “offprice designer sportswear” was. I had never heard the term before. And so my friend explained that it meant “women’s clothing at a discount.” It didn’t take much to convince me that it was worth a chance. My friend then helped me to choose and arrange to buy my first shipment of “off-price designer sportswear.” The merchandise was not unfamiliar to me, as I knew many women whose wardrobes were comprised of it. I then hired a local woman who had had a clothing shop

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in the area to be my sales staff. Because it was another venture and required a greater outlay of investment, I decided to keep the “head shop” merchandise in one room, and put the new merchandise in another. After it was shipped and set up, I put a big handmade sign in the window announcing our new inventory. Within days, the ladies from New Canaan and Bedford and North Stamford were stopping by. The lady who thought $3 for a T-shirt was outrageous was thrilled to see that sweater sets by Kasper, which normally retailed for $319.95, were only $239—she bought three sets! I was amazed at that sale, which had exceeded a month’s gross in the former “head shop.” Soon, it was out with the old and in with the new: both rooms were filled with Kasper, Halston, Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Anne Klein, Don Simonel-

li, and Liz Claiborne. The latest designs for that season were being sold at discounts of 30 to 40 percent, and we were off to the races. I recount these details because, in putting them down, I realized that fashion is what inadvertently led to my career as a writer. Within less than a year in the new business, I had three saleswomen working for me in this little shop. I was doing very well and was beginning to spend more time with what I had been doing since was a teenager: writing. A couple of years later, in my spare time, at the urging of a writer friend, I wrote a film script. Another friend of mine passed my work on to a movie executive in Los Angeles. One night in 1977, I got a call from the movie executive who had just read the script. “You are so talented!” she enthused, adding, “You should be out here writing scripts!”

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R E A ST C A N C E R R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N ’ S “ PA R T Y FO R P I N K ” AT T H E H OM E O F L I S A A N D R I C H A R D P E R R Y I N N O R T H H AV E N

Kelly and Dave Kasouf

That single phone call was all that this boy needed. By the time I hung up, I knew what I had to do. (The movie executive never bought that script, incidentally, nor ever had anything more to do with me.) Whipsnade’s, by then, had become very prosperous. I could see that if I focused intensely on the business, it had enormous potential. Offprice retailing was more than a fad. However, as much as I appreciated its success, it was never where my heart or interests were. I knew that if I became very successful at it and made a lot of money, I’d 48 QUEST

Sean Avery and Hilary Rhoda

Lisa Perry

never be a “writer” by profession. Money makes our lives comfortable in a way that can be difficult, even impossible, to reject. But I’d been a writer since boyhood when I stopped playing with toys and started putting those “stories” down on paper. It was my refuge and where I preferred to live whenever I could, and so I had to go. In the fall of 1978, I packed up my belongings along with my dogs and my cats (of which there were five), and I moved to Los Angeles, the City of Angels, to a new life, a new struggle, and a new career—my

Christina Addison and Heather Mnuchin

only career—not to mention a new style of dress and living. Today, the fashion of the West, specifically Southern California, is known worldwide and seen as totally American. Its roots are not only in the great changes that we witnessed in the 1960s and 1970s, but also in the decades of the 20th century that came before. By the 1990s, Southern California lifestyle and folkways (the results of the entertainment industry) have led the way in American fashion through media. This happened specifically with the

Maria Baum and Leonard Lauder

Larry Leeds

phenomenon of the Hilton sisters, Paris Hilton and Nicky Hilton, and, ultimately, with Kim Kardashian and her family, who took the Hiltons’ marketing mantra: visual publicity and more visual publicity. They ran with it and are still running with it. Running to where, you might ask? We’ll have to wait and see. After I decided to pursue a career as a writer, as the saying goes, I never looked back. Although I still check out the windows at Bergdorf Goodman to see where fashion is going and what it portends. u

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Molly Sims


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Shelby Oken and Janine McAllister 50 QUEST

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David and Nancy Hathaway with Fernanda Kellogg and Kirk Henckels

Piers Lloyd Owen

Daisy Hilliard

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Laura de Gunzburg and Lily Synder

David Pollack and Melissa Parils 52 QUEST

Rickie De Sole

Saranna Biel-Cohen and Dan Gottesman

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00 QUEST

Ben Galef and Kirsten Galef

Mary Unsworth and Lisa Arnold

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Anne Miller and Graham Watkins


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ANIMAL RE SCUE FUND OF THE HAMPTONS’ “BOW WOW MEOW” BALL IN WAINSCOTT

Lisa McCarthy with Bruce

Paul Morgan, Bunny Laughlin and Sarah Coleman

Steve Kroft and Jenny Conant

Peter Duchin 58 QUEST

Kathy Rayner and Peter Marino

Blaine and Robert Caravaggi with Emilia Saint-Amand and Alex Papachristidis

Heather Leeds and Shelley Carr

Peter and Hilary Pulitzer

Lionel Larner, Mary Libby and Kinsey Marable

DAV I D PAT R I C K CO LU M B I A / N E W Y O R K S O C I A L D I A RY. CO M ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Harry and Laura Slatkin


START SPREADIN’ THE NEWS be a part of it. It’s fun. It’s Challenging. It’s informative.

From the Empire State Building to Niagara Falls, Mount Marcy to MOMA, and everything in between, New York State has an abundance of attractions to discover! “I Know New York” tests your knowledge of the Empire State through trivia questions on a variety of subjects.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S U M M E R S O I R É E TO B E N E F I T N A N T U C K E T C OM M U N I T Y S A I L I N G AT O C E A N W I N G S H A N G A R

Eden Gudonis and Joseph Davies

Sara Bonafair

Sarah Vickers, Caleagh Cazzetta and Peter Creech

Revelers repping the cause 60 QUEST

Bobby Arnot

Madelyn Korengold and Jon Terbell

Andrea Cross, Kaleigh Kelley, Courtney Owens and Jaclyn Shepherd

Chimney Ellsworth

Party on the dance floor

Sean Burke, Kiel James Patrick, Adison Law and Drew Peterson

B R I A N S A G E R P H OTO G R A P H Y

Nicola Blair and Chris Gatto


What luxury feels like, every day. See for yourself. The best new address on Long Island. Residences starting at $1.5M.

888.711.8442 · TheResidencesLongIsland.com The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Long Island, North Hills are not owned, developed or sold by The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. or any of its affiliates (“Ritz-Carlton”). RXR North Hills Phase I Owner LLC uses The Ritz-Carlton marks under a license from Ritz-Carlton, which has not confirmed the accuracy of any of the statements or representations made herein. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File No. CD-14-0036. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


This page: Giorgio Armani in his studio, 1998. Opposite page: one of the signed sketches.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 62 QUEST


H A R RY B E N S O N

IN 1998, WHEN I walked into Giorgio Armani’s starkly bare and beautiful minimalist atelier in Milan, I was immediately struck by the calm feeling in the room. Armani was sketching intently at his desk, but he looked up to say hello. Behind his sleek desk was an oversized pencil casually propped up against an oversized Armani perfume bottle, which I found

both interesting and amusing. I asked the venerable designer to sit among the sketches on his desk. He nonchalantly put his hand to his head, mirroring the pencil in the background, which made the photograph interesting to me. His assistant came in to say Mr. Armani was tired, that it had been a pleasure, but it was time to leave. Armani said, “No, no, we are just getting started.� He knew full well I needed a complete set of photographs, so he went bicycle riding in the rain. He introduced me to his beautiful cats and then posed on an oversized wooden rocking chair. All in all, a good day with a great talent. When I left that afternoon, he signed the sketches and gave them to me, which upon my return to New York delighted my wife, Gigi, for she is a special fan of his work. Over the years, I have photographed the master couturier several times and have always found him charming and personable. I look forward to our next meeting. u SEPTEMBER 2014 63


TA K I

A VERY EXCLUSIVE CLUB

This page: White’s, the famous gentleman’s club on St. James’s Street in London, was one of the inspirations for the columnist’s own group, Pugs.

AS EVERYONE WHO has ever joined a club knows, Pugs is the world’s most exclusive. Its members number 19, and its bylaws cap the membership at 21. As I write, a titanic struggle is taking place to fill the last two spots, but blackballs are being thrown around like confetti at a mafia wedding. The ritual of blackballing is just that, a ritual. In fact, one does not 64 QUEST

have to be put up for membership to be blackballed. Suffice one appears in the news, or is a celebrity, however minor, and he—the club is for males only—gets blackballed as regularly as Hollywood types name-drop in Tinseltown. But before I go on about blackballs, a brief history of the world’s most exclusive club. Pugs originally had three members:

Count Leopold Bismarck, Nick Scott, and yours truly. The name derives from Pug Henry, a fictitious character from an unreadable book called The Winds of War, by the unreadable writer Herman Wouk (of Caine Mutiny fame). Bismarck, Nick, and I, with wives and girlfriends, were on board my boat Bushido when someone had the brilliant idea of watch-


TA K I ing the T.V. series, “Winds of War,” starring Robert Mitchum. Needless to say, we were quite drunk. Hence the heroics of Pug Henry impressed us rather greatly. Pug, as a lieutenant commander attached to the Berlin embassy meets Hitler and impresses the Führer with his command of the German language and his knowledge of naval history. In Rome, Pug meets Mussolini with the same results. Recalled to Washington, Pug gives F.D.R. an unsparing briefing on the European situation and, as a result, is dispatched to Moscow, where he meets Stalin. He speaks in Russian with him and matches the dictator in toast after toast to friendly cooperation with Uncle Sam. Finally, Pug is assigned to London, where Churchill sees fit to let him in on every secret and every fear of the British Lion about to declare war on the Axis powers. By this time, a very drunken Nick declared Pug to be a “hell of a fellow,” before passing out and actually falling overboard, fully dressed in his Anderson and Sheppard linen suit. The next day, while sailing off the Peloponnese coast, one of the English ladies on board asked whether a certain structure off our bow was a club. “A club?” said I, “There are no clubs around here, what do you think this is, St. James’s?” And that’s when Nick Scott, whose brother was chairman of White’s at the time, decided that we had to start a club called Pug’s (for our close friends only) with him as president for life, my boat being the clubhouse, and Bismarck head of admissions. Here are the members who followed: Tim Hoare, of the banking family and a Falstaffian figure of London club land; the Maharaja of Jodhpur, the richest prince of India; and Roger Taylor, the drummer of Queen, the pop group. Then came Mark Getty, the first American and scion of the oil family, followed quickly by three Greeks: George Livanos, a major shipowner; HRH Prince Pavlos of Greece, the heir to the Greek throne; and his younger brother Prince Nikolaos of Greece. We need a prince of pop, said Nick, and Sir Bob Geldof was elected unanimously, followed by the actor Sir Christoper Lee, (at the time of his election, he was 90 years old and still acting). Prince Heinrich Fürstenberg—in whose

This page: Ibiza is one of the many places where Pugs has held meetings, thanks to having a boat as a clubhouse (above); Ali MacGraw and Robert Mitchum in The Winds of War (inset).

property the great Danube begins its flow—was next, then came Arki Busson, of Uma Thurman fame; Bob Miller, the billionaire tax-free shop tycoon and trans-Atlantic sailing record holder; and Lord Rayleigh, a milk tycoon. Edward Hutley, Rolf Sachs (the German tycoon) and Tara Getty brought the list up to 19. Nick has turned out to be a priceless president for life, producing an annual Christmas card with all the members dressed in various traditional costumes and with our faces superimposed—yours truly, as vice president for life, is always depicted in an imperial German uniform. But his main contribution is the organization for the club regatta that is held in different places each year. Places like Ibiza, Capri, St Tropez, Corsica, you get the picture. Many of the members own sailing boats and the mother ship is Getty’s magnificent Talitha, a 200 footer with a clipper bow that would make J. P. Morgan drool with envy. Bob Miller’s annual shoot at Gunnerside, England’s grandest estate for killing birds (one that I do not partake in) is another of Nick’s contributions. An annual lunch during Ascot week is also de rigeur. Last but not least is his blackball idea. Basically we have blackballed everyone, starting with Bill Clinton, Jay-Z, all Saudi so-called princes, Warren Buffett—who got 19 blackballs although it emerged that no one knew him or had ever met him—

and, of course, Paul McCartney, whose ghastly ex-wife was asked to be matron of the club on the basis she could not get up the ladder of my sail boat due to her having lost a leg. This autumn we all return to Ibiza, where the first race was held eight years ago. Commodore Tim Hoare lays out the course and hands out the handicaps. Tara Getty is the favorite because he has a 12 man crew that races regularly in the Med. He is the holder now that Bob Miller and his faster-than-lightning Marie Cha retired the trophy two years ago. Neither Tim Hoare nor I have ever won although our boats are by far the most beautiful to behold. The party the night before the race is, needless to say, the highlight of the three-day blast. Quest is a family magazine, and I cannot go into some of the sordid shenanigans the membership has indulged in, but I can guarantee you one thing: Obama has had as many blackballs as Hillary Clinton, even though women are not allowed in the premises of the club. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. SEPTEMBER 2014 65


BY ALEX R. TRAVERS 66 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F I K N O W N E W Y O R K

I KNOW NEW YORK


THINK YOU KNOW New York? Not just New York City, that is, but the entire state. Then “I Know New York”—a new, wildly entertaining multi-player trivia board game by Nut Island—is the best way to prove your prowess. The idea for I Know New York came to creator Gail Keeler out of the blue. Keeler, a New York resident, doesn’t play many games, but she is an insatiable reader. “Mostly non-fiction,” she says. “And I drive a lot. I’m on the road and see the beauty [of New York].” In short, she loves the Empire State. And you feel that affection in her game. I Know New York can get competitive. Exclaims Keeler, “You’d be surprised at what you don’t know.” Her questions challenge you to think. How many readers know what New York town sits on the Niagara River and was the last stop on the Underground Railroad for slaves trying to reach Canada? Didn’t think so. What if you had three options? Try it out: A.) Tonawanda B.) Wheatfield or C.) Lewiston. Any luck? You won’t, however, always have this luxury. There’s a category called “I Know It All,” where you’re on your own. No choices. No help, unless, of course, you decide play in teams. Still, it’s not easy. Here’s one a team I played with missed (and they went to this school): What New York State college hockey team is the only unbeaten, untied national championship team in NCAA history? Well, did you get it? Congrats if so. But you

won’t get any extra points for being brilliant. Collect your single marker and move on. With I Know New York, the goal is to gather all seven category chips. If you want to make the game short and sweet, the rules say you can be the victor with just five. But it moves quickly, so allow me to suggest playing the traditional way. That means correctly answering questions from all seven categories: arts, geography, history, natural history, people, pop culture, sports, and “I Know It All.” Roll the dice, pick your path, and start answering the questions. They’re addicting. Get one wrong and you’ll be anxiously awaiting your turn, playing know-it-all when it’s someone else’s chance. “O.K., let’s play again,” said a guest of mine after our first game. No objections. I Know New York isn’t all about trivia skills, however. Wild cards add a little bit of chance. “Move ahead two spaces” may not particularly help you but “win a category marker chip” will. Are you a sports savant with no interest in natural history? Then hope you can score the wild card that lets you choose any chip if you correctly answer a sports question. There are opportunities to take other players’ chips, too, allowing for a possible comeback. I Know New York is a crowd-pleaser in the best sense of the word: It wins you over with its ingenuity. Look out for I Know New York City—a five-borough-specific trivia game—this November as well. u

1. What New York town sits on the Niagara River and was the last stop on the Underground Railroad for slaves trying to reach Canada? A.) Tonawanda B.) Wheatfield or C.) Lewiston To purchase I Know

2. What New York State college hockey team is the only unbeaten, untied national championship team in NCAA history?

New York, visit www.iknownewyork.com. Opposite page: I Know

1. C.) Lewiston 2. Cornell University

CO U RTE S Y O F I K N O W N E W Y O R K

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

New York creator Gail Keeler.

SEPTEMBER 2014 67


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

PERHAPS LIKE NO other month, September is a perfect

time for change—a chance to switch from summer’s easy ambling into fall’s high-gears of fashion. And who kicks up a wardrobe better than Dennis Basso, Ralph Lauren, or Valentino? Harry Winston even appeals to the guys with a sleek new line of men’s jewelry and furnishings. So come on and talk to us, Harry and all.

Carry the pyramid beaded foldover clutch in mauve from Ralph Lauren Collection, and you’ll be rocking. $2,950. Ralph Lauren Collection: At select Ralph Lauren stores and ralphlauren.com.

Dressing up just got better with Wempe’s 18-kt. white gold necklace with tanzanite cabochon, sapphire cabochon, and pear-shaped and brilliant-cut diamonds. $109,465. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, or wempe.com.

Dennis Basso is ready to suit you up for the season in this silver fox scarf ($4,500) and black-and-white Swirl embroidered dress ($5,800). Dennis Basso New York: 825 Madison Ave., 212.794.4500. 68 QUEST

Stuart Weitzman’s Apogee heel in smoke plaid suede is the height of footwear fashion this fall. $485. Stuart Weitzman: 625 Madison Ave., 212.750.2555.


21 FLO OR S FACING THE FUTURE 21 FLO OR S FACING THE FUTURE

A neighborhood s teeped in his tor y welcomes a contemporar y architec tural s tatement of light and air. 24 full and half floor residences from one to three bedrooms, ranging from $1 to $8 million. Sales by appointment. 2 1 2 . 3 8 1 . 2 5 1 9 1 9 P P T R I B E C A .C O M

A neighborhood s teeped in his tor y welcomes a contemporar y architec tural s tatement of light and air. E XC LU S I V E M A R K E T I N G & S A L E S 24 full and half floor residences from one to three bedrooms, ranging from $1 to $8 million. Sales by appointment. 2 1 2 . 3 8 1 . 2 5 1 9 1 9 P P T R I B E C A .C O M The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. CD13-0284. All rights to content, photographs, and graphics reserved to ABN Realty, LLC. 3D illustrations courtesy of McAuley E XC LU S I V EforMillustrative A R K E T I Npurposes G & S A only. L E S Artist renderings reflect the planned scale and spirit of the building. Sponsor reserves Digital. Artist renderings and interior decoration, finishes, appliances, and furnishings are provided the right to make substitutions of materials, equipment, fixtures, and finishes in accordance with the terms of the offering plan. Equal Housing Opportunity.

The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. CD13-0284. All rights to content, photographs, and graphics reserved to ABN Realty, LLC. 3D illustrations courtesy of McAuley Digital. Artist renderings and interior decoration, finishes, appliances, and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only. Artist renderings reflect the planned scale and spirit of the building. Sponsor reserves


Fresh Finds

The online contemporary art platform Exhibition A has commissioned its first piece of wearable art: 100 limited-edition printed Thought Bubble scarves by artist Christian Joy. $125 at ExhibitionA.com.

The distinctive touch of Roberto Coin is on full display in these Pois Moi square diamond earrings in 18-kt. rose and white gold. $3,900. Roberto Coin: At Neiman Marcus.

Color yourself sweet in Paloma’s Sugar Stack gold rings for Tiffany & Co. in pink sapphires ($4,500), yellow quartz ($675), blue topaz ($1,350), diamonds ($5,500), and lavender amethyst ($675): at tiffany.com.

What2WearWhere has solved your packing needs, introducing a chic array of travel bags that offer checklists and savvy solutions to the art of packing. From $65–85 at What2WearWhere.com. Be guiling in gauzing with Giorgio Armani’s wool-cashmere blend top ($1,145), silk cady pant ($1,795), spiral shawl ($13,225), and mixed-material handbag ($2,995). Giorgio Armani: 760 Madison Ave., 212.988.9191.


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Career Transition For Dancers 29th Anniversary Jubilee

a helluva town Monday, October 6, 2014 • 7:00 PM Honoring

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JAMES EARL JONES

CHITA RIVERA

CHUCK SCARBOROUGH

KAREN ZIEMBA

Special appearances and performances by, and artists from

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater • American Ballet Theatre • Arthur Murray Dance Center, Columbus Circle Ballet Hispanico • Jonah Bokaer • Dance Theatre of Harlem • Industrial Rhythm Silva Dance Company • Tony Waag’s American Tap Dance Foundation • and the Jubilee Orchestra Plus special appearances by the Rockette Alumnae Visit

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Produced and Directed by Executive Producer

for more stars and surprises.

Ann Marie DeAngelo

Alexander J. Dubé

NYCITYCENTER.ORG CITYTIX BOX OFFICE 212-581-1212 131 W 55th St CAREERTRANSITION.ORG PERFORMANCE ONLY TICKETS AT $140, $90, $60, $45 Patron Tickets: $1,200, $750, $600. Tables for 10 start at $7,500. Patron Tickets and Tables include premium performance seating and post-performance “Supper with the Stars,” dancing, and a live auction at the Hilton New York. Contact Marjorie Horne at 212.228.7446 x 33; Marjorie@mcevoyandassociates.com; or careertransition.org • Group Sales: 718.499.9691 • Artists and program subject to change. Photos: Dance Image courtesy of Richard Termine. • A. Lansbury by Stephen Paley • C. Rivera by Laura Marie Duncan • C. Scarborough courtesy of NBC 4 New York • K. Ziemba by Laura Rose

29th Anniversary Chairs

Anka K. Palitz • Susan and Stewart Wicht

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Official Wine Sponsor

Dance Magazine and Pointe • Misty Widelitz • Sono Osato & Victor Elmaleh Joe Tremaine & Tremaine Dance Conventions & Competitions Janice & Stuart Becker • Fe & Alessandro Saracino Fendi • Condé Nast


Fresh Finds

Hank the Chief (in blue silk) and Hank the

Get happy by sporting a colorful

Outlaw (in cotton ban-

display of pattern beneath your

dana) smartly carry

cuffs with Happy Socks. $12 per

your phone, glasses, cards,

pair of Flower socks at

and cash while doubling

happysocks.com.

as a pocket square. Hank: At Story (144 10th Ave.) and meethank.com.

The My Color leather bracelets from TOD’S come in over 15 solid and mixed colors, offering the modern guy countless ways to accessorize. $225 each. TOD’S: 800.457.TODS or tods.com.

The new version of the Rolex Deepsea sports a deep blue to pitch-black gradient, recalling the ocean’s twilight hour. $12,350. Rolex: Visit rolex.com for official retailers.

The Zalium cufflinks in white gold and diamonds (price upon request) are part of Harry Winston’s sleek new line of men’s jewelry: the Zalium Collection, available at harrywinston.com or 800.988.4110.

Christofle breaks into new

Get your suit on this

territory with this stunning

fall with John Varvatos,

Clivage round bowl, fusing different shapes and elements

who’s turning out the sharpest of silhouettes in luxuriously

of nature. $2,160. Christofle:

modern patterns. John Varvatos:

846 Madison Ave., 212.308.9390.

765 Madison Ave., 212.760.2414.

72 QUEST


PRIVATE BROKERAGE & ADVISORS

Guard Hill Equestrian Estate - Spectacular Shingle Style Country House imbued with sophisticated style. Over 7200 square feet of living space. Twelve, flat acres with easy access to the Piney Woods Preserve—some of the finest riding trails in Bedford. Incredible horse farm with state-of-the-art equestrian facilities. Two Barns. Lawton Adams indoor and outdoor riding rings. Ten grass paddocks. Jumping Field. Three Bedroom Groom’s Quarters. The perfect Bedford riding lifestyle. Fabulous and just listed! $5,500,000

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The Perfect Family Colonial - Spacious yet elegant. The perfect 18th Century Farmhouse - Expanded in 1908. Approximately combination of casual rooms for everyday living and formal spaces for entertaining on the grand scale. Nearly 8000 square feet of sun-filled living space with high ceilings, substantial millwork and French doors. Living Room with Fireplace. Impressive Family Room. Formal Dining Room. Spacious Cherry Kitchen. Five Bedrooms. Long drive to three private acres. Gorgeous land with rolling lawns and phenomenal plantings. Deeded lake rights.$1,695,000

6000 square feet of living space with beautifully-scaled rooms, period millwork, five fireplaces and hardwood floors. Impressive Living Room with Fireplace and doors to Sun Room.Seven Bedrooms. Three glorious acres with level lawns, towering trees, old stone walls and incredible gardens. Sparkling Swimming Pool. Desirable estate area moments from shopping, restaurants, schools and commuting arteries. $1,100,000

Pre-Revolutionary Bedford - Charming Antique Colonial, circa 1750. Spectacular wide board pine floors, extensive millwork and built-ins. Center Entrance Hall. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Family Room with Fireplace. Sun Room. Over one beautiful acre in top estate area. Landscaped grounds with rolling lawns and extensive stone work. Charming Summer House and Deck perfect for taking in the view. $599,999

Sophisticated Tudor - Rich in detail and distinctive design. Approximately 4200 square feet of artistic living space. Entry Hall with poured concrete floor with acid finish and Venetian plaster walls. Art Gallery. Living Room with incredible circular wall of windows. Five Bedrooms. Gym, Sauna and Spa Bath with steam shower. Long drive past scenic pond to over three beautifully landscaped acres. 450 lilies. Salt-water Swimming Pool with Spa. $1,295,000

(914) 234-9234

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Fresh Finds

La Perla’s Gremoglio tulle and lace medium briefs ($128) and underwired bra ($188) are boudoir essentials. At La Perla boutiques and laperla.com. Get a step ahead in a touch of gold: the Minstrel Slip back in time and into Patricia

from Belgian Shoes in gold kid leather with

Peckinpaugh’s highly stylish

silver inlay and black sole. $360.

labradorite rings with garnet ($725)

Belgian Shoes: 110 E. 55th St.,

and citrine ($725). At

212.755.7372.

patriciapeckinpaugh.com.

Be the portrait of a lady in Valentino’s shining embroidery gown with a detachable feather collar and pumps. Price upon request. Valentino: Valentino Fifth Avenue Flagship, 212.355.5811.

Diptyque, the fabled French house of scents, now offers this stylish Feuillage holder to house your favorite candles. $150. diptyque: 971 Madison Ave.

James Tufenkian’s Brocade Medici carpet is hand-woven from the finest Tibetan wool and silk, with an ornate design grounded by a versatile, elegant palette. For more information, visit tufenkian.com.


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GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

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EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terchef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terchef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 the home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout The in-ground pool cabanaspacious further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 the home which is sited onRIVER almost 5 acres. Offered $1,875,000 GARRISON, NYand - This contemporary on over 6 acres boasts spectacular HUDSON VIEWS and at total privacy. The house is a

magnificent blend of glass and concrete, creating a light filled home with views from every room. A double faced fireplace separates the living space, the chef ’s kitchen is open and easy, and the master bedroom suite is like a shining jewel box. The lower walk-out level offers a large family room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and sauna. A hallway leads to the surprising 55 by 20 foot pool with walls of sliding glass doors to the exterior. This stunning home, with a resort-like feel, is less than an hour to NYC and only minutes to Cold Spring. Offered at $2,150,000.

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


R E TA I L

PONYING UP ON FIFTH AVENUE FIFTH AVENUE is poised to welcome

back a once familiar fixture for the thoroughfare: horses. Not, perhaps, the horseand-buggy carriages of yesteryear, but an equally iconic staple of the American story—Ralph Lauren’s famous pony-bearing Polo fashion line. Spanning nearly 38,000 square feet behind a neoclassical-style façade of rich limestone and bronzed window frames at 711 Fifth Avenue, this first-ever Polo flagship that just opened represents another 76 QUEST

first for the American designer: the introduction of a dedicated Polo Women’s collection. It also houses a complete offering of the trusted Polo Ralph Lauren Men’s collection, as well as a coffee shop on the second floor and an adjacent restaurant, The Polo Bar, at 1 East 55th Street. The new flagship marks the first of many Polo stores planned to open worldwide in the coming years and signals a new retail strategy for the company. For Ralph Lauren himself, the timeless,

aspirational elements of the classic Polo style that originally launched his fashion and lifestyle empire are coming back home. With the debut Polo Women’s collection, Lauren is proud to bring his Polo style to a new generation of women. “My Polo girl is cool and youthful—though ageless,” he said. “She has her own sense of personal style.” Judging by the mix of sophisticated tweeds, simple dresses, rugged outdoorsy looks, and city-worn leathers on offer, she most certainly does. u

CO U RTE S Y O F R A LP H L AU R E N

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


Looks from Ralph Lauren’s new Polo Women’s collection. Signature touches like plaid flannels (lower left), patchwork patterns (coat, top right), and rugged-meets-city combinations (top left) are on full display at the new Polo flagship at 711 Fifth Avenue (rendering opposite).


AUCTION

AUCTION’S NEW FRONTIER THE MARKET FOR online auctions is booming. According to a report released in April, online art purchases make up 2.4% of the estimated art market, representing $65 billion in 2013 overall value. Enter Auctionata, the innovative online auction house. Auctionata revolutionized the way auctions could be conducted with their interactive platform. Bidders can ask questions of a specialist during the auction about the item for sale, or request that a particular section be zoomed in on—imagine doing that in person! The high-quality production paid off: by June 2013, only a year after it was founded, the house broke the record for online sales with a work by Egon Schiele, which sold for $2.4 million. A large part of Auctionata’s success is owed to the care and research that goes into each auction. Auctionata has a global network of experts who use their vast knowledge and impressive backgrounds to evaluate each piece. It’s a responsibility they do not take lightly. These specialists can assess anything from a work of art to an antique watch to a rare stamp. And it’s not just limited to what will go into an auction—if you have an item that you’re curious about, they 78 QUEST

can give you a free valuation even if you want to hold onto it. “People will find us online, call a number, or send in photos for evaluation through our website,” explains Robert Velasquez, Auctionata’s Head of Sale for the Watch Department in the U.S. The specialist will in turn appraise it, do some research if necessary, and give a rough estimate of its value. “Everyone’s more than welcome to send me things just for information—even if they don’t want to put it up for auction, and they just want to know more about it. Let me be that guy to shed some light on the piece.” What is it that makes Auctionata so popular and appealing? “It’s different than the typical auction house model, which resisted change, and thrived on a lack of transparency, and we are a very transparent company,” says Velasquez. “We’re going to show you the price, the buyer’s premium, we’re going to show you all of it. That’s the experience we want people to have with us. We’re a customer service–oriented company.” u For more information, visit Auctionata.com

CO U RTE S Y O F AU C T I O N ATA

Auctionata uses a revolutionary new platform that allows auctions to be more dynamic and interactive.


Opposite page: Behind the scenes of an online auction. This page, from top: Patek Philippe 2499R Perpetual Chronograph; Vintage Diamond L.U. Chopard Ladies Backwind Cocktail watch in white gold; Patek Philippe 5004R Perpetual Split Chronograph.


ART

MADELINE AND THE CITY B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

the Hameau de Versailles. 80 QUEST

CO LLE C TO R ’ S AT H E N A E U M

This page: Adieu to the Ritz #8 by Ludwig Bemelmans. Opposite page: Illustration from Madeline and the Bad Hat depicting

In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines Lived twelve little girls in two straight lines In two straight lines they broke their bread And brushed their teeth and went to bed. They left the house at half past nine In two straight lines in rain or shine— The smallest one was Madeline.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E A RT

WHEN I WAS six years old, my family announced that we were moving to Paris. Trying to understand what that might entail, I turned to a beloved book about a little French girl’s adventures for answers. Caution: The following verse has been known to induce strong rushes of nostalgia.


As a tomboy of the first water, I didn’t necessarily recognize myself in the primly dressed girls, but Madeline’s precocious courage resonated with me. It gave me comfort—hey, I figured, if there were girls like her in Paris, maybe I could find some kindred spirits after all. (Turns out that the girls at my school actually did dress that primly, but that’s for a different article, “French Schoolgirls Don’t Wear Jeans.”)

To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline’s debut, the New-York Historical Society has gathered her creator’s work in the exhibit “Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans.” Many of the pieces in the show are from the collection of Chuck and Deborah Royce, who have turned their luxury resort in Rhode Island into a museum of illustration, with a particular focus on Bemelmans. Curated by Jane Bayard SEPTEMBER 2014 81


Curley, the exhibit features the work of a man who was an author, illustrator, and much more. “A relentless connoisseur of life, he drew with a child’s eye and wrote with the shrewd wit of an adult,” says Curley. He was also an astute observer of the people around him and could reveal their essence with a few strokes of his pencil. “Bemelmans’ world ranged from yachts and limousines to garrets and subways, and was peopled with moppets, jewel thieves, Ecuadorian Generals, and feather boa–clad vamps. His drawing style, humorous and reductive, captures all this in a flash.” That style, coupled with his natural ear for language, ensured that Bemelmans’ name would be found in children’s libraries for generations. I confess that even now, in my East Village apartment, the original battered copy of that book from my childhood sits on my bookshelf. I keep traveling, and Madeline’s courage keeps coming with me. u

Lady at Table – La Colombe, 1953 (top); Adieu to the Ritz #2, 1950 (bottom). 82 QUEST

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“A relentless connoisseur of life, he drew with a child’s eye and wrote with the shrewd wit of an adult.”


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E A RT CO LLE C TO R ’ S AT H E N A E U M

ART

Two mural panels commissioned by Aristotle Onassis for the children’s dining room on his yacht The Christina, named for his daughter Christina Onassis. SEPTEMBER 2014 83


TELEVISION

A GREAT MEAL, FROM END TO BEGINNING “REVERSE COURSE,” a live-action T.V. pilot that tells the inverted story of a meal’s preparation, is a new way of looking at producing food locally. The name couldn’t be more topical, as the show follows a dinner from its final presentation to the adventurous ingredient sourcing. (The show’s network, FYI, calls it “farm-to-table to the extreme.”) The pilot takes place in East Hampton, New York, where Brooke Geahan, a Shelter Island resident, is hosting a dinner party. But this is no ordinary social event. Geahan has an intention: to join the trustee board of the East Hampton Historical Society. In order to secure her seat, she must impress Richard Barrons, the society’s executive director. Luckily, she knows Barrons is heartfelt about the area’s food. So she calls in the big guns. Her secret weapons are two chefs: Sam Talbot and Michael Chernow, a duo certainly apt for the job. Talbot, having previously worked at Montauk’s Surf Lodge, knows Long

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Island’s cuisine well. And Chernow, a born-and-raised New Yorker, is a co-owner of the Meatball Shop, the restaurant chain that keeps popping up all over New York City. In short, these guys are smart, talented, and passionate about local fare. While the dinner guests converse, Talbot and Chernow are hard at work, turning out dish after dish with precision and wonderful care. The meal begins with oysters, hand-caught by the chefs that morning. We know this because Talbot and Chernow are given the job of explaining each course. The porgies—succulent and beautifully crosshatched—were caught in Montauk. The vegetables came from the nearby Biophilia Farm. And the honey, used in a salad, was produced at Spy Coast Bee Farm in East Setauket. The show’s reverse action isn’t a gimmick—it’s a way to show us precisely how the food is sourced. That delicious porgy? You’ll get to see just how it’s grilled. You’ll even watch Talbot and Chernow catch it. How’s that for foodie action? u

CO U RTE S Y O F S T I C K F I G U R E P RO D U C T I O N S / D O M I N I C K R E C I N E

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


This page: A selection of images from the filming of the pilot of “Reverse Course,” a show that tells the story of a meal’s preparation in reverse. “Reverse Course” will air later this year on A+E’s FYI network. Dinner guests include Brooke Geahan, Richard and Rosanne Barrons, and The Brave jewelry designer Jessica Hendricks. Opposite page: Chefs Michael Chernow (left) and Sam Talbot (right) catch a Montauk porgy for Brooke Geahan’s dinner at the East Hampton Historical Society’s Mulford Barn.


OPEN HOUSE

A NOD TO THE HERITAGE OF GRAMERCY The residences at 234 East 23rd Street boast 57 condominiums that embody the charm and comfort of the neighborhood. “WE MADE A CONSCIOUS design decision to move away from glassy buildings and more toward classic, authentic architecture,” says Miki Naftali, C.E.O. of the Naftali Group, of the residences at 234 East 23rd Street. “The result is a building that has strength and substance and yet has beautiful architecture that accentuates the light on its façade and in the residences. We are proud that this building not only has a great location, but also a very unique and elegant design.” And so Gramercy is to be graced with the 20-storey structure, designed by Goldstein Hill and West Architects as a nod to the history of the neighborhood. The interiors of the residences were conceived by Rottet Studio, which is known for its work on properties such as the Loews Regency and the Surrey in New York and the St. Regis in Aspen. Throughout, spaces for residents—including a roof terrace and a second-floor terrace as well as a library and a lounge—offer the charm and comfort of a boutique hotel. 234 East 23rd Street is comprised of one- to three-bedroom 86 QUEST

residences that range in size from 733- to 2,303-square-feet, plus a full-floor, four-bedroom penthouse. The windows (which are floor-to-ceiling) offer views of the city and its skyline while white-oak floors add a warmth. The properties are priced from $1.4 to $6 million and will be available for occupancy in Fall 2015. “Gramercy is one of Manhattan’s most desired neighborhoods, and 234 East 23rd Street embodies everything that has traditionally been so sought after in the immediate area, including architecture with real character,” says Alexa Lambert, executive vice president of Stribling Marketing Associates. “The building is all about the details and exquisite finishes, and the sum of its parts equals a very sophisticated living space that has been very popular with both seasoned and first-time buyers.” u For more information on 234 East 23rd Street (which is listed by Alexa Lambert, executive vice president of Stribling Marketing Associates) call 212.234.2330 or visit 234e23.com.


This page: The brick and metal faรงade of 234 East 23rd Street in Gramercy, designed by Goldstein Hill and West Architects. Opposite page: A terrace adds to the allure of the oneto three-bedroom residences.


CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

On September 16, the New York Philharmonic will celebrate its 173rd season at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center at 6 p.m. This year’s performance will include suites from famous Italian films, including 8½, La Dolce Vita, Cinema Paradiso, and Amarcord. For more information, call 212.875.5656.

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The Couture Council of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology will honor Carolina Herrera with its 2014 Couture Council Award for Artistry of Fashion at the David H. Koch Theater (20 Lincoln Center) at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 212.527.7531.

The Ailey II Dance Company will host an evening performance at Greenwich Academy at 7:30 p.m. A champagne reception will follow the performance. For more information, call 203.829.8765.

The American Theatre Wing will honor Dame Angela Lansbury at its 2014 gala at the Plaza at 6:30 p.m. Funds raised at the event will provide support for the Wing’s programs, which champion

DANCE TO THE BEAT

STAGE RIGHT

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The Saratoga Wine and Food Festival, a three-day destination event located in Saratoga Springs, will take place at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center (108 Avenue of the Pines). For more information, call 518.584.9330.

MUSIC MATTERS

The opening gala for the New York Philharmonic’s 173rd season will take place at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.875.5656.

HELP HEAL

The New Rochelle Humane Society‘s Paws for a Heart gala will take place at the Glen Island Harbour Club in New Rochelle, New York, at 6:30 p.m. All funds raised will help support the society’s programs, enhance its facilities, and help find loving homes for the animals in its care. For more information, call 908.202.4528.

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NOTHING TO FEAR

The Roosevelt Institute will hold its gala at 583 Park Avenue at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.444.9130.

DIG IN

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HIGHER EDUCATION

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WINE AND DINE

Communities in Schools will honor education advocate and philanthropist Elaine Wynn at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 800.247.4543.

and celebrate American theatre on the stage. For more information, call 212.765.0606.

On September 18, the Palm Beach Show Group will host its New York Art, Antique, and Jewelry Show at the Park Avenue Armory. The show will run through September 21. For more information, call 561.822.5440.

City Harvest will introduce its new Bow Ties and Burgers event, inviting guests to wear fancy and dapper bow ties and dine on burgers, shakes, specialty drinks, treats, and more. The event will take place at Center 548 at 7 p.m. For more information, call 646.412.0600.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N E W Y O R K A RT, A N T I Q U E , A N D J E W E L RY S H O W

FASHION’S ARTISTRY


CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1

SAVING OUR SOLDIERS

The Mental Health Association of New York will host its gala at the Mandarin Oriental at 6:30 p.m. The benefit will recognize companies committed to supporting America’s Armed Forces service members who have returend to civilian life. For more information, call 917.626.1300.

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LEND A HAND

The Girls Educational and Mentoring Services will celebrate its annual benefit at Top of the Garden in Midtown at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.926.8089.

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LUNCHTIME

On September 25, the 2014 Greenwich Wine and Food Festival, a three-day event presented by Serendipity magazine to benefit the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, will take place at Roger Sherman Baldwin Park in Greenwich, Connecticut. For more information, call 203.588.1363. OBJETS D’ART

The Palm Beach Show Group will host over 80 international exhibitors at its New York Art, Antique, and Jewelry Show at the Park Avenue Armory. The show is a must-shop event, offering collectors a vast selection of highquality treasures, from ancient antiques through 21st-century contemporary art. The show will run through September 21. For more information, call 561.822.5400.

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B FA NYC . CO M

RUN FOR A CAUSE

The 10th annual Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City RBC Race for the Kids will take place at Prospect Park in Brooklyn at 9 a.m. The 5k race will help raise over one million dollars to provide one-on-one mentoring relationships for young people throughout the five boroughs of New York who need caring adult role models in their lives. Following the race, participants will take place in special festivities as part of Nickelodeon’s Worldwide Day of Play, including a picnic and appearance by popular Nickelodeon characters. For more information, call 212.686.2042.

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The New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation will hold its “Lunch at a Landmark” with honored guest and speaker Sir David Chipperfield. For more information, call 212.669.7819.

FASHION MEETS DANCE

The New York City Ballet will host its fall gala at the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center at 5:30 p.m. The evening will conclude with a stylish “super ball” on the promenade of the theater. This season, fashion will be back at the New York City Ballet, marking the third exploration of pairing ballet with fashion design. The program will match four of the five ballets with a roster of celebrated designers to create costumes. For more information, call 212.496.0600.

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BURGER BATTLE

The 2104 Greenwich Food and Wine Festival will take place at Roger Sherman Baldwin Park in Greenwich, Connecticut, and will run through September 27. The festival will feature a “Top Bartender Showdown,” a “Most Innovative Chefs Gala” with Geoffrey Zakarian and JeanGeorges Vongerichten, and much more. Presented by Serendipity magazine, the event will benefit the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, dedicated to helping ill children. For more information, call 203.588.1363.

On September 3, the Couture Council of the Museum at FIT will honor Carolina Herrera with its 2014 Couture Council Award for the Artistry of Fashion. For more information, call 212.527.7531. SEPTEMBER 2014 89


Opposite page: Amanda Hearst in one of the High Line Suites at the High Line Hotel. Dress by Dennis Basso with earrings, necklace, cuffs, and ring by Verdura.

A DAY OF FASHION WITH FINN PRODUCED AND STYLED BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

FOR AMANDA HEARST, orange is the new black. No, the beautiful, blonde granddaughter of William Randolph Hearst is not headed off to prison, but she does don a required orange vest when participating in the recovery of sorrowfully inhumane, overpopulated puppy mills. After visiting animals that had been rescued from a Mississippi puppy mill in 2010, Hearst discovered that her adorable little pup, named Finnegan, had come from one of these contemptible mills. With the help of the Humane Society of the United States, Amanda founded Friends of Finn, an organization comprised of young leaders committed to stopping the barbaric treatment of dogs in puppy mills. In 2012, Hearst enlisted in her second puppy mill rescue in North Carolina with the help of friend and fellow FOF committee member Georgina Bloomberg. Their efforts resulted in the freeing of 88 puppies and one pregnant cat. Bloomberg, an award-winning professional equestrian and long-time supporter of animal welfare, lives with five rescue dogs herself—Hugo, Mabel, Mona, Chopper, and Stella— and a rescue pig named Wilbur. She is also a member of the Equine Protection Council of the Humane Society of the United States. This coming November, these two young animal-welfare activists will co-chair the Humane Society of the United States’ 90 QUEST

“To The Rescue! New York” benefit at Cipriani 42nd Street, which will raise support for the rescue, care, placement, and potential rehoming of thousands of animals in need due to disaster, cruelty, or neglect. On January 15 of next year, the HSUS will honor Amanda Hearst for her work with Friends of Finn at the annual “To The Rescue! From Cruelty to Kindness” benefit in Palm Beach. James Berwind and Therese Mersentes will co-chair the event, which will take place in the Circle Ballroom at The Breakers. In these pages, Amanda, accompanied by her adopted Dachshund/Chihuahua mix, “Finn,” was photographed for Quest in the latest fall fashions at the High Line Hotel in New York City. Carved out of the red-brick General Theological Seminary complex in Chelsea, the unique, collegiate gothic– style hotel boasts a mosaic-tiled lobby; soaring, stained-glass windows; and cloistered courtyards. The 60 plush rooms housed inside the landmarked structure are furnished with Victorian and Edwardian antiques and include clever details such as rewired 1920s dial telephones, period art, Tiffany-style lamps, and majestic Oriental carpets. When visiting, don’t miss coffee in the courtyard served from the 1960s Citroën truck parked outside, or a glass of post-work bubbly on the leafy terrace of Champagne Charlie’s. Given that the hotel is notably pet-friendly, you might even spot a friend of Finn’s—or two. —E.M. ­


This page: Carolina Herrera dress, Stuart Weitzman heels, Harry Winston earrings and necklace, Verdura cuff, and Roberto Coin ring. Opposite page: Ralph Lauren Black Label sweater, Lela Rose skirt, Jimmy Choo heels, with necklace, bracelet, and rings all by Wempe.

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Oscar de la Renta dress, Verdura earrings, Van Cleef & Arpels necklace, Wempe rings, and Jimmy Choo heels. All beauty styling: Jacob Schmidt for Serge Normant at John Frieda (hair); Cindy Rodriguez, NARS Lead Makeup Stylist (makeup). Fashion associate: Alex R. Travers. 94 QUEST


This page: Turtleneck, skirt, and shoes by Ralph Lauren Collection; earrings and bracelet by Van Cleef & Arpels; yellow diamond ring by Harry Winston; diamond ring by Roberto Coin. Opposite page: Dress by Valentino with earrings and ring by FabergĂŠ.


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Opposite page: Oscar de la Renta dress; Harry Winston earrings, necklace, and two bracelets; Van Cleef & Arpels diamond ring; FabergĂŠ diamond, pink diamond, pink sapphire, tourmaline, and spinel ring; Manolo Blahnik heels; Edie Parker clutch. This page: Salvatore Ferragamo sleeveless turtleneck; Nonoo skirt; Jimmy Choo shoes; Kara Ross earrings, ring, and large cuff; Seaman Schepps link bracelet.


JOHNNY BE TOO GOOD BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

“I DO, HOWEVER, remember that I was very, very happy to work with Johnny,” says the model Veruschka of the photographer Johnny Moncada. “My most treasured recollection is Johnny’s presence. I instantly felt so comfortable and protected when he was around me. I felt that I was almost part of his family. It was gorgeous working with him.” The model Joan Whelan would, surely, echo the words of Veruschka, seeing that 100 QUEST


This page: A look from Luisa Spagnoli’s Fall–Winter 1958 collection with a string chair designed by Sergio Conti, Marisa Forlani, and Luciano Grassi. Opposite page: Gastone Novelli in the background with a look from Luisa

CO U RTE S Y O F J O H N NY M O N C A DA A R C H I V E

Spagnoli’s Fall–Winter 1959 collection.


Spring–Summer 1959 collection; a look from Luisa Spagnoli’s Spring–Summer 1960, as inspired by football in the United States (inset). Opposite page: Anna Filippini in a look from Luisa Spagnoli’s Fall–Winter 1958 collection. 102 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F J O H N NY M O N C A DA A R C H I V E

This page: Joan Whelan (wife of Johnny Moncada) in a look from Luisa Spagnoli’s


Whelan married Moncada after she worked with him! Whelan, accompanied by models Iris Bianchi and Anna Filippini, can be observed in the exhibition “Made In Italy: Una Visione Modernista,” at the Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia in Rome, Italy, through September 30. It features the collaboration between Moncada and artists Gastone Novelli and Achille Perilli, as curated by Valentina Moncada (daughter of Moncada and Whelan). The photographs—a collection of 60 selected from 600 that were discovered by Emanuele Condò and restored by Corrado De Grazia—offer a commentary on the “modern” woman, as understood in Europe in the 1960s. The models posed in 1956– 1965 ready-to-wear collections by designer Luisa Spagnoli against backdrops decorated with graphics by Novelli and Perilli, which were considered to be, well, una visione modernista (or “a modern vision”). The works have a catalog-type feel (which speaks to Moncada’s start in advertising) and include images like comic strips, a football player, and graffiti. There were pieces of furniture on the set that were designed by


This page: Joan Whelan (right) with another model in front of backgrounds by Gastone Novelli and Achille Perilli. Opposite page: A look from Luisa Spagnoli’s Fall–Winter 1960 collection.

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CO U RTE S Y O F J O H N NY M O N C A DA A R C H I V E

contemporaries, lending to the vibe of the effort. Also, perhaps lending to the vibe of the effort, Novelli himself makes an appearance in the background of a picture—gazing at the model as she gazes at the camera. Moncada, with Novelli and Perilli, endeavored to demonstrate the intersection of art and design, as perceived in an era with an evolving interest in fashion and a recent focus on advertising. The unearthing of these photographs offers a time capsule, of sorts—a fascinating glimpse at another place and time. u


PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY HARRY BENSON WRITTEN BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

LA REINA SUPREMA THERE IS AN AIR of majesty about her, so when you approach, you do it with a fair amount of deference. Asking for an audience in her design studio and a behind-the-scenes tour of her atelier can be a bit like asking for a one-on-one high tea at the palace. She is, after all, the couturier of consummate class, Carolina Herrera. And on the eve of her accepting the 2014 Couture Council Award for Artistry of Fashion by the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, you decide it’s only fitting that this legend, at this moment of her career, should be documented by a Commander of the Order of the British Empire himself, Harry Benson. And thus a photo shoot—this photo shoot—is born. When you arrive, she is nothing but the pinnacle of precision: abundantly ahead of time, turned out in a beautifully tailored navy-and-white shirtdress of her own design, double-stranded pearls tucked elegantly under the open collar, and Manolo Blahnik heels that even the twenty-somethings on her staff wouldn’t dare to try and navigate New York City streets in. Her short-cropped blond hair—perfectly polished and coiffed in a tiara-like swoop up and off her head—is enviable. Harry Benson snaps the designer Carolina Herrera in her Seventh Avenue atelier. 106 QUEST


This page: Carolina Herrera stands for Harry Benson beneath a 1979 Andy Warhol of herself in her office. Opposite page: Herrera at a ball given by Harry Platt at the St. Regis Hotel, 1979; a 1984 portrait by Paul Jasmin (inset, top left); with her horse Balaclava in 1955 (inset lower left); at La Vega, 1970 (right).


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From left: Carolina Herrera’s clothing is recognized for its couture-like quality, which is achieved through

H A R RY B E N S O N ; CO U RT E S Y O F C A RO L I N A H E R R E R A

hand-crafted detailing in her Seventh Avenue atelier; with another fashion icon, Jacqueline de Ribes.

On the walls, there are portraits of her by some of the greatest legends, like Arthur Elgort and Robert Mapplethorpe. There is also one of her as a child, in which she sits grumpily in a little white dress. (“My governess made me play the part of Snow White,” she laughs, “but I wanted to be the Evil Queen!”) She’s pleasantly good-natured and quick-witted. She stops in front of another black-and-white picture of herself dressed in a hat adorned by a thin lace veil: “I wore it to Studio 54 one night, lit a cigarette, then—poof!—I never saw it again!” Her gift to the history of imagery, as her office makes wonderfully clear, is that she will long be a muse to the artistic and fashionable (an Andy Warhol of herself hangs on one wall). But her gift to fashion and to women is that she resonates with every generation—and manages to suit them all. Girls look to Carolina Herrera when they want to be taken seriously as a grown-up— and women, once grown, turn to her when they want to become true ladies. The Venezuelan-born, New York–based designer has always represented the epitome of a certain kind of grace and gracefulness: she is a semi-mythic combination of glamour, beauty, worldliness, and culture, and her

clothing has always reflected that. Carolina Herrera New York, the luxury label she launched in 1980, consistently summons a sense of sophistication—without ever being dated. As Benson calls for lights to be turned up or down, then motions for her to move this way or that with the arm not holding his camera, she falls into place without ever missing a beat. Under the glare, she manages to talk about her Fall 2014 collection: “It’s about new proportions,” she begins, then moves on to call attention to the exploration of soft construction and volume—like those oversized, billowy sleeves. She stops to smile for the camera but can squeeze out enough in between about the range of refined materials in the mix—silk twill, cashmere, jacquard mixed with fur and leather in gentle silhouettes. Above all, it’s about “quality”; otherwise, “what’s the point?” Herrera unfailingly honors the female form, and this season is no exception. She plays off the graceful ideal of a woman’s figure with prints based on sharp geometric shapes inspired by architectural forms. Her risk-taking always reaches a certain limit and remains knowingly in step. This might be due to the fact that Herrera is a master of both propriety and proportion. All of which SEPTEMBER 2014 111


From left: A 1973 portrait by Jose Sigala; snapped by Harry Benson, Herrera looks back on the day she was “forced” to play Snow White (she wanted to play the Wicked Queen).

explains why she’s receiving the Couture Council award this fall—“because she has contributed greatly to the art of fashion through the creation of an elegant personal style that appeals to women,” as Valerie Steele, the director of the Museum at FIT, describes Herrera’s artistry as a designer. Carolina Herrera, like her collections themselves, is an alluring combination of contrasts. With her iconic refinement—like her crisp white shirts paired with ballgown skirts or day pants alike—she is a modern woman with her sleeves rolled up, ready for business. Whether at the opera in evening gowns or in her design studio with reporters, she is a stunning and perpetually reincarnated version of a regal, international lady of another time. Carolina—as both her close friends and anonymous fans alike feel free to call her—speaks endlessly to a certain kind of ideal: the timeless yet modern figure whom every woman aspires to be. u 112 QUEST


H A R RY B E N S O N ; J O S E S I G A L A


This page: Current uniforms of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, page: Tools of the bespoke trade; a mess jacket, the Royal Hampshires, commissioned by the regiment from Gieves in 1988 for Diana, Princess of Wales (inset). 114 QUEST

Š B RU N O E H R S

five officers and 25 gentlemen. Opposite


ON SAVILE ROW BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

FIRST IT WAS THE Burlington Estate, a group of townhouses laid out in the 18th century in London’s Mayfair area. Then it became Savile Row, with renowned tailors such as Poole, Stultz, Meyer, and Hawkes & Co. opening up shops. Today, after nearly three centuries, it’s an address synonymous with best of bespoke tailoring. Which brings us to One Savile Row: Gieves & Hawkes, The Invention of the English Gentleman (Flammarion, 2014), a book that aims to capture the rich sartorial history of England. As advertised, One Savile Row is a tale of the birth and eventual marriage of two houses: Hawkes (London) and Gieves (Portsmouth). Gieves specialized in naval uniforms. Hawkes made helmets and caps. And until 1974, they were separate entities that outfitted civilians, the military, and royalty. When there was war, business was good. War, in fact, sparked innovation. With martini-dry wit, Colin McDowell, a fashion writer for the Sunday Times and contributor to the book, tells us about one of Gieves’ famous military inventions, a uniform


This page: A bespoke morning coat in black fine herringbone, basted up and ready

(Flammarion, 2014) (inset). Opposite page: A bespoke three-piece suit in light gray wool and cashmere flannel.

Š B RU N O E H R S

for a first fitting; One Savile Row: Gieves & Hawkes, The Invention of the English Gentleman


vest—dubbed the “life-saver”—with an inflatable tire–like ring and a pocket for a flask of brandy to keep a floating officer occupied. In gripping style, the original photography in One Savile Row by Bruno Ehrs is stunningly visualized. There are spreads where Ehrs compares the structure of Gieves & Hawkes’ contemporary formal suits to formidable architecture. It’s a testament to the brand’s lasting power; these pictures underscore the transcendence of tradition. Although the images and essays in One Savile Row cover over 300 years collectively, the overall impression is of a moment during which a man and his tailor develop a bond. That’s the book’s driving force. The foreward, written by Admiral the Lord West of Spithead, also discusses the idea of how men were supposed to behave, now that they looked the part of a gentleman. But enough of the past. Does bespoke still work today? It depends on your tastes. According to parent company Trinity, Ltd.’s financials, Gieves & Hawkes operates 122 stores globally. The brand will open in Bergdorf Goodman at the end of August and will be available in the United States under its own label. Home, however, is still One Savile Row, where Jason Basmajian—an American who previously worked at Brioni—is now at the creative helm. Formal ready-to-wear remains the crux of the global business, sold at many of the best stores in the world. But bespoke tailoring holds a special place in the heart of Gieves & Hawkes. Unlike a watch or a car, every stitch and cut is individual. And like that perfect suit or garment, One Savile Row holds our attention and reminds us of why the bespoke and couture traditions continue to persist in a world where fast fashion rules. It’s just that kind of book. u SEPTEMBER 2014 117


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J U L I E S K A R R AT T ( S E L F - P O RT R A I T T H I S PA G E ) ;

FROM AUDITIONS TO APERTURES B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D


“DID I EVER TELL YOU about the time I got sent home by Karl Lagerfeld?” This is the kind of throwaway line that makes Julie Skarratt such a delight. She might be a respected photographer now, but she was once a top model and has the amusing anecdotes to prove it. Coaxed back out in front of the camera for this interview, the leggy beauty kicks off with a good one. “I was a fit model for Chanel. You’d be in the clothes in a room with 20 people and he would say, ‘Ah, the pocket, a little to the left,’ and they’d all say, ‘Oh bravo, Karl, bravo!’ They’d clap their hands and the pocket would be moved. Anyway, I had recently gone to America on a job and discovered See’s Candies…I ate so many. I went back to Paris and my first job was to fit for Karl, and I went in—I had put on two pounds—and I go to put on this skirt and I’m like, ‘Uh oh.’ I couldn’t zip it up. I go out, and Karl looks at me, horrified, and he goes, ‘Oh, no, Julie, you’re fat!’” Skarratt, with her natural Australian accent, delightfully mimics Lagerfeld’s German one when delivering his line. “He sent me home. That’s when I decided I should move to America. Would he remember that? No. But I’ll never forget it.” As she was pulling away from the world of modeling, she saw it was evolving into a new era where the

This page: Julie Skarratt, the 1980s fashion model turned celebrity, fashion, and wedding photographer herself, is captured with camera in hand; magazine cover and image from her modeling days (insets). Opposite page: A self-portrait of Skarratt taken this year, clicker in hand. Skarratt wears a black velvet tuxedo jacket by Ralph Lauren Black Label, shoes by Jimmy Choo, and jewelry by Rebecca Raft for www.bouvier.com.au.


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This page: Magazine covers and fashion ads from when Julie Skarratt reigned as a 1980s fashion model, represented by Eileen Ford herself; a self-portrait by Skarratt as she appears today, in a black suit of her own, Jimmy Choo shoes, and jewelry by Rebecca Raft for www.bouvier. com.au (center); Skarrat with the musician Jimmy Buffett, for whom she travels regularly as tour photographer (top center). Opposite page: Skarratt graced the March 1982 cover of the fashion magazine Donna.


Self-portrait by Julie Skarratt, taken this year. Black velvet tuxedo jacket by Ralph Lauren Black Label, all jewelry by Rebecca Raft for www.bouvier.com.au. For all portraits taken this year: Hair by Mia Santiago at Sharon Dorram at Sally Hershberger; makeup by Cindy Rodriguez, NARS Lead Makeup Stylist. 122 QUEST

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models were selling their own personas. “With Christy and Naomi and that covergirl from Canada [Linda Evangelista], they really changed it. They started promoting themselves and calling magazines, saying, ‘We’ll be at this restaurant, come photograph us.’ I was just before that. We had agents.” (And not just any agent: Skarratt was represented by Eileen Ford herself.) Skarratt downplays her success as a model for laughs—“Everybody else was jumping on the Concorde; I wasn’t”—and it’s with similar whimsy that she explains how she became a photographer. She had received a camera as a gift, but had never picked it up until, one day, a friend who drove racecars invited her to watch him compete. The race was the 1986 Grand Prix of Miami, and her friend was Paolo Barilla. Barilla won. “All of a sudden, I was right there in the middle of everything with my little camera,” Skarratt recalls. “It was so exciting! Afterwards, everybody wanted my pictures. And I was like, ‘Oh my God, that was really fun.’”


Now that she had discovered a new passion, she needed to find a way to live off it. She took a position as assistant to Tanya Malott to shoot weddings, and proved herself so good that when Malott got married the following year, she asked Skarratt to be the photographer. That shoot ended up in Town & Country, and the magazine hired her on the spot. Since then, she has built a sterling reputation as the first name in wedding photography and events. Her secret? “I knew I had to be fast in turning it around. Everybody else was taking a week to get photos to the magazines, so I knew if I was really fast, that would give me an edge. And it did. I know the power of being quick.” Her earlier life of working at all hours on shoots and shows translated into one where every ounce of energy is poured into getting her prints perfect and out the door. To any editor who’s had to harangue people over deadlines, Skarratt is an answered prayer—an angel with heavenly gams. u

A photograph by Uli Rose of Skarratt during her modeling days, taken outside of Paris in 1982 at the home of Chantal Thomass.


SNEAKING IN FOR THE SHOT BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

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© ELIO SORCI/C AMERA PRESS

IN A TIME before Instagram, the world

didn’t much care to see everyone’s morning cup of coffee, workout routine on the beach, or fabulous five-star digs for vacation. One tended to show up in personal family albums, and that was it. In other words, one tended to live a rather undocumented life—unless, of course, you were famous. And the more famous you were, the more the world wanted to see you, which is what gave rise to the “paparazzi.” The term derives from a character in Federico Fellini’s iconic 1960 film La Dolce Vita. The original paparazzi were a band of Roman photographers known for lying in wait to surprise their famous subjects in unexpected and sometimes compromising situations, then zipping away on Vespas to sell their photos to the highest bidder. One of the first and most successful of the paparazzi was Elio Sorci, who in 1962 famously exposed the affair between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton when he snapped them mid-embrace. It was the kiss seen ’round the world, landing on the front pages of newspapers Brigitte Bardot filming in Fiesole, Tuscany, 1962. SEPTEMBER 2014 125


Studios, Rome, 1960. Opposite page, inset: The cover of Paparazzo: The Elio Sorci Collection, available this November from Roads Publishing ($100 at www.roads.co). A deluxe limited-edition, with an archival-quality print, will also be available for $1,490.

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© ELIO SORCI/C AMERA PRESS

Rock Hudson and Cary Grant, Ciampino Airport, 1960 Cinecittà


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and Warren Beatty, Rome, 1962.

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© ELIO SORCI/C AMERA PRESS

Natalie Wood


Elizabeth Taylor at the David di Donatello Awards, Rome, 1962.

“Sorci’s photographs bring vividly to life the personalities who defined that era; they tell of the unique confluence of circumstance that made Rome so vibrant an international playground.” —Philippe Garner

everywhere. Among Sorci’s other unwilling subjects were the likes of Audrey Hepburn, Cary Grant, Sophia Loren, Ted Kennedy, Peter Sellers, Tina Turner, and Keith Richards. This November, in a first-ever collection of the photographer’s work, Roads Publishing is releasing a book of images as quick and as fast as their creator: Paparazzo. With an introduction by Christie’s director Philippe Garner, we’re offered new insights into Sorci’s work. Once inside, the photos featured, like their fantastically eye-catching cover, are raw, candid, stylish, often hilarious, and always cool. For today’s world—where everyone, including even the most famous of celebrities, seems overexposed—Paparazzo serves as a reminder of the allure fostered by a sense of privacy, and the power of giving them just an occasional glimpse. u SEPTEMBER 2014 129


BY DANIEL CAPPELLO PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIBORNE SWANSON FRANK

HOLLYWOOD IN A WHOLE NEW LIGHT


“When it comes to my craft,” says the actress Cody Horn, pictured here, “I am especially interested in the process of character transformation—the immersion into a person completely unlike myself.”

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This page: “I grew up on sets watching my parents and other actors perform,” Ireland Basinger Baldwin, the daughter of Kim Basinger and Alec Baldwin, recalls. “My family has been in the spotlight my entire life; therefore, I have never really known anything different.” Opposite page: The actress Imogen Poots enjoys making films today but admits a nostalgia for the magic of Old Hollywood. “To me,” she says, “the glamour of this world mixes grace and a sense of humor.”

SOMETIMES AN AUTHOR knows the title of her book by the time she’s written the first chapter. And sometimes a photographer knows her cover image the moment she snaps it. So it happened for Claiborne Swanson Frank, whose latest book, Young Hollywood (Assouline), features a close-up of the green-eyed actress Isabel Lucas on the cover. “Our shoot was in the mountains of Topanga Canyon in the late afternoon,” Swanson Frank tells me. “Isabel was in a 1978 midnight blue Corvette. The light was golden, the air warm—I knew the moment after I took the shot it would be the cover.” Other portraits might not have benefitted from that same golden light of Hollywood but were equally special and unique, to be sure. “I shot the actress Riley Keough in a thunderstorm at a circus,” the photographer remembers. “The sky went black and we had 10 minutes to shoot. I love that shot.” Notwithstanding the weather, what emerges from Young Hollywood is an exciting look at a generation of women—actresses and insiders alike—on the verge of defining the next generation of Hollywood influence. “This is the first generation of actresses who are crossing industry lines and also working as directors, screenwriters, and producers in such considerable numbers,” Swanson Frank says. “Young Hollywood celebrates Old Hollywood, through the book’s styling and locations, while


This page: The actress Adelaide Clemens, who in Swanson Frank’s book tells how she is “happiest, strongest, and most free when I am smack-dab in the middle of a scene. It is then that I fear nothing.” Opposite page: The actress Riley Keough, Elvis Presley’s granddaughter, describes how she loves “escaping life through acting. Everything else goes away when you’re working. Hopefully the same happens for the people watching the films.”

honoring this new generation.” As such, the book is as much about recapturing something lost as it is about documenting what’s happening in the moment. Caught by Swanson Frank’s lens, these movers and shapers of Hollywood come into view as poised and heroic figures—stylized, yes, to a certain degree, yet wholly honest in their individual skin. Some are unapologetically feminine and refined, others unabashed in their bravado, which flickers in the stare of their eyes. To make it in today’s Hollywood, it’s sometimes not enough to merely play the part of an actress: sometimes you have to act, write, model, direct—even design. As the fashion designer Michael Kors, who pens the foreword and whose own label is seen on some of the book’s subjects like Ireland Basinger Baldwin and Leven Rambin, describes: “These young Hollywood talents represent the juggling and speed that’s necessary today, but they’re able to channel something that feels old-world glamorous at the same time.” And who better to document them than Swanson Frank, the fashion-savvy former staffer from Vogue who broke ground two years ago with her first book, American Beauty, which brought us face-to-face with a new generation of women defining the cult of American glamour and sophistication? In both books, her subjects call us back again


SEPTEMBER 2014 135


This page, from left: Isabel Lucas graces the cover of Claiborne Swanson Frank’s Young Hollywood (Assouline), available at assouline.com; the actress Lorenza Izzo, who gets into her character by imagining how she would walk, brush her teeth, or make her bed. “I wonder,” Izzo says, “‘Does she have well-manicured toes? What kind of television shows would she watch?’” Opposite page: Leven Rambin never felt like she belonged in her home state of Texas. “I found release from this anxiety through acting in plays at school,” she says. “I was determined to become an actress, to affect people’s lives.”

and again. There’s a quality in each of them that speaks to sophistication and experience, but also to curiosity and possibility, as Kors puts it. “That’s what Claiborne has harnessed in this book. She’s brilliant at showing heightened reality.” For Swanson Frank, her role as photographer is to document American culture through large bodies of portrait work. And Hollywood, which has been a driving force in defining American culture for generations, presented itself as a natural subject and progression from her first book, especially since she and her husband moved to Los Angeles from New York two years ago. Upon arrival, she says, she felt that there was a unique opportunity to tell a fresh story in her new home town. And the story that emerges is one of “ambitious and passionate” women, as Kors describes them. “They’re not afraid to show the world who they are or who they want to be.” Neither, thankfully, is their photographer. u 136 QUEST


The Annual Rose Garden Dinner Dance Thursday, September 18, 2014

Pe g g y R o c kefeller Rose Garden


The Board wishes to salute

Susan and Coleman P. Burke for their extraordinary dedication, leadership, and generosity.


Rose Garden Dinner Dance Thursday, sepTemBer 18, 2014 marks the date for the rose Garden dinner dance at The New york Botanical Garden. This annual event features the Botanical Garden’s world-famous peggy rockefeller rose Garden, designed by celebrated landscape architect Beatrix Jones Farrand in 1916, and fully realized in 1988 through a generous gift by peggy and david rockefeller. With nearly 700 cultivated varieties, the rockefeller rose Garden is one of the most spectacular displays at The New york Botanical Garden. Long lauded as one of the most beautiful rose gardens in america, it has been transformed in

recent years into one of the most sustainable public rose gardens in the world. The rose Garden dinner dance is a celebration of the glorious autumn flowering of the Botanical Garden’s magnificent rose collection. The evening begins with cocktails in the peggy rockefeller rose Garden, followed by an elegant dinner with dancing in the Garden Terrace room. The event attracts 300 members of the Garden’s extended family, and raises $600,000 to support the maintenance, development, and the continued care of one of the world’s premier rose venues.

FOr mOre INFOrmaTION, pLease CONTaCT CarOLINe BaLkONIs aT 718.817.8773


2014 Rose Garden Dinner Dance Honorees THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN is proud to pay special tribute to Susan and Coleman P. Burke in recognition of their steadfast loyalty. We are grateful for the friendship of susan and Coleman p. Burke, including susan’s 22 years as a member of the Board and her service on the horticulture, Library Visiting, and Budget Committees, and the Garden patrons Council. In addition to providing essential operating support through their generosity toward the annual Fund, susan and Coley have long been dedicated to the special events program. susan’s leadership of the antique Garden Furniture Fair for over two decades has been instrumental to this annual event’s success.

We are also fortunate that susan and Coley have made a wonderful new leadership commitment to the Garden in support of the edible academy, the planned state-of-the-art, year-round complex that will make it possible to double the number of children, families, and teachers who can participate in NyBG’s edible gardening, cooking, and nutrition programs. They will champion the new edible academy by underwriting the development of its Terraced Lawn amphitheater, the future site for large-scale cooking demonstrations, concerts, and public programs. The Garden’s preeminence among the world’s botanical gardens has been greatly strengthened through susan and Coley’s philanthropy and dedication.


Chair List Guests of Honor

Vice Chairmen

Mr. and Mrs. Coleman P. Burke

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund M. Carpenter Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Chilton, Jr. Mrs. Thomas H. Choate J. Barclay Collins and Kristina Durr Lucy and Nat Day Patricia and Eric Fast Mr. and Mrs. James T. Flynn Amy Goldman Fowler and Cary Fowler Dotty and Lionel Goldfrank Robert F. Gossett, Jr. Gail Hilson Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mitchell Jennings Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Johnson Diane Katzin and Rick Kurnit Michael A. Kovner and Jean Doyen de Montaillou Thomas E. Lovejoy, Ph.D.

Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. Harry Burn III Memrie M. Lewis Mr. and Mrs. George B. Moore Mr. and Mrs. John M. Sullivan, Jr.

Honorary Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy H. Biggs Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Davidson Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Hubbard Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Nolen

Susan E. Lynch Mr. and Mrs. William I. Morton Mr. and Mrs. William B. O’Connor David Rockefeller Ellen and Kenneth Roman Marjorie and Jeffrey A. Rosen Mrs. Arthur Ross Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Royce Julie and Nick Sakellariadis Sara Lee and Axel Schupf Howard S. Slatkin Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Steel Judy and Michael Steinhardt Carmen and John Thain Caroline A. Wamsler, Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Edward K. Weld Dee and Pug Winokur List in formation as of August 20


Presenting Sponsor: Sponsored by: J.C.C. Fund of the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of New York Additional support provided by: ITO EN (North America), Inc., Marubeni America Corporation, Mayer Brown,

Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Sumitomo Corporation of the Americas Foundation


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1. Chris and Grace meigher 2. Nonie sullivan, Gregory Long, mary davidson 3. amy Goldman Fowler and Cary Fowler 4. Gillian and sylvester miniter 5. ken and ellen roman 6. Jeanne Jones, Friederike Biggs 7. ann and Charles Johnson, Jeanie Burn 8. memrie Lewis, Julia utsch 9. Nick and Julie sakellariadis 10. John and Carmen Thain 11. Caroline Wamsler and deWayne phillips 12. maureen Chilton, dotty and Lionel Goldfrank


SaluteS

SuSan and Coleman P. Burke and

The New York Botanical Garden


BROWN

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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Rachel McAdams and Mick Jagger at the premiere of The Most Wanted Man on July 22.

CO U RTE S Y O F L I B E RT Y H A LL ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


Alex Pinsky, Neal Brown and Will McIver supported Liberty Hall at the Empire Hotel on July 23.

Jenny Evans, Emmy Kean, Jordan Deombeleg, and Brittany Doyle on July 23. Christina Haack, Samantha Bird, Meredith Moran, and Katie Parker-Magyar on July 23.

Kitson Marr, Lindsay Wagner, and Liz McGlinn at “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” to benefit Liberty Hall.

Alexandra Haack and Corbin McPherson at “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Marisa Greechan, Kaitlyn Brant, Taylor Opperman, and

Lauren Formisano and John Kean supported

Dana Greechan supported Liberty Hall.

Liberty Hall at the Empire Hotel on July 23.

“I HATE WRITING. I love having written,” said Dorothy Parker. So, with Labor Day Weekend a-calling, I have to say that I agree with her... Ciao! On July 22, the Cinema Society and Montblanc hosted the premiere of The Most Wanted Man, which features a performance by Philip Seymour Hoffman, at the Museum of Modern Art. The after-party, at the Skylark, was attended by actresses Rachel McAdams and Robin Wright as well as Dane DeHaan, Nate Freeman, Mick Jagger, Cynthia Rowley, and Mara

Siegler, where the Grey Goose cocktails appeared to be the “most wanted.” On the 23rd, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” benefited Liberty Hall Museum at the Empire Hotel. The committee, comprised of Alexandra Haack, Ben Haack, Christina Haack, Ned Horneffer, Katie Parker-Magyar, Mimi Pitney, Lindsay Wagner, and others, went above and beyond—the event was a smash. (Liberty Hall Museum in Union, New Jersey, is a historical estate that was constructed in 1772 to be the home of the first governor SEPTEMBER 2014 149


of New Jersey, William Livingston.) On the 31st, I caught up with Carson Griffith at Root and Bone, where chef Jeff McInnis (of Yardbird fame) and chef de cuisine Janine Booth are offering country cooking in the East Village. We indulged in a spread that included the Drunken Deviled Eggs, the Fried Chicken and Waflle Sandwich, and the Shrimp and Grits and—after compliments, and more compliments, to the chefs—departed with the promise to return. (And we did, within the week.) On August 5, Juliet Izon and I attended a dinner at the Todd English Food Hall at the Plaza Hotel. There, alongside Leah Bourne, Sam Dangremond, and Micaela English, we prepared a lobster-themed meal under the direction of chef Todd English,

From left: Chef de cuisine Janine Booth and chef Jeff McInnis; Root and Bone, at 200 East Third Street (646.682.7076). 150 QUEST

wich with whiskey maple syrup, picked green tomato, watercress, and cheddar cheese.

himself. Think: fritters (with lobster), guacamole (with lobster), pasta (with lobster)... End scene. On the 7th, the young members circle of the Museum of the City of New York threw the “Big Apple Bash” at Fifth Avenue and 103rd Street. Guests included Alexandra Abington, Aditya Bhise, Rob Chedid, Forbes Litcoff, Alex Polkinghorn, Caroline Smith, and Gordon Stewart, who coversed over shrimp rolls from Luke’s Lobster. On the 16th, the Jazz Age Lawn Party saw 4,500 attendees in costumes from the era. The scene was aswirl at Governor’s Island, with flappers (and their admirers) imbibing cocktails by St-Germain. u

B FA NYC . CO M ; J E A N - PAU L C H AT E LLE N A Z ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Root and Bone’s Fried Chicken and Waffle Sand-


Lena Hall, Lisa Goldberg, Iesha Reed, Shane Kidd, and June Ambrose at a Cinema Society after-party on July 22.

Dane DeHaan and Anna Wood at the premiere of The Most Wanted Man, hosted by the Cinema Society.

Jessica Henriquez at the Jazz Age Lawn Party at Governor’s Island on August 16.

Juliet Izon and chef Todd English, making pasta at the Todd English Food Hall at the Plaza Hotel.

Christine Layng, Rebecca Rutkoff,

Avery Salisbury, Ben Shuldiner, Cassie Ryan,

and Lizzie Schneider at the Museum of

Brooke Heidecorn, David Semanoff, Jessica

the City of New York on August 7.

Liberman, Lauren Reddy, and Dara Epstein at the “Big Apple Bash.”

Grace Coddington at the premiere of The Most Wanted Man, hosted by the Cinema Society.

Lindsay Ellingson and Sean Clayton at a Cinema

Josh Lucas at the Jazz Age Lawn Party at

Society after-party at the Skylark.

Governor’s Island on August 16. SEPTEMBER 2014 151


SNAPSHOT

GOING FOR THE GOLD Alfred Hitchcock acted out of character when he dressed Grace Kelly for To Catch A Thief, but the gold lamé gown allowed the actress—and the themes of the plot—to shine. “PALACES ARE FOR ROYALTY. WE’RE just common people with a bank account,” says Francie (actress Grace Kelly) in To Catch A Thief (1955). However, the costume worn by Grace Kelly was the antithesis of common. In fact, it was an anomaly. Designer Edith Head (winner of eight Academy Awards for costume design) recalls the experience of working with director Alfred Hitchcock throughout her career as “an education in restraint.” He was known to refrain from what he termed as “eye-catchers,” or costumes with colors or patterns that 152 QUEST

distracted the audience from the action—think Kim Novak dressed in gray for Vertigo (1958). But for To Catch A Thief, Grace Kelly was outfitted in a gold lamé gown featuring a sash with butterflies—an example of a costume that is the action because it serves to foreshadow what follows: the reveal that Francie, the common person with a bank account, is the thief. With the dress, Edith Head and Alfred Hitchcock could illustrate a character’s obsession with jewels and precious metals, thereby using fashion as a tool in the film. Vanity has its dangers... —Elizabeth Quinn Brown


THE ADDITION AND RENOVATION OF A WILTON HOME INCLUDED OPENING UP THE GARDEN FAÇADE TO TAKE BETTER ADVANTAGE OF THE SPECTACULAR VIEWS.

DESIGNING FINE HOMES, ESTATES, AND APARTMENTS IN CONNECTICUT, NEW YORK CITY, AND PALM BEACH

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Quest September 2014  

Fall Fashion Issue

Quest September 2014  

Fall Fashion Issue