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$5.00 JULY 2021

THE SUMMER ISSUE

CRUISING WITH BARTON & GRAY ABOARD AMERICAN PIE IN NEW YORK HARBOR

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78

CONTENTS The S ummer I SSue 78

RISING TIDES

Barton & Gray Mariners Club sets sail with Quest for a day on the

water surrounding New York City, showing just how great it is to have access to their fleet of stunning Hinckley yachts. phoTographed by

88

produced and wrITTen by

brooke kelly

JulIe SkarraTT

88

A new book by Assouline shows the luscious colors and

CUBA’S JAZZY VIBRANCE

stunning architecture of Havana. by alex TraverS

94

102

Now that the country is reopening, we revisit some of our favorite sunny locales by alex TraverS

AMERICAN SUMMER IS BACK

RANKING THE HAMPTONS

Look, we all know each Hampton has its own culture.

104

HISTORY, MEMORY, & MOTIVATION

108

ENDLESS SUMMER

114

NEW YORK’S HOTSPOTS

Ronald Lee Fleming’s Bellevue House.

Some things never go out of style. by elIzabeTh meIgher Talking with local resident and real estate maven

Andrew Saunders and other brokers about today’s New York lifestyle. by brooke kelly

118

SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE

Take a break from the beach and splurge.

108


66

54

CONTENTS C olumns

58

18

SOCIAL DIARY

54

HARRY BENSON

56

TAKI

58

FRESH FINDS

62

CANTEENS

64

RESEARCH

66

TRAVEL

70

REAL ESTATE

72

LIFESTYLE

74

OPEN HOUSE

76

SOCIAL CALENDAR

110

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

128

SNAPSHOT

The city feels alive and well. Ain’t it grand?

by

DaviD PatriCk Columbia

Our columnist remembers his time spent with the author Truman Capote.

Halston, a designer filled with ego who was destroyed by fame.

by

t aki t heoDoraCoPulos

Summer—and summer fashions—in full bloom. by alex travers anD elizabeth meigher

Newport’s Clarke Cook House has a multilevel array of restaurants to satisfy all diners. A looming mental-health pandemic points out the need for some action. by louisa benton

Summertime is fun—and kid friendly—at the Dominican Republic’s Casa de Campo. Forté, a 24-story tower, enjoys sweeping views of Worth Avenue and the Atlantic Ocean.

Chatting with Sotheby’s International Realty agent Molly Ferrer. A gorgeous home overlooking Shinnecock Bay hits the market.

by

by

brooke kelly brooke kelly

The best events to enjoy in and around town now that summer has begun. Capturing some summer-time fun in the sun.

by

brooke kelly

Cataloguing the vintage comings and goings of the Hamptons social set.


SENSUAL COCOON BY KIM Sensuality in perfect form.

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questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA DEPUT Y EDITOR

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HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA

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CRISTINA CONDON JED H. GARFIELD KIRK HENCKELS KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2021. All rights reserved. Vol. 35, No 7. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor,

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HE ATO R OF T


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Clockwise, from top left: Grateful Pub and Doug Gray, co-founder of Barton & Gray Mariners Club; David Ray aboard his launch “Ahab”; Peter Sullivan, Suzanne Mitchell, Anne Ford, and Chandler Hovey; Marylou and C. V. Whitney; Molly Ferrer at a 1969 debutante ball.

16 QUEST

of Southampton summers spent with her aunt, Audrey Hepburn, and her fleeting moment of movie fame as a deb in Whit Stillman’s still iconic classic, Metropolitan. Per usual, we end with our Snapshot page, which highlights the comings and goings of the Southampton social set through the vintage lens of Ben Morgan’s photographs (where I think I spot my shipmate, Chandler “Bee” Hovey, ogling Anne Ford’s signature bouffant hairdo. Hubba-Hubba!). A full year ago, on this very same page, I stiffened my upper lip and naively proclaimed: “good news resonates and must be embraced,” well knowing that vaccines were many months away and the casualties of Covid had continued to mount. Yet, as a masked and distanced nation, we endured and made the best of a short, sad summer that none of us want to remember ... but probably won’t forget. Now, in this much awaited Summer of 2021, we can exhale again and more than deserve to celebrate. We’ve earned it. We made it through, and mostly because of our simple, stubborn American-ness—the same unfathomable strength that fuels the imperfect union we so proudly call our Country. On this Fourth of July, dear and loyal readers, may God truly bless America and indeed each of you. u

Chris Meigher ON THE COVER: Cruising with Barton & Gray aboard American

Pie in New York Harbor. Photographed by Julie Skarratt for cover story “Rising Tides” (pg. 78). Produced and written by Brooke Kelly.

Julie Skarratt; Courtesy of Molly Ferrer

WITH THE SOLSTICE now in our wake, we lurch into the heart of a more “appropriate” summer with Quest’s annual July number—revisiting the favored seasonal watering holes of our much-revered readership. After great anticipation, we begin our focus on the immediate waterways surrounding our beloved Manhattan Island. Celebration is very much in order, especially as New York City has a competent new mayor in the wings, bringing to an end the most absurd period of municipal governance since Peter Minuit hoodwinked my beloved Native Iroquois into selling him their Island for 60 Dutch guilders. Quest’s purposely patriotic cover story, back-dropped by Lady Liberty herself, features the Barton & Gray Mariners Club—a genuine American success saga conceived by Tim Barton and Doug Gray, two nautically oriented entrepreneurs who cleverly scratched the itch of becoming a (happy!) boat owner without the dreaded hassles of maintaining and managing such pleasure crafts. I have known Doug Gray practically since his birth (his equally talented father, Ed, founder of Gray’s Sporting Journal, was a good pal and college fraternity brother) and I am increasingly impressed with the ongoing safety, service, and professionalism that he and Tim have brought to their coveted Mariners Club. Senior Editor Brooke Kelly and Julie Skarratt, Quest’s ubiquitous Photographer-at-Large, have again teamed up to bring us the spectacular visual experience of cruising “around and about” the iconic Island of Manhattan. They even let this salty pub come aboard for the ride! With nary a nod to last year’s Covid-canceled summer, Managing Editor Alex Travers has compiled a rich look at the traditional haunts of Northeast Harbor, Newport, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, Southampton, Saratoga, and Watch Hill— communities that are again alive with their prideful family residents, their spruced-up eateries and ancestral clubs, their multiple generations of casual elegance ... and their newfound spiking real estate values (Ka-ching!). In our Canteens column we visit Newport and poke our nose into David Ray’s legendary Clarke Cooke House, where the menu may change every decade or so, but never the Dark ‘N’ Stormies. And not to be missed inside these pages is Molly Ferrer’s lovely reminiscence


ON VIEW MAY 8–SEPT 26

The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature Explore ten rooms filled with an eclectic range of historical and contemporary craft, art, and design rendered in miniature. 2 C O L U M B U S C I R C L E , N YC | M A D M U S E U M . O R G

The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature was curated by Caroline Hannah. This exhibition is made possible through Joanna Fisher’s support and efforts. Photos: Jenna Bascom


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY SUMMER STOCK. The appreciation of the change in seasons has heightened more than usual this year. We’re out and about, amongst each other. Otherwise, in the main we were devoid of each other (except for personal partnerships, marriages, etc.) for the better part of a year. Those of us who live

alone—and we are a large and healthy portion of the population—saw people less. And were often in fear. Masks, whatever you want to think of them, added to the “distancing.” This is not good for us humanoids. We need each other and were born to be with each other. Society, as it was and has

been over the eons, is a result of that natural state. At this time in our human history, technology has moved in with the other natural elements: earth, wind, and fire. Now it’s earth, wind, and fire, and email. Sounds like I’m trying to be funny. I’m not. People see less of each other except for their

constant, often compulsive looking at their cell phones at others somewhere else (or across the table). Many think use of cell phones in public, or even private dinners as rude, crude, and annoying. The relationship with that device has changed our selves and our relationship to each other,

A N N UA L R OYA L A S C OT I N E N G L A N D

Prince Edward and Sophie, Countess of Wessex 18 QUEST

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles

Princess Anne

Queen Elizabeth

Mike and Zara Tindall

GETTY IMAGES

Kate, Duchess of Cambridge


NEW YORK IS BACK SUMMER IN THE CITY

Visit The New NikkiField.com THE FIELD TEAM ADVANTAGE: Kevin B. Brown, Daniel Y. Chang, Amanda Field Jordan, Jeanne H. Bucknam, Ashton Monroe, Silvia Wong, Craig George, Nikki Field, Mara Flash Blum, Matthew Perceval, E. Helen Marcos, Benjamin Pofcher, Alexandra Lawrence & Andrew Sideras. Camera Shy: Patricia A. Wheatley, Shelia Ellis, Akash Puri, Leigh Williamson, Yudit Manevich, Miriam Miranda, Jordan Finkle, Michelle Koby & Alexander Brown. Photography by Sarah Merians

© 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty (SIR) . All Rights Reserved. The SIR trademark is licensed and used with permission. Operated by SIR, Inc. The SIR network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Real estate agents affiliated with SIR are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of SIR.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O U T H A M P TO N A N I M A L S H E LT E R ’ S A N N U A L PA R T Y

Amy and Marion Piro

Missy Hargraves and Christian Gomez holding Brody

not to mention Society. The great thing about this new Summer Season is we are now rid—at least for now— of the laws of “experts” and “politicians” that dominated a year out of everyone’s life. With the “rules/edicts” lightened or removed, for the past several weeks, New Yorkers—who have remained here rather than fleeing to solace in quieter climes—have been out and about, and particularly noticeable because of the outdoor dining. That has replaced all those mutilmillion dollar fundraisers’ benefits at large hotels and clubs where the “Social Set” 20 QUEST

Bill McCuddy

Pamela Dove, Enrico Bruni and Dara Sowell

made their appearances as well as their relationships with their (potential) peers. And employed thousands of people. The month of June provided beautiful weather for New Yorkers. There were a couple of big rainstorms that washed the streets and sidewalks and fed the plants and trees, but otherwise the sun shown most days and the temperatures were mainly in the perfect mid- to high-70s. The Social Calendar remained comparatively

sparse although people are getting out and about again. That move has been tempered by the uncertainty caused by the months of The Lockdown. But daily we’ve been moving on …. And up! On a Thursday I went with a friend to see the first theatre that I’ve seen in more than a year. I was invited by another friend to attend a performance of Blindness at the Daryl Roth Theater on Park Avenue and 15th Street. I’ve known Daryl—who was also the producer of

Jeffrey Bradford and Norah Lawlor

Robert and Olga Sweet

Blindness—on a superficial basis for years. The theatre business has always been more than a passing interest. Women producers also interest me because it’s a tough business to swim in, let alone survive, and the women I’ve known with that title are some of nicest, hippest women I know— and successful. Daryl Roth has been at it for years and even has a son who is now a power in the theatre business. So I was curious to see what she had achieved. In a word: Wonderful! The Daryl Roth Theatre was built 115 years ago as a bank on the corner of 15th

PATRICK MCMULLAN

Lee Fryd


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Street and Park Avenue South, right across the avenue from Union Square. It’s an area still filled with much architecture which dates back more than a century. There are beautiful brick townhouses along East 15th Street, more than a century old but still simple and elegant. Blindness. I didn’t know what to expect. I have a friend who is very knowledgeable about theatre and productions. He heard it was “dark a lot” and it didn’t interest him. The thought didn’t affect me because I had been invited and was curious. From the program: Blindness the acclaimed Donmar Warehouse production of Nobel Prize-

winner Jose Saramago’s dystopian novel by playwright Simon Stephens, is a “socially distanced” theatrical event. Through spell-binding storytelling—narrated by Juliet Stevenson—and state of the art design, it unveils a gripping story of a world changed forever, reminding us that from the darkness, we will all emerge stronger. Blindness. I had no idea what to expect. Would we be sitting in the dark? I found that hard to believe. On entering the auditorium which is a three story-tall, vast room all in black, with pairs of chairs, two by two placed at a distance from all other pairs, arranged facing north, south, east and west. And overhead

there was a construction of what looked like metal bars (or narrow pipes), arranged in an order that meant they were part of the show. It was explained on arrival that all courtesies and considerations were observed about “distancing” and surfaces. On our chairs were earphones “sanitized” and waiting in a plastic bag— “ahh, plastic, our savior.” Once we put the earphones on, we learned about what the program would be. There would be “extended periods of darkness.” The play itself would be read/performed by Juliet Stevenson. It began with a woman driving her car when she

suddenly, instantly went blind, yelling, “I can’t see! I’m blind!” And suddenly it all turned black in the theatre. The room must have been black with darkness when it began although I can’t remember. Then the story moved on to her life under those circumstances. Two things were going on in my head. Firstly, because of the darkness (and it was pitch-black darkness), I found myself listening to the drama but also wondering if I might lose my sight during this hour and ten minute show. An absurd, fearful thought but between the dialogue and the blackness, I couldn’t help thinking of this dilemma that

F R E N C H H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y ’ S N E W YO R K D I N N E R

Jeri and George Sape

22 QUEST

Guy Robinson and Elizabeth Stribling

Odile Schieterre-Longchampt and Sana Sabbagh

Benjamin Wells and Natalie May

Ann and Bill Van Ness

John Harvey and Michel Longchampt

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Lee and CeCe Black


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R U N C H AT A N N A B E L ’ S I N L O N D O N

Olga Polienko

would/could affect anybody, and what would that be like to experience. A stranger in one’s own life. Losing your eyesight. What power and courage is required—and amazingly is often achieved. But so what? That question never leaves you throughout the entire show. In fact, you quickly forget about it being a “show,” because its essence and nature includes you “in.” We’re all on this boat together and Fate doesn’t care. But that was only the beginning of the drama read/acted out by Ms. Stevenson. What happens in the end is for you to find out. By the 24 QUEST

Olga Kurylenko

Vic Ceridono

Alison Loehnis

time it rolled around, the front doors to the stage had been suddenly been opened (as if part of the experience) unto lower Park Avenue with cars and pedestrians almost quietly passing by. The Sun was setting and there was an orange-pinkish tint to the light, as if it were designed to contrast the blackness we’d just experienced for 77 minutes. The theater room was still blackened except for the light from the open doors for our exit. It was soft and beautiful. At first the passing parade almost looked like a video, as if this was part of the finale, as if this were the reward (“...

and they lived happily ever after.” Let there be Light). It was artful, and the contrasts of the summer colors was a comforting finale. As was the performance and the entire experience. It was more than going to the theatre. The experience of Blindness—and it is an experience—is in another way a message to guide us out of the darkness we’ve experienced in the past year. The ultimate message of the Theatre. Hear! Hear! We’ve just finished up the ’21 Social Season in New York, in case you didn’t notice. Because mainly there

Alexis Foreman

Sophie Goodwin

wasn’t much. This poor boy who was known to complain to himself about “too much” on the daily calendar, now had the opposite: None. Most charities rely on donations and the philanthropists. It’s an industry in itself. Those “Galas” that have filled people’s daily calendars were absent last year, and now this year. The “virtual” benefits on your T.V. or computer screen were very productive and in some cases super-successful. But they are really just another aspect of isolation which, whether one prefers it or not, it’s not good for you

DAVID M. BENETT/GETTY IMAGES

Emilia Wickstead


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A (and those around you). Nevertheless, the show must go on for the good of us. On a Thursday night, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) held their Virtual Hot Pink Evening, taking their renowned Hot Pink Party to a virtual platform for the second year in a row. And they raised $6 million!—a record for a BCRF virtual event, or any event—to support BCRF’s global legion of 275 scientists whose work is pursuing highimpact breast cancer research that is helping save lives. The evening was hosted by Elizabeth Hurley, Global Ambassador of The Estée Lauder Companies’ Breast Cancer Campaign, the evening featured appearances by Jordana Brewster, Edie Falco, Cheryl Hines, Patti

LaBelle, Lisa Ling, Joan Lunden, Carolyn Murphy, Emma Myles, Amy Robach, Molly Sims. The evening opened with an all-star performance of “Cabaret” from the musical Cabaret. Gayle King introduced Miriam Dance, a singer, songwriter, theatre director, teacher, and breast cancer survivor. Miriam, who was diagnosed with breast cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic, captured hearts in an Instagram post where she sang “One Song Glory” from Rent. On this Thursday night, she sang it again, this time surrounded by the original Rent cast members and Broadway performers,

including: Sebastian Arcelus, Will Chase, Wilson Cruz, Carly Hughes, Jose Llana, Adam Pascal, Charlie Pollock, Anthony Rapp, Mary Testa, Tracie Thoms, Daphne Rubin-Vega and Rema Webb for an unforgettable performance. BCRF’s Founding Scientific Director Dr. Larry Norton of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center introduced Paul Shaffer who was joined by Motown legend Valerie Simpson for a performance of “You Make Me Feel Brand New.” Dr. Norton himself even joined in on bass guitar. It was a performancepacked evening. Also featuring Broadway star

and breast cancer survivor Mandy Gonzalez leading a performance of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” Then Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka introduced Sir Elton John who has devotedly performed at every BCRF annual dinner for the last 25, 26, 27 years! going back to Evelyn Lauder. Sir Elton closed the evening with a spectacular performance of “Tiny Dancer,” in tribute to Evelyn, BCRF’s Founder, telling the audience, “When I reflect upon my favorite memories of your beloved Founder, my dear friend Evelyn Lauder, I am thrilled to think how proud she would be that BCRF is now the largest private funder of breast cancer research in the world. No force of nature,

M U S E U M O F A R TS A N D D E S I G N ’ S PAT R O N S E V E N I N G I N N E W YO R K

Timo Weiland and Bryan Ludwig 26 QUEST

Laura Day Webb and Casey Kohlberg

Meredith and Brooks Marks

Samantha DeTillio, Elissa Auther and Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy

Terry Skoda and Michele Cohen

Yeseul Song

BFA

Christina Senia and Alexander Hankin


Scan to see more

5 MIDDLE ATLANTIC WHARF, Unit 3-B | Downtown | Charleston, SC | 3 Beds | 2 Full & 1 Half Baths 3,044 Sq.Ft | Perfectly placed, sophisticated condominium located on the waterfront of the Cooper River across Waterfront Park | $3,399,000 | Listed By: Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

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To our brave

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A YO U N G F R I E N D S O F S AV E V E N I C E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N I N H O U STO N , T E X A S

doctors, for your courageous commitment

Ashland Hines Odom

Christiana Reckling and Elizabeth Carl

Lauren Reckling

to your patients throughout

THANK

YOU. (212) 367 1950 CCPHP.net 28 QUEST

Lizzie Asher, Counselor Federico Ciattaglia and Skylar Pinchal

no pandemic, can stop Evelyn’s dream of saving lives from breast cancer.” Sir Elton and David Furnish were honorary co-chairs, along with Judy and Leonard Lauder and Anthony von Mandl. Gala Steering Co-chairs were Dee and Tommy Hilfiger, Kinga Lampert and Aerin Lauder. Dee and John Arnhold, Valentine and Patrick Firmenich, Terri and Jerry Kohl, Loria Kanter Tritsch and William Lauder, Adrienne and Dan Lufkin, Jeanne Sorensen Siegel and Herb Siegel, Marilyn and Jim Simons and Candace King Weir. Steven Tabakin served as Director and Executive Producer. Batwin + Robin Productions provided creative direction, video editing and original

Daniel Harrison, Sophia Smith and Will Beard

animation. The Event Co-Chairs were Sandra Brant, Patsy and Patrick Callahan, Shelly and Howard Kivell, Michael Kors, Jane Lauder, Jo Carole and Ronald Lauder, Laura and Gary Lauder, Bryan Rafanelli, Lois Robbins and Andrew Zaro, John Rosewald, Arlene Taub, Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, Ingrid Vandebosch and Jeff Gordon, Vera Wang, and Nina and Gary Wexler More Virtuals. UrbanGlass, New York City’s only non-profit organization dedicated to equitable access to and education about glass as a creative material held its first virtual gala two Wednesdays ago, May 12. They honored Philan-

FULTON DAVENPORT

COVID-19...


Thank you! Michael Siegal, MD, PhD

Gary Horbar, MD

Jeffrey Loria, MD

Peggy Elango, DO

Bradley A. Radwaner, MD, FACC

Amy Lichtenfeld, MD

Richard Firshein, DO

James Underberg, MD

Annette Osher, MD

Leon Hodes, MD

Bruce Yaffe, MD

Michael L. Hundert, MD, FACP

Sandra Gilban, MD

6/18/2021

005_Liakeas_v2.jpg

Bernard Schayes, MD

Woodson Merrell, MD

Gary Goldman, MD

Regina Janicik, MD

Ora Pearlstein, MD

Robert J. Bos, MD

Steven E. Fochios, MD

Jeffrey Glick, MD

Christine Kakoulas, MD

George Liakeas, MD

Daniel Silvershein, MD

Paul Knoepflmacher, MD

Jeffrey H. Graf, MD

Ronald Ruden, MD, PhD

Sharon Hochweiss, MD

https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/1z5vGPUOwte_XlhuEKQuOvfHpSw97SRcp

THANK YOU to our healthcare heroes for their valiant efforts and persistence in keeping New Yorkers safe. CCPHP is proud to partner with exceptional physicians who worked diligently to keep their Members healthy and well-informed To learn more or to schedule a meet and greet with one of our CCPHP concierge physicians, visit ccphp.net/quest and we will gladly guide you through the process.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A thropist Barbara Tober, and acclaimed glass artist Deborah Czeresko. The event was co-chaired by Kiki Smith and Margaret Rose Vendryes, with special appearances by glass artist Beth Lipman, philanthropist and long-time friend of Tober, Leslie Jackson Chihuly, UrbanGlass Board Chair Katya Heller, and UrbanGlass trustee Cynthia Manocherian. Artist Grace Whiteside, MC’d the gala in the mustachioed cowboy persona of Billy Cash. “These two fine people have truly redefined roles for women in their respective fields,” said Ms. Whiteside.

Leslie Jackson Chihuly of Chihuly Studios said of the honoree, “Barbara really became an example to me of what female leadership is, what arts leadership, philanthropy, generosity, style, attention to detail. She’s impacted so many with her deep love of artists. She’s impacted and sustained so many incredible arts organizations across the country and in New York. You could not have honored a more deserving recipient than Barbara.” Which was echoed by UrbanGlass Trustee

Cynthia Manocherian, “Barbara, there is no one more deserving of the award you just accepted, service to the field. No one. And then there was The Hat Lunch. I went, naturally because it’s a good cause and good for all of us. I also liked it because we could get a lot of photos of the girls in their hats—many of which were smart, witty, chic, funny, hilarious, inventive and heyma-lookit-me! Seeing that is good for everybody; just this side of silly, and chic, but not. Anyway boo-hoo, no big tent

luncheon this year. However. It was perfect weather for the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy’s annual Olmstead luncheon which took place on a Tuesday and Wednesday. And in the Park but not at the Conservatory Garden entrance. It is the major fund raising affair for the Park. The Women’s Committee has raised more than $195 million over the years to assist in making the Park beautiful and a useful relief for city dwellers and visitors. So these girls are serious. It’s the city’s true haven for our spirits. This year’s luncheon was broken up into groups

MU S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S S P R I N G G A L A

Gil Meister and Valerie Mogul 30 QUEST

Gerrard Bushell, Whitney Donhauser and Leah Johnson

Paul Jelinek and Kate Guttman

Keith Butler

Luanne Vrattos and Jennifer Sheehan

PATRICK MCMULLAN

Lucinda Bhavsar and Oliver Ryan


New York living, reimagined.

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Represented the Seller & Buyer

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Licensed Associate R.E. Broker Licensed as Cornelia A. Eland M: 917.734.0229 | O: 212.452.4384 cornelia.eland@compass.com

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elandblumenfeld.com compass.com

Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


2

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1

4

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN’S ANNUAL GALA

5

1. Chuck and Deborah Royce 2. Ashley McDermott 3. Georgina Bloomberg and Nicky Hilton Rothschild 4. Brooke

6

Shields, Alek Wek and Karlie Kloss 5. Aurora James and Benjamin Bronfman

7

6. Jodie Turner-Smith 7. Hannah Burch 8. Holly Lowen 9. JV Cossaboom and Tim Landi 10. Fe, Alessia and Paola Fendi

8

10

BFA

9

32 QUEST


3

2 1

4 7

5

6 5 1. Jennifer Creel and Alexandra Lind Rose 2. Lee and Cece Black 3. Nacho Figueras and Delfina Blaquier 4. Sharon Jacob 5. Joseph Riley, Jr., Sabrina Forsythe, Michael Kovner and Jean Doyen de Montaillou 6. Sophie Elgort 7. Prabal Gurung and Tina Leung 8. Susan and George Matelich

7

9. Kit Keenan, Lilah Ramzi, Cynthia Rowley and Pieper James 10. Lili Buffett, Gillian Hearst and Amory McAndrew

9

10

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C H A M B E R M U S I C S O C I E T Y ’ S C O N C E R T AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R I N N E W YO R K

Jamie MacGuire and Michelle Coppedge

lunching over two days in different parts of the Park, including the Garden. We got to see more of this amazing place/world right in the middle Manhattan and its millions of everything. When you hear of someone “exploring” the Park, they’re talking about “something” to explore. I don’t know the final tally for their fund raising but I’m sure it was impressive. The hats this year also had a different spirits, all tributes to the season, the sunshine and the location(s). Enjoy. Meanwhile, in person, not on screen. City Harvest, New York’s first and largest food rescue organization 34 QUEST

Wu Han, Suzanne Davidson and David Finckel

Live concert

hosted its first-ever Spring Dinner high above the town overlooking Fifth Avenue on a beautiful week night in June in New York. The guests gathered together about 6:30 p.m. to recommit to ensuring that no New Yorker goes hungry. The evening marked the Renewed Commitment to Helping New Yorkers Facing Food Insecurity as the City Begins to Reopen. The Dinner took place at 620 Loft & Garden, on the top of a Rockefeller Center building facing Fifth Avenue. From that height and view you’re next door to the majestic St. Patrick’s

Alfred Spector and Rhonda Kost

Neil Westreich and Christina McInerney

Cathedral on 49th Street and Saks Fifth Avenue directly across the avenue overlooking St. Patrick’s Cathedral in the heart of Manhattan. It talks to you and has heightened many an imagination who found their way in New York and made a life and even a world. Like other nonprofits across New York, City Harvest was forced to cancel many of its signature inperson fundraising events— including its annual spring gala. In response, City Harvest gala co-chairs Lise and Michael Evans, Sandra and Eric Ripert, Carola

Martina Baillie and Edgar Choueiri

and Robert Jain, Christine and Richard Mack, Kristen and Patrick McMahon, and Shirley Madhere-Weil and Michael Weil, joined guests. City Harvest continues to serve New Yorkers in need at a record pace. They rescue and delivered more than 165 million pounds of free, nutritious food during the pandemic. That’s more than twice the amount of food the organization rescued and delivered the year before. Food insecurity rates surged 41% overall in New York City—and a stunning 53% among NYC children, according to an analysis by Feeding America.

AMELIA PANICO

John Lindsey and Elinor Hoover


25 EAST 86TH ST. 3C NEW YORK, NY 10028 $3,200,000 | 2 Bed 2.5 Bath | Cooperative Anchored in the heart of Carnegie Hill between Fifth and Madison Avenues, this sprawling residence has been meticulously renovated, blending prewar elegance with modern upgrades. Upon entering the gallery from the semiprivate vestibule, step into the spacious living room, which features a charming wood burning fireplace surrounded by a marble mantle. CRAIG M. DIX | Senior Global Sales Executive, Associate Broker 917.567.0805 | CraigDix@bhhsnyproperties.com EDWARD PRINDIVILLE | Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 732-546-8953 | EdwardPrindiville@bhhsnyproperties.com

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©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Information not verified or guaranteed and subject to change. Equal housing opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

Bring Your Destination Home Martha’s a

Vineyard

beautiful

is

vacation

destination for tens of thousands

of

visitors

each year. Visitors and residents are attracted to the 100-square-mile Island’s exceptional lifestyle, pristine beaches and sense of community. During the summer months, the Island’s population swells to over 100,000 people. Unique cottages, luxurious oceanfront estates, and scenic beach homes all come to life from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Many of which are designed by Gil Walsh, a homeowner on the island for over 15 years. Many homeowners want to combine the contemporary comforts of modern times with the casual island living, with its gracious patina and timeless

“City Harvest has been on the frontlines throughout the pandemic, feeding more New Yorkers in need than ever before,” said City Harvest CEO Jilly Stephens. ”We are so grateful to our supporters and leaders who recommitted to our work at this incredibly important moment for our city.” Most important to know about City Harvest is that it was an idea that came to a woman volunteer volunteering in her community. She was inspired by the “leftover” food that restaurants experience every day. If that food (which would ordinarily would be thrown away) were collected and redistributed, they could feed people. Simple and brilliant. New York’s first and largest food rescue organization, helping to feed millions of New Yorkers who struggle to put meals on their tables.

This year, they will rescue 153 million pounds of fresh food and deliver it—free of charge—to more than 400 food pantries, soup kitchens, community partners and their own Mobile Markets across the five boroughs. For more than 35 years, City Harvest has always been there to feed our city—one day, one meal, one New Yorker at a time. A simple idea to save the nation. To learn more, please visit cityharvest. org. It is notable that their delivery drivers are moved by the experience as well. They are not just driving a truck. They’re diplomats (as opposed to politicians). They are feeding a child, thousands of them. They know their neighbors and their neighbors know them, by name. And heart. In the meantime, let’s stop the bellyaching and think about the children. Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic,

architecture. Others include hints of contemporary rustic and a bohemian ambiance. If you’ve been enraptured by the design aesthet-

R E N A I S S A N C E P R O P E R T I E S H O STS C O C K TA I L PA R T Y I N N E W YO R K

ic of any destination, whether it’s Martha’s Vineyard, the Caribbean islands, the minimalist style of Scandinavia or the colorful mix of French and Southern traditions, it’s easy to redesign your home with the flair of that destination. Of course, you don’t have to commit to an entire home redesign. Sometimes it’s as simple as a Moroccan wedding blanket draped across a sofa or the fragrance of saffron that can give your space the essence of a riad of Marrakesh. On your next trip, consider a souvenir that will help you remember your travels (and inspire new ones) when you are at home. And if you want to incorporate the destination into your home, be sure to use a professional interior designer, like Gil Walsh Interiors. —Gil Walsh, Where Style Lives

Alex Lieb and Bella Genkina

Alexa Babbin and Robbie Nero

Jarad Winter and Kyle Wainwright

Harry Singer, Libby Miller and Matt Augarten 38 QUEST

Maria and Bradley Fishel

PATRICK MCMULLAN

www.gilwalsh.com


WHERE STYLE LIVES

T O L I S T E N . T O E N V I S I O N . T O C R E AT E . T O C O L L A B O R AT E . W W W. G I LWA L S H . C O M

PALM BEACH | MARTHA'S VINEYARD | NEW YORK

561.932.0631


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R V A N C Y ’ S F A M I LY P I C N I C I N N E W YO R K

Tiffany Gardner

reports of child abuse have declined according to Dr. Mary Pulido, Executive Director of the New York Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children. This seems like a good indicator that cases of child abuse were also in decline. Although if you think about it and the way you’ve been feeling, give a little thought to what children have had to deal with in us adults affected It All. (Including the animals too). Us “adults,” now living in a world facing all kinds of possible crises and especially including financial. Back to the NYSPCC. Though the “children” numbers dropping seems 38 QUEST

Jocelyn Gailliot and Ji Park Kwak

Heather McAuliffe

like cause for celebration, unfortunately one of the main causes for the decreased number is that teachers –who are often the top reporters of suspected cases of abuse — have no longer been face to face with their students in the classrooms, and therefore absent from the signs of abuse. Now, Dr. Pulido has published an op-ed on TeachThought, a website for teachers, with the goal of giving them tools and resources to succeed, identifying strategies, tips, and resources for protecting children from abuse.

In her piece she identifies tips for helping students during remote learning, should teachers suspect abuse, as well as resources for teachers conducting in person learning, should signs of abuse or neglect be present. Mary’s comments and resources serve as an invaluable asset for teachers who may not have an outlet to go to if they suspect a student is being hurt or neglected. Slices of Life. Michael McCarty of Michael’s restaurant here (and in Santa Monica) was in town and one night we had dinner with him

Yesim and Samantha Phillip

Leticia Presutti

and his general manager Steve Millington at Sette Mezzo. Dining with Michael is a special treat because first of all he has a big and enthusiastic personality, and secondly he orders a lot of the items on the menu with expertise and curiosity and appetite. Two or three pastas, a chicken dish, a salad, a soup, veal, fish and a filet mignon, three desserts. Which he downs with two different wines. Yes. Oh, he passes it around, help yourself, although how much can you eat? A lot if you’ve got Michael’s curiosity and loves his business. It’s research. Don’t worry, he shares; help yourself. Well,

BFA

Krista Corl


Nothing compares.

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BRENDA S. POWERS 9 1 7 . 9 2 1 . 3 4 6 3 NEW YORK CITY BROKERAGES © 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty office is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. All offerings are subject to errors, omissions, changes including price or withdrawal without notice.

SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM/NYC


2

1

3

4

“GOLDEN AGE: THE GENIUS OF ARCHITECT GROSVENOR ATTERBURY” IN SOUTHAMPTON

5

1. Bronson van Wyck and Judy Taubman 2. Arthur and Linda Fraser 3. Ann Barish and Virginia Coleman 4. Paul Goldberger

6

and Martha Stewart 5. Candace Bushnell and Jim Coleman 6. Clelia and Tom Zacharias 7. Martyna Sokol and Jesse

7

Warren 8. Steve and Christine Schwarzman 9. Tory Burch and Pierre-Yves Roussel 10. Hugh Chisholm and Daisy Prince

8 10

PATRICK MCMULLAN

9

40 QUEST


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5

6 5 1. Jamee and Peter Gregory 2. Ellen and Chuck Scarborough 3. Jane Holzer and Jo Carole Lauder 4. Brooke Shields 5. Regina and Rainer Greeven 6. Tiffany Dubin 7. Douglas Steinbrech and Jeffrey Sharp 8. Gayfryd Steinberg and Michael Shnayerson 9. Peggy

7

Siegal and Kathy Rayner 10. Ingrid Edelman, Peter Pennoyer and Katherine Bryan

9

10

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A something like that because the man is like the best of the restaurateurs, and it’s fascinating to observe. He’s intensely serious checking out the menus for new ideas or even old ideas that could use some renovating. It’s a competitive business and creativity is right up there with a way of life. He also picked up the check for the four of us, including Paige Peterson who was in attendance; and left a heavy tip for the great service provided by Sette’s waitstaff. (He had them working.) Michael also has a son who has joined him in the business. Chas McCarty who was managing the Santa Monica restaurant until the pandemic

got in the way. He is also a writer and was inspired to write about his experience there until … It was published in Los Angeles Magazine and since then Chas has got an agent to write about his own life and adventures in the business. The piece was published last year. Here is the link to it. Chas is a remarkable man and a remarkable talent. On a June night mid-month, the Central Park Conservancy hosted one of their “Starlight Dinners; A Taste of Summer.” It was on the Bethesda Fountain Terrace which is a vast part you don’t see from the

roadway because it’s actually located under the roadways. The Bethesda fountain plaza invites everybody for a million different reasons. It’s a rest for the weary, a coming agent for us New Yorkers who can’t stop. And it’s beautiful natural elegance which is good for what ails ya. The Committee that hosts this annual dinner usually make it a large dinner on one particular night and outdoors. This year, because of the “pandemic,” they couldn’t be sure when planning in advance what the situation would be like for numbers in public places. So

this night’s dinner was just one of several that were being held in different locales around the Park and on different nights. They’re fund-raisers. They keep up the Park for us! This dinner was impressive because the space is impressively elegant and sturdy and the décor is classic, as is the architecture. And you’re outdoors on a beautiful summer evening, calm and even quiet, with the vista from that location is the Fountain and the pond and the forest. Right in the middle of NYC. It’s just beautiful. Our dinner featured Jonathan Waxman of Jams and Barbuto. Mr.Waxman is also a lover of the Park. Once we

C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y ’ S D I N N E R I N N E W YO R K

Mark and Cecilia Vonderheide 42 QUEST

Elyse and Michael Newhouse

Barbara Hodes

Tim and Lisa Broadbent

Lela Rose and Brandon Jones

Jonathan Waxman

BFA

Anna Bender-Zeckendorf and William Lie Zeckendorf


Nothing compares.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C O STA B R A Z I L ’ S D I N N E R AT T U T TO I L G I O R N O I N S O U T H A M P TO N

Naomi Watts and Derek Blasberg

were all seated he first told us where he goes in the Park. He explores and just listening to him you find yourself thinking you’ve gotta check that out. The Park is a miracle and a wonder. After his Park tour, he gave us some details on the evening’s menu. On this warm summer night. Then one day I got a note from Peggy Siegal, the primo Broadway/ Hollywood publicist famous in New York for her film screenings. I hadn’t heard from her in more than a year, almost two. Like most of us she’s been on the silent side for the past year. She been living in Southampton in a rented cottage and working on 44 QUEST

Ashlee Harrison and Delaram Rivani

Parker Voss and Autumn Baron

a memoir. Peggy is a worker. “The world is opening up,” she wrote, adding: “It only took a pandemic to make us more resilient. Life in Southampton has never looked more beautiful.” To celebrate this change in the weather, she had the brightest idea of organizing an “historic” house tour/ party which occurred one Saturday night mid-month from 6 to 8. The historic house was a mansion designed by Grosvenor Atterbury (18691956), an American architect and urban planner who designed and built more than 100 major projects including an array of mansions in the

Hamptons. The house was completely restored and owned by Manhattan real estate developer (DUMBO in Brooklyn) David Walentas. For starters, they organized a house tour and a brief author’s discussion led by Martha Stewart with Paul Goldberger, the American architecture critic and Peter Pennoyer, the New York architect who has written a book on Atterbury’s career. Mr. Walentas has pledged $100 million to his alma mater, the University of Virginia. Included in that pledge is the sale price of the property ($35 million). The evening which was underwritten by Mr.

Gigi Stoll

Randy Baron and Marylou McCann

Walentas, was also benefitting Amanda Foreman’s literary charity, House of Speakeasy, which delivers books in its Bookmobile to underprivileged children in Harlem. A Host Committee was organized for the event which was held on a Saturday night from 6 to 8, on the property at 199 Coopers Neck Lane, in SH. Bronson van Wyck, who is a major organizer of smart, chic, grand (and fun) parties designed the event. The Host Committee was organized by Peg: Amanda Foreman, Steven Gambrel, Paul Goldberger, Peter Pennoyer,

PATRICK MCMULLAN

Brianna Lance and Francisco Costa


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Michael Schnayerson and Gayfryd Steinberg, as well as Martha, Bronson and Mr. Walentas. The celebration included a book party for Goldberger whose book “DUMBO” which tells the story of how Walentas turned the neighborhood Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass (DUMBO, got it?) into a prosperous residential and commercial New York City neighborhood. Peggy also put together the guest list, inviting a more than 100 prominent Summer residents and weekend visitors representing the crème de la crème of New York’s prominent social crowd. From the

looks of it, they all came and were delighted to just be out and about and around friends many of whom they hadn’t yet seen for months and months. The weather on tehat Saturday started out grey and dismal but by late afternoon, the Sun came out, so that by 6 pm, the roadway along Coopers Neck was jammed with enthusiastic residents looking forward to a good time. And a good time was had by all. And then there was the huge excitement of everybody seeing everybody. It was a real reunion celebration produced by Peggy Siegal. Even Brooke Shields who has been recovering from a terrible accident

and surgeries, made it to the party, looking like the top of the morning and showing no sign of what she’d been through (and totally recovered from). Every aspect of the evening was a huge hit, and a great achievement of Peggy who has been devoting her months living in her rented cottage and writing her book about her life and her amazing career. In Memoriam. On a Saturday night, Jack Lenor Larsen was interred at his beloved LongHouse Reserve in a small private ceremony. His ashes were placed in a shaker box wrapped in a length of silk, and are now resting in a spot

he chose under a favorite tree by the pond he designed. His longtime gardeners, Bonifacio Rojas and Josue Rojas dug his deep grave by hand. 30 friends gathered with Peter Olsen, Jack’s life companion. There were four readings: a poem read by Helen Drutt, the Bhagavad Gita read by Alexandra Monroe; Lys Marigold read from the Episcopal Prayerbook., and Peter Olsen attempted to read the Auden poem Funeral Blues but was too moved to continue beyond the first stanza. His sister finished it. And the guests placed dark red rhododendrons blossoms on the grave. ◆

Brian Atwood and Olivia Palermo

Jennifer Yepez and Jake Deutsch

Malini Murjani and Briony Raymond

Natalie Johnson and Matteo Sardi

Pippa Cohen and Jo Ellen Pellman

Vanessa Fuchs and Michael Shapiro

46 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G I L W A L S H ’ S B E N E F I T FO R A S P C A I N PA L M B E AC H

Charlotte Bocly and David Coffin

Alison Newton, Violet and Laura Moore Tanne

Liz McDermott and Webb Edgerton 48 QUEST

Matt Holt and Callie Baker

Pam Miller, Gil Walsh and Carolina Buia Barefooot

John Antonini and Frances Leidy

Jack Lynch and Krystian Von Speidel

Arianna Boardmann, Daisy and Fred Tanne

Tiffany Bufton and Bill Meyer

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compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S OT H E BY ’ S H O STS D I N N E R I N N E W YO R K

Batsheva Hay and Chioma Nnadi

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Jessica Joffe and Valerie Macaulay

Ashley Leeds and Lauren Geller

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Joanna Gong and Caterina Heil Stewart

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Patrick and Milly Park

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H A R RY B E N S O N

Truman Capote in the cold Atlantic near his cottage in Wainscott, Long Island,1982.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY TRUMAN CAPOTE was one of my favorite subjects. You never knew what he was going to say or do. The diminutive writer was at times the most melancholic person I have ever met, yet he was so clever. He had an uncanny way of reading your mind … intuitively he knew I wanted interesting photographs, and he compiled. It was fascinating to listen to him talk about writing his groundbreaking non-fiction novel In Cold Blood. He felt one of the murderers, Perry Smith, was the only person who ever truly loved him … both Truman and I thought the book should have won a Pulitzer Prize. When his alcoholic mother committed suicide in 1953, Truman was sent to live with relatives in Alabama. He ultimately left school at 17 and found his way to The New Yorker magazine, which published his early short stories. When Breakfast at Tiffany’s starring Audrey Hepburn was released in 1958, Capote was disappointed. He told me he felt someone like actress Tuesday Weld should have had the part— someone more street-smart. Truman wrote several notes to me on various legal pads … all of them amusing. Here he signs his name with letters back to front: “Otherwise known as Namurt Eeopac” I really liked him; he was an original. u 54 QUEST


J U LY 2 0 2 1 5 5


TA K I

THE REAL HALSTON

From left: Halston surrounded by models; Jackie Kennedy Onassis in Halston's pillbox hat for her

ALREADY IN YOUR idiot box via Netflix is a miniseries about a man who also used one name, but burned out rather early due to an outsize ego and too much coke. His name was Halston, and his fame was based on the fact he designed a pillbox hat that Jackie Kennedy Onassis wore at her hubby’s inauguration. Yes, fame is tricky, especially in America, where self-creation was invented, and where superciliousness and sleekness pass for gravity and depth. I knew Halston, he was a friend of my then sister-in-law, but we had zero in common. In fact he thought I wasn’t important enough to greet in a nightclub, 56 QUEST

and I didn’t exactly ever mistake him for a Hemingway hero. Never mind. Some wannabe who made a documentary on Studio 54 compared Halston to Cole Porter because they were both from Indiana. That’s a bit like comparing an organ grinder to Mozart because they were both Austrian. Halston affected an upper-class accent and a persona of distance and hauteur, copied by Anna Wintour, both the designer and the Vogue editor mistakenly assuming that a nose up in the air means one’s aristocratic. The Scot Ewan McGregor is cast as the designer in the series, an unfortunate choice as the Scot looks

like a Glasgow tough, whereas Halston was effete, elongated, effeminate, and haughty. The hard-partying designer died of AIDS in 1990, age 57, but his downfall began much earlier when he got down and dirty with the sexual hustler Victor Hugo (the French government should have sued when such a lowlife adopted the great name), spending his evenings in Studio 54’s balcony, where free and anonymous sex took place nightly. But what I want to tell you has nothing to do with the sleaze that was Halston, Warhol, Bianca Jagger, and Studio 54. It has to do with what transpired between Halston, the Queen Mother’s cousin, and

H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; B E T TM A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

husband's inauguration in 1961.


TA K I

Clockwise from top left: The entrance of Studio 54 nightclub; Princess Margaret in 1965; Steve Rubell; Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.

Princess Margaret, parts of the story having appeared on July 12, 1980, in The Spectator. John Bowes-Lyon, Bosie to us for obvious reasons and perennially broke, had been more or less ordered by Halston to organize a party for the designer and invite la crème de la crème of the London scene to meet him. Princess Margaret was the pièce de résistance. The blast took place at the Savoy. Among the first to arrive was Rupert Galliers-Pratt, eager to taste the free canapés and Savoy drinks. Rupert, walking five feet ahead of his wife, advanced fearlessly into the grand ballroom when he ran into a tall imperious figure with an outstretched right arm. Next to that figure stood Bosie. “I am Halston,” said the elongated man with a raised eyebrow. “Thank you, Halston,” boomed Rupert, wrapping his wife’s coat around the designer’s extended arm. When Bosie later remonstrated with him about the coat incident, Rupert said that only people in service had one name, and that he was genuinely sorry. Things did not improve once the glitterati sat down. The main players are all dead so I can finally tell the true story of what eventually became known as the Last Supper. Halston was seated next to

Princess Margaret, and across the table sat his very close—mine also—friend Steve Rubell, owner of Studio 54. After making some polite conversation, Stevie signaled to Halston to pass the coke. “Never, not in a million years,” hissed Halston, eager to impress la Margaret and knowing full well what Steve was like under the influence. Steve kept insisting and Halston resisting, until Stevie decided to take the bull by the horns. He dropped his napkin, pretended to go fishing for it under the table, and on all fours approached Halston underneath, grabbing his leg and biting it as hard as he could. Halston howled and jerked, spilling his wine all over the princess. “Now look what you’ve done,” cried Margaret, “and it’s my best dress.” “You will have an original creation of mine tomorrow, your Majesty,” stammered Halston. “I will hold you to that,” exclaimed the recently upgraded Margaret. And this is where the fun begins. Halston had a new creation of his flown over immediately, hired a stretch limo, and took a groupie along with him, a groupie who is now an aging activist, whatever that means, and the duo arrived at Kensington Palace bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. That is when the designer was informed that

the princess was expecting only one person. He quickly stuffed some large bank notes into the groupie’s hands and told the driver to take her shopping for a couple of hours and then come back for him. Once inside Margaret’s apartment in Kensington Palace, Halston was met by a flunky, handed over the dress to him, was thanked on behalf of the princess, and was shown the door. The whole exchange took less than two minutes. This, of course, was a time long before the world’s second most annoying device had been invented. Without a telephone poor Halston had to find his way among hoi polloi rubbernecking for Princess Diana and other annoying creatures. It was one lost week, and I don’t think he ever went back to jolly old London again. My wife, locked away in London, saw the beginning of the series and didn’t like it. I’m not surprised. Halston was actually to be pitied, a talented designer whose success went to his head in more ways than one.◆ For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J U LY 2 0 2 1 5 7


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY A LE X T R AV E R S A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WHETHER YOU’RE SPENDING summer nights at the beach club or in the heart of Manhattan, designers like J.McLaughlin and Carolina Herrera are making it easy to get dressed up again—even in the heat. We also can’t resist some looks and accessories for more casual days, from Stubbs & Wootton’s sailfish slippers to Ralph Lauren’s new Feed bag. Dance in the summer sun in J.McLaughlin’s Ophelia Tiered Maxi Skirt. $168. J.McLaughlin: 2 Jobs Ln., 631.204.0183 or at jmclaughlin.com. Simply celestial: Verdura’s Pebble Bracelet in Rainbow moonstone, diamond, platinum and 18-kt. gold. $26,500. Verdura: 212.758.3388.

Show off this summer in Stubbs & Wootton’s “Bills” sneaker, featuring a navy Spanish cottonvelvet upper with blue grosgrain Trim, finished off with the Bills embroideries. $525 at stubbsandwootton.com.

The Harbour Tote in lapis bullskin and horsehair is a jewel of its own. $2,850. Asprey: 853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811.


Frette’s men’s Mediterraneo Classic PJ top in melange gray makes for a great gift. Shop at frette.com.

The Brunello Cucinelli Summer 2021 collection was one of our favorites this year. Shop the look at brunello cucinelli.com.

Inspired by this issue’s There’s no better—or more enjoyable—exercise than paddle boarding, so grab Isle’s Versa Paddle Board and soak up the sun. $995 atislesurfandsup.com.

story on Cuban flair, we must recommend a Cuba libre (or two) while you soak in the sun this summer—and Bacardi Superior makes the best.

Rolex’s new 2021 models are all great, but we especially love the new 36-mm. Explorer in Oystersteel and yellow gold. $10,800 at Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Pick up a pair of suedes in a fun new color from Belgian Shoes. $490. Belgian Shoes: 110 East 55th St., 212.755.7372.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 5 9


Fresh Finds Packaged in a beautifully designed, Hope Night Parfum was developed for the woman who lives and loves with intensity. $300 at hopefragrances.com

Branden Maxell’s latest summer collection channels some Tom Ford–like style, and we’re digging it! Brandon Maxwell: brandonmaxwellonline.com.

Paloroma “Main Squeeze” children’s gentle hand wash ($18) and “Whipped Cream” nourishing hand lotion ($18), available at paloroma.com.

The perfect beach read, with themes of inheritance, determinism, and freedom: Edward St. Aubyn’s Double Blind.

Everyone’s racing to get this summer’s Polo Step out in these Basette Pearly stud-embellished Napa flats

backpack. $248 at

by Jimmy Choo. $725.

ralphlauren.com or

Jimmy Choo: 699 Madison

feedprojects.com.

Ave., 212.759.7078.

60 QUEST

Ralph Lauren x FEED


Why not treat yourself to a nice pair of Lilly Pulitzer Halona shades this summer? $48 at neimanmarcus.com.

Carolina Herrera makes getting dressed up for summer fun again. Shop the look at carolinaherrera.com.

The perfect beach—or backyard— chair for sipping champagne or rum Collins on a hot day. Shop at birchlane.com.

Suit up with style in Zimmermann’s Alaine mini tri bikini. $210. Available at zimmermannwear.com.

It never goes out of style. But now Monopoly is back with a facelift from Pottery Barn, making the game even more enjoyable—especially if you win! $299 at potterybarn.com. J U LY 2 0 2 1 6 1


CANTEENS

62 QUEST

N E WP O RT H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

IT’S BEEN A HOST to royalty and yachting stars, captains of industry and charming scalawags—for occasions whimsical and outrageous. Whether you’re looking for a quiet dinner or late-night revelry, the Clarke Cooke House has always been there to provide great food, professional service, and a sophisticated environment. It lends its unique charm to any celebration or meeting, whether a victorious America’s Cup crew or family gathering; the dining room and porches really are the perfect Newport setting. This is the atmosphere of the Clarke Cooke House, the

O N N E VA N D E R WA L / M I C H A E L O S E A N /

THE HEARTBEAT OF NEWPORT


CANTEENS gastronomic go-to spot on Bannister’s Wharf, in Newport. Located in an original circa-1780 structure, the “house” is more of a multilayered array of bars and restaurants for any dining experience. In the 18th-century building, you can soak up the romantic elegance of the Porch, which is housed high above the assembled yachts, or relax more casually in the cafe-like Candy Store, at harbor level. Newporters in the know like to sip cocktails at the intimate SkyBar, adjacent to the porch. In summer, the Midway Bar offers open views of lingering sunsets. It’s also the season when the Bistro opens its wall of windows to allow the sights and sounds

flavorful beef, and regional produce to create imaginative dishes. Gidley trained in fine French kitchens, and it shows, but his cooking remains true to the spirit of Newport’s seaside heritage along the New England coast. Be sure to try the oysters and lobster. The specials are delightful as well. Bur no meal is complete without the Snowball in Hell, an all-time house favorite. It can be spotted at every table for every celebration, grand or small. The dessert is really a wine goblet coated with Callebaut chocolate, lined with slices of a chocolate roulade, stuffed with vanilla ice cream, and topped with chocolate sauce and toasted coconut. A rum-soaked

of Bannister’s Wharf to fill the room. The stately 12Metre Yacht Club Room, a favored spot for private dinner parties, is decked in darker panels, rendering it appropriate for any season. Not to be missed is the Boom Boom Room, famous for good-spirited revelry, which is tucked underground, beneath the Candy Store. No matter which level you dine at (tourists tend to get trapped in the Candy Store, while natives and regulars flock to the Porch), you’re bound to discover that the Cooke House is serious about food. Chef Ted Gidley uses the freshest seafood,

sugar cube is nestled in the ice cream and lit on fire just before being served. One just never seems enough; the staff has been trained over the years to expect encore presentations. Miss out on a trip to Newport for a dinner at the Cooke House? Not a snowball’s chance in hell. u This page, clockwise from top left: Dining at the Clarke Cooke House; a vintage view of the Clarke Cooke House; the Clarke Cooke House, built in 1780, was moved to Bannister’s Wharf in the 1970s. Opposite page: The exterior of the Clarke Cooke House; fresh seafood. J U LY 2 0 2 1 6 3


IS THE PANDEMIC OVER? A LOOMING MENTAL HEALTH PANDEMIC POINTS UP NEED FOR ACTION Scientists at Hope for Depression Research Foundation Answer the Call BY LOUISA BENTON OPTIMISM IS BUILDING that we are on the other side of the COVID-19 pandemic, thanks to the power of science to develop vaccines that are effective and safe. While there is much to celebrate, experts agree we are beginning to see the contours of a second pandemic to come. The threat is no longer a physical virus, but a global mental health crisis triggered by the upheaval and distress of the past year. “Not since the Great Depression and World War II has the world faced such economic, social and health challenges,” said Dr. Eric Nestler, head of the Brain Institute at Mount Sinai and a world leader in psychiatry. “We’re just beginning to see a depression, stress, and anxiety pandemic.” Rates of PTDS and clinical depression always rise after a disaster, research shows. However, the COVID-19 pandemic is a once-in-a-century global event, and early surveys by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are ominous: 64 QUEST

40% of adults in the U.S. have reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder during the pandemic, up from 10% in 2019. • 13% of adults reported starting or increasing substance use, and 11% of adults reported having serious thoughts of suicide in the past 30 days. • The greatest burden falls, as always, on the most vulnerable among us—marginalized groups, women, the poor, and the isolated. In light of this historic challenge, leaders in multiple arenas— from politics to health—must step up to strengthen mental health infrastructure. Key to this endeavor are the scientific leaders like Dr. Nestler, whose biomedical research will pave the way for new and better treatments for depression that can reach a wide population. Recently Nestler met with colleagues on the Depression


H O P E F O R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H F O U N DAT I O N

Task Force at the non-profit Hope for Depression Research Foundation (HDRF). The Task Force is an international team of top scientists from different universities who are pooling expertise and data to find new targets in the brain for treatment. They have been working together since 2012, and their annual meeting this year was set against the backdrop of COVID. The meeting radiated optimism and wisdom. There are no overnight discoveries in science, Nestler stressed, pointing out that even the new COVID vaccines grew out of decades of painstaking research that happened before the virus hit. However, the Depression Task Force was uniquely poised to lead the way forward on the last frontier of medicine: the mind and brain. They have identified the most important targets in the brain to study, and they have discovered several new potential precision treatments, two of which are in clinical trials. Several others are in the pipeline. “The Depression Task Force has largely defined the entire field of depression research over the past decade,” said Nestler. “We’ve made progress across the spectrum.” He closed with a historic overview: “We believe that the field and the Depression Task Force in particular is now at

an inflection point, at the beginning of a revolution in brain research,” he said. “So for the first time in history – in my lifetime—there’s a rational basis for optimism in better understanding and conquering depression.” u Clockwise from above: The HDRF Depression Task Force: Conor Liston, M.D Ph.D., Helen S. Mayberg, M.D., Michael Meaney, Ph.D, René Hen, Ph.D., Elisabeth Binder, M.D Ph.D., Kafui Dzirasa, M.D Ph.D., Eric Nestler, M.D., Ph.D., Huda Akil, Ph.D., Jonathan Javitch, M.D., Ph.D.; Dr. Eric Nestler in his office at Mount Sinai; Audrey Gruss, founder of Hope for Depression Research Foundation; Dr. Eric Nestler. Opposite page: Dr. Nestler with researchers in his Mount Sinai lab. J U LY 2 0 2 1 6 5


66 QUEST

C A S A D E C A M P O R E S O RTS & V I LL A S

SUMMERTIME IS KID-FRIENDLY AT CASA DE CAMPO


T R AV E L

This spread, clockwise from top left: Minitas Beach; the new petting zoo in the facilities of the Equestrian Center; the fast-dry Har-Tru tennis courts; one of the resort’s many private villas.

IT’S TOUGH TO find a premier resort destination as kid-friendly for family summertime fun as is Casa de Campo. Of course known for its incredible golf amenities and trio of celebrated Pete Dye-designed courses like Teeth of the Dog, the world-class resort is offering a series of fun golf clinics for kids through August 31st. Youngsters ages four to seventeen can learn the game. “Junior Elite” and tournament


T R AV E L

This page, clockwise from above: One of Casa de Campo’s summer golf clinics for kids; water sports like kayaking are available at Minitas Beach; the shooting center; guests are provided with a complimentary golf cart upon check-in so they can easily travel throughout the 7,000-acre property. Opposite

C A S A D E C A M P O R E S O RTS & V I LL A S

page: A family together on a boat at the marina.


playing kids can enjoy topnotch instruction from our excellent teaching Pros. Additionally, Casa de Campo is offering the opportunity for two kids or young adults (ages 21 and younger) to be able to play golf for free out on the resort’s courses when accompanied on the same rounds with their parents during resort visits. Casa de Campo’s superb Equestrian and Polo Center is among the best in the Caribbean, especially for families and kids. And even if you’ve never saddled-up before, the expert staff is on hand for lessons in English or Western-style riding and jumping as well as learning grooming techniques and even rodeo stunts. At the resort’s exceptional 245-acre Shooting Centre, shooters of all ages and skill levels will be delighted by the flexibility of the layout and the realistic conditions simulating shooting wild game in their natural habitat. The course has been designed so shooters can progress from station to station in tournaments or individually for a challenging and exciting activity the whole family can enjoy. Dubbed the Wimbledon of the Caribbean,

Casa de Campo’s Tennis Center offers 13 immaculate fast-dry Har-Tru tennis courts where guests can practice their game, take lessons, and plan their own tournaments. Casa de Campo Resort also recently opened a new familyfriendly petting zoo. The mini-farm is in the facilities of the Equestrian Center with a wide variety of domestic animals ready to be pampered by the young and young-at-heart. Visitors will find turtles, chickens, roosters, donkeys, goats, pigs, sheep, ponies, and rabbits. As you can see, Casa de Campo is as family- and kidfriendly for the many joys of summer as a place can be. If you thought that was it, well there is so much more to the resort. From night golf, to the Real Madrid Soccer School, a movie theater, supermarket, and guest pools located throughout the 7,000-acre community, Casa de Campo is a destination unto itself. u For more information about Casa de Campo or for bookings, please visit casadecampo.com.do or call 855.580.4814. J U LY 2 0 2 1 6 9


FORTÉ ON FLAGLER


R E A L E S TAT E

This page, clockwise from above: Each residence at Forté features floor-to-ceiling windows and expansive balconies with views; the pool area; a spacious living room; the entrance of Forté. Opposite page: Forté is a 24-story tower developed by Two Roads Development.

OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH from South Flagler Drive, Forté, a 24-story tower developed by Two Roads Development, enjoys sweeping views of Worth Avenue, the Intracoastal Waterway, and the Atlantic Ocean. Forté offers a collection of 41 flow-through residences, starting at $6.7 million, each with private elevator foyers, dramatic ceiling heights, floor-to-ceiling glass windows, and expansive balconies that provide 1,000 additional square feet of outdoor living. With only two residences per floor, each unit comes with customizable kitchen floor plans appointed with the finest modern finishes, features and appliances. The building’s only penthouse unit, which is 8,976 square feet, is comprised of six bedrooms and grand ceiling heights, ranging from 12 to 15 feet. The penthouse also features an additional 2,103 square feet of outdoor space, including a private roof deck and pool, a summer kitchen, and a cabana bath. Forté on Flagler also offers exclusive amenities for its community, such as 24-hour valet and doorman, onsite con-

cierge, resort-style pool, spa and treatment rooms, state-ofthe-art fitness center, private guest suites, a private 24-seating dining room, evening lounge, sport simulator room, card room, and more. ◆ Forté residences are being sold exclusively by Douglas Elliman. The Forté Sales Gallery is located at 1217 South Flagler Drive, Suite 300, in West Palm Beach. For more information, call 561.653.6240 or visit fortewpb.com. J U LY 2 0 2 1 7 1


FROM METROPOLITAN TO MAIN STREET, SOUTHAMPTON ONE OF THE best performing agents for Sotheby’s International Realty, Molly Ferrer grew up in Manhattan and Southampton. With a history as an active player in New York society, along with close ties to her aunt, Audrey Hepburn, and friends like Whit Stillman, Ferrer has become known as an expert on the Hamptons lifestyle. As such, she is one of the most well-connected brokers on the East End with clients like the late Henry W. Koehler. Below, Ferrer discusses her past and the Southampton market, which is increasingly becoming popular as a yearround destination. Brooke Kelly: Did you know your aunt, Audrey Hepburn well? Molly Ferrer: I did. My uncle brought Audrey to Southampton the summer after they married. Our family fell instantly in love with her and we stayed close throughout her life. A great sense of humor and a big, big heart. Also a little naughty. She was really fun and she could cook. She made the best profiteroles, from scratch. My mouth is watering just thinking about them. She was an extraordinary person. Beautiful on the inside and on the outside. 72 QUEST

BK: You were Whit Stillman’s muse for his first big hit, Metropolitan. Were you the inspiration for Sally Fowler? MF: Yes. Whit’s a dear friend. We ran around together, in a brat pack in the ’70s. We segued from deb parties to Studio 54, Mudd Club, and Limelight. It was a fabulous time in New York. Lots of creative people making wonderful music, art, theater, and fashion. The Vietnam War finally ended and the AIDs epidemic had not taken its toll. I remember being thrilled when Jackie Curtis and Pat Ast, who I’d met at the clubs, brought a few other characters from Andy Warhol’s Factory to my 21st birthday party. They didn’t stay long. Think they found me and my uptown friends pretty square. BK: So real estate. How long have you been with Sotheby’s in Southampton? MF: Close to 20 years. Sotheby’s is the best brand. Period. Best listings. Best brokers biggest network, and well respected around the globe. BK: The market’s been crazy on the East End. Who’s buying? MF: Young families fleeing the city. Turnkey and new homes

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y; M O LLY F E R R E R

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LIFESTYLE

got the biggest COVID bump up in values. A year later, there’s still much demand across all price points. School districts, always a factor in say the Greenwich, Connecticut market but never a consideration here, has now become part of many buyers’ criteria. BK: What special homes are you offering right now? MF: Oh, I wish I could show you The Gables. It’s so lovely. Nothing grand or flashy just the quintessential beach house steps from the ocean. The perfect location and there’s a legal guest cottage. It’s such a gracious, comfortable house and a gorgeous piece of property. I love it. Check it out at 267southmainstreet.com. BK: You have the late artist Henry Koehler’s house too, don’t you? MF: I do. I sold it to Henry 25 years ago. He fell in love with the house’s authentic charm and the location, on the fringe of Southampton’s village center. It’s a classic and so was Henry. You know he was quite a clothes horse. The huge walk in closet in the principle bedroom, was filled with bespoke suits, brogues, and velvet slippers. His family discovered that inside many pieces he’d marked where and when he’d acquired it. Now that’s a posh mark. u

This page, clockwise from bottom left: A newspaper clip that shows Molly Ferrer and Whit Stillman at the Infirmary Ball at the Waldorf Astoria in New York in 1969; the home of the late Henry W. Koehler at 80 North Main Street in Southampton; the late Audrey Hepburn, Ferrer’s aunt. Opposite page: The Gables at 267 South Main Street in Southampton. J U LY 2 0 2 1 7 3


ATOP A ROLLING HILL and overlooking Shinnecock Bay sits this gorgeous and perfectly mixed traditional and modern Hamptons house on 2± acres. Exquisitely landscaped by LaGuardia Design Group, the house is situated on one acre with an additional buildable waterfront acre lot below. Most scenically, there is 180± feet of waterfront with a new bulkhead. With views, views, views, of Meadow Lane and the Atlantic Ocean beyond, expansive windows, patios and balconies, you will never want to leave this special Atterbury property. Enjoy water sports in the Bay, anchor your boat at the mooring, or swim in your own heated gunite pool; the options for recreational activities are many. This beautiful Space 4 Architecture–designed house— renovated in 2012—features 7 bedrooms and 7.5 baths, a double-height living room, library, office, downstairs lounge, third floor game room and gym, and a laundry room. There are wide planked oak floors and white walls making this house forever light and bright. In addition, the large back porch  74  Q U E S T

allows for outdoor living and dining, and as a plus, there is also a lit pergola situated above the pool providing yet another al fresco dining option. For cool days or nights, enjoy the gas fireplace built into the buffet at the pergola. Every detail and finish has been executed to the highest standards making this a most stylish home. Additionally, this property provides and incredible sense of privacy as the house is situated at the end of a cul-de-sac and is surrounded by mature plantings. This is a unique opportunity to own a wonderful four-season dwelling just a short distance from Southampton Village, the world famous Cooper’s Beach, as well as marinas in Hampton Bays. People come to the Hamptons for the light, the water, and to spend quality time with friends and family. 64 and 65 Westway provides it all. u 64 and 65 Westway Drive in Southampton, New York is listed for $9,750,000. For more information, contact Ritchey Howe at 917.670.7495 or ritchey.howe@sothebys.realty.

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WATERFRONT HOME & VACANT LOT IN SOUTHAMPTON


OPEN HOUSE

Clockwise from above: A rear view of the home at 65 Westway Drive in Southampton; a second floor porch overlooking Shinnecock Bay; the property features direct access to the bay; the pergola above the pool allows for al fresco dining; the pool area; the modern kitchen. Opposite page: The property at 64 and 65 Westway Drive sits on 2± acres with waterfront views.


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The 2021 Newport Regatta will be held July 10–11. The event will take place at Sail Newport, home to New England’s largest public sailing center, which is considered Rhode Island’s premier sailing site. For more information, visit sailnewport.org.

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The Newport Music Festival will take place from July 4 to July 20. The outdoor festival has played a significant cultural role in Rhode Island since its launch in 1969, celebrating classical music in intimate concert settings. In the years since, the festival has produced more than 2,000 concerts in a host of renowned Newport Mansions, and in various venues throughout Newport. The festival stages have hosted more than 1,000 artists, including 130 American debuts of artists who have gone on to make history. For more information, visit newportmusic.org.

Join the Benefactors of the Arts for the 2021 Secret Garden Tour “Summer Tour—A New View,” taking place on July 9. Guest will take a self-guided walking tour through Newport’s historic Point section. Gardens that have been perennial favorites on the tour will look very different to past visitors with spectacular seasonal flora in bloom

MUSICAL INFLUENCE

SECRET GARDENS

including a huge variety of hydrangeas and day lilies. For more information, visit secretgardentours.org. FLOWING ROSÉ

Sunset Fridays have returned to the Wölffer Estate. Bring your friends and family to experience a night amongst the vines, enjoying the sunset, music, and wine. Music will start at 5 p.m. each week. For more information, visit wolffer.com.

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FARM TO TABLE

Chefs of the North Fork will return this summer in celebration of all things local. The event is a premier North Fork culinary celebration, uniting local bounty with the talents of world-renowned chefs in a one-of-a-kind gastronomic gathering. Gathering over a dozen of the leading North Fork chefs under one roof, this event will offer an exclusively curated multi-course paired dinner and decadent desserts you won’t want to miss! For more information, visit danstaste.com. GALA FOR GOOD

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The Water Mill Calissa (located at 1020 Montauk Highway) will host a series of performances by some of Broadway’s most entertaining and talented stars including Tituss Burgess, Brandon Victor Dixon, and Joshua Henry at the chic Mediterranean restaurant. Ticketed performances at Calissa will take place weekly from July 8th, to September 2nd. For more information visit calissahamptons.com.

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This August, Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival—along with a new oyster feast—will take place in Edgartown, Massachusetts. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit eventsinamerica.com.

Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation’s Hamptons Happening will return to Bridgehampton this year. The charity gala will take place from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at 900 Lumber Lane. SWCRF will be following the most recent CDC guidelines, so it can safely gather outside with friends, family, and colleagues. Come celebrate health and wellness as well as congratulate the participants in the first ever Global Walk to Flatten the Cancer Curve. For more information, visit waxmancancer.org.


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ARTISTIC INFLUENCE

Market Art + Design, the East End’s premier art fair, will return to The Bridgehampton Museum in August of 2021. Market Art + Design’s 11th edition will feature 80 top galleries presenting the best in modern and contemporary art and design in an expanded pavilion. For more information, visit artmarkethamptons.com. LIBRARY CARDS

Saratoga Track will host its Opening Day on July 15, with the track remaining open through September 6. For more information, visit saratogaracetrack.com. POP-UPS

The Hamptons just got a whole lot chicer. So start making some space in your shoe closet out East because Manolo Blahnik is popping up for the summer, at 52 Main Street in East Hampton. Guaranteed to have you stepping out in style from the beach to dinner to a fabulous soirée, the boutique will feature a special edit of the brand’s seasonal and signature styles. For more information, visit manoloblahnik.com.

changed—and perhaps even more amazed at what has stayed the same. For more information, visit sagharborwhalingmuseum.org.

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AND THEY’RE OFF

Saratoga Track will host its Opening Day on July 15, with the track remaining open through September 6. For more information, visit saratogaracetrack.com. FUN DOLLHOUSES

MODERN MUSES

Alexander Calder’s “Modern from the Start” show will take place at the MoMA through August 7. For more information, visit moma.org.

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SHOWTIME

Starting July 12, New York City Ballet—one of the world’s preeminent dance companies—will return to the Saratoga Performing Arts Center every summer to present new and classical works. For more information, visit nycballet.com. FACE THE PHOTOS

Sag Harbor Whaling Museum’s “A Please to the Eye” exhibit will remain on view until Labor Day. Come see some fantastic photographs of Sag Harbor and the East End taken by William Wallace Tooker, taken around 1895. You will be amazed at what has

world will be hosted at Nova’s Ark Project, which is the Hampton’s largest privately owned sculpture park and art center. The event will be reserved seating with a five-course tasting menu from the region’s top chefs paired with flights of local and international Rosé wines. A sommelier will be circulating throughout the event providing details and explanations of each wine. For more information and to reserve tickets, please visit danstaste.com.

This summer, the East Hampton Library will once again present its annual Authors Night fundraiser as a series of interactive online Zoom events, from August 12–15. Each one-hour event will be in the format of a conversation with the featured author and a noted interviewer, followed by a question-and-answer period. For more information, visit easthamptonlibrary.org.

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The Parrish Art Museum’s annual summer gala will take a new shape at a new time this year. Over the weekend of August 13, friends and supporters may attend a Friday night dance party, a Saturday evening dinner, and programming for families on Sunday afternoon. For more information, please visit parrishart.org.

“The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature” will remain on view at MAD Museum through September 26. Inspired by Venice’s glamourous Gritti Palace and memories of a world once on the move, the dollhouse provided a haven for artist Joanna Fisher and, during the months of quarantine, an escape. For more information, visit madmuseum.com.

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ALL FRIED EVERYTHING

The 2021 Saratoga County Fair will take place from July 23–25 at 162 Prospect Street. For more information, visit saratoga.com.

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CHEERS TO SUMMER!

Dan’s Taste signature Rosé Soriée event featuring Rosé wines from the best wineries throughout the South Fork, North Fork and the

On August 13, The Parrish Art Museum’s annual summer gala will take place at the museum. For more information, please visit parrishart.org. J U LY 2 0 2 1 7 7


P R O D U C E D A N D W R I T T E N B Y B R O O K E K E L LY PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

RISING TIDES NEW YORK is truly rising, and the Big Apple is buzzing with more energy than ever before. Neighborhood streets are lively, restaurants are filling to capacity, and demand for leisure activity is robust. With the summer months still ahead, New Yorkers are looking for unique ways to enjoy their time spent outdoors. Over the past 15 months, boating was one activity that saw unprecedented growth in popularity, offering passengers a safe activity in a socially distant, outdoor environment. A less pricey and a more convenient alternative to yacht ownership are boat club memberships. One of the most coveted memberships is that of the Barton & Gray Mariners Club, which offers unlimited access to a fleet of captained Hinckley yachts for an annual fee. With water venues in nearly 30 harbors, Barton & Gray expects a staggering 200% increase in trips this summer relative to last year. The brainchild of two longtime boat enthusiasts who were well aware of the headaches of ownership, Timothy Barton and Douglas Gray founded their namesake club in Nantucket in 2006. “Tim and I were avid boaters, entrepreneurs, and working in high tech during the early days of the sharing economy. Tim thought boating had the potential to be offered collaboratively, especially as we witnessed countless marinas with nearly all of their boats just tied to the dock, never being used. We spent six months working nights and weekends building the model; then we bought a Picnic Boat and headed to Nantucket,” recalled Gray. The pair understood that for the sharing model to succeed, experiences on board would be paramount. Members—typically career oriented couples with kids and limited downtime—want a stress-free voyage, with their time on board spent enjoying the company of family and friends. As such, Barton & Gray boasts an expert and licensed crew as well as a concierge team that organizes trip details and supplies for fun days on the water. Members and guests can expect to find onboard perks: Yeti coolers stocked with beers, an open bar

with Champagne and cocktails, and high-end catered snacks such as lobster rolls and salad spreads. The club also includes a number of on-the-water restaurant partners where members can dock the boat for an onshore meal. The yachts depart from 30 ports, including Nantucket, Palm Beach, and Greenwich—markets that have boomed in the past year. But the most popular destination for Barton & Gray this summer has been the New York Harbor. “Manhattan went from being the most popular Barton & Gray harbor, to the least popular, and then back again to the top choice in less than 18 months! Members are truly delighted to be back in the Big Apple,” Gray noted. In response to the return of their members to the city, Barton & Gray has recently tripled its number of boats docked and available at Chelsea Piers. And this January the club will be introducing its first boat designed specifically for Barton & Gray members, the Daychaser 48. “While our members adore anchoring at a remote sand bar for some fun in the sun, taking in Manhattan onboard is our most beloved outing,” said Gray. Quest shares this view after our journey through the New York Harbor for this photoshoot, where we cruised by Manhattan icons such as the Brooklyn Bridge, South Street Seaport and Lady Liberty, taking in breathtaking views of the skyline and culminating with lunch at the popular Grand Banks restaurant. As Gray sums it up best, “Whether it's top hats and tails for a pre-theater cocktail cruise, or flip-flops and straw hats for some swimming at Sandy Hook, Manhattan offers more than any other harbor; somehow, it's the best-kept secret in yachting.” There’s just something about cruising in the Hudson and East Rivers—totally unfettered, yet surrounded by the hustle and bustle of the City. It’s the ultimate New York experience. u Opposite page: Andrew Taubman, Abigail Lockhart, Michael Reinert, Brooke Kelly, Michael Jezard, and Abigail MacCallum departing from Chelsea Piers on Barton & Gray's American Pie, a 40' Hinckley Talaria. M AJRUCLY H 22 00 22 01 0 79 0


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From above: Abigail MacCallum and Michael Jezard on Barton & Gray's American Pie; Michael Reinert, Brooke Kelly, Andrew Taubman, Abigail Lockhart, Abigail MacCallum, and Michael Jezard cruising by Liberty Island on Barton & Gray's American Pie. Opposite page: A nautical map of Barton & Gray's routes in New York Harbor.


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Andrew Taubman and Abigail Lockhart on Barton & Gray's American Pie in New York Harbor. Opposite page: Michael Reinert, Brooke Kelly, Michael Jezard, and Abigail MacCallum enjoy oysters at Grand Banks at the end of a Barton & Gray cruise through New York Harbor; passengers on Barton & Gray will enjoy Champagne, a full bar, and snacks; oysters at Grand Banks, a restaurant that can

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

be reached by a Barton & Gray yacht.


Memberships Barton & Gray offers Membership aboard a fleet of crewed day yachts in nearly 30 harbors. You’ll have unlimited access to the entire fleet all year long, with a crew organizing and facilitating incredible experiences on the water. Our members have all the joys of yachting in their life without any of the hassle.

ENSIGN

ADMIRAL

•EVERY HARBOR & ISLAND 36’ PICNIC BOATS •UNLIMITED RESERVATIONS | 2 AT-A-TIME •NOT ELIGIBLE FOR YACHT UPGRADES $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 I N I T I AT I O N $39,500 ANNUAL DUES B I LL E D AT $ 9 , 8 7 5 P E R Q U A RT E R

•EVERY HARBOR & ISLAND EVERY YACHT •UNLIMITED RESERVATIONS | 8 AT-A-TIME •COMPLIMENTARY YACHT UPGRADES OUT-OF-SEASON SCHEDULING $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 I N I T I AT I O N $74,500 ANNUAL DUES B I LL E D AT $ 1 8 , 6 2 5 P E R Q U A RT E R

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP

LIEUTENANT

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP

•E V E R Y H A R B O R & ISLAND •E V E R Y YA C H T UNLIMITED RESERVATIONS | 4 AT-A-TIME •C O M P L I M E N TA R Y YA C H T UPGRADES $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 I N I T I AT I O N $54,500 ANNUAL DUES B I LL E D AT $ 1 3 , 6 2 5 P E R Q U A RT E R

Harbors & Islands Our Yachts and Crews are found in the most sought-after harbors and islands. Each with their own character, and all stunning.

• B O S TO N • O S T E RV I L L E •NANTUCKET • M A RT H A’ S V I N E YA R D • N E W P O RT

NEW YORK & LONG ISLAND SOUND • W AT C H H I L L •SAG HARBOR • E A S T H A M P TO N • S O U T H A M P TO N • R O W AY TO N •GREENWICH • OY S T E R B AY •NEW YORK CIT Y

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THE GREAT LAKES •CHIC AGO •HARBOR SPRINGS

THE MID-ATLANTIC • W A S H I N G TO N , D . C . •ANNAPOLIS • C H A R L E S TO N

FLORIDA

•VERO BEACH •JUPITER • PA L M B E A C H • B O C A R ATO N •FT L AUDERDALE •MIAMI •KEY LARGO •ISL AMORADA •NAPLES •BOCA GRANDE • S A R A S OTA

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NEW ENGLAND


This spread: Barton & Gray's American Pie, a 40' Hinckley Talaria, cruising through New York Harbor. Insets, from left: Barton & Gray offers three different membership tiers; Michael Reinert

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and Brooke Kelly; Andrew Taubman.

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Barton & Gray's American Pie cruising by Liberty Island in New York Harbor. Opposite page: Michael Reinert, Brooke Kelly, Andrew Taubman, Abigail Lockhart, Abigail MacCallum,

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

and Michael Jezard.

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CUBA’S JAZZY VIBRANCE BY ALEX TRAVERS


© B U E N A V I S TA I M A G E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

ONE OF CUBA’S allures is its mystery. Crumbling pastel-colored facades line its streets, live music permeates the air. One of the first thing you see when you arrive is a sea of 1950s Chevys, Chryslers, Buicks, and Pontiacs parked outside the airport. Which leads to the question: What do we except to experience while in Cuba? Will it be a night out at an authentic paladar (a family-run restaurant) in Havana? A discovery into the history of one of Cuba’s Art Deco buildings? Perhaps just a spontaneous adventure?

This spread: View of the Havana Cathedral, built in the 1700s, from the arcade of the Palacio del Conde Lombillo; Havana Blues (Assouline) will be released later this summer.

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Clockwise from left: Cabaret performer at the famous Tropicana Club in Havana; young Habaneros biking through the city; dancers from the musical Almacuba in Habana Vieja; Cuban revolutionary leader Che Guevara participating in voluntary work in Havana, 1961. Opposite: Trumpeter performing in

M A N U E L RO M A N O / N U R P H OTO / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; © I VA N B E L AU S TE G U I

Habana Vieja, 2020.

Well, that’s entirely up to you. But as a precursor to your journey in real life, Assouline plans to release Havana Blues, a stunning tome about Cuba, later this summer. The book is written by Pamela Ruiz, an author and photographer who came to Cuba in the 1990s and fell in love—both with the country and her husband, Cuban artist Damian Aquiles. Formerly a location scout for photography shoots, Ruiz began to turn her attention to art, specifically bridging the international art world and Cuba. Her book welcomes you to Havana, a city filled with overwhelming energy. Situated along the Straits of Florida, the capital of Cuba has been through several identities: Spanish colonial settlement,


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© J AC K PI E R S O N ; © O S VA L D O S A L A S , S A L A S E S TATE , H AVA N A , C U B A ; © B E T TM A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

mobster rule in the 1930s, the glamour of the 1950s, Cuban revolution and, most recently, a cultural renaissance. Havana’s bold, provocative approach to art, cuisine, and Entertainment including its range of architecture styles from the 16th century to the modern day, confer this epic city with a legendary status on par with the world’s greatest locales. While some of the buildings are in disrepair, the beauty of the Baroque, Neoclassical and Art Deco features many triumphs. For instance, the iconic Copa Room cabaret that hosted Ginger Rogers and Abbott and Costello still stands. The Gran Teatro de la Habana—built in the early 20th century—is now home to the Cuban National Ballet. And Habana Vieja is undergoing a massive restoration to its former glory. Havana could be seen as a work-in-progress, but it is more a testament to its never-ending determination to improve and progress— which might be the allure that still attracts so many visitors today. u


Dancing to the rhythms of Havana. Opposite, from above: Bassist carrying his instrument past the Gran Teatro de La Habana; local bartenders competing in Havana’s annual cocktail mixing contest; a local enjoying a cigar.

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SUMMER IS BACK IN AMERICA BY ALEX TRAVERS

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WA R R E N J A G G E R

ON THE PLEASANT shore of Watch Hill, Rhode Island, near the southern border of Connecticut, stands a proud Easter-egg yellow hotel. The Ocean House experience can be described most simply as charming. For one thing, the historic beach hotel is one of the last remaining Victorian Era hotels of its kind. With its strip of tan beach, it is an iconic structure that evokes a timeless elegance, punctuated by its lush croquet courts and long white veranda. Since 1868, it has become a summer resort of notable people; in 2004 it was nearly torn down and turned in to homes. But it survived, just as it had through wars and the Great Depression— and even a global pandemic. Over the last 18 months, Ocean House made many efforts to help both its community and staff. There were images and videos posted on social media, highlighting the initiatives. Families were given meals delivered in the food truck; in another video, the staff clapped for healthcare workers.

“It was really uplifting,” said Deborah Royce, who, along with her husband, Chuck, purchased the property in 2004, “and we’ll continue to support the community as we have in the past.” Ocean House is a hotel steeped in both history and modern comforts, including a fitness center, the croquet court, a billiard room, spas, and a heated indoor lap pool. Plus, it features original elements that were harvested during the $140 million renovation, which were incorporated into the new design. For instance, its front desk, light fixtures, and fireplaces. Ocean House is one of only 13 hotels in the world that have Triple Five Star status, according to Forbes Travel Guide, and a history book was recently released, highlighting its rich past and present. Stop by this summer and enjoy one of New England’s most spectacular resorts. And while you’re on the beach, be sure to enjoy memories of past summers at our favorite destination in the pages that follow. u

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Northeast Harbor Jericho displaying the Northeast Harbor Fleet burgee on her

his mother, Abby (who imparted to him her life-long love of art), outside the Rockefeller’s home in Seal Harbor, Maine, circa 1920; Brooke Astor walking in the garden of Cove End, her Northeast Harbor estate, 1993; a regatta of IODs in Northeast Harbor; a postcard of the Asticou Inn as seen from Clifton Dock in Northeast Harbor; Eileen Rockefeller (left) with her father, David Rockefeller, at age 95, Seal Harbor, Maine, 2010. 96 QUEST

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bow staff while cruising the sound; David Rockefeller, former chairman and chief executive of Chase Bank, as a young boy with


S A R ATO G A S P R I N G S H I S TO R I C A L M U S E U M ; T I M E S U N I O N ; NYR A / S U S I E R A I S H E R

Saratoga This page, clockwise from top left: Saratoga Race Course circa 1937; Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Vanderbilt sitting in their box seats, 1946; Ramon Dominguez rides Alpha (left) in a dead heat against David Cohen on Golden Ticket in the 143rd running of the Travers Stakes (both horses were named winners); Saratoga Springs, 1915; Marylou and C. V. Whitney; Onion beating reigning Triple Crown winner, Secretariat, in the Whitney Handicap at Saratoga, 1973; former U.S. Ambassador to Finland and thoroughbred owner/breeder, Earl Mack, in his box at Saratoga with George Pataki and friends; Ogden Mills “Dinny” Phipps enjoying the races in Saratoga, August, 2015.


This page, clockwise from top: An evening on Nantucket Sound; a vintage poster touting Nantucket; a fleet of colorful sailboats line Nantucket’s coastline; located on the shore of Edgartown Harbor, the private Chappaquiddick Beach Club’s distinctive red, white, and blue pointed beach pavilion tops are easy to spot; sailors approach the shore decked in “Nantucket reds”—the iconic sailing staple of both islands; Carly Simon at home in the 27-acre house she shared with James Taylor in Tisbury, Massachusetts, 1981; The Charlotte Inn of Martha’s Vineyard, the home that Samuel Osborn built and that Charlotte Pent later turned intom an inn.

98 QUEST

S TE V E L I P O F S K Y / CO R B I S ; S A LT WATE R N E W E N G L A N D . CO M ; R E X S H U T TE R S TO C K

Nantucket & Martha’s Vineyard


Newport This page, clockwise from top left: A topiary camel on the lawn of Doris Duke’s Rough Point estate in Newport, Rhode Island (Doris had several live camels in residence); jumping off the boat for a dip in Jamestown’s Mackerel Cove, as seen in Bettie Bearden Pardee’s book, Living Newport: Houses, People, Style; the lawn of Newport’s Castle Hill Inn; Newport’s Castle Hill Light; the New York Yacht Club’s on-the-water clubhouse, Harbour Court, in Newport, Rhode Island; John Jacob Astor VI with his wife, Ellen, at Chetwode, their estate in Newport, 1935;

N I C K M E LE ; A LE X A N D E R N E S B I T T; B E RT M O R G A N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Lee Radziwill dancing at Newport’s America’s Cup Ball, August 15, 1977.


Lyford Cay This page, clockwise from top left: The Little Club is one of two restaurants where dinner is served at the Lyford Cay Club (dinner is usually followed by dancing under the pink and white tent); Lyford Cay regular Terry Allen Kramer; Slim Aarons captures Mrs. C. J. Dauphinot, Jr., and Marina Posson with a friend in Lyford Cay, 1974; the bar at the Little Club was redesigned by interior decorator Tom Scheerer; adored and adorned “social X-ray” Nan Kempner, who was said to have received multiple letters reprimanding her for walking nude on the beach at the Lyford Cay Club; a Slim Aarons photo of stylish tennis in the Bahamas, 1957; the 68-foot charter ketch Traveller II at anchor in the lee of Stocking

S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y

Island in 1964, as seen in Slim Aarons’ A Wonderful Time.

100 QUEST


B E RT M O R G A N CO U RTE S Y O F T H E S O U T H A M P TO N H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

The Hamptons This page, clockwise from top left: The Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett; Mr. and Mrs. Orson D. Munn, Jr. at the Bathing Corp., circa 1968; Bridgehampton’s Cady Kitchen and ice-cream parlour; Franklin D’Olier, Winifred Lee, Jacqueline Bouvier (late Kennedy Onassis), Marian Raymond, and Mrs. James T. Lee at the Southhampton Riding and Hunt Club; children taking over the lifeguard stand on Coopers Beach; Monte Hackett (left) with the Horn brothers and W.P. Laughlin at the Boys Club in Southampton, c. 1940; Genevieve Clendein and E. Morgan Gilbert sunbathing on the beach in Southampton, 1938.


Southampton

Bridgehampton

The Traditional Hampton

The Rustic Hampton

Arriving in town via:

‹ Mercedes G-Class

The Hampton Jitney ›

For sweet lovers:

The Fudge Company

‹ The Candy Kitchen

Ranking:

Plan your stay at:

Iconic institution:

Best night (or day) out:

Notable residents:

Restaurant must:

Event of the summer:

Leisurely activity:

Accessorize with:

Capri Hotel or Southampton Inn ‹ Tate’s Bake Shop

‹ Southampton Social Club

Brooke Shields and Calvin Klein

Tutto Il Giorno

‹ Southampton Animal Shelter's Annual Gala

Golf

‹ Stubbs & Wootton Slippers

‹ Topping Rose House Wölffer Estate Vineyard (Sagaponack) Friday and Saturday Sunsets at Wölffer Wine Stand › ‹ Christie Brinkley

Pierre's

The Hampton Classic ›

Horseback riding or watching polo

‹ Straw sun hat

Pit stop at:

Citarella

Round Swamp Farm

Sipping on:

A Southside

Wölffer’s Summer in a Bottle Rosé ›

‹ Barry’s Bootcamp

‹ Soul Cycle at the BARN

Current exercise obsession:

102 QUEST


East Hampton

Sag Harbor

Montauk

The Flashy Hampton

The Aquatic Hampton

The Party Hampton

‹ Barton & Gray

‹ Jeep Wrangler

Private jet or Blade

‹ Moo Moo's Ice Cream

‹ Big Olaf’s

Sundae Donuts ›

or Dylan’s Candy Bar Hedges Inn or the Maidstone Hotel Longhouse Reserve

‹ Stephen Talkhouse (Amagansett)

Beyoncé and Jay-Z

The Palm

Baron’s Cove ›

Bay Street Theater

The Surf Lodge

Montauk Point Lighthouse

Sunset Beach in Shelter Island

Gurney's Montauk

(just don’t miss the last ferry back)

Resort & Seawater Spa

‹ Jimmy Buffett

Le Bilboquet

‹ Ralph Lauren and Julianne Moore

‹ Duryea's Lobster Deck

Weekly Concert Series

Guild Hall's Annual Gala

Bay Street Theater’s Annual Benefit

Lounging at the Maidstone

Kayaking or sailing ›

Surfing or fishing ›

‹ Oversized designer sunglasses

Swims

Flat Brims and polarized sunglasses

Goldberg’s

Provisions

Veuve Clicquot Rosé ›

Aperol Spritz ›

Montauk Ale ›

Norma Jean Pilates

Swerve Fitness

‹ Tracy Anderson Method

at The Surf Lodge

Herb's Market

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 0 3


HISTORY, MEMORY, & MOTIVATION BY ALEX TRAVERS

RONALD LEE FLEMING has a name for the 12 gardens that make up the stunning outdoor landscape of Bellevue House, his home in Newport, Rhode Island. He calls them “narrative gardens.” Although Fleming’s gardens—and the artifacts in them—speak to context and history, his main goal is to have them create reminders of personal memories. “I wanted to use my garden to discover the cosmology of family and life,” he says, “to evoke the passage of time that resonates through it, to better understand and celebrate the rituals that can define and shape it.” The author/urban designer’s most recent book, The Adventures of a Narrative Gardener, Creating a Landscape of Memory (Giles), is filled with rich visual imagery of Bellevue House and its gardens, and a few very personal tales—some humorous, 104 QUEST


Dancers at Bellevue House at the emerald pool. Opposite: Chinese Chippendale bridge;

RO B E RT K R A N T Z ; CO U RTE S Y O F RO N A L D LE E F LE M I N G

Ronald Lee Fleming.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 0 5


106 QUEST

WA R R E N J A G G E R ; RO B E RT K R A N T Z ; M I C K H A LE S ; I S L A N D M OV I N G CO M PA NY

others less so. Still, there is something oddly romantic about Fleming’s tome. On the surface, yes, this is a story about a successful urban planner who wanted a new home and living space after going through a divorce. So, would it sound mundane if I described Adventures of a Narrative Gardener as a detailed account of creating this garden? Maybe. But this is also as genuine a book as there can be: about how to find empowerment and confidence in a world that may not be so kind; about misfortune and what happens after; about finding a deeper sense of connection with the spaces we occupy; and, perhaps most important, learning from our mistakes. Usually, books about design and gardens are just about that— design and gardens. They are filled with beautiful pictures and few words. The Adventures of a Narrative Gardener is decidedly different, although you wouldn’t necessarily guess it from the book’s appearance. Here is a passage from the book, one that explains the significance of a fountain at Bellevue House: “First I tried to kill a man in black pajamas in the adjacent building with a borrowed rifle—I have a lifetime of gratitude for missing this innocent “neighbor”—and then, in turn, missed being shot by a sniper. A diminutive GI, helmeted and sandbagged, called me up to a nearby apartment parapet. He pointed to a Vietcong position in a cemetery on a hillock a block away. I realized years later, at six feet tall, I was only there to draw the bullet that sucked air three inches from my skull. This is depicted in the Years of Living Dangerously cascade at Bellevue House.” For Fleming, this cascade is about gratitude, fear, and perhaps even luck. It is also about lost companions, many whose counsel helped shaped his way. As we turn the pages in Adventures of a Narrative Gardener, we see the stunning gardens and luxurious “cottage” (a Newport parlance for a mansion). Its lush lawns, ponds, and impressive follies catch our eyes—as do the events he holds there for others to enjoy. But as we read the text, we learn the significance of each piece, each ritual. And Fleming doesn’t hold back—he is brutally honest, showing both humility and vulnerability. “I buried a memoir inside a book about gardens,” he jokes. Fleming was always interested in stately houses. When he was in the seventh grade, he’d send away for catalogs of English Country houses. “I discovered my grandfather’s careful inventory of where he had been on the P&O line in 1922,” he tells me. “I saw all these artifacts and postcards from around the world.” His curiosity was unlike that of most young boys. “I wasn’t out playing ball,” he says, “I was reading articles on country homes.” All this, along with an education at Pomona College and Harvard, led to his career as a planner and preservationist involved in pioneering Main Street Revitalization and innovative place making. He also received a designation as a Fellow by the American Institute of Certified Planners. During our phone conversation, Fleming tells me that he hopes his book “serves as an empowerment guide, so other people have the confidence to go out and do their own garden— whatever the scale.” He wants it to serve as inspiration, a starting point. “The idea,” he says, “is to add their own meaning, their own value, their own connection to it.” u


From above: View from the Arts and Crafts pool, looking south; Oriental Vale, Bellevue House. Opposite, from above: Stable block and library/nymphaeum; staircase at Bellevue House; Bellevue House, c. 2018; monkey sculpted in bronze on the cupola.

SEPTEMBER 2019 00


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER “And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” —F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby 108 QUEST

SH L IOTO M A ACRO N IST/ G E T T Y I M A G E S P RED

BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER


Clockwise from top left: The Black Pearl restaurant on Bannister’s Wharf in Newport, Rhode Island; Laurance Rockefeller speaks with guests at his resort, the Dorado Beach Hotel in Dorado, Puerto Rico, 1959; Prince Rainier and Princess Grace of Monaco in the paddock, Royal Ascot, 1966; Jeanne Murray Vanderbilt beside her bicycle near the entrance of the Southampton Bathing T H E B L AC K P E A R L ; G E O R G E S I L K / T H E L I F E PI C T U R E CO LLE C T I O N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; PA P H OTO S ; M O R G A N CO LLE C T I O N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Corporation, Southampton, New York, late 1940s. Opposite page: Mrs. Henry Cabot, Jr., with her children, from left to right: Henry Bromfield Cabot III, Camilla Foote Cabot, and Andrew Hull Cabot, sitting on a car in the driveway of their home, “Rollingstones,” in Manchester, New Hampshire, 1960.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 0 9


110 QUEST

C E N T R A L P R E S S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; CO N D É N A S T; M G M S T U D I O S ; O R M O N D G I G L I


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER

Clockwise from top left: Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway on the set of The Thomas Crown Affair, 1968; Audrey Jaeckel and John Baker strolling hand in hand at the sixth annual horse show held at the Southampton Riding and Hunt Club in Southampton, 1934; Queen Elizabeth II presenting the polo cup to Prince Philip in 1969; Mr. and Mrs. John Vernon Bouvier III enjoying a view of the fifth annual East Hampton Riding Club

U N I TE D A RT I S TS / S U N S E T B O U LE VA R D / CO R B I S V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; B E T TM A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; R E G I N A L D DAV I S / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; B E T TM A N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

show from the comfort of their motor car in 1929. Opposite page, clockwise from top: American tennis player Althea Gibson, the first black player to gain prominence in the game, competing at Wimbledon in 1956; Minnie Cushing and Peter Beard with their wedding party at her family home, “The Ledges,” in Newport, Rhode Island, photographed by Toni Frissell for Vogue, 1967; Actresses Jean Howard and Irene Hervey ride a tandem bike to work on the MGM lot in 1933 while delivering the peachy phrase, “It’s Bike to Work Day today, so get on it!”; Mrs. Harilaos Theodoracopulos photographed by Ormond Gigli for “How The Other Half Bathes” featured in Time magazine in 1971.

J U LY 2 0 2 1  1 1 1


112 QUEST

B E T TM A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; A M E R I C A S B E S T R AC I N G . CO M ; U N I V E R S I T Y O F P E N N S Y LVA N I A A R C H I V E S ; N A N T U C K E T H I S TO R I C A L A S S O C I AT I O N


Quest

C A RO L I N A H E R R E R A A R C H I V E S ; K E Y S TO N E - F R A N C E / G A M M A - K E Y S TO N E V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; U S O P E N ; S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; J O N AT H A N E R N S T / R E U TE R S

ENDLESS SUMMER

This page, clockwise from top left: Carolina Herrera, age 16, dressed for a dog show; actresses Dora Doll and Bella Darvi pose on a speedboat on the French Riviera during the Cannes Film Festival, 1956; the Tennis Hall of Fame at the Newport Casino, site of the first U.S. National Championships in 1881; Slim Aarons helps his daughter, Mary, sustain a headstand on the Fourth of July in Bedford, NY in 1970; Champion American Thoroughbred racehorse Orb, from the Phipps family stable, won the 2013 Kentucky Derby. Here he is pictured with his training rider, Jennifer Patterson, after a session in preparation for the 2013 Preakness Stakes. Opposite page, clockwise from top: John F. Kennedy Jr. leans on the gunwale of a boat in Penobscot Bay while on a 26-day Outward Bound course based in Rockland, ME in 1977; Mrs. John Hay Whitney (née Elizabeth Altemus, 1st wife of John Hay “Jock” Whitney) at Belmont Park in 1934; Olympic rowing champion John B. “Jack” Kelly, father of Grace Kelly, in his shell on the Schuylkill River in 1920; A crowd gathers at Nantucket’s Brant Point to witness the first landing of two seaplanes in 1918.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 1 3


R E A L E S TAT E HAMPTONS

NEW YORK

HAMPTONS

NEW YORK

HAMPTONS

NEW YORK

NEW YORK’S HOTSPOTS B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

AS THE NUMBER of vaccinated people grows daily, the real estate markets in New York are booming—both in the city and in the Hamptons. In Manhattan, brokers are seeing a steep increase in buyers, with turnkey properties being the most popular; with contractors overbooked and COVID-related building delays, buyers are in search of renovated, move-in ready homes. For a quick transaction, brokers have seen success in the “price low, sell high” concept as the bidding wars only occur if buyers smell a deal. In the Hamptons, an area growing in popularity as a year-round destination due to its beach lifestyle and proximity to the city, inventory is extremely low, and homes are selling at record price points. However, our brokers still recommend pricing homes in line with market comparables as overpricing will rarely deliver a sale.

114 QUEST


HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

R E A L E S TAT E

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

ANDREW SAUNDERS

CO U RTE S Y O F S AU N D E R S & A S S O C I ATE S

Saunders & Associates / 917.696.1252 / as@saunders.com

Q: What do you expect from the Hamptons real estate market this summer? A: The enthusiasm that buyers expressed in transacting in Hamptons real estate in 2020 has continued through mid-June 2021. There is a perception among many, including myself, that there has been a change in the live/work paradigm that has defined society for generations. Many organizations have endorsed remote work protocols that now enable people to live significant distances from their respective main offices. Consequently, people can live in the Hamptons and travel to their main office infrequently. As a result, the Hamptons is evolving into a new kind of bedroom community, which will be populated, in part, by year-round residents whose jobs are tied to New York City or elsewhere but who spend the majority of their time in the Hamptons. This new dynamic will continue to be supportive of Hamptons real estate prices and transactional activity this summer and for an indeterminate period in the future. Q: What’s new and notable Out East? A: What’s new and notable is that people are going out again and having a good time. The restaurants are packed, the markets are busy, parties are happening, and there is a

renewed energy associated with the togetherness that we can all experience again. Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers? A: We continue to advise buyers to bid full-price or higher on new listings. There is a significant imbalance in the supply/demand equation that favors sellers. Many new listings are attracting multiple bids from the outset. Buyers have to differentiate their offers in terms of price and ease of transaction if they hope to acquire the subject property. Sellers are in a position to realize record sale prices for their homes. The market has never been busier. We are observing some property owners pricing too high with the expectation that the strong market will deliver a buyer at an aspirational price. Despite the strength of the market, this strategy rarely is effective. We advise our sellers accordingly.

88 Rose Way in Bridgehampton, New York; $21,000,000.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 1 5


NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

R E A L E S TAT E

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

REBA MILLER

Q: What advice do you have for NYC sellers? A: Sellers must know that they should price their homes differently than the year before the pandemic. If the buyer cannot evaluate or “smell” a deal the unit will not sell. If it is a renovated unit, it will have the best chance of selling, and in fact, have multiple bids (especially if it is priced as a great deal). Buyers can best position themselves to have their offer accepted by having their pre-approval ready, along with the other required documents. Be sure to choose an attorney who is knowledgeable about the NYC real estate market.

quite have the international market just yet, but it’s just a matter of time. These are still times of opportunity, but the window is closing as most of the sellers who wanted to sell, placed their units on the market and we have had a banner spring. Buyers who missed the chance to purchase a home because they didn’t act quickly enough- are now asking themselves, “will new inventory come on the market in the middle of summer?”. The price points of $600K up to $2,500,000 have been the most active, and the homes that need renovation are the challenging ones. Many contractors I’ve spoken to are swamped and short-staffed, as many of their workers are collecting unemployment. Plus, supplies and appliances are delayed in delivery. Once Broadway opens, we anticipate that the market’s activity will only increase!

Q: Tell us about a coveted listing. A: Currently, there are numerous condominiums available at The Sutton. One, in particular, is a 2 Bed/ 2.5 Bath condo that offers 1,428 sq. ft. of living space, as well as the finest finishes, as it was designed by Robyn Karp Interiors. This turn-key home has been upgraded from the original developer’s delivery. Another great feature of this unit is the low common charges ($1,800) and real estate tax ($200). Q: Anything else you’d like to share with our readers? A: The market has been showing an enormous rebound and currently still is, as we anticipated that it would. We don’t

116 QUEST

959 First Avenue, #8P in New York, New York; $2,700,000.

CO U RTE S Y O F B E R K S H I R E H AT H A WAY H O M E S E RV I C E S N E W Y O R K P RO P E RT I E S

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices New York Properties / 646.210.3177 / rebamiller@bhhsnyproperties.com


NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

R E A L E S TAT E

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

CORNELIA ELAND AND MARK BLUMENFELD Compass / 917.734.0229 /cornelia.eland@compass.com or mark.blumenfeld@compass.com

Q: What are buyers looking for in their homes as they return to the city? A: Condition. The last 14 months have been a delay in life, no one wants to wait any longer. Move-in condition is paramount.

CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

Q: Which neighborhoods in the city are popular for young families and couples looking to settle? A: We are seeing huge demand downtown for three bedrooms. Of course, demand on the Upper East Side has remained constant. The Upper West Side has been more challenging in that there has been a dearth of quality, well-priced inventory in move-in condition. Q: What advice do you have for sellers? Is the market still strongly favoring buyers? A: The market is hot, particularly so for turnkey condition inventory. We are seeing multiple bid scenarios across all price segments and locations. Pricing low and selling high has been a successful strategy in this postCOVID climate. If your apartment’s fair value is $X, list it for 5% less the fair value and expect a bidding war. Sitting on the market will only attract low-ball bids.

Q: Tell us about a coveted listing. A: We will be listing a 2,350 sqft, six-room in truly mint, never lived-in, condition at 1112 Park Avenue for $2.85M. Get prewar scale with new development finishes in the best location at 90th and Park Avenue. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers about this unique time and the New York City real estate market? A: Avoid doing work. COVID has resulted in delays— from the delivery of tiles to the approvals from buildings’ managing agents. So as a buyer: jump in, focus on finding a quality renovation, and take advantage of interest rates while they remain low. ◆

180 East 79th Street, #9E in New York, New York; $2,950,000.

J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 1 7


SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE BY THE EDITORS

Getting out of town for the summer doesn’t mean you have to stop shopping ’til you drop. These essential boutiques in our favorite destinations will keep you looking chic during your getaway...and let you take a bit of summer vacation back home with you afterward. This page: Shops along Nantucket’s harbor. Insets, clockwise from top left: Vineyard Haven Harbor in Martha’s Vineyard; map of Nantucket; East Hampton’s Hook Mill.


{ H A M P T O N S } RALPH LAUREN 33 Main Street / East Hampton 631.907.0960 Ralph Lauren’s East Hampton boutique perfectly captures the brand’s charm and sophisticated style. Seemingly a traditional cottage on the outside, the lush and airy Ralph Lauren store of East Hampton has been carefully designed inside to optimize your shopping experience as well as place this destination apart from any other Ralph Lauren location you might encounter near your home town. Be sure to curate a personalized classic look for your warm-weather activities this year with the newest store selections, including silk attire, classic polos, and a wide range of beach accessories.

THE ASPREY BAR 18 Jobs Lane / South Hampton 917.985.1170 Good news residents of the Hamptons: British luxury brand Asprey’s boutique at 18 Jobs Lane is sticking around Southampton this summer! Well-known for producing barware since the Art Deco era, Asprey’s store will continue to highlight the theme this summer, naming its location The Asprey Bar. In fact, since the Golden age of cocktails, Asprey has been mastering the art of creating sophisticated barware, having fully embraced the Art Deco style of the 1920s and 30s. Asprey’s catalogues of this era were beautiful anthologies of barware collections, with many designs reflecting the energy and originality that came in the form of fun shakers, barware accompaniments, and exceptional Cocktail Trolleys. Stop in and see what’s in store!

KIRNA ZABÊTE

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E S TO R E S ; B FA

66 Newtown Lane / East Hampton 631.527.5794 With curated collections personally selected by founder and owner Beth Buccini, Kirna Zabête offers a fashionable destination featuring top contemporary designers. The store is chock-full of lively patterns, colors, and unique designs that bring a summery take on high-fashion styles to the East Hampton community all year round. Kirna Zabête encourages its customers to dress for joy and the store offers an endless selection of original designs made for the bright, bold, and stylish woman. If you’re looking to make a statement with your summer closet this year, be sure to stop by Kirna Zabête—it may just be your cup of tea.


{ N E W P O R T } MANDARINE 16 Bannister’s Wharf 401.848.9360 If you’re looking to bring a little Newport charm into your closet, Mandarine provides a peaceful atmosphere to browse the newest summer trends. With locations in St. Barth and Newport, Mandarine offers a wide selection of relaxed women’s clothing for the summer (think kaftans and wrap dresses) along with fine jewelry to match. Although Mandarine offers experiences in two locations, the Newport store looks to bring an island flair to the founder’s hometown while catering to the rapidly changing trends and interest of all those who enter.

NEWPORT MANSIONS STORE 1 Bannister’s Wharf 401.849.9900 With Newport’s long history, it is almost impossible to leave the town without taking part in some of its history and traditions. Schedule visits to The Breakers, The Elms, Marble House, Rosecliff, Newport’s castle on the sea, the Isaac Bell House, and more of the famous old Newport mansions, and when you’re done, don’t forget to peruse the different themed souvenirs on display. The Newport Mansions Store provides the perfect space to experience the old charms of the city, and also serves as the perfect stop to pick up a housewarming gift for your next summer party.

SEA BAGS 3004, 25 Bannister’s Wharf 207.553.0144 The perfect beach bag is nearly impossible to find. You keep an eye out when you’re swimsuit shopping, in a beach town, or even looking for handbags but it always seems like the perfect bag is in the hands of someone else! However, Sea Bags can place the perfect tote in your hands as soon as you arrive to Newport. Sea Bags are originally sailing bags, and carry the history of sailors all along the East Coast with every product. Sea Bag designs cater to everyone’s style, and will bring you the perfect tote for your vacation needs. 120 QUEST


{ M A R T H A’ S

V I N E Y A R D }

SLATE 1 N Summer Street / Edgartown 508.939.1908 Slate is a fashion and lifestyle shop born in Edgartown, Mass. on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. Tucked away under a sunshine-hued striped awning, the chic storefront offers a carefully curated assortment of established and emerging fashion designers, jewelry, home accessories, and clean beauty products. Slate puts a big focus on giving back to its community through partnerships, events, a conscious selection of brands, and charitable giving. They do their best to support local artisans, emerging designers, and brands that have an element of social responsibility. The island store is open seasonally from early April thru December.

MURDICK’S FUDGE 21 North Water Street / Edgartown 508.627.8047 If the charm of Martha’s Vineyard comes from its local haunts, then Murdick’s Fudge is at the top of everyone’s list. Since 1887, the shop serves a wide range of homemade fudge flavors, peanut brittle, and candy that has everyone on the island stopping in for a bite. The company prides itself on its pure recipe and fresh ingredients that provide rich, authentic flavor to all-natural fudge: only real butter, cream, and flavorings are used. Murdick’s Fudge caters to every one of its customers’ needs, and every sweet treat becomes an essential part of each Martha’s Vineyard memory to bring home long after you return to your hometown. With three locations in Martha’s Vineyard, it is almost impossible to find a reason not to join the flock for fudge.

BUNCH OF GRAPES

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E S TO R E S

23 Main Street / Vineyard Haven 508.693.2291 Looking to revamp your summer library? Bunch of Grapes has stood on Vineyard Haven’s Main Street for 40 years, supplying the town with curated stories from a team of avid writers and readers. The homey independent bookstore allows readers to choose from a wide selection of different genres, and invites local authors for readings and book signings in an intimate setting. Whether you’re stopping by to see your favorite author, to work, or to grab a newspaper or waterside read (be sure to check out the staff’s current picks), you can always count on Bunch of Grapes to satisfy your literary needs all year round. J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 2 1


{ S A R A T O G A } VIOLET’S OF SARATOGA 494 Broadway 518.584.4838 Violet’s Boutique in Saratoga Springs is the place to satisfy your vacation-chic dreams. Discover outfits for any occasion among the store’s wide selection of casual wear, denim, cocktail dresses, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and gifts. When searching for clothing to let your look stand apart from the crowd, Violet’s will help reinvent your closet and cater to your every need. Browse the racks at Violet’s boutique for a fresh take on your usual summer look.

J.MCLAUGHLIN 594 New Loudon Road 917.438.5058 In August of 2019, J.McLaughlin is came to the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame to showcase its newest Equestrian Collection. So its Loudonville store, located just south of Saratoga Springs, is a mustshop. Here, you’ll be able to shop classic J.McLaughlin style, coupled with equestrian-themed prints and bright colors for anyone looking to make a statement. New arrivals will also be showcased at the boutique, like the Nara Dress and the stunning Lois shirt in Westbury Garden prints. Celebrate J.McLaughlin and the long history of racing with a visit to this store, or kick off the weekend of here on your way up to Saratoga Springs.

THE PINK PADDOCK 351 Broadway #101 518.587.4344 When searching for a spot to quench your thirst for chic and colorful clothing, look no further than The Pink Paddock in Saratoga, which carries your favorite brands and beachwear. The Pink Paddock serves as a Lilly Pulitzer signature store and is filled with the designer’s much-loved prints, colors, and classic dresses. Let the bright designs in the open windows of the store draw you into its homey wooden interior and standout selection. With locations all over New York, you can always head back for more. Update your resort wardrobe in the store’s hometown or shop for fun and unique gifts during a leisurely getaway. 122 QUEST


{ N A N T U C K E T } SERENELLA 9B South Beach Street 508.228.3400 It’s hard not to succumb to the inviting beachy charm of Nantucket, and Serenella is just the right place to go to update your summer wardrobe. The boutique carries everyone’s favorite high-end brands, including Oscar de la Renta, Bottega Veneta, Versace, Tabitha Simmons, and more, and serves as the local style guru’s summer haven. The location distinguishes itself through modern silhouettes, high-quality materials and cuts, and the revolutionary vision of the store’s owner. Serenella brings an air of elegance to the small-island paradise of Nantucket, maintaining an air of refinery that adds something completely unique to the island’s original charm.

MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP 62 Main Street 508.228.0437

(VIOLET ’S OF SARATOGA); HEATHER BOHM-TALLMAN (THE PINK PADDOCK STOREFRONT)

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE STORES; DANIA BAYGI PHOTOGRAPHY AND SUPER SOURCE MEDIA

For anyone looking to find the true local styles of Nantucket, Murray’s Toggery is the place for your Nantucket red clothing and accessories. Situated at the very top of Nantucket’s Main Street, the family-owned store was the first to introduce Nantucket reds—pants made from canvas fabric whose red color faded over time in memory of the sails of boats sailing on the coast of France. The pants quickly became a symbol of preppy style, and Murray’s Toggery now stands as the original authentic retailer of the famous faded red and pink clothing.

THE SKINNY DIP 23 Old South Wharf 508.901.5870 The Skinny Dip brings a taste of New York fashion to Massachussetts with a Nantucket twist. The brand’s newest store has opened near Old South Wharf. The Skinny Dip showcases the work of its accomplished founders as well as emerging designers and a careful selection of lifestyle brands in tandem with its male and female fashion lines. Want to go beyond clothes? The Skinny Dip also offers selections in home decor and gifts, sure to bring the summer sun into your own home. The store is open from mid-May to October, so stop by before the season ends. ◆


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY


Clockwise from above: Indré Rockefeller; Melvin Lawovi; Kimberly Drew; Leigh Lezark and Timo Weiland; Madeline O’Malley and Elise Taylor. Opposite page: CeCe Barfield Thompson, Alexandra O’Neill, and Sarah Hoover.

BFA

MODA OPERANDI TOASTS LAUNCH OF CECE BARFIELD THOMPSON’S NEW COLLECTION TO CELEBRATE the launch of Cece Barfield Thompson’s new sustainable home offerings, Moda Operandi, Sarah Hoover, and Alexandra O’Neill hosted a dinner at Creator House in New York. Pieces from Thompson’s new Virginia Collection, including embroidered linens and hand-painted porcelain plates, decorated the table that evening and are being sold exclusively on Moda Operandi. J U LY 2 0 2 1 1 2 5


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BOUNCE BEACH MONTAUK’S OPENING WEEKEND OVER MEMORIAL DAY weekend, Bounce Beach Montauk hosted a series of events to kick off its opening. The bar is located adjacent to the beach and replaced the once-popular Sloppy Tuna. The festivities included a party hosted by Tyson Cameron and Matt James, and an event hosted by Hombres Mescal. The celebrations culminated with a brunch with Solid and Striped.

Matt James, Rachel Kirkconnell, Tyler Cameron, Krista Stephens, Gina Marie Napoli, Kristin Deluca, Anna Logerfo, Alena Scazafave,

and Camila Kendra

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Liz Glusko, and Kara Fragola

Aaron Paul and Bryan Cranston

Kasey Berry Freya Drohan, Ruth O’Neill, and Ellen Brannigan 126 QUEST


VALENTINO HOSTS CLAMBAKE TO CELEBRATE POP-UP IN SOUTHAMPTON THIS SUMMER, Valentino is celebrating its exclusive pop-up in Southampton, a display at Phillips Auction House through the end of July. The special installation, coined “Valentino Episode Hamptons,” showcases the brand’s new collection which draws inspiration from its prints from the ’60s. To launch the pop-up, the Maison hosted a series of events Out East, including a chic clambake. u

Aureta, Nicky Hilton Rothschild, and Tina Leung

PHOTO CREDIT HERE

Elsa Hosk and Tom Daly

Ezra J. William

Julia Fox Gabriella Karefa-Johnson, Richie Shazam, and Nicole Chapoteau

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THE EASTENDERS “NO PLACE HAS such natural attractions; no place such beautiful rivers; no place has such pure, invigorating air; no place better water; and I am certain there is no place better adapted to men of means,” reported the East Hampton Star in the 1890s. The turn of the century brought about the greatest change on the East End—with a swank New York crowd coming to the island for the first time. The “life of quietness and peace,” as the Star described it, was set to change. These newcomers became known as “summer colonists.” By the 1930s, East Hampton and Southampton were in full swish mode with fashionable families spending their summers in these charming villages by the sea. Photographer Bert Morgan (1904-1986) began his career syndicating photographs for the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News. By 1930, he was chronicling high society in The Social Spectator, Vanity Fair, and Town & Country. Promising never to publish an unflattering picture, Morgan became the photographer of choice and gained unique access to a rarified post-Gilded Age world, which he would continue to photograph through the 1980s. During the 1950s, he could be found daily during the summer months in Southampton—cataloguing the comings and goings of the social set. —Georgina Schaeffer Clockwise, from top left: Peter Sullivan, Suzanne Mitchell, Anne Ford, and Chandler Hovey at the Tennis Ball at the Meadow Club; Mrs. Thomas M. Bancroft, Jr. and Mr. Harcourt Amory, Jr. at the Southampton Bathing Club; Ritchy Warren at the Andrews-Wanamaker supper dance; Maria Cooper Janis and Charlotte Ford at the Beach Club; Mr. and Mrs. Garrick Stephenson at the Beach Club. 128 QUEST

B E RT M O R G A N CO U RTE S Y O F T H E S O U T H A M P TO N H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

SNAPSHOT


We look forward to welcoming you to our Pink Paradise—a place where everyone feels at home. And while you are here, take the experience al fresco at Swifty’s POOL. 15 5 H A M M O N AVEN UE PALM B EACH FL 33480 (5 61) 65 5 - 5 430 T HECOLON YPALMB EACH.COM


A Destination of Exceptional Character and Spirit

“One of the 14 Most Luxurious Hotels in the World” –Forbes Travel Guide

natural beauty and a rich heritage have drawn families to this coastal New England resort for more than a century. Unforgettable experiences are infused with lasting traditions, unfaltering attention to detail and uncompromised triple Five-Star, personalized service. Pampered pleasures include award-winning dining, private wine and culinary classes, and other memorable activities including the stunning Atlantic Ocean beach, croquet, art and literary experiences. See our website for details, and reserve your treasured getaway or family celebration.

OCEANHOUSERI.COM

For more information about this distinguished destination, please call 855.399.2812

Profile for QUEST Magazine

Quest Magazine July 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Quest Magazine July 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Profile for questmag

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