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86

118

CONTENTS 12mR World Championships neWport 2019 82

WELCOME TO THE 12 METRE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

84

12 METRE CLASS: IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BOAT The top 10 reasons 12 Metre yachts have been plying racecources for more than 100 years. by peter Gerard

86

The event’s hosts welcome competitors, family, and friends to the 12 Metre Championships.

An introduction to the s ally anne s antos

2019 12 METRE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TEAMS

competing 12 Metre yachts and their crews.

108

114

by

12 METRE AMERICA’S CUP HISTORY, NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 1958-1983

A recap of 12mR America’s Cup racing in Newport.

by

s ally a nne s antos

114

THEN & NOW

118

HAROLD STIRLING VANDERBILT: A SAILOR’S SAILOR The creator of the Rules of Right of Way for sailors led a fascinating life, on and off the water. by Kate Gubelmann

122

“MESSING ABOUT IN (12 METRE) BOATS” PAST AND PRESENT

130

ENDLESS SUMMER

136

SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE

We’ve matched iconic images with contemporary photos to prove that these 12 Metre yachts are as awe-inspiring today as ever. by sally anne s antos

We present a photo retrospective of decades of 12 Metre fun, in Newport and beyond. We look back on fashionable summers past. by elizabeth meiGher

The essential boutiques in our favorite summer destinations will keep you looking chic during your sunny getaway. by nishita naGa

136


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68

CONTENTS Columns 20

SOCIAL DIARY

Remembering social doyenne Gloria Vanderbilt, designer

Oleg Cassini, a special family member, and others.

68

HARRY BENSON

by

Our photographer captures acclaimed French actress Anouk

Aimée cavorting in the sea in Deauville, one of her films’ famed locations.

70

TAKI

A weekend’s house party at an Austrian castle evokes a more civilized era, to

our columnist reminiscing about the days of yore. by taKi theodoraCopulos

72

CANTEENS

Newport’s Clarke Cooke House, on Bannister’s Wharf, has a multilevel

array of bars and restaurants to satisfy every style of diner. by daniel Cappello

74

REAL ESTATE

80

SOCIAL CALENDAR

142

YOUNG AND THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

74

david patriCK Columbia

We check in with our favorite brokers.

by

brooKe Kelly

The best warm-weather events in New York and beyond. Polo matches and garden parties.

by

brooKe Kelly

Bartender Ric “5-0” Rivera reminisces about what he’s learned

during his 42 years (and counting) at Newport’s Clarke Cooke House.

144


Smooth sailing ahead The Hilton Group — helping you make smart financial decisions so you can do what you love

Photo: SallyAnne Santos

We wish all the teams competing in this year’s 12 Metre World Championship fair winds, good luck and safe sailing. May the best boat win! The Hilton Group works with a limited number of successful families for whom we utilize the resources of UBS Private Wealth Management to provide customized, comprehensive services we call Advice. Beyond investing. James Hilton Senior Vice President–Wealth Management Private Wealth Advisor 401-843-8818 james.hilton@ubs.com The Hilton Group UBS Financial Services Inc. Private Wealth Management 130 Bellevue Avenue, Suite 301 Newport, RI 02840 ubs.com/team/thehiltongroup As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, we offer both investment advisory and brokerage services, which are separate and distinct and differ in material ways. For information, including the different laws and contracts that govern, visit ubs.com/workingwithus. Private Wealth Management is a division within UBS Financial Services Inc., which is a subsidiary of UBS AG. For designation disclosures, visit ubs.com/us/en/designation-disclosures. © UBS 2019. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. BO_04252019-1 Exp.: 05/31/2020


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL DEPUT Y EDITOR

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HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN NICK MELE ANNIE WATT


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JED H. GARFIELD ELIZABETH STRIBLING-KIVLAN KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS ELIZABETH STRIBLING WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2019. All rights reserved. Vol. 33, No. 7. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Clockwise from near left: Kate Gubelmann with the late Olin Stephens; Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, three-time America’s Cup defender; SallyAnne Santos accepting the Ted Turner Trophy; trimmers and afterguard aboard the 12mR Courageous; Puck magazine’s America’s Cup cover, 1903; Quest’s deputy editor, Elizabeth Meigher, aboard

JULY MIGHT BE my favorite month, when the Adirondack waters become (nearly) warm enough for swimming and the New England prevailing winds are (mostly) dependable sou’westers at 12 to 15 knots. This July brings Quest back to Newport, RI, that most authentic of American harbors, where the 112-year-old 12 Metre Class will be holding its World Championships in Narragansett Bay. This historic regatta was carefully conceived and developed by James B. Gubelmann when he first became commodore of the 12 Metre Yacht Club, Newport Station, four-plus years ago. With the skilled assistance and execution of Peter Gerard, American Fleet president and and ubiquitous event chairman, these veteran sailors and their crackerjack committee have assembled 24 12 Metres hailing from six countries—the second-largest fleet of 12 Metres to race together (ever!) in one regatta, a gargantuan feat of persuasion, patience, and persistence. Leading Quest’s coverage of this weeklong regatta is SallyAnne Santos, a highly respected sailing reporter whose passion for, and knowledge of, the 12mR Class is unmatched. In addition to her fact-filled 12mR journal of boats and crews, SallyAnne provides us with a lucid history of the America’s Cup competition when raced in 12mRs, from 1958 to 1987. Her expertise and photography reflect a golden era of the America’s Cup, the oldest ongoing competition in all of sports. Perhaps the most legendary of America’s Cup skippers is Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, a three-time AC defender and the epitome of a patrician sportsman. Quest contributor Kate Gubelmann returns to our pages with an insightful profile of “Mike” Vanderbilt on pages 118 to 121. Pictured above with the famed yacht designer Olin Stephens, Kate is no stranger to salt water nor to Newport (Commodore Jimmy is her first mate). 18 QUEST

I save my final salute for deputy editor Elizabeth Meigher (herself an acclaimed junior sailor), who lends her keen eye to Quest’s annual feature on summer chic—a visual picnic of casual elegance during this ever-short summer season. We hope you’ll appreciate and enjoy our focus on the 12 Metre Class, a revered boat for this biased publisher. As 12mR champion skipper Clay Deutsch recently commented, “The physical appeal of the 12 Metres is the feeling of power; everything is heavy and super loaded up. When you get them rumbling, it’s like riding bareback on a 747 plane.” It sure is! u

Chris Meigher

ON THE COVER: Modern Division 12 Metre yachts (right to left)

Courageous (US-26), Freedom (US-30) and Defender (US-33) chase Challenge XII (KA-10) downwind at Newport, photographed by SallyAnne Santos.

CO U RTE S Y O F K AT E G U B E L M A N N ; CO U RTE S Y O F T I M E - L I F E D I R E C T H O L D I N G S ; CO U RTE S Y O F S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

Whitecap with dog Tug.


T H EC OL ONYPA LMB E A CH.CO M

COPYRIGHT © 2018 KATE SCHELTER


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY SUM-SUM-SUMMERTIME

is back, giving us our 15 minutes in the sun and by the sea. Many of our citizens now leave the city, at least on the weekends, providing a respite from the madding crowds which are now out on the East End, or in Aspen, or Newport, where

the boat races are giving its denizens something exciting and beautiful to watch—sailing—or at least to think about. Gloria Vanderbilt, as the world now

knows, left us on Monday, June 17th, here in New York. As a child, Gloria loved the summer fun of Newport, where she stayed at her grandparents’

mansion, The Breakers. At the time, it was still occupied by the Vanderbilt family, including Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney—along with her young niece, of whom she had been awarded custody. Once Gloria became a young mother herself, she owned a house near

W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N S O C I E T Y ’ S A N N UA L D I N N E R D A N C E AT C E N T R A L PA R K Z O O

Patti Harris and Georgina Bloomberg 20 QUEST

Michael Bloomberg

Gillian Hearst

William Sherrill, Mary Carls, Mike Telly and Natasha Makowski

Walter Sedgwick and Laura Stolzenthaler

Kitty Sherrill

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L Z H E I M E R ’ S D R U G D I S C O V E R Y FO U N D AT I O N ’ S C O N N O I S S E U R ’ S D I N N E R AT S OT H E BY ’ S I N N E W YO R K

Judy and Leonard Lauder with Ronald Lauder

William Lauder, Eleanora Kennedy and John Demsey

the beach in Southampton, which she occupied in the warmer months well into the 1980s. Gloria, who was just five years from her centennial at the time of her passing, was historically an authentic figure of American 20th century folklore; an heiress of the 19th-century robber barons, with a name that lent the idea of class distinction to her century. She personally benefitted from it, and filled the pages of books and American press and media with it. Barbara Goldsmith’s Little Gloria… 22 QUEST

Barbara and Donald Tober

Nancy Corzine and Sharon Sager

Happy at Last, a big bestseller in the early ’80s, is a gritty portrait of the childhood of the “poor little rich girl” whose child-custody case between her mother (also Gloria) and her paternal aunt Gertrude filled the tabloids that fascinated the American public of the Depression years of the 1930s. Cole Porter captured it perfectly in his song: When folks who still can

Renee Belfer, Paula Zahn and Bonnie Lautenberg

George and Joan Schiele

ride in jitneys Find out Vanderbilts and Whitneys Lack baby clo’es, Anything goes. She was the only famous, celebrated person I’ve ever met—and I’ve met lots of them in my line of work—who was charismatic on introduction and remained that person always. She was real. It wasn’t an act or pretense, although you could imagine the same character

in a movie. She probably had another side to her, because we all do. But it was a natural awareness of her fame that was her defense and her personal achievement—because she always lived in Gloria’s world. It had been so with her all her life; not just the name but also the dame. That last sentence would have amused her on hearing. Gloria had many woman friends, but she liked the company of men, all kinds of men. She was classy lady in bearing, and romantic,

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Rose Marie Bravo and William Jacky


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A and she had obvious active natural interests. She wasn’t coquettish; she was womanly. Liberated by her childhood experience, she was always an independent woman. Aside from her early years with her own inherited big wealth, which came and went as her life moved on, she simply pursued her interests. I’m guessing that it probably never really fazed her when she was low on funds, which happened in her later years. She was naturally resourceful, like any entrepreneur/artist. And she always had generous friends who refilled the bank account. Bill Blass, at the end of his

life, was a major annual supporter. Gloria always lived in surroundings that accommodated her royalness; it was a matter of fact to anyone who knew her. During that time, Gloria was offered a job on a commercial, which paid her $25,000 (this is the figure that was going around among friends), which was a handsome sum at that time. Gloria took her bounty and went off to Ralph Lauren to spend all of it there. From one designer to another was an outrage to her old friend and benefactor. Nevertheless, he recovered, and in the end provided generously for her in his will. For

Gloria, it was simply an opportunity to choose what she wanted and needed. Ralph’s work also appealed to her. After all, it was just money. She was as fascinated by people as they were by her. I met her in 1990, when I was living in California and had come to New York to research another personality of her social world. It was John Richardson, who suggested I contact her using his name. And so I did. We met at an apartment she had at the time (she moved later to a townhouse on East 90th off Park, and even later to an apartment with a studio on Beekman

Place, which I think was owned by her son Anderson Cooper). She was radiant and warm and vulnerable, but wise, on meeting. When she first appeared, it was like, “There she is, larger than life.” Naturally, I was well aware of this character’s great multifaceted life drama: She was not a celebrity; she was more like a legend. But real. After that initial meeting at a restaurant nearby (Nicola’s), we occasionally dined together, and with others whom she wanted me to meet for my project. Upfront and personal, she was delicate yet sturdy. She was curious, easily amused.

A N N UA L C H I N A FA S H I O N G A L A AT T H E P L A Z A I N N E W YO R K

Chien Chung Pei and Dee Poon 24 QUEST

Yue-Sai Kan and Morris Goldfarb

Angelica Cheung, Anna Hu and Wendy Yu

Jason Wu and Gemma Chan

Sophia Sheng and Daniel Paltridge

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; S TA R PI X ; B R A N D O N LE E

June Gao, Nicolas Ricroque and Desiree Nemati


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A TOA STING THE BRUCE MUSEUM IN GREENWICH

Felicity Kostakis and Tim Yanoti

She loved talking about her life—but only referentially, or if asked. The famous childhood and teenage marriage were not off-limits, but it was so matter-of-fact that you never went there anyway. In 1992, when I returned to live in New York, we resumed contact. She liked me. I was greatly flattered, because I liked her. She was what we used to call “down to earth,” while always being celestial. When she answered the phone, the quiet 26 QUEST

Barbara Netter and Norman Masri

and soft but certain voice spoke: “This is Gloria…” as if to say, “Welcome.” I loved it. I can still hear her in my head as I write. Ours was not a great friendship, although we had several mutual friends and heard about each other— my hearing about her was because friends loved to talk about Gloria. She was always a source of good stories about her. She was unusual. She wasn’t like anybody else. I wrote about her in Avenue magazine back in

Kelly and Joe Stroud

Daisy and Jordan Sanders Adam with Alexandra Friedman

Melissa and Oliver Nisenson

the late ’90s, and she was very helpful in putting it together. She loved that stuff. She had a lot of friends, including friends from her childhood and school years. People wanted to know her, and I could see that it wasn’t just the “celestial” part. And she wanted to know them. Gloria was open and interesting and kind. There was no pretense. She wore it all comfortably and naturally. People meeting her got that warm, delicate, full smile, as if she were hon-

Deanna and Steve Mulligan

ored to meet you. She recalled her aunt Gertrude, who had been awarded custody of the young girl. You got the sense that there was no intimacy between aunt and niece. That was clearly because Gertrude wasn’t capable of expressing it openly. But Gertrude nevertheless was always a fascination for the young Gloria. Art for art’s sake. She once described Gertrude’s daily habits, which were tightly organized. At a certain point in the mid-af-

C H I C H I U B I Ñ A / F C LO O K ; M E L A N I LU S T / M O F F LY M E D I A’ S B I G PI C T U R E

Lisa Bagshaw, Cheryl Kestnbaum, Asya Geller, Amy West and Kelsey Lee


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ternoon, Gertrude, dressed for serious business in suit and flats, and a very widebrimmed hat, would go into her library. There, she would be set up in a highbacked wing chair by the window, overlooking the grounds of the Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney estate, with a writing table, and set to work on a large notebook for her writings. Thinking back on it, it is easy to see that Gertrude was Gloria’s muse: her path to independence and freedom as an artist, a woman artist, and a writer. In reviewing the long life of this remarkable person, Gloria, you can see that she was

indeed her art: authentic, engaging, dramatic, and prolifically expressed. An achievement for the little Gloria; indeed, happy at last. It is fitting that Gloria’s departure from this life was announced to millions of people all over the world by her son Anderson Cooper. In conclusion, her life was brilliantly marketed to a vast audience: an artist’s dream. Auctions and memories of the celebrated. Late last

month, the Doyle Galleries held an auction of the estate of Oleg Cassini at 175 East 87 th Street, between Lexington and Third. In preparation for it, on the previous Saturday and Sunday and Monday, at Cassini’s estate, The Moorelands, the 43acre estate at 47 Sandy Hill Road in Oyster Bay Cove, there was a public viewing of the actual property as well as the items—more than 700 lots of furniture, silver, china, decorative

objects, and cars (a vintage Mercedes and an ’87 RollsRoyce), as well as arms and armor, artwork, Continental and English silver memorabilia, and items from the Gramercy Park townhouse. Mr. Cassini died at 93 six years ago, a rich man with an estate in the millions. He had a long career as a famous American fashion designer whose career— already long-established at the time—took on the mantle of the designer who changed American fashion through his client Jacqueline Kennedy. Cassini designed more than 300 outfits for the First Lady, as well as her

C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R V A N C Y ’ S P L A Y G R O U N D PA R T N E R S F A M I LY D A Y

Kate Hrobsky, Ashley Carlson, Kim Klimczak and Elizabeth Villar 28 QUEST

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Kurt and Kristina Tenenbaum

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gown for the Inaugural Ball. More importantly, she was the perfect client: 31 and a perfect model, and now the First Lady of the land. She already had taste and an eye, and she loved clothes, so it was a designer’s—and a marketer’s—dream come true. At the time he was graced with this moment, Oleg Cassini was already a well-known American designer for women. He had also become a wellknown designer on Seventh Avenue at a time when designers were not so much promoted individually but as a name on a manufacturer’s label. It was no accident that Mrs. Kennedy liked his ideas. (The auction

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included some personal handwritten letters she wrote to him during that time.) The following is a description of his most famous silhouette designed for her, for a first public appearance: “Meticulously tailored and featuring oversized buttons and boxy jackets, as well as occasionally dramatic décolletage.” In the early days in his career, in the 1940s, in the cities and towns across the land, Cassini was known to the public mainly as the husband of Gene Tierney, a beautiful movie star. His public image—designer-husband of a movie star—stuck with the fans. His family background, however, was far more worldly. So too,

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A was his history—a child and man of his time. He was born Oleg Aleksandrovich Loiewski in Paris in 1913, the elder son of Count Alexander Loiewski, a Russian diplomat. His mother was Countess Marguerite Cassini, daughter of an Italian count who had been the Russian ambassador to the United States at the beginning of the 20th century. He had a brother, Igor, who was three years younger. In 1918, the Russian Revolution brought the fall of the Romanov monarchy. All of the elite, including the Loiewski family, fled for their lives, leaving every-

thing behind, including all property and wealth. The family escaped to Denmark, and eventually ended up in Florence, Italy, where they settled. By the mid-1920s, the boys took their mother’s name, probably to make it easier politically and socially in their new country. Growing up among the European aristocracy, Oleg was a jock, international-style. An excellent athlete, he excelled at track, skiing, soccer, and tennis, and was an accomplished equestrian. As a young boy, he also liked to draw. His mother started a fashion house in Florence catering to wealthy American wom-

en, and Oleg grew up in that business. At University, he studied political science, but he also studied fine art under Giorgio de Chirico at the Accademia di Belle Arti Firenze, and then fashion with Jean Patou. In 1936, age 23, Oleg, with his brother Igor, traveled to New York. They’d come to America to seek their fortunes. Years later, Oleg wrote that he arrived in America with “a tuxedo, two tennis racquets, a title (Count), and a talent.” He was all ready for the Land of Opportunity. One day, shortly after his arrival, after winning a doubles tournament at the West Side

Tennis Club, he learned that his partner was the head of Paramount Pictures. Learning of Oleg’s professional interests, the man told him he was looking to increase the staff of costume designers at the studio. The next day, Oleg started as “full designer” and moved to Hollywood. What followed was an amazing life, fully lived. “My preoccupation is to make women look beautiful,” he told an interviewer in Time magazine in 2005, the year before he died. He was a man blessed with opportunity that he was prepared for when it came his way.

F R E N C H H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y ’ S S P L E N D O R O F N O R M A N DY D I N N E R I N N E W YO R K

Odile De Schietere Longchampt and Sana Sabbagh 32 QUEST

Jennifer Herlein, Agnes Beane and Tara Milne

Guy Robinson and Caroline Bassett

Maureen Footer and Stanley Weisman

Robert Lahita and Carolyn Palmer

Joshua and Tamara Leuchtenberg

A N N I E WAT T

George Sape and Elizabth Stribling


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L AU N C H I N G R O U G E AT PAC E G A L L E R Y I N N E W YO R K

Meryl Poster and Rosanna Scotto

Joanna Coles, Wendy Finerman and Ann Berry

Moving on to the dogs and the cats. On a Wednesday at Michael’s last month, I had lunch with Elena Mannes, whom I met indirectly through Maria Cooper Janis, via her literary agent Jane Lahr. Mannes has written a very popular book called Soul Dog: A Journey into the Spiritual Life of Animals. We were talking about mental telepathy and dogs and cats, which both of us are fond of. I had just read her book, and told her of a personal experience I had back in the ’70s with a dog, 34 QUEST

Gigi Mortimer and Bippy Siegal

Jay Kos, Richard Kirshenbaum and David Lauren

which sounds odd even to me in the telling, but nevertheless my experience. Back then, I had a business up in Westchester County, where, one morning, one of the staff came in late. A stray dog had come to her house. He was a beautiful dog, she said, and very friendly, although badly unkempt and uncared for. But she couldn’t keep him. She called the ASPCA to the rescue. After waiting for an hour, by the end of which they hadn’t shown, she locked the dog in her garage and came to work.

I told her I’d go over to her house and wait for the ASPCA. When I drove into her driveway, and got out of my car, the dog, a big guy with the head and snout of a German Shepherd and the mane of a Chow was standing on his hind legs and looking out the garage window. He barked at the sight of me. At that moment, on sight of him, a voice in my head said, “That’s my father and I have to take him.” That’s not a reaction I had ever had before. Or

Nicole Miller and Sally Wu

Leslie Finerman and Karen Finerman

thought about, or even imagined. Analyzing it, I considered that I was recognizing reincarnation. My father had died about two years before, at 73, after a long illness. His had been a long, harsh life, for him and for others surrounding him. His temperament reflected that, and so did the lives of others. All of that came back to me at the sight of the dog locked in the garage. And it was a foregone decision I made: I had to take him. When I opened the garage door, the dog imme-

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Alison Brod and Tatiana Marx


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Sarah Chilton and Sebastian Bland

diately ran right over to my car. And when I opened the car door, he hopped in as if it were his. (Coincidentally, my father loved cars. In his youth, cars were like the internet today.) Driving him home, I named him Rex. He responded to that instantly and forevermore. The following day, I took him to the vet to be checked over and then cleaned up. The vet found bloody wounds around his neck and suspected they were from chains; that perhaps 36 QUEST

Susan and Coley Burke

he had been a junkyard dog. The vet said was a young dog, maybe a year old or so. He cleaned him up and treated the wounds, and we were off to the dog groomer. After a good wash and brushing, the boy looked snappy. He had a very cheerful personality. He turned out to be a good watchdog also. He liked the outdoors, and even liked sleeping outside in wintertime by the front door, on the icy macadam. That was his choice,

Sharon Jacob

Georgina Bloomberg and Lili Buffett

Tina and Steve Swartz

not mine. (On the coldest nights, he preferred sleeping on my bed.) At the time he came into my life, I had five cats in residence (all rescued). It sounds like a lot, but the house was spacious and they also loved the great outdoors. Their initial reactions or interchanges with Rex were uneventful, and so was his reaction to them. One of them, a female named Nikki (who talked in her meows), became his constant compan-

Whitney and John Clay

ion and would often sleep next to him and even on top of him. This didn’t surprise me, as I’d had dogs and cats throughout my childhood and youth; they always got along. All of this came back to me while reading Elena Mannes’ book about the personalities and inner lives of animals. I’d recounted that story about Rex countless times, always referring to the possibility that he was the reincarnation of my father. But I’d regarded it

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Carrie Rebora Barratt, Maureen Chilton and Barclay Collins


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A in a simplistic way. My father’s troubles were shed on the rest of us and left deep wounds on many. From man to dog was my interpretation of his path. I saw it as deep hardship, a punishment. I never thought anything else about the matter. Elena Mannes’ Soul Dog has changed that. The dog she refers to in the book’s title is Brio, the first she ever owned, a standard poodle. She was her early 30s at the time, and after a relationship she had ended, she decided it might be nice to have a dog as a companion. She is obviously a sensible and practical person, at least in matters

of personal responsibility. Her concern was being able to train and take care of the animal, because she had a very busy career that required frequent travel. In the beginning, she was not succeeding. The animal did not accept the requirements of living with her. She thought of giving him back. But she couldn’t. I could see that she is, by nature, a sensitive and responsible individual. Finally, at loose ends with her problem, she consulted a dog clairvoyant. This was another first for her. And it will be for the reader of this book also. And it grabs ya! When coming upon this, I

thought of closing the book. However, the author, or, rather, Brio, won me over. But that was only the beginning of what I was to see and learn in this magnetic story of animal life, human, animal, and otherwise. Mannes writes: “When one feels a connection with another being—human or dog, or another sentient being—one has a sense of their emotions and how they’re experiencing themselves in the world. We get an idea of how they feel themselves. I had certainly come to know Brio and how he saw himself. He obviously never doubted who he was. From that first day I met him as

a tiny puppy waving at me, to when he trotted out onto the New York City sidewalks, to his strong spirit that never wanted during illness, he showed utter confidence in himself… He was always present within himself and in the moment he was living.” Reading that, I came away with many a thought about the nature of us creatures, human animals and otherwise, including an observation by Albert Einstein on the subject: “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has for-

C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y C E L E B R AT E S T H E TA ST E O F S U M M E R

Lili Fast, Amanda Roberts, Kelsey Merghart, Anna Harrison and Anne Harrison

Norman Selby and Melissa Vail with Laurie and Jay Mandelbaum 38 QUEST

Jonathan and Kristy Korngold

Thomas Kempner, Jr. with Liz and Jeff Peek

Gillian and Sylvester Miniter

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Anne Prentice, Rosalia Schmelzer and Alexia Leuschen


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Whitney Donhauser, Jamie Dinan and Bill Vrattos

Daryl Uber, Nathalie Comfort and Tracey Pontarelli

gotten the gift.” Back in town. On a beautiful evening last month, 750 guests attended the Frick Collection’s annual Spring Garden Party for Fellows and Young Fellows. This year’s event was also celebrating the opening of Elective Affinities: Edmund de Waal at the Frick Collection. Edmund de Waal is famous to millions of readers for his brilliant family biography The Hare With Amber Eyes, but he is also 40 QUEST

acclaimed as ceramicist throughout the world for his site-specific works made of porcelain, steel, gold, alabaster, and glass. These are displayed in the museum’s main galleries alongside works from its permanent collection. This project and installation is the first of its kind in this country, and the first such installation for the Frick. The installation will be on view as a temporary installation through November 17th. Guests arrived in all mat-

Ronay Menschel and Amanda Reigel

Jody Mansback, Jill and John Chalsty and Nancy Buckman

ter of festive spring attire ready for summer: bright whites, bold colors, and floral patterns. This annual party is usually held on the front lawn of the museum, overlooking Central Park. But the rainfall that night brought the guests briefly into the Frick to gather in the Garden Court with its bounty of pink and white azaleas, orange bromeliads, and birds’ nest ferns, as well as arrangements featuring blue hyacinths, Veronica peonies, blue and purple

clematis, and mini white roses throughout. Before the party was over, however, skies finally cleared, and in the last hour and a half there was the opportunity, taken by many of the guests, to have a final nightcap under the stars. Guests also had the opportunity to visit the permanent collection as well as the rarely seen second floor of the former Frick mansion, which was open on this special evening. Guests were also entertained by the

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Rick Gargiulo and Danielle Mckenna


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W E N G L A N D S O C I E T Y ’ S FO U N D E R S DAY R EC E P T I O N I N N E W YO R K

Susan Hayward

music of the jazz quartet The Flail as well as the music of DJ Unos and Dubs. Fabulous hors d’oeuvres, including caviar cannoli; lobster tarts; green falafel and copress cucumber; chicken and pecan quesadillas; kale, pancetta, and grape pizza; gruyere grilled cheese; and spring rolls. Cocktails were courtesy of the event sponsor Tito’s Handmade Vodka, which also provided rose by Hampton Water Wine Co. and sparkling wine by Ferrari Trento. 42 QUEST

Mary Moraan

Jan Ogden, Ron Romaine and Jane Crawford

Among those in attendance were the Collection’s Director Ian Wardropper, Helen Clay Chace, Bett and Jean-Marie Eveillard, Christian Keesee and Larry Keigwin, Amory and Sean McAndrew, Sana Babbagh, Paul Arnhold and Wes Gordon; Page Ashley, Ayesha Bulchandani, Dr. Tai-Hen Cheng and Cole Harrell, Emily T. Frick, Caroline and Charles Joyce, Elizabeth and Jon Kurpis, Casey Kohlberg, Lucy Lang and Scott Asher, Victoria Smith, Davide Stefanacci

Ellen Scordato and Roland Foster Miller

Robert and Susan Morris

and Ronnie West, Georgina Bloomberg, Karaugh Brown, Lili Buffett, Margaret Civetta, Jerry Ann Woodfin Costa and Victor Costa, Barbara and Brad Evans, Sarah Flint, Marina Kellen French, Steve and Luz-Mary Harris, Deborah and Chuck Royce, Mrs. William Nitze, Annabelle Selldorf, Tom Wheeler, Bryan and Megan Ramm, Emma Kate Lasry, Barbara Dau and Barton English, Mercedes de Guardiola, Richard Huber, Barbara Reuter and William Wil-

liams Jr., Rochelle and Mark Rosenberg, Eiko and Michael Assael, and Xavier Soloman, and scores more enjoying the always-wonderful Frick evening. On another evening after a beautiful, mainly sunny day in New York with temps climbing into the low 80s, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) held its 13th Annual Connoisseur’s Dinner at Sotheby’s. It is a black-tie affair, traditionally held in one of the main galleries. It starts with a

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Arnold and Hilda Nies


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A cocktail reception in one of the galleries exhibiting the paintings that will be going up for sale in the near future. It’s the best kind of reception, because you can spend your time taking in the art, much of which is famous and even familiar, and yet here on the walls. At close to 8 p.m., the 200 guests took the elevators up to the 10th-floor gallery for the dinner. The location is important in this dinner because the subject is grim. The room is spacious and beautifully lighted, the tables are large enough, and there is a relaxed and comforting feel. It’s the subject. I’ve been

a guest at this dinner pretty much from the beginning. The Lauder family is one of the great philanthropic families in New York. The great fortune that provides that philanthropy was created by Estee Lauder and her husband, Joe, and carried on by her sons and their wives, and now their grandchildren. Great fortunes often lead to great philanthropy, for obvious reasons, but the Lauders stand out in my mind because they are very handson. This kind of generosity comes from the home and not from the bank account. Estee’s sons, Leonard and Ronald Lauder, started

ADDF 20 years ago. I think it was Ronald who went to his brother with the idea of funding a search for a cure. Their part would be to finance the development, the staffs, the salaries, and the expenses, as well as eventually raising money for research. One of their selling points is that all money raised goes directly to the scientists whose research they are funding. This is an important number, often to be as much or even more than 20 percent, just for those business expenses. At this dinner, they raised $2.4 million. Paula Zahn, who is an ADDF Board member, was

the mistress of ceremonies. Paula, always looking very movie-star glamorous, and (not-so-incidentally) whose mother has Alzheimers, talked openly and briefly about the loss and the experience of watching the losing. She then introduced Leonard Lauder, who welcomed guests remarking, “20 years ago, my brother Ronald and I took on a cause: to end Alzheimer’s. Many thought it was an impossible undertaking; that didn’t stop us. With the right research and right resources, such as the Diagnostics Accelerator, we are hopeful that new, effective

CINEMA SOCIET Y’S SCREENING OF JETT IN TRIBECA

Vlada Roslyakova 44 QUEST

Giancarlo Esposito

Carol Alt

Andrew Saffir, Carla Gugino and Daniel Benedict

Helena Christensen

Julianna Margulies and Malin Akerman

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Christopher Backus and Mira Sorvino


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QUEST TOASTS MONICA VINADER’S MADISON AVENUE OPENING 1. Hilary Dick 2. Monica Vinader 3. Eleanora Kennedy 4. Sydie Lansing 5. Kathy Prounis 6. Lisa Bytner 7. Joan Jacobson 8. Sabrina Forsythe and Nicole Fischer 9. Gillian and Sylvester Miniter 10. Perrine Meistrell and Amanda Mariner

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1. Helena and Roman Martinez 2. Susan Magrino 3. Barbara and Kevin McLaughlin 4. Toni Goodale and Sharon Hoge 5. Ted Mariner

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6. Annabel Vartanian 7. Elizabeth Pyne Singer 8. Webb Egerton 9. Elizabeth Meigher and Mary Snow

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K P R E M I E R E O F A L A D D I N AT R OX Y C I N E M A

Gabby Luna and Alejandra Cata

Alexa Reynen, Gregg Bello and Ashley Haas

treatments for Alzheimer’s will be developed in our lifetimes.” Created in spring 2018, the Diagnostics Accelerator was designed to fasttrack the development of new tools and biomarker tests for Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. The evening also marked the one-year anniversary of the ADDF’s new research initiative. It also recognized Bill Gates and other prominent philanthropists for funding this program. Gates was not in attendance, but spoke to the assembled on a video. It sounds naïve in these dark and troubling times, 48 QUEST

but when discussing the progress they’ve made, Leonard reminded us that all human creatures great and small, all races, all religions, all cultures, are vulnerable to this hideous disease of life. He also noted that ADDF’s progress is a testament to Bill Gates as well as Jeff and MacKenzie Bezos, the Dolby family, the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation, The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, and all who joined with him to create the Diagnostics Accelerator. Hearing his words, I was reminded that far from the aggression and the

Ashley Park

Keytt Lundqvist, Alex Lundqvist and Karolina Lundqvist

violence and the seemingly infinite and apparently insurmountable problems we have with each other, we are actually capable of greatness and respect to and of each other. That, to me, is the lesson of the brothers’ voyage. After Leonard spoke, brother Ronald came to the podium to talk about their progress that is becoming more and more positive. Ronald expressed his gratitude to the core funders of the Diagnostics Accelerator: “This is a defining time in Alzheimer’s research, and this initiative is important to develop drugs to prevent and treat

Alzheimer’s disease.” Again, I was reminded of the optimism that comes from this ADDF effort. Leonard Lauder and Ronald Lauder both told the guests that they were convinced this project would succeed. I’ve been watching long enough to see that they are succeeding! Paula Zahn then presented the first four award recipients of the Diagnostics Accelerator. The winners were selected based on their bold ideas for advancing the study of simple blood tests and eye scans for diagnosing Alzheimer’s. She also introduced

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Jessica Hart


SET SAIL FOR THR E E I CO N I C D E ST I N AT I O N S .


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A special guest Michelle Florin, who paid a heartfelt tribute to her mother, Jacki Florin, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s at age 54. She shared excerpts from letters that she wrote to her mother, knowing that she would never be able to read them. Among the guests included Board members Robert Belfer, Carol Seabrook Boulanger, Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, Nancy Corzine, Mitch Eichen, Bonnie Pfeifer Evans, Nancy Goodes, Dr. Allan Green, Christopher Johnson, Bonnie Englebardt Lautenberg, Larry Leeds,

Phil Lovett, Heidi and Tom McWilliams, Julie Medler, Phebe Farrow Port, Sharon Sager, Randal Sandler, Tom Scanlan, Alice Shure, Stephen Toma, David Weinreb, Wendy Wilshin Myra Biblowit, Rose Marie Bravo, and William Jackey. Also, Meryl Comer, John Demsey, Ronald Dickerman, Natasha and David Dolby, MaryAnn and Fabrizio Freda, Susan Gutfreund, Jane Hertzmark Hudis, Eleanora Kennedy, Kerry Kennedy, Judy Lauder, William Lauder, Donald E. Newhouse, Kelly Ripken, Joan and George Schiele, Barbara and Donald Tober,

and George Vradenburg. Inaugural Diagnostics Accelerator grant recipients Kaj Blennow and Hüseyin Firat, MD, PhD, were also in attendance. Guests viewed highlights of Sotheby’s spring sales during cocktails and enjoyed wine pairings selected by Sotheby’s Wine with dinner. Geraldine Nager, senior vice president of Sotheby’s New York, then led the “Fund a Scientist” auction, which raised funds for clinical trials for Alzheimer’s. Founded in 1998, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation is dedicated to rapidly accelerating

the discovery of drugs to prevent, treat and cure Alzheimer’s disease. Hope springs eternal! The ADDF is the public charity solely focused on funding the development of drugs for Alzheimer’s, employing a venture philanthropy model to support research in academia and the biotech industry. Through the generosity of its donors, the ADDF has awarded over $115 million to fund more than 590 Alzheimer’s drug discovery programs and clinical trials in 18 countries. And 100 percent of every donation funds drug research programs. u

TOA ST I N G B R I D G E H A M P TO N I N N LO O K + C O O K B O O K I N G R A M E R C Y PA R K

Laura Meiland-Shaw

50 QUEST

Amanda Taylor, Yevgenia Elkis and Sasha Cutter

Christina Najjar and Katherine Kapnick

Sarah Brown, Meredith Melling and Wendy Wolcott

Dee Poku and Erika Klaur

Cathryn Arsala, Charlotte Snyder and Linda Wells

CO N O R H A R R I G A N

Aerin Lauder and Sybille Van Kempen


ASHLEY COPELAND

Covering the Palm Beaches Awarded Realtor of the Year, 2017 & 2018 • Consistently one of the Top Producers

• Ranked by the Wall Street Journal in the Top 200 Florida Realtors • Honored as a Christie’s International Real Estate Luxury Specialist

Sr. Realtor-Associate 561.596.5959 acopeland@bhsusa.com

Over 15 years successfully helping Buyers & Sellers making sure their needs always come first.

FOR SALE! 1632 S. Ocean Boulevard Offered at $18,500,000 Co-Listed w/ Ashley Lickle O’Neil 203.219.1421

SOLD! 9 Via Vizcaya Listed Price $8,950,000

FOR SALE! 315 S. Lake Drive, #1C Offered at $2,250,000

SOLD! 1460 N. Lake Way Listed Price $24,900,000 353 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach, FL 33480 • 561.659.6400 50 Cocoanut Row, Ste 104, Palm Beach, FL 33480 • 561.659.6400 1970 S. Dixie Hwy., Ste C1, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 • 561.805.5050


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K L AU N C H O F F I N D I N G M R S . FO R D AT D O U B L E S

Icy Frantz and Ty Anderson

Audrey Moore 52 QUEST

Geraldine Nager

Meredith Townsend and Michel Witmer

Grace Meigher with Ted and Christy McGraw

Cecelia Excarra and Emi Battaglia

Tony Marx

Mary Snow and Christine Ebersole

Eleanora Kennedy

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Chuck and Deborah Goodrich Royce


museum of arts and design

THROUGH AUGUST 18

Too Fast to Live, Too Young to Die PUNK GRAPHICS, 1976–1986 Explore the explosive impact of punk music on graphic design — only at MAD! 2 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, NYC | MADMUSEUM.ORG

The exhibition is sponsored in part by Dr. Martens with the support of Marian and Russell Burke, Michael and Patti Dweck, The Paulsen Family Foundation, and Flora Major for the Kutya Major Foundation. Installation Photo: Jenna Bascom


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ARF THRIFT SHOP’S SHOW HOUSE SALE IN SAGAPONACK

Marcia Scarlato

Joey Wolffer, Nacho Ramos and Whitney Fairchild

Linda Silich and Summer Louchheim

Lisa Jackson and George Farias

Linda Silich

Alex Papachristidis and Lisa McCarthy

B OYS ’ C L U B O F N E W YO R K ’ S G O L F O U T I N G I N LO C U ST VA L L E Y

Ebby Gerry

54 QUEST

Cynthia Kempner, Kitty Gerry, Maggie Will and Ellen Breed

Robert Clements, Bill Tyree, Darren Alcus and Rick Kleeman

Rob Vaughan, Kingsley Crawford, Lisa Crawford, Sallie Giordano, Cindy Ketchum, Anjali Melwani, Shannon Henderson, Dawn Barnard, Carolyn Grace, Christy Porter, Liz McLanahan and Willis Fries

Bill McKnight

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; J O N LO P E Z P H OTO G R A P H Y

Curt Curtis


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O S P I TA L FO R S P EC I A L S U R G E RY ’ S T R I B U T E D I N N E R AT T H E M U S E U M O F N AT U R A L H I STO R Y I N N E W YO R K

Carol and John Lyden

Ann Jackson and Ken Wilson

Bryan and Lois Kelly

Mary Lee and Louis Shapiro

Robert Steel, Jonathan Deland and Gillian Steel

Stephanie March and Dan Benton

N E W YO R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N TO A STS I TS N E W E X H I B I T I O N : “BR AZILIAN MODERN: THE LIVING ART OF ROBERTO BURLE MARX”

Fabiane Nunes and Renata Zandonadi 56 QUEST

Robert and Ana Lerario Geller

Amalia Spinardi and Rafael Azzi

Luciana Curtis and Juliana Babin

Marina Larroude and Ana Khouri

B FA ; H O WA R D H E YM A N ; D O N P O LL A R D ; RYA N B RO W N

Barbara Corcoran and Carrie Rebora Barratt


ONNE VAN DER WAL

Robert H. Tiedemann

3 September, 1949 – 8 May, 2006

“I credit him with the renaissance of 12 Meters,” …sailing ambassador Gary Jobson


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R I T I S H FA S H I O N C O U N C I L ’ S N E W YO R K PA R T Y AT T I M E S S Q UA R E E D I T I O N

Anna Wintour, Caroline Rush and Stephanie Phair

Helena Christensen

Steven Kolb and Karen Elson

Tammy and Christopher Kane

Milly Sullivan and Isabelle Hunter

Stephanie Phair

Brian Coats and Camilla Staerk

A M E R I C A N F R I E N D S O F B L É R A N C O U R T K I C K S O F F S U M M E R I N N E W YO R K

Quincy Morgan and Gary Stonesifer 58 QUEST

David and Suzanne Santry

Nell Rebowe and Pamela Johananoff

Franck Laverdin and Sonja Morgan

Lorraine de Tymowska and Phillipe DeLouvrier

A N N I E WAT T; B FA

Matthew Adell and Karin Wyser-Pratte


For those on a journey

740 Park Avenue PH 17/18D

37 West 70th Street

80 Columbus Circle Apt 68E

740PARKAVEPREMIERPENTHOUSE.COM | $34,500,000 37WEST70.COM | $17,950,000

MANDARINOREINTALRESIDENCE68E.COM | $5,950,000

S. Boardman 212.606.7611, M. Smith 212.606.7683 R. Golubock 212.606.7704, M. Amadei

E. Sample 212.606.7685, B. Powers

781 Fifth Avenue Apt 2301

9 North Moore Apt 1

655 Park Avenue Apt 4E

781FIFTHAVE2301.COM | $5,000,000

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00112445 | $4,750,000

655PARK4E.COM | $4,500,000

B. Powers 212.606.7653, E. Sample

L. Maysonet 212.606.7603, Gary Kabol

Meredyth Hull Smith 212.606.7683

60 East 88th Street Apt 4B

1133 Park Avenue Apt 6E

1045 Park Avenue Apt 14A

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00113170 | $2,850,000

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00113198 | $2,595,000

SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/00113851 | $2,450,000

Hideko Horiguchi 212.606.7674

E. Marcos 212.606.7747, K. Brown 212.606.7748 Megan Duryea Scott 917.922.2905

NEW YORK CITY BROKERAGES | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/NYC Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A MU S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S S P R I N G L U N C H EO N

Barbara Tober and Jonathan Marder

Florencia Kaufmann and Whitney Donhauser

Pam Williams, Laura Lofaro Freeman and Shereen Abdel Meguid

Margaret King and Lorna Goodman

Julie Richardson and Nancy Buckman

Prabal Gurung and Cynthia Rowley

Taylor McKenzie and Stephanie Hessler

C O C K TA I L S O N B O A R D P E R S H I N G 9 X I N S A G H A R B O R

Sharon Cardel 60 QUEST

Christie Brinkley

Chloe Anderson and Mara Kanner

Shamin Abas and Robbie Butler

Lauren Sparkman

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

James Peyton and Annika Smith


®

M a d e

i n

B e l g i u m

1 1 0 E a s t 5 5 S t r e e t • N e w Y o r k, N Y 1 0 0 2 2 2 1 2 .7 5 5 .7 3 7 2 • b e l g i a n s h o e s .c o m


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST TOA STS THE CENTR ALE’S MIDTOWN MA STERPIECE

Henry Miller and Philip Howard

Cole Rumbough, Emily Mohr, Sabrina Forsythe and Brian King 62 QUEST

Valerie Dixon and Elise Rosemarin

Duke Puhong and Reshma Kabani

Kimberly Knecht and Bertrand Buchin

Alexandra Lebenthal and Grace Meigher

Jim Carpenter and Will Deitrick

Jay Gunther, Wynn Laffey and Pamela Howard

A N N I E WAT T

Jamee and Peter Gregory


9 East 81st St Neo-Federal Townhouse $17.5M. Web 20779148 Kirk Henckels 917.291.6700. Jennifer Callahan 917.453.8325

Roman & Williams PH Condo in Nolita

W 77th 4BR Condo w Juliette Balconies

Stunning 3BR Duplex on East End Avenue

$8.95M. Web 20772417 Mary Ellen Cashman 917.710.2655

$7.2M. Web 21402594 Alexa Lambert 917.403.8819

$5.495M. Web 21410035 Lib Hyatt Goss 917.270.5433

stribling.com Compass is the brand name used for services provided by one or more of the Compass group of subsidiary companies, including Stribling & Associates. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G A R D E N PA R T Y I N M I L L B R O O K B E N E F I T I N G B R E A ST C A N C E R R E S E A R C H

Karen Klopp

Nancy Hathaway and Beth Ledy 64 QUEST

Larry Graev and Deban Flexner

Lorna Graev and Olivia van Melle Kamp

Lisa Schwartz and Cece Cord

Feli Thorne and Fernanda Kellogg

Patricia Jean and Mary Hilliard

Lori and George Decker

C A RO L A LOT T

Myra Biblowit and Elisa Port


Model treated with JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC in the cheeks, JUVÉDERM® XC in the lines around the nose and mouth, and JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC in the lips. Results may vary.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Do not use if you have a history of severe allergies/allergic reactions, or are allergic to lidocaine or gram-positive bacterial proteins used to make these products. The safety of use while pregnant or breastfeeding has not been studied. The safety for use in patients with excessive scarring or pigmentation disorders has not been studied and may result in additional scars or pigmentation changes. Unintentional injection into a blood vessel can occur and, while rare, could result in serious complications which may be permanent. These include

vision abnormalities, blindness, stroke, temporary scabs, or permanent scarring. Tell your doctor if you are on medications to decrease the body’s immune response or prolong bleeding, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or blood thinners. There is a risk of infection from skin injection procedures. The most common side effects include tenderness, swelling, firmness, lumps/ bumps, bruising, pain, redness, discoloration, and itching. Most JUVÉDERM® XC side effects were mild or moderate, and lasted 7 days or less. Most JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC side effects were mild or moderate, and lasted 14 days or less. Most JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC side effects were moderate and lasted 2 to 4 weeks. To report a side effect, please call Allergan Product Surveillance at 1-800-624-4261. For more information, please see Juvederm.com or call Allergan Medical Information at 1-800-433-8871. Available by prescription only. *With optimal treatment. ©2018 Allergan. All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. JUV117760 10/18


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A N I N T I M AT E D I N N E R AT T H E F R I C K C O L L EC T I O N I N N E W YO R K

Edward Lee Cave and Irene Aitken

Marin Tndyk and Gahl Burt

66 QUEST

Thomas Sculco with Susan and Rick Braddock

Melanie Forman, Greg Miles and Emily Rafferty

Susan Brady, Richeard Debs and Sana Sabbagh

Barbara Fleischman and Vartan Gregorian

Barbara Evans and Emily Frick

Brad Evans and Ian Wardropper

Susan and Glenn Lowry

C H R I S T I N E B U T LE R

Annabelle Garrett and Tomilson Hill III


Bayberry Wood - Sophisticated Country House with stunning interior Stately and Refined - Long, gated drive to formal courtyard. Striking spaces. 5200 square feet of finely finished living space with detailed millwork, wide board vintage oak floors and French doors. Formal Entry with graceful staircase. Living Room with coffered ceiling and Fireplace. Library. Formal Dining Room. Gorgeous, new Country Kitchen with Quartz counters. Family Room with Fireplace. Over five, private acres in a most convenient location with easy access to schools, shops and commuting arteries. $2,100,000

Stone and Shingle Colonial Estate. Classic floorplan with beautifully scaledrooms perfect for entertaining. 8350 square feet of finely finished living space. Formal Living and Dining Rooms. Cherry paneled Library. Chef ’s Kitchen. Five Bedrooms. Eight private acres including a separate four-acre lot. Gorgeous grounds with flowering plantings and private Swimming Pool. Top estate area with easy access to train, shopping and commuting arteries. $2,600,000

Stylish Country Farmhouse - A true oasis. Four serene acres surrounded by watershed. Gorgeous rural setting with Heirloom Apple trees, ancient Hickory and Maple, rock outcroppings and perennial gardens. Stylish 1760 Colonial, renovated and expanded with wide plank wood and slate floors, three fireplaces and walls of windows to capture wonderful light and views. 700-bottle wine cellar. Media Room. Spa Bathroom. Central air. Absolute perfection! $899,000

Historic Hook Road - All that is Bedford. Circa 1850 Federal Colonial brimming with grace and character. Clean lines and perfect proportions. Sunfilled rooms with hardwood floors, period millwork and extensive built-ins. Herringbone brick terrace for outdoor living. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Chef ’s Kitchen. Nearly two gorgeous acres with open, level lawns, specimen trees and incredible gardens. Sparkling Pool. Charming Guest House. One of Bedford’s finest estate locations. $1,595,000

Summer by the Pool - Convenient South Somers location. Over On the Waterfront two beautifully landscaped acres in desirable neighborhood of country homes. Traditional Country Colonial with wraparound porch. Wonderful flow for indoor-outdoor entertaining and everyday living. Well-proportioned rooms, hardwood floors, French doors and built-ins. Four Bedrooms. Gorgeous grounds with rolling lawns, mature trees and specimen shrubs. $1,149,000

BEDFORD HILLS (914)234-9234

Positioned to capture light and views! Remarkable Country Lakehouse with a cool, modern vibe. Stylish, open floor plan with nearly 2500 square feet of sun-drenched living space. Stunning Living Room with Fireplace and wall of windows. Gorgeous grounds with an arboretum of rare and distinctive trees. Sweeping lawns down to the water. Private dock. Swim, boat and fish all summer. $795,000

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H A R RY B E N S O N Anouk Aimée, photographed in Deauville, France, in 1986.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY AN INSTANT SENSATION when it was released in 1966, wildly sentimental yet sophisticated and intensely romantic, A Man and a Woman was the ultimate French film with a fairy-tale ending. Anyone who has seen the film can also instantly recall the brilliant strains of Francois Lai’s score. Although Anouk Aimée had earlier appeared in both Fellini’s groundbreaking La Dolce Vita and the cutting-edge 8 1/2, it was her role in A Man and a Woman opposite Jean-Louis Trintignant that made her an international superstar. Directed by a then-little-known Claude Lelouch, the film became a huge international success, winning 1966’s Palm d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, and both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Film the same year. (Actually, you can even watch the film now on Prime Video, which might be a perfect way to spend one of the rainy afternoons New York is having this summer.) When I photographed the actress in 1986, the sequel, A Man and a Woman: 20 Years Later, had just been released. Since one of the main locations of the original film was Deauville, it seemed the logical location choice for my photograph. Intelligent and professional, dramatically beautiful, relaxed yet confident, the actress was a sophisticated and sexy woman who knew exactly who she was. She was also a good sport. Without hesitation, she shrugged in that recognizable French way and ran laughing into the chilly sea. An interesting footnote: The third film in the series, The Best Years of a Life, was recently screened out of competition at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. It will be curious to see whether it receives a theatrical release. My wife, Gigi, said if it does she will be first in line to see it. u J U LY 2 0 1 9 6 9


TA K I

HIGH LIFE

THEY WERE PUTTING the finishing touches on the giant tent as I drove up to the Schloss Wolfsegg after an hour’s plane ride from Gstaad to a nearby tiny airport. With me were my son and two good friends, and the Pilatus felt like a Messerschmitt 109 cutting through the clouds and landing on a dime. Pilatus is a great airplane. It can cruise for seven hours at 280 knots, and land in less than 500 meters. It seats six people very comfortably. The only man who has complained about this aircraft is my old friend Charlie Glass, who, like a true lefty, whined about the lavatory’s headroom. (I told him to try Easy Jet next time, but lefties like to fly private and not mix with hoi polloi.) The house party at the castle consisted 70 QUEST

of about 75 people, and the occasion was the “Heilige Taufe”—the Holy Baptism— of Antonius Alexandros Edouard Maria, my grandson. Before I go on, a word about how good it feels when far away from the vulgarities of today’s politically correct world. Civilization matters a hell of a lot, and one is reminded of it in places like the Austrian woods and my son-inlaw’s schloss. Here we are after nearly 1,500 years of achievement in philosophy, poetry, architecture, science, music, art and religion, yet we allow cultural troglodytes and other such “cool” types to set the agenda. Western civilization was basically the creation of the Church. It was believers like Charles Martel in 732, Duke John in Lepanto in 1571, and Jan Sobieski in 1683 that defeated the invad-

ing Muslim hordes and safeguarded the Christian continent. Western civilization was erected on a Christian foundation, and the chivalric respect for women grew from the devotion to Mary in the Church. The art that followed was an expression of that faith. Mind you, the spiritual emptiness of


TA K I

This page: A Pilatus plane (above); Schloss Wolfsegg in Wolfsegg am Hausruck, Austria. Opposite page: Wolfsegg am Hausruck, Austria (above); a portrait of Taki's grandson, Antonius Alexandros St. Julien, by illustrator Marianna Kulukundis.

the modern world was absent for the weekend at Schloss Wolfsegg. Friday night’s dinner was at a wonderful nearby inn with traditional Austrian food and lotsa wine. Too much, in fact, and early Saturday morning, in the beautiful tiny church within the castle, the grandfather was feeling his age. Panis Angelicus, the hymn by Cesar Franck, woke me up and inspired me to listen closely to what Monsignor Herman Pachinger and the perfectly named Dr. Markus Himmelbauer had to say. Heaven should be right here on earth, said the good priest—live a Christian good life and you don’t have to worry about what happens afterwards. I looked around me and saw only tall blond men and women, old and young, all listening to the message while my little grandson, dressed up in his great grandmother’s silk white baby dress, looked happy and rather curious at the goings on. No one promised virgins in the afterlife and no one encouraged anyone to go out and kill people. It made for a change.

A great lunch followed in the tent, a very liquid one I might add. I sat between Fiona, a beautiful young blonde, and my friend Ludmilla Habsburg, a grande dame whose political opinions and mine are geometrically opposed. We talked only politics and laughed a hell of a lot and not a single bitter word was exchanged. It was similar to arguing with a Trump hater about immigration. (And if you believe that, you probably think the multi-billionaire investor Steve Cohen is a very honest man.) Then came my Waterloo. At the dinner that evening, my son-inlaw’s best friend, Prince Altenburg, gave a very funny speech although quite gone, if you know what I mean. This encouraged me to do the same after some people called for me to speak. I could see the mother of my children that recognizes the symptoms, squirming. But speak I did and made the most disastrous after dinner speech ever. People were kind but it was embarrassing as only drunken speeches can be. The only relief was more oblivi-

on, but I made up for it the next day by announcing during lunch that Alexandra and I were expecting a happy event, finally drawing a laugh. Well, because of the surroundings and the people present I was transported back to a time of a more civilized era. I was brought back to the present when Prince Altenburg’s little baby boy, born three days apart from my grandson, was brought in and placed next to little Antonius. The babies looked like blond, blue-eyed twins. But my grandson took exception to the new addition to in his crib and screamed like those horror females do against Boris, or Trump, or whatever. Territorial imperative, I presume, it starts early on. They will one day be the best of friends like their fathers, is my guess. I then piled everybody in the Pilatus and flew back to Gstaad, only to come down with the hidden virus I drowned for three days, the one I had carried over from the Bagel. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J U LY 2 0 1 9 7 1


CANTEENS

NEWPORT’S WELL-SET TABLE

72 QUEST

nothing conjures the wharf-side aesthetic quite like it. This is the atmosphere of the Clarke Cooke House, the gastronomic go-to spot on Bannister’s Wharf, in Newport. Located in an original circa-1780 structure, the “house” is more of a multilayered array of bars and restaurants for any dining experience. In the 18th-century building, you can soak up the romantic elegance of the Porch, which is housed high above the assembled yachts, or relax more casually in the cafe-like Candy Store, at harbor level. Newporters in the know like to sip cocktails at the intimate SkyBar, adjacent to

N E WP O RT H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT a giant mermaid that just doesn’t get old. Maybe it’s her spliced fin that curls back up to her perfectly pear-shaped hips, or the way she invites you in to her chest with open arms, only to cover up her breasts with that long, flowing hair? In any case, a mermaid—the longtime fantasy of seafarers everywhere—greets you at the Bistro of one of Newport’s nearly mythical institutions, the Clarke Cooke House. Add to this alluring ocean figure some white walls, wood-beamed ceilings, countless prints of the America’s Cup, sailing memorabilia, and seaglass-green sconces, and

O N N E VA N D E R WA L / M I C H A E L O S E A N /

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS the porch. In summer, the Midway Bar offers open views of lingering sunsets. It’s also the season when the Bistro opens its wall of windows to allow the sights and sounds of Bannister’s Wharf to fill the room. The stately 12Metre Yacht Club Room, a favored spot for private dinner parties, is decked in darker panels, rendering it appropriate for any season. Not to be missed is the Boom Boom Room, famous for bawdy dancing and good-spirited revelry, which is tucked underground, beneath the Candy Store. No matter which level you dine at (tourists tend to get trapped in the Candy Store, while natives and regulars flock to

bass. Here, a seven-ounce filet is wrapped in a thin shell of potato disks (layered to resemble fish scales), brushed with egg whites and thyme, then roasted in the oven. It’s served on a bed of braised leeks with a thyme-scented cabernet glaze, and finished with baby turnips, carrots, and hericots verts. No meal is complete without the Snowball in Hell, an all-time house favorite. It can be spotted at every table for every celebration, grand or small. The dessert is really a wine goblet coated with Callebaut chocolate, lined with slices of a chocolate roulade, stuffed with vanilla ice cream, and topped with chocolate sauce and toasted coconut. A rum-soaked sugar

the Porch), you’re bound to discover that the Cooke House is serious about food. Chef Ted Gidley uses the freshest seafood, flavorful beef, and regional produce to create imaginative dishes. Gidley trained in fine French kitchens, and it shows, but his cooking remains true to the spirit of Newport’s seaside heritage along the New England coast. This season, if you snag a spot on the Porch, you’d be remiss not to start with the raviolo of lobster and wild mushrooms. It’s been on the menu for more than 20 years, and with good reason (rumor has it there’s a stick of butter in every serving). Next up, catch the native striped

cube is nestled in the ice cream and lit on fire just before being served. One just never seems enough; the staff has been trained over the years to expect encore presentations. Miss out on a trip to Newport for a dinner at the Cooke House? Not a snowball’s chance in hell. u This page, clockwise from top left: The interior of the Sky Bar/Porch; A vintage view of the Clarke Cooke House; the Clarke Cooke House, built in 1780, was moved to Bannister’s Wharf in the 1970s. Opposite page: The exterior of the Clarke Cooke House. J U LY 2 0 1 9 7 3


GREENWICH

GREENWICH

GREENWICH

R E A L E S TAT E

CONNECTICUT HAMPTONS NEWPORT CONNECTICUT HAMPTONS NEWPORT CONNECTICUT HAMPTONS

SUMMER’S BEST OFFERINGS B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

SCHOOL’S OUT, temperatures (and spirits) are high, and inventory is burgeoning—lucky for both buyers and sellers, summer tends to be the most lively time of year for real estate. This holds especially true for our favorite summer getaways like Newport, where the true essence of the area isn’t captured in its entirety until beach season. We also see increased interest in enclaves like Greenwich, which has its own beaches, golf courses, clubs, and shops perfect for the summer months—leaving no reason to escape at all. Our top agents—Mark Baron, Shelly Tretter Lynch, Harald and Bruce Grant, Kendra Toppa, and Julie Church— help us survey these markets in the following pages. 74 Q U E S T


HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

R E A L E S TAT E

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

MARK BARON Saunders & Associates / 631.800.1125/ mbaron@saunders.com

A: What kind of real estate opportunities does the summer season offer? Do you expect a lot of activity? Do certain homes on the market benefit more during these months? A: All properties in the Hamptons look their best during the summer and evoke the true essence of the Hamptons lifestyle. Sellers that are situated close to the ocean beaches and waterfront activities are definitely at the forefront during this time of the year.

CO U RTE S Y O F S AU N D E R S & A S S O C I ATE S

Q: Which Hamptons enclaves are attracting the most inquiries right now? A: Sag Harbor continues to be the hotspot of the Hamptons, with the village of Southampton and the Bridgehampton estate area getting a lot of attention as well.

and in good locations are active. However, listings that are priced aggressively will tend to chase the market with 20 percent to 30 percent reductions over several years before trading within 10 percent of their final list price. Q: Who has been purchasing homes in the Hamptons? A: It continues to be a mixture. There are young families who are first-time second-home buyers looking in the $2M and under range, and there are also more seasoned Hamptons homeowners in the higher price points. Q: Any notable openings in the area recently? A: Westhampton Beach seems to be getting a lot more attention—the area has been undervalued for years and is now definitely coming into its own.

Q: Is renting more popular than buying? A: Not necessarily; this current market continues to offer great opportunities for the astute buyer. Q: What kind of market are you seeing? A: Properties that are priced in “the market”

65 Sandpiper Lane in Bridgehampton, New York; listed for $13,900,000.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 7 5


CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

R E A L E S TAT E

CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

SHELLY TRETTER LYNCH Compass / 203.550.8508 / shelly.tretterlynch@compass.com

Q: Are there any areas within Greenwich that are particularly popular? A: Summer in Greenwich is magical, as it offers something for everyone. On the coast, one can enjoy Tod’s point, almost 150 acres of beach and park, great for a variety of watersports, hiking, biking, and sunbathing. There is even an area designated for clam bakes—you cannot get more New England than that. There is also boating, fishing, and sailing on the Sound. Captains Island and Island Beach can both be accessed from the town ferry. Inland offers parks, tennis, polo, horseback riding, and championship golf courses. Greenwich Avenue also really shines during the summer; with extensive restaurant options, art galler-

76 QUEST

ies, and top-notch shopping, strolling up and down the avenue is a great way to spend the day and evening. Q: What kind of market are you seeing? A: The market has had some challenges, but overall the Greenwich market is still extremely desirable. With the current great values, low property taxes, and low interest rates, I cannot imagine a better time to purchase. Q: Any notable openings in the area recently? A: In terms of dining, Douro, a popular Greenwich staple, recently reopened in a larger space to keep up with demand. Also brand new is Miku, a sushi restaurant serving beautiful and delectable dishes.

55 Mooreland Road in Greenwich, Connecticut; $6,200,000.

CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

Q: What kind of real estate opportunities does summer offer? A: Summer is a fabulous way to discover Greenwich. Over the last six or so years, many Manhattan families have started to call Greenwich home in the summer. While it’s difficult to find a summer rental, this offers the perfect opportunity to enjoy all of the beautiful amenities so close to Manhattan. Most of these families find themselves purchasing properties in Greenwich. This creates a busy season in real estate.


HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

R E A L E S TAT E

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HARALD GRANT & BRUCE GRANT

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Sotheby’s International Realty: Southampton / 516.527.7712 / harald.grant@sothebyshomes.com or bruce.grant@ sothebyshomes.com Q: What kind of real estate opportunities does summer offer? A: Summer in the Hamptons is always and perpetually a draw. No matter the year, come warmer weather, people in the greater New York metropolitan area dream about the beach and the easternmost parts of Long Island. Not only do we got a lot of renters coming out, whose mindset often shifts to a purchase or investment, but we also experience a big increase in foot traffic in general. The number of interested buyers asking to view homes goes up substantially. Everyone talks about real estate—at dinner, at parties, while strolling through the villages, or while shopping and browsing. People are just more attuned to talking about real estate in general, and houses they either want to see or have seen specifically. Q: Which areas are attracting the most inquiries? A: Generally speaking, and it comes as no surprise, properties that are located within the villages—from Southampton through Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor, and further out to East Hampton, Amagansett, and Montauk —are most popular. The villages offer desired amenities

and access to necessities, and are all very close to the ocean beaches. Within the villages, new builds generate the most activity—that “new house smell,” as we call it. Q: Is renting more popular than buying right now? A: Interestingly, summer rentals have changed significantly over the last decade. While the number of individual rentals likely is high or even increasing, the duration of a typical rental has decreased dramatically. Folks used to rent the entire summer season, and now, a rental from July through Labor Day seems to be the norm among big summer rentals. We don’t rent for time periods less than two weeks, but we have also seen an uptick in inquiries for very short time periods.

475 Flying Point Road in Water Mill; listed for $19,500,000.

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NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT

R E A L E S TAT E

NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT

KENDRA TOPPA Lila Delman Real Estate / 401.339.6233 / kendra.toppa@liladelman.com

Q: What are the hottest shops, restaurants, etc.? A: Newport is home to so many wonderful attractions and establishments. Beachgoers enjoy time spent at Gooseberry or Easton’s Beach. Second and Third Beach are favorites on Aquidneck Island as well. History buffs enjoy the various Newport Mansion Tours, while sports fanatics love time spent at the International Tennis Hall of Fame Museum. Stop by and shop around Kristen Coates Art & Home on Bellevue, stocked with unique pieces of origi-

78 QUEST

“Land’s End” at 42 Ledge Road in Newport, Rhode Island.

nal art, home accessories, and hostess gifts galore. Enjoy cocktails and sailing vistas on the Lawn at Castle Hill Inn, followed by dinner back downtown at the famed Clarke Cooke House. Don’t forget your jacket for post-dinner dancing under the tented pink-and-white-striped ceiling at Clarke Cooke House’s exclusive SkyBar. Q: Tell me a bit about your listing “Land’s End”? A: An inviting 8+ bedroom family home with carriage house, “Land’s End” presents an extraordinary opportunity to acquire an East Coast legacy property on 5.6 oceanfront acres. The perfect blend of classic design and modernity. Truly Newport’s crown jewel of real estate!

CO U RTE S Y O F L I L A D E L M A N R E A L E S TAT E

Q: Tell me about Newport’s unique history. A: Newport, lovingly referred to as the “City by the Sea,” is a quintessential New England resort community set on Aquidneck Island, and is recognized as the sailing and society capital of the world. Its yacht-filled harbor and culturally rich community make this beautiful city home to those who appreciate world-class beaches, yachting, golf, exceptional dining, and shopping. Newport is perhaps most noted for its Gilded Age mansions (a.k.a. “summer cottages” built by the wealthy industrialists of this time period) lining Bellevue Avenue, most of which are now public museums, protected by the Preservation Society of Newport.


CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

R E A L E S TAT E

CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

JULIE CHURCH Houlihan Lawrence / 203.561.9373 / jchurch@houlihanlawrence.com

Q: What kind of real estate opportunities does summer offer? A: We are busy showing homes to buyers who want to settle in before the school year starts. Greenwich offers summer rentals in a variety of locations for those who do not want to go to the Hamptons. We have public pools, beaches, tennis courts, and golf courses, so there is no need to belong to a private club. There are also farmer’s markets and ferry trips over to our two town-owned islands.

CO U RTE S Y O F H O U L I H A N L A W R E N C E

Q: Are there any areas within Greenwich that are particularly popular? A: Riverside, Old Greenwich, and close to town continue to be the most popular locations within Greenwich. I feel that many are missing a good opportunity to live in backcountry, which gives you privacy and land. Backcountry also offers miles of riding trails for the equestrian buyers.

move for buyers coming from New York City. We are still seeing some buyers who are moving within Greenwich, as well as a new group of buyers who are looking for second homes in Greenwich. Q: Any notable openings in the area recently? A: A new public 6,400-square-foot pool just opened in Byram, and there are always new stores and restaurants opening on Greenwich Avenue. Q: Anything else you’d like to share with our readers? A: Greenwich has a lot to offer, making it an easy move for buyers from the city with familiar establishments — Equinox, SoulCycle, Whole Foods, high-end shopping, and more. u

Q: What kind of market are you seeing? A: We are seeing a value-driven market where condition is a major priority for buyers. Q: Who has been purchasing homes in Greenwich? A: Our low taxes and great schools make it a desirable

40 Otter Rock Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut; listed for $8,950,000.

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CALENDAR

J U LY

On July 11, the Saratoga Race Course will open for the summer season, featuring world-class racing. For more information and a full schedule, visit saratogaracetrack.com.

3

6

Longhouse Reserve will host a special evening with Julian Schnabel at Guild Hall in East Hampton at 7 p.m. to kick off Longhouse’s upcoming summer benefit. For more information, visit guildhall.org. To purchase tickets, call 631.324.4050.

Polo Hamptons will host a match and cocktail party at 900 Lumber Lane in Bridgehampton at 4 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit polohamptons.com.

5

PATRIOTIC WEEKEND

The Southampton Fresh Air Home will kick off the Fourth of July weekend festivities at 7 p.m. with its 31st Annual American Picnic and Grucci fireworks bursting in the air over Shinnecock Bay. The event will include a picnic buffet, popcorn, ice cream, arts and crafts, carnival booths, games, and more. Proceeds will go towards the organization’s goal of providing a specialized recreation program for physically challenged children. For more information, call 631.283.5847.

POLO HAMPTONS

11

SARATOGA RACE COURSE

The Saratoga Race Course will open for the summer season, featuring

world-class racing. The venue offers a variety of viewing options available at the track in addition to the Grandstand or Clubhouse, as well as live music and vendors that sell beautiful pictures of the horses, jockeys, and the grounds. For more information and a full schedule, visit saratogaracetrack.com.

Research Foundation will hold its Hamptons Happening event in Bridgehampton at 6:30 p.m. The event will support the organization’s groundbreaking cancer research that is moving us closer to a cure. For more information, visit waxmancancer.org.

13

MIDSUMMER PARTY

HAMPTONS HAPPENING

The Samuel Waxman Cancer

16

SARATOGA ARTS

New York City Ballet will return to Saratoga Performing Arts Center through July 20. This year, the company will present four distinct programs, including the story ballet Coppélia, an evening dedicated to Balanchine and Tschaikovsky, and more. The extremely popular Ballet Gala, one of the highlights of the season, will be held on Saturday, July 20. For more information, visit saratoga.com.

HIKING IN LAKE GEORGE

The Lake George Land Conservancy will hold its annual Hike-A-Thon to showcase the organization’s parks and preserves, promoting appreciation for the area. For more information, visit lakegeorge.com. 80 QUEST

The Parrish Art Museum will host its Annual Midsummer Party in Water Mill at 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit parrishart.org.

On July 20, RAND Luxury will host its annual Charity Brunch and Concours in Bridgehampton with Ferrari and Maserati. For more information, visit randluxury.com.

19

DANCERS FOR GOOD

The Hamptons’ biggest dance event,

CO U RTE S Y O F B FA ; RO B R I C H / S O C I E T YA LLU R E . CO M

LONGHOUSE AT GUILD HALL


CALENDAR

Benefit 5 p.m. For more information, visit aspenartmuseum.org.

AUGUST 1

NANTUCKET ANTIQUES

The Nantucket Antiques Show will take place at the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club through August 5. For more information, visit nantucketsummerantiquesshow.com.

3

MONTAUK PLAYHOUSE

Montauk Playhouse will hold its annual summer gala at 7 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 631.668.1124.

4

HAMPTONS HOPE

On July 13, the Parrish Art Museum will host its Annual Midsummer Party in Water Mill at 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit parrishart.org. Dancers For Good, will return for its fourth spectacular year on at 7 p.m. The season’s most magical benefit celebration of dance brings unparalleled performances from world-class companies and choreographers to the Hamptons in its mission to support The Actors Fund and its vast array of services. For more information, visit dancersforgood.org. HAMPTONS GRILLING

The Dan’s GrillHampton presented by New York Prime Beef will return to the Hamptons. Eight East End chefs and eight New York City chefs will go head-to-head in the biggest, tastiest showdown of the summer. Guests will sample each chef’s dishes while sipping on cocktails, wine, and beer, and then will vote on their favorite dish of the night while mingling with celebrity judges like Adam Richman and Scott Feldman. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit danstasteofsummer.com.

20

FERRARI & MASERATI

RAND Luxury will host its annual Charity Brunch and Concours in Bridgehampton in association with Ferrari and Maserati. On display will be the latest sports cars and the opportunity to experience a test drive in the fine marques. There will be fine cuisine, Champagne and spirits, and a silent auction.

For more information, visit randluxury.com. UNCONDITIONAL LOVE

The Unconditional Love Gala to benefit the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation will take place under the tents at Wickapogue and Old Town Roads and will feature dinner catered by Stone Creek Inn. For more information, visit southamptonanimalshelter.com.

31

SARATOGA HOSPITAL

The Saratoga Hospital Foundation will hold its annual gala at The Polo Meadow at Saratoga Casino Hotel at 6 p.m. For more information, visit saratogahospital.org. ASPEN ART CRUSH

The Aspen Museum of Art will host its Annual ArtCrush Summer

Hope for Depression Research Foundation (HDRF) will host its fourth annual Race of Hope to Defeat Depression. Audrey Gruss will lead participants on a beautiful three-mile route around Lake Agawam in Southampton Village. This high-spirited event is family-focused, inspiring, and fun, and prizes will be awarded for best time in different age categories, as well as for the top individual fundraiser and top fundraising team. For more information and to register for the Race of Hope, visit hopefordepression.org.

25

CANDY STORE CUP

The Candy Store Cup Superyacht Regatta, organized by Newport Shipyard and Bannister’s Wharf, will take place through July 27. For more information, visit candystorecup.com.

26

NEWPORT ANTIQUES

The Newport Show, which will run through July 28, will hold its Gala Preview Party, featuring more than 40 of the country’s top antiques dealers in one scenic location. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit thenewportshow.com.

27

WATERMILL BENEFIT

The Watermill Center will bring together the worlds of theater, art, fashion, design, and society for the its annual benefit. For more information, visit watermillcenter.org.

On July 25, the Candy Store Cup Superyacht Regatta will take place in Newport through July 27. For more information, visit candystorecup.com. J U LY 2 0 1 9 8 1


Dear 12 Metre World Championship Competitors: On behalf of the International 12 Metre Association (ITMA), the ITMA Americas Fleet, and the 2019 12 Metre World Championship Organizing Committee, we would like to thank you for your participation in the 2019 12 Metre Worlds and welcome you to Newport, Rhode Island. Your efforts to preserve and protect these historic and beautiful yachts have helped insure that all will enjoy them, now and well into the future. And by choosing to join us at the 12 Metre Worlds in Newport this year, you have assured that this will be the largest gathering of 12 Metre yachts ever in the Americas. We would like to thank our partners, the Ida Lewis Yacht Club and the 12 Metre Yacht Club, and the numerous member volunteers for their help and support in making this momentous event a reality. We would also like to thank our sponsors, for without their help we could not have made this great gathering happen; and Quest magazine for enabling this special regatta program. Finally, we would like to acknowledge the enormous contributions to the Class of the late Luigi Lang, Vice President for the Southern Europe Twelve Metre Fleet. Welcome to Newport and welcome to the 12 Metre Worlds! Have a great time and sail fast!

Warmest regards, Wm. H. Dyer Jones President International 12 Metre Association

82 QUEST

Peter Gerard ITMA Vice President—Americas & World Championship Event Chair


Dear 12 Metre Worlds Competitors, Family & Friends, On behalf of the Ida Lewis Yacht Club, I would like to welcome you to Newport, especially those among you who have traveled great distances to join us. Twelve Metre racing has a long and rich history in Newport and at the Ida Lewis Yacht Club. As part of our mission, the ILYC strongly believes in supporting competitive sailing. We host the annual 12 Metre North American Championship each September and are very proud to have been selected to host this prestigious international regatta. For many, this event will invoke nostalgic memories, and for others it will be a whole new experience. In either case, I am confident that you will enjoy our City-by-the-Sea and sailing on Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound. We look forward to welcoming you to our unique club house at Lime Rock, and wish you all the very best with fair winds and good sportsmanship. Sincerely, Daniel J. Faria Commodore Ida Lewis Yacht Club

J U LY 2 0 1 9 8 3


WHY is the largest gathering of 12s from the U.S. and Europe converging on Narragansett Bay this summer

+

WHO are the 300+ top international sailors meeting in Newport, R.I. this July to race them

+

?

WHAT is it about the 12 Metres that made them the most enduring, best-loved design in yachting history

=

? ?

It’s ALL About the

B OAT

written by: Peter Gerard design by: SallyAnne Santos

The Top 10 Reasons 12 Metre yachts have been plying racecources around the world for more than 100 years and counting‌ 84 QUEST


Twelves by the Numbers:

1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Established 1907, among first INTERNATIONAL RULE boats. Based on this formula:

1908, 1912 & 1920 selected for Olympic competition 1956 New York Yacht Club selected the 12s to resume America’s Cup competition

3.

Designed by the brightest naval architects including: Johan Anker | Johan Valetijin Burgess, Rigg & Morgan Davidson, Farr & Holland Raymond Hunt | Ted Hood Ian Howlett | Ben Lexcen A.E. Luders | David Pedrick Charles Nicholson | Philip Rhodes Olin Stephens | John Swarbrick

1958-1987: Selected for 11 America’s Cup competitions 2019 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP SAILORS:

Winners of 8 Olympic Medals 40+ America’s Cup 12mR Vets 70+ America’s Cup Sailors 100+ World & National Champs

2019 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP YACHTS:

2 2x America’s Cup Winners 7 America’s Cup Winners 5 World Champions 6 Countries Represented

10.

9. 350+ WORLDWIDE:

boats

built in:

13+ countries over the past: 117+ years

More than 4 dozen of these iconic beauties race regularly on the Atlantic and Baltic; this summer at Newport we’ll see WHY. J U LY 2 0 1 9 8 5


G R A N D

86 QUEST

P R I X

M O D E R N

S P I R I T


S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

T R A D I T I O N A L

V I N T A G E

2019 12 METRE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TEAMS B Y S A L LY A N N E S A N T O S EVERY TEAM, without exception, considers family, friends, and camaraderie to be the most important deciding factors in crew selection. Some who are sailing were not yet born when their 12 Metre “rides” were built and first raced. Even so, with 40 America’s Cup veterans from the 12 Metre era sprinkled throughout, this fleet may well be the most decorated gathering of 12 Metre sailors ever assembled. Meet the 2019 12 Metre World Championship teams.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 8 7


GRAND PRIX

KIWI MAGIC Owner: Johan Blach Petersen, Aarhus, Denmark Year Built: 1986 Designer: Laurie Davidson, Bruce Farr, Ron Holland

THE BOAT: Kiwi Magic (KZ-7) was the third in the trio of “plastic fantastics” (KZ-3, KZ-5, KZ-7), the first yachts in International Rule history constructed with fiberglass composite hulls. Sponsored by the New Zealand America’s Cup Trust, they were created as potential challengers for the 1987 America’s Cup. As the last to be built, KZ-7 benefited from the extensive tests and trials of her two elder sisters. She had an impressive record throughout the trials but was eventually eliminated by Dennis Conner’s Stars & Stripes ’87 (US-55), which went on to win the Cup and return it to the United States. Owner Johan Blach Petersen first

88 QUEST

admired Kiwi Magic (KZ-7) when he saw her perform at the 1987 America’s Cup. In late 2015, he noticed that she was for sale, traveled to Rhode Island, purchased and shipped her to the Robbe & Berking Shipyard in Flensburg for a major refit. He likens his first experience with this boat to “buying a Formula 1 car without any user instructions.” He has since investigated every detail implemented by the former owners of this high-tech 12 and expects to be “challenged by highly experienced sailors and fast boats” at the Worlds. Team Kiwi Magic is composed of friends and family members, including Johan’s wife Marianne and daughter Christina on backstays and son Christoffer on genoa trim. When not racing, this crew looks forward to a visit to Maine for lobsters! Point of Interest: Three-time 12 Metre America’s Cup veteran Peter Stalkus* (Newport, RI) will serve as tactician and navigator, bringing local knowledge to Team Kiwi Magic. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

SOREN WIEGAND

Builder: Marten Marine & McMullen & Wing

KZ-7


GRAND PRIX

KOOKABURRA II Owner: Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, Italy Year Built: 1985 Designer: John Swarbrick Builder: Parry Boat Builders

KA-12

keel shapes. Leading Twelve Metre authority Luigi Lang noted that these yachts were “distinguished for their elegance, long overhangs, and more freeboard than traditional boats.”

C A R LO B O R LE N G H I

Kookaburra II is one of two teams fielded by current Italian America’s Cup challenger Luna Rossa, whose syndicate is headed by Prada’s CEO and executive director, Patrizio Bertelli+. (The other is Nyala (US-12), in the Vintage division.) The majority of this rock star crew are veteran Luna Rossa/America’s Cup sailors, with five-time Olympic medalist Torben Grael* on the helm and Mr. Bertelli* himself consulting on strategy. This team was reunited onboard at Porto after more than six years apart and “locked-in” after sailing just one leg together again. The Kooka II team is grateful to Mr. Bertelli for bringing this Italian “family” team together and sponsoring this World Championship campaign. THE BOAT: Affectionately known as “Kooka II,” KA12 was the second of three Kookaburras designed by (Australian) Taskforce ’87 managed by Iain Murray. Designer John Swarbrick, with Murray, conceived and incorporated numerous innovations including computerized performance monitors that were quite advanced by 1985 standards. Alan Payne was consulted on the winglet

Point of Interest: Look for this Prada-sponsored team to be the best-dressed on the water, on the docks, and around town! *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner +America’s Cup Hall of Fame inductee

J U LY 2 0 1 9 8 9


GRAND PRIX

LEGACY Charterers: Jesper Bank and Thomas Andersen, Munkebo Fyn, Denmark Designer: Laurie Davidson, Bruce Farr, Ron Holland Builder: Marten Marine

KZ-5

THE BOAT: Legacy (KZ-5) was the second of three twelves built by the NZ America’s Cup Challenge Trust syndicate chaired by Sir Michael Fay for the 1987 America’s Cup challenge. In the history of the International Rule, New Zealand (KZ-3), KZ-5, and Kiwi Magic (KZ-7) were the first three boats built of fiberglass and became known as “the plastic fantastics.” This boat was once owned by the current owner of Freedom (US-30), Charles Robertson, from 1993 to 1995; at the time she was called Cannonball and sailed with number US-62.

as relevant. Trimmer Jesper Seier was Bank’s gold medal-winning teammate at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. According to Bank, it was another former Olympic teammate and Legacy’s helmsman, Thomas Andersen, who suggested putting a 12 Metre team together for the World Championship in Newport. They feel fortunate to have connected with the management team of KZ-5, now owned by the US Merchant Marine Academy Sailing Foundation, from whom they have chartered Legacy for the Pre-Worlds and Worlds.

Legacy’s tactician, Jesper Bank, is a veteran of two America’s Cup campaigns, but he knows that it is his Olympic experience that will serve him best at the 12 Metre World Championship. Banks, a three-time medalist (two gold, one bronze in the Soling Class) told us, “The way I see it is the fleet racing in Olympic competition is more tactical and valuable coming into the 12 Metre Worlds, whereas America’s Cup match racing experience is not

Point of Interest: Jesper Bank has faced off against Kookaburra II (KA-12) skipper Torben Grael racing in the Soling Class on many occasions, including at the Olympic Games. Watch as these two vie for the favored position on the starting line.

90 QUEST

*12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

CO U RTE S Y O F J E S P E R B A N K ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

Year Built: 1986


GRAND PRIX

NEW ZEALAND Owner: Gunther & Maggie Buerman, Newport, RI, USA Year Built: 1985 Designer: Laurie Davidson, Bruce Farr, Ron Holland

CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M N E W Z E A L A N D ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

Builder: McMullen & Wing

THE BOAT: KZ-3 was the first of the firsts—one of New Zealand’s three “plastic fantastics” built in 1985, looking to challenge for the 1987 America’s Cup in Freemantle, Australia. Although not selected for the trials, she and her twin stablemate, Legacy (KZ-5), were instrumental in testing that resulted in the improved design of the third of these sister 12s, Kiwi Magic (KZ-7). Four-time 12 Metre North American champions, New Zealand’s owners, Gunther and Maggie Buerman, have surrounded themselves with a likewise su-

KZ-3

perstar team including 12mR America’s Cup veterans Chris Fisher**, Lexi Gahagan** and Duncan Skinner**. The afterguard also has a pair of World Champions with Brad Read, a three-time J/24 World Champion, and Maggie Buerman, a Youth World Sailing Champion. Gunther, who has won numerous regional and national sailing titles in both J/24s and IOR competition, told us, “Maggie is the star sailor of the family… That is why I am so happy to have a chance to sail in a World Championship; I want to try to equal Maggie’s record.” Point of Interest: When the Buermans purchased KZ-3, they took pride in restoring her 1985 graphic blue and yellow livery, as well as her original name, New Zealand. (A previous owner had named her Wright on White.) *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

J U LY 2 0 1 9 9 1


MODERN

CHALLENGE XII Owner: Jack LeFort, Jamestown, RI, USA Designer: Ben Lexcen Builder: Steve E. Ward & Co.

THE BOAT: Alan Bond commissioned Challenge XII for Australia’s 1983 America’s Cup challenge. Designed by Ben Lexcen, KA-10 became a point of reference for his next and most famous creation: Australia II, which revolutionized modern yacht design with its winged keel, smashed the longest winning streak in all of sports (132 years), and took the Auld Mug Down Under. Owner Jack LeFort has been sailing with most of his crew for the last 20 years; his current Challenge XII team has been together for the past three, preparing for the 2019 12 Metre World Championship. Among the accomplished crew’s cumulative achievements are eight America’s Cup campaigns and 40

92 QUEST

KA-10

One-Design National and North American Championship wins! Trimmer Bob Campbell** was among the last American sailors to win the Auld Mug in Newport as a crew member on Dennis Conner’s Freedom (US-30). The Challenge XII crew, which loves 12 Metre racing and KA-10 specifically, has had very good results for the past two seasons. In recognition of the tremendous competition ahead, they plan to focus on improving their starts. Also, mindful of a very physical two months of racing, they are focused on health and fitness. Point of Interest: The LeFort Family is well represented by dad, Jack, at the helm and mom, Lisa, as navigator, with sons Bryce and Alec, respectively, tending runners and grinding. Also onboard is the “Union” composed of Brad Dimeo, Ken Read, and Tom Scott, who, with Jack LeFort, have been racing together for more than 35 years. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M C H A LLE N G E X I I ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

Year Built: 1982


MODERN

COURAGEOUS Owner: Courageous Syndicate, Newport, RI, USA Year Built: 1974 Designer: Olin Stephens Builder: Minneford Yacht Yard, Inc.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

THE BOAT: One of the most famous boats in yacht racing history, Courageous has the extraordinary distinction of being one of just two 12 Metres to win the America’s Cup twice: in 1974, with Ted Hood as skipper and Dennis Conner as starting helmsman, and again in 1977, with Ted Turner at the helm. The Courageous Syndicate, composed of Ralph Isham, Alexander Auersperg, Steve Glascock, and Ward Marsh, has joined with helmsman Art Santry* and tactician Gary Jobson**+ to create the nucleus of Courageous’s 2019 World Championship Team. Many of the crew have been sailing together for 18 years, first joining forces onboard Columbia (US-16)

US-26

at the America’s Cup Jubilee in 2001. Some have been sailing on US-26 even longer: Jobson, along with mainsail trimmer Robbie Doyle** and navigator LJ Edgcomb**, were on her 1977 Cup-winning crew, skippered by none other than future media mogul Ted Turner. Lucky charm Jon Wright**+ sailed in America’s Cup campaigns from 1974 through 1987, winning the Cup three times over! This truly veteran Courageous crew has eight America’s Cup wins among them; at the 30th crew reunion in 2017, Janet Doyle (Robbie Doyle’s wife) was quoted in jest: “The older they get, the better they were.” Point of Interest: Courageous, Rhode Island’s Official State Yacht, is featured on the tails side of Rhode Island’s state quarter, and is also depicted on storm drain covers throughout Newport. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner +America’s Cup Hall of Fame inductee

J U LY 2 0 1 9 9 3


MODERN

DEFENDER Charterer: Dick Enersen, San Rafael, CA, USA, and Tom Webster, Hilton Head, SC, USA Year Built: 1982 Designer: David R. Pedrick

US-33

Builder: Newport Offshore, Ltd.

and given a complete restoration by Dennis Williams. After a successful racing season in 2017, she was donated to the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Sailing Foundation in 2019.

Defender’s charterer for the 2019 Worlds is an elder statesman of the 12mR Class, Dick Enersen**, who, as a member of the Constellation (US-20) crew, won the America’s Cup in 1964. He is assembling a crew of compatriots, including three-time 12mR America’s Cup veteran Andy McGowan*, who will serve as tactician, for a run at the World Championship in the Modern division.

94 QUEST

Point of Interest: In her debut return to the racecourse after 23 years, Defender took first place in the Around the Island Race at NYYC’s 163rd Annual Regatta / METREFEST Newport on June 9, 2017. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

THE BOAT: US-33 was optimistically named Defender in anticipation of the role she hoped to play at the competition for the 25th America’s Cup in 1983. Then skippered by Tom Blackaller, she was outpaced by both Liberty (US40) and Courageous (US-26) in the elimination trials. After spending the late 1980s through the 1990s on the West Coast, and 2000 to 2010 in Florida, she was purchased


MODERN

ENTERPRISE Charterer: Clayton & Nancy Deutsch, Newport, RI, USA Year Built: 1977 Designer: Sparkman & Stephens Builder: Minneford Yacht Yard, Inc.

CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M E N TE R P R I S E ; P E T E R G E R A R D

THE BOAT: US-27 was designed as an “improved” Courageous (US-26) by Olin Stephens and David Pedrick for the 23rd Defense of the America’s Cup. Enterprise was originally owned by the Maritime College of Fort Schuyler Foundation; she was recently donated to the U.S. Merchant Marine Sailing Foundation. Enterprise has only just completed an extensive multi-year refit. Her first “splash” in many years came just weeks prior to the 2019 12 Metre World Championship. Although Team Enterprise had very little time to shake down the “new” boat, their teamwork came together very quick-

US-27

ly. Enterprise took two first-place finishes in her first competition at the New York Yacht Club’s 165th Annual Regatta in June. With two 12 Metre America’s Cup winners—Vince Brun** and Ralf Steitz**—and four sailors with 12 Metre AC campaigns under their belts—Jeff Benneville*, Dave Cavlerley*, and Mike Toppa*—onboard, Enterprise will be one to watch on the racecourse after a long absence. Point of Interest: Skipper/helmsman Clay Deutsch has won two 12 Metre World Championships, one with Weatherly (US-17) in the Traditional division and one with Freedom (US30) in the Modern division. His wife, Nancy Deutsch, serves as navigator, and his stepson, Alex Hood, is a crew member. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

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MODERN

FREEDOM Owner: Charles Robertson, Guilford, CT, USA Designer: Olin J. Stephens Builder: Minneford Yacht Yard, Inc.

THE BOAT: When skippered by Dennis Conner in 1980, Freedom (US-30) was the last 12 Metre yacht to defend the America’s Cup in Newport, soundly defeating Australia 4-1 in a best-of-seven series. Owner Charles Robertson, a wellknown East Coast sailor who has been active in a number of America’s Cup and 12 Metre campaigns, purchased Freedom in 2016. After a major refit including new sails, instruments, and electronics, she was returned to the water in fine racing form for the 2017 season. The Freedom team, composed primarily of “young, enthusiastic amateur sailors,” is also a family affair, with

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US-30

Robertson’s son Carter serving in the afterguard as tactician. Also in the back of the boat as navigator is International Twelve Metre Class President Dyer Jones* who has played a role in every America’s Cup competition from 1967 to 2007. In 1983, he campaigned for the America’s Cup onboard Freedom herself, along with Bob LaBanca*, who will serve as tactician. Point of Interest: Freedom was the last 12 Metre designed by Olin Stephens, who was said to have had a special affection for her. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; S TE P H E N R . C LO U T I E R

Year Built: 1979


MODERN

INTREPID Owner: Jack Curtin, Toronto, Ontario, Canada / New York, NY, USA Year Built: 1967 Designer: Olin J. Stephens Builder: Minneford Yacht Yard, Inc.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

THE BOAT: Intrepid (US-22) is considered a “breakthrough boat” that introduced numerous successful innovations in both shape and fabrics. They included hull design, the fin-skeg rudder, the keel-trim tab, below-deck crew placement, standing rigging, and sails. Designed by Olin Stephens, she was the first 12 Metre to win the America’s Cup twice. In 1967, Intrepid swept Dame Pattie (KA-2) 4-0, and in 1970 she prevailed over Gretel II (KA-3) by a score of 4-1. (Both series were best of seven.) Owned by Jack Curtin for more than 20 years, Intrepid (US-22) is sailed by a group of friends that have been racing together for just as long. There are no professional sailors on this crew; however, like Courageous (the only other two-time Cup-win-

US-22

ning boat) this team is stacked with America’s Cup 12 Metre veterans, including trimmer Reg Pierce**, tactician Scott Perry*, trimmer Tom O’Brien**, and main trimmer Skip Beck*. The Intrepid team, sailing for both the New York and Royal Canadian Yacht Clubs, also has two father-son duos: Reg Pierce’s son Travis will work the bow, while Tom O’Brien’s son Ian will work the pit. Also aboard is national Laser Champion Ted Moore. Point of Interest: As the only wooden 12 in the Modern division, Intrepid’s owner has made concerted efforts to keep her competitive; she has been restored/upgraded four times—in 1996, 2001, 2009, and 2019. In preparation for this World Championship, Curtin has had her (post-Cup) inboard engine removed, a new rig installed, and hightech sails fitted. *12mR AC competitor, **12mR AC winner

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MODERN

VICTORY ’83 Owner: Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, FL, USA Designer: Ian Howlett Builder: Fairey Allday Marine

THE BOAT: Peter De Savary’s Victory Syndicate commissioned K-22 as a challenger for the 1983 America’s Cup, the last to be sailed in Newport. Victory ’83 was considered a well-balanced boat and the fastest of the pre-winged keel Twelves. As such, she was the last would-be challenger eliminated by Australia II (KA-6), the winged-keeled wonder from Down Under who went on to win the America’s Cup. Current owner Dennis Williams purchased her in 2007 and commenced a complete refit in 2008. The Victory ’83 (K-22) team is based in Newport and composed of a band of sailors that has enjoyed their measure of success on the water and good friendships off the water. Among the ranks of

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K-22

the team are America’s Cup 12mR veterans Richie Boyd**, who won the Auld Mug in 1974 with Ted Turner on Courageous (US26)**, Wally Henry*, Beau LeBlanc*, Chip Parris*, and Mark Preston*. Many crew members have been involved with the design and development of 12mR yachts for decades, including navigator Jim Gretszky, boat captain Kim Roberts, and strategist Randy Shore. The crew credits owner Dennis William’s cool demeanor on the helm as a key to the success of the program. The 2019 World Championship represents a chance for him to defend the 12mR World title he won in 2009. Point of Interest: Dennis Williams has been a major supporter of the Newport 12 Metre fleet. In addition to the refit of Victory ’83 (K-22), he also funded the refit of Defender (US-33) in order to add another boat to the local fleet. *12mR AC competitor, **12mR AC winner

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; RO S E A N N E W I LL I A M S

Year Built: 1983


Owner, New York Harbor Sailing Foundation, Jersey City, NJ, USA

SPIRIT

CO U RTE S Y O F N E W Y O R K H A R B O R S A I L I N G F O U N DAT I O N

US-42 US-46 AMERICA II (US-42)

AMERICA II (US-46)

Owner: New York Harbor Sailing Foundation,

Owner: New York Harbor Sailing Foundation,

Jersey City, NJ, USA

Jersey City, NJ, USA

Year Built: 1984

Year Built: 1986

Designer: M. William Langan,

Designer: M. William Langan,

Sparkman & Stephens

Sparkman & Stephens

Builder: Williams & Manchester Shipyard

Builder: Williams & Manchester Shipyard

THE BOAT: US-42 was nicknamed “Lego boat” because the yacht (keels, rigs, rudders, bustles) could be set up in different configurations as a 12 Metre. She was one of three 12s (US-42, US-44, and US-46) campaigned by the New York Yacht Club for the 1987 America’s Cup held in Freemantle, Australia.

THE BOAT: US-46 was considered the best of the three 12s campaigned by the New York Yacht Club for the 1987 America’s Cup held in Freemantle, Australia. However, she was not ultimately selected to challenge for the Cup. That year, Dennis Conner’s Stars & Stripes ’87 (US-55) recaptured the Auld Mug (which he had lost in 1983) for the United States.

Owned by the New York Harbor Sailing Foundation (Jersey City, NJ), America II (US-42) and her stable mate America II (US-46) are raced by members of the Manhattan Sailing Club. Both boats are supported by Syndicate members, donations, and volunteers who are excited to support the iconic 12mR Class and be part of this historic event. The Foundation’s mission is to foster and promote amateur sailing of national and international importance in New York Harbor. Point of Interest: America II (US-42) was featured in the movie Wind, produced by Francis Ford Coppola. For her film role, her hull was painted red and she was called Geronimo.

Owned by the New York Harbor Sailing Foundation (Jersey City, NJ), America II (US-46) and her stablemate America II (US-42) are raced by members of the Manhattan Sailing Club. Both boats are supported by Syndicate members, donations, and volunteers who are excited to support the iconic 12mR Class and be part of this historic event. The Foundation’s mission is to foster and promote amateur sailing of national and international importance in New York Harbor. Point of Interest: Both America II (US-46) and the Manhattan Sailing Club began sailing in 1987.

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TRADITIONAL

AMERICAN EAGLE Charterer: Eagle 2019 Syndicate, Middletown, RI, USA Designer: A.E. Luders, Jr. Builder: Luders Marine Construction Co.

THE BOAT: American Eagle was a keen competitor at both the 1964 and 1967 trials, but was not ultimately selected to defend the America’s Cup. In 1968 media mogul Ted Turner purchased her. Although US-21 was designed for inshore racing, he converted her to IOR and competed successfully in some of the most challenging offshore races in the world, including the Fastnet and the Southern Ocean Racing Circuit. The nucleus of American Eagle’s team was formed in 2009, and has raced together ever since, collecting titles and trophies including the 2018 North American Championship. The Eagle 2019 Syndicate anticipates fierce competition, but has had its eye on the 2019

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US-21

12 Metre Worlds prize since 2016. The afterguard includes helmsman Bob Morton, a seasoned inshore and offshore sailor with numerous championships to his credit; tactician David Vietor*, a veteran of several America’s Cup trials onboard Independence (US-28), Clipper (US-32), Defender (US-33), and Courageous (US-26); and navigator Herb Marshall, American Eagle’s owner/skipper for the past 33 years. This team appreciates the history of the 12 Metre class and all agree that racing them in the Traditional division is the best way to keep these classic boats in top condition. Point of Interest: Look for American Eagle to sail with a spinnaker featuring a large elephant head. It signifies the team’s commitment to StopIvory.org, an international charity focused on African elephant conservation and stopping the ivory trade through the implementation of the Elephant Protection Initiative. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

Year Built: 1964


TRADITIONAL

COLUMBIA Owner: Kevin Hegarty, Newport, RI, USA, and Anthony Chiurco, Princeton, NJ Year Built: 1958 Designer: Olin Stephens

US-16

Builder: Nevins Yacht Yard, Inc.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

THE BOAT: Designed by Olin Stephens for the 17th America’s Cup competition—the first to be raced off Newport, R.I.—Columbia was the first 12 Metre yacht to win the Auld Mug, decisively sweeping the British Challenger Sceptre 4-0 in the best-of-seven series. Owner/skipper Kevin Hegarty takes his role as caretaker of Columbia very seriously and inspires his crew through appreciation of her heritage and history. They all consider US-16 to be the most beautiful, best sailing 12 Metre in the Newport fleet. Team Columbia, when not performing neurosurgery, devel-

oping businesses, hiking Mount Everest, spear-fishing, analyzing actuarial tables, managing construction sites, administering the Big East Conference, opening restaurants, teaching yoga, sky-diving, editing genes, or analyzing microbiomes, is a tight-knit family that was selected from among friends and by process of elimination. According to one team member, “It’s an honor to be part of Columbia’s hard sailing crew that strives for perfection with every tack!” Point of Interest: One of Team Columbia’s most memorable moments was beating a team led by America’s Cup winners Gary Jobson** and Ted Turner** to win the 2012 Twelve Metre North American Championship. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

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TRADITIONAL

EASTERNER Owner: Scott Bernard, Annapolis, MD, USA Designer: C. Raymond Hunt & F.C. Williams Associates Builder: James E. Graves, Inc.

THE BOAT: Built for the Chandler Hovey family, Easterner (US-18) competed in three Defender Trials for the America’s Cup: 1958, 1962, and 1964. She was considered the fastest boat built for the 1958 trials but failed to secure the defender position versus that year’s eventual Cup winner, Columbia (US-16). Easterner won the New York Yacht Club’s Astor Cup in 1962 and Queen’s Cup in 1964. In 1967, John F. Baillie purchased US-18 and named her Newsboy. According to owner Scott Bernard, he

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US-18

purchased Easterner “because she was moored in front of my family’s home in Balboa, California, during the 1970s and 1980s, when I was learning to sail as a junior member of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club.” Then known as Newsboy, US-18 won nearly 100 local and offshore races and was the belle of the bay. Said Bernard, “She was always a family-owned 12-metre, and it is a thrill for me to own the boat of my boyhood dreams and bring her back to the line.“ Point of Interest: At Easterner’s 2018 relaunch, new owner Scott Bernard invited Nancy Hovey Cooper, daughter of US-18’s first owner, to break a ceremonial bottle of bubbly on her bow. As a young girl, she had also done the honors at Easterner’s 1958 christening.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; G E O R G E B E K R I S

Year Built: 1958


TRADITIONAL

NEFERTITI Owner: Jon Sears Wullschleger, Sarasota, FL, USA Year Built: 1962 Designer: Frederick E. Hood

CO U RTE S Y O F S E A R S W U LL S C H LE G E R

Builder: James E. Graves, Inc. & Little Harbor Yard

THE BOAT: Designed by Ted Hood, Nefertiti was built in just 96 days, in complete secrecy in Marblehead, MA. US-19 was the only newly built potential defender for the 1962 America’s Cup trials. She was the beamiest 12 to date, and while she was very fast in strong winds, the elimination trials took place in light air—a weather pattern that was expected to continue through the Cup races. That being the case, this innovative boat never made it to the “big dance,” but her designer/helmsman Ted Hood went on to win the America’s Cup at the helm of Courageous** ** (US-26) in 1974.

US-19

Nefertiti’s owner, Sears Wullschleger, chose his team from among many friends who have sailed with him over the years. He purchased Neffy, as she is affectionately known around the Newport waterfront, in 1997 and has continued to restore and update her throughout the years. When Sears is not racing US-19, this 12 is very active with Newport’s America’s Cup charters fleet along with other Traditional division competitors American Eagle (US-21), Intrepid** ** (US-22) and Weatherly* (US-17). These four Traditionals face off on Narragansett Bay most summer days, so very experienced, evenly matched competition can be expected within this fleet! Point of Interest: Nefertiti’s support boat was appropriately named King Tut. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

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V I N TAG E

BLUE MARLIN Owner: Henrik Andersin, Kauniainen, Uusimaa, Finland Year Built: 1937 Designer: Charles E. Nicholson Builder: Camper & Nicholson

K-17

Owner Henrik Andersin is very involved with the Finnish Wooden Boat Center and has a passion for restoring wooden boats to the highest standards. He selected Blue Marlin for her six-year restoration because he wanted a yacht that could be suited to his needs, including both family cruising and credible racing within the active Baltic 12 Metre fleet. Blue Marlin’s World Championship team was chosen based on motivation, willingness to work together, and having fun; they expect to improve their skills within a very competitive environment at the Worlds. While in the U.S., K-17’s crew looks forward to the camaraderie of the 12 Metre fleet, exploring historic Newport, and enjoying family time while cruising the New England coast. Come 2020, Blue Marlin will be the hometown team to beat at the next 12 Metre World Championship held in Helsinki, Finland from August 16 to 23. Point of Interest: Blue Marlin’s team is a family affair, with dad Henrik at the helm and his son Oscar on trim. His daughter Carolina (Andersin) Vuorinen and her husband, Tuure Vuorinen, also fill key crew positions.

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CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M B LU E M A R L I N

THE BOAT: Originally named Hurricane, K-17 was purchased in 1938 by Sir Thomas O. Murdock Sopwith, who renamed her Blue Marlin. Sopwith was a famed America’s Cup J-Class racer with Endeavour and Endeavour II. His aviation company produced more than 18,000 aircraft for the allied forces during World War I, most notably the single-seater Sopwith Camel fighter plane.


V I N TAG E

NYALA Owner: Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, Italy Year Built: 1938 Designer: Olin J. Stephens Builder: Henry B. Nevins Inc.

C A R LO B O R LE N G H I

THE BOAT: Nyala has the distinction of being the first 12 Metre designed by Olin Stephens; she served as the trial horse to Vim (US-15) during the 1958 America’s Cup Defender Trials. Over the years, US-12 passed between numerous owners, and from 1951 to 1980, her engine was removed and reinstalled six times! In 1960, Hurricane Donna wrecked her on the rocks of City Island. A few more owners and years of abandonment passed until 1995, when she was rescued by current owner Patrizio Bertelli. He had her completely rebuilt according to the original plans, but with mast and rudder made of carbon fiber. It is Mr. Bertelli we have to thank for the beautifully restored and maintained vintage 12mR we see today. The reigning 12mR World Champion (Barcelona 2014) Nyala US-12 is the second of two teams fielded by current Italian America’s Cup challenger

US-12

Luna Rossa, whose syndicate is headed by Prada’s CEO and executive director, Patrizio Bertelli+. (The other is Kookaburra II (KA-12), in the Grand Prix division.) This team is absolutely stacked with Olympians and 12mR America’s Cup veterans, most of whom who sailed together on both Azzurra (I-4) and Azzurra IV (I-11), including helmsman Mauro Pelaschier* and tactician Enrico Passoni*. Additional Azzurra alumni, Guido Cavallazzi*, Andrea De Marinis*, Daniele Gabrielli*, Mauro Piani*, and Sandro Spaziani*, will play key roles on this well-seasoned Italian crew. Point of Interest: The oldest and youngest Nyala “family” team members are 30-year-old Frederico Piani at the mast, with his father, Mauro Piani, close by in the pit position. *12mR AC competitor **12mR AC winner

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V I N TAG E

ONAWA Onawa Syndicate, Newport, RI, USA Year Built: 1928 Designer: Burgess, Rigg & Morgan Ltd. Builder: Abeking & Rasmussen

US-6

THE BOAT: Built in 1928 (along with sister yacht Anitra (US-5)), Onawa is one of the two oldest surviving 12 Metre yachts. Onawa was the sixth and last identical 12mR hull ordered by the New York Yacht Club for comparison sailing; each was fitted with a rig of a different design. Having just celebrated 91 years since sliding down the ways, both US-6 and US-5 are still racing! Throughout the intervening years, Onawa has had at least eight different owners and completely disappeared from all records

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The backbone of Onawa’s World Championship team will be syndicate members Jim Blanusha, Chris Culver, Steve Gewirz, Louis Girard, Earl McMillen, and Mark Watson. Andy Green of 11th Hour Racing, an America’s Cup veteran and World Match Racing Champion, will be instrumental in quickly coordinating the teamwork of this talented group of sailors. Point of Interest: After a full restoration by McMillen Yachts, US-6 was re-launched on June 9, 2001. That same day, the McMillens brought their newborn son Nelson home from the hospital—who, now 18 years old, is Onawa’s youngest crew member and among the youngest sailors competing at the 2019 12mR World Championship.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M O N A WA

twice: 1943 to 1946 and 1976. In 1999, McMillen Yachts acquired Onawa and formed a syndicate of partners to restore her—today she is again under the watchful eye of McMillen Yachts on behalf of a new syndicate of owners.


V I N TAG E

VEMA III Owner: Vema III AS Syndicate, Oslo, Norway Year Built: 1933 Designer: Johan Anker Builder: Anker & Jensen

CO U RTE S Y O F T E A M V E M A I I I

THE BOAT: Vema III (N-11) was commissioned by Georg Unger Vetlesen+ for the RNYC’s 50th Anniversary races at Hankø in 1933. She went on to compete throughout Scandinavia and at Cowes Week, Isle of Wight. She famously raced against fellow Vintage Division competitor Blue Marlin (N-17) when owned by T.O.M. Sopwith. In 1979, new owners Tor Jøgen Dahl and Lars Christian Dahl realized that corrosion of key structural elements needed prompt attention, and they began her preservation. In 1999, T.J. Dahl, with new owner Einar Nagel Erichsen, undertook an extensive restoration. As of 2019, she has been sailing for 86 years and counting.

N-11

dition, and consider her to be one of the best-preserved 12mR yachts in the world. Point of Interest: The G. Unger Vetlesen+ Foundation made a substantial donation to defray some expenses of the Baltic 12mR Fleet in Newport for the 2019 12mR World Championship.

Since 2006, N-11’s owner is “Vema III AS,” a group of 10 sailors who share a keen interest in 12mR sailing and her notable Norwegian designer, Johan Anker. N-11’s team strives to keep its “pride and joy” in perfect con-

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12 METRE AMERICA’S CUP HISTORY NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND 1958-1983 B Y S A L LY A N N E S A N T O S

PREFACE —1956:

A new era of America’s Cup racing began when the Deed of Gift was changed to eliminate the requirement for all Challengers to arrive at the race course “on their own bottom.” This was an absolute game changer—now potential Challenger yachts need not traverse oceans to reach the starting line as the J-Class yachts had done before them. Each team could develop their new International Rule 12 Metre—the boat selected by The New York Yacht Club (NYYC)—specifically for the anticipated sailing conditions on the actual racecourse on Rhode Island Sound. Previously, this had been a significant advantage held only by the Defenders of the Cup. (And this partly explains why more original, sturdily built [non-American] J-Boats survive to this day.) From 1958 to 1983, each new 12mR was created specifically for September in Newport. As history shows, those that got the forecast right generally went on to the finals.

1). Newport showed the Australians a warm welcome replete with a parade and marching bands playing Waltzing Matilda. Rhode Island Governor John Notte was quoted: “We hope you leave Newport with as warm a spot in your hearts for us as we have for you…but without the Cup.” Weatherly’s skipper, Emil “Bus” Mosbacher, known for his “aggressive tactics at the helm and for leading his team with the dedication and discipline of a nautical Vince Lombardi,”* dominated the racecourse and the series with President and Mrs. Kennedy looking on from a naval destroyer. For the Aussies, it was five races, one win, and a wedding, but they’d be back. *Upset, Australia Wins the America’s Cup by Barbara Lloyd and Michael Levitt

1964 COLUMBIA (US-16) VS. SEPTRE (K- 17) 4-0 Possible Defenders: Easterner (US-18), Vim (US-15), Weatherly (US-17) Would-Be Challengers: Evaine (K-2) Olin Stephen’s newly designed Columbia (US-16) only narrowly defeated her 19-year-old sister Vim (US-15) to earn the role of first 12 Metre defender of the America’s Cup. With the legendary Briggs Cunningham on the helm, she easily swept Great Britain’s Septre (K-17) 4-0, with winning deltas averaging more eight minutes per race, and yet… “There was a genuine feeling of friendship between the two crews as demonstrated after each race when Columbia went alongside to cheer the defeated Sceptre.” –Newport Daily News, July 11, 1958

CONSTELLATION (US-20) VS. SOVEREIGN (K-12) 4-0 Possible Defenders: American Eagle (US-21), Columbia (US16), Easterner (US-18), Nefertiti (US-19) Would-be Challengers: Kurrewa (K-3) Walter Gubelmann’s Constellation (US-20) squeezed American Eagle (US-21) out of the Defender Trials to represent the NYYC in the 19th defense of the Auld Mug. According to her designer, Olin Stephens, “Connie” was not a super boat or a breakthrough design, but she had the perfect combination of winning factors: hull shape, sails, spars, rig, crew, and helmsman. In the Challenger Series, Britain’s Sovereign (K-12) convincingly eliminated Kurrewa V* (K-3) 10-4 and was considered the best prepared Challenger to date. But with Eric Ridder, Bob Bavier, and Rod Stephens in the Afterguard, Constellation swept the finals 4-0 on the newly introduced 4.5-mile-diameter Olympic Circle course. *now named Ikra

1962

WEATHERLY (US-17) VS. GRETEL (KA-1) 4-1 Possible Defenders: Columbia (US-16), Nefertiti (US-19), Easterner (US-18) Ted Hood’s innovative Nefertiti (US-19) was called the “Queen of the Observation Trials,” but it was Philip Rhode’s Weatherly (US-17) that the New York Yacht Club (NYYC) selected for the 18th Defense of the Cup against the first Australian challenger, the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron’s Gretel (KA108 QUEST

1967

INTREPID (US-22) VS. DAME PATTIE (KA-2) 4-0 Possible Defenders: Columbia (US-16), Weatherly (US-17) American Eagle (US-21) Would-Be Challengers: Gretel (KA-1) And then there was Intrepid (US-22). Designed by Olin Stephens, she was a truly breakthrough 12 Metre design. Skippered by

DA N H E R N E Y; S TA N LE Y Z . RO S E N F E L D ; CO U RTE S Y O F D I C K E N E R S E N ; J O H N O S G O O D , CO U RTE S Y O F G E O F F R E Y M A S O N ; S T E P H E N L I R A K I S ; B R I A N M E L Z I A N

1958


Clockwise from top left: Columbia’s crew, 1958; committee members salute Intrepid, 1967; Constellation, 1964; Constellation’s crew celebrating in 1964; Constellation’s crew in 1967, as a trial horse to Intrepid; Nefertiti’s crew, 1962; Ted Hood aboard Nefertiti in 1962; Weatherly, 1962; Intrepid and its tender, Chaperone, 1980.


1962 AC winner Emil “Bus” Mosbacher, she was unstoppable in the Defender Trials, losing just one of 19 qualifying races due to a navigational error. Meanwhile, the Australian invasion was on! Dame Pattie (KA-2)’s skipper, Jock Sturrock, and crew were said to be brimming with confidence. Although plagued by bad luck, they won the Challenger series 13-11 over fellow countrymen on the updated Gretel (KA-1). They enjoyed their favored role as underdog, but confidence was not enough for the team representing the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron. Intrepid, according to Mosbacher, “just took off and flew.” And so she did, leaving Dame Pattie in her wake and going undefeated (4-0) in the finals.

1970

INTREPID (US-22) VS. GRETEL II (KA-3) 4-1 Possible Defenders: Heritage (US-23), Valiant (US-24) Would-Be Challengers: France (F-1) It was not the “same old” Intrepid (US-22) that won the America’s Cup again in 1970. In the intervening three years between the 20th and 21st Defenses, Britton Chance reworked her hull and keel and Ted Hood perfected her sails. During the Defender Trials, skipper Bill Ficker and his young “Quicker Kids” team lost just one race to the brandnew Valiant (US-24), another of Olin Stephen’s designs. In the Challenger series, skipper Jim Hardy’s Gretel II (KA-3) crew easily eliminated the first French entry, Baron Bich’s France (F-1) in a sweep. On the brink of defeat, down 3-0 in the finals vs. Intrepid, the Aussies pulled out a win in race four that inspired fans in both hemispheres. Although Gretel II lost race five, they were not demoralized; it was likely this single win that kept “Australia’s Cup” hopes alive!

before moving on to Courageous (US-26), the first aluminum hulled 12—another breakthrough yacht designed by Olin Stephens with David Pedrick. Skippered by Ted Hood, Courageous picked off Heritage (US-23), Valiant (US-24) and Mariner (US-25) in the Trials, but it was her eldest sister Intrepid (US-22) that proved invaluable as a sparring partner. Courageous secured the first of her two America’s Cup wins convincingly; she sent Southern Cross packing without a win.

1977

COURAGEOUS (US-26) VS. AUSTRALIA (KA-5) 4-0 Possible Defenders: Enterprise (US-27), Independence (US-28) Would-Be Challengers: France II (F-2), Gretel II (KA-3), Sverige (S-3) The run-up to the 23rd Defense of the Auld Mug was far more compelling than the walk-away 4-0 final that led to Courageous’ (US-26) second America’s Cup win would suggest. This time, she was skippered by Ted Turner and faced off vs. Noel Robbins on the helm of Australia (KA5), the second of Ben Lexcen’s 12 Metre iterations, with John Valentijn. The returning Baron Bich with France II (F-2), along with Sweden’s first-time challenger Sverige (S-3), added an international flair to the City-by-the-Sea that summer, while bitter feuds between Americans Lowell North and Ted Turner fueled a (not-so) civil war of words off of the water. One columnist described the atmosphere: “…a Hollywood heyday with Ted Turner playing the leading role and a cast of 1000s who have turned the Americas Cup into a Ben-Hur scenario with a Star Wars twist.” Numerous challengers and defenders accounted for the rapidly growing international fleet of 12 Metres; it was in 1977 that Alan Bond proposed the first 12 Metre World Championship.

1974

COURAGEOUS (US-26) VS. SOUTHERN CROSS (KA-4) 4-0

1980

FREEDOM (US-30) VS. AUSTRALIA (KA-5) 4-1 Possible Defenders: Intrepid (US-22), Heritage (US-23), Valiant (US-24), Mariner (US-25) Would-Be Challengers: France (F-1) Southern Cross (KA-4), representing the Royal Perth Yacht Club, carried the “Australia’s Cup” torch forward to Newport in 1974. The first 12 designed by Ben Lexcen (then Bob Miller) had numerous innovations, including a bow bustle, greater waterline, and a three-part vertically articulated rudder that moved like a fish tail to carve the water and reduce drag. The Aussies had stepped up their design game, and the new boat, thought to be their best chance yet, inspired a song: Born to the ocean, to the fair winds she would fly; She took her name from five bright stars, which ride the southern sky… Jim Hardy and crew swept away Baron Bich’s France (F-1) 4-0 110 QUEST

Possible Defenders: Clipper+ (US-32), Courageous (US-26), Enterprise (US-27) + re-work of Independence by David Pedrick Would-Be Challengers: France III (F-3), Lionheart (K-18), Sverige (S-3) In 1980, would-be challengers from Great Britain, France, and Sweden converged in Newport with Alan Bond’s Australia (KA-5) on the continuing quest for the “Australia’s Cup.” For the Defense, Dennis Conner orchestrated a two-boat program with Enterprise (US-27) and Freedom (US-30), the last of Olin Stephen’s eight 12 Metre designs spanning the years 1938 to 1979. Conner was widely criticized for running his campaign too much like a business, but in doing so he devised many now standard sports marketing techniques. With Jim Hardy


Clockwise from top left: Ted Turner, 2012; Intrepid’s crew, 1967; Bus Mosbacher, Intrepid’s skipper, 1967; Courageous’s crew, 1977; The America’s Cup Committee of the New York Yacht Club, led by Henry S. Morgan, 1967; Freedom racing in the 2018 12mR North American Championship; Designer

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; S TA N LE Y Z . RO S E N F E L D ; CO U RTE S Y O F G A RY J O B S O N

Olin Stephens with a tank-test model of Intrepid.


1983

LIBERTY (US-40) VS. AUSTRALIA II (KA-6) 3-4 Possible Defenders: Courageous (US-26), Defender (US-33) Would-Be Challengers: France III (F-3), Azzurra (I-1), Canada 1 (KC-1), Victory ’83 (K-22), Advance (KA-7), Challenge 12 (KA10) and Australia II (KA-6) First-time entries Canada I (KC-1) and Italy’s Azzurra (I-4) added to the rapidly growing fleet of challengers, including France III (F-3) and Great Britain’s Victory ’83 (K-22). Determined “Men at Work” from the land down under fielded three teams. Advance (KA-7) and Challenge 12 (KA-10), both from Sydney, and Ben Lexcen’s revolutionary Australia II (KA6) from Perth, skippered by John Bertrand, comprised the “Australian Assault.” The mystery created by Australia II’s shrouded keel was a constant topic of controversy and intrigue in Newport that summer. Meanwhile, Dennis Conner’s Liberty pushed past Courageous (US-26) and Defender (US-33) to be selected as the final defender of the longest winning streak in all sports—132 years. The match was tied at 3-3; everything hung on one last race… Authors Barbara Llloyd and Michael Levitt lived the moment and described it in Upset: Australia Wins the America’s Cup: At 5:30 pm on Monday, September 26, as the sun settled over Block Island and the chill of fall returned to the air, Australia II crossed the finish line between the elegant Black Knight and an orange buoy to win the race by 41 seconds. The America’s Cup belonged to the Australians, after belonging to the Americans, or to be perfectly accurate, to the New York Yacht Club—since before the Civil War. Conner had called it “the race of the century.” It was more than that: It was the most sublime sailboat race ever sailed. This was the race that caused the world to discover sailboat racing, and this was one of those rare days when there was something weighty in the air, a day when a mere sporting event transcended the usual considerations of who won and who lost. Wherever one looked there were lessons about life, about the pursuit of excellence for its own sake, about tradition, about nationalism, about commerce, about arrogance, about hubris, and about the 10102QQUUEESSTT

deeper meanings of victory and defeat. Understanding the victory and defeat was easier. America lost the America’s Cup because Australia II was faster than Liberty and all previously designed 12s, thanks primarily to the inspired keel and hull shape that her designer, Ben Lexcen, gave her. Australia II was the biggest breakthrough in the 77-year history of 12-Metre design and perhaps in the history of all yacht design up to that point. And in A Newporter’s Lament, Daily News reporter Cathy Callahan wrote: “My sudden tears surprised me more than Australia II’s win. I wasn’t weeping for the New York Yacht Club, and while my heart went out to Dennis Conner and the Liberty crew, I really wasn’t crying for them. I was mourning the end of an era. The end of the crowded, crazy, nerve-wracking but wonderful America’s Cup summers in Newport.”

POST SCRIPT—1987

KOOKABURRA II (KA-12) VS. STARS & STRIPES (US-55) 4-0 Possible Defenders: Australia (KA-5), Australia II (KA-6), Australia III (KA- 9), Australia IV (KA-16), South Australia (KA-8), Kookaburra I (KA-11), Kookaburra II (KA-12), Kookaburra III (KA-15), Steak ‘n Kidney (KA-14). Would-Be Challengers: America II (US-42), America II (US44), America II (US-46), Heart of America (US-51), Clipper (US-32), Eagle (US-60), Liberty (US-40), Stars & Stripes ’83 (US-36), Stars & Stripes ’85 (US-54), Stars & Stripes ’86 (US-56), Courageous IV (US-26), Azzurra (I-4), Azzurra II (I-8), Azzurra III (I-10), Azzurra IV (I-11), Victory ’83 (K22), Freedom (US-30), Enterprise (US-27), French Kiss (F-7), Challenge 12 (F-5), France 3 (F-3), Challenge France (F-4), True North (KC-87), Canada (KC-1), Canada II (KC-2), New Zealand (KZ-3), New Zealand (KZ-5), New Zealand (KZ-7), White Crusader (K-24), White Crusader II (K-25) In 1986, as a precursor to the America’s Cup, the first 12 Metre World Championship was held in Fremantle, won by Australia III (KA-9), designed by Ben Lexcen for heavy weather, which it certainly was. The “Freemantle Doctor” (vernacular for Western Australia’s extreme sea breeze) was responsible for washing five crewmembers overboard and destroying more than a dozen spars, including four masts and countless sails. Heart of America’s tactician, Gary Jobson, opined, “Freemantle waters are unsuitable for racing.” The final America’s Cup competition sailed in 12 Metre yachts was raced in wild and windy Freemantle, Western Australia. Thirteen syndicates from six countries—Canada, France, Italy, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States—produced a total of 25 challengers; among them was Dennis Conner’s Stars & Stripes ’87 (US-55). Conner outsailed all of them and won the right to sail against Australian defender Kookaburra III (KA-15), helmed by Iain Murray. Stars & Stripes ’87 won the best of seven series with a decisive 4-0 shutout, reclaimed the America’s Cup for the United States, and so ended the America’s Cup 12 Metre era. u

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

at the helm, Australia swept through the challenger fleet and allowed just one loss to France III and an elated Baron Bich in the final elimination series. They arrived at the Cup match hungry. After the first two races between Australia and Freedom, the score was tied 1-1—this was the closest pursuit by any challenger yet. According to the Newport Daily News, the “Aussies thought they finally had a chance to win if the Yanks played fair.” Races 3, 4, and 5 were closely contested, peppered with equipment failures and unpredictable weather—perfect sail changes were a key to success. In the end, Freedom prevailed, the Aussies went home empty-handed yet again and the America’s Cup remained bolted down at the New York Yacht Club for three more years. The prophetic Ben Lexcen predicted: “huge advances in technology would come between 1980-83.”


PH B R IOTO AN M CR E LE ZDIIATNG; OSEASLLYA H E RNEN E S A N TO S ; LE O M A S O N / P O P P E R F OTO V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S

Clockwise from top left: Italian 12mR Azzurra, 1983; Dennis Conner, 2012; Liberty tacking downwind, trailing Australia II, 1983; a poster for the “Australia’s Cup,” 1987; Stars & Stripes ’87, victorious in Freemantle, Australia; Australia II’s winged keel and Syndicate mascot, 1983. MONTH 2013 00


THEN & NOW As evidenced by the yachts’ timeless beauty and enduring presence in Newport, all 12mR owners and skippers take great pride in restoring, improving, maintaining, and racing these legendary thoroughbreds. We’ve matched iconic images with contemporary photos to prove that our beloved 12s are as awe-inspiring today as they ever were…and better!

B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S | W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E

B Y S A L LY A N N E S A N T O S

US-22

THEN: 114 QUEST

Intrepid reaching below France 1, 1980.


US-22

NOW:

Intrepid reaching toward the Newport Bridge, 2014. J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 1 5


NOW:

US-21

THEN:

Ted Turner raced American Eagle on the Ocean Racing Circuit from 1968–1973.

KZ-7

THEN: 116 QUEST

Owner Charles Robertson and crew racing Freedom at the 2018 North American Championship.

US-21

NOW:

Skipper Bob Morton has been racing American Eagle with owner Herb Marshall for the past three seasons in the Road to the Worlds.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S / W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E

Dennis Conner and his Freedom crew won the America’s Cup in 1980.

KZ-7

Dennis Conner, with tactician Tom Whidden, raced Kiwi Magic at the 2012 12 Metre North American Championship.

NOW:

Owner Johan Blach Petersen races Kiwi Magic in the Baltic with his KZ-7 Team.

S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S | W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E ; S O R E N W I E G A N D

THEN:

B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S / W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E

US-30

US-30


K-22

J AC K S U T P H E N , CO U RTE S Y O F B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S | W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E

J O H N O S G O O D , CO U RTE S Y O F G E O F F R E Y M A S O N ; CO U RTE S Y O F S E A R S W U LL S C H LE G E R

B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S | W I N D L A S S C R E AT I V E

K-22

THEN:

Victory ’83 was the last to be eliminated by eventual Cup winner Australia II in the challenger trials for the 1983 America’s Cup at Newport.

NOW:

US-19

THEN:

Designer and skipper Ted Hood at the helm of Nefertiti, 1962.

Thirty-six years later, Dennis Williams’ Victory ’83 continues to be a formidable competitor and frequent regatta winner.

US-19

NOW:

Skipper Sears Wullschleger has owned and raced “Neffy” since 1977.

US-33

US-33

THEN:

Tom Blackaller and his US-33 crew racing at the 1983 Defender Trials for the America’s Cup.

NOW:

Dick Enersen, a 1964 America’s Cup winner (Constellation [US-20]), is leading the Defender team at the 2019 Worlds. J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 1 7


HAROLD STIRLING VANDERBILT: A SAILOR’S SAILOR BY KATE GUBELMANN

HAROLD STIRLING VANDERBILT was a genius. When Albert Einstein discussed sailing, he did it with Vanderbilt, which should be proof enough, but there are many more instances of his innovative intellect. In fact, George Plimpton could not cover them all in a four-part series he wrote for Sports Illustrated in 1956. Perhaps what “Mike” Vanderbilt is best known for today are his creations of the Rules of Right of Way for sailors and Contract Bridge for players, but there were  1 1 8  Q U E S T


In 1933, an American syndicate of 18 O P P O S I TE PA G E : MY S T I C S E A P O RT M U S E U M , RO S E N F E L D CO LLE C T I O N

T H I S PA G E : M O R R I S RO S E N F E L D O F T H E RO S E N F E L D CO LLE C T I O N .

owners joined Harold S. Vanderbilt and ordered a new J-Class defender from the Herreshoff Manufacturing Co., to be designed by William Starling Burgess and to be christened Rainbow. This page: Rainbow in 1937. Opposite page: Harold S. Vanderbilt in formal sailing dress on the deck of Rainbow.


1 2 0  Q U E S T

Rainbow won the series, it was unfavorable. One headline read, “Britannia Rules the Waves and America Waives the Rules.” Vanderbilt responded by co-authoring a pamphlet on the Rules of Right of Way, which would have eliminated the problem in the third race. Vanderbilt’s intellectual integrity is impressive. Although not fully adopted until 1948, these are the rules used in sailing today. As an aside, the Lake George Club was the first yacht club to adhere to Vanderbilt’s practical solution. Sopwith returned in 1937 to challenge the New York Yacht Club again, but the dire economic situation in the U.S. prohibited the formation of a syndicate to defend. Harold Vanderbilt came to the rescue by personally funding a new J Boat, Ranger. This boat was a collaborative design of Burgess and the up-and-coming Olin Stephens. Ranger, considered the fastest J Boat ever built, beat Sopwith’s Endeavor II handily in four races. The mood on Ranger was upbeat: perhaps due to the two accordions being played by the afterguard (Rod Stephens and Zenas Bliss), as well as having the first American woman in a Cup race on board, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt, who had married Harold in 1933. Ranger’s win marked the end of J boat contenders for the Cup. In 1938, Vanderbilt and the New York Yacht Club changed the deed of gift in favor of the smaller 12 Metre boat. Harold never raced in another America’s Cup, but he did successfully race his personal 12 Metre, Vim, designed by Sparkman and Stephens. Vanderbilt never lost his passion for the America’s Cup. When Walter Gubelmann (my father-in-law) went looking for funding for the 1964 campaign for Constellation, he is quoted as saying he went to “the Delphi” for support and got it. Vanderbilt also was a syndicate member of Intrepid, which won the Cup in 1967 and 1970. Before Harold died in 1970, he funded the gift of Marble House to the Preservation Society of Newport. Alva had sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932, by whom it was beautifully maintained until the Society took it over in 1963. Here, the Vanderbilt Trophy Room—created by Gertrude Vanderbilt to showcase Harold’s sailing trophies and memorabilia—can be viewed. It is a tremendous testament to a man who had the genius and the will to improve conditions for his fellow sailors. u

T H I S PA G E : RO S E N F E L D A N D S O N S ; A M E R I C A N CO N T R AC T B R I D G E LE A G U E . O P P O S I TE PA G E : S F O M U S E U M ; A M E R I C A - S CO O P. CO M ; MY S T I C S E A P O RT M U S E U M , RO S E N F E L D CO LLE C T I O N

many other pastimes that Vanderbilt explored and improved— including waltzing backwards. Harold was born in 1884 to William K. and Alva Vanderbilt, the youngest of three children. Educated at St. Marks, Harvard College, and Harvard Law School, Harold grew up summering in Newport, Rhode Island, sometimes at Marble House. Marble House, designed by Richard Morris Hunt and completed by 1882, was an opulent 39th birthday present for Alva. However, she left the house in 1896 to marry Oliver Hazard Belmont. When he died in 1908, Alva returned to Marble House and created the Chinese Tea House. The Tea House hosted gatherings of the Suffragettes, as Alva helped to secure the women’s right to vote. Many children who spend their summers in Newport learn to sail, and Harold was no exception, except that his skill far exceeded that of the average sailor. In 1910, he skippered Vagrant to win his first and only Bermuda Race. By 1922, he was the Commodore of the New York Yacht Club and would proceed to win six Kings Cups and five Astor Cups over the course of his competitive sailing. But it was his three-time winning defense of the America’s Cup that were his greatest victories. In 1930, an aging Sir Thomas Lipton, of tea fame, challenged the New York Yacht Club in a race to win the America’s Cup. A race that had its start at Cowes in 1851, when the American schooner, America (hence the competition’s name) won what was to become the oldest international sporting trophy. Lipton wanted to bring “the auld mug” back to England with his J boat Shamrock V, but it was not to be. Harold Vanderbilt and his syndicate won four straight races on their J boat, Enterprise, designed by William Starling Burgess. The popular success of Vanderbilt’s win earned him the cover of Time magazine that September. Harold even wrote a book on how Enterprise became victorious. His total recall of each race is impressive and illustrates his curious mind for details. The year 1934 brought a new challenger for the Cup, T.O.M. Sopwith, the English flying ace, with his J boat, Endeavor. This time, the race became contentious. Vanderbilt was chosen to defend on Rainbow, which lost the first two races. The third race was won by Rainbow, but not without two incidents of near-collision, which Endeavor protested but lost on a technicality. Although


Counterclockwise from above right: A team at work on board the J-boat Ranger; Ranger’s afterguard in a relaxed moment with owner and skipper Harold K. Vanderbilt at the wheel; “Endeavour II and Ranger, the Americas Cup 1937,” an oil on canvas by Richard M. Firth; Harold K. Vanderbilt at Ranger’s helm with her afterguard (from left): Rod and Olin Stephens (her co-designer), Prof. Zenas Bliss, and Mrs. Gertrude Vanderbilt, along with an unknown crew member; American yacht designer William Starling Burgess and Harold S. Vanderbilt. Opposite page, from left: Rainbow was purchased by Chandler Hovey of Marblehead, Massachusetts, in 1937. Mr. Hovey is the tall man dressed in all white, Chandler Hovey Jr. stands at the wheel behind him, and Elizabeth Hovey (the only woman on deck) acts as navigator in front of him, July 8, 1937; Harold S. Vanderbilt, who invented the modern version of contract bridge in 1925, supplied the permanent trophy for the World Bridge Federation’s Olympiad Team tournaments in 1960.


122 QUEST

C A R LO B O R LE N G H I ; S TA N LE Y Z . RO S E N F E L D ; RO B E RT M . C A R R I C K ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S ; J O H N O S G O O D , CO U RTE S Y O F G E O F F R E Y M A S O N

“MESSING ABOUT IN (12 METRE) BOATS” PAST AND PRESENT


This page, clockwise from above: Kookaburra II; Intrepid beats Dame Pattie in the fourth and final race, 1967; preliminary 12mR budget, circa 1978. Opposite page, clockwise from top: The America’s Cup course; a reunion of the America’s Cup teams from 1964 (Constellation) and 1974 (Courageous), at the New York Yacht Club’s Harbour Court in September 2014; Jon Logan and Rick Ledwidth onboard Nefertiti in 1962.


J O H N O S G O O D , CO U RT E S Y O F G E O F F R E Y M A S O N ; S A LLYA N N E S A N TO S

CO U RTE S Y O F B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; C A R LO B O R LE N G H I ; S TA N LE Y Z . RO S E N F E L D ;


This page, clockwise from above left: Spirit of America, 1983; Courageous, 2007; Freedom and Liberty alongside Fire Three, 1983; Mauro Pelaschier; the crew of Intrepid, 2003 North America champions. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Intrepid’s crew celebrating their victory over Dame Pattie, 1967; Edgartown Regatta, 2004; Jon Wales onboard Nefertiti in 1962; Freedom at the 2018 12 Metre North American Championship in Newport; Edgartown Regatta, 2005.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 2 5


RO S E N F E L D ; CO U RT E S Y O F B R I A N M E L Z I A N ; J O H N O S G O O D ,

S A LLY A N N E S A N TO S ; S T E P H E N L I R A K I S ; S TA N LE Y Z .

CO U RTE S Y O F G E O F F R E Y M A S O N

This page, clockwise from above: USA at the 2012 12 Metre North American Championship in Newport; The crew onboard Independence, with Courageous following, 1977 (inset); Black Knight, iconic Race Committee boat; Courageous’s crew after winning the 12mR North American Championships, 2005; New York Yacht Club Race Committee, 1967. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Defender, 1983; Olin Stephens and Gertrude Vanderbilt aboard Ranger; France III, with others; Jon Wales onboard Nefertiti in 1962; preliminary 12mR budget, circa 1978; aboard Commodore Gubelmann’s Mahubus, 2012.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 2 7


53z

®

Official Boat International Jury

MJM Yachts | 35z | 40z | 43z | 50z | New 53z


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info@mjmyachts.com | 401.862.4367 A Zurn Design


BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER

“And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing

on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that

familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”

—F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

130 QUEST

T H I S PA G E : I N TE R N AT I O N A L TE N N I S H A LL O F FA M E I N N E WP O RT, R H O D E I S L A N D . O P P O S I TE PA G E : TE R RY O ’ N E I LL / I CO N I C I M A G E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; R I D E S A B I K E . CO M ; R E T RO P R I N TM A K E R . CO M ; B E T TM A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER


Clockwise from top left: Audrey Hepburn playing table tennis during the filming of Two For The Road in Saint-Tropez, 1967; Jean Howard and Irene Hervey atop their side-by-side “sociable” bicycle (or buddy bike, or side tandem) during a ride to work at the MGM lot in 1933; Born from a 1920’s sail loft shop in old Newport, Rhode Island, The Black Pearl restaurant has become a New England institution; Pictorial Historic Map of Long Island, 1933; John F. Kennedy Jr. leans on the gunwale of a boat in Penobscot Bay, Maine, during a 26-day Outward Bound course upon his return to the Rockland, Maine, main base of the Outward Bound School, 1977. Opposite page: The International Tennis Hall of Fame, located in the Newport Casino, was commissioned in 1879 by James Gordon Bennett Jr. as an exclusive resort for Newport summer residents.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 3 1


132 QUEST

A F P ; PI N TE R E S T. CO M ; T H E N E WP O RT B U Z Z ; A R C H I V E P H OTO S / G E T T Y I M A G E S


Quest

R E G I N A L D DAV I S / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; G E T T Y A R C H I V E ; B R AU L I O B A E Z A . CO M ; R E P O RTE R S A S S O C I E S / G A M M A / G A M M A - R A P H O V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; A N WA R H U S S E I N / W I R E I M A G E

ENDLESS SUMMER

Counterclockwise from top right: Queen Elizabeth II presenting the polo cup to Prince Philip at Smith’s Lawn, Windsor Park, England, 1969; Prince Rainer III and Princess Grace attend Royal Ascot, 1966; Dr. Fager heads to the track for the 1968 Whitney Stakes at Saratoga Race Course; Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton with their children: Michael, Christopher, Elisabeth, and Maria, on vacation in the French Riviera, 1965; Prince Charles and Princess Diana kiss during a polo match at Cirencester Park, England, July, 1985. Opposite page, from top: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (R), and his wife Kate, Duchess of Cambridge (L), arrive with their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, in Warsaw, Poland, on July 17, 2017; Ginger Rogers, Greg Bautzer, Dinah Shore, and George Montgomery at the Racket Club in Palm Springs, CA, circa 1950; The New York Yacht Club at Harbour Court in Newport, Rhode Island; “Little” Edith Bouvier Beale, a cousin of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, modeling swimwear during her job as a fashion model, circa 1935.

J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 3 3


134 QUEST

T I M E L I F E PI C T U R E S / PI C T U R E S I N C . / T H E L I F E PI C T U R E CO LLE C T I O N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; P E N N U N I V E R S I T Y A R C H I V E S D I G I TA L I M A G E CO LLE C T I O N ; M E T RO - G O L D W I N - M AY E R S T U D I O S ; A M E R I C A S B E S T R AC I N G . N E T


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER

Clockwise from top left: Lauren Hutton seated on a dock wearing a top and poplin skirt by Calvin Klein, 1976; Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt lends an attentive ear to his granddaughter, Anna Eleanor Dall, at his estate in Hyde Park, NY, July 11, 1932 (Anna is the daughter of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Dall, the governor’s daughter); Clint Eastwood sits behind the wheel as he and his wife, Maggie, take a ride on the Union 76 Ocean

A LB E RT WATS O N / CO N D É N A S T; A P P H OTO ; C B S P H OTO A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; N A N T U C K E T H I S TO R I C A L A S S O C I AT I O N ; J E A N - M A R I E P É R I E R

Highway at Pacific Ocean Park, Los Angeles, 1959; a crowd gathers on Nantucket’s Brant Point to see the first landing of aircraft, two seaplanes, in 1918; Françoise Hardy wearing a white Paco Rabanne dress, 1966. Opposite page, clockwise from top: multicolored cabanas align Chappaquiddick “Chappy” Beach Club in Martha’s Vineyard, Edgartown, MA; Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel poses on the beach at the Lido in Venice with Duke Laurino of Rome, 1937; three-time Olympic gold medal winner John Brendan Kelly Sr. (better known as “Jack” Kelly), the father of the actress and Princess of Monaco, Grace Kelly, and John B. Kelly Jr., in his shell on the Schuylkill River at The University of Pennsylvania, 1920; Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway on the set of The Thomas Crown Affair, 1968; Mrs. John Hay Whitney (Liz Whitney, as she was known, who was married to “Jock” Whitney from 1930-1940) at Belmont Park, 1934.


SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE BY NISHITA NAGA

Getting out of town for the summer doesn’t mean you have to stop shopping ’til you drop. These essential boutiques in our favorite destinations will keep you looking chic during your getaway...and let you take a bit of summer vacation back home with you afterwards. This page: Shops along Nantucket’s harbor. Insets, clockwise from top left: Vineyard Haven Harbor in Martha’s Vineyard; map of Nantucket; East Hampton’s Hook Mill.


{ H A M P T O N S } RALPH LAUREN 33 Main Street / East Hampton 631.907.0960 Ralph Lauren’s East Hampton boutique perfectly captures the brand’s charm and sophisticated style. Seemingly a traditional cottage on the outside, the lush and airy Ralph Lauren store of East Hampton has been carefully designed inside to optimize your shopping experience as well as place this destination apart from any other Ralph Lauren location you might encounter near your home town. Be sure to curate a personalized classic look for your warm-weather activities this year with the newest store selections, including silk attire, classic polos, and a wide range of beach accessories.

ALA VON AUERSPERG 8 Main Street / Sag Harbor

This Memorial Day through Labor Day Weekend, Ala Isham is opening the first storefront for her brand Ala Von Auersperg. Customers will be able to try on the Spring/Summer 2019 collection in-store. For fashions known for their effortless, timeless, and relaxed looks, visit the Main Street of Sag Harbor for a fresh take on summer clothes. Inspired by the East End, the styles are named after Ala’s home, and various aspects of each town have been incorporated into every one of the collection’s prints. The collection was created with the culture and season of the Hamptons in mind, making each style perfect for your next summer home soirée.

KIRNA ZABÊTE

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E S TO R E S ; B FA

66 Newtown Lane / East Hampton 631.527.5794 With curated collections personally selected by founder and owner Beth Buccini, Kirna Zabête offers a fashionable destination featuring top contemporary designers. The store is chock-full of lively patterns, colors, and unique designs that bring a summery take on high-fashion styles to the East Hampton community all year round. Kirna Zabête encourages its customers to dress for joy and the store offers an endless selection of original designs made for the bright, bold, and stylish woman. If you’re looking to make a statement with your summer closet this year, be sure to stop by Kirna Zabête—it may just be your cup of tea.


{ N E W P O R T } MANDARINE 16 Bannister’s Wharf 401.848.9360 If you’re looking to bring a little Newport charm into your closet, Mandarine provides a peaceful atmosphere to browse the newest summer trends. With locations in St. Barth and Newport, Mandarine offers a wide selection of relaxed women’s clothing for the summer (think kaftans and wrap dresses) along with fine jewelry to match. Although Mandarine offers experiences in two locations, the Newport store looks to bring an island flair to the founder’s hometown while catering to the rapidly changing trends and interest of all those who enter.

NEWPORT MANSIONS STORE 1 Bannister’s Wharf 401.849.9900 With Newport’s long history, it is almost impossible to leave the town without taking part in some of its history and traditions. Schedule visits to The Breakers, The Elms, Marble House, Rosecliff, Newport’s castle on the sea, the Isaac Bell House, and more of the famous old Newport mansions, and when you’re done, don’t forget to peruse the different themed souvenirs on display. The Newport Mansions Store provides the perfect space to experience the old charms of the city, and also serves as the perfect stop to pick up a housewarming gift for your next summer party.

SEA BAGS 3004, 25 Bannister’s Wharf 207.553.0144 The perfect beach bag is nearly impossible to find. You keep an eye out when you’re swimsuit shopping, in a beach town, or even looking for handbags but it always seems like the perfect bag is in the hands of someone else! However, Sea Bags can place the perfect tote in your hands as soon as you arrive to Newport. Sea Bags are originally sailing bags, and carry the history of sailors all along the East Coast with every product. Sea Bag designs cater to everyone’s style, and will bring you the perfect tote for your vacation needs.


{ M A R T H A’ S

V I N E Y A R D }

JACK WILLS 1 S. Water Street / Edgartown 508.939.4371 Offering variations on the classic fashions so popular in Martha’s Vineyard, Jack Wills brings a European feel to the local island fashion. Although founded in Britain, Jack Wills has offered a style selection in the United States for years, and as part of the Ethical Trading initiative, the company makes sure you are shopping in the right place, with pieces that everyone can love, from comfortable hoodies and sweatshirts to beach-ready outfits and accessories. You will be stepping out of the cottage store and onto the waterfront with an ensemble that feels like it was made just for you.

MURDICK’S FUDGE 21 North Water Street / Edgartown 508.627.8047 If the charm of Martha’s Vineyard comes from its local haunts, then Murdick’s Fudge is at the top of everyone’s list. Since 1887, the shop serves a wide range of homemade fudge flavors, peanut brittle, and candy that has everyone on the island stopping in for a bite. The company prides itself on its pure recipe and fresh ingredients that provide rich, authentic flavor to all-natural fudge: only real butter, cream, and flavorings are used. Murdick’s Fudge caters to every one of its customers’ needs, and every sweet treat becomes an essential part of each Martha’s Vineyard memory to bring home long after you return to your hometown. With three locations in Martha’s Vineyard, it is almost impossible to find a reason not to join the flock for fudge.

BUNCH OF GRAPES

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E S TO R E S

23 Main Street / Vineyard Haven 508.693.2291 Looking to revamp your summer library? Bunch of Grapes has stood on Vineyard Haven’s Main Street for 40 years, supplying the town with curated stories from a team of avid writers and readers. The homey independent bookstore allows readers to choose from a wide selection of different genres, and invites local authors for readings and book signings in an intimate setting. Whether you’re stopping by to see your favorite author, to work, or to grab a newspaper or waterside read (be sure to check out the staff’s current picks), you can always count on Bunch of Grapes to satisfy your literary needs all year round. J U LY 2 0 1 9 1 3 9


{ S A R A T O G A } VIOLET’S OF SARATOGA 494 Broadway 518.584.4838 Violet’s Boutique in Saratoga Springs is the place to satisfy your vacation-chic dreams. Discover outfits for any occasion among the store’s wide selection of casual wear, denim, cocktail dresses, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and gifts. When searching for clothing to let your look stand apart from the crowd, Violet’s will help reinvent your closet and cater to your every need. Browse the racks at Violet’s boutique for a fresh take on your usual summer look.

J.MCLAUGHLIN 191 Union Avenue 917.438.5058 J.McLaughlin is coming to the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame to showcase its newest Equestrian Collection from August 15th to 18th. While the popup usually takes place indoors, this year’s will be presented in a tent just across from the museum. The collection features classic J.McLaughlin style, coupled with equestrian-themed prints and bright colors for anyone looking to make a statement. New arrivals will also be showcased at the pop-up and the company will donate a percentage of proceeds back to the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Celebrate J.McLaughlin and the long history of racing with a visit to its pop-up, or kick off the weekend of the showcase at their post-race party.

THE PINK PADDOCK 351 Broadway #101 518.587.4344 When searching for a spot to quench your thirst for chic and colorful clothing, look no further than The Pink Paddock in Saratoga, which carries your favorite brands and beachwear. The Pink Paddock serves as a Lilly Pulitzer signature store and is filled with the designer’s much-loved prints, colors, and classic dresses. Let the bright designs in the open windows of the store draw you into its homey wooden interior and standout selection. With locations all over New York, you can always head back for more. Update your resort wardrobe in the store’s hometown or shop for fun and unique gifts during a leisurely getaway. 140 QUEST


{ N A N T U C K E T } SERENELLA 9B South Beach Street 508.228.3400 It’s hard not to succumb to the inviting beachy charm of Nantucket, and Serenella is just the right place to go to update your summer wardrobe. The boutique carries everyone’s favorite high-end brands, including Oscar de la Renta, Bottega Veneta, Versace, Tabitha Simmons, and more, and serves as the local style guru’s summer haven. The location distinguishes itself through modern silhouettes, high-quality materials and cuts, and the revolutionary vision of the store’s owner. Serenella brings an air of elegance to the small-island paradise of Nantucket, maintaining an air of refinery that adds something completely unique to the island’s original charm.

MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP 62 Main Street 508.228.0437

(VIOLET ’S OF SARATOGA); HEATHER BOHM-TALLMAN (THE PINK PADDOCK STOREFRONT)

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE STORES; DANIA BAYGI PHOTOGRAPHY AND SUPER SOURCE MEDIA

For anyone looking to find the true local styles of Nantucket, Murray’s Toggery is the place for your Nantucket red clothing and accessories. Situated at the very top of Nantucket’s Main Street, the family-owned store was the first to introduce Nantucket reds—pants made from canvas fabric whose red color faded over time in memory of the sails of boats sailing on the coast of France. The pants quickly became a symbol of preppy style, and Murray’s Toggery now stands as the original authentic retailer of the famous faded red and pink clothing.

THE SKINNY DIP 23 Old South Wharf 508.901.5870 The Skinny Dip brings a taste of New York fashion to Massachussetts with a Nantucket twist. The brand’s newest store has opened near Old South Wharf. The Skinny Dip showcases the work of its accomplished founders as well as emerging designers and a careful selection of lifestyle brands in tandem with its male and female fashion lines. Want to go beyond clothes? The Skinny Dip also offers selections in home decor and gifts, sure to bring the summer sun into your own home. The store is open from mid-May to October, so stop by before the season ends.


K E L LY

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY

Joan Smalls and Emily Ratajkowski at Veuve Clicquot’s Polo Classic at Liberty State Park.

142 QUEST


Left to right: Nacho Figueras and Delfina Blaquier at the annual Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic; Nicky Hilton Rothschild; Team Veuve Clicquot defeated Team

CO U RTE S Y O F B FA ; S I M B A R A S H E C H A ; C H R I S T I N E A . B U T LE R

Liberty Comets in the polo match.

▲ VEUVE CLICQUOT POLO CLASSIC

▼ SPRING GARDEN PARTY AT THE FRICK

VEUVE CLIQUOT PRESENTED its 12th annual polo classic at Liberty State Park, featuring an afternoon of Champagne, mingling, and, of course, a match between Veuve Clicquot and the Liberty Comets—resulting in a 11-10 win for the host team. While Cara Casino received the MVP award, Nacho Figueras was the highest scorer of the day. This year’s festivities attracted Julianne Moore, who performed the ball toss, newly engaged Jennifer Lawrence, Michael B. Jordan, Emily Ratajkowski and Sebastian Bear-McClard, Joan Smalls, Gayle King, Coco Rocha, Nicky Hilton Rothschild, and more.

EACH YEAR, the Frick Collection opens its historic Fifth Avenue Garden for its Spring Garden Party—a rarity that partygoers look forward to again and again. For this year’s occasion— despite the rain—more than 750 guests, including Paul Arnhold, Wes Gordon, Georgina Bloomberg, and Lili Buffett, arrived in festive spring ensembles. The evening offered cocktails and bites while guests perused the permanent collection, special exhibition galleries, and second floor of the Frick mansion. By the tail end of the event, attendees even made their way out to the garden for a perfect nightcap as the skies cleared. u

Left to right: Lili Buffett, Paul Arnhold, Georgina Bloomberg, and Wes Gordon at the Frick Collection’s Annual Spring Garden Party; Olga Sorokina and Polina Proshkina; Amory McAndrew and Elizabeth Kurpis.


SNAPSHOT

THOUGHTS FROM RIC RIVERA (AKA 5-0) (Started working at the Clarke Cooke House May 23, 1977)

ON SAILING & SAILORS: • From where I stand, in the house where I work, I have the opportunity to follow the summer schedule, especially in sailing. From the NYYC Annual Regatta to the Candy Store Cup and the much anticipated 12 Metre Worlds in-between, I get to see the calendar in a very unique way. My first introduction to the 12s was the Cup during the summer of 1977. Courageous and Independence (rival and neighbor) were both docked at Bannisters Wharf. • The most outrageous sailor story? I can’t reveal that. It’s the bartender’s golden rule. AFTER 42 YEARS, WHAT IS STILL CHARMING:

• High season, off season, on shore, off shore, its history and its present (the “goings on”)— Newport is a very special place. And I can apply all of that to the Cooke House as well. This is still the best job in the best place— for the food (Snowballs!), the drinks (Dark & Stormy!), the stories, the tradition—complete! • One of the most gratifying things is to see the next generation coming in the front door and serving them. Tradition continues. Cheers! —Ric Rivera Above: William Heydt’s watercolor original of Ric Rivera from his book, Newportant People. Below, left to right: Ric Rivera stationary; a photo of Ric Rivera at Skybar in Newport’s Clarke Cooke House. 144 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F B A N N I S TE R ’ S W H A R F CO M PA NY; W I LL I A M H E Y DT

• Even in the off-season, there’s always something going on in Newport. The pace is slower, but the town is not idle. It almost seems like we need the winter to prepare for the summer season! An example: This past March, Brad Reed of Sail Newport introduced the team of American Magic, the NYYC entry for the next Americas Cup. This really gave us a bolt of excitement and energy during the last days of winter.


TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MODERN WORLD

PROJECT PLAN FOR CASEY KEY ESTATE

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PALM BEACH, FL 33480

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561 600 5775

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