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$5.00 JULY 2016

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THE SUMMER ISSUE

MINNIE CUSHING AT BAILEY’S BEACH, NEWPORT, RI, BY SLIM AARONS, 1965

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100 80 78

CONTENTS T he S umme r ISSue 80

ENDLESS SUMMER

A look back at the sunny and breezy styles that

the social set loves when the temperature rises.

86

GRAY MALIN’S AERIAL ARTISTRY

by

e lIzabeTh m eIgher

A collection of coasts, as captured by

Gray Malin for BEACHES (Abrams). by elIzabeTh QuInn brown

92

EASY SUMMER LIVING

With so many wonderful places to stay, we

give you a round-up of the history of the best resorts around.

100

THE VISION OF FREDERICK CHURCH

The Olana State Historic Site,

home to the painter Frederic Edwin Church, is celebrating 50 years of perfect preservation.

106 110

by

KaTe gubelmann

GATEWAY TO THE HUDSON VALLEY SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE

The big renaissance of Tuxedo Park.

Take a break from the beach at some of our

favorite spots for splurging on something really cool.

116 120

THE EAST ENDERS

by

l eSlIe l ocKe

Bert Morgan shoots Southampton. by georgIna Schaeffer

HOPPING BETWEEN HAMPTONS

The scoop on this summer destination,

featuring a guide to the different towns.

by

e lIzabeTh Q uInn b rown

86


Portrait by renowned illustrator Joseph Adolphe.

WILMINGTON TRUST RENOWNED INSIGHT

“Families are evolving. Is your estate plan?”

Sharon Klein Managing Director of Family Office Services and Wealth Strategies Sharon uses her vast knowledge of complex estate planning and trust laws to help clients address even the most complex subjects and to create solid strategies. She is part of a seasoned team of professionals who exemplify Wilmington Trust’s 113-year heritage of successfully advising families. For access to knowledgeable professionals like Sharon and the rest of our team, contact Larry Gore at 212-415-0547.

Most laws regarding how estates are handled are designed with a traditional nuclear family in mind – a husband, wife, and biological children. Today, however, fewer than half of all U.S. households meet this traditional definition. And that trend is likely to continue now that same-sex marriage is legal nationwide and as divorce and remarriage remain common. New inheritance questions. It’s not simply about traditional versus nontraditional families. Rapid advances in reproductive technology are creating once unimaginable questions regarding inheritance rights. And this issue has given rise to a new legal territory: posthumous birth laws. How should children conceived with stored genetic material after the death of one or both of the genetic parents be treated regarding inheritance? A complicated topic, indeed. Consideration for pets. Furthermore, the concept of family for some extends to pets as well. Some states have even enacted estate planning laws regarding these four-legged family members. For instance, the growing demand of pet owners to be buried with their pets has caused a few states to permit this

practice. While many states do not currently address this issue, that’s likely to change. LESS THAN

50%

OF HOUSEHOLDS IN THE U.S. TODAY CONTAIN A HUSBAND AND WIFE Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Staying ahead of change. This is the new reality of estate planning, as changes are occurring more rapidly than ever before. It’s clear that the planning solutions of yesterday will not be applicable tomorrow for such unique and complex scenarios. How do you keep up? That’s where Wilmington Trust comes in. Our experts have helped shape key legislation for decades, working diligently to anticipate new trends and be out in front of changes. We are well equipped to address wealth complexities in an ever-changing world, and will customize a strategy that meets your unique needs. For more insight on how to successfully plan for your individual situation, read “Are you prepared for the unexpected?” found at wilmingtontrust.com/estateplanning.

FIDUCIARY SERVICES | WEALTH PLANNING | INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT | PRIVATE BANKING

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the sale of any financial product or service. This article is not designed or intended to provide financial, tax, legal, accounting, or other professional advice since such advice always requires consideration of individual circumstances. If professional advice is needed, the services of your professional advisor should be sought. Private Banking is the marketing name for an offering of M&T Bank deposit and loan products and services. Investments: • Are NOT FDIC-Insured • Have NO Bank Guarantee • May Lose Value Wilmington Trust is a registered service mark. Wilmington Trust Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of M&T Bank Corporation (M&T). Investment management and fiduciary services are provided by Wilmington Trust Company, operating in Delaware only, and Wilmington Trust, N.A., a national bank. Loans, retail and business deposits, and other personal and business banking services and products are offered by M&T Bank, member FDIC. ©2016 Wilmington Trust Corporation and its affiliates. All rights reserved.


60

CONTENTS C olumns 18

SOCIAL DIARY

44

HARRY BENSON

Our columnist remembers his time spent with the champ, Muhammad Ali.

46

THE ITALIAN WAY

Gianni Agnelli, a businessman with political potential.

48

FRESH FINDS

52

CANTEENS

54

AUDAX

58

FOOD & LIFESTYLE

60

TRAVEL

Traveling by private charter to a paradise on St. Barth: Cheval Blanc.

62

BOOKS

Media titan Roy W. Howard’s story comes to vivid life in a new biography.

64

PERSPECTIVE

68

BOOKS

70

OPEN HOUSE

Ginnel Real Estate invites our readers to their properties in Northern Westchester.

72

REAL ESTATE

Quest consults its brokers for advice when purchasing primary and secondary homes.

78

SOCIAL CALENDAR

124

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

128

FAREWELL

Farewell to Bill Cunningham, and the Four Seasons Restaurant. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia

Shopping for summer luxuries.

by

D aniel C aPPello

by

anD

taki theoDoraCoPulos

e lizabeth m eigher

Nights at the Clarke Cooke House in Newport, Rhode Island. by katherine Parker-magyar

The Preservation Society of Newport County sees a year of changes and transformation. Recalling a culinary remedy for Nancy Reagan’s 90th birthday bash. by

by

alex hitz

Daniel CaPPello by

alex travers

Patrick Park on his generous friend—and presidential candidate—Donald Trump.

Our review of Packing to Travel by What2WearWhere’s Karen Klopp.

by

l eslie l oCke

The best events that are taking place in Newport, Saratoga, and the Hamptons. A parade of events, in the city and beyond. by elizabeth Quinn brown

Remembering the legendary fashion photographer Bill Cunningham. by Chris meigher

48


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questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO ART DIRECTOR

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ALEX TRAVERS CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY

ElEctric Paris May 14 – September 4, 2016 Masterpieces of the City of Light

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN ALEX HITZ BILL HUSTED PAUL JEROMACK JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS MICHAEL THOMAS

Florence Gould Foundation

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

TERRY ALLEN HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA CUTTY MCGILL

BRUCE MUSEUM Greenwich, Connecticut www.brucemuseum.org

PATRICK MCMULLAN ANNIE WATT


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Clockwise from top left: Olana, the home of painter Frederic Edwin Church, celebrates 50 years of perfect preservation; BEACHES (Abrams) by Gray Malin; Slim Aarons captures Mrs. Hans Evans watching her children dig for clams at low tide on Black Beach, Massachusetts Bay, 1960.

their place for one in Martha’s Vineyard, and watch them scoff as hard as if you had proposed they lay down on the street and let a bus run over them. It’s not happening. Everyone knows that theirs is the true slice of paradise, despite whatever advantages of travel or scenery or society other destinations may have. Because that is the place where they had the time to enjoy themselves and the people they love. That’s what these places mean to us. That’s what makes them invaluable. u

NEW YORKERS PERFORM their own “Brexit” every summer. When our tumultuous daily lives lie bare under the bright sun, we need to run away to calmer pastures, soothe our furrowed brows, and slip into a relaxed, reflective state. We need to spend the afternoon dreaming about starting a vineyard in Italy from scratch, taking life at a slower pace, and other unrealistic nonsense for anyone who gets their energy from the buzz of the city. This is the time to invent a game—a silly, pass-the-time one filled with secret codes and room for amendments—to play with friends and family, which will end up becoming a favorite summertime activity, a tradition, passed through generations of players, all stemming from a particularly languid Saturday afternoon. The question of where to escape to then becomes a matter of preference. There are so many places that beckon, and each has its die-hard defenders. Try to convince a Hamptonite that Nantucket is the place to be, or a Lake George family that they might want to trade 16 QUEST

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Minnie Cushing photographed by Slim Aarons with her surfboard at Bailey’s Beach (formerly known as “Spouting Rock Beach Association”) in Newport, Rhode Island, circa 1965. Her father, Harvey Williams Cushing, introduced the sport of surfing to the club in the 1930s.


E X T E N D YO U R S U M M E R MORNING YOGA, A SWIM IN THE OCEAN, RELAXING IN A POOLSIDE CABANA MORNING YOGA, A SWIM IN THE OCEAN, RELAXING IN A POOLSIDE CABANA SIPPING A FRESH COLD PRESSED JUICE AND AN AFTERNOON BEACH SIPPING A FRESH COLD PRESSED JUICE AND AN AFTERNOON BEACH WORKOUT ARE JUST A FEW WAYS OWNERS CAPTURE THE DAY. WORKOUT ARE JUST A FEW WAYS OWNERS CAPTURE THE DAY.

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ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE UPON CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED RELIEDSHOULD UPON AS AS CORRECTLY STATING THECONTRACT REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE BE MADE TO A PURCHASE AND THE OTHER DOCUMENTS FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO A PURCHASE CONTRACT AND THE OTHER DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS IS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS YOUR IS NOT NOT INTENDED TO BE AN OFFER TO SELL CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN ANY STATE WHERE PROHIBITED BY LOCAL LAW AND INTENDED TO BE AN OFFER TO SELL CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN ANY STATE WHERE PROHIBITED BY LOCAL LAW AND YOUR ELIGIBILITY ELIGIBILITY FOR FOR PURCHASE PURCHASE WILL WILL DEPEND DEPEND UPON UPON YOUR YOUR STATE STATE OF OF RESIDENCY. RESIDENCY. EQUAL EQUAL HOUSING HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. OPPORTUNITY.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY NEW YORKERS WOKE the morning of Sunday, June 26, to learn the news that Bill Cunningham—the ubiquitous New York Times social and fashion photographer, who became an institution in his own right—died on Saturday afternoon in New York. He was 87 last March 14. Bonnie Strauss had emailed me the previous Wednesday to inquire if I had heard anything about him because he wasn’t in the last “Style” sec-

tion. I hadn’t heard anything. Then, that Friday, Ellin Saltzman sent a message that Bill had had a stroke and was not expected to survive; the call had gone out for “last rites.” Whatever was happening, he had also been up and out there working. Only a couple of weeks before, I saw him at the Wildlife Conservation Society dinner at the Central Park Zoo. He was there in his uniform of the blue cotton jacket and dark khaki pants,

and he was his characteristic, smiling self. Bill and I never knew each other. There was never the opportunity for me to get to know him. (And I never had the impression he was interested in getting to know me, anyway.) Frankly, we were both—wherever it was that we were—in the same room together for the same reason: to cover it. And so I learned about him by watching. Much was

obvious. Bill had a self-effacing manner; he was gracious, polite, centered with his work, but perhaps shy. This was a man who was totally a professional and a very hard worker. He was also a fashion designer in his heart, or at least in a part of his heart. A number of years ago there was an award ceremony for the designer Arnold Scaasi at the National Arts Club by Gramercy Park. I can’t remember the occasion

Bill Cunningham with Vogue Italia editor Anna Piaggi, as photographed by Marc de Groot in Paris, France (1989).

18 QUEST


NEW YORK | HAMPTONS | GREENWICH


for the award, except that it was about Arnold. Arnold enjoyed that kind of attention, so he invited a number of his friends and Bill Cunningham was one of his guests, as well as the main speaker. He was not there to photograph. He was wearing a black jacket and tie—a professional speaking about professional matters. I had seen him hundreds, maybe thousands, of times, but only with his camera while he was working. I had no sense of the man’s personality, except for his impish and wide, bright smile and his somewhat modest presence. At this evening, he spoke about attending the show for Arnold’s first major runway collection. Arnold was a friend: a friendfriend, not just a social or business acquaintance. 20 QUEST

Arnold’s first show was back in the 1950s when Bill was a young man. He was new in New York, pursuing a career as a milliner. (All of this was new information to me at the time of his speech.) That evening, at the podium, he proceeded to describe the different numbers in the show. This moment revealed a man who was not only very knowledgeable about the creative side of fashion but could describe Arnold’s first major fashion show a half-century before in detail. And it was all to explain why Arnold was so good at his work. I wasn’t really surprised to learn how knowledgeable he was. Ultimately, it was knowledge—and it was almost scholarly in reference. Having observed him over

the years, very often when we were working, I knew he was deadly serious. One of my first experiences with him was shortly after Jeff Hirsch and I launched the “New York Social Diary.” In those early days, Jeff and I would go out as a team: he would photograph while I would interview and make notes about the event in my head. We were at a small reception at A La Vieille Russie and Bill was there photographing. There was as moment when there was a shot that all the photographers in the room wanted to get and Jeff was in there with his camera. Suddenly, he was sharply elbowed out of the way by a man 50 years older and 40 pounds lighter—none other than Mr. Cunningham. Ouch!

This kind of aggressiveness from the aforementioned personality came as an unpleasant surprise to both Jeff and me, and we were rather put out by such an action (though, years later, it makes me laugh to think about it). What we learned about the man was to stay out of his sight of lens— or else! He was, in his own mind, the photographer in the room. Not necessarily because he felt that way about himself, but because he knew what he wanted in a shot. And he’d been doing it for 40 years. In later years, he and I were often the only people photographing at a party or an event. I do not regard myself a photographer, incidentally, although I take a lot of pictures so that we’ll have them on the website. Bill Cunningham was

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A a Photographer, of the first order. He was an excellent reporter with a very sharp eye. He had a very charming public manner. He was friendly with some people at these events, but he was always working. When you saw him in conversation with someone (often someone prominent or famous who was on the same scene) he always looked delighted and was smiling broadly as he listened or conversed. But at the same time, his two hands were always on his camera, which he held close to his chest. Ready to shoot. And when his work was over, he left. He didn’t stick around for dinner to schmooze or drink. He had work to do. He was a New England boy. A Bah-ston boy from Marblehead. The second in a Roman Catholic family of four. (The

term Roman Catholic, in those days and in that part of the world, had a special meaning, both pro and con.) He grew up in the Puritan world of the WASP, but during the rise of Joe Kennedy. It was an era when all Massachusetts Roman Catholics, and especially the Irish, were in awe however great or slight of an Irish Catholic boy “making it” in the world of New York. He must have been a creative kid because, as soon as he was old enough to leave home, he came to New York and pursued a career as a milliner. It was an interest he had as a boy. He was good with his hands: an artist in bloom. When hats went out of fashion, Bill’s career in millinery dwindled. Nevertheless, his interest in the business of fashion was his calling. I don’t

know how or why he decided to go the photographic route except that it was his victory. The boy back in Marblehead who took up millinery (or, rather, making hats for a mother who, evidently, wasn’t wild about them) was still that man who took up the camera. The child in him remained operative all his life. He was an artist, and you could see it in his bearing, in his carriage. He was a small man, reedy and slightly hunched over, probably from years of doing just that in order to get a shot. He transported himself around town economically and quickly on a bike, well into his 80s. No limousines (though, he could easily have demanded them). He had a New England frugality about his person. The way he lived was very simply, surrounded by his work.

He was a lone man as far as I know. That said, he had real friends apart from the legions of men and women who liked and admired him. His life was his work, and his work was his life. The archive he leaves behind is a major document of the American 20th century and of New York. His eye was on that time and on that era— and he caught it in all of its glory. And now it has passed, and Bill has left too. On another historical/ cultural note, the American Friends of Versailles held their annual junket (which usually takes place in Paris) here in New York: a fantastic five days of luncheons, lectures, tours of private houses and collections, cocktail receptions, dinners, and finally a “grand ball” that took place at the Metropolitan Club. Funds raised will

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Allan Chapin and Nancy Kissinger 22 QUEST

François de l’Estang and Henry Kissinger

Cindy Carcamo, Lane Harwell and Kathleen Holcomb

Audrey Wolf and James Lowenstein

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tony and Bonnie Smith


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A go to support their project to restore the ceiling of Marie Antoinette’s “queen’s guards room” in her suite of rooms in the chateau. Among the fêtes was a cocktail dînatoire hosted by Elizabeth Segerstrom at her Fifth Avenue apartment. After a reception at the French Consulate—where guests were greeted by the consulate general of France and the French ambassador, and by Catherine Pégard (president of the Etablissement public du château, du musée et du domaine national de Versailles)—they adjourned to the Elizabeth’s home, where they were treated to caviar, lobster, and crème brûlée as served among cascades of white orchids and tulips. A model of Versailles molded of chocolate was a dessert centerpiece. On another note, with more

than 450 guests attending, NYU Langone Medical Center held its annual 2016 Violet Ball at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and raised $7 million to attract and retain brilliant young minds through scholarships. Paolo Fresco, former chairman of Fiat and former executive vice chairman at General Electric, was honored for his visionary leadership in establishing NYU Langone’s Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders. Among the guests were: Nancy and Larry Bossidy, Marjorie and Walter Buckley, Barbara and David Calhoun, Elisabeth J. Cohen, MD, Isabel and Francesco Genuardi, Trudy Elbaum Gottesman and Robert Gottesman, Sheree and Marc Holliday, Julia Koch, Ofer Nemirovsky, Laurie Perlmutter, Klara and Lar-

ry Silverstein, Leonard Tow, Gwen Towns and Representative Ed Towns, Patty Newburger and Bradley Wechsler, Suzy and Jack Welch, and Beatrice and Anthony Welters. Society in New York today is entirely about charity and philanthropy. On a Wednesday night at the Mandarin Oriental, the Boys’ Club of New York (BCNY) held its annual awards dinner and honored William B. Tyree (who was just named BCNY’s board president after serving as a trustee for 26 years) and Jacqueline Williams (who is a former women’s board president and current member of the BCNY women’s board and board of trustees). It is the biggest and most crucial fundraiser of the year for the Boys’ Club of New York and they raised nearly $1.6 million to sup-

port BCNY’s high-quality programs. The Boys’ Club of New York is a noble objective and—like other organizations that focus on assisting children and young people into positions of self-reliance, independence, and initiative—they make a great contribution not only to the boys (and girls) but to the communities. Jacqueline (or Jackie) and I know each other through her late mother Lady Sarah Churchill, who was a close friend of mine. Sarah grew up in Blenheim Palace in a very different life in terms compared to that of the children her daughter’s work nurtures. Sarah’s father was John Spencer-Churchill, 10th Duke of Marlborough, and her grandmother was the icon of the Gilded Age in New York: Consuelo Vanderbilt. Sarah, herself, cut her own

N AT I O N A L AU D U B O N S O C I E T Y H O N O R E D “ W OM E N I N C O N S E R VAT I O N ” AT T H E P L A Z A H OT E L

Dominique Browning and Cynthia Hampton 24 QUEST

Marcy Boyle and Margot Ernst

Catherine Heald

Carrie Price with George and Victoria Whipple

Molly Rauch and Flo Stone

Katie Carpenter and Mark Gilbertson

Allison Rockefeller and Majora Carter

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Peter Rockefeller and Adrian Benepe


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PA R T Y AT T H E N O M A D H O T E L W I T H S TA N P O N T E O F S O T H E B Y ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Alexis Ryder and Randy Correll

Zuni Madera and Douglas Wright

wide swath and was one of the original jet-setters with houses in New York, Beverly Hills, Montego Bay, and on the Peloponnese: “life was a (kind of) banquet.” She was a woman with a big, international personality, comfortable with anyone no matter their rank and, although not philanthropic, she was very kind to and compassionate with the underprivileged and the underserved. Jackie was the youngest of four daughters grew up mainly in New York, in a life that might be considered comparable to that of “Auntie Mame.” After school and college, she went to work for Harper’s Bazaar or Vogue. Then she married a guy named Gene Williams and they started a family with three boys. Seeing Jackie accept her award Wednesday night, I saw a woman who operates on gratitude. She actively works on projects that can guide and 26 QUEST

Randall Gianopulos and Deirdre O’Connell

Naziri Handel and Shante Harris

inspire boys and young men who have come to the table under all the distresses—psychological, social, and financial—that confront so many today. As proud as Jackie might be of her work with the Boy’s Club of New York over the last two decades, you can see she’s mainly grateful for the opportunity—and thrilled with the results. Listening to her acceptance I could only think how she’s the mother she never had in terms of maternal attention— and yet, not deprived. She’s very much like her mother, generous of heart. Thousands of boys and young men benefit and have benefited from Jackie’s maternal instinct and her mother’s humanity. The evening’s other honoree, William (or Bill), is the BCNY’s new board president. Having served on the board for 26 years, Bill was a young trainee with Brown

Heather Moore and Kelly Zerbini

Christian Emmanuel and Heather O’Connell

Brothers Harriman (a big benefactor of BCNY) when he was told it was good for him and his business to do some volunteer work. That was in 1985 and he’s been a devoted member of the club’s staff volunteers ever since. About the Boys’ Club of New York. The membership is $5 a year and all are welcome. There are now thousands attending different programs and facilities every month. The Boys’ Club of New York is committed to nurturing, mentoring, and guiding boys and young men to prepare them to reach their fullest potential. It accomplishes this through an approach that includes music and arts programs, social and recreational activities, academic support, and athletics. By introducing boys to new ideas, expanding their interests, developing their hobbies, providing a safe and nurturing environment, and offering on-

Olympia Cior

going counseling and mentorship, BCNY is there to help to shape boys and young men into the best adults they can be. For more information, visit bcny.org. More grit and creativity. More than 20 years ago, Ruth Shuman hatched this idea that it would be helpful to boys and girls and teenagers in public schools to participate in projects livening up the old and often neglected physical environment of their schools. They did this by painting the rooms and hallways in bright and cheerful colors of their choosing. And thus, Publicolor was born. Publicolor celebrated its 20th anniversary this year at their annual “Stir, Splatter, and Roll” gala at the Metropolitan Pavilion. They honored Michael Bloomberg and John Rosenwald for their longtime support. The evening included 20

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E )

Eric McLaughlin and Stan Ponte


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The Top Doctor Is In by Castle Connolly Top Doctors Q: What are two of the most important factors to weigh when considering LASIK surgery?

The Skill of Your Surgeon: LASIK is a surgeon-dependent, corneal procedure. The corneal flaps created in LASIK are thinner than a human hair. Surgeons who are cornea-fellowship trained are best equipped to perform LASIK, as they are specifically trained in microsurgical techniques of the cornea.

Pre-Screening Technology: Although it’s critical that the most advanced surgical technology be employed for LASIK, the technology used to determine if you’re a good surgical candidate is equally essential. Pentacam analysis is one of the most sophisticated screening technologies available. At our practice, a significant number of patients are turned away as less than optimal candidates because of findings that only this machine is able to uncover. In the hands of a skilled corneal specialist, LASIK is a safe and very effective procedure.

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A stations, where guests enjoyed colorful cocktails and painted totes alongside some of our city’s leading architects, artists, and designers, including: Kenneth Cole, Nicole Miller, Cynthia Rowley, Michelle Smith, and Madeline Weinrib. The evening’s master of ceremonies was Jeffrey Banks. Bloomberg has been a supporter of Publicolor since its earliest days by making annual donations, yes, but also painting with Publicolor students and receiving Publicolor donors to his home for a cocktail party. He declared October 8, 2009, as “PublicolorDay” in an official proclamation. A gift from his foundation is supporting a five-year strategic growth plan. A champion of employee volunteerism, the former mayor and his staff have volunteered with Publicolor every year since 1996. Rosenwald is also a longtime supporter of Publicolor, making strategic contributions throughout its 20-year history. The New York Times called him “Philan-

thropist of the Year” in 2016 for his commitment to many of the city’s leading charities. More than 500 dynamic New Yorkers and luminaries from the worlds of business, fashion, politics, design, education, and philanthropy took part in the evening, which exceeded its $1.5 million goal by over $200,000. The Publicolor guests weren’t the only ones who had a memorable evening: Bloomberg was upstaged by his former staff member Clyde Smith, who dropped to one knee on stage and proposing to Publicolor staff member, Kayla Porter. (SHE SAID YES!) The couple met at Publicolor in 1999 as students, and have both worked for the nonprofit. Friday, June 3, 2016. A perfectly beautiful day in New York, with temperatures in the mid-70s and what felt like minimal humidity. Another annual end of season even is the Conservatory Ball at the New York Botanical Garden. It’s a beautiful affair,

A M E R I C A N F R I E N D S O F T H E PA R I S O P E R A A N D B A L L E T D I N N E R AT T H E C O N S U L AT E G E N E R A L O F F R A N C E

A Harvard-trained corneal specialist, Dr. Mandel has been named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor and has appeared in America’s Top Doctors for 13 consecutive years.

John Heimann and Maria-Cristina Anzola

Eric R. Mandel, M.D. Mandel Vision 211 E. 70th Street NYC, NY 10021, 212-734-0111 www.mandelvision.com Board Certified in Ophthalmology

Top Doctors Make a Difference

0 0 www.castleconnolly.com QUEST

Laure Vienot-Tronche and B Michael

Stuart Coleman with Carole and Bruce Harting

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Aurélie Dupont and Olivia Flatto


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G A L A FO R T H E N E W YO R K P H I L H A R MO N I C AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

Christopher Kojima and Samantha Boardman

Andrew Ross Sorkin, Pilar Queen and Peter May

as serene as the beautiful gardens surrounding the big tent that is set up for the occasion. This is an important fundraiser for the Botanical Garden, a lovely evening that begins with cocktails in the garden surrounding the exhibition that will run through September 11: “Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas,” which is summarized: “From Garden to Canvas, American Impressionism comes to life in an exhibition capturing the spirit of the gardens that inspired artists at the turn of the 20th century.” Then, the Public Theater held its annual gala at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park and it was a rollicking, star-studded affair in the middle of Manhattan surrounded by forests, ponds, and lawns and framed by the skyline. They honored Bank of Ameri30 QUEST

Douglas Brunt and Megyn Kelly

can for “10 years of leadership and support of free Shakespeare in the Park.” The evening celebrated Shakespeare’s 400th Anniversary and his greatest works, as well as the American poems, songs, and stories they inspired, all of which were performed by the nation’s-most celebrated actors and musicians in this onenight-only event directed by Jeremy McCarter. The Public Theater under the leadership of Oskar Eustis and executive director Patrick Willingham is the only theater in New York that produces Shakespeare, the classics, musicals, contemporary works, and experimental pieces in equal measure. The Public Theater is currently represented on Broadway by the Tony Award–winning Fun Home; Lin-Manuel

Gurnee and Marjorie Hart

Joan and George Hornig with Noreen Buckfire

Miranda’s acclaimed American musical, Hamilton; and Danai Gurira’s Eclipsed featuring Lupita Nyong’o. That same night over at Rockefeller Plaza, more than 50 legendary chefs gathered for “¡Qué rico! Celebrating Latino Cuisine and Culture: The 31st Annual Chefs’ Tribute to Citymeals on Wheels.” The culinary stars celebrated the rich flavors of Latino cooking creating dishes at tasting stations throughout the plaza. The highly anticipated event raised more than $900,000 for Citymeals on Wheels to prepare and deliver nutritious meals for homebound elderly New Yorkers. Rockefeller Center was transformed for the evening by renowned architect and Citymeals on Wheels board member David Rockwell. More than one thousand

business leaders, gourmet enthusiasts, food industry trendsetters, young professionals, chefs, and restaurateurs were in attendance. More than 60 percent of Citymeals on Wheels recipients are over 80 years old with 23 percent over 90—and more than 200 have lived at least a century! All recipients are chronically disabled by conditions such as vision loss, diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease, and nearly all need assistance walking. It is estimated that 66 percent use a cane, 39 percent use a walker, and 16 percent use a wheelchair. Citymeals on Wheels recipients are also isolated: 57 percent live alone and 40 percent rarely or never leave their homes. 8 percent have no one with whom they can talk. Many are also at risk for malnutrition. On a Thursday evening,

L I N S LE Y L I N D E K E N S ; J U L I E S K A R R AT T

Trevor and Sarah Jane Gibbons


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C H A N E L F I N E J E W E L R Y AT T H E N E W YO R K P U B L I C L I B R A R Y

Allison Williams

the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) hosted its annual black-tie gala and after-party at the Central Park Zoo. This year’s gala, themed “We Stand for Wildlife,” celebrated WCS’s ongoing mission to advance wildlife conservation with a focus on conserving the world’s largest wild places in 15 priority regions and six species groups: elephants, apes, big cats, sharks and rays, whales and dolphins, and tortoises and freshwater turtles. I was a guest of Leonard and Allison Stern, who have been major supporters of the WCS for a long time. It was under Allison’s active part for 32 QUEST

Leigh Lezark

Laure Dubreuil and Aaron Young

several years that created this fundraising dinner. Unfortunately, Allison could not attend because a few days before she broke her leg! That same night, over at the Mandarin Oriental, National Academy Foundation (NAF) celebrated its 13th annual benefit and raised more than $1.7 million to support its national (conservation) mission. NAF is a national network of education, business, and community leaders who work together to ensure that highschool students are college, career, and future ready. The event honored EMC and its CEO, Joseph M. Tuc-

Jill and Harry Kargman

Lily Mortimer

ci, who serves on the NAF Board of Directors. The Honorary Chair of the event was Sandy Weill, founder and chairman of NAF. On a Wednesday night at the Plaza Hotel, the Municipal Art Society held its annual dinner and gave its annual Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Award to William vanden Heuval for his dedication to preserving New York history as well as his complete dedication to actualizing the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island. Peter Duchin and his orchestra played. Bill Moyers presented the award. Before

Rose Byrne

Jerry and Jessica Seinfeld

Moyers, there was a very charming video of Caroline Kennedy speaking from Tokyo, accompanied by her pet dog (who, amusingly, kept insisting on getting into the picture with his mistress). This was an endearing scene of ambassador Kennedy. Always a good-looking girl and woman but, at this moment in her life, she is a beautiful lady whose physical presence always evokes memories of her famous mother and especially the light Irish charm of her father. Oh, what a loss it was for all of us. Space prevents me to relate the extent of events, and these

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Jamie Tisch


THE LEDGEWOOD RETREAT: MINDFULNESS, HAPPINESS, MOVEMENT AND MEDITATION

Have you found yourself feeling like you’ve been running on autopilot? Need a break? Sunday 10:30am-3pm

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A are only less than half of the extraordinary philanthropic fundraisers that took place in New York in the short space of a few weeks at the end of the spring season. Flash forward. On a warm, summer-like evening in mid-month, I was invited by Liz Peek and Bonnie Strauss to a “farewell” dinner at the Four Seasons Restaurant. It was a “Dutch treat” dinner. How that worked was they invited 50 or 60 people and everyone paid their share by check. The menu was pure Four Seasons with three choices per course, very good wines (of course), and it was held in the dining room above the Pool Room. It was mainly couples, from what I could gather, and they were there to celebrate the restaurant that will be closing this month on July 16. It was kind of like a Sunday supper— just friends enjoying a great dinner in a great restaurant together. Liz asked me if I’d say a few words about the history of the Four Seasons. She said it would be a great favor to her. I had to sit down and think about it. Growing up in a small New England town, we were the only house in the neighborhood that got four dailies: two of which were the New York Daily Mir-

The Four Seasons Restaurant, 1960s

ror and the New York Daily News with the other two being the local morning and evening newspapers (which were owned by S.I. Newhouse). My father was a Brooklyn-born Irishman who had never gotten over New York and kept up through the Mirror and the News. By the time I was eight or nine, I was reading the columns of Walter Winchell and Ed Sullivan and Lee Mortimer and Suzy (the nom de plume of Aileen Mehle) and many others. I didn’t know half of what I was reading at that young age but it was all the same: New York, stars, cars, skyscrapers,

and Broadway. A lot more interesting than sweet little Westfield, Massachusetts. I was 17 when the Four Seasons opened in New York and I read about it because it was all over the Mirror and the News. I knew that Restaurant Associates had “built” it, but I didn’t know about Phyllis Lambert or Philip Johnson (I’d never heard of them). But I knew, even as a teenager, that the Four Seasons was top-drawer when it came to clientele, menu, and price—because of who ate there. Even the kid recognized that it was a truly modern restaurant in the most sophisticated city in America. It even had a menu that changed with the seasons (hence the name), which was also something new (and modern). The first time I actually entered the place was in 1991, 32 years after it opened. The photos I’d seen many times over the years only hinted at its modern grandeur. Fifty-seven years later, it retains its newness, its sleekness, and an ambiance that fit the image of 20th-century prosperity and sensibility. Because I had agreed to say something at this dinner, I had to do a little research to get the essence of the place. I learned that what is interesting about the Four Seasons is what is interesting about the

“ T H R O U G H T H E K I T C H E N ” W I T H C A N C E R R E S E A R C H I N S T I T U T E AT T H E F O U R S E A S O N S R E S TA U R A N T

Martin Lipton and Esther Murray 34 QUEST

Tom and Andy Mendell with Eric Ruttenberg

Ros and Fran L’Esperance

Michael Bloomberg and Tony Bennett

Marilyn Alfeld and Charles Gargano

Noah Ruttenberg and Perri Peltz

Richard Meier

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Ray and Veronica Kelly


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

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whole Seagram Building. What I discovered is no secret. That said, I don’t think it has ever been presented as the story it is in the context of our changing times. This was the creation of a woman. Originally, the Seagram Building was going to be a conventional office building designed by an architect Charles Luckman. Sam Bronfman (who owned Seagram’s) was the owner of the property. Luckman was a very prominent businessman and well known in the business community—a “Boy Wonder of American Business”—who had always wanted to be an architect even though he was a businessman. After working on the planning of the Lever House (which was designed by Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill) Luckman moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career as an architect. His work was solid, fresh, and adequate (if unremarkable). In 1954, Bronfman wanted to build on that plot across from the new Lever House (and also across from McKim, Mead, and White’s Racquet and Tennis

Club). His daughter, Phyllis Bronfman Lambert, presented him with an idea for building something more. She suggested to her father that he make a “significant” building—one that reflected the times, art- and architecture-wise. Her idea was not immediately embraced. I don’t know much about the relationship between father and daughter (or much about how formidable the daughter was) but after she wore down her father’s resistance and he acquiesced and assigned her the job of coming up with the “significant.” Her first step was to hire her friend Philip Johnson to help her find the architect, and he soon led her to Mies van der Rohe, who was hired for the job. In the original plans, the use of the building’s ground floor was not necessarily intended to be for a restaurant. There were other suggestions, such as an automobile showroom. However, they wanted it to be a venue for the modern art complementing the architecture, so the idea of a restaurant was established. It would be featuring the work of artists of the mo-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ment such as Jackson Pollock, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, and Mark Rothko. The making of the restaurant was undertaken by Restaurant Associates—a major force in Manhattan restaurants in the 1950s and 1960s. They were to share ownership with the Bronfman family. Restaurant Associates was an important partner-manager. They were a class act. Several years before, they’d made a big splash with a restaurant in Rockefeller Center called The Forum of the Twelve Caesars. It was a Cecile B. DeMille production in presentation, with classic Romanesque decor and prices to match the image. Its appeal was a reflection of the growing American prosperity of that post-war decade: luxe, with epic gran-

deur in detail. And it was a hit. When it came to the new Seagram Building, the emphasis would be on making the ultimate “modern” restaurant—a total representation of the age, and it would be called the Four Seasons. Museum of Modern Art got into the act, consulting-wise, involved in the hiring of the designers, artists, and artisans who provided the detail. MoMA’s participation gave an added heft to the “significance” that Lambert had had in mind—something that no other restaurant in the world had. Among their commissions to artists, they hired Marc Rothko to do a series of paintings. Rothko was characterized to me (by a prominent New York art dealer) as a man who never smiled. He also, evidently, had

a real problem with the commission (or, more specifically, with the people who hired him). At the time of making the deal, he had “secretly decided” to “paint something that will ruin the appetite of every son of a bitch who ever eats there.” Evidently, the idea was so overwhelming for him that he thought better of giving his three paintings to the Four Seasons. So, he returned the commission and sold his paintings to private individuals. Today, his three paintings are hanging in the Tate Modern (London), the National Gallery (Washington, D.C.), and the Kawamura Memorial Museum (Japan). The Huxtables: Garth Huxtable, the industrial designer, and his wife Ada Louise

Huxtable (who was for years the architectural critic at the New York Times) were hired to design the table settings as well as some of the furniture as based on Mies van der Rohe’s designs from the 1920s. This focus on art would be unlike any other “important” restaurant in New York, which were “French” and dominating the first-class cuisine scene: Chambord, La Caravelle, La Côte Basque, Pavilion, Voisin, etc. When it opened for business in 1958, the reviews swooned over the concept and the experience. Though, art critic B. H. Friedman (who was also a biographer of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and Jackson Pollack) published a scathing review of the whole project in a new “of the moment” quarterly literary mag-

S O C I E T Y O F M E MO R I A L S L O A N K E T T E R I N G ’ S S P R I N G B A L L AT T H E P L A Z A H OT E L

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A azine Evergreen, which had been founded by Barney Rosset (publisher of Grove Press). Friedman was highly critical of the art and design, linking it to the “importance” of the expense (very great) of making this restaurant. The most interesting piece of information in Friedman’s review is the menu, which reflected a very expensive bill of fare. He wrote: It seems as though you have left the world of The Forum of the Twelve Caesars behind—and maybe you miss it. If you do, you needn’t for long. The menu will remind you that you are eating on the other side of the same coin. The paper that this menu is bound in is rather more fashionable, sort of Japanese, and the typography and layout are

as hip as the latest Container Corporation ad. But there’s “BOUQUET OF CRUDITES, Hot Anchovy Dressing 1.75”; and “Small Clams with Green Onions and TRUFFLE 1.65”; and “BEEF MARROW in Bouillon or Cream 1.65”; and “Crisped Shrimp Filled with Mustard Fruits 1.85”; and “Rack of Lamb Persillé with ROBUST HERBS, for Two 13.00”; and “Stuffed Breast of Chicken with TARRAGON, Demi-Deuil 4.85”; and “Avocado with Sliced WHITE RADISH 4.25”; and three kinds of crepes, again; and six kinds of coffee (seven, including iced coffee, which is listed separately and priced 25c more than the hot); and, of course, no dollar signs. In short, everything but Van Gogh’s ear.

Friedman’s review aside, the Four Seasons was a great hit and has been one of the longest running restaurant successes of the century. It soon became the destination for the prominent, the rich and powerful (as well as their aspirants), and the thousands who worked in the neighborhood. Personally, for the first 10 years of the new century, I shared Thanksgiving dinner there with David and Helen Gurley Brown, who had been very longtime customers. Despite its swank atmosphere and clientele, the Thanksgiving dinner there was (almost) as homey as it was back home in New England when I was a kid: families of all ages around the tables and the atmosphere was totally New York holiday

with a touch of glamour to accompany the gravy, stuffing, and pumpkin pie. The big difference from the dining room at home was the service, the menu (more sophisticated and varied), and the amazing monumental rooms that represented Lambert’s vision of significance. There will be an auction of the entire furniture and supplies this month and the restaurant will be turned over to the building’s new owner, Aby Rosen, who is also a major art collector in the world. Many changes will be made, except for those disallowed by its landmark status. But those changes will no longer reflect the Modern Age, but the post-Modern. Moving right along. u

W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N S O C I E T Y ’ S “ W E STA N D FO R W I L D L I F E ” AT T H E C E N T R A L PA R K Z O O

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Robert and Barbara Liberman

Brian and Maddie Hamilton

Jackie Weld Drake and Richard Lewisohn

Janet and Jeff Smith

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Steve and Stephanie Hessler

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Gillian Hearst and Christian Simonds


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O P E N I N G O F K I P S B AY D E C O R ATO R S H O W H O U S E AT T H E C A R LTO N H O U S E

Cathy Kincaid and Bunny Williams

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Victoria Hagan and Newell Turner

The Kips Bay Decorator Show House Team

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This spread: Muhammad Ali and the Beatles in Miami, February 1964.


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY BEFORE HE became Muhammad Ali, before he won his first world title fight against Charles “Sonny” Liston in Miami in February 1964, before he influenced a generation of young men to resist fighting in Vietnam, before he became the most well-known, revered, and respected athlete in the world, he was Cassius Clay. I was in Miami with the Beatles for their second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, sitting in my hotel room watching television when I saw 22-yearold Cassius Clay shouting and spouting poems, preparing for his title fight with heavyweight boxing champion of the world, Sonny Liston. I thought to myself: that would make an interesting photograph, the Beatles and Clay, both in Miami, both causing a stir. I told the Beatles about my idea. John Lennon knew who Clay was and said he didn’t want to meet the challenger who was going to get beaten. The Beatles wanted to meet the champ, Sonny Liston. Later that day, I went to Liston’s gym and asked Willie Reddish (one of Liston’s seconds) if the meeting could take place. He told me I’d better ask Sonny himself. While tying his shoes, Liston didn’t even look up at me. He said he didn’t want to meet “those bums.” There was no point

in trying to change his mind. Later, I went back to the Beatles with a car and took them to the famous 5th St. Gym where Clay (who would become Muhammad Ali after he defeated Liston) was working out. Clay was ready for them. He completely ruled the day, ordering the Beatles around the ring, shouting, “Lie down. Stand up. Who’s the most beautiful?” He called Paul the pretty one but said, “You’re pretty, but not as pretty as me.” In the car on the way back to the hotel, John said, “That man made a fool of us, and it’s your fault, Benson.” The Beatles weren’t happy because for the first time someone else had outwitted them. Afterward, the Beatles were mad at me for a month. It didn’t matter. They went back to London. I was off to Jamaica to photograph Ian Fleming, author of the James Bond novels. Back in Miami I covered the Clay-Liston fight. By the time I met up with the Beatles again, everything was fine. No one knew at the time these five young men would become five of the most famous people in the entire world. Happenstance figures prominently in everyone’s lives, and I am glad I just happened to be watching television that February day in 1964. ◆ J U LY 2 0 1 6 4 5


TA K I

THE ITALIAN WAY This page: Giovanni “Gianni” Agnelli was the principal shareholder of Fiat.

GIANNI AGNELLI has been dead for 13 years but still his name resonates when people discuss Italy, style, or the Fiat automobile company. Gianni was the founder’s grandson, and became Fiat’s president sometime during the Sixties. Throughout his life—one I was privileged to observe 46 QUEST

in my youth—Gianni fought with all the powers he controlled in the media to combat his reputation of being a playboy. An extremely handsome man who dressed impeccably and had great style, Gianni nevertheless could not resist the pleasures of women and cocaine, in that order. A

great seducer of women, he nevertheless tried desperately to go straight, whatever that means, once he turned 60, becoming a senator for life, hobnobbing with Henry Kissinger and various European heads of state, but still the rumors persisted. The Agnelli family was by far the most pow-


TA K I

This page: Silvio Berlusconi (left) is often used as a comparison to Donald Trump; many wished that Agnelli had ventured further into politics (right).

erful and richest in the land of pasta, controlling newspapers, T.V. stations, heavy industries, and, of course, Fiat. Now you’d think the head of that family—an extremely intelligent man like Gianni— would ignore the gossip, take hold of the reins, and actually change Italian politics for the better. But no. He never even considered running; he just had his sister Suni appointed Secretary of State and various buddies sent to the senate. Agnelli played it safe as Fiat’s head. With 200,000 workers in Turin alone, the protective tariffs kept Fiat humming along until the E.U. opened up the European markets. Then Fiat had to come crawling to America for help, hence the Chrysler-Fiat deal sealed after Gianni’s death that has been a bonanza for both companies. “Ah, if only Gianni had gone into politics” is a lament I have heard hundreds of times throughout my life. And I always answer it with, “It would have been, plus ça change, nothing more.” If Gianni played it as safe as he did with Fiat, why would he had ventured more with the fate of a nation? Which Berlusconi did. Berlusconi famously began his career as a singer on a liner, yet ended up Italy’s richest man. And as a three-time prime minister. Trump haters now compare The Donald to Berlusconi, but fail to

note that the Italian was in the midst of radically changing a corrupt judiciary and political system when he was stymied by the very system he was trying to do away with. His private life did not help. Italy is still Italy, corruption and all, and still the most fun country to visit in Europe. So, do politicians trump (pun intended) businessmen, or vice versa? In my own country, we have terrific businessmen that are self-made and who control politicians. It has never been the other way around. Onassis ran Olympic and a large fleet from his yacht, summoning prime ministers at a moment’s notice. So did my papa, at least for a while. In Germany, Europe’s richest and most productive country, the world of business and politics live happily side by side, and work “suzamen,” together. In the land of cheese, nothing works because the unions control the streets, and the politicians give in time and again. Hence nothing works except for terrorism. In Britain, of course, the daughter of a grocer changed things around and turned the sick man of Europe into the lion it is today. She put business first, broke the unions, and freed the markets. Which brings me to the “good old U.S. of A.” Will a businessman like The Donald make a good president? I happen to think

he’ll make a very good one, but I also fear that a small-time hustler like Hillary will prevail. Henry Ford II was, at times, a bore of a man, but he saved a great company from ruin, and turned it back into its rightful place. Would he have made a good politician? I doubt it, too apt to say the truth, but then so does Donald Trump. Would any of the Silicon Valley billionaire-nerds do well in Washington? Not bloody likely, says Taki. Zuckerberg has the charm of a Manson follower, and the Twitter and Apple biggies would not see the common interest if it reared up and kicked them in their ample derrières. No, Silicon Valley boys have the charm of a cobra, and are just as deadly. Give me The Donald any day; at least his women are O.K. (Just O.K.) Dan Ludwig was the greatest American shipowner who lost billions trying to develop the Amazon. He would have made a strong president, but would a strong businessman like Joe Kennedy have been any better than his martyred son? JFK was not a successful president—too cautious— and LBJ was a terrible president because he wasn’t cautious enough. But he was a good (crooked) businessman. Go figure, as they used to say in Brooklyn. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J U LY 2 0 1 6 4 7


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WHETHER YOU’RE SPENDING summer nights at the beach club or in

the heart of Manhattan, designers like Dennis Basso are making it easy to get dressed up—even in the heat. We also can’t resist some looks for more casual and sporty days, from J.McLaughlin’s easy, breezy blazers to Hedge’s white-hot Dune racerback dress. No matter how you might want to define it, make this a summer of luxury.

Cartier’s High Jewelry Brooch hails from the Cartier Royal Collection and features the highest quality of sapphires, tourmalines, and yellow and white diamonds. For more, call 800.227.8437.

Walk in beauty like the night in Dennis Basso’s printed midnight silk and embroidered dress. $4,800. Dennis Basso: 825 Madison Ave., 212.794.4500.

The Ruby clutch in light bronze lamé glitter fabric by Jimmy Choo is a jewel of its own. $745 at us.jimmychoo.com.

You’ll be feeling the love in Stuart Weitzman’s Bunnylove heel in blue and nero mink. $498. Stuart Weitzman: 675 Fifth Ave., 212.759.1570.

48 QUEST


They’re simply celestial: Oscar de la Renta’s Celeste gradient crystal flower earrings. $390 at oscardelarenta.com.

Everyone’s racing to get this summer’s must-have: the Dune racerback dress in white by Hedge. $235 at hedge-quarters.com.

With a focus on all things wedding, Monique Lhuillier Fine Papers is inspired by the designer’s coveted bridal collections and modern aesthetic. Now online at finestationery.com.

The first signs of aging seem to vanish as La Prairie’s uniquely formulated Cellular Swiss Ice Crystal Serum rejuvenates and replenishes skin. $320 at laprairie.com.

Pick up a pair of Midinettes in a fun new print at Belgian Shoes. $390. Belgian Shoes: 110 East 55th St., 212.755.7372.

You’ll jump for joy in Lilly Pulitzer’s Emiko jumpsuit, in Lilly’s Lilac Nice Ink. $188 at lillypulitzer.com. J U LY 2 0 1 6 4 9


Fresh Finds

Sport a new look this summer in Rolex’s GMT-MASTER II in 18-kt. white gold with rotatable red and blue ceramic bezel, black dial, and Oysterlock bracelet. $38,250. Visit rolex.com for retailers.

When making summer vacation plans, rely on National for superior rental car service. For more information and to reserve, visit nationalcar.com.

Model–turned–designer Garrett Neff is bringing back the ’60s runningshort swim trunk with the Braden trunk (shown in barn red), from his Katama swimwear line. $216 at katamaswim.com.

Suit up with summer style in J.McLaughlin’s navy cotton Lisbon blazer ($395), light blue Sonoma polo ($85), and mandarin and sky blue Gibson swim trunk ($88), available at jmclaughlin.com.

Pack up and support our teams with the Team USA Trek Pack from Polo Ralph Lauren. $125 at ralphlauren.com.

Havaianas, born in this summer’s Olympic host city of Rio de Janeiro, will be celebrating the games with the Slim USA flip-flop, part of the Havaianas  USA collection. $28 at us.havaianas.com. 50 QUEST


Maison Mumm unveils its Sachin & Babi’s patterned kneelength Francisca dress is perfect for summer parties in the city and the country. $895. Sachin & Babi: 1200 Madison Ave., 212.996.5200.

new bottle for Mumm Grand Cordon by British designer Ross Lovegrove, who did away with a label and indented Mumm’s iconic red sash and emblem into the body of the bottle itself. $45 at mumm.com.

Escada’s python ML40 handbag is the arm candy of the season. $4,825 at Escada New York (212.755.2200) or Escada Palm Beach (561.835.9700). Sip champagne for nights to come—1,000, to be exact—in Baccarat’s amber crystal Flutissimo flute, designed by Mathias as part of Baccarat’s Mille Nuits collection. $260 per flute at us.baccarat.com.

Lalique’s Bacchantes vase in bronze crystal is mythical in nature—and quality. $6,400. Lalique: 609 Madison Ave., 212.355.6550.

Why not treat yourself to Vhernier’s Calla necklace in ebony and pink gold? $8,750. Vhernier: 783 Madison Ave. in New York City or 140 NE 39th St. in the Design District of Miami.

Roberto Coin’s Rock and Diamond ring collection—exclusive to Neiman Marcus—in yellow, white, or rose gold with white or black diamonds. From $4,700. Call Neiman Marcus at 888.888.4757 for more. J U LY 2 0 1 6 5 1


CANTEENS

NEWPORT NIGHTS BY K AT H E R I N E PA R K E R - MA G YA R

The Clarke Cooke House, located at 26 Bannister’s Wharf in Newport, Rhode Island (401.849.2900). Opposite: The

FITTING FOR A TOWN where many summer residents live in the rambling cottages built by their ancestors of the Gilded Age and seasonal visitors are privy to tours of lavish Vanderbilt mansions dotting Bellevue Avenue, the Clarke Cooke House feels preserved in time. The historic space was built by the Newport sea captain Clarke Cooke in the 1780s and was a candy shop (hence its nickname among locals: “The Candy Store”), before David Ray established the restaurant in the 1970s. The food—especially the raw bar—is divine, and the service impeccable. You know the staff is legendary when they served your parents at your age, and likely served your grandparents along the way. The revelry is accommodating to all generations, as is the food. This time of year offers an added 52 QUEST

enticement: Summer Sushi, which began over Memorial Day weekend, when sushi chefs arrived in Newport from St. Barth, where they work during the winter season. Walking down Bannisters Wharf on a Saturday night and arriving at the Cooke House, you have three options: the Boom Boom Room, the downstairs dance club; Midway, the groundand second-floor levels where sailors toast old salts; and Sky Bar, the upstairs porch where the fine dining has a dress code and the after-dinner dancing is even finer. The terrace of the Sky Bar is adorned with pink and white cabana stripes offset by hunter green lacquer woodwork. The dancing begins after dinner when the tables are cleared and the DJ spins “Play that Funky Music White Boy”—an apt choice.

O N N E VA N D E R WA L ; M I C H A E L O S E A N

interior of the Sky Bar/Porch.


The atmosphere is hot; when the dress code requires men in blazers and long pants, sweat is inevitable. Luckily, the staff know more than one perfect cocktail to quench your thirst, including a house favorite: the Snowball in Hell. This is not to say the more elegant crowd doesn’t behave indecorously. If you dress well, you can get away with all magnitude of sin or silliness (though in this case, the misbehaving takes the form of unabashed dance moves and copious consumption of Dark and Stormys). At his rehearsal dinner in the Sky Bar, my father and his groomsmen did the “alligator,” flipping off the wooden bar and sliding down the stairs on all fours—apparently a very

revelry, returning to the scene of the crime for Sunday brunch is the perfect antidote, with Bobby Ferreira playing the piano in the background. The Bloody Marys are excellent and, for those looking for some local flavor, peruse the selection of Rhode Island wines. To be sure, daytime is the best time to appreciate the lovely interiors. Light bounces off the water and streams in through the bay windows, and the restaurant’s centerpiece, a wooden mermaid, puts the Starbucks icon to shame. The walls are adorned with nautical charts; half hull models; paintings, etchings, and photos of yachts; and, of course, sailing trophies.

happening move in the 1980s. Descending downstairs, you take note of a neon sign indicating the Boom Boom Room, where music beckons inside. The same classic sense of style dominates, with upholstered banquettes, but in this crowded and darker space, you’re more focused on getting to the bar or dance floor. The wall of ivy is a nice touch on the dance floor, though don’t do anything too scandalous—a hidden security camera nestled in the leaves broadcasts a live feed on the television across the room. Throughout all three levels of the bar, closing time is announced with Kate Smith’s version of “God Bless America,” bringing the house down. If you are feeling slightly under the weather from all this

Perhaps they will add another sailing trophy this year: the Candy Store Cup will be hosted by the Newport Shipyard and Bannister’s Wharf from July 29 through the 31st. The regatta will carry on the tradition of the Newport Bucket, a hosting of the world’s largest super-yachts, where the focus is decidedly more playful and less commercial than other races. The stated goal of the Bucket Regattas is to “win the party,” and, as it was the preferred bar of Dennis Connor and Ted Turner during their America’s Cup years in the ’70s and ’80s, the Cooke House remains a favorite for the yachtsmen of today. You’d be hard-pressed to find a better weekend to visit and observe the nation’s yacht-racing capital at its finest. God Bless America, indeed. u J U LY 2 0 1 6 5 3


AUDAX

THE PRESERVATION SOCIETY of Newport County, long the model for similar organizations around the country, marked a significant milestone this month when its longtime Board Chair, Donald O. Ross, passed the baton to his successor, Monty Burnham. Don had served on the board since 1989 and was named chair in 2010. During his tenure, the Preservation Society—which oversees such historic “cottages” in the Queen of Resorts as The Breakers, The Elms, Marble House, Rosecliff, Kingscote, and 54 QUEST

many others—grew its membership from 2500 to 35,000. In the last decade, annual attendance at the Newport mansions has grown to 960,000, quadruple the number in 1972. Visitors come from 40 states and 114 countries to inspect the Gilded Age digs of the Vanderbilts, Astors, Oelrichs, and Goelets. The annual budget is now $21 million, the endowment has swelled to $38 million, and the recently completed capital campaign, which started with a goal of $21 million, ended up raising $31 million.

Originally, the Preservation Society was an advocacy group that concentrated on preserving such colonial era Newport landmarks as The White Horse Tavern. But that emphasis changed in 1962, when The Elms was threatened by demolition in favor of an ugly new shopping center. Concerned citizens rallied to save it, and the Preservation Society added The Breakers, Rosecliff, Kingscote, and Marble House to its holding in the early 1970s. Today, it also owns Hunter House, Isaac Bell,

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PRESERVING NEWPORT


This page, clockwise from left: Donald O. Ross, the Chairman of the Board of the Preservation Society of Newport County since 2010, is stepping down this month; Monty Burnham will be his successor; CEO and Executive Director Trudy Coxe. Opposite page: The Elms, designed by Horace Trumbauer.


This page: The most visited mansion in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II (above); the Green Animals Topiary Garden is the oldest in the country (below). Opposite page: The Breakers’ Great Hall, with the Vanderbilt family crest adorning the ceiling (above); Marble House features a grand staircase of yellow Siena marble (below).

Chepstow, Chateau-sur-Mer, and Green Animals, the beautiful Portsmouth topiary gardens and estate of the late Alice Brayton, a niece of the axe-wielding murderess Lizzie Borden over in Fall River. (Full disclosure: in the 1960s, your correspondent and other Priory incorrigibles would cross Cory’s Lane in the midnight hour, not to admire the magical topiary giraffes and elephants,

but to help ourselves to the deliciously ripe tomatoes growing in Miss Brayton’s vegetable garden). Phase one of the Preservation Society was advocacy for Colonial Newport. Phase two was preserving the historic Gilded Age piles when the economic and social situation of the 1970s threatened to turn them into extinct white elephants. In recent years, the Society has entered

into a new period in which it is concentrating, not only on the houses, but on building the collections within them, and on increasingly sophisticated landscaping and education programs as well. That, Ross says, is his proudest achievement—along with hiring talented new staff like Laurie Ossman as director of Museum Affairs and John Rodman, director of Museum Experience, to


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assist longtime head, Trudy Coxe. Ross also focused on professionalizing the Society’s Board so that the quality of governance has steadily improved with the addition of such trustees as former New York Times CEO Janet Robinson and former Goldman Sachs Asset Management Chief David Ford. Old line Newport remains well represented by such Quest readers as Bill Wood Prince, Duncan Chapman, Tim Berkowitz, Eaddo Kiernan, and Ala Isham. The result is that the Preservation Society is well positioned to move forward into new initiatives and has already done so in championing the burial of power lines behind Second Beach and advising the Navy where wind turbines might be best placed so as not to disrupt the magnifi-

cent sight lines in Newport Harbor and on Narragansett Bay. Asked if he had any regrets (I was afraid he might say asking me to play in the member-guest at Bailey’s Beach one summer 25 years ago or so, when Don, a superb tennis player at Chapel Hill, could only carry me as far as the finals before we suffered an ignominious loss), Ross replied that he wished the effort to build a worthy welcome center at The Breakers had been finished on his watch, but, after a long legal battle, that ambitious project is now fully funded, and, if all goes well, should begin construction later this year. Not a bad record, all in all, and one that augurs well for the future of the Newport we all love. Nice job, Don! ◆ J U LY 2 0 1 6 5 7


LI F OFO ES DT& Y LLEI F&ESTY F OOD LE

NANCY’S 90TH

EVERY SUMMER IN LOS ANGELES, usually the last week in

July, I always gave a dinner for several friends who had birthdays close to one another. Birthday parties mean cake—or in this case, cakes—and everyone’s favorite dishes. Nancy Reagan loved fish, so I served Mountain Trout from Washington State. David Jones was always happy with anything amandine, so that was easy with the trout. Connie Wald adored fresh summer corn, which got puréed within an inch of its life, and then reduced for several hours to become a sweet, silky bisque that rivals any I 58 QUEST

have ever tasted (more on this corn bisque in a minute). Betsy Bloomingdale speaks avocado better than anyone I know— her son grows superb ones in Santa Barbara—and Sophie Winkelmann Windsor loves dessert. Any dessert. In addition to my Peach Cobbler, which I couldn’t help but serve because the peaches were unbelievable and sent to me from a family friend in Atlanta, we made five birthday cakes, each one an easy but delicious vanilla cake with candles and varied icings—orange, lemon, strawberry, caramel, and chocolate—for the celebrants to

A MY G R AV E S

BY ALEX HITZ


COLD AVOCADO

This page, from bottom left: Alex’s Cold Avocado Soup, served for Nancy

Yield: 8 cups, 2 quart

Reagan’s 90th birthday party at his home; Nancy’s place card; the table

s (or 6-8 servings)

setting; the recipe for Alex’s Cold Avocado Soup. Opposite page: Alex and Nancy blow out the candle on one of Alex’s homemade vanilla cakes.

take home and share with whomever they’d like. Or not. The year these photos were taken was 2011, Nancy’s 90th birthday. An occasion like that warrants something special, I thought, so…remember that corn bisque? I made it. That bisque takes almost three days, and is completely worth it, but it’s an opera to do. Simmering, sitting, straining, resting, and straining again endless times so it becomes the smoothest, most sumptuous it can be. None of it happens without intensive handwork. On the final strain, about an hour before the party, my weary hands slipped and the immense vat of silky corn lusciousness spilled in the sink and, quite literally, went down the drain. Just like that, the last 36 hours of culinary hue and cry were gone in the blink of an eye—see how smooth it was—and I was stuck high and dry without a first course. Enter some avocados, onions, and a Cuisinart stage left and you’ve got Cold Avocado Soup. If this soup were any easier it would make itself, and it’s just the perfect thing for when you’re expecting a former first lady who’s celebrating an important birthday—not to mention her discerning pals—in 25 minutes. Even if you’re not, whatever and whoever your summer entertaining plans include, make this soup a go-to favorite in your repertoire and remember the moral of this story, which an old French adage says best: “When people make plans, God laughs.” u

SOUP

• • • • • • • • •

Ingredients: 4 cups chicken stock 3 ripe avocados, spoo ned out from their sk in 1 cup chopped red onion ½ cup chopped cilan tro 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 ½ teaspoons salt ¾ teaspoon ground black pepper Crème fraîche or so ur cream to garnish Additional chopped cilantro to garnish

Preparation: • In a food process or fitted with a metal blade, purée the avocados, onions, and chicken stock until they are smooth . • In a large mixing bowl, combine the pu réed vegetables and add the cilantro, lemon jui ce , salt, and pepper. • Stir the soup we ll to combine thorou ghly. Garnish with a dollo p of crème fraîche or sour cream with addition al chopped cilantro, and serve immediately.

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TN RA AV MEEL

A WHITE HORSE ON BLUE WATERS EVEN IF THE FAIRY-TALE notion of the knight in shining armor

is just that—a fairy tale—perhaps another part of that fantasy may yet exist: the mythic white horse. In fact, it does—and it’s both gallant and Gallic, going by the name of Cheval Blanc. Set on Flamands Bay, widely regarded as Saint-Barthélemy’s finest beach, Cheval Blanc St-Barth Isle de France is the third property in the Cheval Blanc collection, under the umbrella of the French luxury consortium LVMH. On an island that is synonymous with luxury itself, it’s saying something to call this resort the chicest of the lot, but in doing some research by way of a quick poll before my trip, friends and colleagues independently agreed that it is—and it’s hard not to concur. Had I known sooner about this white horse, I never would have waited so long to visit. I was happy my research led me to bypass a commercial flight (which typically involves a customs bottleneck in St. Maarten), and instead flew in via the hassle-free San Juan airport, where I connected to a small private charter in the form of a Pilatus PC-12 from Tradewind Aviation. Once on the ground (yes, the nosedive descent into Rémy De Haenen airport is as harrowing and thrilling as it has been described), a member of the Cheval Blanc team escorted me to the resort, a mere 10 minutes away. The property prides itself on its highly personalized approach to the art de recevoir (the art of receiving guests), and this was apparent from the moment general manager Christelle Hilpron, bearing an uncanny resemblance to a circa-1970 sun-kissed Lee Radziwill, greeted me with the sort of warm French flair you find along the Côte d’Azur. I felt as if I had arrived where I was always meant to be. Cheval Blanc is not far from anything on this enchanting island of eight square miles, and you should definitely delight in

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the charm and shopping of downtown Gustavia, or a trip to one of the other beaches like Colombier or Gouverneur, or a daylong private catamaran tour led by a Cheval Blanc major-domo. But the true magic of staying here are all the indulgent touches right at home. The line between outdoors and in is blurred by the open West Indies architecture. A recent renovation by Bee Osborn lends a sense of understated sophistication, set off by a delicate color scheme: blush pinks and dusty dove grays everywhere. That art of receiving guests is renewed each and every day: from bedtime elixirs on the nightstand, to small daily packages (a handsome gray beach bag one morning, a stylish beach blanket the next); from pillow mists with the house’s signature scent—Tropical Chic—to what are decidedly the best bedroom slippers I’ve ever slid into (silky yet sturdy in those same elegant shades of blush and gray). The LVMH connection means Ruinart Champagne flows here like sparkling water at other hotels, and the Cheval Blanc Spa lays claim to the only Guerlain outpost in the Caribbean (don’t forego a signature cooling facial with deep-tissue massage). At night, you could have fun at any of the boisterous boîtes in town, but I was just as happy here with the cuisine and ocean views at La Case de l’Isle—or keeping my toes in the cool night sand at La Cabane de l’Isle. As it came time to leave, I didn’t want my séjour to end (an off-season trip is wonderfully private), which is why I was happy to suffer some travel hiccups that delayed my departure. Not to worry: it meant one more casual meal at the poolside White Bar before Tradewind Aviation summoned a plane and a pilot just for me, giving the run of a private aircraft all to myself. Turns out it’s easy to forget that knight in shining armor: there’s an even more unforgettable legend, and it’s called Cheval Blanc. u

CO U RTE S Y O F C H E VA L B L A N C ; P. C A R R E AU ; S . C A N D I TO

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


Opposite page: Saint-Barthélemy’s iconic Gustavia Harbor. This page, from top left: The Flamands Villa opens directly onto the beach of Flamands Bay; water sports, like standup paddleboarding, are a must; the main entrance to the Maison; the casual poolside White Bar offers light fare by day and cocktails at night; Niçoise salad; catamaran excursions to private beaches can be arranged as part of a Big Blue Escape; a garden room; Cheval Blanc Spa, with signature treatments by Guerlain, is nestled among lush gardens. For more about Cheval Blanc St-Barth Isle de France, visit chevalblanc.com.


BOOKS

DIARIES OF A NEWSPAPER MAN

SEVERAL YEARS AGO, the biographer Patricia Beard was approached by Pamela Howard. Howard, the granddaughter of media mogul Roy W. Howard, was familiar with Beard’s work as an author, and decided that she was the right person to tell the story of her late grandfather, a publisher, journalist, and editor who was once chairman of the Scripps-Howard news empire. At first, Howard tired to write the book herself, but there were some hiccups. “I started off writing the story, and got very involved in it. And then I became very involved with him. I got sort of angry about certain things and overjoyed about others. I couldn’t seem to control that side of the writing.” To help with the research, Howard organized her grandfather’s notes and Beard was offered unrestricted access to Roy Howard’s diaries, which were kept tucked away by his son (Pamela’s father) until he died in 1998. “It was the kind of material you could never get today,” Beards tells me. “He noticed every detail—how Stalin would pace, how his boots would squeak. He gave a sense of what somebody was like.” Beard’s biography of Roy Howard, Newsmaker, includes 62 QUEST

plenty of the material found in his extensive diaries, much of it remarkable, as well as a trove of stories about Howard’s correspondence with major political figures of the time. (There is a particular exchange between Howard and General Douglas MacArthur that is hair-raising.) For most of the book—and this is its power—you are immersed deep in the world of Roy Howard’s life, writings, and experiences, often wondering why his name isn’t as ubiquitous as William Randolph Hearst. Perhaps that will no longer be the case. “I’d like to see his biography on library shelves next to the other great media figures of his day,” expresses Howard. Here, she explains this, and the many other decisions that led to chronicling her grandfather’s life. Quest: At the outset of your research, what were you hoping to find out about Roy Howard? Pamela Howard: I wanted to know the story of his life because as a child I had only known about his years in New York, which was a very glamorous existence. I knew he had another life in the Midwest, and I was interested in that. For whatever reason,

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E H O WA R D FA M I LY A R C H I V E S

BY ALEX TRAVERS


BOOKS

This page, clockwise from top left: Roy Howard dressed to look older; Howard with his wife and daughter; Jane, Peg, and Roy Howard; Howard became the publisher and editor of the World-Telegram. Opposite page: Howard’s diary; Newsmaker (Lyons Press), by Patricia Beard.

I had never talked about it with him. I also wanted to explore that wonderful golden age of journalism in the first half of the 20th century. I came to the idea [for the biography] after he died because there was no funeral. For years, I felt there was a void.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E H O WA R D FA M I LY A R C H I V E S

Were you more interested in his personal life or career? Being a journalist junkie, I was interested in his career and how he got there and what he did along the way, which I had never really spoken to him about personally. Why do you think your father kept Roy’s diaries a secret? They weren’t really a secret, but [the Howards] were a very low-profile family. I think my father was a bit of a secretive person about personal things, and maybe he just thought it was better to keep them private. I once asked him if I could see them. He looked at me and said, “Maybe some day.” Were there any reservations about digging deeper into your grandfather’s life? Well, no, because I have an overwhelming curiosity. I love to

find out what people were thinking, what they were doing. His diaries were all extremely factual. He didn’t get very personal. When you were researching, were you picturing certain characters in certain ways? Like, did you find out his parents or any of his contemporaries were much different than you imagined them? I had heard the names of a lot of people before—who they were, where they figured in the overall picture, but I wasn’t sure how they were all connected. Some of the people were different than I imagined. And he was different than I imagined. I was really touched on a lot of occasions by his sentiment. In recent years, have there been stories similar to your grandfather’s that you’ve found fascinating? I’m fascinated by all media titans. But [Roy] loved both the reporting and the business side. He loved the immediacy of the wire service, the deadlines every minute. He would have been fascinated to be in this world today. Would Roy Howard have tweeted? I think probably. u J U LY 2 0 1 6 6 3


PERSPECTIVE

MY GENEROUS FRIEND DONALD TRUMP I WAS 28 IN 1982 when I entered Harry Winston’s on Fifth Avenue and Mr. Winston commented, “Did you see Trump’s incredible high-rise going up across the street?” It was my first look at one of Manhattan’s most famous buildings, the 68-story Trump Tower, and my first impression of Trump, who at only 35 was completing something so remarkable. This visionary, who has great courage and love for New York, was effectively turning our nation’s largest city around from its great decline in the mid1970s to developing many huge projects, investing billions and employing thousands of people worldwide. During this same time, I was helping to transform our family’s 2.5-million-square-foot facility in Cleveland to become an International Exposition Center (I-X Center). The I-X Center provides a spectacular venue for hundreds of shows and events, including the largest annual indoor amusement park. It is amazing to think that our I-X Center would be used 34 years later for a Trump presidential rally. In 1998, I arrived in Palm Beach and was introduced to the spectacular Mar-aLago Club. Trump had purchased the famous Marjorie Merriweather Post estate and spent tens of millions to bring it back to its glory days and create an incomparable club. His vision for Mar-a-Lago included hosting charitable events, where one 64 QUEST

could experience the hospitality and elegance of this world-famous club. He then built an exquisite European-style ballroom to accommodate these events. After seeing his vision for Mar-a-Lago, I immediately decided to do whatever I could to bring charitable events, special shows, and concerts to this grand, one-of-a-kind ballroom—similar to what I had done in Cleveland at our I-X Center. Event-driven charities in Palm Beach have been a way of life for me and it has not come without the kindness and generosity of Donald Trump. For the past 18 years, I have hosted and chaired over 200 events at Mar-a-Lago. Mr. Trump has truly made a difference for organizations such as American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Red Cross, Arts and Letters, Cleveland Clinic, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Food for the Poor, International Society of Palm Beach, It Happened to Alexa Foundation, Junior Achievement, Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, LIFE, March of Dimes, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Palm Beach Symphony, and many others. He and his wife, Melania, personally attend many of these events and, many times, I would witness Mr. Trump raising his hand in generosity during a charity’s “call for donations.” Often, when he could not be present, I would find generous donation checks in

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y; CO U RT E S Y O F PAT R I C K PA R K

A personal perspective by Patrick Park


This page: Donald Trump, Bonnie McElveen-Hunter (Chairman of the American Red Cross), and Patrick Park (Ball Chairman) at the American Stendhal’s unreturned affection for an Italiksn Baroness culminated in his 1822 book De Amour, an analysis of

Red Cross’s International Ball at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach—where Trump was honored with the Humanitarian Award. Opposite page: A written dedication from Trump to his friend Patrick Park and virtuoso pianist Lola Astanova.

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PERSPECTIVE

This page: Patrick Park speaking at his family’s I-X Center for the rally in Cleveland, Ohio, to support candidate Donald Trump (above); Trump hosted the Cleveland Orchestra’s debut at Mar-a-Lago with Russian-American pianist Lola Astanova—who performed Sergei

my mailbox. (Others have had the same experience.) I have seen extraordinary things happen at Mar-a-Lago in the name of charity and Trump is a champion to many non-profits, big and small. People come here from around the world to support a cause and experience charitable giving at its finest. From the full-service event team and impeccable hospitality suites to the most refined and delectable cuisine and unmatched superior waitstaff, everything at Mar-a-Lago is world-class. Bernd Lembcke, the club’s managing director and executive vice president, ensures that every event’s detail is meticulously executed. Yet another magnificent space envisioned by Trump, the Donald J. Trump Grand Ballroom in Miami serves as Trump National Doral’s largest function space. (It is noted to be among the most elegant and versatile meeting and event spaces in the United States.) There, Trump also extends his generosity for charity functions. Upon his completion of Doral’s $300-million renovation, he invited the Miami Symphony Orchestra and piano virtuoso Lola Astanova as guest artist to inaugurate the resort’s 66 QUEST

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y; CO U RT E S Y O F PAT R I C K PA R K ; D O N A L D B L AC K , J R .

Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 to rave reviews (below).


This page: Ralph DeVitto, Tommy Quick, Donald Trump (host), Rocky Marciano (honoree), Vince Cerone, and Patrick Park at the American Cancer Society’s event at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach (above); Trump receives the American Cancer Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award from Dr. John Seffrin (below).

new ballroom. Indeed, Trump is effectively utilizing his developments as tools to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for charity. Mr. Trump’s children are also incredibly generous. I recently attended an event for the Eric Trump Foundation and it was easy to conclude that a father’s character has tremendous influence on his children. On this night, funds were being raised for a $30-million research wing for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Eric displayed the same kindness and considerate respect that I have come to know from his father. He made a point to personally thank each donor that evening, no matter the size of their gift. For two decades, I have witnessed the charitable side of Donald Trump. This man exemplifies everything you would want in a person, friend, leader, and president of our great country. He is the George Bailey in It’s a Wonderful Life. If he had never been born, the world would not be the same. He has left an imprint from east coast to west coast, having a positive influence on our communities. For these reasons and many more, Trump has my vote. u


BOOKS

THE GLOBETROTTER’S CLOSET OUR READERS ARE KNOWN for their constant jetting around! All that travel—whether it’s to your cottage in Nantucket or estate in Southampton—can be very stressful to pack for. You can finally cross off the panic of packing. Writer and woman-about-town, Karen Klopp, has written a brilliant guide to packing and dressing for every event or vacation, all in one perfectly portable book. Karen is an energetic, jet-set woman herself. All her years of going from her Upper East Side apartment to Millbrook (and down to Vero Beach) taught her valuable lessons to share when it comes to packing. She has been through the frenzy of trying to pack for a themed wedding and knows the differences in attire between clay and formal shooting. We are all forever grateful she has saved us from making any more outfit blunders or omissions! The book is as easy to read as it is cute and fun. The illustrations by Lara Glaister give the reader a little inspiration when it comes to applying the packing lists to your own closet. It’s easy to say “mix and match neutral pieces from your closet” when picking out clothes for a safari, but the ideas really come to life when you can see a more interesting outfit already thought out for you. 68 QUEST

We cannot stress enough how helpful Packing for Travel: From Jetset to Trekset, the Definitive Globe-Trotting Guide has been. Ever forget to bring a sweater out on the boat? It seems like the perfect sunny day on shore, but Karen reminds you the wind really picks up once you get out on the water! In addition to packing and event attire advice, Karen also included a section to help women dress for the everyday. She had the foresight to include tips for outfitting your body type; what pieces to splurge on; and where to restrain yourself from making purchases when it comes to your closet. Never again will you overpack with this secret weapon! In addition to her book, Karen’s website “What2WearWhere” (what2wearwhere.com) is constantly being updated with possible looks for upcoming philanthropic events. Didn’t have a clue what to wear to that gala this month? Now you do! No matter what you are dressing for, Karen has got you covered from head to toe. Wherever summer, or future, travel takes us, this book is one item we will always keep in our carry-on! u For information about purchasing Packing for Travel by Karen Klopp, visit what2wearwhere.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F K A R E N K LO P P

BY LESLIE LOCKE


This page: Advice from this adorable book, featuring illustrations by Lara Glaister. Opposite page: The cover of Packing for Travel by Karen Klopp. J U LY 2 0 1 6 6 9


OPEN HOUSE

A sophisticated, center-hall Colonial with tremendous “old-house” feel—as situated on four acres with breathtaking views and a pool.

A COUNTRY ENCLAVE was beautiful farmland. Our towns and homeowners have worked to maintain the bucolic character. Open space and privacy are the underlying appeal. Whereas other areas have become more suburban, many Northern Westchester residences are on larger parcels of land. Privacy is our greatest luxury.” And this luxury, this enviable country lifestyle, is available at a range of prices: homes start at $500,000. The diversity of estates—coupled with the value of the area—is what makes this enclave so desirable for people in the market for primary homes as well as

for secondary homes. Northern Westchester continues to maintain its idyllic surroundings while experiencing an influx of culture: Restaurants in the area have come to include the Bedford Post’s The Barn and Campagna (by chef Michael White) and The Inn at Pound Ridge (by chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten). And the Bedford Playhouse is being converted into an arts theater. u For more information, contact Daniel H. Ginnel of Ginnel Real Estate at 914.234.9234 or dginnel@ginnel.com.

Waccabuc’s finest equestrian estate on the Lewisboro horse trails, offering 22 pastoral acres with a pool and scenic pond.

CO U RTE S Y O F G I N N E L R E A L E S TAT E

NORTHERN WESTCHESTER offers a peaceful country lifestyle with a wide array of intriguing properties, less than one hour from midtown Manhattan. Many New Yorkers have found that living in Bedford and its environs is the perfect antidote to the hectic pressures of working in New York. Dan Ginnel (president and owner of Ginnel Real Estate) explains the allure of the area: “What’s most appealing and impressive about Bedford and Northern Westchester is the tremendous open space with low-density zoning. Historically, the land around us

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OPEN HOUSE

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An idyllic home in Honey Hollow that resonates with Pound Ridge’s rich past, featuring three fireplaces and four bedrooms.

An emblem of Bedford’s past that dates back to 1790: the former Methodist-Episcopal manse, an impeccably renovated center-chimney Colonial. J U LY 2 0 1 6 7 1

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GREENWICH

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R E A L E S TAT E NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

THE BEST OF THE NORTHEAST BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

OUR BROKERS invite us to their towns (destinations from Bedford, New York, to Newport, Rhode Island) to tour their markets. The selection is diverse, featuring a range of properties for a variety of buyers. Summer is the time to venture to the Hamptons or the Hudson Valley CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

in order to explore these homes—which boast the flexibility to function as primary or secondary residences. We welcome our readers to the best of the Northeast... 72 QUEST

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LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND

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LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND

HARALD GRANT Sotheby’s International Realty: Southampton / 516.527.7712 / harald.grant@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: What’s your background— why real estate? A: Although I call it luck, I probably was destined—if destiny is real—to be in Hamptons real estate. It’s been over 25 years: this is my career. Q: What about the Hamptons is so attractive to buyers? A: Over the last 2+ decades, I have seen enormous changes. Oceanfront houses used to sell for maybe a million dollars—once. Price points, value, and investment opportunities exist here on grand scales. The Hamptons are, in many ways, like no other place in the world. Our ocean beaches still look (and mostly are) untouched. The dunes and waves look timeless; there is almost a wild quality to them. Then, just minutes in from the water, some of the most time-honored and glorious estates have existed for years—or are built new. Q: As a resident of the Hamptons, what are your favorite activities, events, restaurants, etc.? A: Folks know that I love boats and that I love sailing. I am keen to get back on the water very soon. I keep a boat in Sag Harbor, which is one of my all-time favorite places. Just down from the docks in Sag Harbor, I love dining

at the American Hotel and, more recently, the revamped Baron’s Cove. I’m a big fan of Bobby Vans in Bridgehampton and Sant Ambroeus by my office in Southampton. Q: Tell us about your current listings in the Hamptons. Which are the most exciting? A: Each listing is unique. The Angel View estate in North Haven is really special. We’re on the cusp of bringing in a one-of-a-kind “new build” estate (which is fully-furnished with custom work imported from Italy). Another “new build” on Old Towne Road in Southampton is absolutely first-rate, with a pool and tennis court as well as ocean views. Plus, I have two Mecox Bay estates that are forever breathtaking.

44 Forest Road in Sag Harbor, New York: $18.9 million.

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H U D S O N VA L L E Y

H U D S O N VA L L E Y

R E A L E S TAT E

H U D S O N VA L L E Y

H U D S O N VA L L E Y

BOB MCCAFFREY Robert A. McCaffrey Realty / 845.721.0972 / bmccaffrey@mccaffreyrealty.com

Q: As a resident of the Hudson Valley, what are your favorite activities, events, restaurants, etc.? A: The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is one of my favorite activities. It is truly a gem of the Hudson Valley. Musical concerts at local churches are another favorite of mine. For younger folks, between three and five thousand people visit Cold Spring each weekend to hike the nearby Breakneck Ridge and enjoy its spectacular views of the Hudson River and the Catskill Mountains to the west.

Q: Tell us about your current listings in the Hudson Valley. Which are the most exciting? A: 90 Indian Lake Road in Putnam Valley, New York, is the best lake house you could ever imagine. The former convent sits on the cleanest lake in the state of New York, offering the kind of privacy you almost can’t put a price on. (But of course we did.) It’s on the market for $4.5 million. Then, 322 Route 403 in Garrison, New York, offers a spectacle of wide-open river views—it is a completely updated beauty of a house. Truly, the sunsets from this perch are not be be believed.

90 Indian Lake Road in Putnam Valley, New York: $4.5 million.

CO U RTE S Y O F S AU N D E R S & A S S O C I AT E S

Q: What about the Hudson Valley is so attractive to buyers? A: For starters, the area offers one of the most attractive landscapes in America. Mountains line either side of the scenic Hudson River and provide countless opportunities for activities like hiking and boating. Add to that an easy one hour commute to New York City, and the result is the area provides the best of both worlds.

Kayaking is another big activity in our area, and visitors are often surprised to learn that we actually use the river!

CO U RTE S Y O F RO B E RT A . M CC A F F R E Y R E A LT Y

Q: What’s your background— why real estate? A: In 1975, I was teaching school when our family attorney suggested that my personality, love of people, and longstanding family connections might be a good fit for real estate. And it’s been a great 40+ years in the business!

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HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

R E A L E S TAT E

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

HAMPTONS

MARC HESKELL Saunders & Associates / 917.328.2800 / mheskell@saunders.com

Q: What’s your background— why real estate? A: I have been a top-selling real estate agent in the Hamptons for over 10 years. My graduate work at N.Y.U. (including a M.B.A. in finance plus studies in architecture and design) and more than 10 years at Morgan Stanley has served me well: I bring a sense of design, creativity, financial acumen, and well-honed negotiating skills to my clients.

CO U RTE S Y O F S AU N D E R S & A S S O C I AT E S

CO U RTE S Y O F RO B E RT A . M CC A F F R E Y R E A LT Y

Q: What about the Hamptons is so attractive to buyers? A: My love of the East End started over 20 years ago on my first trip and I’ve been coming here ever since—making it my full-time home in 2005. The area’s small-town feel, historic homes, farms, beaches, waterways, art scene, events, sophistication, and eclectic mix of people make this a one of a kind place. The quality of life here is extraordinary. Q: As a resident of the Hamptons, what are your favorite activities, events, restaurants, etc.? A: Enjoying the water—whether paddle boarding, kayaking, surfing, boating, or just taking a swim is a must. Ending a day with a walk on the beach and watching the sunset is something my family does as much as possible—it is a wonderful way to wash away stress and reconnect you with the area’s

natural beauty. Many top chefs and restaurateurs have planted their flags here, so there are many great dining options. But one of my favorite food experiences is going to our local farm stands to pick the freshest produce you can imagine, stopping by our favorite seafood or butcher shop, and hosting a gathering of family and friends for dinner. Q: Tell us about your current listings in the Hamptons. Which are the most exciting? A: There is a spectacular property in Water Mill on Mecox Bay that combines grand architecture and design with an intimate orientation to the water (37 Westminster Road). And there is a one-of-a-kind, historic Sag Harbor Village property with a separate cottage and artist studio (37 Palmer Terrace).

37 Westminster Road in Water Mill, New York: $14.995 million.

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LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND

R E A L E S TAT E

LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND LONG ISLAND

JAMES RETZ Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty / 631.423.1180 / jamesretz@danielgale.com

Q: What about the Long Island is so attractive to buyers? A: Spanning over 100 miles from east to west, and bordered by the Long Island Sound and the Atlantic Ocean, we’ve got a lot of desirable real estate. The area includes everything imaginable—from urban/suburban neighborhoods, vibrant open land, and estates to second-home, retirement, and resort markets. It’s serviced by some 11 bridges and tunnels, three international airports, ferries, and several major roads.

76 QUEST

Q: As a resident of Long Island, what are your favorite activities, events, restaurants, etc.? A: My favorites are a few private beaches, golf clubs, and “real” bookstores—and I adore the proximity to Manhattan without the pain of living with all that noise and stress. I prefer restaurants that have great food, reservations, and are quiet. Peace is a good thing. Q: Tell us about your current listings in Long Island. Which are the most exciting? A: I’m responsible for the day-to-day marketing of 1,500 listings with an average price of $1 million. Much of my expertise has been on North America’s luxury market, so I favor our major iconic listings with true architectural integrity.

69 Lawrence Lane in Bay Shore, New York: $4.25 million.

CO U RTE S Y O F DA N I E L G A LE S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: What’s your background— why real estate? A: I’m a native New Yorker that started my career at IBM after graduating from N.Y.U. An unscheduled detour for the USMC with boot camp in San Diego helped me fall in love with the West Coast, so I joined a Manhattan-based real estate company and, at 25, was packed off to their L.A. office. My first year included clients like Dean Martin, James Stewart, and Julie Andrews—plus, a twoweek journey to Papua New Guinea. It was a decade before I returned to the East Coast (with Sotheby’s International Realty) and I’m thrilled to have landed at Daniel Gale Sotheby’s as Senior Vice President of “Marketing and Technology” in the early 2000s. This is the most exciting chapter in my career, hands down.


NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT

R E A L E S TAT E

NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT NEWPORT

CHRIS WEST Gustave White Sotheby’s International Realty / 401.849.3000 / cwest@gustavewhite.com

Q: What’s your background— why real estate? A: I have a degree in teaching from Bucknell University, but when I went back to work after starting our family, I went into real estate for the flexible hours and absolutely fell in love with it. I enjoy helping people find houses. In Newport, there are cute, cozy, two-bedroom cottages, and there are 12,000-square-foot mansions. When you spend time matching people with houses, you really get to know them; it’s a very rewarding job.

CO U RTE S Y O F G U S TAV E W H I TE S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

“Chartwell” at 311 Indian Avenue in Middletown, R.I.: $5.495 million.

Q: What about Newport is so attractive to buyers? A: Newport is the most charming city by the sea. It attracts a diverse population and is a great walking town with a mix of young and old, students and retirees—it appeals to everyone. There are all kinds of cultural things to do, including the Newport Art Museum, the International Tennis Hall of Fame, and a phenomenal car museum. There’s the largest enclave of colonial houses in the United States, and the Preservation Society oversees the mansion museums around town—not only huge, Victorian “cottages” but also a sea captain’s house. We boast a variety of restaurants, including the beloved Clarke Cooke House. It’s fun living on Aquidneck Island, comprised of Middletown, Newport, and Portsmouth.

Q: Tell us about your current listings in Newport. Which are the most exciting? A: “Chartwell” ($5.495 million) at 311 Indian Avenue is in an exclusive area—very quiet and peaceful, with views out to an estuary and the Atlantic Ocean beyond, and located only five minutes from downtown. The house is really special— built recently so everything’s new and well done. And there’s “Nearside” ($2.995 million) at 20 Wickham Road. It was originally a carriage house to one of Newport’s Gilded Age “cottages,” and is a complete, perfect redo from a big, old stable with a hayloft and horses below. It’s downtown near the yacht clubs and a 20-acre park. u

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CALENDAR

J U LY

On July 22, the Saratoga Race Course (located at 267 Union Avenue in Saratoga Springs, New York) will host its Opening Day event. The gates will open at 11 a.m. and races on both dirt and turf will begin at 1 p.m. For more information, call 718.641.4700.

4

A SPARKLING EVENING

The Fine Art of High Jewelry and Timepieces gala will take place at the Louvre at 8:45 p.m. For more information, call 212.541.9459.

7

CULTURAL KICKOFF

Art Southampton 2016, presented by Art Miami at Nova’s Ark Project, will host its opening night preview at 60 Millstone Road in Bridgehampton at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 305.517.7977. SEA ST YLE

Angela Moore’s seaside-inspired fashion show will be featured at 78 QUEST

Rosecliff Mansion in Newport at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

8

LET THE GAMES BEGIN

Saratoga Polo Association will begin its tournament season on the historic Whitney Field. Matches will be played every Friday and Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 518.584.8108. SUMMER MELODY

Newport’s 48th Musical Festival will feature fine chamber music in the Newport Mansions and other venues. For more information, call 401.846.1133.

9

10

The IYRS Summer Gala will be held at Restoration Hall in Newport. The evening will include cocktails, live and silent auctions, dinner, and dancing, with live music from Jackson Browne. For more information, call 401.848.5777.

The International Tennis Hall of Fame Championships will take place in Newport. For more information, call 401.849.3990.

SUMMER SOIREE

ROSÉ ALL DAY

This year’s weekend-long PINKNIC festival will take place on Governor’s Island. Festival-goers will enjoy the finest selection of wine and food along with live music by Miami Horror, Cedric Alexander C.M.A., and Claptone. For more information, visit pinknic.com.

WHITE OUT

14

BITE THE BULLET

A unique opportunity will arise at Fort Ticonderoga, allowing visitors to hold and learn about original weapons. For more information, call 518.585.2821.

15

AFTERNOON IN BLOOM

The Westhampton Garden Club House Tour will feature six houses in Quogue, Westhampton, and


CALENDAR

23

DRINKS ON THE HOUSE

The Hampton Designer Showhouse gala preview will host its cocktail party at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.980.1711. THE SILK ROAD

The 20th annual Silks and Satins 5k Run will take place in Saratoga Springs at 8 a.m. All proceeds will benefit the Special Olympics and its athletes. For more information, call 518.744.5646.

28

GIVE IT A SHOT

On July 21, the preview party for the 10th annual Newport Antiques Show will begin at 6 p.m. at St. George’s School (375 Purgatory Road). For more information, call 401.846.2669. Remsburg areas beginning at 10 a.m. Complimentary refreshments and boutique shopping will also be available. For more information, call 914.419.5869. EAST MEETS WEST

The 32nd Annual Black Ships Festival in Newport will be an event for all ages to experience Japanese traditions. Featured activities will include Martial Arts, Tea Ceremony, Black Ship Gala, and Sushi and Saki Sail. For more information, call 401.846.2720.

18

TEE UP FOR TREES

The Aquidneck Land Trust golf tournament will take place at Newport National Golf Club at 11 a.m. Tickets will include a lunch and a post-play reception. For more information, call 401.849.2799.

19

’ROUND AND ’ROUND

The 175th Saratoga County Fair will begin at 9 a.m. This classic carnival will be a hit for the whole family. For more information, call 518.885.9701.

21

SNEAK PEAK

The Gala Preview Party for the 10th Annual Newport Antiques Show will begin at 6 p.m. at St. George’s School (375 Purgatory Road). For more information, call 401.846.2669.

22

READY THE HORSES

The Saratoga Race Track will have its opening day beginning at 11 a.m. For more information, call 718.641.4700.

The Golf Classic hosted by Arrowhead Equipment will be held in Warrensburg, New York. A shotgun start will begin at 11:00 a.m. All proceeds will go toward The Fund for Lake George. For more information, call 518.668.5915. JAZZ HANDS

The Arts and Culture Alliance will be presenting the Newport Jazz Festival at Fort Adams (84 Fort Adams Drive). There will be three full days of jazz on three separate stages. For more information, call 212.875.5781.

30

WALKING ON SUNSHINE

The Southampton Hope for Depression Research Foundation’s Inaugural 5k Walk will begin at 7:30 am. Runners will depart from Southampton Cultural Center, located at 2 Pond Lane in Southampton, New York. For more information, call 212.676.3200.

AUGUST 3

MUSIC IN THE AIR

The Philadelphia Orchestra will hold its opening night at the Saratoga Springs Arts Center at 8:00 p.m. For more information, call 518.584.9330.

4

ARTISTIC ENDEAVORS

The Saratoga Art Community will be hosting an arts grant seminar on education starting at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 518.584.4132.

5

FABULOUS FUNCTION

The Polo series will celebrate its silver jubilee this season during the Bal du Soleil charity gala. The event willtake place at the Rosecliff Mansion in Newport. There will be a pre-gala meet-and-greet for attendees. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

6

OUT OF THE GATES

Saratoga Race course will be holding its annual $1.25 million Whitney Stakes for older race horses at 1 p.m. The stakes will include a full day of racing on both turf and drit. For more information, call 718.641.4700.

7

PLAY AWAY

Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Society will open its 3rd annual residency at Saratoga Performing Arts Center with the debut of Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring. For more information, call 518.584.9330.

On July 18, the Aquidneck Land Trust golf tournament will take place at Newport National Golf Club at 11 a.m. Tickets will include a lunch, a post-play reception, and a chance to hoist the ALT Cup. For more information, call 401.849.2799. J U LY 2 0 1 6 7 9


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER “Then followed that beautiful season… Summer... Filled was the air with a dreamy and magical light; and the landscape Lay as if new created in all the freshness of childhood.” ~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 80 QUEST

VH I OOTO L A GCARLLE P E DRY. I T CO M

BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER


This page, clockwise from top left: The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park, London, June 13, 1969; Jockey Ron Turcotte rides Triple Crown winner Secretariat (aka “Big Red”) as the pair is led by owner “Penny” Chenery Tweedy into the winner’s circle, 1973; Tullio Abbate, of Abbate Boats, at the helm of one of his custom-built speedboats as it is moored at a property on the shores of Lake Como, Italy, in June 1983; a sea plane docked next to a camp on Blue Mountain Lake in New York’s Adirondack Park; one of Bruce Weber’s beloved golden retrievers seated in the back of a Penn Yan boat on Spitfire Lake at Weber’s majestic camp Longwood in the Adirondacks.

M I R ROX PI X ; S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Opposite page: “Tea Time” by Alex Timmermans, Netherlands, 1962.

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82 QUEST

T H E P R E S E RVAT I O N S O C I E T Y O F N E WP O RT CO U N T Y; S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER

This page, clockwise from top left: Princess Caroline of Monaco playing tennis in 1979 (photographed by René Maestri); the wonder dog “Keystone Teddy” chauffeurs Gloria Swanson in the 1917 black-and-white film Teddy at the Throttle; Cheryl Tiegs models a striped sheath dress aboard a sailboat for a 1967 issue of Glamour; Slim Aarons captures a little boy and two young girls lifting a sailing dinghy from its trailer on a dock off the coast of San Diego, California, 1956. Opposite page, clockwise from top: a 1933 map of Newport’s Famous Ten Mile Drive along the ocean front, guiding users from the beginning of Wellington Avenue around Ocean Drive to Bellevue Avenue; surfing in Montauk from the book The End: Montauk, New York by Michael Dweck; Nora Cushing and Mrs. Peter Vought captured by Slim Aarons at Bailey’s Beach Club in Newport, Rhode Island, 1965; Carly Simon with her mother, Andrea Simon, and

S YG M A - CO R B I S ; S A N TE F O R L A N O / CO N D É N A S T V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

daughter, Sally Taylor, in Martha’s Vineyard in 1983.

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84 QUEST

S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; T H E A N DY WA R H O L F O U N DAT I O N F O R T H E V I S UA L A RTS , I N C . ; P H OTO BY S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S


Quest

ENDLESS SUMMER

This page, clockwise from top left: Ted Turner—skipper of the 1977 America’s Cup winning 12-meter, Courageous—standing on the afterdeck in Newport, Rhode Island, on September 17,

A P P H OTO / RO B E RT C H I L D ; E S TATE O F S TA N LE Y T R E T I C K LLC / CO R B I S ; C A I T L I N S E LLE BT LP H OTO G R A P H Y. WO R D P R E S S . CO M

1977; Harbour Court, New York Yacht Club’s waterfront clubhouse in Newport; erected in 1877, the historic Nauset Lighthouse in Cape Cod can be seen on the front of every bag of Cape Cod Potato Chips; Jackie Kennedy and John Jr. on the beach in Hyannis Port, July, 1964; the Bixby family compound on Lake George in the Adirondacks; Bill Busch, owner of Lake George’s Canoe Island Lodge, chauffeuring guests to his camp in the 1940s. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Minnie Cushing carrying her surfboard at Bailey’s Beach, officially named the Spouting Rock Beach Association, in Newport, 1965 (Cushing’s father introduced the sport to the club in the 1930s); Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (center) with his son and their host Barclay “Buzzy” H. Warburton III aboard the brigantine Black Pearl, circa 1960; fashion in L’Officiel magazine, 1970; Lee Radziwill photographed by Andy Warhol on the beach in Montauk, 1972; waterskiing from the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Cap d’Antibes, France, 1969.

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in Montauk, New York, as photographed by Gray Malin. 86 QUEST

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

This page: Montauk Point Beach


GRAY MALIN’S AERIAL ARTISTRY

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

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This spread, from left: A snap of La Fontelina in Capri, Italy; photographer Gray Malin; the cover of BEACHES by Gray Malin (Abrams)—as available at graymalin.com.

GRAY MALIN presents BEACHES (Abrams): a parade of bold, enticing coasts, as snapped across six continents. Here, we chat with the photographer known for his refreshing, sunny aerials—a talent who proves as cheery and inspiring as his work: Q: What inspired your book, BEACHES (Abrams)? A: The book is the embodiment of my largest collection, “À la Plage,” which is the aerial beach collection. BEACHES (Abrams) documents the past five years of my travels to 20 cities across six continents. The goal of the work and, ultimately, the book is to transport the viewer to the world’s most luxurious beaches. Though the idea originated from a swimming pool in Las Vegas the beach aspect first began above the shores of Miami during Art Basel in 2011, quickly followed up with trips to Australia, Rio, Dubai, and Europe in 2012 and 2013. I was hooked on capturing this global project from the beginning and it’s been a total whirlwind since! 88 QUEST

Q: What was the process for these pictures? A: I think that a lot of times people assume my work is shot with a drone or perhaps simply created on a computer, but it’s really me going up in a doorless helicopter and leaning out of the side to capture beautiful timeless imagery. Every time I go up is different as every beach has its personality, from the crowded sand of Rio de Janeiro to the more private beaches of Saint Tropez. But one thing is for sure: it’s always beautiful. From above, the people with their umbrellas and towels create patterns that are eye-catching and unique. Q: What were your favorite destinations to photograph? A: This is such a hard question but I have to say the beaches of Cape Town and the beaches of St. Barth. For me, though, Cape Town is the whole package. Beyond being a truly awe-inspiring country, it has the most beautiful rugged coasts, incredible wildlife, and a world-class, breathtaking wine country—it’s a


must for anyone’s bucket list. I am so taken with it that I actually have been back twice since my first trip in 2013. I love Grand Saline Beach in St. Barth, which is hanging behind the front desk of Montauk’s own Surf Lodge (which hosts other “À la Plage” images in the newly renovated rooms). Q: What differentiates the beaches from place to place? A: Yes, the geography is of course different from beach to beach. Lisbon, Portugal, is very interesting with a range of rugged, rocky beaches for surfing to more family- and sunbather-friendly locations. The sand color ranges from the white sand of Dubai and Mexico to the almost dark bronze sand of a San Francisco nude beach, which leads me to topless sunbathers: It’s probably most prominent in Europe, like in Barcelona (which coincidently inspired my apron collaboration with Hedley & Bennett). When it comes to water, I must say I have always loved the shade of emerald of the water in “Hamptons Lone Swimmer”

and then, of course, the vivid blues from the Italian coast, which holds my heart when it comes to umbrellas. There are just so many beach clubs that consume the coast with their umbrellas that when I go up in the helicopter to photograph, I’m literally dizzy with all of the stunning pops of colors along with neutral tones lining the beaches below. Q: What was your impression of the Hamptons? A: The Hamptons are just so classic from above and from the ground. I have close friends who own a house in Southampton, so I have spent a lot of time there strolling Main Street and dining at Red Bar. One of my favorite activities to do is rent a bike from Rotations and take a leisurely ride along Gin Lane, taking in all of the beautiful homes. Another very fun day is to charter a boat with a captain for you and your group to cruise around for the day. My most recent trip to the Hamptons was to Montauk. I J U LY 2 0 1 6 8 9


definitely recommend taking in the sunset at Navy Beach for the evening and then splurging on a daybed at Gurney’s Beach Club for a music-filled day in the sun. As far as hotels go, I had the pleasure of staying at Surf Lodge, which recently refreshed its imagery to utilize “À la Plage” as the exclusive artwork in their 20 rooms. This is such a cool and unique place, so it was a thrill to experience in person after working so closely with the lovely owner, Jayma Cardoso, and with interior designer, Fiona Byrne. I would highly recommend anyone to stay there or, at the very least, stop in for a delicious bite. If you’re there on a Sunday, enjoy the live music that happens outside on the sand in the evenings featuring bands like Oh Wonder. Q: What has to happen for an aerial picture to be compelling? A: There is always an element of danger with these shoots because you’re at the whim of the weather (particularly the wind). I used to get scared but it’s more of a thrill now and all part of the fun. I will say that flying hundreds of miles an hour while the wind is whipping you in the face and tears are streaming down your cheeks makes it all the more challenging to capture that perfect moment. I also manually shoot so I have to toggle the aperture and shutter speed all while I’m dangling out of the door!

Q: What artists and other creatives have inspired your work? A: I am a huge admirer of Gaston Ugalde, who mentored me during my shoot in Bolivia for my series, “Far Far Away.” I just adore his whole demeanor and his vision. He’s a true artist. Then in rapid fire, I would say I love Slim Aarons for his timeless and luxurious photographs; Christo and Jeanne-Claude for their forward-thinking and structural work; and lastly David LaChapelle for his artistic editorial vision that’s so grand yet so relatable. My focus is creating a moment in time that the viewer wants to live within. Some concepts take years of planning while some take only months but, regardless of the time frame, all of my collections have their own personality and stories that aim to be timeless. Each concept ignites an adventure, traversing the globe to bring my inspired visions to life with the ultimate goal of hanging an incredible moment on one’s walls for years to come and enjoy. u For more information about Gray Malin and his book, BEACHES (Abrams), visit graymalin.com. 90 QUEST

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Q:What about your work resonates with so many people? A: The type of work I like to create is approachable with a bit of unexpected whim, which people connect to and incorporate into their own lives. It’s about capturing a moment in time that evokes a sense of adventure and joy. Whether it’s a place that you have fond memories of or it’s a dream getaway destination, to have a piece of artwork that takes you there just by looking at your wall is pretty incredible, don’t you think?


This page: “Blue and White Umbrellas” in the Hamptons—

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

as captured by Gray Malin.

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EASY SUMMER LIVING Henry James once wrote to Edith Wharton: “Summer afternoon. Summer afternoon...the two most beautiful words in the English language.” From family fishing trips in the Adirondacks, to sipping Southsides in Southampton, to black-tie parties in Newport, Quest wishes you a happy summer!

The Adirondacks ADIRONDACK PARK was formed in 1892 and is bigger than Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier combined. It is the largest publicly protected area in the contiguous United States; under the New York State constitution, the land is protected as “forever wild.” Of its six million acres, just over half are privately owned, and, thanks to zoning laws, most of the family camps are scattered acres apart from each other, creating unrivaled privacy for families who spend their summers in the mountains. Though originally the domain of loggers and hunters, it became a summer destination in the nineteeth century after William H. H. Murray published Adventures in the Wilderness, Or, Camp-Life in the Adirondacks and Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau opened a health resort at Saranac Lake. William West Durant developed the architectural style known as the “Great Camp,” which was copied and reproduced for families. Today, much of the landscape and traditions of camp life continue to thrive. 92 QUEST


QUEST ARCHIVE: JULY 2010 This page, clockwise from top left: A black bear; an historic postcard of the Sagamore; the playroom at Margaret Vanderbilt’s Camp Sagamore; The Uplands, a typical Adirondack-style camp; fly fishing; a group gathers in late afternoon, including Chris Manice, Nicole Hanley Mellon, Harry LeFrak, and Locke and Lily Maddock. Opposite, clockwise from top left: At Bolton Landing on Lake George aboard a 1937 Hackercraft and a 1937 Chris-Craft; a

DA P H N E B O RO W S K I ( G RO U P )

V I S I TA D I RO N DAC K S . CO M / M A R K S E E R A N ( P E O P LE ) /

1931 Model-A Ford; Peter and Sarah Bertine on a float.

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QUEST ARCHIVE: JULY 2010

This page, clockwise from top: “The Huntsman,” a photograph by Kathy Landman, captures the Millbrook Hunt Club; a view of Lake Minnewasaka from Millbrook Mountain Road; team Quest goes for the goal at Mashomack Polo Club; a rider checks her position during the Fitch’s Corner Horse Trials.

Millbrook ORIGINALLY SETTLED by Quakers in the middle of the eighteenth century, Millbrook, in

Dutchess County, New York, is best known for its bucolic rolling hills of hunt country. With vast tracks of farm land, the equestrian life has always reigned supreme here, making Millbrook a favorite destination for the horsey set. The nineteenth-century village itself dates from the arrival of the railroad in 1869. Though the railroad no longer exists, Franklin Avenue and the village green still do, as does the Tribute Garden for fallen soliders in the heart of town. But the Millbrook community’s heart really beats for the horses. From the reputable Millbrook Hunt Club, to the Mashomack Polo Club, to the Horse Trials at Fitch’s Corner—every type of equestrian sport can be found. For hunting, the 1,900-acre Mashomack Fish and Game Preserve is a favorite among sportsmen. The summer season begins with the International Polo Challenge at Mashomack and concludes with the Millbrook Horse Trials in August. 94 QUEST


This page, clockwise from top left: The Mashomack International Polo Challange; Farnham Collins with his horse, Limerick; post-and-rail fences line the roads in Millbrook; Karen and Everett Cook at Box Turtle Farm; Thornedale, the Millbrook home of Mrs. Oakleigh

L I B R A RY O F CO N G E S S ( V I N TA G E ) / S A R A B LO D G E T ( FA M I L I E S )

C H I S H O L M G A LLE RY ( S P O RTS ) /

Thorne; Tony Hennenbert in his tree house.


This page, clockwise from top left: The Cushing family at their home, The Ledges; an early historic map of Newport; a view of the city of Newport from

QUEST ARCHIVE: JULY 2010

Jamestown, Rhode Island; the windmill at Hammersmith Farm in Newport, where a young Jacqueline

Newport FOUNDED BY English settlers in 1639, Newport’s history begins with Anne Hutchinson, who fled Boston from religious persecution. Beyond the Bellevue mansion façades, visitors can still see the Quaker and religious roots in the town with landmarks like the Old Stone Mill, White Horse Tavern, and Trinity Church. As one of the largest ports on the East Coast, Newport bustled with economic growth in the early eighteenth century but was bypassed during the industrial revolution. Ironically, her frozen-in-time landscape became an asset for the rise of the summer community. Artists and writers came first, followed by elite families during the Gilded Age, including the King and Griswold families of New York, and then the Vanderbilts, who would transform Newport into the summer resort that it is today. Tied to the sea, Newport is known for her sailing community, with many regattas throughout the summer. 96 QUEST

Bouvier Kennedy spent her summers.


This page, clockwise from top left: Bob Dylan performing at the Newport Folk Festival, 1963; the entrance to Marble House, one of Newport’s famous mansions; the grass courts at the Casino, home of the International Tennis Hall of Fame; Eileen Slocum with her grandchildren; the wedding of Jack and Jackie in Newport; Topsy Taylor at Gooseberry

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S ( V I N TA G E ) / P E TE R M E LLE R A S ( FA M I L I E S )

Island; David Ray aboard his lake launch, Ahab.


This page, clockwise from top left: A view of Lake Agawam from First Neck Lane; Dolly and Jack Geary, Pat Wood Ney, and Hilary Geary Ross; old Halsey House, one of the oldest buildings on the East End; Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, father of the Southampton Summer Colony; the McKnights at their home.

Southampton THE OLDEST English settlement in the state of New York, Southampton was settled in 1640 by a group of English Puritans who came from Massachusetts. Now one of the toniest of towns, the 11968 zip code originated as a summer destination during the industrial revolution, when doctors would frequently perscribe sea air for a host of maladies. One of those doctors was the gynecologist Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, who settled in Southampton and recommended the town as a cure for “women’s hysteria.” Top-notch golf courses and exquisite grass courts have added appeal to athletes, but, to this day, it is the beaches of Long Island that make it a favored resort. (Cooper’s Beach is a constant on world charts.) Southampton’s historic roots can still be seen between her high privet hedges. For instance, Halsey House, a home of one of the original settlers who traded with the Shinnecock Indians, still stands proud on South Main Street. And there’s always Gin Lane, where cattle once grazed. 98 QUEST


This page, clockwise from top left: The Southampton Bathing Corporation at the turn of the century; Jim and Molly Ferrer with their dogs, J.B. and China; the legendary beaches of Long Island; The Fairy Tale Chase by famed painter of the Shinnecock Hills, William Merritt Chase; the Hackett family; with one of the most challenging courses,

S O U T H A M P TO N H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y ( V I N TA G E ) / E R I C S T R I F F LE R ( FA M I L I E S )

the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club hosts the U.S. Open.

QUEST ARCHIVE: JULY 2010


THE VISION OF FREDERICK CHURCH BY KATE GUBELMANN WHAT HAPPENS WHEN America’s foremost landscape artist creates landscapes for his personal use? It becomes Olana, the house and property of Frederic Edwin Church. This year, we are celebrating a two-fold achievement. Fifty years ago, the house was saved by a nascent preservation movement and today its views, created by the artist himself, have been recently and carefully restored. 100 QUEST

Frederic Church (1826–1900) was an American wunderkind who visually translated the philosophy of Alexander von Humboldt by painting the Divine in nature. At the age of 19, Church was exhibiting landscapes of the Catskills and was quickly recognized as a gifted artist. He traveled all over the Northeast in search of scenery that reflected the hand of the Maker. The coast of Maine, mountains of Vermont, and


This spread: The 1857 painting of Niagara Falls by Frederic Edwin Church, the American landscape painter (above); the Olana State Historic Site in Greenport,

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New York, was home to the artist (inset).


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Niagara Falls were all depicted in a glowing light that conveyed a sense of wonder. Travel was an inspiration to Church and he went everywhere from South America to paint the Andes to Labrador to study icebergs. Europe, the Middle East, Jamaica, and Mexico were all revealed by his hand. A multitude of sketches and oil studies, coupled with Church’s prodigious memory, resulted in large-scale works that wowed an American public—one on an economic rise but not yet worldly. Church not only showed his viewers what was around the world, but translated these exotic findings for his personal use. Thus, East meets West at Olana, which Church painstakingly designed. It is an Orientalist statement in an archetypal American landscape: the Hudson River Valley. The Hudson River Valley has become America’s first school of painting, thanks mostly to Thomas Cole (1801–1848). He was the sole teacher of Frederic Church and the keystone to a trend of landscape painting that portrayed America as being the ideal of Eden. Although Cole lived in Hudson, New York, and Church would follow him there, other members of the Hudson River School did not. What united them were their convictions that mankind could experience God in Nature. Albert Bierstadt, Martin Heade, John Kensett, Jasper Cropsey, Worthington Whittredge, Robert Scott Duncanson, and Thomas Moran


This page: Clouds over Olana, 1872, where Church depicts his home and the surrounding landscape (above); after two trips to Ecuador, he produced four landscapes including Heart of the Andes (1859), which stunned audiences and helped him rise to prominence (below). Opposite page: A preserved view of the Hudson Valley from Olana’s bell tower (above); Church’s artists tools, including paintbrushes, exactly as he left them (inset).

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were just some of the men that brought an artistic European sensibility to the newly formed country of America. Influenced by Claude Lorrain, John Ruskin, and J.M.W.Turner—shored up by Emerson and Thoreau—these painters took to the woods, the seas, and the mountains to depict the Almighty. Some were Luminists, giving translucent light to panoramic views of the Sublime. These paintings were made to show the great power of the natural world and to instill awe and humility in the viewer. In America, this became a manifest destiny to go West. In 1966, when the State of New York designated the house and 250 surrounding acres of Olana as an historic site, the movement for preservation was just taking root. The destruction of the Pennsylvania train station in 1963 shocked small groups of like-minded people into saving what they could. David Huntington, in the midst of his thesis on Church, opened the door to Olana’s salvation. New York stalwarts like the Aldriches and Rockefellers came to the rescue. Thankfully, most of the house at Olana had been left as the Churches had left it. Their daughter-in-law, Sally, strictly guarded the contents—to such an extent that Church’s brushes were as he left them. Today, upon entering the house, one is stepping back into the Churchs’ lives. Either Frederic or his beloved wife Isabel could 104 QUEST

be just around the corner. We are put into another century and into their intimate setting. Using Church’s sketches as a guide, paths have been cleared and plantings reinstated to mimic these views. If the house is the heart of the property, then the contrived roadways are its arteries. We can walk the paths that he did, and approach the house as he did. Church’s later inability to paint large canvases due to arthritis did not stop his creative output; he took to the outdoors and created a 350-degree view from his house. These restored views would be appreciated by Church, as he too was a preservationist. In 1878, he and Frederick Law Olmsted helped to save Niagara Falls from commercial interests. Today, coincidently, Olana and Niagara Falls are both flagship parks under the aegis of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation. At Olana, we have an opportunity to transcend time and witness the life of an artist. Perhaps Monet’s Giverny is comparable, but the experience of being in the mindset of an American virtuoso is unique to us. From Frederic Church, we inherited the Romantic big picture of how our country looked in the 19th century as well as the personal domicile of a visionary. The 50 years of saving and preserving Olana, inside and out, have given us the means to see what Church saw and what a lovely vision it is. u

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Today, upon entering the house, one is stepping back into the Churchs’ lives. Either Frederic or his beloved wife Isabel could be right around the corner.


This page: Church’s painting of the Cotopaxi volcano in 1862 was part of his Ecuadorian landscapes (above); the house at Olana is an unusual mixture of Victorian structural elements and Middle Eastern decorative motifs from different times and places (below). Opposite page: Thanks to the conservation efforts of Sally Church, the house’s rooms remain perfectly preserved.


GATEWAY TO THE HUDSON VALLEY


This spread: A mountaintop manor in Tuxedo Park designed by Walker & Gillette in 1922; Michael Bruno, the

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savior of Tuxedo Park (inset).

THE NEWS of the impending renaissance of downtown Tuxedo and Sloatsburg has already made a tremendous impact on the local real estate market. Michael Bruno, founder of the online luxury marketplace 1stdibs, has started a new chapter of his life. In order to revitalize the Tuxedo–Hudson corridor, Bruno created the Tuxedo Hudson Company, an enterprise that is planning the complete transformation of this area, which is sure to become a place known for antiquing, world-class cuisine, and lodging. Bruno has purchased 20 historic commercial buildings and is investing over $15 million to restore and repurpose these buildings. He re-envisions this area, located 30 minutes from the George Washington Bridge, as a destination for great food with the focus on the bounty of the Hudson Valley. Word has spread that within the next 12 months, organic greens, vegetables, fruits, cheese, herbs, honey, flowers, fish, eggs, meat, locally roasted coffee, and hand-made chocolate are going to be readily available. “There is buzz and activity happening here J U LY 2 0 1 6 1 0 7


that has not been seen in decades,” shares Bruno. In July, the Tuxedo Hudson Company will open a weekly farm stand to glimpse the official Tuxedo Hudson Company market that is set to open in 2017. Housed in the historic building designed in 1895 by renowned architects Walker & Gillette, this marketplace will soon reclaim its role as the town center. “We can see the positive influence our project is having on the corridor with the announcement that trendy internet eyewear company Warby Parker is set to open a 34,000-square-

foot lab in Sloastburg,” states Bruno. Warby Parker will not only create 128 jobs over the next five years but also will attract more residents and bring a newfound energy to the area. “This manufacturing facility will boost the local economy while also having the potential to lure other businesses into the region and will only continue to elevate the real estate market here,” he emphasizes. Bruno can see “Sloatsburg being the Brooklyn in the gateway to the Hudson.” The second company that Bruno started, Tuxedo Hudson Realty, hung its shingle out for business in April, and has sold more homes in the three months that they have been operating than have been sold in the previous year in Tuxedo Park alone. “There is a substantial amount of activity going on in Tuxedo Park and I see an uptick in the neighboring towns as well,” explains Bruno. From speaking with Bruno, the general sense on the market is that the mood is positive and that the home market is percolating; his Tuxedo Hudson Realty has 29 listings and nearly 10 deals in contract on homes that had previously sat on the market for years. They have seen a dramatic sales increase in the community in the last two months. Some of the recent properties to be listed with THR include a number of historic homes located in Tuxedo Park: the stunning “Mortimer Cottage,” which was built circa 1891-98 and is rich with many of the original architectural details; a magnificent mountaintop manor designed by Walker & Gillette in 1922 for Charles E. Mitchell, who hired Olmstead Landscape Architects to design the gardens and stone walls; and an exceptional Delano and Aldrich designed Tuxedo Park Manor estate. u


This page, clockwise from above: “Turtle Point” is situated on nearly three lakefront acres on its own private peninsula on Tuxedo Lake; “Topridge” an exceptional estate situated on nearly 20 acres; “Mortimer Cottage,” built circa 1891; 104 Clubhouse, an historic masterpiece designed in 1889; “Topridge” façade. Opposite page: The “Turtle Point” estate was designed by the distinguished architect, Bruce Price, in 1881; one of the magnificent views of Tuxedo Lake and the surrounding countryside.


SUMMER SHOPPING SPREE BY LESLIE LOCKE

For all you vacationers lucky enough to be at one of these premier destinations, don’t let this sunny season pass you by without visiting our favorite splurge spots! Each town has a personality, and a must-have item, all its own. This page: A New England lighthouse; a map of Nantucket; Jobs Lane in Southampton in the early 1900s; Hudson, New York—today.


{ H A M P T O N S } RALPH LAUREN 31–33 Main Street / East Hampton 631.324.1222 In the usual style of the multifaceted Ralph Lauren, one of the best-looking shops on Main Street in East Hampton is, of course, his. The moment you step inside, it’s hard to choose which impressively decorated room to browse first (you’ll also be tempted to lounge on the patio outside). Naturally, it would depend if you are in the market for one of the brand’s perfectly tailored gowns, or maybe a new sweater to throw over your shoulders once the sun goes down at the golf club. No matter what you are looking for, one thing is for sure: you will want to saunter from room to room all afternoon.

THE MONOGRAM SHOP 7 Newtown Lane / East Hampton 631.329.3379 Do you crave authenticity, quality, and affordability? Do you desire specialty-made items personalized just the way you like them? Do you dream of adding your own specific touch to your home, or giving great gifts to your family and friends? Since 1997, the Monogram Shop has never failed to amaze. With an abundance of choices, this mother-daughter business accommodates anyone’s need with the finest quality monograms, equivalent to your grandmother’s work of needlepoint. Whether you want it on your linens, bags, or glasswear, they’ll always have you covered for any need or occasion. Come in and browse this summer.

VALERY JOSEPH SALON

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2454 Main Street / Bridgehampton 631.537.8967 There’s nothing worse than an assortment of falsely advertised hair sprays promising you the perfect “beachy waves” on your holiday vacation. When you’ve tried them all out, and find that your frizz is still frizzy, head on over to Valery Joseph Salon in Bridgehampton. Valery Joseph Salon offers cuts, blowouts, color, extensions, hair relaxers, and Brazilian straightening—everything you could need to get those beachy waves. The sought-after salon is not only open Monday through Saturday, but will also schedule house calls to help you primp and prep for your summer festivities. So jump in the ocean and embrace that summer heat, you’ll be missing it when its gone—frizz or no frizz.


{ H A M P T O N S } DYLAN’S MINI CANDY BAR 52 Main Street / East Hampton 631.324.6181 If you are going to break your summer diet, look no further than this retro candy shop. Dylan’s is a bit like Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, sans the Oompa Loompas. On its shelves, you’ll find everything from jumbo jawbreakers and gummy sharks to chocolates infused with spices from the far corners of the earth. While you are out embracing your inner child, you can still bring home something to the little ones in your life that won’t make them bounce off the walls by purchasing some of their candy-inspired loungewear. Be warned: you will want to go back every time you run out of oversized gummy bears at the house.

SIP ’N SODA 40 Hampton Road / Southampton 631.283.9752 Take a blast back into the past with a visit to Sip ’n Soda and discover Southampton’s charming three-generation business. For over 50 years, their doors have been open providing an exciting gateway to anyone who enters. The menu is a refreshing throwback, and the food never disappoints! Whether you have a sweet tooth in need of curing, are craving an oozing grilled cheese, or just want to refresh with a bubbling lime rickey, their menu offers an assortment of taste-bud-popping goodies sure to satisfy. Don’t forget about their homemade thick and creamy ice cream, or for those with a hungrier appetite, the tripledecker club found on the lunch menu. Each trip will surely be calling you back for more, year after year.

AERIN 83 Main Street / Southampton 631.353.3773 Everything you need to update and accessorize your Hamptons home (and yourself) is inside this Main Street boutique. Aerin carries it all—from the perfect throw pillows to pull together your living room, to espadrille ballet flats that can take you from the beach to the latest restaurant pop-up. Forget your beach essentials? No need to fret. Aerin has you covered offering styles that scream “beach chic” for the perfect Hamptons look. Whether you choose from the Kiini Bikinis, Filip Tunics, Capri collection, or woven hats, you’ll be sure to turn heads wherever you go. That’s a promise. Be sure to try the weekend lip gloss, too—guaranteed to help you seal the deal on date night.


{ H U D S O N } CM CHERRY 259 Main Street 518.822.9492 We can all agree that candlelight is infinitely more flattering than its modern counterpart. CM Cherry, a one-of-a-kind antique store, specializes in a carefully curated collection of candlesticks made of glass and crystal. If you look around you’ll find a pair of candlesticks perfect for your bedside tables, as well as a candelabra that happens to splendidly complete your dining room. (Be sure to carefully browse their impressive collection of vintage Tiffany candle sticks.) The store also carries a selection of chandeliers, which operate with candlelight only. One visit here and you won’t have to deal with those hateful fluorescent lights ever again.

F R GILLETTE 217 Warren Street 646.483.9109 Your senses might feel a bit of a shock after walking into F R Gillette’s interior design showroom, after having adjusted to the small-town feel of Hudson, New York. Gillette’s designs are made to be definitively modern, but they also keep a sense of comfort in mind. You may think you could never have that allwhite living room with just a pop of color in the carpet. It would feel sterile, right? Well, not at all after you feel how soft the color-spotted carpet is, and how nicely you sink in to those couches! Stop in here the second you feel your house needs a simplistic make over.

NAGA

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536 Warren Street 518.528.8585 If you have been looking for a Far East accent to place in your home, you have finally found the store of your dreams! Naga Antiques prides itself on its exquisite collection of Japanese screens, sculptures, and ceramics. In addition to Asian antiques, they also carry works of art and furniture from the Art Deco, American Modern, and Beidermeier periods. It’s quite the collection. In fact, you may find yourself browsing for hours. For over 45 years, this special antique shop has been a staple of fine art in Hudson. So, if you wander in, there will absolutely be something inside you find you can’t live without. J U LY 2 0 1 6 1 1 3


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MURDICK’S FUDGE 21 North Water Street / Edgartown 508.627.8047 Stop anyone on the street and mention the name Murdick’s and you’ll be stuck listening to them rave about this small town establishment. Locals especially love it. For over 35 years, this mom-and-pop shop has had people chasing the delicious scent of their fudge from all across the island. Everyone from year-round residents to summer vacationers visit when they are in need of a sweet treat. In addition to fudge, Murdick’s also offers peanut brittle and the classic combination of caramel and cheese popcorn, if you happen to not be in the mood for one of their mouth-watering fudge options. But be sure to at least buy some for later. You won’t regret it!

VINEYARD VINES 56 Narragansett Avenue / Oak Bluffs 508.687.9841 Vineyard Vines can easily be considered an East Coast classic. Or better: a New England staple. It should then come to no surprise that its nautical influence would extend past New England’s border and into all areas of the country. Vineyard Vines, whose inspiration came from a series of summers spent in Martha’s Vineyard, sparked the foundation of a small tie company. In just a few years, that tie company expanded into a largely renowned clothing brand. Its pink whale logo is now ubiquitous. Despite the company’s growth and expansion, its nautically inspired roots remain and are the perfect addition to your summer holiday, wherever that may be this year. Indulge a little and buy the famous salmon shorts. Maybe even splurge on that creative needlepoint belt. Hey, why not? You deserve it!

ISLAND OUTFITTERS 29 Main Street / Edgartown 508.627.7201 Add a little prep to your step by stopping in here for a dose of brightly colored apparel. Inside, you will find the newest lines of brands like Lilly Pulitzer, Holebrook, Southern Tide, and Vineyard Vines. It’s fun finding all these classic preppy staples in one place— and easy to go overboard on summer shopping. The accessories here are also a shining star of the shop. Island Outfitters offers a variety of sea-inspired jewelry—think starfish earrings and coral necklaces that really stand out against your hard-earned tan. After shopping at here, you will be sure you are always putting your best foot forward, with a coordinating sweater right behind it. 114 QUEST


{ N A N T U C K E T } SERENELLA 9B South Beach Street 508.228.3400 If you are looking for the perfect mix of city chic and beach boho style, you have found your heaven at Serenella. Here, the bright clothes pop against the white minimalist store. At this unique boutique, it’s all high fashion, which can often be hard to find in New England. Along its many racks, you will discover the latest items from Bottega Veneta, Dolce & Gabana, Missoni, Stella McCartney, and Versace. This shopaholic’s paradise has been named one of the top 50 boutiques in America for a reason. Don’t let the summer pass by before visiting this fashion emporium.

MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP 62 Main Street / East Hampton 508.228.0437 Since the 1960s, Murray’s Toggery Shop has been the hub of the quintessential Nantucket red pants and shorts. The store has since expanded the fabric to be featured on bowties, sunhats, and an array of other accessories (they have gotten pretty creative, and it’s fun to see what they do). Other brands have adopted the recognizable faded red color, but it all started at Murray’s Toggery. If you want authentic, it’s here. In addition to its vast selection of Nantucket red items, the store also carries shirts, ties, and pocket squares of every color. For those of you who know a lot of people with summer birthdays, their needlepoint flasks or key fobs make the perfect gift! Be sure to check out the great selection of belts as well.

THE LION’S PAW

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62 Main Street 508.228.3837 As you veer off the cobblestone street to venture inside the Lion’s Paw, you have to pause for a minute to take in the colorful vibe of it all. There are always new home decor treasures for you to uncover inside this boutique. Do you first go for the throw pillows, or maybe the dishware? This store carries an eclectic mix of hand-painted furniture, glassware, and rugs to outfit your cottage. Additionally, they carry table linens and tabletop trinkets for anyone’s home aesthetic. Best of all, the Lion’s Paw carries the finest bed linens, perfect to fall into after a long, sandy day at the beach.


THE EASTENDERS BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

QUEST ARCHIVE: JULY 2011

rivers; no place has such pure, invigorating air; no place better water; and I am certain there is no place better adapted to men of means,” reported the East Hampton Star in the 1890s. The turn of the century brought about the greatest change on the East End—with a swank New York crowd coming to the island for the first time. The “life of quietness and peace,” as the Star described it, was set to change. These newcomers became known as “summer colonists.” By the 1930s, East Hampton and Southampton were in full swish mode with fashionable families spending their summers in these charming villages by the sea. Photographer Bert Morgan (1904-1986) began his career syndicating photographs for the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News. By 1930, he was chronicling high society in The Social Spectator, Vanity Fair, and Town & Country. Promising never to publish an unflattering picture, Morgan became the photographer of choice and gained unique access to a rarified post-Gilded Age world, which he would continue to photograph through the 1980s. During the 1950s, he could be found daily during the summer months in Southampton—cataloguing the comings and goings of the social set. u This page, from top: Peter Sullivan, Suzanne Mitchell, Anne Ford, and Chandler Hovey at the Tennis Ball at the Meadow Club; Austine Hearst and Kay Meehan at the Beach Club; Harold Wall presents an award to Henry Ford II and his partner Richard L. Harris (walking), Seventh Flight Winners at the Invitational Golf Tournament at the Shinnecock Golf Club.

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“NO PLACE HAS such natural attractions; no place such beautiful


This page, clockwise from top left: Mr. and Mrs. Chester Dale at The Horse Show Ball at The Meadow Club; Mrs. Warren Johnson, Col. Serge Obolensky, and Mrs. Raul Sanchez-Elio at the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club; Mrs. Thomas M. Bancroft, Jr. and Mr. Harcourt Amory, Jr. at the Southampton Bathing Corporation (the Beach Club); Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Rodgers at the Tennis Ball at the Meadow Club; Mrs. George Harris at the Beach Club; Southampton Police Chief Buck Burnett is greeted by the receiving line at the AndrewsWannamaker supper dance, July, 4, 1958; Mary Curry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Curry Jr., and Maureen Sullivan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sullivan, at the Beach Club.

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This page, clockwise from top left: Mrs. B. Kingore Bixby (center) with her daughter Mrs. Beatrice B. Andrews and granddaughter Susan Andrews at the Irving Hotel; Maria Cooper Janis and Charlotte Ford at the Beach Club; Tony Leeds, Robert Weiser, Ruth Havemeyer, George Graham, and Sally Niness at the Beach Club; Megan and Richard L. Harris, Jr.,children of Richard Harris, at the Beach Club; Henry R. Benjamin, Jr., Harold M. Wall, Paul Massey, and Oliver Rogers at Shinnecock. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Billy Hitchcock at the Andrews-Wannamaker dinner dance; Mrs. John B. Aspergren and Mrs. James P. Stuart at Shinnecock; Monte Hackett and Linda Laughlin at the Beach Club dance; Mr. and Mrs. James dePeyster at St. Andrew’s Dune Church for the Prentice-ten Bos wedding; Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Magowan at the Meadow Club opening dinner dance; Mrs. Angier Biddle Duke and Mr. Jacques Fray; Mrs. George Johnson at the Parrish Art Museum for Mr. John’s hat fashion show; Mr. and Mrs. Carmen Messmore at the Beach Club; Mr. and Mrs. Garrick Stephenson at the Beach Club. Center,

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Ritchy Warren at the Andrews-Wanamaker supper dance, July 4, 1958.

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HOPPING BETWEEN

HAMPTONS BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

THE HAMPTONS STRETCH from Southampton to the beaches of Montauk and, even, Shelter Island: a collection of hamlets that entice the elite (and captivate the rest). Of course, the interest isn’t new. For decades, cameras have been directed at clans like the Bouviers (with “Big Edie” and “Little Edie” of Grey Gardens) and, also, the Kardashians. But the East End that we know, as readers of Quest, has remained concealed by the privet hedges... Here, an invitation to the Hamptons we have adored for generations. From the exclusive communities of East Hampton to the exciting scenes of Montauk, we compare these towns—from the inside.

This page: The sign for one of the iconic restaurants of the Hamptons, Lobster Roll (which is located on the Montauk Highway). Opposite page: A bouquet with the rosés of the Hamptons, featuring Whispering Angel’s Rosé (Southampton); Wölffer No. 139 Rosé Cider (East Hampton); Domaines Ott’s Rosé (Sag Harbor); Moët & Chandon Rosé Impérial (Montauk); and Château Minuty Rosé (Shelter Island).


J U LY 2 0 1 6 1 2 1


Southampton

East Hampton

The Old-School Hampton

The Posh Hampton

Your Friend’s Parents’ House

‹ The Maidstone Inn

De rigueur clothing staple:

White Denim

‹ Roberta Roller Rabbit

Most overheard or overused pick-up line:

“Any interest in our foursome

“My family’s been members of the

tomorrow?” [golf understood]

Maidstone since ’91—1891.”

Barry’s Bootcamp

Soulcycle

‹ Parrish

The Stephen Talkhouse

Art Museum

(in Amagansett) ›

Ranking:

Where to stay:

Beach bod, courtesy of:

Cultural institution:

Signature ingredient:

Personalities of note:

Tate’s Bake Shop Cookies ›

Round Swamp Farm’s Fried Chicken

‹ Tory Burch

Alec Baldwin

and Brooke Shields

and Gwyneth Paltrow

Boîte of choice:

Red Bar

Salon request:

Mega-Blonde

Event of the summer:

July 30: Robert Wilson’s Summer Benefit

August 13: “Authors Night”

at the Watermill Center.

at the East Hampton Library.

‹ Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Labradoodle

Your Friend’s Parents’ Land Rover

Tesla ›

A Case of Sancerre

‹ Flowers by Ron Wendt

Best in show:

Mode of transport:

Party “must”:

122 QUEST

‹ Bostwick’s Chowder House

Glossy Brunette


Sag Harbor

Montauk

Shelter Island

The Nautical Hampton

The Happening Hampton

The Non-Hampton Hampton

‹ Baron’s Cove

Boating Stripes

Gurney’s Montauk Resort & Spa ›

‹ Sunset Beach

Mirrored Sunglasses

Your Alma Mater Tee

“Haven’t we met,

“I have a reservation at

Something about knowing

at Beacon?”

Surf Lodge on Sunday.”

André Balazs.

‹ Sailing

New York Pilates at Gurney’s

Jogging (to and from the farmstand)

Sag Harbor Whaling

‹ The Memory

Shelter Island,

and Historical Museum

Motel

Itself

Tapenade (for Boat Picnic)

Montauk Brewing Company’s Summer Ale

Fresh Peaches ›

Richard Gere

Robert De Niro

‹ Sean Connery

and Billy Joel

and Ralph Lauren ›

and Simon Doonan

The American Hotel

‹ Grey Lady: Montauk

Vine Street Café

Tousled Strands

‹ Shimmering Highlights

Pulled Back

July 2: Fireworks by Grucci

July 30: ClambakeMTK (hosted by Marc Murphy) at

August 20: Dan’s Harvest East End (hosted

at the Sag Harbor Yacht Club.

Gurney’s. (Or, duh, Ben Watts’ Shark Attack Sounds.)

by Geoffrey Zakarian) at McCall Vineyard

Golden Retriever

Beagle

‹ Portuguese Water Dog

Audi Wagon

An Appearance from Jay McInerney

‹ 1980s Ford Bronco

$30 for the Cover Charge

‹ Bicycle with a Basket

String Lights ›

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BROWN

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST Alexandra Richards, Chanel Iman, Wyclef Jean, and Olivia Palermo at the Renaissance New York Midtown Hotel.

124 QUEST

B FA . CO M ; CO U RTE S Y O F T H E R E N A I S S A N C E H OTE L

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


Clockwise from left: Elle Dee; The Knocks; Harley Viera-Newton; Franco V and Lauren Buys; Alan Eckstein, Timo Weiland, and Tim Bryan, at a bash for the Renaissance New York Midtown Hotel.

LAUNCH OF THE RENAISSANCE NEW YORK MIDTOWN HOTEL THE RENAISSANCE HOTEL debuted its newest destination

(218 West 35th Street) with a bash that featured a concert by The Knocks (with Ben “B-Roc” Ruttner and James “JPatt” Patterson) and Wyclef Jean. The event was sure to nod to the Garment District, so it included an installation that replicated the studio of designer (and darling) Timo Weiland. Guests for the festivities included: Chanel Iman, Nigel Barker, Alan

Eckstein, Savannah Engel, Olivia Palermo, Alexandra Richards, Frederica Tompkins, Jonah Tulis, Harley Viera-Newton, and Francesca Vuillemin. Fans of the New York Knicks and the New York Rangers should note the Renaissance New York Midtown Hotel’s proximity to Madison Square Garden—its airy restaurant (Rock & Reilly’s) is perfect for cocktails, pregame or post-game. J U LY 2 0 1 6 1 2 5


and Jeremy Irons; Lauren Hutton, at the screening of IFC Films’ The

▲ SCREENING OF THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY

▼ BUCCELLATI DEBUTED OPERA COLOR COLLECTION

THIS COLUMNIST WAS thrilled to attend the screening of The

BUCCELLATI INVITED US to wine/dine between the baubles at their store on Madison Avenue: a celebration of the new collection, Opera Color (which was inspired by the culture of the Italian Renaissance). Lucrezia Buccellati and Rickie de Sole hosted the lunch, treating their guests—Claire Distenfeld, Sophie Elgort, Grace Fuller, Nicole Hanley, Sarah Hoover, Dalia Oberlander, and Stefano Tonchi, among others—to a social, sparkly afternoon in honor of the spectacular, storied brand.

Man Who Knew Infinity: a gem from IFC Films that features the greatness of Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel as well as the talent of Devika Bhise (who happens to be the sister of a close friend). The event—which was hosted by Gabriel Byrne, J.C. Chandor, Joanna Coles, Hendrik Hertzberg, Steve Kroft, Bennett Miller, Emily Mortimer, Lawrence O’Donnell, and Beau Willimon—ended with a bang at Elyx House.

From left: Rickie de Sole, Lucrezia Buccellati, and Grace Fuller; Chelsea Leyland; Nicole Hanley; Kate Davidson Hudson and Pari Ehsan, at a luncheon with Buccellati. 00 QUEST 126 QUEST

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Man Who Knew Infinity.

B FA . CO M ; K R I S T I N A B U M P H R E Y / S TA R PI X ;

YGL

From left: Dev Patel; Devika Bhise


Clockwise from left: Jennifer Cuminale and Samuel Leeds; Eliza Glaister and Oliver Blodgett; Lara Glaister and Adam Maib; Peter Kunhardt, Jr., and Sarah Arison; Rufus Wainwright and Kick Kennedy, at Gordon Parks Foundation’s dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street.

GORDON PARKS FOUNDATION’S DINNER AT CIPRIANI 42ND STREET GORDON PARKS FOUNDATION—which continues to dedi-

cate its efforts to the work of Gordon Parks (and other creatives)—hosted its dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street. There, a number of names were honored for their contributions to the arts, including: Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne (who were introduced by Alex Soros); LaToya Ruby Frazier (who was introduced by Leslie Parks); Janelle Monáe (who was introduced by Kaseem "Swizz Beatz" Dean); and Bryan Stevenson (who was introduced by Elizabeth Alexander)—as well as

Leonard Lauder and his wife, Judy Glickman. The power of the program was evident in the eyes of the attendees—between a speech by Kathleen Cleaver (a former Black Panther who had been captured by Gordon Parks) and a performance by Jon Batiste with his band, Stay Human. Peter Kunhardt, Jr., executive director of Gordon Parks Foundation, exalted: “Last night was a true testament to the legacy of Mr. Parks and his long-lasting impact on the art world and the next generation of artists.” It was art for more than art’s sake. J U LY 2 0 1 6 1 2 7


FA R E W E L L

REMEMBERING BILL CUNNINGHAM

This page, clockwise from below: Bill Cunningham, as captured on the streets by Andy Warhol; the photographer on “his” corner at 57th Street

AFTER MY DEAR mother died, Bill was the last one to call me “Christopher,” always in his soft-toned, near squeaky voice. It was pure Bill, and it reminded me of my childhood. As countless others have lovingly remarked, Bill was as likeable as he was genuine. And yet, his modest mannerisms aside, Bill was also a sharp-elbowed competitor, who was never bashful about getting the shot he saw… and wanted. Not unlike the legendary Slim Aarons (whose timeless image of Minnie Cushing adorns the cover of your Quest issue in hand), Bill Cunningham well understood his near iconic standing in the social scene. Like Slim, he never took it too seriously; it was always just his job. Even when surrounded by would-be “swans” and stiletto-toed wannabe climbers, all vying for his camera’s attention, Bill was never taken in by the spectacle. He was all about the shot. And the clothes. I once commented to Marian Sulzberger Heiskell of the New York Times clan that, “Bill Cunningham is your secret weapon.” Marian paused, then thoughtfully replied: “No, Bill is far more. He’s our street conscience.” All of the Quest family, and our dedicated readers alike, will miss Bill’s gentle presence and discerning decency. And we share comfort in knowing that he loved what he did. As did we. —Chris(topher) Meigher 128 Q U E S T

G A R E T H C AT TE R M O LE / G E T T Y I M A G E S

and Fifth Avenue; a note from Cunningham to Quest’s publisher.


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