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THE GREENWICH ISSUE

KATHERINE PARKER-MAGYAR, PATRICK MCGOWAN, PAIGE CORBIN, WESLEY WYNNE, ALEXANDRA PORTER, AND JOANNA SCHOLTZ IN GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT questmag.com


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CONTENTS The G reenwich i ssue 88

GREENWICH ROOTS

Quest returns to the grassy Connecticut

enclave, where our models explore an estate. produced and sTyled by elizabeTh Quinn brown, phoToGraphed by F.e. c asTleberry

100

114

An invitation to visit the country clubs of Greenwich, courtesy of the Greenwich Historical Society. by elizabeTh Quinn brown

PART OF THE CLUB

104

LET’S SHOP GREENWICH AVENUE

108

ARTNET: VOICE OF THE MARKET Artnet—a company founded by Hans Neuendorf—encourages transparency in the art market. by alex Travers

112

The Bruce Museum offers a revealing look at the role of new lighting technologies in the work of the Impressionists and their contemporaries.

114

A LONDON GUIDE Our picks for hotels, restaurants, and more—a must-read for crossing the pond. by elizabeTh Q uinn brown

118

AND THE OSCAR GOES TO...

124

QUEST POLO JOURNAL

124

An overview of Connecticut’s world-class shopping and dining scene. by alex Travers

ELECTRIC PARIS

The photos of Oscar Abolafia. by daniel cappello

Our annual ode to the sport, featuring our favorite clubs.


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62

70

CONTENTS

58

C olumns 18

SOCIAL DIARY

54

HARRY BENSON

56

A DATE WITH HISTORY

58

FRESH FINDS

62

CANTEENS

64

FASHION

66

REAL ESTATE

68

BRIDAL

70

OPEN HOUSE

72

EVENTS

74

WISDOM FROM REAL ESTATE’S BRIGHTEST

80

WEDDINGS

86

SOCIAL CALENDAR

136

SNAPSHOT

On the scene at Central Park Conservancy’s “Hat Luncheon.”

by

DaviD PatriCk Columbia

In 1984, our columnist photographed Caroline and John F. Kennedy, Jr., at the JFK Library. The ideal guest list for a legendary dinner party. by taki theoDoraCoPulos

For him and for her, from cars to necklaces. by Daniel CaPPello anD elizabeth meigher

Geoffrey Zakarian opens The National—his second—in Greenwich. by Daniel CaPPello

Oscar de la Renta offers stylish kids a beautiful new season of childrenswear at a trunk show. The stunning new tower at 252 East 57th Street offers buyers the home of their dreams.

A conversation with the team at Sachin & Babi about their bridal business.

by

alex travers

Helene Barre opens the doors to 7 Old Round Hill Lane in Greenwich, Connecticut.

An elite circle from all over the world meets in Salzburg to raise fundson Amadeus Weekend. The best brokers weigh in on the market. by the eDitors

We bear witness to the most stunning brides and grooms as they recite their vows. The greatest events to enjoy in and around town now that summer has officially begun.

Our editor-in-chief remembers Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia

58


S U N D A Y

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Alfred Maurer, Nocturne, Paris, oil on board, Avery Galleries, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Clockwise from top left: Some direction during our cover shoot; Nacho Figueras on the field; a 1932 parade on Greenwich Avenue; one of the area’s historic country clubs.

“JUNE IS BUSTIN’ OUT ALL OVER,” sang Nettie in the Rodgers and Hammerstein 1945 classic Carousel—lyrics that also inspired our social scribe David Patrick Columbia (see page 18 to sing along). But rather than following Nettie to a clambake, Quest skipped over to the meadows and hills of Connecticut to see what’s good in Greenwich. Lizzie Brown found a gaggle of fun pals who love nothing more than a day spent serving up some buggy whips on the tennis court à la Rafael Nadal; lounging poolside in the afternoon; relishing drippy ice cream cones in the sun; and an evening cocktail spent discussing politics and Real Housewives. She and F.E. Castleberry captured all these moments and more in this month’s cover story, “Greenwich Roots.” While the city may be fashion capital to the world, Greenwich can still hold its head high next to her bigger sibling, with many wonderful stores that include Betteridge, Ralph Lauren, and Madewell. Alex Travers imparts tips on the best places to stop in—only to leave loaded with bags. We also take a look at the historic and exclusive country clubs of Greenwich, thanks to the fascinating archives from the Greenwich Historical Society. Thumbing through the old pictures, one can’t help but wish to have been a fly on those hallowed walls. And of course, now is the time for all great men to come to the aid of their…polo team! Hop on those ponies for a chukka or two with our round-up of the best venues and 16 QUEST

historical tales of the sport of kings. From Mashomack to Haviland and all the way to Casa de Campo, this is a great time to bowl in. Whether a proud resident or a delighted visitor, bring a copy of this year’s Greenwich Issue with you when you find yourself in the neighborhood. That way you can be assured that “you’ll never, ever walk alone.” u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Quest returns to Connecticut in a 1976 Ford Bronco. Our models—natives of the area—are dressed in clothing from Carolina Herrera, GANT, J.McLaughlin, Lilly Pulitzer, and Ralph Lauren. From “Greenwich Roots,” produced by Elizabeth Quinn Brown and photographed by F.E. Castleberry.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY “May was full of promises, But she didn’t keep ’em quick enough for some. And a crowd of doubtin’ Thomases, Was predictin’ that the summer’d never come. But it’s comin’, by gum! You can feel it come…” OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II

wrote these lyrics 70 years ago for a song by Richard Rodgers called “June Is Bustin’ Out All Over” for a show called Carousel. This past May reminds of the May that

Hammerstein was referring to: It was the first time in memory when the heat was on—mid-month—in New York buildings. Around the town. On a Thursday night, Shirley Lord

gave a dinner for her friend Hillie Mahoney, who has just published a memoir: Journey Interrupted: A Family Without a Country in a World At War (Regan Arts). Mahoney is a popular fig-

ure, here and in Palm Beach (where she has a residence and spends a good deal of her time). Her late husband, businessman David Mahoney, was chairman of Norton Simon, the conglomerate.

FA S H I O N I N ST I T U T E O F T EC H N O L O G Y H O N O R E D D E N N I S B A S S O AT T H E P L A Z A H OT E L

Nicky and James Rothschild 18 QUEST

Leba and Neil Sedaka

Carl McCall and Joyce Brown

Mike George and Jill Martin

Liz Peek

John and Laura Pomerantz

B FA . CO M ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Michael Cominotto and Dennis Basso


NEW YORK | HAMPTONS | GREENWICH


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O C I E T Y O F M S K H E L D A D E S I G N S A L E AT T H E I R B O U T I Q U E

Webb Egerton and Courtney Moss

When he retired, he turned to his personal philanthropy to fund the David Mahoney Institute of Neurological Sciences at his alma mater: the University of Pennsylvania. And in 1990, he endowed the Mahoney Neuroscience Institute at Harvard University. He died in 2000 and his wife chairs the latter today. Hillie Mahoney—whose birth name (and name on her book) is Hildegarde—was very active in her husband’s philanthropies as well as her own. She also has her own fascinating story, which (af20 QUEST

Stephanie Woodmansee and Danielle Burke

Nancy Pearson and Kathy Abbott

ter decades of thinking about it and being unable to find someone to write it for her) she finally found a way to tell by putting pen to paper. The “journey” in the title is about a trip her family took in 1941, when her father (then the head of a major German bank in New York) was called back to Berlin. The parents, both native Germans who had become Americans, decided to take their three young children so they could visit the grandparents who still lived in Germany. Because Adolf Hitler’s war with Britain and

Mark Gilbertson, Anne van Rensselaer and Todd Klein

Shanda Chapin and Janette Liptak

France was already on, they could not cross the Atlantic. So, they took the very long way around the globe: from New York to San Francisco to Yokohama, with the intention of traveling through Russia to Germany. Six days after they arrived in Japan, Hitler invaded Russia, which meant they couldn’t risk traveling through Russia. Then, because of Japan’s involvement in wars in Asia and its alliance with Germany, they couldn’t return to New York because of the number of people evacuating the Far

Coco Kopelman and Gretchen Fenton

East. On December 7, 1941, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. They couldn’t leave Japan, so they remained until the end of the war in 1945. They were there, as aliens—and highly suspicious since the parents were both American and German, and young— when the first atom bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. What it was like and what happened to them and their small children is Mahoney’s quietly riveting story. Aside from an amazing and unusual tale, knowing I

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Lavinia Snyder, Caryn Zucker and Anne Mott


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A would write about this dinner (where I happened to be seated next to the author) I opened my copy the following afternoon to get a look. Being the slow reader that I am, I had no intention of reading much of it in a few hours. Hillie was eight years old when this occurred to her and her family. The child’s memory is the purest because everything is new, and so the ordeal remains fresh for the reader, and shocking, and at moments almost terrifying. That said, her parents looked after their family in such a way that the children were fortified by their unity. This is truly one of those “can’t put it down” books, where you learn what the child learned as she learned it. The family finally returned to New York at the end of the war, after the Japanese surrendered and General Douglas MacArthur landed in Japan. It’s a story of history, of travel, of culture, of geogra-

phy in the mid–20th century, with all the horrors surrounding millions of people all over the world—and one family’s way of getting through it. The Social Season in New York is dominated mainly by the charities and philanthropies that bring people together, both in volunteering and in massive fund-raising. Hundreds of millions are raised for hundreds of charitable and philanthropic organizations that serve not only the citizens of New York, but in many cases, universally in the world. Many focus on specific medical, educational, and cultural objectives, much of which is taken for granted as part of the city’s daily life. On another Thursday night, Ronald Lauder was honored by the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) at its 10th Annual Connoisseur’s Dinner at Sotheby’s. The event raised over $3.25 million for Alzheimer’s research.

Leonard Lauder presented his brother, Ronald, with the Chairman’s Award for his leadership in supporting new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. In his introduction, Leonard told us how his brother came to him 18 years ago with this project (to fund research for an Alzheimer’s drug) and he suggested that they do it together. That was a moment in our history. Ronald wanted to find a cure. The idea is never impossible in this great scientific age of ours, but close to it. Alzheimer’s really came into the national consciousness in the late 1970s. It was a frightful mystery. By the 1990s, it was beginning to take on the numbers of epidemic. And it was scary. I was at the first of these annual dinners, when the result of the Lauder brothers’ intention had taken form and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation was established. It was held in same

auction room in Sotheby’s that we were in on this Thursday night. It was not a gala in the cookie-cutter way that galas are staged nowadays. It was a serious dinner: black-tie, beautifully presented, and beautifully lit. The message from the podium (courtesy of Leonard as well as Nancy Corzine and Dr. Howard Fillit) was presented over the course of the dinner. It was very civilized and very serious. It was a select audience of about 200 guests, because it was a fund-raiser and they had invited potential donors. The Lauder family is known for its great philanthropists in New York and they give on a large scale. They know their neighborhood. That’s who was in the room. The initial discussion of Alzheimer’s at the very first dinner was not memorable, except for the fact that they didn’t have a cure and they

T H E M I D D L E B U R G S P R I N G R AC E S AT G L E N W O O D PA R K I N V I R G I N I A

Temple and Ellie Grassi 22 QUEST

Ned Grassi and Andy Harris

The Temple Gwathmey Trophy

Edith Grassi

Charlotte Aukamp

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E G R A S S I FA M I LY

Louise Whitney


Portrait by renowned illustrator Joseph Adolphe.

WILMINGTON TRUST RENOWNED INSIGHT

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the sale of any financial product or service. This article is not designed or intended to provide financial, tax, legal, accounting, or other professional advice since such advice always requires consideration of individual circumstances. If professional advice is needed, the services of your professional advisor should be sought. Private Banking is the marketing name for an offering of M&T Bank deposit and loan products and services. Investment and Insurance Products: • Are NOT Deposits • Are NOT FDIC-Insured • Are NOT Insured By Any Federal Government Agency • Have NO Bank Guarantee • May Go Down In Value Wilmington Trust is a registered service mark. Wilmington Trust Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of M&T Bank Corporation (M&T). Investment management and fiduciary services are provided by Wilmington Trust Company, operating in Delaware only, and Wilmington Trust, N.A., a national bank. Loans, retail and business deposits, and other personal and business banking services and products are offered by M&T Bank, member FDIC. ©2016 Wilmington Trust Corporation and its affiliates. All rights reserved.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A were bound in their minds to find one. Now. During our lifetime. It did not sound realistic, but it was hopeful. In the ensuing years of this annual dinner, the news has become progressively more assured in a way that it wasn’t at the beginning. They were already talking about drugs that could halt the progress of the disease. This evening, they were talking about discoveries that were raising the hopes and realities. Ronald Lauder was introduced by Leonard, who praised his younger brother’s philanthropy as well as his ambassadorial career. They are without question the two most interesting brothers in New York today because of their mother: Estée Lauder, a petite, diminutive woman who, driven with ambition and creative imagination (and

with a lot of help from her husband), made an empire. The two boys (who inherited it from their mother, who lived a long life) have made even more of it. I was thinking about this as I watched the exchange between the two brothers at the podium. I was thinking how, on some level that was very real, Estée would have been deeply proud of the boys she brought up. I’m sure she had help in raising them as she was a working mother, but their own conduct reflects a very strong, nurturing mother. A kind of epigenetic detail. I’ve never met Ronald although I’m well aware of his cultural work— especially with the Neue Galerie New York, which he created in the old William Starr Miller mansion on East 86th Street and Fifth Avenue. (This is

the building where the last Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt lived out her years after the Gilded Age.) I might have been introduced to him at some public occasion because I’ve been in his presence a number of times at these events, but I don’t recall. So my only impression of him had been physical. He’s a tall, solid-figured man, always impeccably dressed in a well-tailored suit and tie. There is a quiet, serious expression in his natural repose and demeanor. But I had no sense of his personality. That all changed at the podium in giving his acceptance speech. He told the nearly 300 guests: “Leonard and I have been involved together in many causes over the years. But this cause, this effort, means more to me than

almost anything else.” And then he continued to discuss how it came about, what he had learned, and what we can look forward to. This was done in a style that belied his serious countenance. He’s a man of a dry but jubilant wit. Again, I thought of his mother, whom I have been told doted on him as a young boy. It shows. He has a light but ironic sense of humor with a good dash of the “Noo Yawker” in him. He’s fun to listen to at times, and funny. He’s a man, like his older brother, with a serious sense of purpose as well as the joy of pursuing it. I believed him. They’re going to find that answer. Ronald told his audience of potential donors that every dollar goes entirely to the research. Everything else about the now major project (e.g.,

O P E N I N G O F C H R I S L E I DY ST U D I O AT 1 49 W E ST 2 2 N D ST R E E T I N N E W YO R K

Tina Townsend, Michael James and Charlotte Sabbagh 24 QUEST

Daniela Dello Joio and Kelly Van Ingen

Julie Graham and Liza Pulitzer Calhoun

Meredith Melling and Molly Howard

Charlie Rugger and Adrienne Conzelman

Nicholas Rosenkranz and Eva O’Neill

CO U RTE S Y O F C H R I S LE I DY

Tim Ives and Chris Leidy


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Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A employees and their salaries) are underwritten by him and his brother. The dinner was hosted by Nancy Corzine (a longtime member of the board) and guests included: Donald Newhouse, Herbert Kasper, Jo Carole Lauder, Judy Glickman Lauder, William Lauder and Lori Tritsch, Tad Smith, Mary Freda, Jean Kennedy Smith, Lois Robbins, John Demsey, Ann and Andrew Tisch, Olivier Reza, Eleanora Kennedy, and Sheila Johnson Robbins— who enjoyed a preview of Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale. Founded in 1998 by Leonard and Ronald Lauder, the

Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation is dedicated to rapidly accelerating the discovery of drugs to prevent, treat, and cure Alzheimer’s. It is the only public charity solely focused on funding the development of drugs for Alzheimer’s, employing a venture philanthropy model to support research in academia and the biotech industry. Through the generosity of its donors, the organization has awarded nearly $90 million to fund more than 500 Alzheimer’s drug discovery programs and clinical trials in 18 countries. To learn more, please visit: alzdiscovery.org. It was a good night. The first Wednesday in

May was the Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon in the Conservatory Garden in Central Park (which is located behind the Vanderbilt Gates at 105th Street and Fifth Avenue). It was a record attendance (with over 1,300), raising $3.6 million. The weather was not a deterrent. It’s known in local parlance as the “Hat Lunch.” It is hosted by the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy—a division that was founded by four women back in the 1980s, who decided to clean up the park so that it could look the way it does today. Of those four, only Norma Dana (a leader of the pack to some) survives. She

was there at the lunch, and she was pretty in pink. Rainy days, gray days, green days: that was the first week in May. That said, the green is sumptuous against the gray, thanks to the ultra-violet rays that give them their fluorescence. Temperatures were in the 50s. This is good for many things except people’s moods. However, all that changed—as if Mother Nature simply flipped the switch—on Mother’s Day. The sun came out and temps moved up toward 70. On the Tuesday night of the month, I went to the Barnard College’s annual alumni dinner in the Grand Ballroom

T H E WOM E N ’ S C OM M I T T E E O F C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y H O ST E D T H E F R E D E R I C K L A W O L M ST E A D “ H AT L U N C H EO N ”

Norma Dana 26 QUEST

Karen May and Lucinda May

Meera Gandhi and Tracy Young

Anna Harrison, Anne Harrison and Katie Harrison

Nancy Roeder and Kimberly Jetnil

Sharon Jacob and Stacey Bishop

B FA . CO M

Stephanie and Fred Shuman


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A of the Plaza Hotel. Why the interest? (Someone who knew I was going, wanted to know.) I’d heard about this annual before and was curious. A lot of powerful women in the room, I was told. Erica Jong, Martha Stewart, and Twyla Tharp were all in the same class (’63), and Ellen Futter (the head of the American Museum of Natural History whom I greatly admire) was president of the college before moving to AMNH. The Gala was co-hosted by award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa (’84), actress Cynthia Nixon (’88), and Barnard College president Debora L. Spar. Nina Davidson (’95) and Meryl Tisch (’77)

were co-chairs of the evening. It was like a family affair, but with a serious purpose. Despite Barnard College’s brilliant alums’ achievements, something like 40 percent of the students are on some kind of financial aid. The college needs to increase its endowment substantially to continue their great work. There were many couples attending, some of whom were only associated with the college through their children or friends’ children. The honorees were Cheryl Glicker Milstein (’82) as well as husband Columbia University alumnus Philip Milstein (’71) and daughter Toby Milstein (’14) for their extraordinary generosity to support

the construction of a state-ofthe-art teaching and learning center scheduled to open in the Fall 2018. The Milsteins endowed the college with a $25 million gift. Toby joined Tony Award– winning musical theater composer and arranger Jeanine Tesori (’83) in a musical tribute to her parents, which was commissioned specially for the evening. The second week of the month, on a Monday night, Lighthouse Guild NYC hosted its annual POSH dinner at the Four Seasons Restaurant. They were honoring four “Visionaries”: Margo Catsimatidis (introduced by Mark Simone) for her philanthropy

and humanitarian work; Kim and Michael McCarty, artist and restaurateur (introduced by Blythe Danner and Jay McInerney, respectively); and B Michael, the fashion designer who was introduced by the amazing Cicely Tyson (who, at 91, is still working and looking smart and beautiful). After the presentation, we were treated to Valerie Simpson performing some of her songs on the grand piano. This evening drew a big crowd, which was even more surprising because there were other major events around town on Monday night. Being in the beautiful, classically designed rooms of the restaurant (which will cease

L I G H T H O U S E G U I L D ’ S “A P O S H A F FA I R ” AT T H E FO U R S E A S O N S R E STAU R A N T

Barbara and Donald Tober 28 QUEST

Marc Rosen and Geoffrey Bradfield

Muffie Potter Aston, Margo Catsimatidis and Somers Farkas

James Dubin

Judith and Rudy Giuliani with Nicole Miller

Cicely Tyson and B Michael

Susan Fales-Hill

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Blythe Danner, Kim and Michael McCarty and Jay McInerney


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Maura Christu and Adele Merck

to exist in a little more than a month after a lifetime in New York) was fun for everyone. It also drew some of the guests who were eager to have a last chance to appreciate what New Yorkers once had and will have no more. Dinner chairs were this writer and Margo and James Nederlander. Honorary chair was Arlene Dahl. Honorary dinner hosts were Hamish Bowles, Amy Fine Collins, Alex Hitz, and Lorry Newhouse. Vice–dinner chairs were Mark-Anthony Edwards, Susan Fales-Hill, Joanna and Brian Fisher, Somers Farkas, Charlie Ha30 QUEST

Jean and William Matthews

roche, Risteard Keating and Charles Van Campenhout, Sharon and John L. Loeb, Jr., Tina and Terry Lundgren, Amelia Quist-Ogunlesi, and Karen and Charles Phillips. Except for the welcoming introduction to the evening by James Dubin (chairman of Lighthouse Guild NYC) and Alan Morse (president and CEO of Lighthouse Guild NYC), it was a relaxed evening of many friends enjoying the great menu followed by the Four Seasons’ signature cotton candy—which was presented at all tables after the dessert. Some of the more talented guests (actors) impro-

Jeffrey and Frances Fisher

Lyanne Azqueta and Christina Macfarland

Nick and Caroline Rafferty

vised to the delight of everyone else. The following Wednesday was a good day at Michael’s. At a glance, it looked something like this: Katherine Farley (who is the chair of Lincoln Center of the Performing Arts as well as the senior managing director at Tishman Speyer) and husband Jerry Speyer; Lisa Linden (public relations extraordinaire) with George Lentz; Jack Abernathy; Jeffrey Beers; Brant Cryder; Beth Comstock; Ivan Delgado Gonzalez; and Jonathan Estreich. At table one was Star Jones with Denise Rich, Bonnie Ev-

Helene and Matthew Lorentzen

ans, Michelle Rella, Pamela Johanoff, Vivian Diamont, Felicia Taylor, and Patricia Gucci. I don’t know what they were talking about but I do know the story around the table was about Gucci, who has written a family memoir mainly about her father, Aldo Gucci, and her mother (who for many years was Gucci’s inamorata while he was otherwise engaged). After Patricia was born, things changed. Gucci has written a book about the whole matter, and surely about the life of her father who was a genius retailer and at the forefront of Italian retailers and manufacturers.

C A P E H A RT

Kevin Ferro and Thomas with Edwin Gordon


atmosphere for enjoyment Harry Bertoia’s environment for sound

bent, cast & forged tHe Jewelry of Harry Bertoia

Through SepTemBer 25, 2016

museum of arts and design Jerome and Simona Chazen Building / 2 ColumBuS CirCle, nYC / madmuSeum.org Support for Atmosphere for Enjoyment: Harry Bertoia’s Environment for Sound and Bent, Cast & Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia is generously provided by Nanette L. Laitman; Kay Bucksbaum; KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, the Official Airline of MAD; Joy and Allan Nachman; Kim and Al Eiber; Siegelson, New York; The Rotasa Foundation; Wright; and Barbara Fleischman. MAD gratefully acknowledges the in-kind support of Knoll, Inc. Bertoia Barn, Barto, PA, 1975. Photo by and courtesy of Beverly H. Twitchell.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A INSTITUTE OF CLASSICAL ARCHITECTURE AND ART’S ARTHUR ROSS AWARDS

Suzanne Santry and Martha Alexander

He had such an enormous impact on the luxury market in our civilization. I remember the early days of Gucci here on Fifth Avenue. It was a narrow shop where Godiva is now located (or was last time I noticed). This was in the mid-1960s. It was the talk of the town because their “walking shoe” was (at the time) the most “must have” shoe for all women in New York, fashionable and/or young. It was a simple, low-heel shoe with a brass buckle, to be worn with Diane von Furstenberg’s wrap dress for a look that was “of the moment” 32 QUEST

Gary Brewer and Christina Davis

for the woman in New York. The shoe was also just about the most expensive women’s shoe of the moment: $45! The men’s loafer, also with a thin brass buckle, was just about the most expensive man’s shoe: $41! The store was famous not only for their shoes but for their attitude, which was intimidating even to the savvy New Yorkers. First of all, they closed for lunch at 1 p.m. and opened again at 2 p.m. If you were in the store when they were closing for lunch, you had to leave, sale or no sale. This was interpreted, realistically, as “you don’t matter

Robert A.M. Stern and Peter Lyden

Michael and Janice Barker

as much as lunch, or at all.” The whole behavior unnerved everybody, which made them (Gucci) more of a challenge and more popular. You had to dare yourself to go in there to buy the most expensive shoes in town. The kicker was the shoes were fabulous and classic and even today work in the fashion scheme of things. One Wednesday night, Jeff and Danielle Hirsch joined me for a dinner date with Michel Witmer and his partner, Dr. Dino Rivera, at the restaurant in the Armani store on Fifth Avenue and 56th Street. I’d never been there before, and neither

Bunny Williams and Randall Walton

Nicholas Stern and Paul Whalen

had Jeff and Danielle. It’s on the third floor with a special entrance on 56th Street between Fifth and Madison avenues. I had no idea what to expect, but only because I didn’t extend my imaginative powers. Armani is Armani: simple, elegant, monochromatically inclined, contemporary, sophisticated, shiny, serene with perfect service, unobtrusive and yet devoted, and with menu that is exotically Italian, post-modern, healthy and also, like all of Armani, elegant. The five of us sat at a round table with banquettes. I was told that this was former

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Doc Williamson with Cheryl and David Andreozzi


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

The Top Doctor is in

prostate cancer and am looking for the best treatment option. I’m nervous about surgery affecting my sexual function and urinary control. How will treating it with robotic surgery help and not cause more harm? What should I do? A: I completely understand your concern regarding why you should choose surgery. However in the hands of an experienced surgeon, I believe surgery is the best option for most cases of prostate cancer. Prostatectomy is the ONLY option which removes the entire prostate. With complete removal of all prostatic tissue and lymph nodes, the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) should drop to undetectable levels after surgery, with radiation as an option after surgery only if necessary. If radiation is used first, trying to use surgery as a secondary intervention can prove to be very complicated. Surgery provides more accurate staging and grading for prostate cancer, which is critical in determining the appropriate follow-up care. Concerning the recovery of sexual function and continence post-operatively, I have developed the SMART (Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique). With this robotic technique patients see an excellent return of both sexual and urinary function. I have made it my mission to personally perform each surgery in its entirety to ensure these outcomes. My team and I are on your side! For more information please visit www.prostatecancer911.com

David B. Samadi, M.D. 485 Madison Avenue., 21st Floor New York, NY 10022 212.365.5000 www.prostatecancer911.com Board Certified Urologist

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0 0 www.castleconnolly.com QUEST

E L M U S EO D E L B A R R I O ’ S G A L A AT T H E P L A Z A H OT E L

Karina Palma

Elizabeth Kahane and Eve Reid

Catalina Meduna and Maria Luisa Ferre

Pat Cleveland

Tony Bechara and Maria Eugenia Maury

mayor Michael Bloomberg’s table and that he is a frequent guest. Jeff and I met Michel and Dino more than 10 years ago through TEFAF (The European Fine Art Fair). It was Michel who invited us to visit the Fair in Maastricht, Netherlands, in the early 2000s. It turned out to be a fantastic privilege. The European Fine Art Fair is the greatest in the world. Maastricht is a city in Holland that still has its ancient 15thand 16th-century buildings and references to the Roman conquerors. It was one of the few cities that was not affected by the Nazis’ invasions during World War II, and so it was not bombed, leaving its ancient and aged architecture intact and still used today. TEFAF is so popular among connoisseurs and collectors the world over that, when the fair opens, the local airport has

Clarice Tavares

Brent and Laura Nicklas

more private jets landing than at a Super Bowl. The other side of it is that as rare and precious as the merchandise, the atmosphere is comme il faut. Witmer is the only American on the board. When we first learned of it through him, what interested us was that TEFAF is a non-profit organization that supports arts education, conservation of world monuments, cancer research, and museum programs. It is unique in bringing its money from Europe to support programs in American museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met), the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (among many others). Numerous organizations take money from United States organizations to support European cultural institu-

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A tions, often named “American Friends of...” Over the past few years, TEFAF has given 25 grants to museums throughout the United States, and the TEFAF grants program was created and is headed by Witmer. The big news is that TEFAF is coming to New York. The first TEFAF NY will open October 22, 2017, at the Park Avenue Armory. Witmer will remain on the board of its parent company in Europe (TEFAF) plus, as the only

American officer of the TEFAF NY corporation, he’ll be involved in New York, too. For those who follow the Armory antique shoes, TEFAF has purchased the Haughton International Fairs space and will bring their sensational exhibitions to New York. The vetting system for TEFAF is the strictest in the world with more than 100 experts involved in the process. New Yorkers and Americans are in for a treat and a really big show.

End of the same week, TGIF: Sarah Rosenthal organized a dinner with Alex Hitz, Kathy Steinberg, Annette Tapert, and this writer at Sette Mezzo. Sette was a mob scene (no surprise) and possibly the most sophisticated Upper East Side neighborhood restaurant of the moment. That night’s rez list included: Renée and Robert Belfer with daughter Elizabeth Belfer; Betsy Lovett with David Beer; Peter and Barbara Georgescu; and Ian and El-

len Graham—who had come in from the memorial at Jane and Peter Marino’s apartment for Betsy’s brother-in-law, the late Larry Lovett. Also: Harry and Gigi Benson with Linda Buckley; Catie and Donald Marron with Lauren and John Veronis; Alex Papachristidis and Scott Nelson with Caroline Berthet; John and Joan Jakobson with Philip and Joan Kingsley (who were in from London for the week) and Patrick Murphy; Joe and Hilary Califano with

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Ken Karakul and Bettina Anderson 36 QUEST

David Lambert and Yolanda Oliver

Bradford and Pamela Miller

Mario Nievera and Maura Christu

Mary and Bob Simses

C A P E H A RT

Pauline Pitt, Carol Mack and Nataly Langner


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Herb and Jeanne Siegel; and Jon Corzine and friends. One of the restaurant partners, Oriente Mania, was back on the job after a month’s absence. Oriente had had a stress test and they happened to find something questionable and so, with another test, they found three potential blockages. Next: open-heart surgery, by the same doctor who operated on Bill Clinton. One month later,

Oriente is 14 pounds lighter, looks 14 years younger, and is back on the job feeling really fine. “I’m a lucky man,” he told me. So are the Sette Mezzo customers. On a Thursday afternoon mid-month , Rockefeller University Women & Science Initiative held its 19th Annual Spring Lecture and Luncheon, at the campus on York Avenue and 66th Street. This year’s lecture subject

was “How Long Could We Live? Harnessing our Longevity Genes” and the lecturer was Cynthia Kenyon—who is vice-president of Aging Research at Calico (a new venture launched by the founders of Google), which is searching for innovative technological approaches to extend human life and health. Prior to Caliico, Kenyon received her Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Tech-

nology. In 1986, she joined the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco, before joining Calico in 2014. Kenyon’s research has shown that aging is not an arbitrary outcome of time and physical deterioration; rather, it is biological process subject to genetic control. She began finding evidence of this the early 1990s, when she discovered genetic mutations that dramatically

S P R I N G G A L A AT N E W YO R K C I T Y B A L L E T

Nev Schulman and Megan LeCrone

Julia Koch and Earle Mack 38 QUEST

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Lesley Stahl, Peter Martins, Ursula Brown and Kathy Brown

Alexandra Kerry

Lisa McCarthy

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Hope Smith


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Regina Donahue and Carol Mitchell

extend the lifespan of C. elegans (the tiny, soil-dwelling worm that is her favorite research model). Worms with certain gene mutations lived five times longer than average and, amazingly, they also displayed the energy, flexibility, and smooth appearance of normal, young worms. Kenyon has found longevity genes within a C. elegans’ hormonal circuit that corresponds to the human insulin system. A key regulator of this pathway, FOXO, has a counterpart gene in humans that is often mutated in an intriguing population: centenarians. In studies of worms and mice, Kenyon and her col40 QUEST

Marietta Contadino

Lisa Lori, Jill Weiner and Jamie Eisenberg

Catherine Polkinghorn, Giovanna Miller, Mary Young and Christine Calzolano

leagues have also identified a neural protective pathway that may help to explain the causes of age-related dementia. She sees great promise in efforts to forestall many diseases simultaneously by designing therapies that act upon the genes and proteins that influence aging. Well, if you didn’t think Kenyon’s thoughts and data were riveting to an audience of basically middle-age to senior-age adults, mainly women… A friend of mine (female) who attended told me you could hear a pin drop in that Geodesic, dome-like auditorium as the good doctor was sharing her knowledge.

This is what makes this luncheon so special. It is unique in its way, not unlike the famous “Hat Lunch” of the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy. That lunch was about (generally speaking) what one wore on one’s head. This one is about the head on our shoulders and what’s in it for all of us. I’m simplifying to explain how compellingly available is the content of this annual Women & Science event. Several hundred attend every year, and the sold-out lecture is followed by a bright and cheerful spring luncheon under a large transparent tent

Priscilla Morphy

just outside the auditorium to hold a couple hundred guests. By New York 21st-century standards, it is also a glamorous affair in that people attend looking their—and thinking their best. The event was hosted by Marc Tessier-Lavigne, president of Rockefeller University. Among those attending were Samantha Boardman Rosen, Nancy Kissinger, Sydney R. Shuman, Debra Black, Amy Falls Rogers, Agnes Gund, Anna Chapman, and Lulu Wang. Since I didn’t make it thanks to some medical issues of my own, I wonder if they video these lectures for the edification of all of us. u

CO U RTE S Y O F G R E E N W I C H U N I TE D WAY

Cricket Lockhart, Grace Djuranovic and Ann Hagmann


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A “ S I P A N D S H O P ” W I T H A N I M A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R AT J . MC L AU G H L I N

Bunty Armstrong

Barbara and Kevin McLaughlin

Anne Randall and Toni Tucker 42 QUEST

Janet York

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Nina Reeves and Carmine Cassino

Nicole DiCocco and Jack Lynch

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KLEMM REAL ESTATE Inc Litchfield County’s Premier Brokers

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NEW FAIRFIELD, CT

GOSHEN, CT

$6.900.000

WASHINGTON, CT

$4.950.000

$4.750.000

Candlewood Isle Modern. 4 Bedrooms. Open Floor Plan. Oversized Hot Tub. Beach. Dock. 0.64± Acres. Joseph Lorino. 860.868.7313.

Classic Federal Georgian. 2 Guesthouses. Barn. Garages. Pool. Tennis. Paddocks. Views. Privacy. 74.32± Acres. Drew Hingson. 860.435.6789.

Outstanding Lake Waramaug. State-of-the-art Newly Built Modern. 4 Bedrooms. 125’ Lake Frontage. Dock. 1± Acres. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

MORRIS, CT

WEST CORNWALL, CT

SHARON, CT

$4.500.000

$3.950.000

$3.750.000

Private Estate on Bantam River. 5 Bedroom Main House. 2 Bedroom Guesthouse. Pool. Tennis. Pond. 95.46± Acres. Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Private Modern. 5 Bedrooms. 3 Fireplaces. Pool. Terrace. Close to Villages & Metro North Train. Views. 17.96± Acres. Graham Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Exceptionally Renovated Colonial. 4 Bedrooms. Patio. Pool. Bath House. Grill Station. Gardens. Orchard. Views. 9.5± Acres. Roger Saucy. 860.868.7313.

WASHINGTON, CT

WASHINGTON, CT

BETHLEHEM CT

$1.995.000

$1.349.000

Pristine In-town 1820 Colonial. 4 Bedrooms. 5 Fireplaces. Screened Porch. Deck. Pool. Sauna. 1.1 ± Acres. Judy Auchincloss. 860.868.7313.

Distinguished Historic Compound. 6 Bedrooms. 5 Fireplaces. Patio. Pool. Tennis. Barn. Pond. Gardens. 10.77± Acres. Beverly Mosch. 860.868.7313.

WASHINGTON, CT

WASHINGTON, CT

WARREN, CT

$39.000/MONTH SUMMER

Major Estate. Historic District. Highest Standards of Construction. Guesthouse. Pool. Ponds. 14.28± Acres. Many Amenities. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

ET COME HLOW S US YOU!

$20.000/JULY

Private Colonial. 4 Bedrooms. 3.5 Baths. Heated Gunite Saltwater Pool. Terrace. Landscaped Gardens. Views. 5.3± Acres. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

#1 for Selling & Renting Fine Country Properties!

KLEMM REAL ESTATE Inc Litchfield County’s Premier Brokers

Litchfield Hills, CT - Less Than 2 Hours From NYC

klemmrealestate.com

$28.000/SUMMER

Private & Stylish Modern Home. 3 Bedrooms. Large Deck. Views. Close to Lake Waramaug & Town Beach. Graham Klemm. 860.868.7313.

klemmrentals.com

$2.695.000

Gracious Country House. 4 Bedrooms. 2-car Garage. Fenced Garden. Specimen & Fruit Trees. Views. 13.68± Acres. Beverly Mosch. 860.868.7313.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

NEW YORK, NATIONAL HAS YOU COVERED

C O C K TA I L S W I T H T H E F U N D FO R L A K E G EO R G E AT H E A R ST TO W E R

NATIONAL CAR RENTAL NEW YORK AREA LOCATIONS:

19 E. 12th Street 212.366.5423

Sarah Caldwell, William Duker and Ruben Caldwell

Marie Kireker

142 E. 31st Street 212.447.5883 138-146 E. 50th Street 212.317.8649 305 E. 80th Street 212.452.1000

9.75"

Jeff Killeen and Dede Potter

Chuck Locke and Chris Navitsky

Cornelia Wells and Kate van Dyke

David Darrin and Blair Keller

252 W. 40th Street 212.575.5400 219 W. 77th Street 646.981.1920

LAGUARDIA AIRPORT 888.826.6890

Go National. Go Like a Pro.

Yuliana Cummings and Jessica Rubin 00 QUEST

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BOSS OF YOU

SKIP THE COUNTER AND CHOOSE ANY CAR IN THE AISLE.

AT N AT I O N A L , YO U ’ R E T H E B O S S O F YO U . There’s no check-in on arrival. You fly by the counter and head out to the Emerald Aisle, where you have your choice of every car there. Full-size? SUV? Take it. It’ll always be a mid-size on your receipt. Be the Boss of You.

GO N AT I ONA L. GO LI K E A P R O.

nationalcar.com *At participating locations and subject to availability and other restrictions. Requires enrollment in the complimentary Emerald Club. ©2015 National Car Rental. All other marks are property of their respective owners.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L Z H E I M E R ’ S D R U G D I S C O V E R Y FO U N D AT I O N ’ S D I N N E R AT S OT H E BY ’ S

Marielle Safra and Yosun Reza

William Lauder and Laurie Tritsch

Helena Wong and Howard Fillit

Mary Farrell and Dan Sullivan

Julie and James Nesci with Nancy Goodes

Gurion Kastenberg, Judy Glickman, Evan Glickman and Rachel Brenner

Kathy Mele and Donald Newhouse 46 QUEST

Leonard Lauder and Ronald Lauder

Stephen Smith and Jean Smith

Tina and Simon Beriro

Lanny Edelsohn and Sheila Robbins

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Lisa and Paul Revson


Space is the breath of art. — Frank Lloyd Wright

Coopers Neck Lane - Southampton

SOUTHAMPTON, NY | $32,500,000 | Web: 0056813 11 bedrooms, 12 baths, 4.6+/- acres, pool, tennis and converted barn A grand 1899 Gilded Age, classic shingled house, set on 4.6 +/- acres on the most exclusive Southampton lane, less than half a mile from the Atlantic Ocean. Steeped in history & built to the highest standards, it has been impeccably restored & completely updated with 21st century systems. 12,000 +/- square feet of exceptional architectural details in perfectly proportioned rooms, the three-story residence has deep covered porches throughout.

MOLLY FERRER Senior Global Real Estate Advisor | Associate Broker d: 631.227.4925 | c: 631.513.9895 | e: molly.ferrer@sothebyshomes.com

HARALD GRANT Senior Global Real Estate Advisor | Associate Broker d: 631.227.4913 | c: 516.527.7712 | e: harald.grant@sothebyshomes.com SOUTHAMPTON Brokerage 50 Nugent St. I Southampton, NY 11968 I 631.283.0600

sothebyshomes.com/hamptons

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B OYS ’ C L U B O F N E W YO R K AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Jackie and Gene Williams

Friederike Biggs and Nancy Phelan

Howard Clark, Michele Linen and Bill Tyree

Stretch and Liz Gardiner

Sara Ayres, Amy Griffin and Kitty Sherrill

Luisa Cobb and Betsy Pitts

Averell Mortimer, Ebby Gerry and Peter Friedman

C H A M B E R M U S I C S O C I E T Y O F L I N C O L N C E N T E R AT A L I C E T U L LY H A L L

Jennifer Myerberg, Charles Crispin and Marsha Laufer 48 QUEST

Guy Robinson and Elizabeth Stribling with Coke Anne and Jarvis Wilcox

Herbert and Judith Schlosser

Peter Duchin, Paula Zahn and Leslie Wilson

Veronica Bulgari and Shannon Wu

William Baker and James MacGuire

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; A M E L I A PA N I CO ( B E LO W )

Edwin and Kathe Williamson with Whitney Stewart


Triple Mint 10 at 120 East End Avenue East River views. Grand 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, living room & library with WBFPs, formal dining room, fabulous eat-in kitchen, white glove co-op. $9.295M. Web 14536273. Valerie Artzt 212.585.4525

Renovated Park Avenue 10 Room

Gorgeous Central Park Views

3 bedrooms + library, 5 baths, gallery, living room with WBFP, dining room, eat-in kitchen, home office, maid’s room. Arched doorways, W/D. Full service co-op. $7.775M. Web 14723193. Rema Parachini 212.434.7081

‘Majestic’ classic 7, wood-burning fireplace, 3 master bedrooms, 4 baths, rare opportunity, high floor, top Central Park West location & building. Co-exclusive. $9.25M. Web 14330126. Rosette Arons 212.452.4360

The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. Stribling Private Brokerage is the Stribling & Associates marketing division for properties valued in excess of $5,000,000. It provides services on the level of “private banking” and intensive, customized marketing for luxury properties and discerning clients on a global basis. STRIBLING.COM · UPTOWN 212 570 2440 CHELSEA 212 243 4000 TRIBECA 212 941 8420 BROOKLYN 718 208 1900 · EQUAL HOUSING OPPTY

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A FO U N TA I N H O U S E ’ S L U N C H EO N AT T H E P I E R R E H OT E L

Elizabeth Peabody

Kitty De Chazal and Missie Rennie

Barry Osborn and Payne Middleton 50 QUEST

Frances Adler

Gail Gilbert

Nancy Missett

Evelyn Bell

Elsie Vancy and Lorna Graev

Avril Meyer and Nancy Hoguet

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Rebecca de Kertanguy


THE LEDGEWOOD RETREAT: MINDFULNESS, HAPPINESS, MOVEMENT AND MEDITATION

Have you found yourself feeling like you’ve been running on autopilot? Need a break? Sunday 10:30am-3pm

July 17th 2016

MINDFULNESS THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION Come join us for an uplifting day of light yoga, meditation, lunch, and music! We will meditate, release stress, discuss the benefits of downtime / importance of chakra healing and listen to vibrational music. Prepare to be truly inspired! Tickets: $295 (includes vegetarian lunch and exclusive $100 GIVING candle). For inquiries only, call 917-582-6808 Register online

TheLedgewoodRetreat.EventBee.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U N C H EO N AT R O C K E F E L L E R U N I V E R S I T Y FO R T H E I R W OM E N A N D S C I E N C E I N I T I AT I V E

Blair Enders and Alison Cody

Eva Andersson-Dubin and Beth Dozoretz

Eliza Bolen, Amy Rogers and Jane Fried

Marnie Pillsbury, Sydney Shuman, Beth Rudin DeWoody and Cynthia Whitehead

Nancy Kissinger 52 QUEST

Jessica Hart

Claudia Overstrom

Anne Baker and Melissa Reichman

Bianca Duenas and Jeanne Garbarino

Elizabeth McCreery and Shelley Carr

Samantha Boardman

S COT T RU D D ; W I LL R A G G A Z I N O

Daisy Helman and Amanda Eilian


Towering Oaks - Classically restored Colonial with gleaming wood floors, exquisite millwork and impeccable attention to detail. 5000 square feet of perfectly finished living space with incredible light. Center Entrance Hall with graceful staircase, raised paneling and random-width Oak floor. Sun-filled Living Room. Mahogany Library. Formal Dining Room. Spectacular Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace Five Bedrooms. Four acres in one of Bedford’s finest estate areas on the Bedford Riding Lanes. Sparkling Pool. $2,295,000

Edition Farm -

Heart of Mount Holly -

The Silo - Lovely Country Colonial connected to original grain silo. Rocking Chair Porch. Center Entrance Hall. Living Room with Fireplace and doors to rear Sun Deck. Formal Dining Room with chair rail. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with old beams and Fireplace. Five Bedrooms. Silo with Media/Movie Room. Pole Barn with Recreation Room. Long drive to five beautifully landscaped acres overlooking scenic pond stocked with Bass. Heated Pool. Vegetable Gardens. Heart of North Salem. $1,695,000

First time offered in over 40 years! Idyllic setting in the heart of one of Katonah’s finest estate areas. Nearly five breathtaking acres with level lawns, stonewalls, towering trees and specimen shrubs. Traditional Country Colonial imbued with classic style. Center Entrance Hall. Finely appointed Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Family Room with Fireplace. Cozy Den. Five Bedrooms.Terrace overlooking the Pool. Conveniently located with easy access to commuting arteries, train and Katonah. $1,390,000

Waccabuc’s finest equestrian estate on the Lewisboro horse trails. Gated, tree-lined drive through park-like grounds to perfect privacy. Twenty-two pastoral acres with scenic pond. Classic Shingle Country House with handsome lines and finely appointed interior. Five Bedrooms. Greenhouse. Awning-covered terrace overlooking the Swimming Pool. Gorgeous flowering perennials. Herb and Vegetable Gardens. Immaculate seven stall stable with Groom’s Quarters. Three large pastures and riding ring. $4,450,000

Absolutely Turn-Key - Stunning Country Colonial perfectly reno- Stunning Tashkovich Design - Long drive to perfect privacy. vated! Charming Board & Batten exterior with cedar shingle roof. White walls, dark hardwood floors and airy, open floorplan. Four Bedrooms. John Jay Schools. Over five peaceful acres with pristine pond. Barn with electric. Desirable country road within easy walking or riding access to the trails of the Pound Ridge Reservation. Perfection and just listed! $1,100,000

(914) 234-9234

Over four serene acres with beautiful gardens, mature trees and flowering shrubs. The perfect country house impeccably maintained and updated. Light airy, open rooms with walls of crisp white, gleaming hardwood floors, high ceilings, walls of windows and clerestories. Five Bedrooms. Greenhouse with door to flowering gardens. Sparkling Swimming Pool. $1,150,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY IN 1984 I was given what I consider to be a very interesting assignment from LIFE magazine, quite challenging and possibly of historic value: to photograph all 23 living descendants of the presidents of the United States. The children included—if you can imagine the contrast—Francis Grover Cleveland, whose father was president when the Statue of Liberty was dedicated; Elliott Roosevelt; Margaret Truman; and, finally, Amy Carter, whose father was president at the time. I was pleased that the Kennedy children had agreed to be photographed as they would complete the group. John, Jr., and Caroline, then 24 and 27 years old, sat on the lawn behind the President John F. Kennedy Library in Boston for their portrait. Here were two members of the most photographed family in American history, and suddenly they were telling me, in a thoroughly convincing way, that they had never actually posed for a formal portrait before and would I mind telling them what to do and how to pose. When the magazine appeared on the stands, their mother, Jacqueline Kennedy, confirmed their story, adding that before the photography session, Caroline had not been particularly 54 QUEST

This spread: Caroline and John F. Kennedy, Jr., at the JFK Library, Boston, 1984.


interested in fashion or in what she wore, but after the issue appeared, she became much more aware of her appearance in public. Mrs. Kennedy thanked me for contributing to the change in Caroline’s viewpoint. I found her remarks unexpected and quite amusing considering that at the time Mrs.

Kennedy was considered the style icon of the world. When it came time to choose the cover from among the 23 subjects, John, Jr., and Caroline were the unanimous choice of the LIFE editors. It seems like yesterday that LIFE was on the newsstands—I wish it were still around. ◆ JUNE 2016 55


TA K I

A DATE WITH HISTORY I READ THIS in a newspaper, written by a woman who used to edit my copy for Quest, but I will withhold her name to save her embarrassment and social atrophy: “He’s hosted Kim Kardashian and Kanye West for Thanksgiving, regularly cruises with Justin Bieber on his party yacht...” The mind reels. Is it possible to read such crap without throwing up? How would you, dear reader, like to spend Thanksgiving with Kim and Kanye, or go cruising with Justin, Heaven help us. (I’d rather fail a syphilis test than have a Kardashian as a guest.) I suppose the selfish generation, whose motto is “he who dies with the most toys wins,” could easily spend a holiday with the above mentioned unmentionables, yet the “my cell phone is thinner than yours” principle leaves something to be desired. Mind you, the person who has had such august personalities for dinner is a Miami nightclub owner, hardly le gratin of American society, but my ex-editor meant to be nice. She was actually impressed by his name drops. Imagine if she had asked him for an imaginary dinner party. I wonder whom he would have picked? Charlie Sheen? The imaginary dinner party is a bit like Desert Island Discs, an English institution. I was on it once, and Sue Lawley, the presenter at the time, and I got along just dandy. During a break I asked her about the choices people made, and she told me that those who picked only classical and rarely listened to pieces, were mostly footballers or music hall comedians. 56 QUEST

Ditto for imaginary dream dinner parties. I once asked an American automobile tycoon—O.K., it was Henry Ford II—whom he would have liked to dine with à deux, and he answered Paul Valéry. I was impressed. “How come Paul Valéry? Which poem?” “Poem? What poem? It’s my whorehouse on Rue Paul Valéry in Paris.” Sure enough, he was right. Billy’s was a whorehouse in Rue Paul Valéry, and I had been a client once, but Madame Claude had left Billy a mile behind in the quality of service. Back then, when girls didn’t give it away as often as they do nowadays, whorehouses were good business. But back to dinner parties, imaginary ones. I suppose I should start with myself. Who would I have to dinner? As I’m only interested in history, I suppose they would all have to be people who have played a great part in it. Among the Ancient Greeks I would be over my head, so I’d pick someone who was both a great warrior and womanizer, Alcibiades. He was also the first conservative, putting himself above the state. When the Athenians went after him for midwifing the Sicilian disaster, he defected to Sparta. When he slept with the Spartan queen and had to skidadle out of town, he went over to the Persians. That’s where the Greeks finally caught up with him. After his girlfriend covered him with her shawl trying to protect him from their arrows, the killers went back to the mainland and said he was dressed as a woman. Alcibiades was an Athenian aristocrat whose

teacher was Socrates, and there’s a wonderful passage where Alcibiades is riding while old Socrates is walking. I remember asking my old dad why it was so and I was told: Patricians rode, plebs walked. I don’t think I would have Napoleon because the Corsican blamed others when he made mistakes, and although I take no back seat to anyone in my admiration for him, in his period I would choose Prince Talleyrand, the bishop of Autun, Napoleon’s foreign minister as well as before and after him. Napoleon once famously called him a shit in a silk stocking, but Talleyrand was much more than that. He managed to seduce three generations of the Duchess of Dino—granny, mother, and daughter—as difficult an achievement as it was to survive Napoleon’s rule and still have a sway in Vienna. His illegitimate son, Count de Flahaut, fought with Napoleon in Russia and was the lover of three queens, although two of them were Napo’s sisters. Three was a lucky number for the Talleyrand family. Needless to say “Papa” Hemingway would be included. I wonder what Alcibiades and Talleyrand would make of Papa? Hemingway’s style cannot be imitated because it comes from inner necessity. Thousands have tried, but their writing remains a fake imitation. Papa was haunted and wrote hauntingly. He’s be great with Alcibiades about nature and rivers back then, but cool to Talleyrand’s exquisite manners. Or maybe not. Hemingway appreciated the old aristocracy, as long as they were not too stupid, some-


TA K I

Dinner with Taki

This page, clockwise from top left: Our columnist’s ideal dinner guests would include Ernest “Papa” Hemingway; Alcibiades; Prince von Metternich; and Prince de Talleyrand; place settings.

thing the old fox certainly was not. But he wouldn’t bring up women. He was old fashioned and I’m sure the Greek and the Frenchman would have understood. Finally I’d have Prince Metternich as the fourth. He was also a great seducer— he was late at a conference and a whole province was lost to Austria while the winners were redistributing real estate, and when informed he sighed and said, “but she was worth it.” When the Greeks asked for the King of Rome to become their first monarch after the liberation in

1827, Metternich refused. He knew Napoleon’s son was tubercular and the mild Greek climate would prolong his life. He kept him in Austria and the young man died in his early twenties. Metternich did not wish for too many Napoleonic descendants around. So the next time you plan a dream imaginary dinner, give a thought to poor old Kim and Kanye, and don’t forget Justin B. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. JUNE 2016 57


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

WHO SAYS SUMMERTIME means the going’s easy?

Some of our favorite designers, for their part, have been hard at work, crafting only the best products possible so the rest of us can enjoy a long weekend or few. Ladies have a host of innovations for accessorizing, even at home. And guys have just as much to be excited about, from limited-edition driving slippers by Tod’s to the first Mercedes-Benz Cabriolet convertible debut since 1971. It’s time to rev your engines. Mark Davis Swirl bangle with rhodolite and pink sapphire ($3,210) and robin’s egg blue bangle with blue and pink sapphire ($3,770), available at Betteridge: 239 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, Conn., 203.869.0124.

Nothing beats a timeless straw hat, especially when it’s J.McLaughlin’s Palm River hat in pale blue, denim, natural, orange, or cream. $125 each at jmclaughlin.com. Solid tops and geometric bottoms come together perfectly in Escada Sport’s turtleneck ($295) and skirt ($325). Available at Escada New York (212.755.2200) or Escada Palm Beach (561.835.9700).


One of the smartest new additions to the Rolex fleet is this 40-mm. steel Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona with fixed Architect Giulio Cappellini called upon

engraved black Cerachrom bezel and black

five designers and architects to reinterpret

dial. $12,400. Visit rolex.com for more.

Tod’s iconic Leo Clamp, including this limited-edition navy pair designed by Leonardo Talarico. $725 at select Tod’s boutiques.

Enjoy the glorious Caribbean sun by day and balmy breezes by night at Casa de Campo in the Dominican Republic. Book a villa now and you can stay three nights for the price of two (800.877.3643).

Be your summer best in Ovadia & Son’s double-breasted silk suit ($2,195) and printed floral cotton shirt ($265). Visit ovadiaandsons.com for more.

Dream convertibles do come true: The 2017 Mercedes S-Class Cabriolet makes its first debut since 1971 with a new design, cutting-

Arkwear’s cotton and spandex polo shirts help raise awareness and funds for the threatened animal species embroidered on their chests. $95 at arkwear.com, with 5%

edge technologies, and a state-of-the-art

of proceeds going to the Wildlife

climate control system. Visit mbusa.com.

Conservation Society. JUNE 2016 59


Fresh Finds

String on this signed Sorab & Roshi fluorite and blue topaz necklace

Perfect for dressing from

with gold and diamond

day (with flats) to night

clasp. $7,800. Sorab & Roshi: 30 West Putnam Ave.,

(in heels), the vibrant

Greenwich, Conn., 203.869.5800, or

pink GOAT Baylee dress

sorabandroshi.com/shop/jewelry.

in light wool features softly peaked shoulders and full sleeves that draw into buttoned cuffs. $670 at goatfashion.com.

Sail off with the perfect summer hostess gift: the 60-oz. Anchor pitcher from Pickett’s Press, which can be customized and monogrammed. $56 at pickettspress.com.

Shirtdresses from Stratton & Co. are designed by Stratton Bouloukos, who previously served as head designer for Mary McFadden Suits. By appointment at Stratton & Co.’s East 97th Street atelier; visit strattonandco.com to schedule.

Lighten up any room with this Kelly Hoppen for Resource Decor Retrospective Collection Diaz chest in the softest hint of pink. $4,797 at resourcedecor.com.

Here’s looking at the bright side of things: the Saint-Louis Les Endiables bowl, a cheerful addition to any tabletop. $4,075 at saint-louis.com.

60 QUEST


Clutch things ups with CH Carolina Herrera’s Goldie satin clutch. $620. CH Carolina Herrera: 802 Madison Ave., 212.744.2076.

Summer getaways are always picture-perfect on the shores at Ocean House, Rhode Island’s AAA Five-Diamond and Forbes FiveStar resort. To reserve, call 888.552.2588.

Enjoy the soft touch of luxury in La Perla’s Whisper slip, in pink. $424. La Perla: 803 Madison Ave., 212.570.0050. Timeless yet undeniably modern, Ralph Lauren’s Italian-made sunglasses are inspired by Ricky Lauren herself, and feature a rounded square shape. $209 at ralphlauren.com.

With soft, feminine lines and beautiful appliqué detailing, Sachin & Babi’s Maya dress is made to make you look your best when going out. $365. Sachin & Babi: 1200 Madison Ave., 212.996.5200.

Welcome summer with a brewed pot or iced pitcher of AquaRosa, Kusmi Tea’s first fruit blend that includes hibiscus, apple, and assorted berries. $20.20 for 4.4-oz. metal tin at kusmitea.com.

Coast from shore to shore in Hunter Slides (shown in sunset), a standout piece from the Hunter Original collection featuring Hunter’s iconic logo split across both feet. $85 at us.hunterboots.com. JUNE 2016 61


CANTEENS

THE NATIONAL MAKES A LOCAL STOP

62 QUEST

tables and back in court are palm trees galore—filling the place, reflecting in the mirror-top tables, and restoring the grand space to a sexier, swankier version of itself. Zakarian certainly seems to have learned a thing or two about the power of the palm—and its ability to posh up a place. He recently took his midtown Manhattan restaurant The National up to greener pastures in Greenwich, opening this second location here along the tony shopping strip of Greenwich Avenue. And it’s not just the grass that’s greener in Greenwich—so are the palm fronds. There are lots of them: potted in floor planters, perched above the banquettes. The truth is that they look great and liven the place up—especially at night, when you walk into a

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L

NEVER UNDERESTIMATE the power of the palm. The palm tree, that is. Or, perhaps more accurately, the palm frond. There’s a reason palm-frond prints are so popular on the curtains and walls of residences and private clubs in sunny locales. Even outside of Miami, the Keys, or Los Angeles—like New York’s famous and longstanding fashion-and-celeb hangout and eatery Indochine—the chicest of boîtes have benefitted from that punchy appeal of plastering palm fronds everywhere. We had almost forgotten why The Palm Court at The Plaza Hotel was named as such until celebrity chef Geoffrey Zakarian took the bar over in the recent years and enlisted architect and designer Thierry Despont to up the décor ante. Gone are the fussy teatime

MARGARET ZAKARIAN (GEOFFREY ZAKARIAN);

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS room of moody lighting and flickering candlelight and push your way past those palms on your way to your table. The feeling of “having arrived.” For starters, we’re giving points for the palms. We’re also giving points for the bar, which is equally attractive in its own right. Classic white oak warms things up and melds seamlessly with the white-and-black flooring below and the deep burnt-Tuscan stool tops. Behind the bar, bottles sparkle on glass shelves that are highlighted with brass details. It’s hard to peel yourself away from the bar once you’ve sat for a drink. The space is hopping and the drinks—curated by Brian Van Flandern, a “cocktail historian” and mixologist serving up the Blue Blood & Sand (’natch, for the blue bloods in the crowd) and Martha’s

nouveau,” but it’s really just a generally “approachable food” menu, as Zakarian puts it, which might explain why we’re asking for pork-and-veal meatballs along with shishito peppers. As a rule of thumb, if a good chef—and the house’s chef, Eric Haugen, is certainly that—offers chicken, you should probably try it. The seemingly simple bird—prone to being boring or dry— is often the sign of a great chef, and the organic wood-roasted Amish chicken with tarragon chimichurri and crisp Bibb lettuces is not something you’ll replicate at home, so enjoy it. Pastas are handmade and used in combination with seasonal offerings from the sea. If you’re feeling the need for a protein push, then the Creekstone Farms côte de boeuf for two is the way to go.

Martini (could it be for Martha Stewart, who’s been spotted dining here since it opened?)—go down easy. Still, be sure you do peel yourself away, and try settling into one of the light blue banquettes in the sea of palm trees in the front dining room. Can’t decide what to eat? Then put an order in for raw oysters (with rhubarb mignonette sauce) and deviled eggs, which have been devilishly concocted with salmon mousse and a touch of vinegar that make them surprisingly moist. Gem lettuces with Sicilian pistachio, ricotta salata, and creamy tarragon dressing is a pleasant way to start, perhaps coupled with the blistered shishito peppers (a rare find outside of a tapas restaurant). The food feels mostly “American” or “American

Even if you’ve ordered more than a bottle of wine and feel as if you’ve capped out on calories for the day, don’t say no to dessert. Life’s too short, and the olive oil cake with citrus segments and lemon sorbet will round out your meal perfectly without drowning it. It’ll be worth the trip to Greenwich. u This page, clockwise from top left: The exterior at night; woodroasted mushrooms; the stylish bar; Scottish salmon is served up; a front-window detail; the Blue Blood & Sand cocktail; a lemon and pine nut tart. Opposite page: Chef and partner Geoffrey Zakarian. The National: 376 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, Conn., 203.861.6851. For more, visit TheNational-CT.com or follow @TheNationalCT. JUNE 2016 63


CALLING ALL DAPPER TOTS: Oscar de la Renta has some gorgeous (and adorable to the point of squeal-inducing) new outfits lined up for you! On April 12, Quest hosted a trunk show of the 2016 Fall/ Winter childrenswear collection at the Oscar flagship store along with Muffie Potter Aston, Claiborne Swanson Frank, Lily Maddock, Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler, Alexia Hamm Ryan, and Mary Elizabeth Snow. Parents delightedly fussed over the fashions, which feature exclusive prints and silhouettes inspired by recent ready-towear collections. Crisp, classic, and vibrant, the pieces were fawned over as ideal for back-to-school, perfect for spending the holidays with grandparents, and, well, just the cutest gosh-darn things ever. The racks of clothing and stacks of accessories were blossoming with abstract garden prints and painted poppies, giving new meaning to the term “children in bloom.” The bright array of colors—with vivid shades of ultraviolet, ruby, navy, and green—are guaranteed to attract the eye of any mini-fashionista (or maybe even their schoolyard crush, for that matter).

J U L I E S K A R R AT T

AN ADORABLE OSCAR TRUNK SHOW


FA S H I O N

This page, clockwise from top left: Lily Maddock and daughter Mimi; Michele de Bourbon and Giulia Azmoudeh; Carrie Connor; the childrenswear collection offered stylish pieces for boys and girls; Muffie Potter Aston and Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler; Alexia Hamm Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Snow; Krista and Jim Corl; Lacy Kiernan and Claiborne Swanson Frank; a small bouquet of the accessories in bloom. Opposite page: The colorful array of garnments (above); Lara Meiland-Shaw holding up one of her favorites (inset).

And because it’s Oscar de la Renta—a name synonymous with meticulous quality—the same careful attention to detail that adults enjoy is applied to these pieces as well, with each garment hand-sewn by artisans in Portugal. These hemlines and elbow patches can last through every tumble that being a kid might bring. This amazing collection will be available beginning in mid-July through the fashion house’s website, listed below. From regal wool blazers to elegant velvet dresses, every young dandy and demoiselle is sure to feel spiffy and sophisticated thanks to this season of childrenswear, which still manages to retain the essence of what makes childhood so magical: fun. u For more information, visit www.oscardelarenta.com. JUNE 2016 65


R E A L E S TAT E

“NEW YORK’S 57TH STREET is a spectacular Boulevard, more than equal to Regent Street in London, the ChampsElysees in Paris, Kurfrtstendamm in Berlin, or Paseo De La Reforma in Mexico City,” says bestselling author Michael Gross in 57 Newspaper. Soaring 700 feet above of the world’s most coveted residential boulevard is 252 East 57th Street, a stunning 65-story tower of curved Italian glass. Perched above the 35th floor are 93 expansive condominium residences each with sweeping views stretching from the George Washington Bridge, to Central Park, to the East River. This stunning tower is equaled only by its interiors, the work of architect and designer Daniel Romauldez. The 2016 “AD 100” edition of Architectural Digest proclaims, “Daniel Romualdez has has won accolades for his seamless, sublimely crafted environments, whose broad range of styles share a rarefied attention to detail.” Romualdez is globally renowned having designed the homes of elite tastemakers such as Tory Burch, Aerin Lauder, and Daphne Guinness. With this, his first new development commission, Romualdez’s approach was to treat each residence as he would a private home, designing 19 different two- to five-bedroom layouts. His signature can be seen in every detail from oversized corner living rooms properly aligned to display art, to his unique custom designed finishes. When designing the floor plans, Romualdez looked to the dimensions and proportions of classic Upper East Side buildings. Spaces flow naturally into one another, grand entrance galleries lead to expansive living and dinning rooms. Perched on the upper floors are the 4,900-square-foot, 5-bedroom, 66 QUEST

6-bath homes, with massive entertaining spaces including: 38-foot living and dinning rooms; working fireplace; walls of windows and ceiling heights that rise to over 12 feet; custom-designed eat-in chef’s kitchen; formal library; and a classic layout that masterfully separates the public and private spaces. With light streaming in from triple exposures capturing a panorama of iconic New York views, the residences at 252 E 57 are like living in a home in the sky. The residences are enhanced by three floors of amenities. Also designed by Romualdez, the 34th Floor Club is grandly scaled with 16-foot ceilings and walls of windows. Included are a private dinning room, billiards room, 70-foot south facing terrace, private screening room, guest suites, fitness club, Pilates studio, 75-foot pool with spa, and hydrotherapy circuit, as well as a playroom, dog play space and grooming bar. Since service is of the utmost importance, residents can be assured that their needs will be well looked after by lifestyle purveyors Luxury Attaché; charged with providing a seamless experience from white-glove move-in coordination, to maid service, to impossible-to-get reservations, and access to entertainment, cultural, and social events. Assuring privacy and exclusivity, residents will arrive to a gated, attended, interior porte-cochere. Within the porte-cochere is the largest automated parking garage in New York with four electric car-charging stations. 57th Street has been referred to as the “boulevard of dreams,” and there’s no better way to live in a dream than from your home in the sky at 252 E 57. u

CO U RTE S Y O F S T R I B L I N G

252 EAST 57 STREET


This page, clockwise from above: Dramatic great room with expansive proportions showcasing unobstructed views of the farthest horizons; dream kitchen with fully integrated Eggersmann cabinetry and Miele appliances; children’s playroom with interactive activities. Opposite page: Daniel Romualdez in his design of the 34th Floor Club library. Artwork by Matt Magee, Red Oracle, 2007.


BRIDAL

HERE COMES THE SACHIN & BABI BRIDE

THESE DAYS, the back of a dress, par-

ticularly a wedding gown, is especially important to them. Sachin and Babi Ahluwalia, the husband-and-wife founders of fashion brand Sachin & Babi, recognize that for a large portion of the wedding ceremony, a bride’s back will face her family and friends, as well as the photographers. It’s a detail they carefully considered while creating their first bridal collection, which was shown to the press in April and will be available in the fall of 2016. Since then, they’ve been thinking a lot about how to make a wedding gown appealing from all angles. They started by giving the gowns low V-backs, and then added beautiful embroideries and detachable bows. “Feminine but sexy,” Sachin attested. The Ahluwalias’ signature ready-to-wear dresses are rich in textures and embellishments, and their use of color is highly praised. When they launched Sachin & Babi in 2009, they already had several years’ experience creating and manipulating fabrics for couture houses. In the early days, their designs for the couture houses stressed opulence, and their ambitions were to “add value” to all types of fabrics. But as time passed, the allure of couture dimmed, and practicality began playing a larger role in fashion. 68 QUEST

“Women started getting more cued in to what the trends were,” explained Sachin. “They would look at our designs and say, ‘That’s wonderful, but that’s not our lifestyle.’” Asked why they decided to start their own company, Sachin replied: “The things that we were making were not for our peers. But we were able to use our knowledge from the past and create a product that was comparable to what people were seeing in the media.” The Ahluwalias were lured into creating a bridal line by neither the fashion media nor a particular passion to design wedding gowns. Babi, whose background is in textiles, said that a few people walked into their boutique and asked if they could customize a dress. One was a doctor. She was looking for her wedding dress. “In three or four cases, we did custom gowns before we started doing bridal,” said Sachin. Plus, they were told that a few clients were already wearing Sachin & Babi dresses at their weddings. “A lot of our gowns lend themselves to bridal,” he continued. “A black or a red gown—if we made it in white—could quite easily be a wedding gown.” Soon, the department stores that carry their ready-to-wear line realized the same things. They said they didn’t have a bridal line with a Sachin & Babi aesthetic and that they’d like one. “Bridal,” said Babi, “became a natural evolution into what we are doing.” “We went to the same resources where we buy all our jacquards from,” added Sachin, “the same mills that that weave our jacquards and our satins. We just asked them to weave our eggshell colors, our ivories.” Today, the quality of their fabrics and the effort put into the construction of the garments remain as they always were—topnotch. And that, combined with the Ahluwalias’ ability to blend fantasy with reality, is what makes their dresses desirable. “At the end of the day,” stressed Sachin, “we still need to make clothes that fit women. Clothes that they can actually buy. If you look at what women really can wear and what they want… If you can fulfill that, everything else is fluff.” u

CO U RTE S Y O F S AC H I N & B A B I

BY ALEX TRAVERS


This page: A selection of wedding gowns from Sachin & Babi’s Spring 2017 bridal collection, their first to market. Opposite page: Outtakes from Sachin & Babi’s bridal presentation, which took place at their New York City studio.


GRASS IS GREENEST Q: Explain your background—why real estate? HB: My career of 25 years began in New York with Sotheby’s International Realty. When our family moved from the city, I continued in Greenwich. There is no other firm that offers the global reach of Sotheby’s International Realty, plus the brand association with quality. I have a degree in education and psychology that I supplemented with two years at the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID), so real estate is a natural fit for me. My knowledge of design continues to be a very valuable tool in helping my sellers to prepare their homes; today’s buyer demands a home that is either new or looks updated. The staging business has grown rapidly, but I can update a room with three three simple tweaks: new wall color, less cumbersome furniture arrangement, and simplified window treatments. One of my favorite gifts to my sellers after their homes have sold is a hardcover coffee-table book with pictures of their home that I put together. They are always so grateful for this memento. Q: What skills differentiate you from others? HB: When working with buyers who are new to the area, I 70 QUEST

draw on my own experience when making the transition to Greenwich. I can relate firsthand to their fears and concerns, so I make sure that they feel comfortable asking any questions they might have. Usually, I give them a brief tour of the town, pointing out its many amenities. I advise my clients to think about the “Three Cs” and the “Three Ls.” When considering a home, remember: you can change the Cleanliness, the Color, and the Condition but you can’t change the Layout, the Location, and the Lot. Q: What are some of your successes as an agent? HB: I have sold many significant properties over the years, but to name a few: a well-known Great Estate; a 1926 magnificent Twachtman masterpiece; a 1935 Platt Brothers Art Deco jewel; two different Queen Anne Victorians from 1911; a Conyers Farm brickand-limestone classic Georgian; and a 22-acre Conyers Farm lakeside estate manor reminiscent of the Gilded Age of retreats. All were significant sales. But my biggest success lies in the relationships that I have formed through these transactions. In the books that I mentioned I give as closing gifts, I write a dedication—a note expressing how grateful I am to have worked with them and formed a lasting friendship with them. u For more information, contact Helene Barre of Sotheby's International Realty at 203.618.3123 or helene.barre@sothebyshomes.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

HELENE BARRE CATERS to the community of Greenwich, Connecticut, as an agent with Sotheby’s International Realty. Here, we chat with Barre about her experience as a resident of the town—an enclave that “offers a sophisticated lifestyle while being so family friendly.”


OPEN HOUSE

This page: 7 Old Round Hill Lane in Greenwich, Connecticut—a 2.86-acre estate in a gated community—is on the market with Helene Barre of Sotheby’s International Realty for $12 million. Opposite page: The home features seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms as well as amenities such as a pool (above); Helene Barre of Sotheby’s International Realty in Greenwich, Connecticut (below).


EVENTS

AMADEUS WEEKEND An elite circle from all over the world meets in Salzburg to raise funds SALZBURG HAS been the glamorous backdrop to the world’s most famous music festival since 1920. This year it celebrates the 260th anniversary of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s birth. This promises to offer even more than ever before. Therefore it is hardly surprising that celebrities and nobility from all over the world are pleased to accept Eva Maria O’Neill’s invitation to a legendary Amadeus Weekend. The invitation combines enjoyment of the arts and joie de vivre in a unique manner. In 2003, Donald Kahn, the nephew of Walter Annenberg and a music lover who adored Salzburg, and Eva Maria O’Neill, who has been attending the festival since her youth, created an exclusive weekend within the festival. The very first weekend was attended by His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales, as a guest of honor. The Amadeus Weekend has evolved into a much coveted an72 QUEST

nual event where music lovers can indulge in their favorite pastime while partaking in the beauty and the splendors of Salzburg. A multifaceted social program at the most appealing locations in Mozart’s hometown will complement the festival’s performances. One of the highlights is a gala dinner on the terrace of the new “House for Mozart” theater after a concert by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchesra. After watching the opera Die Liebe der Danae, Eva Maria O’Neill and gallery owner Thaddaeus Ropac invite the party to a reception at Ropac’s villa, Emslieb, where Mozart, as a young boy, gave his first concerts. Finally, an evening with Anna Netrebko and her newlywed husband, Yusif Eyvazov, as well as an invitation to the famous Salzburg Residenz, a palace located in the center of the old part of Salzburg will complete three unforgettable days in Salzburg. u


This page, clockwise from top left: Princess Gabriele zu Leiningen and Maestro Riccardo Muti; Anna Netrebko in Trovatore; Princess Franziska von Fürstenberg and Maya Swarovski Langes; Eliette von Karajan, Donald Kahn, and Eva Maria O’Neill; Countess Natascha Abensperg und Traun and Anne Prevost. Opposite page: HSH Prince Pierre D’Arenberg, HSH Furstin Gloria von Thurn und Taxis, and Dr. Michael Feichtinger.


GREENWICH

GREENWICH

GREENWICH

R E A L E S TAT E CONNECTICUT

N E W YO R K

CONNECTICUT

N E W YO R K

CONNECTICUT

N E W YO R K

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N E W YO R K

WISDOM FROM REAL ESTATE’S BRIGHTEST BY THE EDITORS

OUR TRUSTED REALTORS welcome us to their

towns, where we survey the land (and the markets) in the states of Connecticut and New York. Our experts are “of” enclaves like Greenwich and Westchester: professionals who can assist with the brokering of a home while recommending a restaurant for lunch. Here, these professionals—Daniel H. Ginnel, Brad Hvolbeck, Peter Klemm, Jennifer Leahy, and Francine Liza—offer their advice for navigating their towns. 74 Q U E S T


CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

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CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

BRAD HVOLBECK Sotheby’s International Realty / 203.940.0015 / brad.hvolbeck@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

What is particularly exciting about Greenwich right now? This time of the year, many of our non-profit organizations are busy hosting their events, including the Greenwich Town Party as well as the Greenwich Concours D’Elegance (June 3–5), the Greenwich Film Festival (June 9–12), and the Greenwich Riding Trails Association’s horse show (June 12). In addition, the Greenwich Polo Club is about to start their season. The Sotheby’s International Realty—Greenwich Brokerage proudly supports and often sponsors a number of these events. What areas or types of properties tend to be your focus? My area of focus is luxury properties of all prices, ranging from townhomes to estate properties in all sections of town. I sold over 40 percent of the properties located in Conyers Farm, where the average sales price exceeds $10 million. In addition, I am currently marketing townhomes priced at $2.6 million located in central Greenwich (which is now on fire), a farmhouse on four acres with a pool and guest house in “mid-country” for $3.975 million, many estates located in “back country,” and the home featured here—which is a completely renovated 1930s Tudor with cottage, pool, and tennis court for $12.75 million.

What is your background in Greenwich? I am very fortunate to be a fourth-generation resident of Greenwich, which provides me with a wealth of local knowledge. Having been involved in over 800 real estate transactions that total in excess of $1 billion provides me with a unique perspective of the real estate market. I am currently on the board of the Greenwich Leadership Forum and a trustee emeritus of Eagle Hill School after serving on the board for 25 years. I am an avid sportsman and athlete: I have played ice hockey, lacrosse, and polo at the highest amateur level, and I have coached youth hockey and lacrosse.

16 Old Mill Road in Greenwich, Connecticut—a 10,881-square-foot manor with with 6+ bedrooms—is on the market for $12.75 million.

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JENNIFER LEAHY Douglas Elliman of Connecticut / 917.699.2783 / jennifer.leahy@elliman.com

What makes the Greenwich market so robust and perennial? New York City is so close—just a 40-minute train or car ride away. It also serves as a central business district that draws in new residents, and Greenwich has something for everyone—most importantly, different types of properties at a wide range of pricing (from $215,000 to $75 million), several beaches, fantastic shopping, amazing restaurants, golf, tennis, and ample extracurricular activities for children! The list goes on and on…anything you want is here. What properties are popular at the moment? I see a lot of buyers from New York, Westchester, and Fairfield County looking for upscale condos in walking distance to town and the train. They want something they can leave for several months, knowing a management company will care for it. They want convenience, service, and ease of living. They don’t want to have to mow their lawns or plow

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their driveways—most aren’t even here during the winter! Who is the standard buyer for your area? The reason I love Greenwich is because there are many “standard” buyers. Of course, there are the luxury mid-country $3-million-plus buyers, and I have waterfront buyers, $1–2 million first-time home buyers as well as a ton of down-sizers looking at condos. My clients are both natives of Greenwich and those coming from New York, Westchester, Europe, and the West Coast, even. Greenwich is amazing because the people who live here aren’t just one thing—you really can’t stereotype.

Luxury townhouses at 39 Indian Harbor Drive A in Greenwich offer ideal proximity to downtown, and range from $2,450,000 to $2,600,000.

CO U RTE S Y O F D O U G L A S E LL I M A N

What’s exciting about the Greenwich market right now? Much like the larger Fairfield County market, we are seeing more sales activity than last year at this time. Sales of single family homes and condos were up year over year in the first quarter.


NEW YORK

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NEW YORK

R E A L E S TAT E

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FRANCINE LIZA Tuxedo Hudson Realty / 201.970.1737 / fran@tuxedohudsonrealty.com

CO U RTE S Y O F T UX E D O H U D S O N R E A LT Y

What is particularly exciting about the Tuxedo market right now? At this time, everything about the Tuxedo market is exciting. Tuxedo Hudson Company has recently invested in a decade-old revitalization plan and vision, which will boost our reputation and continue to put this gateway community of the Hudson Valley on the map.

size homes, and premier properties. Currently, all three levels have become of interest. How is the current market doing? New price points have been set early this spring and, with other sales in contract or having accepted offers, it should be a great 2016! Who is the standard buyer for your area? Frequently, buyers are from New York City; Bergen County, New Jersey; The Hamptons; the West Coast; and Canada. The truth is, they’re from all over the country.

What makes the Tuxedo market so robust and perennial? Location, Location, Location—along with beauty, the nature, and a great vibe. We are 36 miles from New York City, an easy commute for full-time residents and a destination for all those who appreciate the unparalleled location. Tuxedo is a historically significant town, set in the midst of the nation’s largest preserved parkland: the beautiful Harriman State Park and Sterling Forest. We are truly the gateway to the magnificent Hudson Valley. Which areas or types of properties are experiencing popularity at the moment? Frequently it goes in waves: small cottages, mid-

79 Turtle Point in Tuxedo Park, New York—which is situated on three acres on Tuxedo Lake—is on the market for $6.25 million.

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CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

PETER KLEMM Klemm Real Estate / 860.868.7313 / peterklemm@msn.com

What makes the Litchfield market so robust and perennial? Litchfield County has a rich social and intellectual life and there are more private preparatory schools per capita than in any other county in New England and New York. Northwest Connecticut also has overwhelming natural beauty with thousands of acres of land trust affording unlimited hiking, mountain biking, snow shoeing, horseback riding, and fly fishing to name a few easily accessible outdoor activities. Our market is steady, offering savvy buyers a safe investment along with a wonderful quality of life. Which areas or types of properties are experiencing popularity at the moment? Turn-key properties and those with waterfront, privacy, and large acreage are commanding the biggest premiums. Properties which generate rental income can make great investments. There’s also demand for antiques in need of restoration.

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How is the current market doing? The Litchfield County real estate market saw significant growth during 2015 in luxury-buyer demand for properties in excess of $2 million. And although our prime selling season has just begun for 2016, there have been fewer luxury sales this year through May, coupled with more inventory versus last year, indicating more good deals on the horizon. Who is the standard buyer for your area? We’re seeing an influx of affluent young couples and families, many of whom are ex-Hamptonites, and sophisticated mature couples seeking family compounds.

This outstanding property on Lake Waramaug in Washington, Connecticut, is the only new construction currently available for purchase: $4.75 million.

CO U RTE S Y O F K LE M M R E A L E S TAT E

What is particularly exciting about the Litchfield market right now? The values and current property selection are the best they’ve been in years.


NEW YORK

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DANIEL H. GINNEL Ginnel Real Estate / 914.234.9234 / dginnel@ginnel.com

What’s exciting about Northern Westchester right now? It’s the most exciting time to buy real estate in Northern Westchester in my 40 years in the business. The arbitrage between the high prices in Manhattan and the tremendous value in our area is absolutely the best time to make the “sell high, buy low” trade. What makes this market so appealing? When you boil it down, open space is really what makes our area so special: low-density zoning, tremendous amounts of land in preserves and conservation, and privacy—truly the greatest luxury of all. Plus, we are only 40 miles from midtown Manhattan!

CO U RTE S Y O F G I N N E L R E A L E S TAT E

Which areas or types of properties are popular now? The trend generally has been close to town, train, and shopping, but recently we’ve seen larger estate properties further out from town drawing a lot of interest. How is the current market doing? We’ve had a record year so far, and we have been in business for 65 years. We’ve had an 80-percent-plus market share for homes over $3 million in Bedford in the last year. There remains an amazing variety of wonderful properties at tre-

A historic 14-room country-colonial estate on 39.79 acres at 270–306 Hook Road in Bedford, N.Y., is on the market for $7,500,000.

mendous values. It’s a great time for Ginnel—a boutique office—to use its deep historic knowledge to be more adept at navigating this market than the large regional offices. Who is the standard buyer for your area? Ginnel’s standard is anything but standard—a rock star in a very wide variety of professions. Historically people in the investment services have dominated our market, but now we’re seeing a far more diverse group of entrepreneurs, artists, and individuals looking for an unusual property in a country setting that’s also very accessible. u

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MARRIAGES BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Chauncey Kerr & Perrin Hamilton III August 8, 2015 • Locust VALLey, New york

Chauncey’s sister, Samantha Kerr, served as maid of honor and Perrin’s cousin Justin Moore served as best man. The bridesmaids wore dresses by J.Crew.

Chauncey and Perrin (who danced to “Into the Mystic” by Van Morrison) were introduced at Trinity College.

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The bride had her rehearsal dinner at the same venue as her parents’ rehearsal dinner: the Piping Rock Club’s Men’s Bar.

J AC Q U E LY N E PI E R S O N P H OTO G R A P H Y

The bride wore a dress by Anne Barge with a bouquet of white calla lilies. She was escorted by her father, E. Coe Kerr III, for the ceremony—which was held at the Piping Rock Club.


WEDDINGS

MARRIAGES Courtney Dolan & Page Leidy

DA P H N E Y O U R E E P H OTO G R A P H Y

NoVember 21, 2015 • bostoN, mAssAchusetts

Courtney (who wore a dress by Carolina Herrera) and Page danced to “Come Away With Me” by Norah Jones. The couple treated their 250 guests to a dessert by Cakes to Remember. The couple was married at the Church of the Covenant with a reception at the Harvard Club.

Carter Leidy served as best man and Erin Kurtz, Lauren Mannam, and Haesther Shnay served as matrons of honor.

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MARRIAGES Morgan Clifford & John Howell FebruAry 13, 2016 • New york, New york

The bride wore a dress by Anne Barge and the bridesmaids wore dresses by Alfred Sung. The bride’s sister, Kate Clifford, served as maid of honor.

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The groom’s brothers, Michael Howell and Stephen Howell, served as best men.

The festivities were hosted at a club in the city, where the 250 guests were treated to an EDM set with DJ Casey Kiss. The flowers were arranged by Bloomers Designs.

LNIAT L I AUNR AHLA E I DXEPRR EPSHSOTO I O NGSR A P H Y

The couple, who danced to “Thinking Out Loud” by Ed Sheeran, plan to honeymoon in Tahiti.


WEDDINGS

MARRIAGES Ariel Moses & Marshall Weinstein FebruAry 20, 2016 • New york, New york

The bride carried a bag by Edie Parker, which was personalized with the groom’s nickname for her: “Schmoops.”

RO E Y Y O H A I P H OTO G R A P H Y

The 280 guests were treated to a dessert of “piecaken,” plus music by the team from SET Artist Management.

The couple danced to “You Are” by Lionel Richie in the middle of Gotham Hall.

The bride, who wore a dress by Pnina Tornai, carried a bouquet of anemones, white fringe tulips, and white roses.

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ENGAGEMENTS

Stephanie Brag & Peter Enestrom

Emily Mendez-Penate & Christopher Sturgess

Alexandra Miller & Juan Pablo Egui

Stephanie Brag and Peter Enestrom will be wed in Newport, Rhode Island, on June 18—with a reception at New York Yacht Club’s Harbour Court. Nedenia Edmiston will serve as matron of honor and Nicholas Hodler will serve as best man. The bride is the daughter of Anders Brag and Amy Leeds. She was raised in New York, New York, where she attended the Chapin School before receiving a degree from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. The groom is the son of Ronald and Suellen Enestrom. He was raised in Sydney, Australia, where he attended the Sydney Grammar School before receiving degrees from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and Columbia Business School in New York, New York. Stephanie is the co-founder and C.O.O. of Dee Hutton (who designed the dresses for the bridesmaids) and Peter is the founder of Dear Boy Ventures. The couple resides in Greenwich Village.

Emily Mendez-Penate and Christopher Sturgess are to be married at the John’s Island Club in Vero Beach, Florida, on May 13, 2017. Margo Mendez-Penate will serve as maid of honor and Jamie White will serve as best man. The bride is the daughter of Carlos and Ellen Mendez-Penate. She attended New Canaan High School before graduating from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The groom is the son of Jeffrey and Catharine Sturgess. He attended the Taft School before graduating from Colorado College in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Emily explains: “Although we both grew up in the small town of New Canaan, Connecticut, we didn’t meet until years later in the Hamptons. We remained friends until the summer of 2014, when we saw each other at several of the same weddings. Sparks flew after a wedding we both attended in Louisville, Kentucky, and after that we were ‘off to the races.’”

Alexandra Miller and Juan Pablo Egui will be wed at the Rosewood Mayakoba in Riviera Maya, Mexico, on Saturday, October 29—as officiated by the bride’s cousin, Anton Honikman, and the groom’s brother, Teunis Egui. Because the wedding is scheduled for Halloween weekend, the festivities will include a “Day of the Dead” brunch on Sunday, October 30. The bride is the daughter of Leonard and Karin Miller. She was raised in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, before attending the Middlesex School and New York University. The groom is the son of Gloria Stolk de Egui and the late José Manuel Egui. He was raised in Caracas, Venezuela, before attending Colegio Jefferson and then relocating to the United States to attend Boston College. Alexandra is an account supervisor at Nike Communications and Juan Pablo is the head of sales and trading at Compass Group. The couple resides in Gramercy Park.

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ENGAGEMENTS

Milena Duke & David Holmes, Jr.

Elizabeth Tuke & Robert Dake

Paige Corbin & Tyler Kyle

Milena Duke and David “D.R.” Holmes, Jr., are to be married at the Meadow Brook Club in Long Island, New York. Camila Carber (the bride’s cousin) and Cristina Kloss (the bride’s sister) will serve as maid of honor and matron of honor, respectively. Alex Webel will serve as best man. The bride is the daughter of Tony and Olga Duke. She was raised in Oyster Bay, New York, before attending the Brooks School and Elon University. The groom is the son of David Holmes and the late Linda Holmes. He was raised in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, before attending Choate Rosemary Hall and St. Lawrence University. (The couple had known each other as children, given their homes on Long Island.) The couple planned to wed in Puerto Rico, but rerouted their celebration—with 75 days to go—because of the Zika virus. Milena and D.R. reside in Greenwich Village and are eager to adopt an English Springer Spaniel.

Elizabeth Tuke and Robert Dake will be wed at Indian Hill Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, on October 1, with a reception at the Camargo Club (where the bride’s father has held the title of “club champion” for a number of years). The bride is the daugher of Ms. Melissa Kinne Norton and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Frederick Tuke, Jr. She was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she attended Cincinnati Country Day School before graduating from Hobart & William Smith Colleges. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Dale Dake. He—like the bride—was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, before attending William Henry Harrison School and Miami University. The couple met at Gate C32 of LaGuardia Airport, where they were delayed while traveling home for Christmas. Elizabeth is the founder of TUKE Consulting and the groom is a vice president at Bixmor Property Group.

Paige Corbin and Tyler Kyle are to be married at Trinity Episcopal Church in Newport, Rhode Island, on June 25—with a reception at New York Yacht Club’s Harbour Court. Bailey Moyer will serve as maid of honor and Tripp Kyle will serve as best man. The bride is the daughter of David and Andrea Corbin. She was raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, before attending the Taft School and the University of Virginia. The groom is the son of George and Jill Kyle. He was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before attending Chestnut Hill Academy and Williams College. The couple were introduced at a Halloween party at the University Club—and they reconnected at The Surf Lodge in Montauk, New York. Paige and Tyler reside in the city, where the bride is a Capital Markets Associate at WisdomTree Asset Management and the groom is the Managing Director at BMO Capital Markets. JUNE 2016 85


CALENDAR

JUNE

On June 17, the 635-mile Newport Bermuda Race (a.k.a. the “Thrash to the Patch”) will be set to start in the mouth of Narragansett Bay. Sailed almost entirely out of sight of land, the Bermuda Race was created in 1906 by Thomas Fleming Day. For more information, call 441.295.2214.

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The 2016 Warrensburg Bike Rally will take place at Warren County Fairgrounds at 9 a.m. For more information, call 518.791.8728.

Maya Angelo and Grace Paley will be inducted. For more information, call 845.546.8444.

place at Bethesda Terrace at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.446.2242.

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Central Park Conservancy’s Taste of Summer will take

The Willie L. Marsaw Foundation will celebrate its Blazers and Bow

TAKE A RIDE

WALK IN THE PARK

BUTTONED-UP

PIONEERING RESEARCH

The Hospital for Special Surgery will hold its 33rd annual Tribute Dinner at the Waldorf=Astoria at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.245.6570.

HONORING EDUCATION

Teach For America will host its 2016 benefit dinner at the Waldorf=Astoria at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.279.2666.

HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL

The Billy Esposito Foundation will hold its Stories of Hope Gala at Tribeca Three Sixty at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 201.655.2064.

SPECIALT Y GARDENS

Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Spring Gala will be held at the Japanese Hill and Pond Garden at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 718.623.7200.

OPERA STANDARDS

SCRIBES

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New York State Writers Hall of Fame Induction Gala will take place at the 3 West Club at 6 p.m.

Ties with a String of Pearls event at the Houston Health Museum at 7 p.m. For more information, call 713.521.1515.

On June 17, the annual Saratoga Balloon and Craft Festival will take place at the Saratoga County Fairgrounds (162 Prospect Street) at 3 p.m. For more information, call 518.798.0858.

Chelsea Opera will present “Puccini... The Man and His Music” at Christ and St. Stephen’s Church at 7:30 p.m. Fore more information, call 212.260.1796.


CALENDAR

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LET’S DANCE

Held outdoors in idyllic Litchfield County, the Pilobolus Ball will take place in Washington, Connecticut, at 6:30 p.m. The event will include two special performances by the Pilobolus dance company at sunset. A seated dinner and dancing under the stars will take place after the performances. Each year, the summer bacchanal plays an essential role in providing the community with an extraordinary artistic collective to call its own. For more information, call 646.695.4926.

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ART AND COMMUNIT Y

The Beaux Arts Ball will take place under a tent outside the Newport Art Museum at 6 p.m. For more information, call 401.848.8200.

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HAPPY FOURTH!

The Firecracker 4 Road Race will take begin at Saratoga Springs City Center (522 Broadway) at 9 a.m. For more information, call 518.316.4445.

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EAST END ART BIG HEARTS

On June 7, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Spring Gala will take place at the Japanese Hill and Pond Garden at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 718.623.7200.

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GET UNDERWAY

The 50th Newport Bermuda Race will be set to start in the mouth of Narragansett Bay. For more information, call 441.295.2214. UP IN THE AIR

Avenue). This year there will be special events, guest speakers, new garden displays, and shopping opportunities. Programming will also include luncheon lectures by Bunny Williams and Bruno Duarte. For more information, call 401.847.1000.

The 20th American Heart Association’s Hamptons Heart Ball will be held at The Hayground School. The event will celebrate the organization’s work and mission, its donors and volunteers, and the lives saved and improved because of everyone’s effort. The Heart Ball promises to be an engaging evening of fun and passion, bringing community and philanthropic leaders together. Last year, the Heart Ball campaign raised just over $71 million nationwide, allowing the organization to fund life-saving research and prevention programs in our community and across the country. For more information, call 800.242.8721.

Art Southampton 2016 will take place at Nova’s Ark Project (60 Millstone Road). For more information, call 305.517.7977.

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YACHT ROCK

International Yacht Restoration School will host its 2016 Summer Gala at 449 Thames Street in Newport. For more information, call 401.848.5777.

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DEUCE

The International Tennis Hall of Fame Championships for the Van Alen Cup will take place at 194 Bellevue Avenue in Newport, Rhode Island. For more information, call 212.217.4105.

The Saratoga Balloon and Craft Festival will take place at the Saratoga County Fairgrounds (162 Prospect Street) at 3 p.m. For more information, call 518.798.0858.

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HEALTH CARE

The Floating Hospital’s Summer Soiree celebrating the organization’s 150th anniversary will take place at Current at Chelsea Pier 59 at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 718.784.2240.

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FRIDAYS AT THE LAKE

The Georgie Wonders Orchestra will perform live at Shepard Park in Lake George at 4 p.m. For more information, call 212.921.9070. PRIMROSE PATH

The 21st annual Newport Flower Show take place from June 24–26 at Rosecliff (548 Bellevue

Through September 25, artist Henry Bertoia’s “Atmosphere for Enjoyment” exhibition will be on view at the Museum of Arts and Design. For more information, call 212.299.7777. JUNE 2016 87


GREENWICH ROOTS PRODUCED AND STYLED BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN PHOTOGRAPHED BY F.E. C A STLEBERRY

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Patrick McGowan (wearing a Gramercy Classic Fit Shirt and the Gibson Swim Trunk in Lobster from J.McLaughlin with a pair of Milanos from Red’s Outfitters) splashes Katherine Parker-Magyar (wearing the Karlie Wrap Romper from Lilly Pulitzer with NearlyNude shoes from Stuart Weitzman).


This page: Alexandra Porter (in the halter jumpsuit from MILLY with Chaos shoes in leopard-print patent from Manolo Blahnik) and Paige Corbin (in the viscose ottoman pleated dress and erline woven raffia sandal by Ralph Lauren Collection) invite our readers through the gates of 16 Old Mill Road in Greenwich, Connecticut—a property on the market with Brad Hvolbeck and MJ Bates Hvolbeck of Sotheby’s International Realty (203.618.3110).


Katherine (in Dsquared2’s Little Dress Sandals); Patrick (in an outfit by GANT); Paige (in J.McLaughlin’s Casey Sleeveless Dress in Safari Chain with Stuart Weitzman’s Elixir shoes); Wesley Wynne (in a cream silk poplin dress shirt, a lavender cashmere sweater, and a cream wool gabardine trouser by Ralph Lauren); Alexandra (in Lilly Pulitzer’s Melody Crop Top and Pleated Skirt with Jimmy Choo’s Romy 110 shoes in suede pop yellow); and Joanna Scholtz (in Carolina Herrera’s pink mini dress with Jimmy Choo’s Romy 110 shoes in kid leather nude) decorate a 1976 Ford Bronco—courtesy of Saumil Mehta (inquiries: saumil.ny@gmail.com).

GREENWICH IS ROOTED in tradition (as, of course, is Quest). So, we (again) gathered a crew of charming twenty- and thirty-somethings at an estate in Connecticut—an offer extended by our friend Brad Hvolbeck of Sotheby’s International Realty. And we (again) grabbed a car with charisma and two-tone sexiness: a 1976 Ford Bronco. Our models are representative of the storied town, a nest that encourages its own to graduate from its greenest grasses and succeed. Paige Corbin, Patrick McGowan, Katherine Parker-Magyar, Alexandra Porter, Joanna Scholtz, and Wesley Wynne are thriving in the city—a nod to their families and the opportunities of Greenwich. Patrick and Wesley attended the Brunswick School before graduating from Vanderbilt University and Trinity College, respectively. Wesley works as an analyst at Columbia Records (a division of Sony Music) while writing, recording, and producing two albums under his label, Bird Rock Records. Our women (Paige, Katherine, Alexandra, and Joanna) are as accomplished as one would expect, given their educations at the likes of Choate Rosemary Hall and the Taft School. Katherine is graduating with honors to receive an M.A. from the New School while Alexandra is continuing to evolve her company: Alexandra Porter Advisory (alexandraporteradvisory.com). Here, we break from the frenzy of the city for an opportunity to frolic, from the grass court to the pool—as documented by our photographer F.E. Castleberry (fecastleberry.com). —Elizabeth Quinn Brown JUNE 2016 93


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This page: Wesley (in an ultra dry polo and sport taffeta tennis shorts from LACOSTE, styled with a wool/linen tweed blazer by F.E. CASTLEBERRY) preps for a game of tennis on a grass court with Joanna (in Tibi’s silk pleated strappy dress and Manolo Blahnik’s BB shoes in beige suede) and Alexandra (in Carolina Herrera’s light pink pleated dress with Jimmy Choo’s Romy 110 shoes in kid leather nude). Opposite page: Katherine, wearing Veronica Beard’s Coral Gables crew neck top and FRAME’s citadel short with J.McLaughlin’s Jill Tote, pauses for a treat.


This page: Patrick wears a cream barathea formal sportcoat, a white poplin formal dress shirt, a black satin bow tie, and a black silk gabardine trouser by Ralph Lauren with a pair of Carters from Red’s Outfitters. Joanna wears the “champs de fleur” on georgette beaded evening dress by Ralph Lauren Collection. Opposite page: Katherine (in Salvatore Ferragamo’s blue cotton poplin strapless dress with Salvatore Ferragamo earrings) pours a bottle of Moët & Chandon Rosé Impérial into a Snowe-brand flute for Paige (in Salvatore Ferragamo’s black cotton poplin bi-level dress).

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Beauty Styling: Hair courtesy of Frédéric Fekkai Greenwich Salon (2 Lewis Court in Greenwich, Connecticut; 203.861.6700) and Frédéric Fekkai Greenwich Creative Director Alexandre Chouery. Makeup courtesy of Juliette Perreux for Laura Mercier. 98 QUEST


PART OF THE CLUB

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN COURTESY OF THE GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, WILLIAM E. FINCH, JR., ARCHIVES, PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION 100 QUEST


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Greenwich is known for its clubs:

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beacons of exclusivity that define their members, who convene for sporting and, of course, socializing. Here, we peer into their histories: This page: 1. A current picture of Greenwich Country Club. 2. A 1917 postcard of Greenwich Country Club—which was reconstructed after a fire in 1930 and a fire in 1961. 3. Belle Haven Club, today. 4. A 1908 postcard of Belle Haven Casino (which preceded the Belle Haven Club): an elegant center for entertainment, where guests were invited for activities such as billiards and lawn bowling. 5. A current picture of Round Hill Club. 6. A game of tennis at the Field Club of Greenwich, circa 1930. Opposite page: A 1918 postcard of the Field Club of Greenwich (above); a tournament—and its trophy—at the Field Club of Greenwich, circa 1930 (below).

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CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E C LU B S

This page: A 1925 picture of Narcissus, a 10-meter racing sloop that was owned by Frank Page. Opposite page: 1. A 1908 picture of Anatares, a power ocean cruiser that was commissioned by Alexander Stein (a resident of Greenwich) and designed by Morgan Barney (a member of Indian Harbor Yacht Club). 2. Indian Harbor Yacht Club, circa 1900. 3. The commodore of Riverside Yacht Club, circa 1920. 4. The entrance to Indian Harbor Yacht Club, circa 1925. 5. The view of Indian Harbor Yacht Club from Captain’s Harbor, circa 1960. 6. Indian Harbor Yacht Club hosts a picnic for its members in 1896. 7. Sailors on the dock of Riverside Yacht Club, circa 1890.

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LET’S SHOP GREENWICH AVENUE BY ALEX TRAVERS

Greenwich Avenue has a look all its own—polished, understated, and entirely charming. For shoppers, it’s paradise. No wonder the strip continues to offer the best in boutiques, cafés, and restaurants, making it one of Connecticut’s most exciting retail destinations.


RALPH LAUREN 265 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.2054 / ralphlauren.com Here’s a store on Greenwich Avenue you won’t want to miss. Boasting a barrel-vault entrance that leads to a towering glass-and-wrought-iron door, this Beaux Arts wonder welcomes you to the world of Ralph Lauren. Denizens of Greenwich flock here to outfit themselves in the latest offerings from America’s favorite designer. From shortsleeved polos for the golf and tennis courts to elegant evening wear for nights on the town, you’ll find it all at this multi-level marvel. For summer, look out for great double-breasted blazers and chic fit-and-flare indigo blue dresses. Also: the best in summer camp essentials—bright tops, jean shorts—for the kids. It’s hard to leave here empty-handed.

MADEWELL 256 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.1591 / madewell.com Looking for great denim and more? Head over to Madewell’s sunny Greenwich Avenue store. Offering an exciting selection of women’s clothes and accessories, Madewell has it all. Founded back in 1937 as a denim workwear label, the brand remains focused on straightforward, smart pieces designed for everyday use. With a talented design team and a careful eye for fashion that stands the test of time, Madewell seems to be the source for effortless styles that will last forever. Think perfect jeans, relaxed tees, chambray shirts and dresses, and all the wear-everywhere accessories to pair them with. In fact, it’s easy to spend hours inside the store mixing and matching the clothes and accessories.

STUART WEITZMAN

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120 Greenwich Avenue 203.622.5036 / stuartweitzman.com He’s the man who created the million-dollar shoe. But that’s just one of Stuart Weitzman’s many achievements. After 30 years of designing footwear and being honored with a lifetime achievement award by Footwear News, it’s no wonder Stuart Weitzman is embraced by the shoppers of Greenwich Avenue. From flats to pumps to wedges, the brand is known for breathing new life into classic looks. A one-stop shop for footwear, Stuart Weitzman showcases shoes that always look stunning, whatever the occasion. Shoppers would be remiss to forgo an opportunity to indulge in some of the other items from the brand, like its collection of handbags and accessories. Stop in and see for yourself.


VILEBREQUIN 200 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.6989 / us.vilebrequin.com While recently browsing the web, I came across an enthusiastic, and somewhat amusing, Yelp review by someone named T. N. from Darien, Conn. “If I have to wear a bathing suit,” it reads, “it’s Vilebrequin for me! As madras is to golf, gin is to sailors, Vilebrequin is to iconic swimwear for men and boys alike.” Since T. N. wrote this back in 2007, allow me to bring you up to date by informing you that the brand now makes bathing suits and clothing for women as well— pieces that always capture the bright and sunny days of a Saint-Tropez summer. Suit up for the season in high style.

LULULEMON 151 Greenwich Avenue 203.622.5046 / lululemon.com Athletic wear is everywhere, and Lululemon—with its vast selection of tops, yoga pants, swimsuits, and accessories—has helped pioneer the movement. Grab gear for the gym, for a workout class, for a long run... or even for just running errands. This stuff is the best, and it lasts. Doesn’t shrink. Doesn’t crinkle. Plus, it’s super comfortable. Offering clothes for both sexes, Lululemon prides itself on garment construction. Most pants and tops, for example, feature hidden pockets so your phone doesn’t hobble around or fall out. Some jackets even have little cuffs to keep your hands warm, in case you’re out on a cool summer night. “Less thinking, more feeling,” is the brand’s mantra. They’ve sure got it right.

THEORY 396 Greenwich Avenue 203.422.0020 / theory.com “Ready, set, summer” boasts Theory’s website, which, along with its Greenwich retail store, is offering a selection of sleek maxi dresses and silk shirts for women, all stylish and perfect for the warm weather. For men, lightweight blazers and cotton shirts are great for both wearing to work or a night out on the town. In fact, Theory’s men’s wear has been stealthily evolving with today’s trends. Suits are more streamlined, more agile. Simple T-shirts and sweaters seem to fit better. Call it the “tailored casual” look. Known for its minimalist style, the brand continues to provide smart wardrobes for both men and women.


BETTERIDGE 239 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.0124 / betteridge.com Founded in 1897, Betteridge is one of America’s historic fine jewelers. In fact, the Betteridge name has been associated with jewelry for centuries— the company’s president, Terry Betteridge, is a fourth-generation jeweler whose roots date back to the 1700s in Birmingham, England, where the name was associated with fine-jewelry design and silversmithing. Today, the Betteridge boutique—now loacated at 239 Greenwich Avenue—is a true gem, offering up watches, gifts, and fine jewelry from Rolex to Patek Philippe to Cartier to Verdura. Be sure to see what they have in store this season.

LACOSTE 98 Greenwich Avenue 203.422.0180 / lacoste.com There are many reasons to visit Lacoste’s Greenwich Avenue boutique: stock up on classic piqué polos, test the latest fragrances, check out the new French Sporting Spirit collection. But alternatively—if faced, say, with a sudden urge to take a trip to one of Connecticut’s beautiful beaches— you can also find great swimwear (for men and women) and beach towels, along with a colorful selection of bags to pack everything you may want to bring along for your trip. And if you need a pair of sunglasses (the new ones float) for any occasion this summer, Lacoste has you covered. “For tennis, golf, and beach,” the brand’s tagline once read. Today, they really cover all fashion grounds.

RESTORATION HARDWARE

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310 Greenwich Avenue 203.552.1040 / restorationhardware.com When you walk into Restoration Hardware, you’ll enter a realm of home furnishings that features furniture, lighting, textiles, bathware, and garden and outdoor décor, as well as baby and child products. RH’s collection offers timeless classics and modern masterpieces that are great for any style of home. Their authentic reproductions also provide a combination of inspired design, high quality, and unmatched value. RH operates at over 70 locations, and the brand’s source book and website serve as a virtual extensions of their offerings. JUNE 2016 107


ARTNET: VOICE OF THE MARKET BY ALEX TRAVERS

This spread: Artnet’s New York headquarters are located on the 26th floor of the historic Woolworth Building.


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FOR DECADES—centuries, really—the unwritten rules of the art market were sacrosanct: buyer and seller premiums at auctions were kept high, prices practically secret. But now, a new generation of art professionals is saying: Enough of that. Let’s try something different. What’s coming out of this revolution is exciting, and redrawing everything we know about the way art is purchased. And Artnet, an online resource for the international market, is standing at the forefront. Artnet’s New York headquarters, located on the 26th floor of the Woolworth Building, appears almost bare. In reality, it’s not—employees are at work, a series of Warhol photographs adorns the walls—but the sheer size of the place, along with its stripped floors and high ceilings, make it seem that way. I am here to meet with the company’s founder, Hans Neuendorf, and his son, Artnet CEO Jacob Pabst, to learn more about their business. For one thing, Artnet’s price database: its archive of auction results going back over 30 years. But also, its 24/7 online auction platform for buying and selling art as well as its network that connects galleries and collectors around the world. Before anything, I want to talk about how art is sold today, and in particular some unique aspects of it that seem central to Artnet’s success. “There’s no longer any question about the validity of the concept of selling art online,” says Neuendorf, confidently. “The question now is: What is the best way of selling art online?”

Neuendorf, whose rise to power catalyzed price transparency in the art world, founded Artnet back in 1989. At the beginning, he was an impassioned reformer whose price database disrupted an opaque industry. By cataloguing years of auction results, he was able to assign reliable value to artworks, allowing buyers to make more informed decisions. His actions, however, upset many art dealers—often known for exploiting the lack of knowledge of their clients—and auction houses. “The [auction] houses thought it was their data and they didn’t want anyone else to publish it,” he remembers. “They were against price transparency.” Neuendorf, adamant that change had to come, carried on with his work. JUNE 2016 109


million according to Artnet’s 2015 annual report—seems to be the slowest growing segment. “We are not where we want to be yet,” says Pabst. There’s no rush. “Sometimes,” he observes, “it takes a bit for the market to embrace a product.” After all, it took almost 10 years for the price database to be successful. “It’s all about timing,” notes Pabst, “and we’re a little too early.” u 110 QUEST

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produce analytics reports. There are also Artnet’s proprietary auctions, which charge very low premiums since the company doesn’t need to own prime real estate in major cities, collect and insure the works, or produce a physical catalog. And then there is Artnet News, a newswire that launched in 2012. “All different businesses under the same hood,” says Pabst. “A one-stop shop.” That’s helped Artnet boost subscriptions, according to Pabst. “We have the most traffic in the online art market.” With that, advertising revenue has skyrocketed, up 36 percent in the first quarter of 2016. Right now, the auction platform—while producing significant revenue, $2.9

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After all, prices were public. No one had exclusive rights to the information. He steadfastly stood up for buyers and continued to gather data. Plus, unlike the print catalogues of the time, he started incorporating electronic imaging so buyers could understand why an artist might have large price discrepancies on works of the same size and year. “Pioneer stuff,” he says. “We thought it would be a slam dunk.” It wasn’t. Not at first. The data lines were slow, “and [the dealers] thought they already knew everything,” he explains. “It took ten years to make the database properly.” By then, the auction houses that initially dismissed the price database were dependent on it. “It’s much less expensive than what they’ve done before,” informs Neuendorf. “There’s always a right moment for everything,” he continues—and for Artnet, this seems to be that moment. “All of a sudden,” says Neuendorf, “we have a lot of competitors who copied the entire business model. That confirms that we are on the right track.” In 2016, Artnet is no longer just one particular product. The price database is growing, now able to forecast trends and


This page, clockwise from top: Artnet founder Hans Neuendorf; his son, Jacob Pabst, became the CEO of Artnet in 2012; Sophie Neuendorf, director of Artnet’s gallery network and partnerships. Opposite page: George Condo’s “Face” (1985) sold for $252,000 on Artnet’s online auction platform (above); an Andy Warhol work sold on Artnet’s auctions plat-

form for $1,322,500 (below).


ON VIEW AT THE BRUCE MUSEUM from May 14 through September 4, 2016, “Electric Paris” offers a revealing look at the role of new lighting technologies in the work of the Impressionists and their contemporaries. While the nickname “City of Light” first arose in the 18th century when Enlightenment philosophers made Paris a center of ideas and of metaphorical illumination, the term came to be associated with the blaze of artificial light that began to illuminate the streets of Paris by the 1840s and 1850s. Illuminated public spaces and private interiors appear frequently in works of art and popular depictions of contemporary life in the second half of the 19th century, yet the different types of lighting that animate such spaces have never been considered in detail. This exhibition is the first to explore the ways in which artists depicted older oil and gas lamps as well as the newer electric lighting that began to supplant them by the turn of the 20th century. Whether nostalgic renderings of gas112 QUEST

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ELECTRIC PARIS


lit boulevards, subtly evocative scenes of half-shadow, or starkly illuminated dance halls, these works of art record the changing appearance of both interior and exterior spaces, and suggest the ways in which Parisians experienced the city as it transitioned from old to new technologies. Organized thematically into four sections––Nocturnes and Panoramas, Lamplit Interiors, Street Light, and In and Out of the Spotlight––the exhibition will reveal the era’s fascination with forms of artificial lighting (éclairage) as opposed to natural light (lumière). A selection of approximately 50 works––paintings, prints, photographs, and drawings––by artists such as Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt, Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, Georges Seurat, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jean Béraud, James Tissot, Childe Hassam, Charles Courtney Curran, Alfred Maurer, and Maurice Prendergast, among others, will be on view. Co-curated by S. Hollis Clayson, Professor of Art History and Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern University, and Margarita Kara-

This page: Willard Leroy Metcalf’s Au Café. Opposite page: Le magasin de nouveautés by Alexandre Lunois (above); Konstantin Korovin’s A Boulevard in Paris at Night (inset).

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E B RU C E M U S E U M

The exhibition is the first to explore the ways in which artists depicted older oil and gas lamps, as well as the newer electric lighting. soulas, PhD Candidate in Art History at the University of Delaware, “Electric Paris” will be accompanied by a scholarly lecture series, film series, audio guide, and supplemental brochure, along with the sale of Clayson’s book, Electric Paris: The Visual Cultures of the City of Light in the Era of Thomas Edison, forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. This is an expanded version of an exhibition first organized by the Clark Art Institute, also curated by S. Hollis Clayson, in 2013. u For more information, visit www.brucemuseum.org. JUNE 2016 113


This page, from above—Mayfair’s Finest: Brown’s Hotel, established in 1837, is comprised of 11 Georgian townhouses; the entrance to The Connaught; see (and be seen at) Annabel’s,

PROPER PLACES AND SPACES Our tips for “Ruling” Britannia—from where to play to where to stay. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

114 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y S O F T H E R E S P E C T I V E D E S T I N AT I O N S

A LONDON GUIDE:


WHERE TO STAY:

There are rooms with a view, and then there are rooms with everything... The treasured Brown’s Hotel has introduced its first Forte Suite: the Kipling Suite, so named for the writer who penned The Jungle Book from his room. (Winston Churchill is known to have said, “I don’t stay in a hotel. I stay at Brown’s.”) Also in the neighborhood of Mayfair: The Connaught, with its “champagne room” (featuring art by Sophie Dickens, a granddaughter of Charles Dickens) and, of course, its famed “martini trolley.” Then, in Holborn, there’s the new Rosewood Hotel London with its 262 rooms and 44 suites. And, in Kensington, there’s the Italianowned Baglioni Hotel London with its proximity to Hyde Park. Beyond the city, there’s Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons in Oxford—a lush experience, created by chef Raymond Blanc OBE. And there’s Soho Farmhouse, the exclusive member’s club in tony Chipping Norton, comprised of 40 cabins, a sevenbedroom farmhouse, and a four-bedroom cottage.

This page, clockwise from above left: The Connaught (Carlos Place, London: +44 (0)20 7499 7070 or the-connaught.co.uk); Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons (Church Road, Oxford: +44 (0)1844 278 881 or belmond.com); Brown’s Hotel (Albemarle Street, London: +44 (0)20 7493 6020 or roccofortehotels.com); Baglioni Hotel London (60 Hyde Park Gate, London: +44 (0)20 7368 5700 or baglionihotels.com); Rosewood Hotel London (252 High Holborn, London: +44 (0)20 7781 8888 or rosewoodhotels.com); Soho Farmhouse (Great Tew, Chipping Norton: +44 (0)1608 691 000 or sohofarmhouse.com).


(24 Great Windmill Street); Berners Tavern at The London Edition (10 Berners Street); The Orange (37 Pimlico Road); Scott’s (20 Mount Street); The Arts Club (40 Dover Street); 5 Hertford Street.

Let’s chat private “clubbing”... Obviously, there’s Annabel’s, established by Mark Birley, and there’s 5 Hertford Street, established by his son, Robin Birley—which host everyone from the royals and Kate Moss to One Direction and the Rolling Stones. Then, there’s The Arts Club: a hub for PYTs, whose roster of members includes Gwyneth Paltrow (tip: book a room for access). When it comes to wining/dining, Quest adores the tradition of Bellamy’s (elegant French fare) and Scott’s (exquisite fish). For mixing with Sloane Rangers: The Ivy Chelsea Garden (the buzzy boîte with perfect ambiance) or, even, Casa Cruz (the Argentineanflavored darling of the scene). And for mixing with carnivores: Berners Tavern at The London Edition (chef Jason Atherton’s gastronomic gem) and The Blacklock (an eatery devoted to chops—from pork belly to prime rib). Fancy yourself a foodie? Venture to Hoppers (a restaurant from Gymkhana’s founders, serving cuisine from Sri Lanka and Tamil Nadu) or Kitty Fisher’s (a cozy nook for cocktails with Spanish-inspired fare). Seeking a Sunday roast? Tuck in at The Harwood Arms (the “it” pub for the posher set) or The Orange (a modern inn where meat is served with the trimmings, like Yorkshire pudding). u

CO U RTE S Y S O F T H E R E S P E C T I V E D E S T I N AT I O N S

WHERE TO PLAY:

This page, clockwise from above: The Blacklock


This page, clockwise from above left: Hoppers (49 Frith Street); Annabel’s (44 Berkeley Square); Bellamy’s (18 Bruton Place); Kitty Fisher’s (10 Shepherd Market); Casa Cruz (123 Clarendon Road); The Ivy Chelsea Garden (197 King’s Road).


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AND THE OSCAR GOES TO...

O S C A R A B O L A F I A : F RO M I CO N S BY O S C A R ( L A N N O O P U B L I S H E R S / ACC ) ; W W W. O S C A R A B O L A F I A . N L

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

THERE’S ARI (ONASSIS), leaving dinner at the 21 Club in 1972. And Dolly (Parton), at the Grand Ole Opry in 1980. And Audrey (Hepburn), at F.I.T. for a tribute to Hubert de Givenchy in 1982. And of course there’s Diana (Princess of Wales), pulling away from the Carlyle Hotel in 1995. And the other Diana (Ross), blazing past the Pierre Hotel on roller skates in 1982. They were all icons of their times, and they were all photographed by a man who, like them, is often referred to by his first name alone: Oscar (Abolafia). This month, in Icons by Oscar: The Works of Photographer Oscar Abolafia, Lannoo Publishers (with ACC Art Books) unleashes a 248-page hardcover treasure-trove of some of the photographer’s greatest candid shots. The book is only the beginning. Abolafia, in conjunction with the Amsterdam-based art-book authority This page: Ann-Margret at the Grammy Awards in New York City’s Astor Theatre, 1975. Opposite page: Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis in the Green Room at American Ballet Theatre in New York City, 1975. All images from Icons by Oscar: The Works of Photographer Oscar Abolafia (Lannoo Publishers/ ACC Art Books). For more, visit www.oscarabolafia.nl.


This page: Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, and Fred Astaire in Las Vegas at an opening-night party for Nancy Sinatra, 1969 (above); Debbie Harry in New York City, 1987 (below). Opposite Page: Robert Redford playing football

O S C A R A B O L A F I A : F RO M I CO N S BY O S C A R ( L A N N O O P U B L I S H E R S / ACC ) ; W W W. O S C A R A B O L A F I A . N L

in the Netherlands on the movie set of A Bridge Too Far, 1977.

Mendo, is also launching an initiative to open more than 300,000 intimate and iconic photographs, as part of a carefully curated “conversation” with iconic stars from the past and into today. In our age of the all-pervasive image, Icons by Oscar reminds us of the power of the singular shot: that special, can’t-quite-capture-it-again moment in time. Social media has made “photographers” of us all, and even though we’re more capable than ever of being able to document any moment of any day, there is still something special about the expert eye that knows how to hone in on a revealing truth, an unexpected instant, the proverbial road—or angle—not taken. It’s what draws us back time and again to photographs by the genuinely gifted and truly great. And Abolafia, a chronicler of the mega stars of his day, proves himself with just about every candid portrait in Icons. Take, for instance, Jacqueline Onassis. We’ve seen her countless times before, but rarely have we seen her as we do through Oscar’s eyes. Yes, she was one of the most well-documented people of her time, with every coming and going caught endlessly by the paparazzi: sometimes in cool reserve, sometimes in fastpaced flight. Through Oscar’s lens, however, we see something more than just the boat neckline with signature pearls, more than just the stylized bouffant. We don’t just see the icon as subject, bur rather see into her—the chestnut highlights of her dark


This page, clockwise from bottom left: Jack Nicholson at the Lincoln Center Film Festival in New York City, 1970; Priscilla Presley on her first day shooting the television series Dallas, 1983; Faye Dunaway at the movie premiere of Bonnie and Clyde in New York City, 1967. Opposite page: Elizabeth Taylor promoting her movie The Taming of the Shrew at a press

W W W. O S C A R A B O L A F I A . N L

coiffure, the intensity of her contemplative stare, the pursed lips smoking—yes, smoking!—through an elegant cigarette holder. Oscar, in explaining how he managed to get the shot, writes about his window of opportunity literally opening up, as he stood patiently until a waiter cracked open a door of the private Green Room at an American Ballet Theatre gala, affording him a split second to glimpse—and capture—a private Jackie. Such details are the joy of Abolafia’s work, and they help explain why it feels as if we’re seeing not only Jackie but Elvis, Barbra, Liz, Frank, and Bette—among so many others—for the first time. From his humble beginnings on the “wrong” side (as he puts it) of Broadway in New York City to his rise as a photographer for People, Vanity Fair, and Harper’s Bazaar magazines, Abolafia bore witness to some of the most captivating actors, singers, politicians, and celebrities of his—and our—time. And now, thanks to Icons, we can all walk away with an Oscar of our own. u

O S C A R A B O L A F I A : F RO M I CO N S BY O S C A R ( L A N N O O P U B L I S H E R S / ACC ) ;

conference in New York City’s Plaza Hotel, 1967.


JUNE 2016 123


POLO JOURNAL 2016 SEASON

One of the draws of polo for spectators is the beauty of the game. And for players, there is the lure of the adrenaline, the thrill of a win. Quest revisits a few stylish moments

Librar y of Cong ress

of the sport in our Polo Journal.

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This page, clockwise from top left: Charles, Prince of Wales, kisses Princess Diana after a match; a game takes place in New York state; playing in the snow makes polo even more challenging; the 1912 U.S. Army team; in Argentina, polo is also played on camels; Queen Elizabeth II and Ronald Regan go for a trot. Opposite page: Players take the field in Long Island for the 1914 International Polo Cup competition.

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This page: A member of the U.S. Army polo team. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The 2015 Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic; princes William and Harry keep to the sidelines during a match; Manipur polo players; polo mallets and balls; a young woman sits on a wooden polo pony; Queen Elizabeth II attends a polo match with Prince Philip in 1975.

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POLO CLUBS

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CASA DE CAMPO

GREENWICH

HAVILAND HOLLOW

Looking for the perfect pony? At Casa de Campo’s exquisite equestrian center, you’ll find dozens of world-class horses. With three playing fields, one practice field, and the largest string of ponies under a single brand in the world, there’s no better place to participate in this rigorous and thrilling sport. Enjoy guided trail rides throughout the Polo Villas with expert staffing on hand for lessons in all areas of expertise. Families can compete against each other in matches held each week, all year round, for added competition and excitement.

Established in 1981, the Greenwich Polo Club is internationally recognized for its roster of legendary teams and outstanding players. The club hosts public USPA high-goal polo matches on Sundays in June, July, August, and early September. It is also home to players such as Steve Lefkowitz, Peter Orthwein, Fred Mannix, and the 31 championship–winner and owner of the club, Peter Brant. Greenwich Polo Club offers individual and group polo lessons by professionals. Everyone from beginners to accomplished players can gain some extra edge.

Some of the finest polo fields in North America can be found at Haviland Hollow Farm. This one-of-a-kind environment is for players and spectators alike who wish to immerse themselves in one of the finest polo experiences in the New York area. The farm’s two regulation-size fields were designed by world-renowned polo-field designer and engineer Alejandro Battro. Their indoor state-of-the-art arena, located only an hour from Manhattan, is a distinction that Haviland Hollow shares with no other polo and equestrian facility in the state.

Visit casadecampo.com.do.

Visit greenwichpoloclub.com.

Visit nycpolo.com.

Co u r te sy o f re sp e ct i ve c lu bs

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POLO CLUBS

Co u r te sy o f re sp e ct i ve c lu bs

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MASHOMACK

SARATOGA

WELLINGTON

Located on a 1,900-acre preserve in Pine Plains, New York, the Mashomack Polo Club is a full-service club for polo players of all levels. Mashomack Polo has undertaken a multi-year capitalimprovement program and now features five tournament-class fields, one practice field, stick-and-ball areas, and a regulation outdoor polo arena. Mashomack Polo holds various tournaments such as the USPA Eduardo Moore Invitational and the Tracey Mactaggart Challenge Cup. There is polo to suit every level of player from May through September.

Saratoga, New York—a place that is synonymous with horses and the sporting events that surround them—is home to the Saratoga Polo Association, which was established in 1898. The charming, air-conditioned clubhouse features a panoramic match view with a full cash bar and great dining options. The season takes place from July 8 to September 4 and V.I.P. all-inclusive package experiences are offered throughout those months. Polo is one big family, which is why spectators are always invited to the post-match trophy presentation.

A beautiful, palm-lined drive leading past tennis courts and a magnificent pool to the lush, carefully manicured polo fields greets visitors upon their arrival at the International Polo Club Palm Beach. Created by players for players, the club showcases the sharp skills of the ponies and athletes that dominate the sport. The arenas of play include three state-of-theart playing fields and a stick-and-ball field. This season will include gourmet brunches and après-polo celebrations. It’s certainly worth the trip south, even in the summertime.

Visit mashomackpoloclub.com.

Visit saratogapolo.com.

Visit internationalpoloclub.com.

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MASHOMACK POLO Mashomack Polo Club Hosts its 19th Annual International Polo Challenge

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This page, clockwise from top left: Fanfare outside of the 2015 Mashomack International Polo Challenge, which took place on June 27; a member of Team Quest attacks the ball; three teams—including Team Quest, in yellow—pose for a photo after the match; two guests get some sun before the game; going for the goal.

Children who attend will be treated to their own activities, including access to the petting zoo and a kid-friendly buffet. In June, the club hosts the four-goal White Pants Challenge (June 10–12) and the eight-goal USPA Officers Cup (June 17 through July 13); in July, the eight-goal USPA Eduardo Moore Invitational (July 8–31); and, in August, the USPA Constitution Cup (August 12–21) and the eight-goal Fall Classic (September 16–25). Besides the exciting matches, private polo lessons are offered independently to both adults and children. Group clinics are also arranged from May through August. u For more information, visit mashomackpoloclub.com.

Co u r te sy o f th e M as h o ma c k Po lo C lu b

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Located on a 1,900-acre preserve in Pine Plains, New York, just 90 minutes from New York City, the Mashomack Polo Club is a full-service club for polo players of all levels that features five tournament-class fields, one practice field, stickand-ball areas, and an outdoor polo arena. On Saturday, June 18, the Mashomack Polo Club will host the 19th Annual Mashomack International Polo Challenge and Luncheon. The event begins at noon with a champagne reception, followed by a tented field-side luncheon and the exciting International Polo Challenge match. Teams representing the United States, Great Britain, India, Brazil, France, and Italy have battled valiantly in the past to secure the coveted trophy for their team and country. This year, Team Germany will be on hand for their first appearance at the Challenge. This prestigious event attracts over a thousand patrons and spectators and marks the official start of the summer social season in Millbrook. A wonderful day of sport brings guests from New York City, Westchester, and Fairfield County to spend the day in the countryside and experience the sport.


PRESENTED BY PRESENTED BY


N YC P O L O C L U B AT H AV I L A N D H O L L OW FA R M Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 016

NYC POLO CLUB AT

HAVILAND HOLLOW FARM NYC Polo Club at Haviland Hollow Farm Enters its Eighth Season of Sport

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This page: A selection of sporting scenes from NYC Polo Club at Haviland Hollow Farm, one of the few year-round polo clubs in the country.

polo program was introduced five years ago and is available for young players who want to pursue the sport at the college level. “Many of our members have gone on to play matches outside of the club and received MVP and compliments on the quality of their play. Once our members learn the basics, we encourage them to improve,” says owner and two-goal rated player Sam Ramirez, Jr. “Our training team has a 5 month program for even the most novice of players that gives them the foundation needed to enter the sport safely.” The club has successfully introduced people of all ages to this challenging and exciting sport in a unique way, having produced many players that started with little to no experience. The social aspects of NYC Polo offer horse enthusiasts an opportunity to come and watch scheduled games and tournaments as well as attend charity matches in September. Guest can also come see the USPA Players Cup starting on July 25 and the USPA Masters Cup on August 15. The fields are well designed for an afternoon of relaxing on the hill while picnicking and viewing a match. On June 4, the club will host its Opening Day BBQ, which will feature an evening of delicious food and live music. u For more information, visit nycpolo.com.

Co u r te sy o f NYC Po lo C lu b at H av i la n d H o ll ow Far m

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NYC Polo Club at Haviland Hollow Farm (www.nycpolo. com) is headed into its 2016 season with another year of solid growth. On the heels of rave reviews from the polo community over the past seven years, NYC Polo continually develops a strong following of polo players, new players entering the sport through the clubs large lesson program, and fans from around the world. The farm, conveniently located one hour from midtown Manhattan and 30 minutes from Greenwich, has become known for the incredible quality of its facilities, its great polo training program for beginner and intermediate players, fast and competitive polo tournaments, and its unique position as one of the few year-round polo clubs in the country. NYC Polo Club boasts a program with two top-notch polo fields and two polo arenas. The summer polo season runs from May until September 24 and has 4 to 14-goal polo for its members, with the majority of play at the 6 goal level. The winter season runs from November until March and play is a similar level. The facilities include a 325x125–foot outdoor arena, a 200x100– foot indoor arena, riding trails, and a nice turnout on 250 acres. In addition, the farm has two half-mile sand exercise tracks. Members have the ability to play competitive polo year round. The club’s training and lessons program is one of the most active in the country introducing beginners to the sport through a comprehensive program that focuses on riding, skills, rules and strategy. In addition, the training team helps intermediate players improve speed, technique, and strategy. A high-school


Challenge Both Your Body & Mind

With the Most Exhilarating Sport in the World

Play The Sport of Kings Just One Hour North of Kings County! NYC Polo Club @ Haviland Hollow Farm, entering its eight season, is the only year round polo facility in the Northeast and a great place to play, socialize and be introduced to this exciting and challenging sport. The 2016/2017 Polo season offers members 4 to 14 goal levels of play, tournaments and lesson/training programs throughout the summer. The season has already begun and runs until the end of September. For more information contact us at info@nycpolo.com

at Haviland Hollow Farm www.nycpolo.com Connect With Us at facebook.com/nycpolo Did You Know? The first polo match played in the U.S. was played at Dickel’s Riding Academy on 39th and 5th avenue in the late 1800’s. A tradition that continues…


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CASA DE CAMPO POLO After a Successful Season, Get Ready for More Polo at Casa de Campo this Summer

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This page: Scenes from the regular 2016 Casa de Campo polo season. Players interested in being part of the Summer Season of the Polo Challenge 2016 should contact Casa de Campo’s Polo Director, Fernando Arata, at f.arata@ccampo.com.do.

The first of these tournaments will take place from June 10– 24, and will be played in the 8–10 goals category. After that, there will be two 10–12 goals tournaments, and the season closing, which will feature a 6-goal Amateur Championship. The Polo Challenge committee shared a few words following this exciting announcement: “We feel very satisfied and privileged for the success and both national and international repercussion that the high goal season has had. We have set the goal of achieving excellence in the projects that benefit and position the Dominican Republic as the perfect sporting vacation destination in the Caribbean.” u For more information, visit casadecampo.com.do.

M atí a s Ca lle j o

l

Are you ready to experience the thrill and the majesty of polo at Casa de Campo? The resort’s polo facilities—which include three well-groomed playing fields and one practice field—are among the best in the Caribbean, with the largest string of polo ponies under a single brand in the world. Beginners and experts alike can take advantage of equipment, group instruction, and personalized training. Guests can also hire ponies for stick and ball tournaments, a fantastic and entertaining activity for families. Regular polo matches are played from early November to the end of April for those simply content to cheer from the sidelines. After a successful high-goal polo season in which guests were able to witness sportsmanship at its best, Polo Challenge of the Dominican Republic recently announced its summer season, which will be celebrated between the months of June and July and take place at Casa de Campo. The 2016 season will feature medium- and low-goal tournaments that will give players the opportunity to play in the warm and enchanting island.


SNAPSHOT

Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman died at home on May 10. Her daughter Sage Lehman was with her. Wendy was the eldest child of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, Jr., and his first wife, Palm Beach socialite Molly Hudson. She had once been married to the late Orin Lehman, with whom she had two daughters, Brooke and Sage. She was the great-granddaughter of Alice Gwynne and Cornelius

From left to right: Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman arriving on a red carpet with Kenneth Jay Lane; photographed by Slim Aarons in Palm Beach; as a child; and modeling Lilly Pulitzer.

Vanderbilt II and grand-niece of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Like her great-aunt, Wendy was an artist, painter, and sculptor, committed and hard-working. Wendy was a familiar figure all of her life around New York, Southampton and Palm Beach. She had a quiet elegance about her, accompanied by a wide smile and bright, sparkling eyes. She was a very friendly lady who, whatever the hardships she endured, could always find a laugh or a chuckle and warm words for friends. Among her friends she was famous for daily distributing bawdy jokes people had sent her over the Internet. You knew when you got them that Wendy— this very proper yet modern lady—had already found them hilarious. After her divorce from Orin Lehman, she bucked up and moved on, concentrating on her art, her daughters—who were grown—and her friends and new friendships. For years she had a studio on the corner of 82nd and Third, and when she found a new apartment at 66th Street and Lexington Avenue, she turned it into a studio-residence.

In spite of how she modestly characterized herself, she was a remarkably courageous person. She never lost her sense of humor or her interest in what was going on with those she loved, or the world at large. The following is an excerpt from the obit published in the Times, written by someone who knew her long and well: “Although she enjoyed the social circuit, Wendy chose to devote her time to her children and her art. In addition to her work as an artist, she was a founding member of STOP: Stop Traffic Offenses Program, having witnessed a red light runner nearly kill a friend’s child. A natural born tinkerer, in the 70s Wendy made her friends light dinners out of margarine containers for Christmas. She spent countless hours working on benefits for institutions like the New York Studio School. She was also a spirited member of both The Century Association and the Junior Fortnightly.” The Editor and Publisher of Quest will dearly miss her salty wit, authentic style and immense charm. —DPC

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; S L I M A A RO N S

REMEMBERING WENDY VANDERBILT LEHMAN


s tatement made of light and air. 24 full and half floor residences from one to three bedrooms,

A neighborhood s teeped in his tor y welcomes a contemporar y architec tural

ranging from $1 to $8 million. Sales by appointment begin Summer 2014.

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The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. CD13-0284. All rights to content, photographs, and graphics reserved to ABN Realty, LLC. 3D illustrations courtesy of McAuley Digital. Artist renderings and interior decoration, finishes, appliances, and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only. Artist renderings reflect the planned scale and spirit of the building. Sponsor reserves the right to make substitutions of materials, equipment, fixtures, and finishes in accordance with the terms of the offering plan. Equal Housing Opportunity.

21 FLO ORS FACING THE FUTURE

E XC LU S I V E M A R K E T I N G & S A L E S


Great Jewels Have a S to r y Van Cleef & Arpels Colombian Emerald and Diamond Pendant Necklace, from the Betteridge Estate Collection

Quest June 2016  

The Greenwich Issue

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