__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

$5.00 MAY 2021 Caroline Kennedy

York and mes

35 3

Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Arsht

Tara Milne and Tivia Kramer

Susan Fales-Hill

7

Peter Lyden, Fe Fendi, Cindy Sites, and John Banta

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

and Karl Wellner

Anne Grauso

7/29/20 7:01 PM

9

10

12

questmag.com

15

16

11


INTRODUCING

THE

STIRRUP

EYEWEAR

COLLECTION


33 sunset avenue westhampton beach (631) 288-4800

14 main street 2287 montauk highway 26 montauk highway 764 - 4 montauk highway southampton village bridgehampton east hampton montauk (631) 283-5050

(631) 537-5454

(631) 324-7575

(631) 668-2211

“Saunders, A Higher Form of Realty,” is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Please refer to our website for the names under which our agents are licensed with the Department of State. Equal Housing Opportunity.


160and164TrelawneyRoad.com

secluded bridgehampton south waterfront estate Why rent when you can own two contiguous properties featuring a gated 2.6-acre parcel with a 13,000+/- sq. ft. estate, dock, pool and waterfall, finished lower level with temperature-controlled wine cellar and gym. The adjacent vacant parcel features 2 acres with water frontage on Kellis Pond.

164 Trelawney Road - $12.5M | 160 & 164 Trelawney Road - $20M

Terry Cohen

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson C: (631)

804-6100 | TCohen@Saunders.com


T H E F I N D L AY I N S T I T U T E

Stephanie Borynack Clark

Founder & President of The Findlay Institute

A catalogue raisonné is an affirmative collection of an artist’s complete oeuvre, or complete body of work. The Findlay Institute is seeking submissions for the catalogue raisonné currently underway for the following artists: Tadashi Asoma (1923 - 2017) • Beltrán Bofill (1934 - 2009) Constantin Kluge (1912 - 2003) • Le Pho (1907 - 2001) Henri Maïk (1922 - 1993) • André Hambourg (1909 - 1999) Gaston Sébire (1920 - 2001) • Nicola Simbari (1927 - 2012) Vu Cao Dam (1908 - 2000) Contact The Findlay Institute to submit your artwork for inclusion in the forthcoming catalogues. We are proud to be protecting the artists’ true body of work and each one’s continuing legacy.

stephanie@findlayinstitute.com

W W W . F I N D L AY I N S T I T U T E . O R G P . O . B O X 175 L O C U S T VA L L E Y , N E W Y O R K 11560 Copyright © 2021, Findlay Institute, All rights reserved.


O N

V I E W

E X H I B I T I O N S

A L S O

N E W

Y O R K

A V A I L A B L E

O N L I N E

James Brooks (1906 - 1992) | Garee | 1969 | acrylic on canvas | 32 x 38 in.

LY R I C A L A B S T R A C T I O N

JAMES BROOKS

A GROUP EXHIBITION

F I N D L AY GA L L E R I E S

32 E A S T 57 T H S T R E E T , 2 N D F L O O R , N E W Y O R K , N E W Y O R K 10022 · (212) 421 5390 165 W O RT H AV E N U E , PA L M B E A C H , F L O R I D A 33480 · (561) 655 2090 VIEW OUR GALLERY ONLINE | WWW. FINDLAYGALLERIES. COM Copyright © 2021, Findlay Galleries, All rights reserved.


IN TODAY’S MARKET, HOME V CONDON SINCE 1982 LET THE PALM BEACH EXPER THE VALUE OF YOUR HOME TO

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


VALUES ARE SOARING RTS HELP YOU UNDERSTAND ODAY

Kevin Condon Broker Associate

Cristina Condon

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor

kevin.condon@sothebyshomes.com

cristina.condon@sothebyshomes.com

646.457.8919

561.301.2211 | cristinacondon.com


C H E E R S TO 3 5 QUE S T. YOU ’ R E A TRU E CL A S S IC .

JMCL AUG HLIN .COM


BUNNY WILLIAMS INTERIOR DESIGN MASTERPIECE 1158Fifth.com

Photography by Travis Mark. © 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty (SIR) . All Rights Reserved. The SIR trademark is licensed and used with permission. Operated by SIR, Inc. The SIR network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Real estate agents affiliated with SIR are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of SIR.


Nikki Field

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor Associate Broker | 212.606.7669

Visit The New: NikkiField.com


BOSTON OSTERVILLE NANTUCKET MARTHA'S VINEYARD NEWPORT WATCH HILL EAST HAMPTON SAG HARBOR SOUTH HAMPTON ROWAYTON GREENWICH OYSTER BAY NEW YORK CITY CHICAGO HARBOR SPRINGS

WASHINGTON DC ANNAPOLIS CHARLESTON VERO BEACH JUPITER PALM BEACH BOCA RATON FT. LAUDERDALE MIAMI KEY LARGO ISLAMORADA NAPLES BOCA GRANDE SARASOTA

The Sea is Our Clubhouse


Experience a lifetime of memories with a membership aboard the B&G Fleet. With over 50 Hinckley Yachts from Nantucket to Palm Beach, all captained, all provisioned and all at your beck and call, yachting has never been better. bartonandgray.com | (617) 728-3555


235 WEST 75TH ST. 623 NEW YORK, NY 10023 $6,195,000 | 4 Beds 4.5 Baths | Condominium

An exceptional seamless blend of prewar splendor and contemporary elegance, this spacious 4-bedroom, 4.5-bathroom home designed by Pembrook & Ives Architects is one of a kind. Residence 623 is a unique home modified to create generous rooms and ample storage with tasteful millwork built-ins. FRANCE COURCHESNE Senior Global Sales Executive, Associate Broker 917.613.3947 | 646.677.1045 | FranceCourchesne@bhhsnyp.com

25 EAST 86TH ST. 3C NEW YORK, NY 10028 PRICE UPON REQUEST | 2 Beds 2.5 Baths | Cooperative No expense spared in this meticulously renovated residence located only steps from Fifth Avenue, Central Park, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This spectacular home with Eastern and Western exposures has exceptional attention to detail and is well known for its low maintenance. CRAIG M. DIX Senior Global Sales Executive, Associate Broker 917.567.0805 | 646.677.1038 | CraigDix@bhhsnyp.com

170 EAST 87TH ST. PH-1B NEW YORK, NY 10028 $3,150,000 | 3 Beds 2.5 Baths | Condominium

This fabulous Penthouse Duplex apartment on the 23rd & 24th floors with sun splashed Eastern and Southern open city views, plus the added bonus of a wrap terrace of approx. 447 square feet which completes this wonderful Apartment in the full-service premier Gotham Condominium in the heart of the Upper East Side. MARIE YELJENIC Licensed Real Estate Sales Person 917.854.8440 | MarieYeljenic@bhhsnyp.com

590 Madison Avenue, New York, New York @bhhsnewyork

BHHSNYPROPERTIES.COM


List With Me. Buy With Me.

Keith of Palm Beach

Keith has lived real estate his entire life while growing up in Michigan. His mother owned a brokerage and his father owned a construction company. At an early age Keith relocated to Los Angeles and parlayed his experience in the family business into a partnership with an investor. In his early 20’s he was renovating multi-million dollar homes which were being sold to celebrities and other people of tremendous wealth. Keith began his Florida Real Estate career as an investor in 2005. He has owned, renovated and sold homes in multiple states and Countries.

Keith Vanderlaan Global Real Estate Advisor

keith.vanderlaan@sothebyshomes.com 561.972.0115 | keithofpalmbeach.com

Featured New Listings N EW L ISTING

1 S PALMWAY 303 2-Bedroom, 2-Bath New Construction Corner Unit $699,000 | 1southpalmway303.com

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

N EW L I ST ING

OASIS AT ROSEMARY SQUARE 3-Bedroom, 3-Bath, 2-Car garage 1,890 sq.ft. $599,000

NEW LIST ING

BRAZILIAN COURT, 227 1-Bedroom, 1-Bathroom $499,000


Please Visit 2774southoceanblvd.com more information

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 603 - JUST RENOVATED. Direct Ocean views from every room, large kitchen. $2,900,000 | 2774southoceanblvd-603.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 505 Cabana, covered parking space $1,300,000 | 2774southoceanblvd505.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 410 Oversized kitchen $775,000 2774southoceanblvd410.com

keithofpalmbeach.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 803 Direct ocean views, Open Floor-plan $1,650000 | 2774southoceanblvd803.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 808 Turnkey includes all art and furnishings $1,200,000 | 2774southoceanblvd808.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 608 Furnished, Covered parking. In unit washer and dryer. $769,000 | 2774southoceanblvd608.com

2774 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD 506 Oversized kitchen, One bedroom $500,000 2774southoceanblvd506.com


150

114

CONTENTS The 35 Th A nniversAry i ssue 114

QUEST'S 35TH On

146

JEWELRY JOURNAL A

150

THE NEXT ROARING TWENTIES The 2020s may not be as wild or decadent as the 1920s—but as the urge to indulge grows, our columnists speculate on how

its 35th anniversary, Quest looks back at the people, events, and institutions that have best represented it, as told by writers who knew them.

brief history and guide to discovering the best jewelry brands—and a peak at their latest and greatest baubles. by Alex TrAvers

the worlds of night life, film, and fashion may change over the next decade.

146


104

98

CONTENTS C olumns

106

30

SOCIAL DIARY The story of how it all began, from the one who started it all, with notes on how social life in New York has changed over the years. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia

96

RESEARCH

98

BENSON

100

TAKI

102

EDUCATION

104

EVENTS

106

FRESH FINDS The latest things for spring, from stylish looks for him to earrings that pop and the latest must-have fashions for her. by alex travers anD elizabeth meigher

112

SOCIAL CALENDAR

162

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

168

SNAPSHOT

Hope for Depression Research Foundation shares its latest discoveries on the brain.

Our photographer remembers some of his favorite moments in time.

Musing on the woes of the technologically disadvantaged.

by

taki t heoDoraCoPulos

The Oxbridge Academy advantage is waiting for you in West Palm Beach.

The Garden Club of Palm Beach hosted its wonderful Flower Show in style this year.

Our monthly guide to virtual and in-person galas and goings-on about town.

A look back at the beginning and evolution of this column and its writers—Andrew Black, Jack Bryan, Elizabeth Quinn Brown, Alex Travers, and Brooke Kelly— and their nighttime chronicles of all the best parties, from the early 2000s to today. Remembering the adventurous life of Prince Philip.

by

Chris meigher


LIVE PASSIONATELY. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2021. BACARDÍ, ITS TRADE DRESS, AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE TRADEMARKS OF BACARDÍ & COMPANY LIMITED. RUM – 40% ALC./VOL.


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA DEPUT Y EDITOR

ELIZABETH MEIGHER MANAGING EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS ART DIRECTOR/ PRODUCTION MANAGER

TYKISCHA JACOBS SENIOR EDITOR

BROOKE KELLY CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY INTERN

JARED BRILL CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN TONY HALL ALEX HITZ ROBERT JANJIGIAN JAMES MACGUIRE HAVEN PELL CHUCK PFEIFER DAISY PRINCE LIZ SMITH (R.I.P.) TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA

bfa.com

CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN NICK MELE ANNIE WATT


questmag.com PUBLISHER AND C.E.O.

S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN ACCOUNTING MANAGER

LUWAY LU

Gated c1750 Antique Estate. 3 Bedroom Main House. Guest Cottage. Apartment. Pool. Tennis. Riding Rings. Stable. Pond. 175± Acres. $3.200.000. Graham Klemm. Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Baronial House on Lake Lillinonah Waterfront. 5 Bedrooms. 4 Fireplaces. Pool. Dock. Views. 3-car Attached Garage. 5.02± Acres. $2.900.000. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

c1850 Renovated Farmhouse. 4-5 Bedrooms. Pool. Flagstone Terrace with Outdoor Fireplace. Party Barn. Wine Cellar. Forever Views. 4.7± Acres. $2.495.000. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Fabulous 1740 Historic Antique. 3 Bedrooms. Pool. Guesthouse. Pond. Waterfall. Bordering Shepaug River & Land Trust. Privacy. 6.4± Acres. $1.995.000. Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

MARKETING SERVICES

ROXANNE UNRATH

ext .

106

PA L M B E AC H & M I A M I

LINDA LANE SOPER 612.308.4159 CHICAGO

TIMOTHY DERR 847.615.1921 HONG KONG

BINA GUPTA 852.2868.1555 MILAN

#1 Boutique Firm in Connecticut 2020

EMILIO ZERBONI 011.39.031.267.797

KLEMM REAL ESTATE

A R T S & C U LT U R E

LISA ROSENBERG 917.576.8951 DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL S ALE S

JODY REISS

LITCHFIELD COUNTY’S PREMIER BROKERS

Lakeville/Salisbury 860.435.6789 > Litchfield 860.567.5060 > Roxbury 860.354.3263 Sharon 860.364.5993 > Washington Depot 860.868.7313 > Woodbury 203.263.4040

klemmrealestate.com

Source: SmartMLS, CC & DC MLS, MHMLS and Klemm Private Sales 1/1/93 – 4/6/21 BOARD OF ADVISORS

CRISTINA CONDON JED H. GARFIELD KIRK HENCKELS KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2021. All rights reserved. Vol. 35, No.5. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor,

ER

YE

OP

Call 646.840.3404, ext. 106

1st

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

AR

New York, NY 10017.

For article reprints, contact Wright’s Media: 877.652.5295

Inc

HE ATO R OF T


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Clockwise, from left: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in their Land Rover in Fiji, 1977; one of Quest’s earliest issues; Bark of the Town Minnie the dachshund in E.B. White’s office; Judge Lisa Small (right) swears in Danielle Moore as mayor of Palm Beach while Moore’s mother— former Palm Beach mayor Lesly Smith—and daughters, Lesly Moore and Ali Moore, watch at Memorial Fountain; Quest’s founder, Heather Cohane.

you sit ... you feel the vibrations of great times and tall deeds.” Even Sinatra crooned: “New York, New York—a city so big they had to name it twice.” New York Strong is no longer just a slogan; it’s a fact. Inside these pages we celebrate a legacy of Palm Beach Mayors ... we bid farewell to the muted elegance of the late Prince Philip, and ... we doff our cap to Quest’s plucky founder, Heather Cohane, who possessed the original vision and moxie to begat this magazine. Again, I’ve been asked by Quest’s talented team to send you, dear readers and online viewers, our deep appreciation for your encouraging emails, inspiring texts, and generous messages. Your support during these past 13 months has been unwavering, and your collective courage has inspired our mission. Sometime this Fall we will celebrate our 35th—together!—when we will ask each of you to raise a glass and join us, finally ... IN PERSON. u

Chris Meigher D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

A M E R I C A N B A L L E T T H E AT R E C E L E B R AT E S I TS 6 7 T H A N N UA L S P R I N G G A L A

ON THE COVER:

Aileen Mehle and Pepe Fanjul

Marjorie Gubelmann and Lance Armstrong

Anka Palitz and Emilia Fanjul

Caroline Kennedy

David Koch with Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner

Sara Ayres, Todd Meister, and Elizabeth Lindemann

Sherrell Aston, Muffie Potter Aston, Robert De Niro, and Grace Hightower De Niro

7

7/29/20 7:01 PM

9

10

11

12

15 QT0521_Cover.indd 1

28 QUEST

35 Susan Fales-Hill

Peter Lyden, Fe Fendi, Cindy Sites, and John Banta

38 QUEST

QT0707_SD.indd 38

A collection by some of our favorite photographers: Harry Benson, Patrick McMullan, Billy Farrell Agency (BFA), Rex Features, Getty Images, Capehart Photography, Alamy, Slim Aarons, Julie Skarratt, Ron Galella, Christina Macaya, and Marry Hilliard.

3

Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Arsht

Tara Milne and Tivia Kramer

Sarah, Duchess of York and Marcelo Gomes

Anne Grauso

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

Blaine Trump with Maxim Beloserkovsky and Irina Dvorovenko

16 4/29/21 9:01 AM

S E R G E LE M O I N E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; M E G H A N M CC A RT H Y / PA L M B E AC H DA I LY N E W S

HOO-RAY, HOO-RAY, it’s the First of May ... will “normalcy” begin today? This eternally optimistic pub sure hopes so, though my pragmatic side says our re-entry will be more g r a d u a l and somewhat protracted. Encouragingly, there is no doubt whatsoever that Manhattan is opening up, and with residential fanfare at that. While the midtown blocks still seem sluggish, the rediscovered Upper East Side is again abuzz with young families and schoolbound children. Both Chelsea and TriBeCa feel equally re-energized, while on East 72nd Street I saw a few Brearley and Dalton parents actually smiling ... With our May issue, Quest begins its 35th year—quite an achievement these days for any independent journal. Over these past nine Covid-dominated months, our stalwart staff has spent many long but highly amusing evenings picking through 35 years of richly bound back issues. At various moments this experience has been revealing ... touching ... sobering ... and truly hilarious. A stroll down Memory Lane awaits you in the pages ahead, and we hope you’ll be as amused and entertained. Our anniversary centerpiece is a deep dive into the personalities and institutions that have defined Quest over these past 35 years— as told by the scribes and reporters who know them well. It’s an authentic fabric that has bound this tribe together for the past three-plus decades, shaping the social history not just of our great Gotham, but indeed those younger, like-minded communities now challenging New York up and down the Eastern Seaboard. Quest salutes the growth of Charleston, Nashville, Dallas, Palm Beach et.al. and we embrace their dedicated readership and support. Indeed, their future is our lifeline. But it’s New York to which we will, and have, returned. The American bard of pristine letters, E.B. White, so simply understated it: “New York is the concentrate of art and commerce ... sport and religion ... entertainment and finance. It carries on its lapel the odor of the long past, so that no matter where


© 2021 Estée Lauder Inc.

© Skrebneski Photograph

Founded by

A Woman. For Women. esteelauder.com @esteelauder esteelauder.com @esteelauder


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY

I WROTE MY FIRST Social Diary in Quest at the end of 1993. I’d come out to New York to write a book for Bobby Short in late ’92. One night my friend Beth DeWoody invited me to join her at a cocktail party at Chanel on 57th Street. I’d been away from the Big Town so long, I didn’t know people had cocktail parties in high end clothing shops. But Beth was kindly

thinking of this old friend, and so I went. I have no memory of the evening except for the moment that made it so important and particularly memorable. At the party I was introduced to a small, blonde British woman with a smiling face named Heather Cohane. Heather had launched her own magazine here in New York a few years before. It was (and is) called

Quest. Her husband, the writer Jack Cohane, had died a few years earlier and she had children in school and needed to earn money. Her solution to such a task was to start a magazine, designed to advertise the residential real estate industry in New York. She was inspired by a similar magazine in London called Cavalcade. Heather told me she’d read a couple of pieces

I’d written for (the old) Connoisseur magazine. And we chatted briefly about people we had in common. One was Gloria Etting, a Philadelphian who led a very active social life wherever she went. Gloria lived her life as an adventure. She was not rich or even wealthy although she knew them all. Her friendship was her ace. I’d first met her in Los Angeles where she

T H E C O N S E R VATO R Y G A R D E N L U N C H EO N I N C E N T R A L PA R K Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 8 8

Amber Walker, Jan Cowles, and Lil Groueff

Mark Hampton 30 QUEST

Barbara Uzielli

Nina Griscom

Thorunn, Soffia and Berge Wathne

Mr and Mrs Deane Johnson and Viginia Soloman

Jamie Niven


G I VE YOU R SPA C E T HE FRE E DO M I T N E E DS Luxury for Life. VA R A N A B R E E Z E R U G 8 4 4 . 4 0 . STA R K | S TA R KC A R P E T. C O M


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D I N N E R AT C A F É B O U L U D B E N E F I T I N G W O R L D C E N T R A L K I T C H E N I N PA L M B E AC H

Katherine Boulud and Joanna McDuffee

was visiting Billy McCartyCooper who was a neighbor of mine. On hearing that, she asked if I would write a piece on Gloria for the magazine. And I did. That was 28 years ago. With the exception of the last three years of the ’90s, I am the only contributor from the original staff. It was after the first four or five articles that one day Heather asked if I’d like to do a monthly social column. I was surprised because it was something this kid— while playing on my portable Smith-Corona typewriter that Santa delivered on my 32 QUEST

Daniel Boulud

Steve and Stephanie Miskew

12th Christmas—had always (day) dreamed of doing. It was never an objective of ambition. It was a kid’s free imagination, a permanent resident. And I’ve been playing in that sandbox ever since; thanks to Heather Cohane, a generous soul who made her life a great adventure. Back to basics and the Business. After almost a year of lockdown and social withdrawal, Spring

Janie and Allan Jones

Marcus Samuelsson

is definitely here now, with more and more people out even just for walks—families, small children, dog walking, exercising. The restaurants are open again with people taking long lunches and dinners with friends and family. Many mention the vaccine—having got or getting it. It represents relief to many if for no other reason that it implies we’ll be getting back to business; and New York will return to life.

Susan and Catherine Cowie

Freedom. However, many of us have been under lockdown and/ or isolated for a year. It may be over but there remains the so-called rules about our social habits. Distancing, masks, etc. have become habits. The fear remains with many. Not necessarily the facts, but definitely the “fear.” How this will affect our return to the freedoms we have taken for granted for many generations remains to be seen. What I am certain of is that most all of us millions and millions of people really want to live around each other,

L I L A P H OTO

Kit Moeller and Jim Goughary


What does VINCENT VAN GOGH, GEORGE JONES and LINDA HORN have in common?

Actually, the whole idea comes from Vincent... he called George Jones and told him all about the Majolica haystack cheese bells that he saw in his wheat fields... at the same time George was having coffee with Linda Horn... in that cafe on the left bank... you know the one... what a coincidence... and at the same time Linda was “ showing George her new book... he was amazed... INSPIRATION... My Love Affair With Majolica” OH... YOU MUST SEE

THIS BOOK!!!

LINDA HORN available at LindaHorn.com 212-772-1122


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A as is our natural habitat: independence. Changes. Elsa Peretti, the jewelry designer, died at the end of March in Florence, Italy. Elsa was briefly, in retrospect, a great New Yorker. She was one of those “very special persons,” a woman who possessed the blessings of Respect and Self-Respect. I did not know her, although I met her a couple of times. She had a naturally soigne manner, like her creations. I knew nothing about her personal life except that she had been a model and longtime friend of Halston in his heyday. And speaking of Halston, there was an occasion when she was so offended by something her friend had

done or said (or both) that while a guest in his house, she took off her chinchilla greatcoat that he had given her; and in front him, to show him how much that kind of generosity mattered to her, she threw it in the b u r n i n g fireplace. Snap, crackle and pop! I am not a connoisseur of jewelry design which I am mainly unfamiliar with, but because I had dinner with Elsa once at the apartment of Tom Scherrer, the interior designer, I had a strong sense of what she

was like to know. She had one of those big, dramatic Italian personalities—full of emotion, and irony, and wit, and curiosity. It was beautiful to behold. I’m exaggerating but it feels like that in memory, so great was the impression she made. A number of years ago, after she’d “retired” from the mainstream, I attended a big retrospective Tiffany hosted celebrating her 35th anniversary with the store. Looking through the displays of her pieces I could see her jew-

QUEST, NOVEMBER 1987

34 QUEST

elry was the refinement of that personality. After that initial dinner in 1996 I never had the privilege of seeing her again. She was already living mainly in Italy and then Spain where she had a fantastic tiny old villa that she purchased and restored. I saw a maquette of it somewhere. It reminded me of when I was a kid, where I would have liked to live. It was the sensibility of Elsa Peretti that was is the main attraction for me. Irresistible. So on that night of the Tiffany reception for her, I naturally went just to have the opportunity to see her again. And when I did see her, I didn’t recognize her. It was fifteen or twenty years


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

later and she was using a cane and had put on weight. This is not so surprising when you get to a certain age, and you look around and see youth ebbing all over the place. That night Elsa was enjoying the vibes, surrounded by wellwishers, fans, colleagues, photographers. I reintroduced myself. I reminded her about the dinner. She didn’t remember the evening; but then I wouldn’t have if it weren’t for her. Nevertheless, she was that naturally warm and gracious woman. Everyone was happy that she was back and in the room. And so it was, with Elsa. Back to the present 36 QUEST

and the subject of jewels and jewelry designers. Christopher Walling the jewelry designer with a shop at 58th Street and Park hosted a book signing for Prince Dimitri of Yu g o s l a v i a who has just published a memoir, “Once Upon a Diamond; A family tradition of royal jewels” My personal interest was accidental since jewelry is not a subject that has ever fascinated me. However, I started to read the introduction of

Dimitri’s memoir since it was in front of me, and that was just the beginning. It is a history of our Western culture that delivers insight to our civilization then and now. A knowledgeable, charming, good looking, real honest-toGod European prince, Dimitri is sophisticated to the point where he is comfortable with one and all. He has what our politicians “acquire” (or hope to) when they gain position. Dimitri’s are real. You

could also describe him in the very American nice-guy. He was a vice-president at Sotheby’s in that department. Several years ago he opened his own business with his own designs. Initially I thought this was a book just about Diamonds—highly attracting subject for those eternally interested. But he’s not only an expert, he’s a natural historian. Expecting a book of images, I was instantly caught up in the history of the characters as well as their treasures. It begins with Russia at the end of the 19th/beginning of the 20 century when the Tsars were about to lose power fatally. All of Europe and including

C A P E H A RT

T H E P R E S E R VAT I O N FO U N D AT I O N O F PA L M B E AC H ’ S A N N UA L G A L A AT T H E B R E A K E R S QUEST, APRIL 2005


ID PATRICK COLUM BV I AI D P A T R I C K C O L U M B I A DA Blaine Trump with Maxim Beloserkovsky and

H E A T R E CRussia E L E Bhad R A Tbeen E S monarchies I T S 6 7 T H A completely N N U A L S Penamored R I N G G A with LA

Anka Palitz and

earrings that belonged to were also grander Irina andDvorovenko Emilia Fanjul for centuries. By the late diamonds.” During her more imposing than other Marie Antoinette, Queen 19th/early 20th century, reign she spent vast fortunes monarchs could ever hope of France. A hundred years Marie Antoinette they were all related to on acquiring “presentation to possess.” So too was after each other by birth or by jewels” which were deeply her power. Revolutions are was guillotined, in the last marriage and their world political, as they gave the also the end result of too quarter of the 19th century, was changing dramatically. empress the incomparable many diamonds for too few they became part of the It is another view of our aura of majesty when she although that was not an collection of the Russian issue at the Grand Duchess Vladimir, a civilization of the past five e n t e r t a i n e d time. And, German princess who at age or six centuries right up to a chamber of d i a m o n d s , 20 married to the brother of today that was central to our c a n d l e l i g h t AV I D U M Bcould I A Tsar Nicholas II, the senior behavior as a society. Yet it D beaming on P A T R I C K C O Lyou uBd Ie Agrand duke of the House often escapes the historian’s the treasures DA V I D P A T R I C K C O cLoAileen Un cMlMehle David Koch with Deborah Norv and Pepe Fanjul from Prince of Romanov. The Grand summation. Dimitri’s story she Carolinewas Anka Palitz and Anne AME R I C Aand N B Aw L LeEKennedy R A T E S I T S 6 7 TDHi A R I N G Gacquired ALA Fanjul a huge mNi N t rUiA’ Ls S PDuchess it is Emilia about the royals aT r Ti Hn EgA.T R E C E L E B Grauso collection ofL A diamonds, their political Apower her M E R I Cthat A N B This A L L Eset T TH E A T R E C E L E B R A T E S I T S 6 history 7 T H A N Nand UAL S PRING GA sapphires and p e r s o n a l rubies, provided all the luxury and apart from background, emeralds. treasures that came with everyone else. The astounding diamond are forever. it; and how it all declined It ensured A m o n g earrings that had originally almost to obscurity today. It that everyone those featured belonged to Marie Antoinette also is a unique insight into a would be are two large in the 18th century outlasted history of Who We Are and awed by her pear-shaped diamonds more than one owner How We Get Here. power and her greatness. D A V I D PBecause A T R Catherine I C K ChadO L UMBIA V I1920s D when PATRICK theAlate weighing 14.25 and 20.34 until D Catherine the Great, for D A V funds, I D “her PAT R I Ccarats K Crespectively, O L U MsetB IinA the Communists who had example, “was reputedly endless jewels

D AV I D P A T R I CD K ACV O ID L UPM AB T IRAI C K C O L U M B I A D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

D AV I D PAT R I C K C

A M E R I C A N B A L L E T T H E A T R ERachel C E LMoore, E B RKaren A T EAkers, S Iand T SAdrienne 6 7 T HArsht A N N U A L ASM PR ING GALA David Koch with Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner E R I C A N B A L L E T T H E AT R E C E L E B R AT E

A M E R I C A N B A L L E T T H E A T R E C E L E B R A T E S I T S 6 7 TMarjorie H A NGubelmann N U A L Sand PRING GALA Sara Ayres, Todd Meister, with Maxim Beloserkovsky and Caroline I C A N B A L L E T Blaine T H ETrump A TARM E ECR EILCEAB NR A B TA EL S L EITand T ST H6E7 AT THR AE NCNEULAnka A E LBPalitz RSAPTR EISN GI TGS A6L 7AT H Lance A N NArmstrong U A L S P R I N G G A L A Anne and Elizabeth Lindemann Q U E SEmilia T , J Fanjul UNE 2007 Irina Dvorovenko Kennedy Grauso E IRNI C AGNA B E C E L E B R AT E S I T A M E RBlaine I C A Trump N B Awith L L Maxim E T T Beloserkovsky H E A T R E Cand E L E B R AT E S I T S 6 7 T H A N N U A L AS M PR GCaroline L A L L E T T H E AT R Anka Palitz and Anne Irina Dvorovenko

Emilia Fanjul

Kennedy

Grauso

Blaine Trump withand Maxim Beloserkovsky and David Koch with Anka Palitz and Caroline Anne Arsht Aileen Mehle Pepe Fanjul KarlCaroline Wellner Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Anne and ne Trump with Maxim Beloserkovsky and Anka Palitz and Deborah Sara Ayres, Todd Meister, Tara Milne and Susan Norville andBlaine Trump withMuffie MaximPotter Beloserkovsky Anka Palitz a IrinaMaxim Dvorovenko Emilia Fanjul Kennedy Grauso Maxim Beloserkovsky and Blaine Trump with AnkaBeloserkovsky Palitz and and Caroline Anka Palitz and Anne Caroline Anneand Sherrell Aston, Aston, Robert De Niro, Sarah, Duchess Fales-Hill and Elizabeth Lindemann Tivia Kramer Kennedy Grauso Irina Dvorovenko Emilia Fanjul MehleDvorovenko and PepeFanjul Fanjul David Koch Deborah Norville Blaine and Caroline Karl Wellner Rachel Moore, Anne Karen Akers, andGrauso Adrienne Arsht Irina Dvorovenko Emilia Fanju Trump with Maxim Beloserkovsky and Anka Palitz and vorovenko Emilia Irina Kennedy Emilia Fanjul Grauso Kennedy Blaine Trump with MaximAileen Beloserkovsky and Anka Palitz andwith Grace Hightower De Niro Marcelo Emilia Fanjul Kennedy Irina Dvorovenko Grauso Irina Dvorovenko Emilia Fanjul 38 QUEST

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

QT0707_SD.indd 38

Aileen Mehle and Pepe Fanjul David Koch with Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Arsht nd Pepe Fanjul David Mehle Koch with Norville and KarlDavid Wellner Rachel Moore,Norville Karen Akers, andWellner Adrienne Arsht Aileen and Deborah Pepe Fanjul Koch with Deborah and Karl Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Arsht Aileen Mehle and Pepe Fanjul Koch with Deborah Norville an Aileen and Mehle and PepeGubelmann Fanjul David Koch with Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner Moore, Karen Akers, andFanjul Adrienne ArshtDavid Marjorie and David SaraFeAyres, Todd Meister, Tara Milne and Susan Niro, andMehle Peter Lyden, Fendi, Cindy Sites, Sarah, Duchess of York and Aileen Pepe Fanjul Koch with Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner Rachel Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne ArshtDavid Aileen Mehle and Pepe Koch with Deborah No Lance Gomes Armstrong and Elizabeth Lindemann Tivia Kramer Fales-Hill John Banta Marcelo Marjorie Gubelmann and Sara Ayres, Todd Meister, Tara Milne and Susan Lance Armstrong and Elizabeth Lindemann Tivia Kramer Fales-Hill 38 QUEST


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A TOA ST I N G W H I T E A L B U M O F T H E H A M P TO N S I N PA L M B E AC H

Kim Charlton

deposed and murdered the Tsar and taken over Russia, were selling a lot of the royal jewels they’d confiscated (aka “stolen”) to raise cash. The diamond earrings were purchased in 1928 by Marjorie Meriweather Post, the Post cereals heiress who often wore them at fancy dress balls. Eventually they became a gift to one of her granddaughters, and were then donated to the Smithsonian where they remain as a record of another time and place and political power. 40 QUEST

Priscilla Whittle and Christopher von Hohenberg

Peggy Stephaich Guinness and Robin Baker Leacock

Dimitri’s book appearance drew a very big crowd over the three day reception. Among those who came by Christopher Walling’s shop to see their friend Prince Dimitri and to see what his book is up to were: Susan Gutfreund, Jill Spalding, Amanda Rubin, Istanbul’s “Queen:” (and Omer Koc’s mother) the incredible Cigdem Simavi,

Driss Ramdane, Kate Coe, Nathan Coe and Junny Luke

Sylvia Hemingway and Peter Soros

Alejandra Cicognani, Barbara Tober, Margo Langenberg. Pia Getty, Cecile David Weill, Charlotte Ford, Diana Feldman, Sean Gilson, Elbrun Kimmelman, Sharon Novak, Frank Lavervin, Amy Fine Collins, Judith Agisim, Jennifer Crandall, Liliana Cavendish, Judi Harvest, Susanne Klevrick, Richard and Geanne Zaroff,

Clementina and Yaz Hernandez

Rebecca Koven, Jeffrey Podolsky, Linnard R. Hobler, Dr. Edward Seidel. Put it all together on all the avenues, and you’ve got daily life in New York slowly coming back to life. Although the masks have turned a fascinating passing parade into anonymous creatures of all shapes and sizes (and fashion) going about their individual ways. This is a new experience for all of us whether we recognize it or not. It has never been thus before. And it is a separating albeit not

A N N I E WAT T

Alain Degrelle, Julie Hayek and Manuel Balbontin


The Koch Team is to real estate what sunshine is to island living... ready for you.

Ranked by sales volume by

Real Trends The Thousand, as published in The Wall Street Journal

1 # 4 # 32 $ 450M+ #

PA L M B E A C H

FLORIDA

#PALMBEACHPROVENLEADERS

N AT I O N W I D E

SOLD IN 2020

Transform your vacation destination into your own slice of paradise. Owning a home in Palm Beach has never been more valuable. Contact The Koch Team to navigate the market with the Island’s proven real estate leaders.

Follow us on Instagram,

@ KochTeam

New Custom Built Direc t Oceanfront Estate FEATURED LISTING (above): 7BR | 9.2BA | $78.5M | Web# 14012

Paulette Koch Broker A ssociate m 561.34 6.8639 | paulet te.koch@corcoran.com #14 Nationwide by Wall Street Journal / RealTrends 2019

Dana Koch Sales A ssociate m 561.379.7718 | dana.koch@corcoran.com #32 Nationwide by Wall Street Journal / RealTrends 2020 Equal Housing Opportunity. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or regarding financing is from sources deemed reliable, but Corcoran makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property information is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and withdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. All dimensions provided are approximate. To obtain exact dimensions, Corcoran advises you to hire a qualified architect or engineer.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A so’s ya’d notice. The topic at hand in the middle of last month was the passing of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. I knew very little of his background because he was never been a person of great interest to me. He was, generally, always just the husband of the Queen, and father of her children. The stories I’d heard over the years were gossip— about his extra-monarchal social life around London. It was a “picture” of a difficult person in that he could be bored or intolerant or arrogant around people, such as members of the palace staff. It was a picture of a man who’d married the Queen; and basically that was his “job.” Except, in the Prince’s case, it was just idle

gossip, and false. We all have our likes and dislikes about public people—people we actually don’t know or have never met. But we think we know them because their public personality is so prominent or we’ve seen them speak on T.V. Yet despit worldwide prominence, very often the public hasn’t a clue about what that person is really like if we actually knew him (or her). I did see him speak once here in New York. It was back in the mid-90s, and on behalf of the World Wildlife Fund which I believe he

was head of. He must have been in his mid-70s then. In person he was a man with very much a presence. I can’t remember where it was held, but it wasn’t a large group— maybe a hundred or so; and I see a wood paneled room in my mind’s eye. I had been invited by the PR people in charge of the event. Despite my lack of interest, I a c c e p t e d because it would give me something to write about, and therefore curiosity drove the thoughts. He stood on a low platform before us and behind a podium but

clearly very at ease. He was, of course a familiar face immediately. And his classic handsomeness was irrelevant. He was very comfortable in his own skin, as they say. It’s the kind of “comfort” that draws the audience in. However, after listening to his talk, the substance of which was about the caring for the wild life as well as the civilized – I was very impressed by his humanity. He spoke of the good and delivered it like a personal experience. He relayed a sense of the ultimate authority, a kind of caretaking that you naturally expect of leaders. What he possessed that I’d never read about was great personal charm. It was the real thing, a kind

QUEST, MARCH 1991

Art Dealer’s Show at the Armory for Sloan Kettering

K

een Drexel, Gin halil Rhisk, Nor

Linda de Roulet and Eben Pyne 42 QUEST

ny Burke and Ba

rbara Gimbel

Pat Patterson

Consuelo Crespi, Fifi Schiff and Lida Schiff

Harry and Nina Tourer

Blaine Trump


2345 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD. AT THE PAR 3 GOLF COURSE PALM BEACH 561.273.4130 • ALFRESCOPB.COM

Renato’ s PALM

BEACH

87 VIA MIZNER • WORTH AVENUE 5 61- 6 5 5 - 9 7 5 2 • RENATOSPB.COM

14 VIA MIZNER • WORTH AVENUE 561.832.0032 • PIZZAALFRESCO.COM

2 8 7 5 S O CE A N B LV D 5 61. 5 47. 0 0 0 5 • ACQ UAC A F E P B .CO M


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L A VO N AU E R S P E R G ’ S T R U N K S H O W I N PA L M B E AC H

Priscilla Rattazzi Whittle and Eleanora Kennedy

of polished niceness that makes the others feel good being in its presence. But what struck me and stayed with me was that he wore a natural modesty, almost like (but not nearly) one of the guys. The obituaries of the man reached into his childhood and youth which occurred amidst great changes in the world and in his family’s life. He was born a member of the royals who inhabited the thrones of Europe and Russia—his own 44 QUEST

Ducan Chapman, Barbara Chapman, John Dangarden and Ralph Isham

Julie Hayek

background was Danish and Greek—and were all related directly to the other royal families. It was no accident that he ended up with Princess Elizabeth who was going to become the Queen. They were a perfect ( “ c u t e ” ) couple to the public’s eye. Evidently they really liked

Kristy Strait

each other too, but they were all related. Conrad Black wrote the best piece about Prince Philip in The Sun. Titled; “Philip: What an Astonishing Life Was His.” Black begins recalling when as a young boy growing up in Canada about seventy years ago when his mother took

Ala Von Auersperg

Robert Janjigian

him and his brother to see the then Princess Elizabeth and “her almost new husband pass by on their way to look at E. P. Taylor’s racehorses at Windfields Farm, now the Toronto community of Don Mills.” As fate would have it for Conrad Black, many years later, then in the newspaper business in Canada, he met the Prince for business reasons. As matter of course in their common interests, he and Philip met him several

A N N I E WAT T

Nicole Linbocker and Kate Gubelmann


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A more times and became familiar acquaintances. His memories and example of “what it was like/what he was like” are kind yet incisive. He liked Philip. He was a GREAT husband to Her Majesty the Queen and served his role brilliantly and effectively, often with the wisdom granted to him by his past, the roots of Common Sense that his fate had taught him. It was a life well-lived, and good. Conrad Black’s article: h t t p s : / / w w w. n y s u n . c o m / foreign/philip-what-anastonishing-life-washis/91472/ Hollywood, Hollywood, fabulous follywood. My interest in that “town”

stems from childhood and continued into my adult life when lived out there from the late 1970s to the early ’90s. The impression it made on me then was unlike the boy’s imagination but nevertheless as fascinating. R e c e n t l y the Daily Mail—now the world’s g r e a t e s t tabloid – had an article on “The Hearst E s t a t e , ” about the Los Angeles property now being put on the market by its present owner D AV I D PAT R I for $90 million that was

originally the residence of the legendary American newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst who occupied the mansion with his longtime mistress, the silent screen star he c r e a t e d , M a r i o n Davies. Mr. Hearst died in the house in 1951. I drove by the property hundreds, m a y b e thousands of times although you couldn’t see the 40,000-squarefoot mansion with its CK COLUMBIA 8 bedrooms and 15

bathrooms from the road, but was well aware of its history because of its owner and his “companion” Miss Davies. By the late 1970s, its original resident had long passed away and few people knew about the property or its distinguished resident and his companion of more than three decades. There was a legal Mrs. Hearst, Millicent, who lived mainly in New York and was the mother of his children— with one exception—a daughter whom he had with Miss Davies named Patricia Lake. Although it was never known or publicly talked about Miss Lake in her lifetime,

Q U E SATP,RAI LP R1 9 I L9 41 9 9 4

Melissa Ryan, Alice Thomas and Andrew Roosevelt

Christine Hearst and Stephen Schwarzman 4(even 6 Q U Ewhen ST

they grew older) would visit Grandpa’s Camp

Howard Johnson, Mary Darling and John Pickett III

Adrienne Colgate and George Phipps

was born in the mid-1920s; I was born during the Second

was, potentially, respect—including for oneself. This is, of

Kelly Olsen and Charlie Ayres

More history to consider. Best-selling author Barbara


Discover New Dimensions in Palm Beach Living Three Full Floors of Amenities | Half- and Full-Floor Residences From 4,200 Square Feet | Starting at $6.7M

OVER 50% SOLD VISIONARY DESIGN | SWEEPING

VIEWS | ICONIC STYLE

SALES GALLERY OPEN DAILY 1217 SOUTH FLAGLER DRIVE | FORTEWPB.COM | 561-810-2268

Broker Participation is welcomed and encouraged. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE SELLER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES TO BE FURNISHED BY A SELLER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This project is being developed by Flagler Residential LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which was formed solely for such purpose. Two Roads Development LLC, a Florida limited liability company (“Two Roads”), is affiliated with this entity, but is not the developer of this project. This condominium is being developed by Flagler Residential LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of Two Roads pursuant to a license and marketing agreement with Two Roads. Any and all statements, disclosures, and/or representations shall be deemed made by Developer and not by Two Roads and you agree to look solely to Developer (and not to Two Roads and/or any of its affiliates) with respect to any and all matters relating to the marketing and/or development of the Condominium and with respect to the sales of units in the Condominium.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P R E S E R VAT I O N FO U N D AT I O N O F PA L M B E AC H ’ S B A L L I N G E R A W A R D P R E S E N TAT I O N

Mimi and Leroy McMakin

she was very close to her mother and her maternal aunts who brought her up. I heard about Marion Davies out there for the first time through a screenwriter and film producer, an Englishman named Ivan Moffat—who coincidentally was the father of an English writer Ivana Lowell who grew up not knowing of him, or that he was her father. One night back in the late ’70s I happened to meet Ivan at home of Lady Sarah Churchill in Beverly Hills. A man a generation older than I, we got into chatting about his career in Hollywood, which led 48 QUEST

Amanda Skier, Julie and Brian Simmons and Betsy Shiverick

Jorge Sanchez and Brian Vertesch

to Marion Davies, whom I also knew very little about. In 1951, the same year that Hearst died, Ivan had been a producer on a controversial picture called A Place in the Sun starring Elizabeth T a y l o r , Montgomery Clift and S h e l l e y Winters. The film was based on a novel and later a play by Theodore Dreiser called “An American Tragedy” which was inspired by a true story, a

Tyler Cain and Kit Pannill

real-life murder in 1906 of a young pregnant woman named Grace Brown by a man named Chester G i l l e t t e . Brown had b e c o m e pregnant by Gillette who was convicted of her murder and sent to the electric chair two years later. Around the time the film was finished, Ivan happened to meet Marion Davies at a cocktail party. In the course of their conversation he told her

Kate and Bill Benjamin

Susan and Joe Meyer

about the new film and its background. I don’t know if she were aware of the play or novel although it occurred when she was a famous silent film star and well known as Hearst’s mistress. In relating the story, Ivan told her that they were worried about getting a release date for the film because of the subject (unwed mothers). Marion was curious to know more and told Ivan that if he could get a print, they could run it in the screening room of the Hearst mansion. He got the print and on the appointed day and hour, he took it up to the house

C A P E H A RT

Pauline Pitt and Ted Cooney


91 East Bay Street | Rainbow Row | South of Broad | Charleston, SC | 3 Beds | 3 Full & 1 Half Baths 4,160 Sq.Ft | circa 1787 | The Inglis Arch House | Completely rebuilt in 2004 | rooftop terrace with views spanning the Charleston Harbor | $3,599,000 | Listed By: Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

The Jasmine is in the Air...

5 Middle Atlantic Wharf, Unit 3B Perfectly placed, sophisticated condo located on the waterfront of the Cooper River across Waterfront Park | $3,399,000 Factors Walk | Charleston, SC Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

128 Bull Street

Circa 1814 | The Joseph Bennett House | Grand Double Home with income producing separately metered 2 bedroom, 1 bath suite | $2,299,999 Harleston Village | Charleston, SC Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

Deborah C. Fisher , Broker in Charge

Downtown | 843.727.6460

handsomeproperties.com

Charleston

38 South Battery

Circa 1895 | enjoys water views of the Ashley River and White Point Garden at the tip of the Charleston Peninsula |$2,195,000 South of Broad | Charleston, SC Deborah C. Fisher | 843.810.4110

285 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29401

handsomepropertiesinternational.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A on Beverly Drive where the elder Mr. Hearst was then bedridden and ultimately on his last days. Ivan and Miss Davies watched the film alone. She was shaken by story and its message. Weeping profusely at the end, she congratulated Ivan on the greatness of the film. He in response told her again how they were unsure that it would ever be released because in the 1950s, unwed motherhood was never discussed publicly and women were looked down upon for getting pregnant under the circumstances. Hearing of this, Maid Marion as she was known to friends, told Ivan that she could help. Leaving the screening room of the great house she led him

outside and down the long driveway to the gatehouse. The gatehouse, as Ivan described it was an office, full of teletype machines and telephones which could connect Mr. Hearst to any and all of his newspapers across America. Once inside, Marion picked up a phone where she was automatically connected to the editor of the New York JournalAmerican or the Daily News—Ivan was never certain of which of the two Hearst newspapers she’d reached. With the editor at the other end of the line, Mar-

ion explained that she “and Mr. Hearst had just seen the most magnificent film” called A Place in the Sun and that Mr. Hearst had directed her to call to tell the editor that he wanted the film to be publicized everyday for the next two weeks in every Hearst newspaper in America as a “great film.” And that, was that; and so it was. The film was a huge success, critically and commercially. It won six Academy Awards for that year and again forty years later in 1991, it re-

ceived a Golden Globe for the first award for a Best Motion Picture. It was later chosen by the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress for being “culturally historically, or aesthetically significant.” Several weeks after the screening, Marion’s man, William Randolph Hearst died in his bed. Without alerting Marion, the body was removed from the house at the direction of his sons and a funeral was held to which Marion was not invited. On his death, Hearst left Marion much of his fortune. She sold it back to the Hearst Corporation for $1. When she died ten years later at age 63, she left an estate valued at more than $20 million. u

JEFF HIRSCH

T H E MU S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S A N N UA L S U M M E R F U N D R A I S E R “A HOT NIGHT IN HAVANA,” QUE ST, OCTOBER 2002

50 QUEST


THE AMM TEAM 212.606.4129 | ammteam@sothebyshomes.com ammnewyork.com | amm.sothebysrealty.nyc Merrill Curtis

Megan Duryea Scott

Amanda Cannon Goldworm Brooke Block Kennan

151 East 79th Street, Fifteenth Floor & 16B 5 bedrooms, 4 baths | Offered at $8,800,000

1148 Fifth Avenue, Apartment 10C

325 East 57th Street, Apartment 11A

4 br, 3.5 ba | Offered at $4,350,000

3 br, 2 ba | Offered at $1,575,000

East Side Manhattan Brokerage | 650 Madison Avenue | New York, NY 10022 | 212.606.7660 © 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty office is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. All offerings are subject to errors, omissions, changes including price or withdrawal without notice.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S W E A R I N G - I N C E R E MO N Y I N PA L M B E AC H

Danielle Moore

John, Gail and Ted Cooney

Congratulations

Quest 35th on your

Nick and Gail Coniglio

anniversary!

(914) 580-4151 ccphp.net/quest 00 QUEST

Lew Crampton

Julie Araskog

Adolfo Zaralegui, Danielle Moore and James Borynack

C A P E H A RT

From your friends at Castle Connolly Private Health Partners.


Care you can trust, available to you

at a moment’s notice.

Castle Connolly Private Health Partners’ unparalleled concierge programs give you exclusive connectivity to a range of wellness amenities and care enhancements. Every membership offering is carefully designed to deliver the most personalized, connected and convenient care by select top doctors. Member amenities include:

• Unlimited complementary health coaching appointments

• Member-exclusive wellness events, tips, and newsletters

• Extended office visits

• Connectivity to nearly 60,000 Castle Connolly Top Doctors®

• 24/7 communication directly with your physician

• Same-day or next-day appointments regardless of medical necessity

Call: (914) 580-4151 or visit ccphp.net/quest to be matched with a concierge physician.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A R O W M A N & L I T T L E F I E L D ’ S C O C K TA I L R EC E P T I O N I N PA L M B E AC H

Elizabeth Libert and Dan Sterner

Gil Walsh

Reuben Jeffery and Ann Coulter

54 QUEST

Jed Lyons, Robin Jeffery and David Ober

Blythe Lyons, Susan McGuinn and Martin McGuinn

Kathy Cheek, Catherine Eshelman, Andy Eshelman, Katie Benjamin and Bill Benjamin

Bob Novick and Marilou Sanford

Patrick Gross

Johnny Johnson


KNOWLEDGE. INTEGRITY. DISCRETION. Kirk Henckels, former Vice Chairman and Director of Stribling Private Brokerage and currently Founding Director of East Coast Luxury Properties and Jennifer Callahan have provided private banking type brokerage style to discerning clients for decades. We continue to do so because we simply love what we do.

JENNIFER CALLAHAN

Licensed as Jennifer L Callahan Boston College St John’s Law School JD Licensed Associate RE Broker jennifer.callahan@compass.com M: 917.453.8325

KIRK HENCKELS Stanford University Harvard Business School MBA Licensed Associate RE Broker kh@compass.com M: 917.291.6700

Kirk Henckels and Jennifer Callahan are Real Estate Associate Brokers affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed Real Estate Broker and abides by equal housing opportunity laws.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M A R I A N N E A N D J O H N C A ST L E H O ST E D A SM A L L D I N N E R AT MO R TO N ’ S I N PA L M B E AC H FO R T H E D U K E A N D D U C H E S S O F M A R L B O R O U G H QUEST, JUNE 2006

Lady Carol Bamford, Lady Jane Churchill and Pauline Pitt

George Baker IV and Felix Mirando

John Bowes-Lyon and Liz Ward 56 QUEST

Anthony Baker and Caroline Benson

Sunny, The Duke of Marlborough

HRH Michel de Bourbon, HRH Maria Pia de Savoia and The Hon. Peter Ward

David Metcalfe

Jim Mitchell and Lord Charles Churchill

C A P E H A RT

Lord Anthony Bamford and Princess Cristina de Caraman

Rosita, The Duchess of Marlborough and Marianne Castle


JENNIFER GARRIGUES Interior Design

308 Peruvian Avenue | Palm Beach, FL 33480 | Tel.(561)659-7085 954 Lexington Avenue, Ste 225 | New York, NY 10021 www.jennifergarrigues.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L I G H T H O U S E G U I L D ’ S C O C K TA I L PA R T Y AT T H E C O L O N Y PA L M B E AC H

Marc Rosen and Beth de Woody

David and Jennifer Fischer

58 QUEST

Dennis Melchoir and Nancy Tsai

Calvin Roberts, Frannie Scaife and Tom Quick

Miguel Placencia, Mark Helliar and Jason Laskey

Martin and Audrey Gruss

Kathy Bleznak and Fern Tailer

Barbara San Damian and Jean Denoyer

C A P E H A RT

Jackie Weld Drake and Bill Beadleston


Classical Elegance, Contemporary Luxuries. Upper East Side Condominiums Designed by Deborah Berke Partners Three to Five Bedroom Residences Attractively Priced from $4.5M to $25M On-Site Model Residences Now Open

Immediate Occupancy 40EastEnd.com | 646.760.1712 | hello@40EastEnd.com

EXCLUSIVE MARKETING & SALES AGENT: CORCORAN SUNSHINE MARKETING GROUP The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. Sponsor: 40 East End Ave. Associates LLC, 460 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10022. File No. CD1800052. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, AUGUST 1986

Front row, seated, left to right: Mrs. Walter B. Delafield, Mrs. J. Frederic Byers III (now Califano), Mrs. Marilyn T. Graves, Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, Mrs. John R. Fell, Mrs. Thomas L. Kempner, Mrs. Walter Nelson Pharr, Mrs. Thorburn Rand, and Mrs. Harmon L. Remmel. Middle row, from left to right: Mrs. Clyde M. Newhouse, Mrs. Robert McKinney, Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, Mrs. Thayer Gilpatric, Mrs. Guy G. Rutherfurd. Back row, from left to right: Mr. Locke McLean, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Walter A. Nicholis, Mrs. Paul Sherlock, Ms. Mildred Custin, Mrs. Evelyn Laskoe, Mrs. Charles N. Breed, Mrs. Kerryn King, Mrs. Percy L. Douglas, Mr. Lyman Clardy, Mrs. John Bourke, Mrs. John Winsko, Mrs. George Hyman.

T H E M U R A L AT MO R T I M E R ’ S FO R T H E M S KC C A R MO R Y S H O W Q U E ST , M A R C H 1 9 9 5

Betsy Bloomingdale, Nancy Reagan, Carolina Herrera, Nan Kempner, Pat Buckley, Anne Slater, C.Z. Guest, Brooke Astor, Grace Dudley, Brooke Hayward Duchin, Mica Ertegun, Aileen Mehle, Chassy Rayner, and Anna (the dog belonging to Gloria Vanderbilt).

QUEST, MARCH 1999

Top row: Jamee Gregory, Hilary Geary, Nancy Stahl, Carlyle Slado, Monique Merrill, and Jackie Williams. Bottom row: Debbie Bancroft, Grace Meigher, Meg Kirkpatrick, Allie Hanley, Linda Hickox, and Jay Keith. 60 QUEST


We look forward to welcoming you to our Pink Paradise—a place where everyone feels at home. And while you are here, take the experience al fresco at Swifty’s POOL. 15 5 H A M M O N AVEN UE PALM B EACH FL 33480 (5 61) 65 5 - 5 430 T HECOLON YPALMB EACH.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T R I - C O U N T Y A N I M A L R E S C U E ’ S L U N C H EO N I N PA L M B E AC H

Fran Burns and Leigh-Anne Kazma

Mary Boykin and Dale Milner 62 QUEST

Andrea Stark with Bailey

Gail Worth with Cookie and Frank Orenstein

Sully Sullivan with Sophie

Melissa Johnson and Victor Concepcion

John Cammayer and Marie Feldman

Ted Campbell and Daniela Gross

C A P E H A RT

Pam Siegman and Ann Goldberg


A yard big enough for the kids.

elliman.com © 2021 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O P E N I N G O F C H I N E S E P O R C E L A I N C OM PA N Y O N PA R K AV E N U E QUEST, DECEMBER 1994

Indoor – Outdoor Living With warm days and cool

nights

come

outdoor fêtes, gatherings around the fire pit, and afternoons relaxing by the pool. These outdoor activities are all the more enjoyable when you also have a few interior comforts to enhance the experience. The best thing about an outdoor room is that it’s a place of relaxation that puts you in arm’s reach of nature: shrubs, trees, scent-

Tina Fanjul and Kenny Lane

Louise Grunwald and Boaz Mazor

ed flowers, water features and outdoor accessories. It’s a pared down and more casual version of your interiors. Indoor/outdoor living is a growing trend, even before the pandemic hit us all, outdoor spaces were fashionable. Their options are limitless, it expands your living space without investing in an addition or expensive remodel. Thanks to their versatility as multi-use spaces, homeowners can easily entertain and enjoy the indoors and outdoors without feeling limited. By maintaining a consistent design theme the two spaces can blend seamlessly.

Lee Thaw and Khalil Rizk

John Radziwill

Mary McFadden and Jamie Figg

Homeowners are now leaning towards more functional spaces, like outdoor kitchens and lounge areas fully equipped with fireplaces or firepits. Others are using their outdoor areas for pools and spas, to de-stress and relax, surrounded by nature. Being outdoors also has several surprising health benefits, it’s relaxing, therefore it helps lower blood pressure and is beneficial to many other organs. Homeowners are focusing more on making the natural world accessible, they desire a connection to nature. They just glance up at the sky or daydream about the ocean. —Gil Walsh

Pete Hathaway and Sam Green

Brucie Hennessy and George Trescher

Stefan de Kwiatowski with Michelle and Alessandro Corsini

Charles Washburn and Molly Wilmot


WHERE STYLE LIVES

T O L I S T E N . T O E N V I S I O N . T O C R E AT E . T O C O L L A B O R AT E . W W W. G I LWA L S H . C O M

PALM BEACH | MARTHA'S VINEYARD | NEW YORK

561.932.0631


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

C U T T Y M CG I LL

J U N I O R C OM M I T T E E O F T H E B OYS ’ C L U B O F N E W YO R K C E L E B R AT E S S U M M E R QUEST, SEPTEMBER 2004

66 QUEST


Who is #1? You Are — My Clients and Customers. In the first quarter of 2021, I’ve had more than $70 million deals closed or contracted, including $45 million off-market. With over $1 billion in career transactions, I have the discretion, expertise, and guidance to help you find your place in the world.

Shelly Tretter Lynch Licensed Real Estate Salesperson Founding Member Compass Greenwich shelly.tretterlynch@compass.com M: 203.550.8508 200 Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich, CT Compass Connecticut, LLC is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


1

2

3

5 6

4

QUEST AND DE GOURNAY CELEBRATE THE LIVING ROOM AT THE COLONY IN PALM BEACH

7

1. Andrew and Sarah Wetenhall 2. Mary and Peter Dawkins 3. Karen Klopp and Robert Caravaggi 4. Doug and Julie Brawn 5. Xiomi and Robby Penn 6. Monique Ogilvie

8

and Darcy Gould 7. Grace Meigher and Maria Gerrity 8. Ted and Nikki Cooney 9. Lauren Layne Merck and George Merck 10. Sharon Bush and Robert Murray 11. John Johnson

10

and Gil Walsh

11

CAPEHART

9

00 6 8 QUEST


2 3 1

6

5 4

6 5

7

7 1. Jack Lynch and Amy Stroh 2. Wilbur Ross and Hilary Geary

9

Ross 3. Eleanora Kennedy and Lila Feinberg 4. Ann and Peter Summers 5. Alan Quartucci and Webb Egerton

8 CAPEHART

6. Olivia Meyer and MK McCloskey 7. Britty Bardes and Jon Damgard 8. Mimi and Leroy McMakin 9. Jayne Chase and Susan Magrino 10. Stacey Leuliette and Hogan Gidley

9

10


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

QUEST, DECEMBER 1999

70 QUEST


Featured Manhattan Listings presented by Jill Roosevelt

820 Fifth Avenue, Maisonette

4 East 72nd Street, 4A

Upper East Side. 4BR. 5.5 Bath. $19.995M. Web# 20008079.

Upper East Side. 4BR. 4.5 Bath. $10.995M. Web# 20022297.

25 Sutton Place, 4th Floor

65 East 76th Street, PHA

Sutton Place. 3BR. 4.5 Bath. $6.495M. Web# 20829984.

Upper East Side. 2BR. 2 Bath. $2.8M. Web# 20794346.

Jill Roosevelt Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker jroosevelt@bhsusa.com o: 212-906-9340


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H B O PA R T Y AT S A P O R E D I M A R E FO R “ T H E B A N D P L AYE D O N ” QUEST, NOVEMBER 1993

Sally Quinn and Ben Bradlee

Ann and Keith Barish

Jenny Conant and Steve Kroft

Clifford Klenk and Elizabeth Polster

Jack and Hilary Geary

C H A M B E R MU S I C S O C I E T Y ’ S C O N C E R T I N PA L M B E AC H

Jane Rothchild, Peter Gottsegen and Lynn Tishman

Arlette Gordon and Jean Dolan 72 QUEST

Vicki Kellogg and Peter Foley

Rochelle and Mark Burandt with Elaine Kay

Guy Johnston, Ben Beilman, Gilles Vonsattel and Arnaud Sussmann

Gil Pierson and Geryl Pearl

A N N I E WAT T

Doug Evans


This year, vacation somewhere you know,

somewhere you know you love

V I L L A W V R E P, S T. B A RT H S

P R I VAT E V I L L A R E N TA L S , AT T E N T I V E C O N C I E R G E S E R V I C E , T R U S T E D E X P E R I E N C E

wimco.com/destinations

+1 401 849 8012

@wimcovillas

info@wimco.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, JUNE 1995

74 Q U E S T


THE GABLES, SOUTHAMPTON On one of the most desirable streets in Southampton’s estate section and featuring water views of tranquil Lake Agawam, The Gables is less than half a mile from white sand ocean beaches and the village center. 267SOUTHMAINSTREET.COM

Offered at $16,900,000

Molly Ferrer

Associate Broker 631.513.9895 Molly.Ferrer@sothebys.realty

Southampton Brokerage 50 Nugent Street | Southampton, NY | sothebyshomes.com/hamptons

© 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty office is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. All offerings are subject to errors, omissions, changes including price or withdrawal without notice. 


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST, OCTOBER 1993

76 QUEST


Leslie Priggen

Since 1904…

THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF NEW YORK Clinic and Adoption Center 306 E. 59 St., New York, NY 10022 (212) 752-4842

For a needy animal, your donation to us means food, shelter, and lifesaving medical care. Please send all you humanely can.

If You Abandon Us, You Abandon Them


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O U T E A ST P R E S E N TS “ L A D I E S W H O L AU N C H ” AT L E B I L B O Q U E T I N PA L M B E AC H

Martin Martinov

Phillippe Delgrange 78 QUEST

Jean Baptiste Parvaix and Dobi Trendafilova

Peter Tunney

Danielle Rollins and Tiffany Isaacs

Elizabeth Meigher and Paula Bickford

Patrick Mitchell and Nick Mele

Elisabeth Munder and Derek Summerlind

Bettina Anderson

Benjamin Wood

N I C K M E LE

Kristen Vila and Maribel Alvarez


“Happy 35th, from one Classic to Another” www.kennethjaylane.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUEST, NOVEMBER 1991

80 QUEST


Kudos to QUEST on your 35th Birthday!


2

1

3

5 6

4

35 YEARS OF MARK GILBERTSON’S PERSONAL PICS 7 1. Mark Gilbertson and Nina Griscom 2. Barbara Cates and Bill Benjamin 3. Calvert and George Moore 4. Gigi and Averell Mortimer 5. Dominick Dunne and Barbara Bancroft 6. Louis Auchincloss and Zibby Tozer 7. Hamish Bowles and Amy Fine Collins 8. Charlie Washburn, Mollie Wimot and Bob Leidy 9. Grace Meigher, Susan Burke and Friederike Biggs 10. Carolyne Roehm, Anne Bass and Lynn Wyatt

9

82 QUEST

10

8


3

2

1

6

5 4 5

7

7 1. Allan Scherer, Guilford Dudley and Jane Dudley 2. Lise Arliss, Jared Goss, and Evelyn Tompkins 3. Mercedes Bass and Paul Gismondi 4. Jamee Gregory, Wendy

8

Carduner and Meg Kirkpatrick 5. Silvia and Pierre d’Arenberg 6. Sloan and Roger Barnett 7. Susie and Fred Bancroft 8. Tom Ford and Richard Buckley 9. Whitney Fairchild and Geoffrey Bradfield 10. Tara Rockefeller, Rachel Hovnanian and David Lauren

9

10


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 6

84 QUEST


Expert kitchen designer with over 40 years of experience. View portfolio of projects from Connecticut, New York, Palm Beach and The Hamptons on our website, or contact us for a consultation.

I S AR A H B L A NK D E S I GN O S A R A H B LA N K D E SI G N ST U D I O . C O M V 203. 655. 6900


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P EG G Y A D A M S C E L E B R AT E S N E W A D O P T I O N C E N T E R I N PA L M B E AC H

Sam and Vicky Hunt

Kevin Clark and James Berwind

Tina Fisher Grow, Rick Grow and Nellie Benoit

Stephen Gottlieb and Laurie Raber Gottlieb

Lesly Smith and Danielle Moore

Gerald Seay and Pauline Pitt

Chistina Dennis and Dan Ponton

K I P S B AY D EC O R ATO R S H O W H O U S E PA L M B E AC H ’ S K I C K - O F F D I N N E R

Elisabeth and Adam Munder

86 QUEST

Jonathan Savage and Nazira Handal

Jason and Ivy Wiloughby

Matthew and Brittnay Bromley, Fernando Wong and Tim Johnson

Daniel Quintero and Ellie Cullman

Jorge Sanchez and Meg Braff

C A P E H A RT

Ellen Kavanaugh and Brianne Engelhardt


A Destination of Exceptional Character and Spirit

“One of the 14 Most Luxurious Hotels in the World” –Forbes Travel Guide

natural beauty and a rich heritage have drawn families to this coastal New England resort for more than a century. Unforgettable experiences are infused with lasting traditions, unfaltering attention to detail and uncompromised personal service. Pampered pleasures include award-winning dining, private wine and culinary classes, and other memorable activities including the stunning Atlantic Ocean beach, croquet and art experiences. Enjoy triple Five-Star service with our OH Well program for health and safety. See our website for details, and reserve your treasured getaway or family celebration.

OCEANHOUSERI.COM

For more information about this distinguished destination, please call 855.399.2812


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

Q U E S T , J U LY / A U G U S T 1 9 9 9

88 QUEST


Elegant 40’ wide TH Mansion w Garden 160 East 81st Street. $26,000,000 Alexa Lambert + Patricia Farmaian 917.403.8819

High Flr Condo. Views of Madison Sq Park

13 Acre English Tudor Manor with 9 BRs

15 East 26th Street. $8,685,000 Tracie Golding + Peter Boehm 917.837.1918

297 Mill Hill Road, Mill Neck. $27,000,000 Mary Ellen Cashman 917.710.2655

FS 3 BR Art Deco Condo w Majestic Views 25 Central Park West. The Century. $6,400,000 Walter McCullough 212.787.0881

Sunny & Large Classic 8 into 7

WV Condo with Empire State Bldg Views

33 East 70th Street. $6,495,000. Maint: $4,600/mo Kirk Henckels + Jennifer Callahan 917.291.6700

160 West 12th Street. The Greenwich Lane. $7,995,000 Jeffrey Stockwell + Jill Bernard 917.449.3433

compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PA L M B E AC H G A R D E N C L U B ’ S F LO W E R S H O W

Heather and Patrick Henry

Mary Chapman Webster

Brian Rafanelli and Peggy Moore

Patt Sned and Sue Strickland

Kit Pannill and Kate Gubelmann

Mary Pressly

Vicky and Sam Hunt

Merrilyn Bardes and Meg Bowen

R OYA L P O I N C I A N A P L A Z A ’ S E A ST E R EG G H U N T I N PA L M B E AC H

John Cooney, Jr., Gail Cooney and Ted Cooney 90 QUEST

Adria Holmes with “Penny Lane”

Shannon, Ryan, Bennett and Elodie Carroll

Lori Berg, Michael Reinert and Dana Filetti

Tristan Eckert Gremaud with Margaux and Luca Gremaud

Beckett, Harlo, and Haven Veitch

C A P E H A RT

Melissa, Teagan and Ryanne McCahill


sensual by kim Sensuality in perfect form.

700 FIFTH AVENUE & 55TH STREET • NEW YORK • 212.397.9000 • wempe.com Hamburg Berlin Duesseldorf Frankfurt Munich London Madrid Paris Vienna


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST, OCTOBER 1990

92 QUEST


A Curated Selection of UNIQUE ARTIST-MADE HOME ACCESSORIES and JEWELRY An ORIGINAL VOICE in NEW YORK CIT Y THE STORE AT MAD ENJOY A 30% SAVINGS* In-Store Say QUEST Online Use Code QUEST30

Offer Ends July 4. One time use only. Restrictions Apply.

THE STORE at MAD

2 Columbus Circle, NYC 212.299.7700 thestore@madmuseum.org


’ IA S RY

T

D

PC RS

D

FI 94 QUEST

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A QUE ST, OCTOBER 1994


The GreenVale School EARLY CHILDHOOD THROUGH 8TH GRADE | ON-CAMPUS 5 DAYS/WEEK

Superior academics, a joyful atmosphere,

and emphasis on character development lead Green Vale graduates to excel at the top secondary schools and colleges…and in life.

Private Campus Tours Available

Come see how GVS offers what other schools can’t. Learn more at www.greenvaleschool.org/welcome Located on 40 acres in Old Brookville, Long Island | 516.621.2420

Follow us

@greenvaleschool


RESEARCH

WHAT CAUSES DEPRESSION? Scientists at Hope for Depression Research Foundation Are Assembling a Picture of How Depression Develops in the Brain, Leading to New Treatments CLINICAL DEPRESSION is the world’s single leading cause of disability, ahead of heart disease and cancer. It is a devastating illness that shatters lives. And yet science does not have a firm understanding of it or new ways to treat it. Conventional medications like Prozac (or other SSRIs) are over 35 years old and do not fully work for 50% of patients. The Hope for Depression Research Foundation (HDRF) is working to change that with advanced research. Many have heard that depression is caused by a “chemical imbalance” in the brain, something to do with a serotonin deficiency. This explanation is not inaccurate, but it is too simplistic to lead to new treatments. In fact, the most important underlying cause of depression lies elsewhere. It involves our stress response; when our brain’s fight or flight circuits get stuck in the “on” position for so long that it becomes toxic. Cells and circuits are thrown off balance, affecting sleep, memory, mood and behavior. 96 QUEST

“Depression affects a large swath of the brain,” said acclaimed brain scientist Dr. Huda Akil, Ph.D., who works with HDRF. “The entire biochemical and cellular balance of many brain areas is altered.” Our stress response involves hundreds of molecules and hormones that influence the brain and change it. Some stress is good for us, but an extended or chronic stress response can leave what might be viewed as “scars” in the brain that initiate the pathology of depression. But how? And when? This is where the HDRF Depression Task Force comes in. This team of nine world-acclaimed neuroscientists are from different universities but have joined forces in a historic effort under the auspices of the Hope for Depression Research Foundation. The Depression Task Force (DTF) is starting to discover more about these “scars” left by stress in the brain, and also the genetic variations that make some of us more vulnerable to stress than


H O P E F O R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H F O U N DAT I O N

others. This is leading to new ideas for treatment; HDRF has one clinical trial underway currently at Columbia and Mount Sinai, and others in the pipeline. No other team has been able to achieve the Depression Task Force’s integrated approach. Their labs collaborate seamlessly and share unpublished data to accelerate discovery. Working together, the HDRF researchers can embrace the complexity of the brain, from genes to molecules to cells and entire circuit networks. They can also step back to see how risk pathways develop during the life course, from infancy to old age. “While we are working on understanding the genetics and brain biology of mood disorder and on finding better treatments,” said Dr. Akil, “the real goal is to prevent the illness and stem the epidemic of depression.” “Their leadership will influence the field for the next 50 years and beyond,” said Dr. Nestler, current Chair of the DTF and

head of the Friedman Brain Institute at Mount Sinai. Dr. Akil of University of Michigan is a founding member of the HDRF Depression Task Force. The other members are: Elisabeth Binder, MD, PhD, Max Planck Institute, Munich; Kafui Dzirasa, MD, PhD, Duke University; René Hen, PhD, Columbia University; Jonathan Javitch, MD, PhD, Columbia University; Conor Liston, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell; Helen Mayberg MD, Mount Sinai; Michael Meaney, PhD, McGill University; and Eric Nestler MD, PhD, Mount Sinai, DTF Chair. - Louisa Benton u Clockwise from above: Conor Liston, M.D Ph.D., Helen S. Mayberg, M.D., Michael Meaney, Ph.D, René Hen, Ph.D., Elisabeth Binder, M.D, Ph.D., Kafui Dzirasa, M.D, Ph.D., Eric Nestler, M.D., Ph.D., Huda Akil, Ph.D., Jonathan Javitch, M.D., Ph.D.; Audrey Gruss, founder of Hope for Depression Research Foundation; a Hope for Depression Research Foundation session. M AY 2 0 2 1 9 7


IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 98 QUEST


H A R RY B E N S O N

HAPPY 35TH birthday to Quest! It’s hard to fathom that 35 years have flown by since the first issue of Quest hit the stands. My column began in May 2006, after the illustrious publisher Chris Meigher took the reins from founding editor, Heather Cohane, and where the remarkable David Patrick Columbia has been holding court each month with incredible stories that surprise, entertain, and inform. On a personal note… Over the years I have been privileged to work with the talented editor, Elizabeth Meigher, on many fun assignments—and now with Alex Travers who painstakingly pushes me to turn in my column on time each month. I have enjoyed working with many fine young editors who have gone on to great heights after learning the ropes at Quest. Quest is a serious magazine and I’m thankful that it’s here. It’s very reassuring to know that my photographs will be treated with respect, and it makes me want to take the best possible photographs when on assignment. I look forward to keeping up with the magazine’s high standard—I’m doing my best for it! The incredible publisher Chris Meigher’s boundless energy keeps the magazine on track—a magazine to be reckoned with—while readers turn to the keenly perceptive David Patrick Columbia as the arbiter of good taste... What’s happening now? And what happened then? Quest is a damn good magazine which makes writers and photographers, myself included, proud to be a part of its heritage. u Row one, left to right: Berlin Kiss, Berlin 1996. Andy Warhol, The Factory, 1983; The Beatles Pillow Fight, Paris, 1964; Grace and Chris Meigher with Gigi and Harry; Mikhail Baryshnikov and Liza Minnelli, 1980. Row Two: Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen,1985; Lauren Hutton, 1990; Francis Ford Coppola, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, The Godfather, NYC, 1971; President and Mrs. Clinton, 1992; Brooke Astor at home, 1980; President and Mrs. Reagan, The White House, 1985. Row Three: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1966; Harry and Brooke Shields, 1978; Amy Winehouse, London, 2007; Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Royal Tour of the Caribbean, 1966. Row Four: Jacqueline Kennedy, Canada, 1968; Dolly Parton, Nashville, 1976; Kate Moss, Paris, 1993; HRH Queen Elizabeth II, Buckingham Palace, London, 2014; Diana Vreeland, NYC, 1980. Row Five: Sir Winston Churchill at Harrow School, England, 1960; David Patrick Columbia at work; Bianca Jagger and Andy Warhol, 1977; Valentino, 1984; Farrah Fawcett, 1981; Bob Nederland, Gil Maurer and Harry, Norton Museum of Art. M AY 2 0 2 1 9 9


TA K I

FIGHT OR FLIGHT Clockwise from top left: A private jet lands in Gstaad; a

P R E S S A S S O C I AT I O N I M A G E S

vintage cell phone; Pavlos, Crown Prince of Greece, RE.

OH, TO BE IN ENGLAND, but let’s start at the beginning. I challenge any reader to claim they are more technologically disadvantaged than yours truly, or anyone not suffering from Alzheimer’s in fact. I resisted getting a mobile telephone until my days on board a sailing boat became a nightmare. I missed get-togethers and lost friends, and finally gave in around ten years ago. More trouble followed. For example, I get pings all the 100 QUEST

time and can see on screen names of Pugs members sending messages to each other, but I don’t know how to put in my five cents. Prince Pavlos of Greece set it up so it rings, but in the meantime poor little Taki is voiceless. And it gets better—worse, rather. My daughter once taught me how to retrieve a lost column on my word processor, but I have since forgotten how to do it. My son simply refuses to offer technical


TA K I

From left: Lord and Lady Lucan pictured in 1964—10 years before he vanished; Grand Hôtel Bellevue.

help, as he calls it, and I’m incapable of cutting the ingrate off for good because I’ve already handed it over. Last week, however, things got hotter by the minute. The wife, who does not approve of flying private, advised me to do so from Gstaad to London because she knew things, but the airfield was closed, and going private from Geneva is a sucker’s game. One can land in the boondocks after paying through the nose and take three hours to get to Chelsea. Good old Charlie the driver, now speaking to me again, drove me to Geneva and I checked into BA with a very nice hostess, all smiles. Then the trouble began. I had papers with me stating that I had had two Covid shots and had tested negative on the day before flying. But there were some other things required that I had never heard of. So the nice woman behind the desk, who had a very sexy figure by the way, took my mobile and began working on it. I had been there approximately 45 minutes when the stewardess told me to take my luggage off and wait for a call from the U.K. “A call from the U.K. on a Sunday evening? Are you sure?” asked poor little me. By this time Wafic Said’s nephew had arrived with pretty wife and children in tow, and they volunteered to help. They knew what they were doing and fixed my telephone, and it was only a matter of a few minutes and I would be free to fly, but then the

sexy one asked for my password. I’ve had so many I gave the wrong one and everything collapsed. “You need a PA,” said the sexy one. “I had one and the wife fired her because she had a body like yours,” I ventured. A wintry smile from her and then more questions about email addresses and passwords. Finally, one hour after my flight had left, Charlie returned from halfway up the mountain and drove me back to my humble Gstaad home. That same evening, a bit frustrated, I drank two bottles of white wine and collapsed. The next morning the telephone rang nice and early. It was the U.K. checking up on me and warning me that it would be calling me back. In other words, be a good boy, stay home, or else. It was a female voice, perhaps a recording. Here’s the number: 300 123 2008. The message also said that the long arm of the law might be coming around. Not a bad idea, as the Bellevue hotel is still open and also one ski lift. The fuzz might look into the Lucan mystery while here, as Anthony Bingham lives here, he’s a relation of the missing earl so the trip and expenses can be justified. So now I am officially in England, and under British law I have to stay home for a couple of weeks or so. But I’ve been playing hooky and went skiing today and was amazed to find so much snow and beautiful mountains in Chelsea. Even Countess Bismarck has joined the circus,

offering her hubby’s PA to sort things out. I appreciate it greatly, but Bolle’s PA is a lady of a certain age. Now, don’t get me wrong, I love oldies, my wife Alexandra is going to be 117 years old come September. Also, do not forget that I’m a victim. I am victimized by young women because of my age, victimized by young men who use their thumbs to send ungrammatical messages to each other about matters such as jeans, rap music, and the environment; in fact I’m a martyr and I demand social justice. Never mind, the internet is the worst thing ever to hit humanity, and it most likely will be the end of me along with other Luddites. From where I sit among the snows in Glebe Place Chelsea, Switzerland, I read about the ghastly man and ghastly woman who made fun of the British flag, a symbol so many millions have died for. I believe in having fun and all that, but funny how some things strike me as being not funny at all. The man and woman are lowlifes, but they influence public opinion by being on the radio and TV. What I see as unfair is that if the poor little Greek boy was, say, to make fun of the woman’s name, race, or color, I’d be thrown out of The Spectator in less than 44 minutes, 44 being the amount of years I’ve been writing my column. Oh, to be in England. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 0 1


E D U C AT I O N

THE OXBRIDGE ADVANTAGE IS WAITING FOR YOU OXBRIDGE ACADEMY is an independent, co-educational day school for grades 7-12 located on a beautiful 54-acre campus in West Palm Beach, Florida. In an environment founded on a culture of kindness, Oxbridge delivers an exceptional educational experience by teaching what is worth learning; emphasizing course rigor; fostering personal discovery; integrating academics, the arts, and athletics; and focusing on character building. The result: students who are caring, confident, compassionate, critical thinkers, and global citizens prepared to tackle 21st-century problems—and annual graduating classes with 100% acceptance to four-year colleges and universities. Philanthropist William I. Koch founded Oxbridge in 2011 with the goal of bringing together like-minded families who place a high value on fostering a love of learning and providing a world-class education to academically qualified children regardless of their financial need. Mr. Koch established a unique school environment where social class and cliques are irrelevant, and compassion and cooperation are the traits that matter. The best teachers, some of whom are leaders in their fields, inspire Oxbridge students who also benefit from state102 QUEST

of-the-art teaching technology and an emphasis on hands-on learning over note-taking and memorization. Health, wellness, and proper nutrition are built into the school day. All students have access to the school’s first-rate health clinic and staff; PE, sports injuries, and rehab can be addressed here. Oxbridge also employs a fulltime psychologist. The school chef is celebrated by students and staff alike for preparing tasty, nutritious meals to power them through the day. Oxbridge has an average class size of 14, a 9:1 student/faculty ratio, and a faculty of which 77% have advanced degrees, including 13% with doctorates. Oxbridge is also proud of its unique, signature programs: Artificial Intelligence (AI), Aviation, Independent Research, and Cambridge Scholars— Yes, students spend two weeks studying at the prestigious school in England! The school’s Model UN and debate teams and its theater students are annually among the best in the state. The number of extra-curricular options grows yearly as students are encouraged to bring new ideas for programs and clubs to the administration. Oxbridge also encourages and emphasizes community


Clockwise from above: Courtyard seating at Oxbridge Academy; students during science class at the lake; Oxbridge offers a program in Aviation; inside the library. Opposite page: A class in session outdoors at Oxbridge Academy.

service, sometimes well beyond the local community. In 2019, a dozen Oxbridge students had the eye-opening experience of traveling to the Dominican Republic to help deliver hearing aids to hundreds of hearing-impaired residents. Oxbridge is also proud of its 22 varsity and seven JV athletic teams, which include sailing, equestrian, and girls flag football as well as basketball, volleyball, soccer, and lacrosse, among others. Since 2011, Oxbridge athletic teams have won five individual and team state championships, 10 regional championships, and 37 district titles. Fifteen percent of Oxbridge graduates have received scholarships to continue competing at the collegiate level. One recent graduate is playing lacrosse for Princeton, another is playing baseball for Johns Hopkins, and a third is on the soccer team at Villanova. Athletes in the Class of 2021 will be playing college sports as

well, joining the sailing team at Tulane and the softball team at Holy Cross, among others. In conjunction with its 10th anniversary, Oxbridge is adding seventh and eighth grades beginning in August 2021. Adding a middle school expands Oxbridge’s commitment to providing a world-class education to younger students from all walks of life who have a love of learning, allowing them to benefit sooner from the school’s focus on character development, its culture of kindness, and enabling them to make a seamless transition to the high school. The Oxbridge Advantage is waiting for you. u Oxbridge Academy is located at 3151 N. Military Trail in West Palm Beach. For more information, call 561.972.9826 or visit oapb.org/admission. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 0 3


A PALM BEACH TRADITION A HIGHLIGHT of the Palm Beach season every other year is The Garden Club of Palm Beach’s Flower Show. And because of the pandemic, the Garden Club of America, which the Palm Beach club has been a member in excellent standing of since 1931, decided there would be no GCA flower shows this year, said Heather Henry, the club’s historian. But current club president, Mary Pressly, would hear nothing of a flower-show-less year. Pressly, said Henry, came up with idea of having a different kind of show that would demonstrate the creative skills of the membership in floral design and showcase the horticultural talents of local women without the pressure of being evaluated by GCA judges. “We just wanted to have a little fun this year,” she said. The club staged flower shows yearly from 1929 till 1940, with a simpler, less showy version offered in 1932, because of the Great Depression. “The club didn’t think it appropriate for the time to present an extravagant flower celebration,” Henry explains. There were no Palm Beach flower shows from 1940, until the club members decided to revive them in 1979. The club focused its attention on civic and town beautification projects, something it has done since its inception, when the 104 QUEST

club commissioned the creation of a formal town plan that was enthusiastically adopted by the Town Council in 1930. The club continued maintenance of the lovely demonstration garden on the campus of the Society of the Four Arts, which it still is very involved with, and showcased members’ and local citizen’s horticultural prowess with house tours—eventually retitled the annual, and tremendously popular, House & Garden Day. The flower shows became bi-annual in 2000, because of the amount of time and effort that went into planning them. The 2021 Flower show, with the theme “Garden in Bloom” presented member’s floral interpretations of works in the Four Arts’s Philip Hulitar Sculpture Garden and elements throughout the Demonstration Garden and around the King Library, with Horticultural gems, especially orchids, presented in the Pannill pavilion. There was lots of humor and extremely clever among the exhibits. Visitors were greeted initially a bevy of spectacular legged bouquets seated on curved benches near the entrance. Whimsy and light-hearted for the most part, the open-air show was a stellar example of adaptation to a changed world. But the competitive show inside should return in 2023. u

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

BY ROBERT JANJIGIAN


EVENTS

Clockwise, from above: The Tidal Garden at Bradley Park; Ginny Parker and Squirty Kenan working on their design; Lewis Miller of LMD New York creating an arrangement at one of four lectures the Garden Club presented this year. Opposite: Mary Pressly, Pam Patsley, Vicky Hunt, and Heather Henry (not pictured) created this design staged along the Moonlight Garden bench.


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY A LE X T R AV E R S AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

MAY MEANS MOTHER’S DAY—and what better way to honor Mom than with a new bauble for spring? Keeping her in mind, we’ve combed the treasures of celebrated houses like Asprey, Elizabeth Gage, Verdura, and Vhernier, and we’ve found some unique pieces from favorites like Ralph Lauren and J. McLaughlin. From shoes and beauty, to weekend escapes, we have gifts that any mon (or dad) would delight in. Arriving just in time for spring, Staud’s latest

Preferring the

collection—featuring beautiful hues of blue—

wider palette range offered by

is perfect for when the weather warms up. Shop

semi-precious stones,

at staud.clothing/collections.

Verdura set vibrant hued “pebbles” in rich yellow gold, often with rope detailing reminiscent of the designer’s youth in Sicily. $7,950 at verdura.com.

Tell mom she’s one-of-a-kind with this stunning Elizabeth Gage Aquamarine Fish pin featuring a sapphire eye in 18-ct. yellow gold setting that swims beneath 18-ct. yellow gold waves, pavé-set with 26 diamonds to their crests and set with gold sea-weed claws. $19,312 at Elizabeth-gage.com.

We can’t get enough of the latest accessories by Alexander McQueen, like this “Short Story” handbag. $1,990 at alexandermcqueen.com.

106 QUEST


For the rebel who is always fashion-forward: The Persol 714SM Steve McQueen sunglasses. $780 at persol.com. Brave the extremes with the new 2021 Rolex Oyster Perpetual Explorer II, redesigned with a new case and bracelet. $8,850 at Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Spruce up your spring style with great new looks from J. McLaughlin—like these Lukas pants in Midi Geo Palm. $175 at jmclaughlin.com.

Get ready for fun in the sun with Bacardi’s rum punch cocktails. Check out the flavors and more at bacardi.com.

Cheers to spring—Stubbs & Wootton’s “Celebrate” slipper features an assortment of our favorite celebratory concoctions. $525 at stubbsandwootton.com.


Fresh Finds

Toast to Mom’s big day this year with Ruinart Rosé

She’ll surely get emotional when

Champagne. Avaialbe

opening these Pomellato Rose Quartz

at select stores. Visit

and Brown Diamond Nudo Drop

ruinart.com for

earrings. $5,800 at betteridge.com.

more information.

Think pink this spring in this chic outfit from Kiton. Shop the look full at kiton.com.

We love Linda Horn’s vintage domeshaped bird cage in green paint framed with a series of turned wooden dowels and four arched doors, with a central interior column provides multiple perches. $1,385 at Linda Horn: 212.772.1122 or lindahorn.com.

Take Mom on a trip to Casa de Campo Resort, the stunning 7,000-acre resort and private gated community in La Romana on the southeastern coast of the Dominican Republic. See packages at casadecampo. com.do.


Drop by the Kemble Shop—or visit thekembleshop.com—and grab these large red pansy earrings for Mom. She’ll be most grateful. The Kemble Shop: 294 Hibiscus Ave., Palm Beach.

Firmer. Smoother. Radiant. Change the future of your skin with every drop. It’s the one serum beautiful skin can’t live without. Advanced Night Repair, 1 oz. $75 at esteelauder.com.

Be sure to stop by the MAD Museum in late May to see the upcoming Craft Front & Center exhibition, on view until Feb 13, 2022. Visit madmuseum.com.

Tibi does simple elegance so well, making their pieces a great gift for fashion lovers. Shop the Spring 2021 collection at tibi.com.

A vivid expression A fun gadget for any accessory lover: L’Objet’s Crocodile Magnifying Glass. $150 at neimanmarcus.com.

of Ralph Lauren’s appreciation for tradition and style, the RL Stirrup collection captures equestrian heritage with its stirrup-shaped silhouette. $3,850 at ralphlauren.com. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 0 9


CALENDAR

MAY

Frieze New York, one of the cities most anticipated art fairs, will take place at The Shed in Manhattan (545 W 30th Street) from May 5-9, 2021. For more information or to buy advanced tickets, please visit frieze.com. or call 212.463.7488.

A NEW TRADITION

AD Art Show will take place May 1 at the Oculus at the Westfield World Trade Center. The show is a groundbreaking juried art exhibition—launched at Sotheby’s New York in February 2018 and now in its fourth year—featuring artworks by artists from around the world. AD Art Show at the Oculus at Westfield World Trade Center will offer art lovers a spacious destination, with shops and dining open Monday–Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. During the month of May, visitors will be offered a free sweet and a coffee from show partner, Eataly. For more information about the AD Art Show 2021, MvVO Art, and the artists, visit mvvoart.com.

segments for viewers to tune in to throughout the day, inviting viewers to break out griddles, crack some eggs, and cook along for the most important meal of the day. Throughout the social programming, Kitchn food experts, cooks, and editors will feature the best brunch recipes, showcase interac-

tive Instagram polls and games, provide tutorials, and more. Hosted by Kitchn’s Editor-in-Chief Faith Durand, Brunch Fest infuses a fresh, fun twist on brunch, with influential cooks and chefs that will share methods, hacks, recipes, and more. For more information, please visit thekitchn.com.

Frieze New York, one of the cities most anticipated art fairs, will take place at The Shed in Manhattan (545 W 30th Street) from May 5-9, 2021. For more information or to buy advanced tickets, please visit frieze.com. or call 212.463.7488.

The New York City Ballet will host its 2021 Spring Gala virtually at 7 p.m. For more information, please contact the Special Events office at 212-870-5585 or specialevents@nycballet.com.

11

FURRY FRIENDS

VIRTUAL COOKOUT

110 QUEST

ART FAIRS

PLIER

2

Kitchn—Apartment Therapy Media’s food site, made for and by home cooks—will host its virtual Brunch Fest in partnership with EnvyTM this May. Held on Instagram @thekitchn, the event will consist of interactive social

5

The New York City Ballet will host its 2021 Spring Gala virtually at 7 p.m. For more information on attending or contributing to NYC Ballet, please contact the Special Events office at 212-870-5585 or specialevents@nycballet.com.

During the first-ever PAWS NY Virtual Benefit, the organization will honor the great work that’s been done this year and Spring Forward with Hope. As a local NYC nonprofit organization, PAWS NY provides pet care support to elderly, ill, and disabled New Yorkers, helping them stay with their pets at home. Guests will be able to join PAWS NY on Tuesday, May 11, from 6:30–7:15 p.m., for

CO U RTE S Y O F F R I E Z E N E W Y O R K ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

1


M A D I S O N W O RT H AR CHI T EC T UR E

DPC

Architec t ure - Design - Pl anning

w w w. M a d i s o n Wo r t h A r c h . c o m

4 8 5 M a d i s o n Av e n u e , S u i t e 2 0 0 - N e w Yo r k , N e w Yo r k 1 0 0 2 2 - ( 2 1 2 ) 3 5 5 - 3 2 6 1 1 2 5 Wo r t h Av e n u e , S u i t e 3 0 6 - P a l m B e a c h , F l o r i d a 3 3 4 8 0 - ( 5 6 1 ) 8 3 3 - 3 2 4 2

PA L M BE A C H - N E W Y O R K C I T Y - G R E EN W I C H - L O N G I S L A N D


CALENDAR

CALENDAR

Native arts and culture. For more information, please visit authorsguild.org.

20

A GREAT CAUSE

Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s Hot Pink Evening will take place virtually on May 20 at 7:45 p.m. For more information, please visit bcrf.com.

25

HITTING FAIRWAYS

Don Bosco will host its Summer of Dreams 2021 Golf Outing at on the legendary West Course of the Winged Foot Golf Club, home of the 2019 US Open Championship. For more details about reservations, please contact Mary Keating at mary@mkeventstudio.com or call 914.980.1964.

28

SOUTHERN CHARM

Spoleto Festival USA— featuring show by famous artists and emerging performers in opera and dance—will take place in Charleston from May 28 to June 17. For more information, please visit spoletousa.org. a night filled with messages of hope from our clients, volunteers, and supporters, a tempting online silent auction, and surprises to come. For more information, visit pawsny.org.

12

HATS OFF

The 1st Annual First Responders Charity Event will take place at Bottagra Restaurant in Hawthorne, New Jersey, at 7:30 p.m. The event will feature special guests such as former New York Met and Yankee, Doc Gooden, and former Yankee, Mickey Rivers. There will also be a silent and live auction. For more information, please contact Ken Thimmel at kthimmel@gmail.com or call 862.238.7268.

Author Award and One World publisher and editor-in-chief Chris Jackson with its Literature That Inspires Change Publisher Award. It will also honor Louise Erdrich with the Distinguished Service to the Literary Community Award for expanding the American literary canon to include stories that reflect the Native American experience and foster a better understanding of

For 17 days and nights each spring, Spoleto Festival USA fills Charleston, South Carolina’s historic theaters, churches, and outdoor spaces with performances by renowned artists as well as emerging performers in opera, theater, dance, and chamber, symphonic, choral, and jazz music. (This year, it will take place in Charleston from May 28 to June 17.) Now approaching its 45th season, Spoleto Festival USA is internationally recognized as America’s premier performing arts festival. For more information, please visit spoletousa.org.

JUNE 4

FOR THE HORSES

Spirit’s Promise Equine Rescue will host a Farmers Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 5 at 2746 Sound Avenue, Riverhead, New York. Guests will have the opportunity to support local businesses, shop vendors and take a tour of the farm, meet the animals and learn more about what they do at Spirit’s Promise Equine Rescue. For more information, please call 631.875.0433.

6

MARINE LIFE

The costal bays of the Hamptons are home to many marine animals, with shallow waters that provide food and hiding places for young fish and crabs and other marine life. Walk Leader, Melanie Meade, and SOFO Education & Outreach Coordinator will take guests to explore a Hamptons bay habitat by seining for fishes and crabs, digging for clams, and see how many different sea creatures they can find and identify. Please contact SOFO Education at info@sofo.org.

10

FOR OUR CHILDREN

Kids in Crisis Gala will take place on June 10 at Belle Haven Club in Greenwich, Connecticut, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, please call 203.622.6556.

18

SCRIBES

The Authors Guild Foundation will hold its 29th Annual Gala & Benefit on May 18. The event will be virtually streamed and open to the public. The theme of the 2021 Gala & Benefit is “Books That Inspire Change” and transform the world. To that end, the Authors Guild Foundation will honor Ibram X. Kendi with its Literature That Inspires Change 112 QUEST

Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s annual; Hot Pink Evening will take place virtually this year on May 20 at 7:45 p.m. For more information on the event, please visit bcrf.com.


THE #1 SELLING OFFICE IN NORTHERN WESTCHESTER 2020.* *Based on OneKey MLS New York statistics, sold transactions 1/1/20-12/31/20 in Bedford, Lewisboro, Mt. Kisco, North Salem, Pound Ridge and Somers

VIEWS ON INDIAN HILL - Bedford, NY

SPACIOUS & SOPHISTICATED - Bedford, NY

$2,250,000

$2,395,000

THE NARROWS ROAD - Bedford, NY

A BEDFORD CLASSIC - Bedford, NY

$2,275,000

$1,550,000

ROMANTIC HILLTOP ESTATE - Mt. Kisco, NY

TASHKOVICH DESIGN -Pound Ridge, NY

$2,195,000

$949,000

BEDFORD OFFICE

914-234-9234

POUND RIDGE OFFICE

914-764-2424

BROWSE ALL OF OUR LISTINGS AT GINNEL.COM FOLLOW US @GINNELREALESTATE


Caroline Kennedy

f York and mes

Rachel Moore, Karen Akers, and Adrienne Arsht

Tara Milne and Tivia Kramer

Susan Fales-Hill

Peter Lyden, Fe Fendi, Cindy Sites, and John Banta

PAT R I C KM C M U LL A N . CO M

e and Karl Wellner

Anne Grauso

7/29/20 7:01 PM

35 How does a magazine mark its

35th anniversary? We say, with a look

at the people, personalities, and institutions that have represented and defined Quest over the past 35 years—as told by the writers who know them.


1987

GETT Y IMAGES

Slim Aarons by Chris Meigher Over the last three and a half decades, Quest has been blessed with an exclusive tribe of revered and renowned columnists, several of whom still contribute brilliantly to our issues. Many of these “ink-drenched quill drivers” have penned profiles in the forthcoming pages that celebrate another bunch of bold-faced New Yorkers from our past 35 years. Our columnists’ ever-grateful-and-proud publisher tips his cap to each of his noble scriveners, including the iconic photojournalist and Fleet Street renegade, Harry Benson; the late doyenne and queen of all New York columnists, and the pride of Galveston, Texas, Liz Smith; the erudite, irreverent, and much-envied scoundrel, Taki Theodoracopulos; the ever-glamorous, kind, and generous society scribe, Hilary Geary; the Midas-minded Renaissance man, Michael Thomas; the late Corinthian scholar and decorated sportsman, Eddie Ulmann; the Audaxian reminder of people and places past, Jamie McGuire; and our own beloved,

best-read, loyal, and most-respected editor-in-chief, David Patrick “DPC” Columbia. One Quest columnist no longer among us is a pal from my TIME LIFE days, Slim Aarons. Slim’s photos captured the sensibility of timeless and casual elegance so embedded in Quest’s understated voice and innately chic style. He was an authentic New England Yankee who saw our world as “attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places.” Slim’s column, “Once Upon A Time,” ran in Quest from 1998 until his death in 2006. We salute—and very much miss—him. Godspeed, old friend. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 1 5


1988 Central Park by Suzie Aijala From the time I was a little girl growing up in New York City in the ’70s, Central Park has been my oasis in one of the busiest cities in the world. It’s where I learned to roller-skate and ride a bike. It’s where I saw my first concert (Beach Boys and Chicago in Sheep Meadow), and walked with my first boyfriend through the Great Lawn. But the Central Park of my childhood wasn’t what it is today; back then, the grass was dead, the benches were falling apart, and there was broken glass and garbage everywhere. We were actually afraid to go in after a certain hour. The Central Park Conservancy changed all of this when it was founded in 1980. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the Conservancy and its Women’s Committee, for which I serve as president, Central Park has been transformed into a jewel. The Conservancy now welcomes over 42 million visitors to Central Park each year and raises an incredible 75% of the annual $67-million operating budget from private donations. I get inspired every day knowing there are so many wonderful people willing to contribute their time and money so we can all enjoy the best park in the world. The Women’s Committee, which has raised over $150 million since 1983, is celebrating its 35th anniversary this year and has committed to raise at least $5 million of the $10 million needed to restore the historic Conservatory Gardens, home of the Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon. I am so passionate about Central Park, having enjoyed its many benefits my entire life, and am so proud to be supporting the gold standard that the Conservancy has created. 116 QUEST


1989

Diana Vreeland by Amy Fine Collins

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Diana Vreeland invented the fashion world as we know it—the glitzy, hyperbolic, personality-driven, social, high-low international glamour spectacle, in which appearances are reality, and surface is substance. She understood the need for neophilia—by which I mean the love of change for change’s sake. Vreeland’s Vogue uprooted editorial from reality and even from aspiration. It was dream-driven, a fantasia, and a cornucopia. Paradoxically, she herself was very disciplined in how she dressed, ate, worked, and lived. She really believed that there was no beauty without strangeness, and that truth could be found only through exaggeration. So she was an oracle, but one with detractors. Geoffrey Beene and Eleanor Lambert, for example, objected to her essential indifference to American fashion designers. It was her more self-effacing colleague, Baron Niki de Gunzburg, who championed American fashion. Vreeland’s ever-present revival—in addition to a new biography, the past few years have witnessed the publication of her famous memos and a biopic—shows how much the fashion world is in search of an ancestral totem.

M AY 2 0 2 1 0 0


Metropolitan by Charlie McSpadden “We’ve met before, haven’t we?” asked Whit Stillman, blazer-clad despite the summer heat, on a West Village street corner in July of 2010. Though we hadn’t—that day marked my first as an assistant on his recently released film, Damsels in Distress—it certainly felt like I knew him from his wry and deeply personal films: Metropolitan, Barcelona, and The Last Days of Disco. Though he’ll be the first to denote the separation between his opinions and those of his characters, one can’t help but note that (more than) a few of his traits inform his endearing fictional creations. I was fortunate to experience this firsthand, when, in the middle of the Damsels shoot, an unexpected surgery left me apartment-bound for a week,

1990 immobile, recovering, and aching to return to set. A buzz at my door brought a care package of books and films, with a handwritten note from Whit wishing swift improvement. Much like the sentiments of Metropolitan’s Tom Townsend and Damsels’ Violet, I agree that handwritten notes are rare and to be cherished. And the same goes for Whit’s exceptional and distinct voice in film. Whit brings welcome honesty and nuance to a world prone to caricature, and rewards his audience with deft insights on the vulnerability and social discomfort of youth. Luckily, I felt neither of these adolescent afflictions upon returning to Whit’s set, but instead, refreshed and grateful for his words and generosity.


1991 Brooke Astor by David Patrick Columbia She was a child of Victorians who came into young womanhood at the end of the Edwardian era, which had great influence on the American men and women of a certain socioeconomic stratum. This was a woman whose example was contrary to the popular notion of womanhood. Without the physical trappings of youth, she was a lady who often wore a hat and gloves, white gloves, a lady who wrote a memoir and put it all out on the table, and with grace and style, as well as discretion. She slowly but steadily became the grande dame of a New York that had not seen much of grandes dames since her husband’s grandmother reigned a century before. She became the right person for the right moment. She had an abiding interest in philanthropy; her choices for assistance were followed up by personal experiences. She walked among the kings, a tiara nearby for her, and had the common touch. By the time she was in her eighties, she was a legend. She was a writer, an artist, an actress. When she lost her love, Fate presented her with the task of giving away the American Astor fortune. She made it her mission and her mission made her. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 1 9


Michael’s by Joe Armstrong

1992

I knew about the original Michael’s restaurant in Santa Monica in the late ’70s, when I ran New York and New West magazines and sent Ruth Reichl to do the first review (a rave). When Michael McCarty ventured to New York City, it was at a time when the media gathered at the Four Seasons restaurant, which was getting expensive. I had done a lot of charity work with Robin Williams in the ’80s, and when 9/11 happened, he put his film career on hold to try to make America laugh again. I gave him a lunch the day his national tour hit Carnegie Hall; coincidentally, there was this beautiful café on West 55th Street, so I did it there because it was quiet, wasn’t crowded, and, best of all, had one big round table in a bay window. It was Michael’s. Robin said, “Have anyone you want, Joe, but please invite Bill Clinton and Billy Crystal.” So I added the great Texas governor Ann Richards, Liz Smith, and Diane Sawyer (Barbara Walters was furious with me about that!). A New York Post photographer in the back room snuck past the Secret Service and took a photo that was big in the paper the next day. Robin went on “The David Letterman Show” and Letterman said, “Tell me about this amazing lunch and how it happened.” The New York Times and Newsweek followed, so it became the lunch heard round the world. Soon after, Michael’s evolved into a media hangout and its business boomed. Michael himself and Steve Millington were the great conductors of a symphony staff, with the amazing L’Oreal in the control tower doing the greeting and seating. And the Cobb salad was never better anywhere. It was such a warm atmosphere and it was THE media club. It still is. I gave a few more lunches for longtime friends: Elton John the day Billy Elliot opened on Broadway, Mel Brooks and Susan Stroman for the opening of Young Frankenstein, and for Ken Burns and Meryl Streep with the launch of “The Roosevelts.” Since then, other historic lunches have been hosted by others at that great round table isolated in the big bay window. Michael’s—such a happy place. 120 QUEST


PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

1993

David Patrick Columbia’s Social Diary by Mark Gilbertson Raconteur, historian, writer, editor, and popular gentleman, David Patrick Columbia has been an integral and vital part of Quest magazine for 35 years now. Since 1987, David has guided his readers through countless tales of New York society, intertwined with its rich heritage, making his readers aware of the past and present social world of the city and its outposts. Very well informed and often amusing, he is quite the expert on what’s proper and what’s not, and isn’t afraid to point out the difference! However, much to the relief of many a well-known New Yorker, David is the consummate gentleman both in his writings and in person. Everyone always seems so happy to see David on his daily rounds, whether it be at Michael’s, a dinner party, or one of the myriad of charity events he is so proficient at covering in his online New York Social Diary or in Quest. When out-of-towners and news stations are looking for the inside scoop on life amongst New York’s upper echelon, it’s David they seek to interview. David is inclusive in his coverage of society and philanthropy, which in New York go practically hand in hand. Charities clamor to get the photos of their benefits into Social Diary and Quest, and he accommodates them if possible. Informed and in demand, fair and entertaining—he’s had a positive effect on Quest and New York. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 2 1


122 QUEST

London, 1961: The minute she stepped off the plane she caused a sensation. This wasn’t Mamie Eisenhower—a perfectly nice woman in her own right. But Jackie was beautiful and chic, well educated and instinctively elegant. People screamed, “Jackie! Jackie! Jackie!” everywhere she went. She took it all in her stride. By the time I moved to New York in 1964, Jackie owned the city. John Fairchild of WWD would later christen her “Jackie O.” She stopped all conversation when she walked into a restaurant. When I asked Liz Smith what she remembered most about Jackie, she told me, “Re-reading all the recent books about the Kennedy years, I am struck once again with what an influence Jackie had on her adoring and, even later, speculative public. Jackie was in a class by herself. When you first photographed her in London in 1961, I loved her from afar. You caught her essence, right up through Caroline’s wedding and after. When I finally met her she was ever intellectually intrigued, adoring gossip and fun and living through the tragedy which she tried so hard to overcome. I think it amused Jackie to be seen with a gossip columnist. She liked to make waves and she both loved and loathed being photographed. You always knew when you had a real star, and she was a real star for the ages.” I showed this photograph to my friend, design director emeritus of Tiffany & Co. John Loring. It was taken in London in 1962 as Jackie was on her way to Buckingham Palace to lunch with Queen Elizabeth. John said, “That photograph was taken before 1963.” When I asked how he knew, he replied, “She never smiled that way after 1963.”

H A R RY B E N S O N

1994

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis by Harry Benson


1995 H A R RY B E N S O N

Dominick Dunne by Jane Stanton Hitchcock Dominick Dunne was great company, in art and in life. He was an Irish leprechaun who spun gossip into literary gold. He was also a great friend. I first met Nick when he was emerging from the ruins of a once-glamorous life in Hollywood. He had worked his way out of a deep despondency when an even darker tragedy struck. His only daughter, Dominique, a promising young actress, was strangled by her boyfriend. Her murderer was put on trial in Los Angeles. Nick sat in the courtroom day after day, watching a travesty of justice unfold. He reported it all in a riveting series of articles for Vanity Fair. After that, he deepened. In 1985, he wrote The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, which established him as a vastly entertaining chronicler of low goings-on

in the high life. He went on to write other classics in the genre he helped create. He also became a crusader for the families of murdered children and for victims’ rights. His power was such that he got a famous murder case reopened and put the perpetrator behind bars. Success became Nick. He was generous with it, always helping others. His personality was as vibrant and colorful as his signature Turnbull & Asser shirts and ties. Nick had his share of controversy, and practically everything else this life has to offer. He wrote it all down for us to savor. He always liked to say that Dominique was watching over him. I like to think he’s watching over all of us, then giving the on dit to God at dinner. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 2 3


1996 New York Yankees by Jack DeLigter Joe Girardi’s triple in the bottom of the third, Charlie Hayes’s grab in foul ground to end it in the top of ninth, and Wade Boggs’s famous celebratory equestrian jaunt around the stadium. To say that the New York Yankees were late to the championship-winning party way back in 1996 is to underestimate just how long it had been since they had last held World Series gold. By ’96, New Yorkers had grown accustomed to winning. The New York Giants had won the Super Bowl in ’90, the Rangers had captured the Stanley Cup in ’94, and that same year the Knicks fell a three-pointer short of taking home the Walter A. Brown trophy. Hell, if you count New Jersey, the Devils won it all in ’95. For a team that has always taken great pride in its winning traditions, the New York Yankees’ last World Series appearance had been back in ’81—and they hadn’t won it since ’78. Even the lowly Mets of Flushing had managed to eke out a World Series victory since then; their miracle in ’86 had been the last time the City That Never Sleeps had witnessed a World Series triumph. By October, the listless Yankees of the past decade and a half were no longer. Led by Joe Torre, they won five comefrom-behind playoff victories as World Series underdogs. Five rollercoaster games later, the Yankees were on the verge of winning their 23rd world championship. As Boggs’s steed would agree: the Yanks were back in the saddle again.


1997

The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Michael Thomas For Quest’s 25th Anniversary Issue, I began a hymn to the Metropolitan Museum as follows: “Of the great arks of civilization that dot the city, one above all seems hardly to have put a toe wrong: the Metropolitan Museum of Art. . . . Even as it grows as a tourist attraction, (the Met) prospers as a fortress of high culture, an institution with a contented, motivated, challenged faculty (curatorial staff) whose head person has their backs. Thus was the Met run by Philippe de Montebello, and so is it being run by his successor, Thomas Campbell, (along with) President Emily Rafferty.” Well, how short-sighted I was. In the half-decade since I wrote that, all hell has broken out uptown. Rafferty retired; Campbell has resigned; curatorial discontent has festered in the wake of new hires, buyouts, and benefit cuts. A cottage industry of Met scandal-mongering has grown up, dangling choice tidbits of gossip before the public like cheesy ornaments on a plastic Christmas tree. Worst of all, the museum’s financial condition has been shown to be if not dire, certainly more parlous than was thought—and this suggests that the Met’s board, which flaunts some of the most glittering, self-regarding names in high finance, went into hibernation sometime around 2013. These will be fixed. Financial problems can be solved with a mix of prudence and common sense. Initiatives that seemed ill-advised to begin with—a massive push into contemporary art, for openers—have been cut back, although Met Breuer seems to be a success. Nothing good can be said about the pimpish connection to the fashion industry but that foolishness must in due course wither away. What will never wither is what the Met is really all about: the incomparable treasures it houses and the people who care for and explicate them. Ars longa, vita brevis. Truer words were never spoken.

M AY 2 0 2 1 1 2 5


126 QUEST

When the social history of the ’80s is written, Glenn Bernbaum—the cranky, funny, snobby, taste-perfect, complicated, hilarious, grouchy, generous, gossip-loving friend and owner of Mortimer’s—will be defined as the Ward McAllister of his era. Ward McAllister, in case he’s slipping your mind, was the bon-vivant dandy who created the social phenomenon known as the 400, based on the number of people Mrs. William Backhouse Astor, Jr., could fit into her ballroom. Glenn was his own version of McAllister—he created the Mortimer’s set. High society, high finance, and old money mixed with a little new money and a little Hollywood like Betsy and Nancy, plus a few actors and writers, in which category I was. Mortimer’s always seemed more of a swanky club than a restaurant. It was a hangout for a hand-picked crowd. A couple nights before his death, I went to a private party in the side room of Mortimer’s. Suddenly Glenn walked in from the main room wearing an overcoat, as if he had come in from some other place. He was walking through the domain that he had created, perhaps for the last time. His restaurant closed the day he died, never to be opened again. That’s the way he wanted it.

H A R RY B E N S O N

1998

Glenn Bernbaum by Dominick Dunne (1925–2009)


1999 Checkered Cabs Retired by Robyn Travers They were New York: those instantly recognized, immense yellow checkered cabs that once navigated the avenues with pride, their bumpers metallic grins. But in 1999, the venerated vehicles became extinct—dinosaurs of an urban jungle. Now all we have are our memories and a faint nod by a few taxis that wear two small tapered checkered decals as a black armband. Years have gone by since I sat in a checkered cab, but I remember loving the space. It made it fun and easy to go places with friends because they had fold-up stools in the back, so you could get five people in there. This was of course before everyone was hyper about seatbelts. And consider this: a clunky checker could also double as a noble hero. Fresh back from our honeymoon in France, my husband, Peter, was knocked down by a bike messenger and broke his patella. Peter’s Jimmy-Stewart-in-Rear-Window-size cast wouldn’t budge and the colossal cabs were the only cars that could get him to work. It was a very sad day indeed when they were taken off the roads for good.

2000 B E T TM A N N

Johnny Galliher by David Patrick Columbia He was a most unusual person, the likes of whom I’d never met before. Although no stranger to the world known as “Society” in the 20th century, he was the kind of character you’d read about in a novel but never think to know or meet. And yet, in his way, he was a simple man. The word “chic” is over-used and I’m not sure what it means. Though John, or Johnny, as everyone liked to call him, defined it in his completeness: always a gent, wellturned-out, never calling attention to himself, a good ear, a good laugh, a bit of mystery, and a good life well-lived, apparently doing nothing but being “chic.” Therein the mystery; he was sensible. He possessed a unique combination of characteristics and qualities—easily said but rarely found in life—and therefore difficult to define. He was naturally gentlemanly, curious, and the kind who if he didn’t have something nice to say (or amusing, which might be more like it with him) said nothing at all. As a very agreeable (a favorite word of his) man, he navigated skillfully for more than 60 years through a world where gossip, bitchery, and malice could be commonplace and even lethal. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 2 7


$5.00

2008

A MA yo f or r SeAS onS

All

mich runs ael bloo mber for a th ird te g rm

que 000_qu

est_Cov

er Bloo

stm

mbe

ag.c

rg cx.i

ndd

om

1

September 11, Rudy Giuliani, & Michael Bloomberg by Alex Travers It’s a short video clip. No matter how many times you look at it, it seems impossible that the chain of actions and reactions—planes crashing into the World Trade Center towers and their ultimate collapse—could happen, though of course it did. Like the rest of the country, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was shocked, saddened, and angry after the September 11 attacks. Yet he was determined to rebuild. He helped put both New York and the country at ease, organizing the response of city departments and gaining the support of state and federal authorities to restore Ground Zero. In time, Giuliani became known as “America’s Mayor.” There he was, just weeks after the attacks, at a Mets–Braves game, assuring the country that life must go on. “Tomorrow New York is going to be here,” he maintained. “We’re going to rebuild. And we’re going to be stronger than we were before... 128 QUEST

BER

10/1

/08

3:22

:18 PM

I want the people of New York to be an example to the rest of the country, and the rest of the world, that terrorism can’t stop us.” Michael Bloomberg was sworn in as mayor of New York City by Giuliani just after midnight on January 1, 2002. Bloomberg’s emergence in the election was big news, and with Giuliani’s endorsement there was belief that the city would be in excellent hands. Over the course of Bloomberg’s three terms, neighborhoods blossomed and many parts of the city changed dramatically. Parks were refurbished and new ones have opened. His contributions to arts and culture had an enormous impact on the city. And now a new, bigger tower (One World Trade Center) has gone up, a symbol of the city’s sturdiness. Nearby, the 9/11 Memorial tells the history of that day. It shows us that freedom carries an enormous weight, but we keep proving just how strong we are.

H A R RY B E N S O N ( B LO O M B E R G )

2001

OCTO


2002 H A R RY B E N S O N

C. Z. Guest by Hilary Geary C. Z. Guest, the celebrated great American beauty, was a society icon but so much more than that. She was a Renaissance woman, a doer who embraced life with her wide range of talents. She could do anything, went everywhere, and did everything with taste, style, and enthusiasm. C. Z. was an energetic entrepreneur who never stopped creating. She wrote books, penned a gardening column, and designed sweaters, candles, and more. Her profile graced the covers of Time magazine and Slim Aarons books, amongst others. Her portrait was painted by Andy Warhol, Salvador Dalí, and Diego Rivera, and she was photographed by all the greats. She was a horticulturist who adored her garden, an animal lover, an athlete who rode and played tennis, too. C. Z. was a fabulous hostess who entertained beautifully at her country house, Templeton. She was always dressed perfectly, never over-dressed but never, ever boring. In fact, C. Z. had a quick wit, was great fun, and, best of all, was a true-blue friend. They don’t make them like that anymore. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 2 9


Professional athlete, military man, actor, journalist, author, editor, asteroid namesake, and, yes, even Fireworks Commissioner of New York. Was there any profession or corner of the earth that George Plimpton wasn’t capable of touching? The inimitable lion of the American literary (and party) scene, his mere presence bespoke an erudite but effortless intellectualism. His was a whisky-laced wit: equal part brains to bite. I first “met” George—and his tireless sense of taunting—when I was a Harvard undergrad, working on the Ernest Hemingway Collection at the JFK Library. One day, while arms-deep in archives, the phone rang and it was George. He was calling for permission to publish a letter or some document of Hemingway’s

in The Paris Review. An archivist said we’d have to find the document and get back to him, but George insisted that he needed to know then and there. When the archivist explained that it would take some time just to track the document down, George retorted that he, in fact, already had it. Somehow, at some point in time, he managed to leave the library with it, unnoticed. And now he was playing a game of make-’em-sweat. Suddenly it wasn’t a question about permission, but whether George would be willing to return the document without a stink about how it left. I don’t remember if he ever published it, but it was George in jest, at his best. In his uncannily capable omnipotence, George—as he liked to remind the rest of us—always had the upper hand.

2003

H A R RY B E N S O N

George Plimpton by Daniel Cappello


H A R RY B E N S O N ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Liz Smith by Elizabeth Meigher I have always been an avid fan of Liz Smith, affectionately known as the “Doyenne of Dish.” Not only because she was a good person with a tremendous heart, but in this era of fake news and paid celebrity interviews, Liz remained comfortably grounded in her long-standing principles. She was a no-BS gal who shot straight from the hip. She probably doesn’t remember this, but we first met when I was about 10 years old at an after-party for a performance of The Nutcracker at Lincoln Center. I was wearing a parentally mandated Laura Ashley dress, but with a slew of rebellious black jelly bracelets running halfway up my arm. “Hey kid, what are you doing here?” she asked in her most charming Texas twang. “Wouldn’t you rather be at a Madonna concert?” Of course she was right, and I thought to myself, “Wow—she’s cool; I like her.” And I have adored her ever since. Smith became a bona fide New Yorker, having moved from Texas when she was only 25 years old. During her first five years in Manhattan, she was a news producer for NBC-TV while she was also ghostwriting the Cholly Knickerbocker gossip column for the Hearst newspapers. By 1976, Liz was writing a string of self-titled gossip columns for The New York Daily News, Newsday, and The New York Post, most of which were nationally

2004 syndicated. She was the only columnist ever to have had their column printed in three major New York City papers at the same time. At the end of her career, Liz focused on her fivedays-a-week column for the New York Social Diary, as well as her regular “Living Legend” feature in Q (the magazine that I edit), for which she profiles a different “legend” in every issue. She has featured such icons as Natalie Wood, Elizabeth Taylor, and Lauren Hutton, as well as Madonna, Michael Jackson, and Cher. And guess what? She knew all of them. Reading Liz’s take on celebrities is especially compelling as she never relied on tired news—she always provided unique insights and anecdotes from her own personal experiences. Speaking of her personal commitments, Liz was devoted to several charities and has raised millions for Literacy Partners, AIDS, AmFAR, Lighthouse Guild, the Police Athletic League, the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and so many others. Vanity Fair called her “an unflagging standard of integrity and grace that is shamefully rare in today’s media. . . . She redeemes the very institution of the Gossip Column from utter disrepute.” Having had the privilege of working with Liz for over a decade, I couldn’t agree more.

M AY 2 0 2 1 1 3 1


NAN! (Kempner, of course.) New York is not the same without her. She was a “piece of work” and also a work of art. Her medium was the everyday things of life. She turned them into masterpieces. Simple things like the selection of her clothes, a meal cooked by the wonderful Sylvina, a spaghetti party given on a Sunday night, served by Bernardo…things most people think of as unimportant. She made them an art with her flair, originality, style, and attention to detail. The mundane was banished by the perfect perfectionist. Nan had the wide and diverse circle of friends she deserved with her quick wit and quips (often at her own expense); her generosity and curiosity; her love of beauty, art, and music; and her pleasure in sharing all she had. She had exciting new friends who mixed with good friends from her childhood in San Francisco. I thought she valued most those who were truly down-to-earth under their colorful coating of sophistication, style, and flair—like Nan herself.

H A R RY B E N S O N

2005

Nan Kempner by Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman (1944−2016)


A N N I E WAT T / C U T T Y M CG I LL

2006

Doubles by Lily Hoagland Doubles is like the closet to Narnia, or Madeleine L’Engle’s tesseract: breach an unassuming door inside the Sherry-Netherland hotel, descend the lushly carpeted stairs, and you will discover a more genteel world than the one you left behind. The private club has the magic of sophistication, thanks to standard-bearer and proprietor Wendy Carduner. From extravagant holiday events to impromptu latenight after-parties, members share a lifetime of memories among the shades of claret decorating the main dining room. This bastion of old New York celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2006, and has maintained its reputation as a kind of pied-à-terre for generations of high-society denizens. Its longevity proves its status as the best safe haven from the grinding city—all the more so as, situated a full story below Fifth Avenue, there is no cell phone service. For that and many more reasons, we have always RVSP’d yes to Doubles’ invitation to dine, dance, and mingle. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 3 3


2007 The New Wave of Debutantes by David Patrick Columbia In the first decade of the 21st century, the public image of the debutante evolved somewhat from its oblivion into what had become a media circus of both young women and men pursuing publicity and branding rather than marital alliances that support community and family traditions. Young women now, however, have different role models than their antecedents. They expect to advance themselves through education and careers, rather than marriage. They often want full-time careers rather than, or as well as, motherhood. They also live in a world where the word “marketing,” as much as education, is a key to accomplishment and achievement. The word debutante, aside from its social intimations, is, as it always was, an “opportunity,” but now it is for the experience of meeting people, of going out into the world, of gathering. And so it remains the ritualistic tradition that it always was, but with some major alteration. What has changed is the world, changed to suit the debutante, the young woman of tomorrow.

2008 It’s well known that Bronson van Wyck creates amazing events and has the best team around. (Shout out to Kari Bien!) I have friends throughout New York City, and elsewhere too, who have had wonderful experiences with his production and planning—from weddings and birthdays to charity dinners and benefits. Having worked with him on one of the most important evenings of my life, I can easily say what a consummate professional he is, though what Bronson is best at is people. You can have the dream setting and all the elements that go with it, but the elusive piece to any event is an authenticity that’s particular to every couple or host. Bronson gets this, just as he understands how to gracefully deal with family politics. The second best part about him is his wit and sense of fun. There’s nothing like planning a party with someone who contributes elegant levity to all that goes wrong—and right. He’s beloved by both sides of my family and by my husband in particular. Any time I would start to worry about something for my own event, Bronson had a simple answer. Today, years after that special evening that he made possible, I still find myself turning to Bronson with questions—and, being the gentleman that he is, he always has the simple answers.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; PAT R I C K D E M A R C H E L I E R

Bronson van Wyck by Stephanie LaCava


2009

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Young and the Guest List by Jack Bryan “Jack, just do it. What do you have to lose?” Georgina, my soonto-be editor at Quest magazine, asked me as we sat side-by-side at a 2008 end-of-summer Bryant Park event. She was offering me the magazine’s “Young and the Guest List” column and, having shown up to the cocktail-casual party in black-tie, I thought the idea that I was going to be offered a society column about anything pretty suspect. I knew Chris Meigher, Quest’s sharp and charming publisher, to be a man of taste (he liked me) and admired him for always being surrounded by beautiful women (namely his wife and daughters) so I figured that this was a man I could work for and learn from. I accepted to helm the column, which had started under Andrew Black in 2006 as a means of giving Quest a younger nightlife voice. Over the next two years I acted as Roger Moore to Andrew Black’s Sean Connery. The fun in writing YGL was always in the research: I had a method wherein every month I would go to a certain number of events until invariably I would either stick my foot in my mouth or accidently do something stupid enough to warrant a column. If you know me you know I didn’t have to wait that long. After two years, I went Hollywood (via TriBeCa) and the column went Brown. The lovely Elizabeth “Lizzie” Quinn Brown took over in 2010, the Daniel Craig to my Roger Moore. Her work was smart, funny, original— and it continues to be, although she too is no longer with Quest. Lizzie will be missed. Whether she was reporting from Madison Square Garden (she was the biggest Rangers fan in the office) or the newest downtown hotspot, Lizzie’s column was always bursting with energy. Her version of YGL, which she helped redesign, was fun to look at, fun to read. Alex Travers was then assigned the column, until it was taken over by the outgoing Brooke Kelly. Brooke's YGL is a blast to read, even in a pandemic. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 3 5


2010 Ralph Lauren revolutionized the retail experience in 1986 when he took over the famous Rhinelander Mansion and opened his global flagship at 867 Madison Avenue; he was a visionary in having ushered in the branded retail environment. He quickly became the arbiter of American taste. In Ralph Lauren’s case, it’s always been the casual privilege of the WASP lifestyle par excellence. With a pillar in preppy chic, Lauren has built a global empire around the notion of the idealized American guy gone right—and the glamorous, independent-spirited American woman who’s evolved right there with him. The company’s founding as a maker of ties, some 60 years ago, could be likened to its prep-school period of life: casual, carefree, collegiate. Over time, Ralph Lauren has gone on to graduate, enter the world, and capture the collective imagination of the 136 QUEST

American culture that it represents, and now helps to define. In 2010, on the heels of opening a new Paris location in a sumptuously refurbished hôtel particulier on Boulevard Saint-Germain, housing the still impossible-to-get-into restaurant Ralph’s, the designer dared to recreate a part of that Parisian chic across the street from where it all began in New York. That year, a limestone Beaux-Arts building with decorative ironwork was erected at 888 Madison Avenue as the women’s counterpart to the men’s flagship on the opposite corner. Today, these iconic edifices anchor a strip of Madison Avenue known as Lauren Land. But the gates of the empire don’t stop on Madison Avenue. In 2015, Lauren went on to open the clubbiest of canteens on East 55th Street, aptly named The Polo Bar, where the burger is served with a side of slaw—and a whole lot of tartan touches.

CO U RTE S Y O F R A LP H L AU R E N

Ralph Lauren by Daniel Cappello


2011 Evelyn Lauder by David Patrick Columbia Evelyn Lauder died on a Saturday in late November 2011 at her home here in New York. She had been suffering from a nongenetic ovarian cancer, and had celebrated her 75th birthday that August. She was born Evelyn Hausner to Jewish parents in Vienna in the mid-1930s, an infant when Hitler annexed Austria with the Anschluss in 1938. Her father, who was in the lumber business, had the foresight to get himself, his wife, and his only child out of the country. It was a long and arduous task but, in 1940, the family boarded a steamship for New York. She grew up on West 86th Street. She went to Hunter and met Leonard Lauder. They married four years later. Over the years of their marriage, the Lauders became actively dedicated members of the community. It was an extraordinary life for the child who arrived in New York a refugee from Hitler. In 1989, when Evelyn was 53, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. This matter was never publicized until the time of her death. It was assumed so only because she was so passionately committed to finding a cure. Her own treatment was successful. But by the time she started the Breast Cancer Research Foundation in 1993, she was famous amongst friends and friends of friends for assisting them when the call came. Since she created it, the BCRF has raised hundreds of millions of dollars. Her bravery, her gumption, and her cleverness, as well as her appetite for life, made all of that possible for her as well as hundreds of thousands—possibly even millions—of others. We miss her. We miss her smiling face, her sweet hello. And her courage. Well done, Evelyn, well done.


2012 Albert Hadley by Bunny Williams Years from now, when one looks back on the interior designers of the last 35 years, Albert Hadley will stand out as the star on top of the tree. His unique ability to see interiors in many ways made him a master creator. Though he was interested in tradition, he was passionate about Modernism, and his work was always new and fresh. He never adopted a “look” but treated each project with a fresh eye. He spent time with his clients so that their homes represented their lifestyles. He was a skilled interior architect and paid as much attention to the details of a space as to its furnishings. A scholar of the past, all of us fortunate enough to have worked with him spent hours discussing the great interiors of old. But he was also an innovator; in the ’80s, when design was at its most opulent, Albert was always restrained. Because of his editing and his ability to make magical combinations of pieces, his rooms never became dated. The elegant red lacquer library with simple brass moulding that he created for Mrs. Vincent Astor is a great example of his flair for imagining a fresh approach to a room. The combination of the rich leather-bound first-edition books and the shiny red lacquer shelves will remain one of his greatest rooms. Albert was a true gentleman. In a profession of egos, Albert always put his aside. There was no arrogance or pretension. He was kind and considerate to everyone. Albert cared a great deal about education and was a masterful teacher; because of this and his generosity, many of us received the most amazing education ever. We feel it is our responsibility to pass that gift along to others. 138 QUEST


2013 Lilly Pulitzer by Daniel Cappello In a way, the dresses were a sort of metaphor for her life: zesty, colorful, shocking, and bright, yet practical, sensible, reliable, and handy. Lilly Pulitzer, like the shift dress she became famous for, was so much more than a fashionable staple of the town of Palm Beach—she was one of its icons. It started with a dress born of necessity. In 1959, while working at a juice stand that she opened among the citrus groves, Lilly, an heiress to a famous oil fortune who had married into a famous publishing family, needed something that would hide the stains and spills of oranges and grapefruits. So she had a shift dress made in whimsical prints and irreverent tropical colors, like hot pink and lime green. “I designed collections around whatever struck my fancy,” she once explained: “fruits, vegetables, politics, or peacocks. It was a total change for me, but it made people happy.” It certainly made the ladies of Palm Beach happy. One glimpse of Lilly, and locals had to have a dress of their own. Soon, the peppy shifts were appearing at dinner tables on the social circuit, and when clients like C. Z. Guest and Jacqueline Kennedy were photographed in them, the demand grew so great that a bona fide resort label was launched, grossing up to $15 million in annual sales. Like her company, Lilly’s life took turns. She divorced Peter Pulitzer in 1969 and remarried to Enrique Rousseau. Her company sought bankruptcy protection in the ’80s, was revived in the ’90s, and was acquired in 2010 by Oxford Industries; by 2012, annual net sales reached a reported $122.6 million. Though Lilly was no longer the active head of the company, she remained its undeniable soul until her dying day, at the age of 81, in April of 2013. She continued to serve as a creative consultant, approved fabrics and new designs, and helped expand the accessories line. “Whenever we saw Lilly down in Palm Beach,” Jane Paradis, a vice president of the company, tells me, “she was always pushing us to make the collection modern,” which might explain the chic new silhouettes that keep the brand relevant today. Her original shift, in other words, keeps on shifting, but her originality will always endure as its own.


2014 Hamilton by Daniel Cappello George Washington may very well be the father of America, but when it comes to our home city, Alexander Hamilton will always reign supreme. And thanks to the genius of composer-lyricist-actor-singer Lin-Manuel Miranda, our ten-dollar Founding Father was memorialized for the ages in a new and groundbreaking light—that is, a hip-hop musical titled, simply, Hamilton. Inspired by Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography Alexander Hamilton, Miranda’s musical takes a cue from Hamilton’s immigrant experience (he was an orphan of the Caribbean who muscled his way to the colonies) and sings the story—via a multiethnic cast—of an immigrant nation. Hamilton has enjoyed rapturous acclaim by fans and critics alike, garnering a kind of praise that Shakespeare himself should have enjoyed in his own lifetime (it seems safe to say that Hamilton is likely to sit alongside Hamlet on college syllabi). The musical made its Off-Broadway debut at The Public Theater in February 2015, but buzz about its brilliance was percolating in the year before its opening—and even earlier. Miranda had performed versions of the opening song as early as 2009, and complete acts were being read in workshops by 2013. Once it opened at The Public in the winter of 2015, its engagement quickly sold out. The show moved to Broadway in August 2015 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre, and, last year, Hamilton was nominated for a record-setting 16 Tony Awards, winning 11 of them, including Best Musical. It was also awarded the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Hamilton the man, in many regards, will always be the quintessential, if not original, New Yorker—proof positive of the Sinatra mantra, “If I can make it there, I’ll make it anywhere.” We’re just glad Hamilton the musical made itself here in our city too.


2015

American Pharoah by Alex Travers The great miracle of the 147th running of the Belmont Stakes—which a bay colt named American Pharoah won, making him the first Triple Crown winner in 37 years—was that long after the race was over, the crowd remained. When American Pharoah crossed the line, beating runner-up Frosted by five-and-a-half lengths, fans cheered and cheered. The roars were deafening. But after the noise subsided, they all stayed put, a crowd of 90,000 lingering around the track. Thirteen horses have failed to make the Triple Crown sweep since 1978. Two—War Emblem in 2002 and California Chrome in 2014—were ridden by Victor Espinoza, Pharoah’s jockey. So there were many skeptics who thought there’d never be another Triple Crown winner, even after Pharoah began making headlines. There’s a video on the Internet of Pharoah’s first public workout where an exercise rider is nearly tossed off the colt from his acceleration. Spectators watch in silence until one loud “Holy s---” can be heard in the distance. Some credit this as the first blossom of hope for the eventual Triple Crown winner. By the age of two, Pharoah took to the track and was proving he could run. At three, he won the Kentucky Derby and went on to win the Preakness. But there was still the Belmont, the grueling mile-and-a-half race that has dimmed the hope of owners, trainers, and fans alike—and this was a distance Pharoah had never raced. In the end, he handled it perfectly, becoming the twelfth member of the most exclusive group of athletes on earth. To many, Pharoah’s win was not about strategy or whether or a quick start out of the gate. The past had proved otherwise. This win had to do with faith, which cannot be fought by reason and thrives when faced with doubt. Faith’s only enemy is disbelief. And on June 6, 2015, there were legions of Pharoah’s believers at Belmont. Owner Ahmed Zayat, trainer Bob Baffert, and jockey Victor Espinoza will always be credited for the win that day, but it was also a victory for those who love and believe in the sport. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 4 1


2016 Bill Cunningham by Chris(topher) Meigher After my dear mother died, Bill was the last one to call me “Christopher,” always in his soft-toned, near-squeaky voice. It was pure Bill, and it reminded me of my childhood. As countless others have lovingly remarked, Bill was as likeable as he was genuine. And yet, his modest mannerisms aside, Bill was also a sharp-elbowed competitor who was never bashful about getting the shot he saw…and wanted. Not unlike the legendary Slim Aarons, Bill Cunningham well understood his near-iconic standing in the social scene. Like Slim, he never took it too seriously; it was always just his job.

142 QUEST

Even when surrounded by would-be “swans” and stilettotoed wannabe climbers, all vying for his camera’s attention, Bill was never taken in by the spectacle. He was all about the shot. And the clothes. I once commented to Marian Sulzberger Heiskell of the New York Times clan that “Bill Cunningham is your secret weapon.” Marian paused, then thoughtfully replied: “No, Bill is far more. He’s our street conscience.” In the time since his death, we have missed Bill’s gentle presence and discerning decency, but we share comfort in knowing that he loved what he did. As did we.


2017 Donald Trump by Taki Theodoracopulos China, North Korea, and ISIS aside, here is what the 45th American president has to contend with: a small group of men and women who have achieved monopoly control over the most powerful means of communication known to man, and who are exploiting this power to shape national opinion to advance their own ideological agenda. The trouble is that The Donald is no fool. He knows how to get down and dirty and play the same game. He calls them purveyors of FAKE news, and, despite their disinformation campaign, has 60 million Americans behind him. The vituperation shown by the media against Trump, however, is as unprecedented as it is unfair. Simply put, Trump’s most ardent opponents see him as an existential threat, and comparisons between Hitler and Trump abound. The mainstream media has failed to understand that The Donald’s victory at the polls was no fluke; he captured the populist shift while news organizations like the Times and the networks were bewailing the plight of transgenders or some other exotic bunch of the New Democratic coalition. Just like a Pat Buchanan speech delivered by Spiro Agnew long ago, Trump is now attacking an effete corps of impudent snobs who characterize themselves as intellectuals but who are self-appointed analysts, the majority of whom express their hostility to whatever Trump has to say. Hence the 45th president’s answer to them: You will not have a free hand in selecting, presenting, and interpreting the great issues—I will. This will be a long and brutal battle as the Fourth Estate does not like its power challenged by anyone, especially a populist like Trump. My personal worry is not North Korea or ISIS, but the media, who have proven that they actually are the enemy of the American people.

2018 A LE X I LU B O M I R S K I

The Royal Wedding by Elizabeth Meigher

Prince Harry and former Hollywood actress Meghan Markle’s wedding took place at St George’s Chapel in Windsor on May 19, 2018. To many, the match seemed hopelessly romantic, as the two met through mutual friends, and what might have seemed like an unlikely pairing ended in a royal wedding. That the two wed was certainly considered remarkable, as their marriage broke from royal tradition in a number of ways. Meghan was not British (an American!), Meghan had been married (a divorcée!), the bride was not Protestant (Meghan was raised Catholic), and Meghan’s father, Thomas Markle, is white, while her mother, Doria Ragland, is black. Additionally, in breaking with the royal norm, Meghan’s father did not walk her down the aisle—Meghan walked down the aisle alone, while Prince Charles accompanied her in her final steps. Yes, Harry and Meghan decided to do things their own way for their royal wedding. For example, the two did not share the traditional “kiss” on the Buckingham Palace balcony. Ever since the weddings of Queen Victoria’s children, it has been customary for royal couples to take to the balcony at Buckingham Palace to acknowledge the crowds below. In 1981, Charles and Diana were the first royal couple to share a kiss in front of the cheering crowds, later followed by Andrew and Sarah, and William and Kate. Because Harry and Meghan chose to marry in Windsor instead of London, there was no balcony appearance. Nevertheless, that didn't stop the newlywed couple from sharing a kiss for the cameras in Windsor. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 4 3


2019 The Notre Dame de Paris fire broke out on April 15, 2019, just after 6 p.m., beneath the roof of the cathedral in Paris. An electrical short was the likely spark for a blaze that nearly burned the famous cathedral to the ground. Fortunately, firefighters followed a protocol developed for this type of disaster, knowing which artworks to rescue—and in which order. They also knew to keep the water pressure low and to avoid spraying the stained-glass windows as to not to shatter the hot glass. A lot was saved, but reconstruction will continue for the next few years. (The cathedral plans to open in 2024.) It was recently reported that the lattice of the roof, which was badly burned, will be replaced by oak tress in the former royal forest of Bercé. Pictured here is a 65-foot-tall oak tree, one of many being felled as part of the ongoing efforts to rebuild Notre Dame. The tree eventually will join over 1,000 other oaks being used to replace the base of the fallen spire engulfed by the fire. “What matters isn’t the roof and vault so much as the sanctuary they protect,” said Aline Magnien, director of the Historical Monuments Research Laboratory. “The heart of Notre Dame had been saved.” And we have high hopes Norte Dame will come out this experience enriched. 1040 4QQUUE ES ST T

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Notre Dame by Alex Travers


Covid-19 Pandemic by Chris Meigher

2020

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

I admit to inherent optimism, but in the early months of 2020, it was not easy to see around the tight corners of this growing pandemic. By late Spring I was convinced we were beginning to gain back ground—encouraged by how remarkably well (most) people had responded to managing their lives, and their families during the eeriest of Aprils. Still, it was hard to see light at the end of the tunnel. Businesses remained closed, travel halted, and hospitals were overwhelmed with Covid patients. Major streets in New York, London, and Paris were near empty. There were no visitors at the Louvre ... you could hear a penny drop in Piccadilly Circus ... Times Square was ghostly. Yet, we remained hopeful, carefully regaining our moral footing and re-plotting our national course as a beacon of humanity throughout the free world. Fighting a negative tide, our United States produced successful vaccines in less than nine months. Perhaps it's why our Country, and our republic's imperfect system of popular democracy, will survive and prosper in the trying postpandemic years ahead of us. Today, there is much good rising around us as we reclaim the uprooted needs of our families, our neighbors, and our planet. Let us each agree not to forget the lessons we’ve gleaned during this most troubled time: learning to better live with others, and indeed within ourselves.◆

M AY 2 0 2 1 0 0


J E W E L RY JOURNAL

A pendant and earrings from the Chaos Collection; Asprey’s London flagship. Below: The Duchess of Cambridge wearing Asprey.

ASPREY HAS always embraced eclectic beauty, and its Chaos Collection features items with asymmetric stones and cuts in a kaleidoscopic range of colors. As you can see here, the stunning Colour Chaos Pendant in 18-ct. white gold and Colour Chaos Earrings in 18-ct. white gold both feature unique colors like blue topaz, amethyst, peridot, and citrine accented with diamond bale. The Chaos Collection is named in reference to the deliberately disordered layout of stones used in each piece, encompassing a range of shapes, cuts, and tones. Chaos, the brand says, celebrates nonconformity and the beauty of the irregular, and the result is a collection of distinctive pieces encapsulating Asprey’s trademark of playful eccentricity. 146 QUEST

For over two centuries, Asprey has been regarded as a top British luxury lifestyle brand. It has a rich legacy in creating beautiful jewelry, being featured in Titanic with a remake of the Coeur de la Mer necklace, specially created for the Oscarwinning film. Asprey also has spectacular jewelry workshops and offers special bespoke commissions. The brand’s product assortment includes jewelry, leather goods, accessories, silver, watches, clocks, first edition leather bound books, china, crystal, games, silk and accessories. Asprey even holds a Royal Warrant from HRH Prince of Wales for jewelry and silver. Be sure to explore Asprey’s boutiques in New York, Palm Beach, and East Hampton. There truly is something for everyone. For more information, visit asprey.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F A S P R E Y; B L A I R G A B LE P H OTO G R A P H Y

ASPREY


J E W E L RY J O U R NA L

Pieces from Vhernier’s new Palloncino ring and earring collection.

CO U RTE S Y O F V H E R N I E R

VHERNIER PLAYFUL, REFINED, AND, unconventional, the newly debuted Palloncino Collection by Vhernier is simply stunning. Based on the faithful reproduction of its namesake brooch (which was designed in 1984 and went on to become one of the brand’s bestselling items) these earclips are made in white gold, with a rope of wonderful diamonds, pairing well white motherof-pearl and magnificent turquoise and rock crystal. The clip-back style can be worn alone or paired with another Palloncino earring—but Vhernier suggests it be in another color. The Palloncino rings also make great gift ideas for Mother’s Day or for anyone special in your life. In 1984 Vhernier was founded in Valenza as a goldsmith workshop. In 2001, Carlo Traglio became the President of Vhernier; he made the company grow while respecting

its tradition and history, with the help of expert craftsmen who are thoroughly familiar with every secret of this art. Each piece of jewelry is unique, handmade, with a shape and volume influenced by modern and contemporary art movements, the true cultural heritage of the company. Bracelets are golden bands: on women’s wrists, they magically open up revealing unexpected precious stones. The Disco line, with its reflections and light effects, is inspired by an ancient painting tradition—tricks with mirrors. The Animalier brooch collection are unique sculptures, sought after by collectors worldwide. Rings, with their soft, seductive lines, evoke the Futurist volumes. And essential shapes characterize the Calla line: vibrating slender cones, made of gold, diamonds, and ebony. For more information, visit vhernier.com. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 4 7


J E W E L RY J O U R NA L

ELIZABETH GAGE’S approach to design is as unique and avant-garde as the jewels themselves. She combines different elements in her work, which she chooses for their individual beauty: exquisite stones, ancient bronzes, beautiful carvings, baroque pearls, anything where the shape and color inspire her. Having trained for six years as a goldsmith, her first major commission was for Cartier in 1968. A resounding success, Elizabeth went on to win many accolades including the prestigious Queens Award for Export, British Jewellery Designer of the Year, and the coveted De Beers Diamond Award for her Agincourt Ring, described as an engineering masterpiece. 148 QUEST

In 2017, Elizabeth was immensely proud to be named in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List to receive an MBE. Her enthusiasm for creating beautiful jewelry continues and it is her unrivalled, and her custom creations are sought-after throughout the world. Today, Elizabeth no longer works at the bench, instead employing goldsmiths to bring to life her exclusive designs. Elizabeth dedicates herself to her design work and to her business; she still designs every piece that bears her name. For more information, visit elizabeth-gage.com. A collection of Elizabeth Gage’s jewelry, including the Mandarin Garnet Valois Ring and Lapis Lazuli Bracelet. Below: Elizabeth Gage.

CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H G A G E

ELIZABETH GAGE


J E W E L RY J O U R NA L

Clockwise, from top left: Theodora Cuffs; Fulco “Y” Necklace; Lily Bracelet; Quatrefoil Earclips in Aquamarine and Sapphire. Below: Ward Landrigan and Nico Landrigan.

CO U RTE S Y O F V E R D U R A

VERDURA IT HAS been said that Duke Fulco di Verdura was the most original and protean designer of the 20th Century. Born into Sicilian aristocracy, his designs were inspired by classical patterns and natural forms, brightened with intense colors and infused with a sophisticated wit. Fulco’s early collaboration with Coco Chanel shattered the status quo in jewelry design in the early 1930s when, for the first time in centuries, gemstones were pressed into yellow gold in splendid contradiction to one another. Coming to America in 1934, the young duke’s intimate and highly personalized designs for Golden Age Hollywood personalities and sophisticated New York society immediately set him apart. He became an “American jeweler” on September 1, 1939 when his friends Cole Porter and Vincent Astor financed his debut on Fifth Avenue, the day the war broke out in Europe.

However, Verdura’s international sensibility and Italian roots stayed with him and his design aesthetic throughout his career. In 1985, Ward Landrigan, head of Sotheby’s U.S. jewelry department, purchased the company, including its archive of nearly 10,000 original sketches, and set about to bring Verdura’s timeless designs to a new generation of collectors. His son Nico joined the company in 2004 and currently serves as President alongside Ward, Verdura’s CEO. The Verdura collection of fine jewelry—including the pieces you see here—is available at the company’s New York salon at 745 Fifth Avenue overlooking Central Park as well as select retail partners, including Bergdorf Goodman, select Neiman Marcus locations, Betteridge, Obsidian in London, and Mindham Fine Jewelry in Toronto. For more information, visit verdura.com.◆ M AY 2 0 2 1 1 4 9


“They were smart and sophisticated, with an air of independence about them, and so casual about their looks and clothes and manners as to be almost slapdash. I don’t know if I realized as soon as I began seeing them that they represented the wave of the future, but I do know I was drawn to them. I shared their restlessness, understood their determination to free themselves of the Victorian shackles of the pre-World War I era and find out for themselves what life was all about.” —Colleen Moore.

HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES; HULTON-DEUTSCH COLLECTION/CORBIS

ROARING TWENTIES REDUX ?


Clockwise, from above: In the 1920s, the literary party was the event of the season, complete with drunkenness, obscene nursery rhymes, and those devastated by the “lack of refinement in their idols”; female flappers kicking, dancing, and having fun while musicians perform during a Charleston dance contest at the Parody Club; Betty Field dances the Charleston in the 1949 film of The Great Gatsby. DECEM MBAY E R 22002210 10501


COLUMBIA

COMING INTO THE LIGHT. Someone asked recently how I would compare Society in New York today in the 2020s with Society a century ago in the 1920s. I understand the curiosity. The world is now a very different place thanks to the technology that first took hold of our behavior and habits a century ago. The 1920s in America were the beginning of the modern age. They are remembered as “the Roaring 20s,” or “the Jazz Age” when our great-grandparents began changing the rules. At that time, finally the country had recovered from the disaster of the Civil War which had ended more than 50 years— having profoundly and even tragically affecting many families North and South with losses of life, limb and/or fortune. But the 1920s was the New: the telephone, the electric light, the Silent Screen, and then the little radio, had “suddenly” become available to all. The horse and buggy was replaced, launched by Henry Ford’s Model T. The new mobility created a “smaller world.” The camera became mainstream and the “motion” picture entered the equation of communication. “Liberation” was unleashed. Women radically shed the old fashions, “exposing” their sex appeal (and personal comfort). Skirts from centuries of lower-ankle length, suddenly were 10502QQUUEESSTT

UNDERWOOD ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES; PATRICK MCMULLAN

THE LOST GENERATION


Clockwise, from above: Opera dames Lady Decies (neé Elizabeth Wharton Drexel) and Mrs. George Washington Kavanaugh; Ann Ziff (left) at The Met Opera Gala, 2019; Marina Kellen French and Susan Braddock. Opposite, from above: Lavish parties were all the rage in the 1920s as people looked to make the most of their newfound freedom—pictured here are people in elegant attire dancing at a formal party, Hollywood, California, 1920s; Tom Kean and Emilia Saint Amand at The Met Opera Gala, 2019. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 5 3


10504QQUUEES STT

The “changes” were not without complaints. Every so often someone wrote to a newspaper about Jazz. With an almost religious fervor, they dissected the current popular tunes, defined as utter vulgarity, and accused them of being the source of all sorts of contemporary degeneration. American Jazz became popular all over the world. A century later, the decade that launched so many changes in our civilization is now remembered almost quaintly with amusement. At the time the machine had “advanced” us to the ultimate, or so it seemed. Space travel remained almost outrageous science fiction. Today you can pick up your iPhone and get Singapore (and your image) on the line in a matter of three seconds. Privacy as it was honored and protected a century ago no longer exists. The population of the planet has increased eight times since then; gender is being re-defined by surgical manipulation; and we’ve got a camera exploring on MARS with the ultimate question of possible habitation. And Society has simply been redefined as the Elite and measurable entirely by financial calculations. The result from all of this progress is only the question of “what more can we expect of ourselves?” —David Patrick Columbia

PH H UO L TTO ONC A RR ED CH I TI VGEO/ G ES E TH TY E RIEM A G E S ; P A T R I C K M C M U L L A N

shortened right up to the knee and even higher in some cases. The old rules were tossed. Relationships were beginning to be redefined. And the ladies took up smoking. Cigarettes, in public! And as for Society itself—still high and mighty—the sharply witty Dorothy Parker wrote in the original version of Vanity Fair: “From this carnival of vulgarity the fashionable society of the time of course held strictly aloof. They took their pleasure decorously, behind their own mahogany doors, at Delmonico’s, the theatre, or opera, and once a year at the Charity Ball which was then held at the Academy of Music.” In 1919, a new law created Prohibition: No More Booze for anyone. Ha Ha. At the same time speakeasies opened (and “secretly”) to flout the law; and “nightclubs” were born. Society was opening up from the old rules and new members, christened by one social columnist as “Café Society.” That was Then, This is now: In America, everything was changing radically. Even the popular music had a new message for the public about love and kisses and missing the Moon. The word “jazz,” originally slang meaning, “catch-all” soon became music associated by the black musicians who naturally created a sound that today is formally classified as a kind of popular music. In the 1920s it became part of the central elements of the modern man and woman.


PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

Clockwise, from above: Clara Bow on a trip to Catalina, 1927; Rihanna at a film premiere; Miley Cyrus. Opposite, from above: Women standing by a convertible car, wearing fur lined coats, 1920s.

MMAY AY 22002211105 0 5


SAFFIR

Clockwise from left: Director and producer Cecil B. DeMille and cinematographer Victor Milner on the set of Cleopatra at Paramount Studios in 1934; The Cinema Society hosted a screening of Julie Taymor’s film, The Glorias, at Donna Karan’s waterfront home in East Hampton, starring Julianne Moore as Gloria Steinem; Andrew Saffir, founder of the Cinema Society; Gloria Swanson in the final scene of Sunset Boulevard, directed by Billy Wilder, 1950. Opposite page, from top: The premiere of Starz’ “Power Book II: Ghost” in Water Mill, New York, September 5, 2020; drive-in theater in the 1950s; from left, actors Wallace Beery and Robert Florey, ASC founding member Arthur Edeson, star Douglas

I’ve been an ardent movie lover since I was a little kid. Certainly my tastes have evolved, from getting excited over annual airings of The Wizard of Oz (remember when movies you loved came around and were only available on TV once a year?) to the black and white splendor of David Fincher’s Mank or the tender and stirring beauty of Minari, this year. The theaters have changed too—I remember going to Charlie Chaplin revivals and Annie Hall multiple times at the Trans-Lux theater on Madison and 85th Street. And there was the Thalia, 8th Street Playhouse, the Beekman, the Baronet/Coronet, and of course, the glamorous Ziegfeld. Sadly all gone, giving way to formidable successors like the iPic, with big reclining seats and cocktail service. This past year has of course given us all much to think about, and if anything, it has reinforced my knows-no-bounds love of the movies. More than ever, I’m reminded of the power of film— 156 QUEST

OPPOSITE PAGE: BFA; NEW YORK TIMES CO./HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES)

CINEMA

THEASC.COM; GRIFFIN LIPSON/BFA.COM; SILVER SCREEN COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES.

Fairbanks, and director Allan Dwan during the production of Robin Hood (1922).


to lift, to transport, to elate, to inspire, to educate, to heal, to empower, to enthrall, and of course, to entertain. And it’s not just the movies I long for, but the theatrical experience as a whole. Sitting in a crowded, dark theater, inhaling buttery popcorn, and savoring the latest Hollywood offering or venerable classic, amongst fellow movie lovers, communally gasping, laughing, fighting back tears, and applauding, as a group. Fortunately, I’ve been able to continue what I do and what I love, with multiple outdoor screenings and (retro!) drive-ins over the last year (who would have predicted the drive-in would make a comeback?), and thank goodness for Netflix, HBO, Amazon, hulu and the like, who kept us entertained and sane at home for the past fourteen months, but I can’t wait to sit in a real theater again, lights dimming, coming attractions unveiled, and a John Williams score building to a goosebump-inducing and eye-watering crescendo. To quote the Norma Desmond character in Sunset Boulevard, just before she famously tells director Cecil B. DeMille that she’s ready for her close-up… “there’s nothing else. Just us, and the cameras, and those wonderful people out there in the dark.” See you at the movies! —Andrew Saffir (Founder, Cinema Society) DECEMBER 2020 00


THOMAS

From above: The exterior of the Cotton Club in Harlem; this 1927 program for the Cotton Club advertised Cab Calloway and his orchestra. Opposite page, clockwise from left: The entrance of Tao Downtown in Chelsea; American bandleader and singer Cab Calloway leads an orchestra during a New Year’s Ball at the Cotton Club in New York, 1937; bottle service at Tao Group’s Marquee Vegas before the pandemic; a speakeasy during the Prohibition era. 10508QQUUEES STT

HISTORY HAS NOT been without its ups and downs. In the last hundred or so years, the world has seen two world wars, the Spanish Flu pandemic, and a host of other tragedies in between. In my lifetime there were no world wars, no global pandemics that reached the U.S. shores, and the many tragedies that did occur around the world were just news stories to many of us. That was until early 2020 when things started to unravel with the outbreak of COVID-19. COVID-19 seems to have touched everyone. It was a pretty mixed bag of who got dealt what hand, but everyone was dealt something. We saw many lose their jobs, some lose loved ones, and small group see their fortunes grow as a result, but one thing that everyone faced was that we all had to quarantine. And while some had a more favorable quarantine than others, we all had to miss seeing friends and loved ones for what seems like an eternity. Now, more than a year later, many are still quarantining and playing it safe. But at least now, I think it’s safe to say we all see some light at the end of the tunnel and each day that light seems to get brighter and brighter. People are ready. Ready to hug friends, ready to get back to their office and see coworkers in person, and, of course, they are ready to PARTY!

GETTY IMAGES; TAO GROUP; BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES

NIGHTLIFE


No place is more ready to get back to life and party it up than New York City, which, as we all know, was hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. New Yorkers are now more ready than anyone to get back into party mode, by which I mean doing the things they once did for fun. Whether it was boozy brunches with friends, seeing their favorite bands at Madison Square Garden, going out to big dinners at their favorite restaurants or, my favorite, dancing at nightclubs until 4 a.m. Whatever it is that people are into, they will come roaring back like we did in the Roaring ’20s, only this time... alcohol is legal. Yes, the Roaring ’20s... It was a time after both the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the end of the Great War, now known as WWI. People had a new appreciation for life and the finer things that were put on hold for so many for what seemed like an eternity. In this new “Roaring ’20s” that many think is on the horizon, we will see it all. Those who made new fortunes, buying big bottles at night clubs and old money cringing at their name appearing in the gossip columns after a hard scandalous night of partying, perhaps too hard one night. Or the young adults who just turned 21 last year and didn’t get the chance to take advantage of it and see their favorite world renowned DJ at a club they are just now allowed to enter. No matter what you fancy, you’ll hopefully be able to get back to it sooner than later. —Rich Thomas (Partner, TAO Group Hospitality) M AY 2 0 2 1 0 0


BEARD

Clockwise from upper left: Veronica Beard brand co-founders, Veronica Swanson Beard and Veronica Miele Beard; actress Janet Leigh, born in 1927—wearing a belted swimsuit reminiscent of the era in which she was born ; shopping in New York City in midtown in 1920s. Opposite page, from above: Four young women dressed in 1920s era high fashion in San Francisco; two looks

IMAGES. OPPOSITE PAGE: GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY VERONICA BEARD

IMAGE COURTESY VERONICA BEARD; PICTORIAL PRESS LTD/ALAMY; KIRN VINTAGE STOCK/CORBIS VIA GETTY

from Veronica Beard’s Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear collection


FASHION AFTER THE SPANISH flu came the Roaring Twenties. World War 1 had ended, women were getting to vote for the first time, and people wanted to get dressed up, go out, and live life to the fullest. The Jazz Age ensued, and with it came sequins, flapper dresses, and a general looseness to the fit and feel of all clothing as everyone danced and shimmied through the 1920s. Will glamour return with the hopeful close of this pandemic or is athleisure here to stay as people hit the road traveling… Both? The sisters-in-law who co-founded eponymous fashion brand Veronica Beard have kept things moving during Covid—with stylish activewear that can easily transition from home back into the office—and beyond. We asked them to share a few of their thoughts on the future of fashion Will people embrace athleisure and continue that trend well into the 20s as they travel and head back to work? Yes, but updated. We show sweatpants in prints, for example, and styled with heels. Her life may have changed but that doesn’t mean she doesn’t want to look good and feel good! Or will the hopeful end of the pandemic see people who have been craving glamour getting dressed up again—donning sequins and evening inspired attire—or both? We believe women will want to get dressed up again. We have been wearing heels and dresses to the office and can’t wait for the glamour to come back. We have an allover sequin dress for fall! Fashion of all forms seems much more accepted these days— how will fashion be the same/different as we step into the current 20s? Or to put thhings more simply, what trends to you see forming as we step into September? For us, it is always about a classic jacket with jeans and a

T-shirt—and really high heels. Who do you think will be wearing sequin dresses in the fall and where will they be wearing them? Dinner parties at home? Private events? Galas? All of the above! ◆ —Veronica Miele Beard & Veronica Swanson Beard (Co-Founders, Veronica Beard) M AY 2 0 2 1 1 6 1


R E TR E OTS R PO EC SP TE IV C ET I V E

B L A C K | B RYA N | B R O W N | T R AV E R S

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST This column serves to chronicle the parties of the PYTs. Here, we raise a glass (of Champagne, of course) to the adventures of Quest’s A-listers—past and present—as they navigated their names onto the guest list.

Lauren Remington Platt dancing with Euan Rellie at New Yorkers for Children in 2012.


Elizabeth Kurpis at the American

Ali Wise, Tinsley Mortimer, and

Museum of Natural History in 2010.

Shoshanna Gruss at the American Jessica and Ashley Hart at Save Venice in 2013.

Museum of Natural History in 2010.

Harry Brant at New Yorkers for the Children in 2013.

Ames Brown, Elizabeth Quinn Brown, and

Claire Distenfeld and Zani Gugelmann at

Oliver Ames at the American Museum of Natural

New Yorkers for the Children in 2013.

History’s “Spring Safari” dance in 2010.

Kelly Van Ingen, Susannah Vasu,

Andrew Saffir, Olivia Palermo, Daniel Benedict, and Johannes Huebl at New Yorkers for the Children

Karlie Kloss and Derek Blasberg at

and Genevieve Bahrenburg at The Frick

at the Mandarin Oriental in 2013.

a Cartier event in 2012.

Collection in 2013. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 6 3


K E L LY

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY

David Beckham and David Grutman.


Clockwise from top left: Alesso and Erin Michelle Cummins; Zachary Weiss; Kim Kardashian West and Jonathan Cheban; Vanessa Hudgens;

JOE SCHILDHORN/BFA.COM

Future and Pharrell Williams.

OPENING OF THE GOODTIME IN MIAMI TO CELEBRATE THE opening of the Goodtime Hotel in Miami Beach, business partners David Grutman and Pharrell Williams hosted a cocktail party on the hotel’s pool deck in collaboration with David Beckham, who was toasting the season opener of his Inter Miami CF. Guests of the joint celebration included Kim Kardashian West, Victoria Beckham, Vanessa Hudgens, Rick Ross, Alesso, Jasmine Sanders, Cuba Gooding, Jr., and more. M AY 2 0 2 1 1 6 5


YGL

CELEBRATING ISLAND WHIMSY AT THE COLONY IN PALM BEACH TO TOAST Celerie Kemble’s new book, Island Whimsy, Kemble Interiors hosted a private booksigning at The Colony Hotel, where the team recently completed a renovation of the main lobby with custom de Gournay wallpaper. The reception took place during the trunk show of Pearl by Lela Rose, which raised funds for Leukemia Lymphoma Society (Palm Beach Treasure Coast).

Amy Cestra and Baby Charlie Cestra with Tammy Pompea

CAPEHART

Tory Miller Casey and Keithley Miller

Celerie Kemble Caroline Bramlett and Amy Golden 166 QUEST

Cameron and Monika Preston


AMAFFI’S NEW YORK FLAGSHIP BOUTIQUE LAUNCH LAST MONTH, Amaffi launched the opening of its flagship boutique in New York City, where guests previewed the brand’s decadent perfumes made from the world’s rarest and highest quality natural ingredients, each bottle retailing for around $7,000. The perfumery was founded in Switzerland six years ago and boasts locations in London and Moscow. Now, its New York City boutique is decorated with interiors as extravagant as the scents, featuring black lacquer furniture and crystal throughout. u

Kate Young, Didier-Alexandre Ambroise, and Taylor Yunker Naomi Campbell

MATTEO PRANDONI/BFA.COM

Olivia Palermo

Jessica Williams and Grace Santa Maria Live performers at the boutique launch M AY 2 0 2 1 1 6 7


SNAPSHOT

A LIFE WELL LIVED

168 QUEST

Sir.” To which the Duke of Edinburgh, tiller-in-hand, stood up and hailed back: “WHO’s water?!” Born into a modest tier of Greek royalty, he never fully bought into the pomp and often foppish ways of Royal protocol. Yet, he more than honored his oath sworn duty—to The Crown and to The Queen, the later often calling the Prince “her strength and her stay.” Exhibiting both the devotion he shared for the monarch, plus the drollness of his humor, he was once asked if during their long marriage he’d ever harbored second thoughts about marrying the future Queen of England. Phillip dryly replied: “Divorce? Never!” and then, after a momentary pause: “Murder? Often!” —Chris Meigher Clockwise, from top left: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip; Prince Philip with Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex; former Top Cadet at the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth; The Royal Family’s children and grandsons trail Prince Philip’s Land Rover hearse during the ceremonial procession, with Queen Elizabeth’s Rolls Royce behind them.

WPA P O O L ; G E T T Y I M A G E S

PHILIP MOUNTBATTEN was a man’s man and a gentleman’s gent. During 73 years of marriage to the Queen, he never wavered in his role as prince consort, and complained even less. He was authentically himself and shunned the spotlight of Royal favor upon his modestly attained, yet significant achievements. Such was his Duke’s duty, which he performed with humble grace as a model to all. Influenced by his un-coddled school days at Gordonstoun, he challenged young people to explore adventure outside of the classroom and to vigorously support their communities by example, and not just academic rhetoric. A Royal Naval Officer and an avid sailor, he was often seen competing during England’s Cowes Week where he participated in several one design regattas, including the Dragon class. When I was a crew member on the U.S. Admiral’s Cup team competing at Cowes, I recall a story that perfectly captured the Prince’s wry and subtle wit: on a close-hauled course in a rough Solent sea, Prince Phillip’s boat had tacked perhaps too close to another competitor and that skipper yelled across to Phillip, “You’re tacking in my water,


©Verdura. All rights reserved. Please visit verdura.com for more information about our flagship and retail partner locations.

The Sunburst Cuff

The Theodora Cuff

The Maltese Cross “Midas” Bracelet

The Maltese Cross Bracelet

The Maltese Cross Stone Cuff

7 4 5 f i f t h av e n u e – 1 2 t h f l o o r , n e w y o r k verdura.com

2 1 2 .7 5 8 . 3 3 8 8


When t he answer me ans t he world.

GREENWICH

|

PA L M B E A C H

b e t ter i d ge .com

|

VA I L

|

ASPEN

Profile for QUEST Magazine

Quest Magazine May 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Quest Magazine May 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Profile for questmag

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded