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$5.00 MAY 2014

THE JEWELRY ISSUE

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This fully renovated four bedroom period home echoes the grandeur of 19th century Greenwich in one of its lovely residential areas. Traditional layout with all the modern amenities. WEB# QU887329 GREENWICH $2,649,000

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PREMIER MID-COUNTRY Located near Greenwich Country Club, this 8000+ square foot Colonial built in 2008 features only the finest finishes. Joanne Mancuso Five suites, chef’s kitchen, custom landscaping with pool RE Salesperson M: 203.667.3887 and spa. WEB# QU871962 GREENWICH $5,450,000

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PRIVATE COUNTRY SETTING Enjoy the solitude of this private property located minutes from town. Gracious one story living with elegant, sunny Debby Gardiner rooms. Sophisticated four-bedroom home on two acres RE Salesperson M: 203.253.4038 with pool. WEB# QU905246 GREENWICH $1,875,000

We are affiliated with Christie’s International Real Estate in Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess counties.


112

100

CONTENTS

122

The Jewelry I ssue 100 In the Deco Suite of The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel, REMAINS OF THE DAY

spring jewels—much like other distinguished guests—find a home away from

home in the meticulously maintained corners of an Upper East Side institution.

by

108

Daniel Cappello

A TIME FOR POWER

and

Lily Hoagland,

photographed by

A collection of the variety of timepieces that defined our

44 presidents—from pocketwatches to wristwatches.

112

GREEN GLOW

& Hudson’s new book about them, Emeralds.

118

by

Elizabeth Quinn Brown

A look at the enduring allure of emeralds and at Thames

PHRASING ROCK AND ROLL

by

D avid Patrick Columbia

Lisa Robinson’s There Goes Gravity: A Life in

Rock and Roll etches a wild path of rock journalism.

122

TIME AFTER TIME

by

Alex R. Travers

Our men’s watch guide highlights the lastest timepieces

that the well-dressed man should never be seen without.

128

Julie Skarratt

PERFECT TIMING

by

Alex R. Travers

Reporting back from Baselworld on tweaks to the tourbillon,

the rise of women’s watches, and a record-breaking price point.

132

JAR: GENIUS AND MYTHOLOGY

Arthur Rosenthal, a.k.a. JAR, is also the most mysterious.

by

Tanya Dukes

The world’s most revered living jeweler, Joel by

L ily H oagland

108


60

144

CONTENTS 66

C olumns 22 The trees are blossoming and along comes pretty little May... D P C 60 Paloma Picasso in August of 1980, on the brink of becoming a jewelry star. 62 The New York skyline doesn’t impress much anymore. T T 64 Princess Grace, the jet set, and the glamour days of aviation’s glory years. L S 66 Shower mom with a bouquet of gifts. D C E M 74 Why the Marlton Hotel’s Margaux is on all of downtown’s speed dials. D C 76 The National Jewelry Institute celebrates ten years with a gala at the Morgan Library. 80 Same Sky jewelry is helping to empower the women of Rwanda. L H 82 Tying the knot in Boston, New York, and Palm Beach. E Q B 88 The charities of Palm Beach are reaping the benefits of Scott Snyder’s artful sense of style. 98 See what’s budding and who’s buzzing around town as Memorial Day approaches. 138 DANNIJO’s dynamic jewelry duo has a philanthropic eye, too. D S 140 What’s happening with the junior set in the city. E Q B 144 Nan Kempner’s wit, legend, and iconic style stand the test of time. E M SOCIAL DIARY

by

avid

atrick

olumbia

HARRY BENSON OBSERVATIONS

by

aki

heodoracopulos

NOSTALGIA

FRESH FINDS

by

by

aniel

appello and

CANTEENS

lizabeth

by

aniel

by

ily

iz

mith

eigher

appello

JEWELRY

PHILANTHROPY WEDDINGS

by

lizabeth

oagland

uinn

rown

by

anielle

DESIGN

SOCIAL CALENDAR

GUEST APPEARANCES

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST SNAPSHOT

by

lizabeth

by

uinn

lizabeth

nyder

rown

eigher

66


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

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LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

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DREW ALTIZER HARRY BENSON LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN JOE SCHILDHORN JULIE SKARRATT ANNIE WATT


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EDITOR’S LETTER

These gems have life in them: Detail from “Remains of the Day,” shot by Julie Skarratt (left); famed sapphire brooch “La Rose de Bourbon” by Michele della Valle (right).

Myron Cohen had a great story about jewelry and their relevence to relationships: A businessman once boarded a plane to find, sitting next to him, an elegant woman wearing the largest, most stunning diamond ring he had ever seen. He asked her about it. “This is the Klopman diamond,” she said. “It is beautiful, but it’s like the Hope diamond; there is a terrible curse that goes with it.” “What’s the curse?” the man asked. “Mr. Klopman.” u

Lily Hoagland

ACCORDING TO A Chinese proverb—although, really, can you

trust any sentence that starts “according to a chinese proverb”— it’s better to have a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without. Well, we think that’s setting the bar too low and that our pebbles, diamonds, and any other stones available should all be flawless. This Jewelry Issue has clearly spoiled us. But seriously, how can we not be spoiled when we were able to play with beautiful pieces from Harry Winston, Fred Leighton, and the rest of the best in the jewelry biz for our shoot, “Remains of the Day.” The scintillating (pun absolutely intended) photographer Julie Skarratt captures the lively question of where women’s jewels can end up throughout the course of a day...or evening. Though the old trick of leaving a bracelet at a lover’s house so that you will have to meet again becomes very imprudent when said bracelet is worth the price of a private jet. But ladies are not the only ones with baubles to ogle this month, as we have laid out some of the best new watches to hit the market. And to see what a man’s choice of timepiece says about him, we have a roundup of what past Presidents have sported on their powerful wrists and fobs. 20 QUEST

ON THE COVER: Clockwise from top left: Marisa Berenson wearing a Bulgari necklace of gold, diamonds, rubies, and emeralds, photographed by Gianni Turillazzi, circa 1970; model wearing Van Cleef & Arpels diamond and emerald jewelry, photographed by Bert Stern, 1966 (courtesy of Corbis); Ruth Knowles photographed by Erwin Blumenfeld for Vogue, May, 1949; Lisa Fonssagrives in a beaded evening dress by Sophie Gimbel, photographed by Horst P. Horst for Vogue, 1940; Astrid Heeren wearing Schlumberger jewelry, photographed by Bert Stern, 1963; Deborah Dixon, photographed by Bert Stern, 1960.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO C IAL DIARY April cried and stepped aside / And along came pretty little May… —Carousel’s “June Is Bustin’ Out All Over,” by Oscar Hammerstein II PRETTY LITTLE MAY was preceded by about 10 days of April showers, sprinkling the heavenly pear trees that someone was inspired to plant on the streets of New York about 30 or so years ago. They continue to light up New York, affirming that spring is here. By mid-month, we had a flurry of beautiful spring days in New

York, with lots of sunshine and sudden bursts of nature to charm us out of the winter doldrums. And the first pears blossomed overnight—between a warm sunny Sunday and a cool Monday morning—some ahead of others, according to their relationship to the sun. The temperature was hover-

ing around the high 60s and the low 70s. The pear trees in New York are, truly, one of the highlights of the season. The first pears to blossom in my neighborhood were on the row along Henderson Place, on the northwest corner of East 86th Street and East End Avenue. They were first because they were in the

direct course of the sunrise. A businessman named John C. Henderson built these brick townhouses in the early 1880s, when this part of New York was sparsely settled. Gracie Mansion, which is now home to the mayor of New York, is across the road, built 80 or so years earlier in 1799. It was originally

L E N OX H I L L N E I G H B O R H O O D H O U S E G A L A AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

Ashley McDermott, Mark Gilbertson and Caroline Dean

Leslie Keno, Leigh Keno, Tom Edelman and Stephanie Foster 22 QUEST

Hayley Sarno and Patrick Mele

Tracy Johnson and Weston Quasha

Kathy Prounis and Alberto Villalobos

Andrea Stark, Mario Buatta and Libby Langdon

A N N I E WAT T

Daniel Cappello and Georgina Schaeffer


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

The Hutton-Mdivani jadeite necklace sold for $27.44 million at auction on April 7, 2014.

a country house when the city rested way down at the tip of Manhattan on a road known as Avenue B. Much of the acreage in the area was still part of the Astor Estate, which was inherited in part by Vincent Astor, who built the limestone apartment building at 120 East End in 1930. It included apartments of 10 to 19 rooms and occupied one block of Henderson Place. Henderson’s intention, according to Christopher Gray, the always fascinating architectural historian of the New York Times, was to build the houses for “persons of moderate means.” The middle class lived in townhouses in those days, many of which were rentals. The working class lived 24 QUEST

in tenements. The wealthier citizens lived in townhouses, which sometimes were mansions. Avenue B was almost an outpost from the city. Henderson built 32 houses. The architects he used were Lamb & Rich, who designed Sagamore Hill in Long Island, the now famous country house of Theodore Roosevelt. The complex on Avenue B is, according to Gray, “one of their signature works, on which they called on all the charming details in their portfolio and lavished them on the complex.” Henderson’s inspiration retains its charm, 130 years later. And it’s even more beautiful while the pears are flowering before it. As you can see from

Prince Alexis Mdivani and Barbara Hutton, wearing the jadeite necklace, were married from 1933 to 1935.

the photograph that I took (pictured), it’s not an outpost from the city anymore. That said, by nightfall it’s far from the city’s bustle. Speaking of Springtime: “very lightly, rarely leaving fingerprints”… We got a lot of mail about the “perfect funeral” of Bunny Mellon at the end of March, which you read about in the April 2014 issue of Quest. Among the letters was the following memory from Nelson Hammell of Palm Beach: “I remember many spring times ago I was slowly driving along a very rutted dirt road between Marshall and the Plains, in northern Virginia… Mrs. M was halfway up the embankment by a stone wall

clipping some early spring daffodils. I stopped to chat and she told me that this particular variety of jonquil was a native hybridizer and she had dug up some from this same spot several years before. The transplanted ones on her property always bloomed 10 days later and she knew the blooms in this particular wild spot would be ready for an arrangement she wanted for a dinner party that night. “She was dressed in wellies and a Barbour coat and she called her clippers “secateurs,” which is a word very few folks know. Mr. Baltimore, her African American driver, was behind the wheel of the muddy BMW station wagon, which had a bucket of

CO U RTE S Y O F DAV I D PAT R I C K CO LU M B I A

David Patrick Columbia’s photograph of Henderson Place, which is decorated in blossoming pear trees.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A water in the back. “We chatted for a few moments, and I told her where there was a stand of early Japanese cherry branches just ready to bloom in a neighboring woodland. I’m sure she headed right over there, just as excited as she might be when in pursuit of the most perfect piece of jewelry in a Left Bank atelier! “The Ms lived in a grand style, but they both lived it all very lightly, rarely leaving fingerprints.” Someone sent me the announcement from Christie’s that said that Barbara Hutton’s “legendary Jadeite necklace sold at auction in Hong Kong for $27.4 million, more

than double its estimate of $12.8.” It was known as the Hutton-Mdivani necklace because Hutton bought it when she was married to Prince Alexis Mdivani, one of four Romanian brothers—princelings, real or self-created— known as the Marrying Mdivanis in the 1920s and 1930s. The marriage lasted no more than a year or so, but the Mdivanis got the necklace in the divorce. Forgotten now in the contemporary life of the 21st century, Hutton was an heiress to the Woolworth fortune. Her mother, Edna Woolworth Hutton, committed suicide when Barbara was seven years old. Hutton was alone in the

apartment with her mother and found the body. Being the only child, and as her father and mother had divorced, she inherited her mother’s share of the F.W. Woolworth fortune, which measured in billions in today’s dollars. Her father, Franklyn Hutton (brother of E.F. Hutton), would soon increase her inheritance through investment so that, when she reached majority, she came into about $500 million (or $5 billion in today’s dollars). She acquired several husbands and one son (Lance Reventlow) as well as several residences, including the American ambassador’s residence in London, which she built: Winfield House. She

also acquired a drug addiction and an enormous cache of precious jewelry, which she started collecting at the age of 14. It eventually became one of the largest private collections of the 20th century, ranking up there with the Duchess of Windsor and Margaret Thompson Biddle, the American mining heiress. Prince Mdiviani’s sister Nina Mdviani kept her friendship with her sister-inlaw after the divorce from her brother and enjoyed the heiresses’ spectacular generosity. Eventually, she ended up with several pieces of Hutton’s collection, including the necklace. Nina died in 1987 and the Mdivani family sold

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H Ô P I TA L A L B E R T S C H W E I TZ E R H A I T I H O N O R E D C A R O L I N A H E R R E R A AT T H E F L A G L E R M U S E U M I N PA L M B E AC H

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the necklace in 1988 for $2 million, a major price for the time. Six years later, the buyer sold it for more than twice that amount, $4.2 million. Barbara was one of those girls who, like Elizabeth Taylor, used to like to “play” with their jewelry. She would have it all brought out and spread out on her bed while she looked it over and tried it on. One of her cousins, Marjorie Durant Dye (a granddaughter of Marjorie Merriweather Post), went to visit Barbara one day in the mid-1960s, when she was living at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. (It was said that she had gone through most of her 28 QUEST

Alfy and Raysa Fanjul

Mario Nievera and Cynthia Boardman

fortune by then.) Barbara was surveying her jewels, which were splayed on her bed, while visiting with her cousin Marge. She was fondling an extraordinary emerald necklace that took Marge’s eye. Marge commented, “Oh, Barbara, that’s so beautiful.” Barbara passed it over to her, saying, “Try it on.” “Oh, it looks beautiful on you,” Barbara enthused, when Marge put it on, adding, “Take it…” “Oh, Barbara, I can’t take it…” Marge replied. “No, take it, it looks so good on you,” Barbara insisted. Marge Dye didn’t take it.

Allie and Lee Hanley

Rudy and Judith Giuliani

Bill Mann and Evelyn Harrison

Later, she told her grandmother, Mrs. Post, the story. Her grandmother responded: “You should have taken it. She’s only going to give it away to somebody else, maybe even a stranger.” Barbara had what her late friend, John Galliher, called “inconsequential generosity”—giving away something for no reason other than because of a whim in the moment. Barbara died in 1979 at the age of 67. She was living in a suite at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel and was said to have died with only $3,000 in her bank account, having spent an estimated $900 million in her

lifetime. However, despite the great attrition of her collection either by “inconsequential generosity” or by certain individuals helping themselves in a variety of ways, a great many jewels were still in her possession at the time of her death. Her cousin Marge, who is also Dina Merrill’s niece, still lives in Southern California, now in her mid-eighties—a virtual recluse. Marking the day. On a Thursday night I started out at the East 72nd Street apartment of Lauren Lawrence (the lady who analyzes dreams in the Daily News). She was giving a cocktail reception for Sirio Maccioni, who was

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM’S 30TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

Adele Chatfield-Taylor and John Guare

Harry Crosby and Dina Chartouni

marking his 82nd birthday. Sirio has been a real legend in this town for several decades, starting out in the days of yore at the fabled Colony restaurant, where all the swells and café society and visiting royalty lunched and dined daily (wearing their jewels, of course). In the 1980s, Sirio’s Le Cirque—which was located where Restaurant Daniel is today at 65th Street and Park Avenue—was a magnet for all the “nouvelle” society girls and their husbands, benefactors, pals, and chums. Lunchtime was a lineup of table after table of the “who’s who” in the social world of New York. Everybody wanted to lunch or dine at Le Cirque. And just 30 QUEST

Darren Walker and Shelby White

Stephanie French and Jim Marlas

about anybody who was anybody did. Today, Sirio’s vision extends to both coasts—well, sort of: from New York to Las Vegas. He’s a brand. There are currently three Maccioni restaurants and watering holes here in Manhattan: Le Cirque, Circo, and Sirio Ristorante in the Pierre Hotel. And don’t forget Le Cirque at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, Circo Las Vegas, Circo Abu Dhabi, and the Beach Club by Le Cirque at Casa de Campo in the Dominican Republic. He’s lightened up on his workload somewhat with the assistance of his sons, who are all in the family business and are well tutored by their father and mother. The boys also

Olivia Flatto, Nicolas Mirzayantz and Princess Alexandra of Greece

Anne Bass and Steve Reich

possess their father’s finesse. That said, Sirio continues to “think” about his business and is always looking to approve. He had a big turnout at Lauren Lawrence’s including: Pamela Fiori, Carolyne Roehm, Susan Gutfreund, Iris Cantor, Carmen, Kalliope, Karella Rena, Elizabeth Kabler, Larry Kaiser, Hormoz Sabet, Dennis Basso, Geoffrey Bradfield, Ann Rapp, Lady Liliana Cavendish, Cole Rumbough, Alex Papachristidis and Scott Nelson, Leesa Rowland and Larry Wohl, Michele Gerber Klein, Maggie Norris, Consuelo Costin, Lucia Hwong Gordon, Monique van Vooren, and many more. Everyone was paying tribute to The Man.

Leaving Lauren Lawrence’s that night, and back to the subject of jewels and jewelry, I headed up Fifth Avenue to the Guggenheim Museum, where Tiffany & Co. had taken over the space for the evening to celebrate the debut of Tiffany & Co.’s Blue Book 2014 Collection. This was a first for me, visiting this annual Tiffany & Co. tradition for the presentation of their Blue Book 2014 Collection of dazzling diamonds. Jessica Biel, Kate Bosworth, and Katie Holmes were among those attending and wearing what Anita Loos dubbed, “A girl’s best friend…” in her tale of Miss Lorelei Lee almost a century ago in New York.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Kathy Brown and John Heimann


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A What lured me that night was the venue—I love looking at the Guggenheim. For the occasion, there was a onenight-only showing of “The Diamond Sky,” a custom projection mapping installation by the Leo Kuelbs Collection. It was “inspired by the vibrancy and luminosity of Tiffany & Co. diamonds and the Blue Book 2014 Collection,” so I was told. I wanted to see what that inspiration turned into on the walls of the museum’s central gallery. Everything about the evening had the Tiffany & Co. touch to it. I remember the days when you’d go into the

store only if you looked presentable (jacket and tie). It was usually as quiet as your local village library, and you were serious about being there. It never looked busy, except around the holidays, and even then it seemed restrained. It was a beautiful place but really only meant for people doing business. Young couples bought their wedding rings there and registered for the patterns and designs of their choice of china, crystal, and silver as well as watches and jewelry. It had a luxurious hush to it all. And it was fun. A trip. The Tiffany & Co. of the

21st century retains its platinum and diamond aura and reputation, but the Fifth Avenue store now draws crowds on many days. There is always at least a small group viewing the display cases and there are always people choosing their choices to take home as well as people outside taking photos of each other standing by the Fifth Avenue entrance. The costume of much of the clientele is different than the days in memory, much like how the American costume is different from 25 years ago. People dress very casually, looking like tourists, but not really. It’s the style. But the Tiffany &

Co. charisma lives on. This, to me, is the genius of its leadership, beginning with Michael J. Kowalski, chairman of the board and C.E.O., who has been with the company for more than three decades. I’ve written about Tiffany & Co.’s annual holiday luncheon where they invite the fashion press and treat everyone to an elegant luncheon before sending them on their way with a very nice piece of merchandise, be it silver, china, or crystal. No, no diamonds, rubies, or emeralds, but always elegant, thoughtful, and understated yet generous in spirit.

R EC E P T I O N FO R OX B R I D G E A C A D E MY AT T H E PA L M B E A C H H OM E O F B I L L A N D B R I D G E T KO C H

Kathy and Richard Lubin 32 QUEST

Darlene Jordan, Bridget Koch and Christina O’Donnell

Mary and Bob Simses

Jeanne and David Rosow

Bob and Ellen Kaufmann

JoAnna and Steve Myers

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Hilary Jordan and Dack Patriarca


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NIKKI fIELD | Visit us at NikkiField.com Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 212.606.7669 | nikki.field@sothebyshomes.com E. HELEN MARCOS | ASSOCIAtE BROKER 212.606.7747 | helen.marcos@sothebyshomes.com east side Manhattan brokerage 38 East 61st Street | NY, NY 10065 | +1.212.606.7660 Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A MOT H E R S A N D D AU G H T E R S AT L A N V I N

Jennifer Creel and Alix Creel

The event at the Guggenheim was called for 6:30 p.m. I got there at about 8 o’clock (it was a cocktail reception). It looked like a Tiffany & Co. production as their famous Tiffany Blue was cast onto an exterior wall of the museum and there was a bank of photographers taking pictures on the red carpet of beautiful young women dressed for the occasion. It was a very cool scene. It wasn’t subdued, yet there was a very cinematic atmosphere, visually, that reminded me of Bernardo Bertolucci or Luchino Visconti. The lighting was soft and changing from a soft light to a Tiffany Blue and a 34 QUEST

Cecile Martel and Catherine Lacaze

Elsa Wilkis and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson

Brett Heyman and Alina Cho

Dalia Oberlander and Lisa Salzer

ruby red. There were young women glamorously dressed, the champagne was flowing, canapés were being scooped up, and the men were in suits. There were many very sophisticated Asian people. The women especially were very chic in the classic sense. There was also a wall of four or five lighted portals displaying some of the Blue Book 2014 jewels. Jessica Beil was in an Oscar de la Renta dress and wearing a Diamond Drop necklace in platinum ($325,000) and Tiffany Diamond Legacy earrings in platinum ($165,000). Kate Bosworth was wearing a cushion-cut Blue Elbaite Cu-

prian Tourmaline Ring with yellow and white diamonds ($40,000) and a Tiffany Victoria necklace in platinum with diamonds ($55,000). Katie Holmes (in Balenciaga) was in a sapphire and diamond bracelet in platinum ($85,000) and an emerald-cut 27.31-ct. Esteemed Sapphire ring with diamonds in platinum—only $425,000! Just like the song: “Square- cut or pear-shaped, these rocks don’t lose their shape / Diamonds are a girl’s best friend.” I don’t think it takes much convincing, just from watching the crowd at the Guggenheim. Meanwhile, apropos of nothing but fun, I did get a

Amy Fine Collins and Flora Collins

surprise gift from Victoria Amory, whose picture you may have seen on these pages over the years, as she travels between here and Palm Beach. Victoria, who is a gracious and friendly lady, is also a chef, a foodie, and an industrious entrepreneur. She and her husband divide their time between Greenwich, Southampton, and Palm Beach with a lot of ole Manhattan thrown into the mix. But I think, mainly, Victoria’s heart (and imagination) is in the kitchen. This little gift she sent me comes as an “introduction” to her condiment collection, which is debuting at my Saturday-afternoon favorite food

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

HIDEKO HORIGUCHI Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker Sotheby’s International Realty Q: How did you come to pursue a career as a realtor with Sotheby’s International Realty? A: I joined Sotheby’s International Realty in 2001 and have been in the business for 23 years. Most of my clients are from overseas, thus it has been a great privilage to be a part of a company with a strong brand name and a global network that connects buyers and sellers. Q: What areas to you specialize in? A: My expertise is in new development for buyers and investors. I believe in quality and work with clients according to their specific needs and criteria. Each neighborhood in New York has its own character and, in my long career, I’ve worked throughout the city. I enjoy tailoring my services to meet the needs of my clients, both locally and worldwide. Q: Why do you think Sotheby’s International Realty enjoys the reputation that it does? A: Throughout history, Sotheby’s auction house has earned a reputation for expertise in the valuation and sale of fine possessions. Sotheby’s International Realty maintains this distinguished reputation in residential real estate. The company has set price records with the sale of many spectacular homes. It is the expertise and service that we provide that we are known for.

emporium, Zabar’s, over on 80th Street and Broadway. The collection includes: Roasted Garlic Mayonnaise, Classic Lemon Mayonnaise, Fine Herbs Mayonnaise, Champagne Ketchup, Sherry Ketchup, Smokey BBQ Ketchup, Roasted Pepper Piri Piri, Green Chili Piri Piri, and Almond & Garlic Romesco Sauce. I’m one of those people who makes dinner when I’m home. Nothing fancy, just easy and practical: chicken, pasta, meatloaf, some vegetables, and a salad, maybe. This collection is a great way of putting a little variety into the everyday menu. Back to business: On a Thursday night at the Plaza Hotel, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) hosted its 17th annual Bergh Ball to raise funds to directly impact the lives of homeless, abused, and abandoned animals across the country. The theme this year was, “House of Paws.” It was a black-tie evening with Isaac Mizrahi. Henry Bergh, who lived and died in the 19th century in New York, founded

the ASPCA in 1866, three days after the New York State Legislature passed its laws against animal cruelty in the United States. Bergh’s work prompted the formation of both the New York and the Massachusetts societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals. The Bergh Ball gets a great turnout. Among those attending this year were: Lake Bell, Nathan Lane, Vincent Piazza, Andy Cohen, Victor Garber, Georgina Bloomberg (who is ASPCA associate chairman), Chuck and Ellen Scarborough, Nigel Barker, and Drena De Niro. Also there were chairpersons and vice-chairpersons: Allison Aston, Arriana Boardman, Margo McNabb and James Nederlander, Linda and Ben Lambert, Bill Bratton (New York Police Commissioner) and his wife Rikki Klieman, Ginger Zee (of “Good Morning America”), Kathy and Rick Hilton, and Danielle Knudson. Several guests walked the red carpet with adoptable dogs from the ASPCA

H A N L E Y C E N T E R FO U N D AT I O N ’ S P I C N I C AT T H E EQ U E ST R I A N C E N T E R I N W E L L I N G TO N

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Contact Hideko Horiguchi at 212.606.7674 or hideko.horiguchi@sothebyshomes.com. 00 QUEST

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Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Adoption Center, in hopes of finding a new home for the dogs. Bratton escorted ASPCA dog Duchess, who had been brought to the ASPCA by the New York Police Department in November. Andy Cohen accompanied his own dog, Wacha. I missed the Bergh Ball this year and also last year. I totally support their work and I had other commitments, but the Bergh Ball was on my mind. Two years ago when I went to cover it, I adopted a 12-year-old Shih Tzu named Jenny. It was a spur of the moment decision because I already had two rescued Shih Tzus at home and I have a busy day-to-day life

away from the apartment. But Jenny, who was being carried around that evening by one of the ASPCA volunteers, reminded me of another dog named Buster that I adopted back in the late ’90s from the Center for Animal Control. He was a little sweetie. It turned out that my new girl was 12, was blind, had been in terrible health, had had tumors on all of her teats, and had a bronchial problem. But who cares? She needed a home. After I agreed to share my home with her, the vets at the ASPCA waited until they were sure she was in good health before releasing her. That was in June 2012. She’s been in very good

health ever since. She’s a sweet dog and able to maneuver around carefully, despite her blindness. She loves affection but, unlike my other two dogs, she does not come for it and, at first, was uncertain about receiving. I don’t know what her history is but she was a very alienated dog. They told me that she stayed off by herself at the center. It always amazes me that people have animals (and children) and abuse them or abandon them. Those are the real losers in life. Losers in so many ways. She was very tentative when she came home with me. Also, my other female—my alpha dog—Madame, or Missy, was

not hospitable. In fact, she was something of a little brat about this new girl in town. I could actually see the dialogue going on between the two of them. Jenny backed off quite easily, as if to say: “Fine, have it your way.” I excoriated Madame and she wagged her tail in response. The other guy, Byron, follows Madame around like her little puppy (unless she shoos him away). It is a very amusing scene for me to watch them live their lives quite apart from me. When Jenny was first living with us, she wouldn’t sleep in the bedroom with the rest of the gang. I tried to help her by putting her on the bed, but she wanted to get off and then

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Carola Jain, Lesley Schulhof and Natalia Echavarria

Annelise Peterson, David Winter and Amar’e Stoudemire 38 QUEST

Kristi Garced and Zani Gugelmann

Valerie Boster

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A YO U N G N E W YO R K E R S FO R T H E F I G H T A G A I N ST PA R K I N S O N ’ S AT L AVO N E W YO R K

Anne McLaughlin and Missy Sheehan

she’d leave the room. I wondered if it was something between the two females. Eventually, I made a little bed in a basket for her and put it next to my bed. After about nine or 10 months, she claimed it. However, her presence still quietly riles Madame who has been known to get into her basket, driving Jen out. I reprimand Madame, who always acts like she doesn’t know what fuss is about as Jenny returns to her pillow. She must be about 14 now. She’s not a warm and cuddly girl like her cousins, although she responds to affection with pleasure. I’ve brought her up on the bed and held her by 40 QUEST

Melissa Epperly, Andrew Gustin and Jen Field

Barbara and Gregory Romero

Derek Pitts, Kelsey Lam, Shane Burn and Elizabeth Urstadt

my side and petted her and, although she likes it, when it stops, she leaves. She’s the first dog I’ve had who is very reserved after living with me for a long period of time. I have a feeling that if Madame weren’t around, she might be more enthusiastic. But these dogs know boundaries and respect them—unlike a lot of us. I can’t imagine what her earlier years were like that they would dampen the canine spirit, but they did. Nevertheless, in the two years she’s lived here, she’s managed to make it her home and she is safe and cared for. And fed. She, like her cousins, gives me, this solitary man, the opportu-

nity to express my profoundly joyous affection for them daily, and that is their gift to me. The more, the merrier! Thursday, April 24, 2014. A sunny day, but not warm. A chill in the air, a strong breeze, and big gray clouds moving across the blue. Late in the afternoon, the news came out about the sudden, untimely death of Mark Shand, an Englishman who had been here in New York promoting his Elephant charity with the auction for the Fabergé Big Egg Hunt that was held the previous Tuesday night at Sotheby’s. To the many who knew him, it was shocking. Shand had gone on to a party to cel-

Shelby Freda and Edward Vietor

ebrate the great success of the auction in fundraising for the elephants. After the auction, many of the participants, including Shand, moved on to the Gramercy Park Hotel for an after-party. When it came time to leave, he walked out of the hotel with a friend and, at curbside, he briefly slipped or lost his balance and fell headfirst onto the pavement. He was taken immediately to Bellevue Hospital and had surgery but never recovered. He died the following day at noon. He was 62. Head wounds are often fatal and New Yorkers, including visitors, are at risk. It is important, though almost im-

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tess Clarkson and Chris Arnold


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Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A possible, for all of us to watch where we’re going all the time. That’s quite a challenge when you consider all the distractions and safety hazards that confront any New Yorker out on the pavement in a crowded street with rife with cars, buses, trucks, and bikes on top of a populous that is obsessed with looking at their cell phones while making their way around town. Even the slightest accident, like a slipping or tripping, can land you on your head. It’s a most ordinary accident that can occur under any circumstances at any time of day. And it’s very often fatal. For Shand, it was nighttime and it was not light. A moment’s distraction

can be one’s fate. It was later reported in the Daily Mail that Shand had taken both blood-thinning and pain medications, had a bad hip that he was scheduled to see the doctor about in a couple of days, and had been drinking. He left the building with his hands in his pockets, feeling unsteady. Shand was well-known, one of those people who was famous to the famous. Among other things, he was something of a swain, very popular with the ladies: good-looking, charming, and a man who liked the company of women. He’d been married only once to Clio Goldsmith (niece of the late tycoon Jimmy Gold-

smith) and had a daughter with her. But the list of his conquests (or volunteers) was long and star-studded. He was first mentioned in the American press in the 1970s when it was reported that he had a date with the then teenage Caroline Kennedy. She had been in London when they met. The item was newsworthy because it was showing that the late president’s daughter was growing up. Shand was no more than in his early twenties, if that. I met him in the early ’80s, when he was in Los Angeles with his friend Harry Fane and they were doing business internationally collecting and selling vintage Cartier jewelry,

watches, and more. The two young men were staying with our mutual friend Lady Sarah Churchill in Beverly Hills. Sarah often had houseguests and there was a resulting camaraderie between everyone, as she liked to entertain. Shand was of particular, if uneventful, interest to me because of his connection with Caroline. He was movie-star handsome and possessed a bright personality full of curiosity. He was in his way a party boy, accessible to many and, despite his aristocratic background, drawn to all kinds of people, both high and low on the social scale. So, conversation was engaging and laughter was often included, for

VA N C L E E F A N D A R P E L S S P O N S O R E D T H E T R I B EC A B A L L AT T H E N E W YO R K AC A D E MY O F A R T

Jane Rosenthal and Richard Pandiscio 42 QUEST

Eileen Guggenheim

Harley Viera-Newton

Padma Lakshmi

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Genevieve Sonsino and Alessandra Baker

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Sarah’s dinner and luncheon tables were often full of animated conversation supplied by the hostess if not by the guests. He was one of those Englishmen; an aristo that had a passion for adventure. You could see that almost upon meeting. He was thrown out of school when he was 16 years old, having been caught smoking pot. His father warned him not to spend his time in London partying and so he did the next best thing: he went to spend time in Bali for awhile. He had the temperament of those British aristos who were attracted to the exotic lands that his forebears had colonized, such as Africa and India. I never saw him again after that time at Lady Sarah’s, but I wasn’t surprised to later learn that he had had an adventurous life that passed through exotic lands and a plethora of peoples. He was a man who

Yan Assoun and Polina Proshkina

lived hard and played hard. Few adventurous experiences were outside his ken. Adoring friends would point to his trek across India on an elephant as an example of his feats. Everywhere he went, like the greatest ambassador of goodwill, he made lots of friends and fluttered many a female heart. His involvement with the elephants reflects the bigness of his heart and his lust for life, true joie de vivre. He was a man of many, many friends, and you could see that such was his path. I am certain there are scores, maybe hundreds, maybe thousands, who remain very sad from learning of his sudden demise. Incidentally, he was also famous, to a degree, because one of his two sisters, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, is married to Prince Charles. There can be no doubt that the sadness and loss they are feeling now is wounding. u

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K S O C I E T Y F O R T H E P R E V E N T I O N O F C R U E LT Y TO C H I L D R E N AT T H E P I E R R E H O T E L

Burwell Schorr and Eliza Bolen

Lisa Colgate and David Stack

Cristina Cuomo and Valesca Guerrand-Hermes

Alison Brokaw, Justine Koons and Amy Griffin 46 QUEST

Chris Mack

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Elizabeth Mayhew and Electra Toub

Karl Wellner and Deborah Norville

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Tania Higgins and Lise Evans


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA R I S R E V I E W ’ S S P R I N G R E V E L AT C I P R I A N I 4 2 N D ST R E E T

Lewis Lapham and Radhika Jones

Euan Rellie, Mercedes Martinez and Lucy Sykes Rellie 48 QUEST

Boa Legendre and Judith Foster

Jennifer Isham and Terry McDonnell

Uma Thurman and Leanne Shapton

Stephanie LaCava

Hope Winthrop and Amanda Urban

Zadie Smith, Nick Laird and Jeffrey Eugenides

Larissa MacFarquhar and Katie Roiphe

Vera Szombathelyi

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tim Lovejoy and Judy Auchincloss


PREMIERE LOCATION - IMPORTANT ESTATE | $16,250,000 This timeless stone Georgian manor is set on 3 acres of manicured property in a prime Mid-Country Greenwich location. WEB ID: 0067050 | Shelly Tretter Lynch | 203.618.3103

CONNECTICUT CLASSIC ON ROUND HILL | $8,250,000 One of historic Round Hill’s highest properties, 4 acres of sweeping velvety lawns is the stage for this beautifully scaled, warm and inviting Connecticut classic. WEB ID: 0067047 | Steve Archino | 203.618.3144

DISTINGUISHED GEORGIAN | $6,995,000 Sited on 4 park-like acres, this 7 bedroom home has gracious rooms with exceptional detailing. Grand entrance, chef’s kitchen, guest cottage, pool and theater. WEB ID: 0065622 | Joseph Barbieri | 203.618.3112

ELEGANT GEORGIAN MANOR | $6,400,000 Extraordinary brick Georgian manor offered for the first time in almost 30 years. Sited majestically on nearly 4 acres of beautifully manicured grounds. WEB ID: 0067037 | Lyn Stevens | 203.618.3170

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MID-COUNTRY SPLENDOR | $4,495,000 This light-filled 6 bedroom Colonial is better than new with many extra amenities that the owners have had professionally designed and installed. On 2.13 acres. WEB ID: 0067032 | Suzanne Katz | 203.618.3161

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P E R L M A N M U S I C P R O G R A M AT T H E H OM E O F K R I ST Y A N D J I M C L A R K I N PA L M B E AC H

Fred and Stephanie Clark

Bill Koch, William Acquavella, Jim Clark and David Koch

Toby and Itzhak Perlman 50 QUEST

Anka Palitz and Kristy Clark

Irma Anapol

Cindy Anderson and Peter Rock

Peter and Amy Tunney

A N N I E WAT T

Charlie Schlangen and Elijah Duckworth


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S AV E V E N I C E ’ S B A L L AT T H E P I E R R E H OT E L

Luigi Tadini

Peter Brant, Jr. and Harry Brant 52 QUEST

Jim and Susan Duffy

Alex Acquavella and Mollie Ruprecht

Derek Blasberg, Hamish Bowles, Julia Loomis and John Robbins

Mary Snow

Stavros Niarchos and Jessica Hart

Lauren Santo Domingo

Amanda Hearst

Alexia Hamm Ryan

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Joey Lico and Elizabeth Kurpis


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THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION GALA 2015 will be held on Wednesday, April 15th 2015 at the Pierre Hotel, with a star lineup of guests already confirmed. Please book at www.TheGivingBackFoundation.net


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B A R E F O OT O N T H E B E A C H B E N E F I T E D T H E B OYS & G I R L S C L U B AT T H E B R E A K E R S I N PA L M B E A C H

Judy and Jim Harpel

Kristine Watkins 54 QUEST

Jim DIack and Laura Evans

Susan and Lloyd Miller

Loy Anderson and Bettina Anderson

Wally and Betsy Turner

Taylor Collins, Lauren Borman and Reid Boren

Llywd and Diana Ecclestone

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Ben and Elizabeth Gordon


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U N C H EO N AT T H E C E N T E R O F C R E AT I V E E D U C AT I O N I N PA L M B E AC H

Gail McMillan and Loy Anderson

Lore Dodge and Kathy Weller 56 QUEST

Rena Blades and Jerry Crank

Susan Miller and Darcie Kassewitz

Pamela Miller and Mary Gilbane

Maura Christu and Talbott Maxey

Jessica Koch and JoAnna Myers

Cheryl Gowdy and Pamela O’Connor

C H R I S TO P H E R FAY

Frannie Kettenbach and Kenn Karakul


PRIVATE BROKERAGE & ADVISORS

Woodlands - Part of Bedford’s rich past. White-washed brick Georgian, the former Carriage House to the Scribner estate, carefully and exquisitely renovated. Incredible craftsmanship from a bygone era. Spectacular 70’ Marble Entry Hall with Cloak Room. Pine paneled Library. Five Bedrooms. Long, gated drive to over seven private estate area acres surrounded by 630 acres of sanctuary. Absolutely exquisite landscape with magnificent gardens. Sparkling Pool. Tennis Court. $4,850,000

Phenomenal Reservoir Views - One of the most spectacular settings in Westchester. Sixteen private estate acres on the Cross River Reservoir with incredible distant views. Gorgeous grounds with old stone walls and rolling lawns. Striking Mid-Century Modern with beautifully scaled rooms and sophisticated appointments. Walls of windows afford breathtaking views. Slate floors, built-ins and four fireplaces. An incredible opportunity to own the ultimate getaway! $4,750,000

A Pound Ridge Landmark - Charming Country Farmhouse, Flowering Magnoliacirca 1850, with wide plank floors, hand-hewn beams and original hardware. Living Room with Fireplace. Den with wet bar. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen with Breakfast Area. Three Bedrooms. Private Office. Wraparound stone terrace. Two peaceful, usable acres, bound by old stonewalls, with gorgeous gardens. Small Barn, Two-Car Garage and old farm building. Quiet country setting. $699,000

Impeccably renovated Stone and Clapboard Farmhouse. Beautifully appointed rooms with wonderful light, great flow and quiet sophistication. Living Room with Fireplace. Dining Room with French doors to covered terrace. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace and doors to terrace. Elegant First Floor Master Suite. Spacious Guest Suite. Two additional Bedrooms. Au Pair/Office. Long drive to private setting. Nearly three gorgeous acres with sparkling Pool. $1,525,000

Historic Bedford Colonial - Picturebook setting off of desirable Pine Brook Road. Three scenic acres with 200-year old Sugar Maples and a pond! Stunning 1820 Colonial with period details. Entry Hall with rare Cyprus paneling. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms+Office or Guest Suite. Indoor Pool Room with Fireplace. Barn. $2,195,000

1928 Georgian Estate - The golden age! Long gated drive to perfect privacy. 13 spectacular acres with magnificent trees and gardens. Exquisite country estate with old world elegance. Aged pine-paneled Living Room. Billiard Room. Formal Dining Room. Chef ’s Kitchen open to Family Room. Sun Room with State-of-the-Art Indoor Pool. Six Bedrooms. Outdoor Pool with Pool/Guest House. Tennis Court. Garages for 7 cars. $7,950,000

(914) 234-9234

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M E E R A G A N D H I ’ S G I V I N G B AC K FO U N D AT I O N G A L A AT T H E P I E R R E H OT E L

Joya Dass and Meera Gandhi

Donald Tober and Susan Fisher

Barbara Tober

Donna and Dick Soloway

Barbara Ellsworth and Lloyd Robinson

Phylicia Rashad

Gregory Speck and Susan Gutfreund

Godfrey Wood, Whitney Bylin, Karen Wood and Art Bylin

Warren Abrahamson, Mary Hufty, David George and Hilary Swain 58 QUEST

Kendall Wheeler with Norberto and Robin Azqueta

Chris and Binkie Orthwein

Carter and Marie Leidy

Heath and Karly Randolph with Paige Leidy and Francie Mackay

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; A R C H B O L D B I O LO G I C A L S TAT I O N ( B E LO W )

A R C H B O L D B I O L O G I C A L STAT I O N D I N N E R I N PA L M B E AC H


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate sited on 17.6 magnificent acres of rolling hills, features a 7000 square foot Georgian style main house offering 6 COLD SPRING,gleaming NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story bedrooms, wood floors, multiple fireplaces, entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offerspaneled massive two story period details and a gourmet kitchen. A richly chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large inglibrary, mountain expansive stream. Delightful detailsdining and high room quality materials are evident throughout formal and stately living chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout room are among the well proportioned and classicalthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ly styled rooms of this fine home. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,225,000

GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious GARRISON, NY - Courtside. This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers living space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 a separate 2 bedroom apartment. The beautifully landscaped 4 acre property also offers a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 home offers window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a forwindow seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inmer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a former dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000

EAST FISHKILL, DUTCHESS COUNTY

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 60 QUEST

OVER THE YEARS, I have photographed

the exotically beautiful Paloma Picasso on several occasions and have always come away with a photograph I like. The one here was taken in August 1980, on the brink of her becoming a Tiffany & Co.


H A R RY B E N S O N

Paloma Picasso in August 1980.

superstar. The name “Paloma” means “dove” in Spanish, and so Paloma incorporated the dove into several of her classic designs. She is graceful and gracious and has a confident yet refined manner that is reassuring when you meet her.

I asked John Loring of Tiffany & Co., a longtime friend of Paloma, to tell me about her rise to prominence in her own right, no longer in the shadow of her famous father, and John replied: “Paloma Picasso blazed into the strato-

sphere of haute joaillerie in 1980 with her first collection of jewels for Tiffany & Co. Her use of ample to lavish scale, her love of vibrant color in gemstones (which brought fiery orange opals and shocking pink tourmalines into fashion) and her ever-so-chic use of ‘scribbles,’ ‘graffiti’ and, of course, of her signature ‘X’ instantly established her as jewelry design’s newest star. Her unerring eye for glamour and her inquisitive and informed sense of personal style played their roles. Youthful, playfully exuberant, visually stunning—her Tiffany jewels were all of these.” Not a bad way to be described. What more can I say? It seems like only yesterday, once again. u M AY 2 0 1 4 6 1


TA K I

SO LONG, SKYLINE Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire danced to the rhythm of the city in the ’40s

BACK TO THE mythic city, dreamed into existence by the movies long ago and instantly memorable—a visually stunning place built for action and adventure, a city of broad avenues and narrow side streets, of soaring towers and grubby tenements. It is the stuff that dreams are made of, as Sam Spade drooled in The Maltese Falcon. But what has happened to the gritty stoops of Harlem, the waterfront filled with gleaming ships, the majestic train stations and grand hotels? I’ll tell you, progress is what has happened. And it stinks. New York, for me, has always been a fictive place, mostly made up from movies I’d seen, the rest from childhood impressions at a time when New York really was the center of the universe. A mythic city is an idea, an American masculinity sort of thing, with a moral code of honor all its own, which includes gangsters in fedoras, cops in double-breasted, ill-fitting suits, and dizzy dames with runs in their stockings. Yes, I know. I’m back in the ’40s and everything appears in black and white, but if you don’t like black and white and you prefer car crashes and explosions in glorious Technicolor, stop reading here. Manhattan’s skyscrapers were where superheroes strutted, as in The Fountainhead and Executive Suite. There were times when Fred and Ginger whirled around on a rooftop, and there 62 QUEST


TA K I

This page, from left: The Fountainhead should have served as a lesson; Mary Astor and Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Fountain, which originated the phrase “the stuff that dreams are made of ” ; the skyscrapers that bolster the city.

was another time when a giant monkey hung on for dear life at the top of the Empire State Building. Yes, this was the city I laid eyes on in 1948 and the one that has remained an illusion ever since, a shimmering picture of glamour and pleasure and danger that distracts and hypnotizes. But no longer. The Empire State and Chrysler buildings are real, of course, and their enduring place among the most distinctive and majestic buildings ever produced is assured. So is Rockefeller Center, a marvel that I watched nonstop on my first night in Manhattan as a 12-year-old. My, what a place to land in after eight years of war and privations! It made Alice in Wonderland sound boring and pedestrian. The next year Warner Brothers released an adaption of The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand’s peon to the value of the individual versus the collective. Ironically, the hero, Howard Roark, is a modernist who struggles to build his bold designs in a compromising world that “made buildings look like Greek temples.” I was young and impressionable and failed to boo when they showed the movie on a Saturday night at the Lawrenceville School. Neoclassical skyscrapers are shown to be timid and conventional by Rand and director King Vidor, but the tragedy is that neither of them is around today to see what the modernists have done to

this once beautiful city. The great press lord, played by the aristocratic Raymond Massey, does not resemble today’s Rupert Murdoch at all. (He dresses like a gentleman and doesn’t look like a man who would ever fall for the snaky charms of an ugly Chinese hustler like Wendi Deng.) Massey dismisses the Neoclassical designs as “great big marble bromides,” a capital offence in and of itself because I cannot think of a more beautiful design than a great big marble bromide that uses glass to frame panoramic views of Manhattan. The Fountainhead should have been a lesson but it wasn’t. Sleek and dynamic modern glass buildings turn lifeless and anonymous when repeated ad nauseam, as happens to be the case in the city. Great architects are very few and far between. For every Ludwig Mies van der Rohe there are countless Norman Fosters, the man who managed to turn the main square of St. Moritz into a carbuncle of ugliness in his search for innovative modernism. (You can search all you want, Norman, but without talent you ain’t gonna find it.) Modernism, especially in architecture, is bleak and sterile and incomprehensible and a panacea for the talentless and the phony. Urban architecture that draws on the decorative style of previous eras is beauty personified, whereas functionalism—as the gimmick is called nowadays—is the very stuff that

has made architects and city planners turn their backs on what makes a city beautiful and livable. And speaking of modern life, the takeover by the Internet has sealed our fate, and it’s not for the better. Porn is king, but leave it to the New York Times to run a major article debating whether porn has influence on the young. How can anyone debate this? What David Cameron referred to as “the corrosion of childhood” is a fact to anyone who recognizes the difference between day and night, but porn is very, very big business and I don’t give a damn what neuroscience tells us. Young people exposed to porn are malleable to extreme behavior and teens need protection from the porn merchants of not only the Internet, but of Hollywood and the T.V. networks. Last month, a great American hero died at 89, rear admiral Jeremiah Andrew Denton, Jr., the pilot who, while being interviewed as a POW,  blinked in Morse the word “torture,” signaling to the Jane Fondas of the world that the men in black pyjamas in North Vietnam did not exactly play by the rules. He spent seven years in a tiny cell but his greatest disappointment once back home was the failure of morality among Americans. No modernist he. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. M AY 2 0 1 4 6 3


N O S TA L G I A

GRACE KELLY AND THE JET SET BY LIZ SMITH “THE PASSENGER JET was, and still is, one of the wonders of the world, a world whose other wonders the jet makes accessible,” writes author William Stadiem. If they keep getting super bad publicity for the upcoming movie Grace of Monaco, they are going to create an underground demand for this outrageous movie, which I hear my friend, producer Harvey Weinstein, would rather downplay than play up. But how can he, when the movie will open the Cannes Film Festival on May 14? (Word of mouth is that it’s not even “campy fun,” which would at least guarantee some interest.) Meanwhile, the Prince of Monaco, Albert, is saying the film portrays his late father, Prince Rainier, as “some kind of putz.”

Or so he complained to the New York Post. Nicole Kidman, an actress I like and admire, stars in this movie and is said to bear very little resemblance to the super glamorized Grace Kelly, who deserted films back in the ’50s to become Prince Rainier’s fairytale princess. At the time, Grace gave up an already very sexy and entertaining life, kissing the likes of Clark Gable and Bing Crosby and winning an Oscar. She was at the peak of stardom when she gave up her acting career and became a princess. Hollywood had been a snap for the demure-looking blonde from Philadelphia. At the time, the golden Greek Aristotle Onassis—pre-Jackie Kennedy—owned the Société des Bains de Mer, which meant


This page, clockwaise from top left: Grace Kelly holding her Best Actress Oscar statue with William Holden; Kelly dancing with her husband, Prince Rainier III of Monaco; Jet Set by William Stadiem. Opposite page: Kelly

CO U RTE S Y O F B A LL A N T I N E B O O K S

with To Catch a Thief co-star Cary Grant.

owning Monaco itself. It was a little tiny enclave on the edge of the French Riviera that had been created as an escape from taxes. And everybody began to go to Monaco to gamble and shop and join what was coming to be called the Jet Set. I keep telling people that the family in place at the Monaco palace was Johnny-come-lately among many European titles. The press always refers to them as “royalty,” but they were about as royal as Royal Crown Cola. If they were anything, they were mere “serene highnesses,” as my then boss, Igor Cassini, always told me. His brother, movie costume designer, Oleg, had almost married Grace Kelly himself. The Cassinis knew history and titles. Both brothers spent a lot of time helping to further the glamour of Monaco and Igor feathered his own nest as an international columnist for the then powerful Hearst newspapers. (I was just a ghostwriter for him.) You can read all about these realities in the coming June book titled Jet Set: The People, the Planes, the Glamour, and the Romance in Aviation’s Glory Years. Stadiem’s work is comprehensive, all about when folks began to really fly around in a hurry. This booming air era facilitated both advertising and publicity and everybody began to worship the Jet Set and tried to become a part of it.

Included in this coming book are par examples of the then successful man, the aforesaid Igor Cassini, who used the nom de plume of Cholly Knickerbocker. He created and helped popularize the phrase “Jet Set.” This book shows us how society changed with the coming of rapid air travel and as the “social” or “society” world began to lose its polish, events took on the false glamour of “celebrity.” That is exemplified in today’s world where push, shove, and getting attention hold sway. What a book Stadiem has written for Ballantine Books! The Kennedys, the Rat Pack, Frank Sinatra, and early financiers like Eddie Gilbert are dealt with in depth. It was a beginning for the sort of frenetic, desperate world we now seem to be living in. If you think yesterday’s glamour and appeal was for people trying to be rich and famous, well, that’s nothing compared to nowadays. I lived intimately through it all in the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s and I am yet to find a mistake in author Stadiem’s amazing book. Order it now. All the players are here, Bobby Kennedy as a menace to much of the fun; Joe Kennedy, his father, having young ladies procured for him; lawyers making millions getting “socialites” out of hot water; the creation of disco and rock and roll; the rise of Great Britain’s popular music and fashion appeal; and on and on. Plus, New York as the so-called “400” became the 4 million. M AY 2 0 1 4 6 5


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

MAY IS FOR MOTHERS, we all know, but it also marks our annual Jewelry

Issue—and what better way to celebrate the most special woman in your life than with a dazzling new statement piece? We’ve checked in with some of our favorite jewelers to offer some splendid options for mom. Along the way, we stumbled upon just the right page-turner (and the perfect beach to read it on, too).

Cultivate your garden in Van Cleef and Arpels’ “Les Jardins” Melia necklace, with pink sapphires, mandarin garnets, and diamonds in white gold. Price upon request. Van Cleef and Arpels: 212.896.9284.

Reign with beauty in Marchesa’s empire-

This sketched-flowers scarf in silk was illustrated

waist gown with gold metallic lace bralet and tulle skirt with ribbon

by Benjamin Seidler for

roses and tied ribbons. Price upon

Asprey. $510. Asprey:

request. Marchesa: At marchesa.com.

853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811.

Set the table in style with breathtaking crystal stemware in assorted colors from Saint-Louis: Apollo Purple N2 ($495), Bubbles Light Blue N2 ($290), and Tommy Chartreuse N2 ($495). To purchase, call 855.240.9740.

Charm her beyond her wildest imagination with Fabergé’s Charmeuse Fuchsia Ring in white and pink gold, pink sapphire, white diamonds, and pink and violet sapphires. Price upon request. Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave., 646.559.8848. 66 QUEST


Dangle on a bangle (or few) in any number of these cheerfully colored enamel bracelets by Hermès. $470–830. Hermès: Available at Hermès stores nationwide, 800.441.4488, or hermes.com.

Black onyx surrounds .51 carats of diamonds set in 18-kt. yellow gold in these stellar Black Onyx Starfish Earrings at Scully & Scully. $3,950. Scully & Scully: scullyandscully.com.

Cartier introduces this Amulette de Cartier necklace in 18-kt. yellow gold, diamonds, and onyx. Price upon request. Cartier: At Cartier boutiques nationwide, 800.CARTIER, or cartier.us.

Feel fresh as the morning dew in Carolina Herrera’s green and black embroidered dress for spring. $5,990. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552.

Wempe’s BY KIM Voyage rings in 18-kt. yellow, rose, or white gold, with brilliant-cut diamonds, are worth taking along for life’s journey. Starting at $725. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, or wempe.com.

Fasten on Sorab & Roshi’s Stay on track in Stuart Weitzman’s Rotary heel in Iriquois weave. $435. Stuart Weitzman: 625 Madison Ave., 212.750.2555.

Golden Seahorse Pin with diamonds in 18-kt. gold. $19,800. Sorab & Roshi: 30 West Putnam Ave., Greenwich, Conn., 203.869.5800, or sorabandroshi.com. M AY 2 0 1 4 6 7


Fresh Finds She’ll delight in Roberto Coin’s Black Jade necklace in 18-kt. rose gold with African black jade,

Two heads are better than one:

green agate, and diamonds.

David Webb’s Double Lion bracelet

$9,400. Roberto Coin: 212.486.4545

in 18-kt. yellow gold, platinum,

or us.robertocoin.com.

diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and black enamel. $68,000. David Webb: 942 Madison Ave., 212.421.3030.

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find out what happens, pick up

ends May 11, 2014. Bellmore, Garden

Tatiana Boncompagni’s latest

City, Woodbury. To find

novel, Social Death

out more, visit

(Tudor City Press). $12.99.

reddoorspas.com. 866.RED.DOOR

Change it up in Marina B’s

Be boldly

18-kt. yellow gold

uniform in

interchangeable ebony

Ralph Lauren’s

hoops and diamond Karine earrings. $6,500. Marina B: 30 East 57th St., 212.644.1155, or marinab.com.

black and white Cady striped peplum jacket ($3,295), white cotton shirt ($740), and black double-faced wool short ($795). Ralph Lauren Collection: At ralphlauren.com.

No doubt about it, Stubbs & Wootton’s Bow Raffia Skimmer is the ultimate dinner slipper this season—and the shoe every girlfriend is sure to slip into when her boyfriend’s not watching. $495. 987 Madison Ave., 212.249.5200.

68 QUEST


Design meets color in this necklace by Bulgari,

For the fashionable woman who also embraces function,

in pink gold, spinels, peridots, amethysts, and diamonds, from the High Jewelry Collection. Price upon request. Bulgari: 800.BVLGARI

the Shilo™ frame offers a smooth, sexy design that performs as well as it looks. Italian-made frame in tortoise. $229. Kaenon: kaenon.com.

or bulgari.com

Dee Hutton is keeping things cool yet hot with her Waverly T in guipure lace ($850) and Kool pant in sienna stretch leather ($1,750). Dee Hutton: By studio appointment or select trunk shows nationwide; for more, visit deehutton.com.

For the woman who’s grown into her own: Mauboussin’s My First Madame ring in 18-kt. pink gold with mother-ofpearl and a rhodolite center stone. $3,100. Mauboussin: 714 Madison Ave., Harry’s still talking to us, especially with these Diamond Loop earrings in round- and pear-shaped diamonds and platinum. Price upon request. Harry Winston:

P U N TA C A N A R E S O RT & C LU B ( P U N TA C A N A ) ; C A R LTO N DAV I S ( T I F FA NY & CO . )

800.988.4110 or harrywinston.com.

Take advantage of the Dominican Highlights package at Puntacana Resort & Club’s Tortuga Bay property and enjoy daily breakfast for two, one fishing tour per stay, VIP roundtrip transfers, and Villa Manager Service, all starting at $705 per night (plus taxes): 888.442.2262.

The Tiffany Blue Book 2014 bracelet is a surefire stunner in brilliantly colored gemstones and gold. $115,000. Tiffany & Co.: tiffany.com.

212.752.4300.


R E A L E S TAT E

This spread, clockwise from top: A rendering of a living room in the of the coastal city; the expansive infinity-edge pool with waterfall available to the residents; among the many amenities afforded by the waterfront properties include an on-site marina and a private day yacht; the master bedrooms feature Boffi wood vanities and Dornbracht fixtures; the architecture is a new example of the best of Miami Modern; each residence has custom interior details by Piero Lissoni.

CO U RTE S Y O F R I T Z - C A R LTO N

Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach, which affords a sweeping view


BEAUTY BY THE BEACH SET IN A quiet corner of Miami Beach where lake, ocean, and waterway converge, The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach, will offer the ultimate in luxury waterfront living: seven acres of gardens, pools, private boat slips, and entertainment spaces. Comprised of 111 condominium residences and 15 private single-family villas, these will be some of only a few standalone Ritz-Carlton Residences in the world. Located at 4701 North Meridian Avenue, the project brings together exceptional amenities and services with modern architecture and design unmatched in South Florida. The expansive residences incorporate natural materials and framed views with a modernist vision and detailed Italian craftsmanship designed by acclaimed architect Piero Lissoni. In line with the long-standing tradition of excellence synonymous with The Ritz-Carlton name, these Miami Beach residences will include a collection of resort-style amenities unparalleled in the greater Miami region. A unique feature of The Residences will be the on-site private boat slips and a condominium-owned luxury Van Dutch boat. Owners will have the opportunity to rejuvenate in a private spa treatment suite, steam rooms, and a sauna; reenergize in an outdoor yoga garden; and work out in a state-of-the-art fitness center. There will also be a barbecue, in-house restaurant, private screening room, and library. The founding partner of Lissoni Associati and BY LISSONI, Piero Lissoni works across various disciplines of architecture, executing visually arresting spaces that are a pleasure in which to live, work, and play. Headquartered in Milan and New York, the company has won numerous awards for projects including the historic renovation and addition of the Mamilla Hotel in Jerusalem; the interior architecture of Studio M Hotel in Singapore; and the construction of the Ferrari Club House in Italy. Lissoni Associati have created hotels that have become city icons, from Amsterdam’s Conservatorium to Hotel Monaco & Grand Canal in Venice. The Residences’ modern and artistic design will create a development that will change the Miami Beach skyline and how we look at luxury living. Thanks to The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach will now have one of the world’s premier luxury spots to host the life of your dreams. u M AY 2 0 1 4 7 1


T H E N E X T S T E P R E A LT Y

TAKING THE NEXT STEP WITH KHAKI WENNSTROM This month, Khaki Wennstrom of SpikedSeltzer invites the twentysomethings of Quest to party with The Next Step Realty at Figawi on Nantucket. The weekend promises to be filled with boats and, well, low-carb, gluten-free booze from SpikedSeltzer!

WHAT IS FIGAWI? 1. A new energy bar

packed full of figs; 2. What a toddler says after smashing his pinky in a door; or 3. A sailing race with over 240 boats from Hyannis to Nantucket during Memorial Day weekend. If you answered “3,” you are very clever and probably do well on standardized tests. If you also know why the race is called “Figawi,” you likely

have attended and know how friggin’ awesome it is. Before I revert to proper English (which is optional during Figawi, as it’s more of a slurring kind of weekend), let me explain why the race is blessed with this endearing name. So, imagine you are a captain from the islands (or think Baaahhston), and you are lost at sea somewhere between Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard,

maybe because you’ve been drinking too much SpikedSeltzer (we’ll get to what that is in a minute). You turn to your first mate and exclaim, “Where the figawi?” Get it? Now you are chuckling and thinking, “I need to check this out.” Make plans to head to Nantucket and join 3,000 spectators as they party-hop across the island. Be assured that those

CO U RTE S Y O F S PI K E D S E LT Z E R

This page, from left: Dave Holmes and Nick Shields, owners of SpikedSeltzer; Nantucket, where Figawi takes place on Memorial Day weekend.


on the list of friends, family, clients, and ambassadors over at The Next Step Realty are already set to take Figawi to new heights. The Next Step Realty, which locates starter apartments in Manhattan for recent college graduates and young professionals, opened in 2010. And already, co-founder and C.E.O. Blair Brandt has figured out that the best way to get from New York to Nantucket for Figawi is to do away with boats and, with the help of a few corporate sponsors, charter a 737 straight from White Plains Airport. On Fly Figawi (www.flyfigawi. com), passengers will enjoy free-flowing SpikedSeltzer before and during the flight. What the fig is that? A new alcoholic refreshment, which is converting bloated beer drinkers to its low-carb, gluten-free alternative.

over. SpikedSeltzer will be the buzz of summer as The Next Step Realty’s official liquor sponsor. Complimentary SpikedSeltzer will be served up at The Next Step Realty’s three locations in Manhattan and at their events in East Hampton and Nantucket. “A few years ago, I went out to Nantucket and fell in love with it,” says Brandt. “One of our business partners has a house in Sconset. It’s a special place for me to go and decompress. That led me to say, ‘I’m out there, let me find a way to make this productive.’” And in ‘Next Step’ lingo, that means fun for all! “We decided to throw a party during Memorial Day weekend; that’s when the post-grad twentysomething crowd really starts going out to Nantucket.” The event is at a house a tad larger

list and security, the party will retain the laid-back feel that Nantucket—and Sconset—are known for. “We watch the weather and declare which day the party will happen on the morning of,” explains Brandt. “People roll with it. It’s not like the Hamptons, where you put up a tent and send invitations.” You might also publicize V.I.P. guests there, but not here. He expects high-profile guests, but “in the culture of Nantucket,” will keep names on the down low. The SpikedSeltzer guys are sure to be there, and you may be asking for their autographs once you taste the stuff. They only live a short paddle away, on Long Island Sound in Connecticut. Shields and co-founder Dave Holmes both happen to be oarsmen—as well as pilots—so I asked if they consid-

This page, from left: A sampling of SpikedSeltzers in Valencia Orange, West Indies Lime, and Indian River Grapefruit; a view of the race.

Boathouse Beverage founder and brewer Nick Shields developed the unique product. “We combine a few simple ingredients: cold-pressed lime essence, a secret natural sugar blend, and pure Adirondack water,” explains Shields. After the brewing process, what customers get is 6 percent alcohol, 140 calories (only 20 of which are from sugar), and, reportedly, no hang-

than the average quaint Sconset cottage (say, 10 times larger). It proved a popular venue for an all-day pool party during Figawi weekend. “We have a Range Rover with our company name on it,” says Brandt. “A buzz developed. People would stop us and ask when the party was.” The first year, 150 people attended; last year, 200; and this year, 300 are expected. Despite the need for a guest

ered entering a SpikedSeltzer boat in the race. Rowing, flying, sailing—what’s the difference? Turns out Shields has another concern: “Well, our logo is a mermaid… I’m sure you know what mermaids do with sailors. Best we stick to serving drinks on shore.” Should you get lost and miss Figawi, be sure to try SpikedSeltzer anywhere from Boston to Montauk this summer. u M AY 2 0 1 4 7 3


CANTEENS

WE ALL GO TO MARGAUX

ONCE YOU FIGHT your way through the bustling lobby, past the wall of diner-like booths lining the bar, then into the restaurant, you might think you’ve stumbled upon the New York sister restaurant of, say, Pierre Jancou’s Vivant Table in Paris. There’s an airy romance about the place, set into effect by an overwhelmingly calm, sepia-tinged patina cast everywhere, as if the lush green banquette seating, fresh plants in porcelain potting, Argentinean floral tiles, and warm woods are being scanned through a Valencia filter in our eyes. Or you might think you’ve stumbled into the back garden area of the Waverly Inn and Garden, over in the West Village. It makes sense: hotelier Sean MacPherson, who renovated the Waverly Inn with Graydon Carter, is the mastermind behind this latest “neighborhood café,” Margaux, in the heart of Greenwich Village. MacPherson, who is also responsible for the recent multi-million-dollar renovation of the Marlton Hotel, which houses 74 Q U E S T

Margaux, has said he was inspired to transform the former Marlton House (a onetime abode for great minds of the Beat Generation) into the sort of hotel on a Parisian side street that might be found in Tender is the Night. Thus explains the Parisian-influenced “baby grand” hotel that alludes to both postwar Paris and glory-days Greenwich Village in the details. MacPherson, like Jancou in Paris, is a modern master of the espace retrouvé—reclaiming old spaces on shadowy streets or corners and revitalizing them with crushingly nostalgic splash. (MacPherson is poised to help put West 8th Street, the den of Doc Martens–type shoe stores, back on the map, much like Jancou turned the rue des Petites-Écuries into a hip Parisian destination.) At Margaux, there’s no need to Instagram anything; life here is already some dreamy vision of the past. Chefs Michael Reardon and Jeremy Blutstein boast dishes with “sunny, dynamic flavors,” and the food certainly does call

CO U RTE S Y O F M A R G AUX

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS

This page: A view of Marlton Bar, just before the entrance to Margaux (above); the squid ink bucatini with Maine lobster and Calabrian chili (below). Opposite page: The Atrium dining area. Margaux at The Marlton Hotel: 5 West 8th St. (between 5th and 6th avenues), open from 7 a.m. until midnight; 212.321.0111 or margaux@marltonhotel.com.

to mind rather far-flung coastlines. Starters like the olives with citrus, chili, and preserved lemon transport you immediately to the Italian seashore; the country bread—well worth the four dollars (bread, dear New Yorkers, is disappearing from tables faster than complimentary in-flight beverage service)—bathes beautifully in Sicilian olive oil, Kriemhild Dairy butter, and sea salt. With an ethos of seasonality and healthful ingredients, the menu can change daily, which might be cause for disappointment among return customers wanting more, but which is meant to offer the highest-quality food and drink “without pretense,” as the restaurant puts it. To be sure, pretense has been expunged from the menu, and also, in part, from the service. Don’t dare to deliberate too long on dishes (or you might lose your turn), and don’t banter about the earthiness or minerality of possible wines. Though the food is partly California-inspired, this is not wine country: even if you say no to Rieslings, one might be

served anyway, and even though you thought you wouldn’t like that (admittedly agreeable) chilled Alsatian Pinot Noir with your (unmistakably delectable) Arctic char with English peas, black trumpets, and horseradish, you might have to suck it up anyway. The burger surely beckons with English cheddar and pickled jalapeños (the pickled treats to start, it must be mentioned, are so good they’re apt to induce future pregnancy-grade cravings), but it’s “just a burger,” or so we’re told. More seasonal might be the olive oil–poached dayboat cod with wax beans, fingerling potatoes, and Taggiasche olives, or the rotisserie chicken with Urfa biber (a dried Turkish chili pepper), smashed sweet potato, and harissa. Turkish spices, curried yogurts, and kale salad with chilies and spicy pumpkin seeds might be more in keeping with the menu’s mission, but the marriage of Italy and American East Coast in the squid-ink bucatini with Maine lobster and Calabrian chili is so ambrosial, you might just have to Instagram it. u M AY 2 0 1 4 7 5


J E W E L RY

THE FINE ART OF HIGH JEWELRY

QUEST: How did the National Jewelry Institute come to be? JUDITH PRICE: I founded the NJI 10 years ago. At the time, there was no not-for-profit organization focused on telling the story of the jewelry industry. We’re not a trade company but, rather, our mission is to educate people about people, events, and places—using jewelry as a metaphor. Every show that we’ve had in 10 years, and we’ve had 14 exhibitions, has really been about education. 76 QUEST

We have a show coming up called “Destination New York: Traveling In Style.” I think if you asked about what life was like 20 or 30 years ago—what did people wear when they went on a plane, a train, or a ship—you’d realize that, for us, it would be like experiencing going to the moon. Our honorary chairperson, Princess Marie-Chantal, took her seven-year-old son to the USS Intrepid and, on deck, there’s a Concorde plane. She said, “This is where mommy used to sit.” He answered, “I don’t understand, mommy. This plane looks like the future but it’s in the past.” Luxury, especially luxury traveling, doesn’t exist today, unfortunately. It’s always been our mission to speak to these eras using jewelry as a metaphor. Q: How has the NJI evolved over the decade since 2004? JP: When we started the NJI, jewelry was a $50 billion industry with the big players. But this was 10 years ago, when the Internet wasn’t as pervasive and you didn’t have Google and

F R E D LE I G H TO N

JUDITH PRICE ESTABLISHED the National Jewelry Institute in 2004 to educate the world on eras of history through the jewelry of the time. The organization has since hosted 14 exhibitions and is celebrating its 10-year anniversary on May 7 with a gala at the Morgan Library. There, it will announce a partnership with Parsons The New School of Design, a collaboration to introduce one-week courses for students interested in jewelry in New York and Paris. Here, Quest speaks with Judith Price about her passion project.


This page, clockwise from top left: The court at the Morgan Library, where the National Jewelry Institute will celebrate its 10-year anniversary; Judith Price, president of the NJI, and Ashton Hawkins, chairman of the NJI; “Jeweled Binding with Virgin and Child Surrounded by Evangelists, Five Saints, and Two Virtues,” purchased by J.P. Morgan, Jr., in 1926. Opposite page: Fred Leighton’s Zolotas brooch, which belonged to Jackie Kennedy.

M I C H E L D E N A N C É ; T H E M O R G A N L I B R A RY A N D M U S E U M

(The piece returned to the collection of Fred Leighton, but has been sold.)

the would-be creators weren’t able to distribute their products. So, while $50 billion is no small potatoes, we now have a $100 billion industry because of e-commerce. The industry blossomed and the museums started having more shows about jewelry. There became more of an interest. Ten years ago, the interest was fashion, and then it started being about accessories—accessories and shoes—and then the sweet spot was jewelry. You don’t have to buy the jewelry, but you do have to learn. It’s like, we go to the concert without having to play an instrument. You don’t have to be an actor, but isn’t it wonderful to watch the movie? Q: Who collects jewelry? JP: The important collectors of jewelry are men. Think about the very famous Cartier Patiala necklace for the Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patalia and think about the Indian princes—they wore jewelry, they were collec-


This page, clockwise from top left: Joel Towers, executive dean of arsons The New School for Design; Joan Crawford, dressed in jewels; Diana Vreeland’s Schlumberger lighter from the 1940s; Joan Crawford’s Raymond C. Yard bracelet. Opposite page: “Jeweled Covers of the Lindau Gospels” (circa 880), purchased by Pierpont Morgan in 1901.

78 QUEST

M AT T H E W S E P T I M U S ; N AT I O N A L J E W E L RY I N S T I T U TE

Q: What are your favorite types of jewelry? JP: For me, I like three types. I like Art Deco, where there’s the very elaborate and the very plain. For fun, I like to wear Sophia Vari, who is married to Fernando Botero. She’s a sculptress. I like to wear her earrings because they’re mahogany and amusing. The third thing I like to do is medals. I’ll go to flea markets and buy old medals. The one that I’m wearing today is from the First World War and it is no longer issued. I put them on an old necklace and they dress it up. I bought medals in a flea market in Turkey and had them made into a necklace. Not to sell, but for me to be amused. I think the trick is to wear something you feel comfortable with. It doesn’t have to be expensive, but it has to make you feel good. It could be a locket that your grandmother gave to your mother. Jewelry should be about memories. It should be about your first job, your first kiss, your first promotion. It should only be serious in that way. In other words, it’s about evoking a memory and not how expensive something is. u

© B E T TM A N N / CO R B I S ; CO U RTE S Y O F VA RTA N I A N & S O N S ;

tors. And think about J.P. Morgan, whose legacy is of course the Morgan Library and Museum, which is where we are celebrating our 10-year anniversary. He was the greatest jewelry collector of the Victorian Era.


T H E M O R G A N L I B R A RY A N D M U S E U M

J E W E L RY

M AY 2 0 1 4 7 9


SPARKLE AND SOUL RWANDA HAS LONG held an important place in the life of philanthropist Francine LeFrak. She attempted to make a movie about the 1994 genocide, and when that didn’t pan out, she created an organization with the intention of giving a hand to the women who were devastated by the genocide and chaos that followed. During a 2007 trip to Rwanda, a longtime friend, Willa Shalit, showed Francine a crocheted bracelet made of hand-blown

glass beads designed by AIDS activist and artist Mary Fisher. Francine immediately saw the potential to create something beautiful that would employ women who needed a way out of poverty. She decided to create a special jewelry collection. Along with Janet Nkubana, of the weaving cooperative Gahaya Links, she recruited four HIV/AIDS-affected women already trained to crochet by Fisher. And thus, Same Sky was born.

“Never did I think that my life’s journey would bring me to own a company based in Rwanda,” Francine said. “But sometimes life’s plans are taken on a different course simply because of the people that you meet and the stories that they tell you. If you allow people to touch your heart in a certain way, it changes you forever.” The Same Sky foundation gives women affected by hardship a chance to work,

CO U RTE S Y O F S A M E S K Y

B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D


PHILANTHROPY

offering training and education in the hopes that they will go on to lead independent lives. According to its mission statement, “our goal is to effectuate social change for women who can then act as role models for their surrounding communities and the generations to come.” Thanks to the sales of the jewelry and the foundation, Same Sky has grown to include nearly one hundred women artisans in Rwanda and a partnership in Zambia. The foundation is supported through charity events, with all proceeds going to training, as well as sales of the bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and cufflinks—all handmade and unique. You can see examples on the Same Sky website: woven or crocheted bracelets, silver necklaces with beads or lacquered with

pearls. The African success led to Same Sky America. Last year, the organization opened a halfway home in New Jersey for women who have recently been released from jail. Using the same training and goals as in Rwanda, Same Sky is giving these women a second chance, which society often won’t. Now sold around the world, the Same Sky jewelry line is made by women who say these elegant pieces reflect their stories. Brigitte, one of the artisans in Rwanda, Brigitte, says: “I had nothing but now I am a woman, I am a mother, and I am someone. Same Sky has restored my dignity as a woman.” u

This page, clockwise from top: The jewelry is made with detailed crocheting; Same Sky founder Francine LeFrak with an artisan; Prosperity Bracelets; black laquer Sky bracelets; the Carnelion Sky necklace. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Artisans in Rwanda; an Indigo Sky bracelet; the Papaya Hope necklace.

M AY 2 0 1 4 8 1


MARRIAGES BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Alexandra Parsons & Mark Andrews January 11, 2014 New York, New York

The ceremony took place at the Church of Heavenly Rest. The bride wore a dress designed by Monique Lhuillier and carried a bouquet from Renny & Reed.

The flower girls were Beatrice duPont, Clementine duPont, and Eleanor duPont, who enjoyed a carrot cake by Sylvia Weinstock at the wedding.

82 QUEST

The wedding party included best man Reynolds duPont III, the groom’s brother-in-law, and maid of honor Jessie Parsons, the bride’s sister.

J U L I E S K A R R AT T

The reception took place at the Pierre Hotel, where the couple danced to “You’re My Home” by Billy Joel.


WEDDINGS

MARRIAGES Lizzi Bickford & Trey Sned April 5, 2014 Palm Beach, Florida

The bride—who is the head of Events by Lizzi Bickford in Palm Beach—put her talents to work at her own wedding.

The bride wore a dress that she designed herself, with lace that she discovered with her father in Paris.

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

The ceremony took place at Bethesda by the Sea, which was followed by a reception at the Sailfish Club of Florida.

Guests were served Southsides—a favorite cocktail of the bride and groom—braised short rib, and carrot cake.

The couple danced to “Into the Mystic” by Van Morrison before honeymooning in Bangkok, Koh Samui, and Singapore.

M AY 2 0 1 4 8 3


MARRIAGES Amanda Senatore & Parker Hatfield October 26, 2013 Boston, Massachusetts

The wedding party included best man Justin Siebel and maid of honor Adelaide Polk-Bauman, as well as flower girl Vivian Whitelaw.

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The couple minimooned in Bermuda and plan to honeymoon in Italy.

L AU R E N K I LL I A N / P E R S O N A N D K I LL I A N B O S TO N

The bride’s parents, John and Nina Senatore, and the groom’s parents, Guy and Debbi Hatfield, celebrated the union of their children.

N AT U R A L E X P R E S S I O N S

The wedding, which took place at the Boston Harbor Hotel, was attended by 150 of the couple’s nearest and dearest.

The bride wore a dress designed by Amsale and carried a bouquet of white garden roses with ranunculus, stephanotis, and ivy.


WEDDINGS

ENGAGEMENTS

Casey Roach & Emilie Kuhn Casey Roach and Emilie Kuhn will be married on October 11 in the gardens of the City Club in Wilmington, North Carolina. The ceremony will be officiated by Reverend Terrence Elsberry of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Bedford, New York, the husband of the groom’s godmother, Nancy Elsberry. The sister of the bride, Jennifer Schade, will serve as matron of honor and the brother of the groom, Taylor Roach, will serve as best man. Also to be in attendance are the couple’s parents: James and Elizabeth Kuhn and John and Joan Roach, Jr. The bride and groom are from towns in Connecticut (North Granby and Greenwich, respectively) but were introduced by a friend when they were living in Chicago, Illinois. Casey proposed to Emilie at their apartment in Brooklyn, New York, where they relocated to in 2013. The groom designed the engagment ring with a diamond that once belonged to his great-grandmother. The bride graduated from Denison University and the groom graduated from St. Lawrence University.

Kirk Bedell & Sally Lynch Kirk Bedell and Sally Lynch will be married on May 10 at the Mill Reef Club in Antigua. Sally visited the Mill Reef Club with her family throughout her youth and the resort has since become special to the groom as well as to the bride. At the wedding, the bride’s sisters, Helen Kingsley Lynch and Maisie Lynch Branson, will serve as maids of honor and the groom’s brother, David Branson Smith, and friend, Turner Westray Battle III, will serve as the best men. The Reverend George Andrews, who married Sally’s parents as well as her aunts and uncles, will be there to participate. The couple met at a fête for a book by Kirk’s mother, author Sally Bedell Smith, at Doubles. Though Kirk lived in St. Louis, the couple wasn’t deterred—they commuted for a year before Kirk relocated to New York, where he was born and raised. Kirk proposed to Sally on a dock off the 17th green at the Fishers Island Club, following an early-morning stroll, with cups of coffee in tow. The bride and groom both graduated from Trinity College.

Jennifer Stocker & Scott Riebe Jennifer Stocker and Scott Riebe will be married on October 18 at the Coral Beach and Tennis Club in Bermuda—the couple’s go-to for vacations because of how romantic it is. The bride, designer of the resortwear brand Sail to Sable, will be designing the dresses of the 13 bridesmaids—how lucky are they! The service and reception will take place outside at the club and the maids of honor will be Brooke Shepard and Jodie Stocker; the best men will be Mac Bayly and Thomas Knechtel. The couple met as children in Darien, Connecticut, but started dating after they reconnected at a Halloween party in New York City. Scott proposed to Jennifer at the couple's apartment on the Upper East Side over a meal of Jennifer's favorite cuisine, sushi. He presented her with a box from Monograms Off Madison with her “new” intitals. Inside, an engagement ring that she couldn't say no to. The bride graduated from Loyola College and the groom graduated from Villanova University. u

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FINANCE

WHY TRUSTS MATTER BY MARY HICKOK, BRUCE HOFFMEISTER, AND SHARON KLEIN COMPREHENSIVE ESTATE PLANNING

allows individuals and couples to maximize control over where their assets will go upon their death, while minimizing taxes so they can leave as much as possible to each other, their loved ones, and charitable causes. While this sounds simple enough, most laws regarding how estates are handled are designed with a traditional nuclear family in mind: a husband and wife and their biological children. Today, fewer than half of all U.S. households meet the traditional definition, according to the United States Census Bureau, which found that the number of husband-wife family households declined to 48.4 percent in 2010 from 55.2 in 1990. The trend is likely to continue as same-sex marriage becomes legal in an increasing number of states, rapid advances in reproductive technology

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continue, and divorce and remarriage remain common. So how can today’s families plan for their futures? Fortunately, recent changes in the law—including the passage of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) and the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)—are opening up new options for many families. Perhaps the most seismic legal changes in the United States are occurring in the area of same-sex marriage. On June 26, 2013, in the case of United States v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court found Section 3 of DOMA, which denied federal recognition of same-sex marriages, unconstitutional. As a result, the federal government must recognize same-sex marriages for couples who live in states where same-sex marriage is legal (so long as the marriage was

performed in a state where the marriage was legal) and provide the same benefits previously reserved for opposite-sex married couples. The federal government is quickly moving to extend the federal benefits of marriage to all legally married samesex couples regardless of where the couple resides, so long as the marriage was performed in a state or country where the marriage is legal at the time of the marriage. Benefits have already been extended to all same-sex married couples for the purposes of federal income, estate, and gift taxes; qualified retirement plans; immigration rights; military benefits; veterans’ benefits; and all federal government employee benefit rights. The world of federal gift and estate tax planning dramatically changed for all married same-sex couples when the IRS announced on August 29, 2013,


FINANCE that same-sex marriage would be recognized for all federal tax purposes. For example, legally married same-sex couples, regardless of where they live, may now give property to a spouse during life or upon death free of federal gift or estate taxes by taking advantage of the unlimited marital deduction, a provision of the federal tax law that permits an individual to transfer an unlimited amount of assets to his or her U.S. citizen spouse, free from taxes, during lifetime, or at death. This provision allows a married couple to defer all federal estate taxes until the death of the surviving spouse. In addition, same-sex married couples may defer estate taxes until the death of the surviving spouse by taking advantage of “portability,” a feature of federal tax law made permanent under ATRA that allows a surviving spouse to take advantage of the deceased spouse’s unused federal estate and gift tax exemption, in addition to his or her own exemption. The current available federal exemption for every person is $5.25 million. As a result, a same-sex married couple could leave up to $10.5 million to their children without paying any federal estate taxes. Affluent married same-sex couples should review their estate plans to

ensure that they are comprehensive and effective, and continue to review them regularly as the laws regarding same-sex marriage are rapidly changing. The following are among the trust strategies that were once only available to opposite-sex married couples, but are now worth considering in the wake of the DOMA and IRS rulings recognizing same-sex marriage: Credit

Shelter Trusts, Disclaimer Trusts, and Qualified Terminable Interest Property Trusts (QTIPs). The legalization of same-sex marriage in an increasing number of states is just one of the factors driving the transformation of the American family. Other forces include the country’s rate of divorce and remarriage. According

to the U.S. Census Bureau, at least one spouse was previously married in approximately 30 percent of marriages that occurred in 1996, 2001, and 2004. Spouses in blended families may wish to provide for a current spouse as well as children from previous marriages. Trusts can help achieve both goals. For example, individuals can use the previously mentioned credit shelter or QTIP trusts to provide tax-efficiently for a spouse while still ensuring assets ultimately pass to individuals of their choosing, usually the children from a previous marriage. The recent ATRA legislation and DOMA decision have helped inject an increased degree of certainty into planning. While ATRA makes permanent many of the most important estate tax benefits for married couples, the DOMA decision allows many same-sex couples to take advantage of them. Tax planning is just one part of estate planning, however. For non-traditional families—many of whom face a myriad of complex issues when it comes to providing for their loved ones after they are gone—planning remains as important as ever. Recent legislation, judicial decisions, and federal regulations serve as important reminders to have a timely and comprehensive plan in place. u

This page: Same-sex marriages benefit from increased recognition from the federal government (above); the authors, from left: Mary Hickok, Managing Director and Trust Counsel, Wilmington Trust Company; Bruce Hoffmeister, Senior Financial Planner, Wilmington Trust, N.A.; Sharon Klein, Managing Director of Family Office Services & Wealth Strategies, Wilmington Trust, N.A. Opposite page: Blended families are also benefiting from increased recognition.


PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( H E A D S H OT )

CO U RTE S Y O F S COT T S NY D E R , I N C . ;

DESIGN

DESIGN FOR A CAUSE SCOTT SNYDER, the designer recognized throughout the world for his talents in the areas of interior design and architecture, arrived in Palm Beach in 1981. Since, he has become more and more integral to the community by donating his efforts, as well as his financing, to designing events for the charities that serve—and therefore define—the town. “He loves Palm Beach and he’s added so much to the town with the work that he’s done,” says Audrey Gruss, who has worked with Scott for 25 years, on her homes and on events for her organization, the Hope for Depression Research Foundation. “Our friendship has never faltered and I think that whatever we do together as friends or with me as a client is just consistent. He’s brilliant, talented, generous to a fault, and he cares about this town. He has made his mark here. His career was created by the top level of people from Palm Beach.” Scott’s taste is traditional—it’s elegance polished with sophisThis spread: The 2014 Palm Beach Preservation Foundation Ball; Scott Snyder with a collection of stuffed dogs for an Animal Rescue League event (left inset); the designer (right inset).

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This page, above and below: Scott Snyder’s contribution to the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art, and Antique Show, presented by the Hope for Depression Resarch Foundation. Opposite page: A variety of views of the clubhouse at the Par 3 Golf Course, to which the designer gifted his talents of design. It has earned $1 million in revenue since it opened this year by selling breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

CO U RTE S Y O F S COT T S NY D E R , I N C .

tication—and is inspired by his globetrotting. (“I travel a lot to places like India and Morocco and Russia. I’ve come back with things and portraits and paintings and lanterns and more. For me, it’s such a passion, it’s such a creative process.”) This sensibility echoes throughout his work on interiors (including the clubhouse at the Par 3 Golf Course, which he completed as a gift to the town of Palm Beach) and into his work on events. He recalls working with Ginny Burke on an event for the Hospice of Palm Beach County: “She is a swan, she loves swans and she looks like a swan. She’s just a beauty and she loves pink. So, I turned that ballroom into a completely pink room with a pink dancefloor and pink flowers towering. It was a refreshing Palm Beach party that looked like it could’ve been in the 1960s. I drew that from what Ginnny is all about.” “What he does is give us time, which would be a fortune,” emphasizes Michele Kessler, who has worked with Scott for the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, where he serves as a trustee. “We sit with him and pick a theme and he develops it from that point forward. It’s truly magical when you see it. His finished product is amazing, he is the go-to, and his design talents are really utilized in Palm Beach.” u


DESIGN


PROFILE

INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY design house Marina B opens its first boutique in over a decade in New York City. The recently opened and centrally located store is right off the prestigious Madison Avenue on 57th Street in midtown Manhattan. Designed by the renowned Ron Wendt Design group, this “jewel box” boutique is decorated to mimic the interior of a jewelry box with ultra-suede tan walls complemented by sleek gold trimmed cases. In addition to being a much anticipated retail location in New York, this store is also very close to the U.S. headquarters for the company. Among the collections featured in the New York City boutique are the Cardan and Atomo, two of Marina Bulgari’s most notable. Marina B designed the Cardan collection in 1987 as an alternative to stringing beads in the traditional fashion. The brand recently launched spring and summer tones with rose 92 QUEST

quartz, amethyst, blue topaz, pastel chalcedony, and pearls. In addition, the Atomo Collection is a classic design by Marina B made with 18kt yellow gold beads that are intricately strung together in an apparently random fashion. The pieces are a uniquely distinguishable design that can be worn during the daytime or for the most glamorous evenings. Marina B’s collections have been filled with eye-catching designs that mix classicism and modernity, color and contrast, and bold design elements that have true artistic flare. Founded in 1978 by Marina Bulgari, granddaughter to the founder of the renowned Italian jewelry company, Marina B was recently acquired by Windsor Jewelers in 2010. Marina B has maintained an elite clientele with classic icons such as Sophia Loren, Elizabeth Taylor, Julia Roberts, and Princess Grace all wearing her pieces, and more recently, Marina

CO U RTE S Y O F M A R I N A B

MARINA B OPENS A JEWEL BOX


B’s designs have been worn by notable celebrities such as Alicia Keys, Mila Kunis, and Jennifer Lopez. Taylor Swift was recently featured on the cover of the New York Times wearing Marina B Troc earrings, Trisola bangle and Alfa ring from her appearance at the Country Music Awards. Always looking for unique partnerships, this May, Marina B will cohost an event with “100 Women in Hedge Funds” to benefit Action on Addiction, a British charity founded by The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry. The event will take place at the Marina B NYC store and will be hosted by Sophie Lasry, the daughter of American Hedge Fund Manager Marc Lasry. Marina B will generously donate thirty percent of the total sales to the Action on Addiction charity. u For more information, visit www.MarinaB.com or visit the New York City boutique at 30 East 57th Street (between Madison & Park Avenues).

This page, clockwise from top: Necklaces from the Cardan collection; Sophia Loren, longtime supporter; Taylor Swift wearing Marina B at the Country Music Awards; assorted Marina B rings. Opposite page: The new Marina B boutique.


BEAUTY

A CITY’S SANCTUARY B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

UNION SQUARE HAS a new oasis for New Yorkers, those anxious creatures strung out on caffeine and deficient in Vitamin D. Elizabeth Arden’s The Red Door spa and beauty boutique comes to the rescue at its new downtown location, offering treatments to help unwind, detox, and get rid of the layers of stress that can settle on people like a second skin. In a city where luxury spas try to one-up each other with fad services (Wheatgrass-infused oxygen nasal cleanses! Goose feather reflexology in sensory depravation tanks!) Elizabeth Arden’s Red Door spas have retained their status as all-inclusive destinations with impeccable standards. Like the vibrant signature red hue of the décor, the quality of the treatments does not fade. This latest location offers the same pampering clients have experienced at the historic Fifth Avenue spa, but adds something extra for the faster pace of downtown: expedited services from blow drying to makeup and lash bars, all of which take under 30 minutes. Pop in to get a mini facial in less time than it takes to order an oversized ice coffee during rush hour. The boutique features high-tech skincare and color products like the custom color foundation, which is designed to perfectly blend a foundation matched exactly to every client’s skin tone. Elizabeth Arden is a quintessentially New York brand, and this new location offers another trusted refuge for the overworked and under indulged. u 94 QUEST


CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H A R D E N

This page: The Red Door, Elizabeth Arden’s new spa and beauty boutique in the heart of Union Square in New York City. Opposite page: Express services like a blow dry bar are offered for quick treatments.

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ELEGANCE ON THE UPPER EAST

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the rooms are bathed in more light than most New Yorkers can imagine. The home was designed by William Sofield to include a variety of details, such as Nanz hardware and white-oak flooring with a herringbone pattern in many rooms. In the bathrooms, there are Kallista fixtures and slabstone surfaces. In the kitchen, the appliances are designer: a Miele dishwasher, Sub-Zero refrigerators, and a Wolf stove. The Maisonette West at 135 East 79th Street is listed by Stribling & Associates for $18.5 million. u For more information, contact licensed real estate salesperson Inez Wade of Stribling & Associates at 212.452.4439 or at iwade@stribling.com.

DAV I D PA LE R

A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH—well, if the Upper East Side is considered “the rough”—the Maisonette West at 135 East 79th Street. The property is one-of-a-kind, a private duplex located in a full-service “townhouse” in a condominium. The unique Maisonette West is the epitome of a “trophy” apartment, spanning 4,803 square feet to feature six bedrooms, five bathrooms, and two half-bathrooms as well as spacious dining and living rooms and an eat-in kitchen with a pantry. Don’t forget the 972-square-foot garden, which includes a water system. Enter the residence via the foyer, where you are greeted by a stately spiral staircase, pictured above. The space is vast, with 10’6’’ ceilings on the first floor and 9’4’’ ceilings on the second floor. And because the Maisonette West faces north,


OPEN HOUSE

This page, clockwise from above: The appliances in the kitchen are from designer brands such as Miele and Sub-Zero; the 972-square-foot garden; the master bathroom; the entrance to the full-service “townhouse� at 135 East 79th Street. Opposite page: The entrance to Maisonette West features a stately spiral staircase.


CALENDAR

MAY afternoon for the whole family and will include works by artists William Wegman, Christine Sciulli, and Emilio Perez. In addition to media and fine arts projects, the event will feature ageappropriate performances by actors, comedians, and musicians. For more information, call 212.274.0986.

5

HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL

Fountain House will host its symposium and luncheon at the Pierre at 11:15 a.m. Each year, the event helps provide services to more than 1,300 individuals with mental illness in New York City. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

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IN ART WE TRUST

The Outsider Art Fair will hold its V.I.P. vernissage to benefit God’s Love We Deliver at Center 548 at 548 West 22nd Street at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.779.0834. REVOLUTIONARY DAMES

The Daughters of the American Revolution Palm Beach chapter will hold its Memorial Day luncheon at the Beach Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 202.628.1776.

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ROOFTOP BENEFIT

1

FINDING A CURE

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America will hold its annual Women of Distinction luncheon at the Waldorf=Astoria at 11 a.m. For more information, call 212.254.6677. LEADING LADIES

The Ms. Foundation for Women will host its Gloria Awards: A Salute to Women of Vision and celebrate Gloria Steinem’s 80th 98 QUEST

birthday at Cipriani 42nd Street at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.463.0684. SCANDINAVIAN SOIRÉE

The American-Scandinavian Foundation, a leading organization committed to promoting educational, cultural, and professional exchange between the United States and the Nordic countries, will celebrate its spring gala at the Pierre Hotel. For more information, call 212.779.3587.

2

ANIMAL LOVE

The 17th annual Sailor’s Ball will take place at the Downtown Association at 60 Pine Street at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.786.3323.

The Animal Fair will celebrate its 12th annual Paws for Style fashion show to benefit the Humane Society of New York at Pacha New York at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.752.4842.

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The Children’s Museum of the Arts will host its spring benefit at 103 Charlton Street at noon. The spring benefit is an exciting

The Wildlife Conservation Society will host its Explorers’ Party at the Central Park Zoo at 6 p.m. For more information, call 718.741.1639.

POINTS OF SAIL

ARTISTIC YOUTH

WILD ADVENTURE

CO U RTE S Y O F H U D S O N VA LLE Y S H A K E S P E A R E F E S T I VA L

On June 7, the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival will celebrate the Bard’s 450th birthday at the Great Lawn at Boscobel in Garrison, New York. The evening will also feature cocktails, a live auction with Nicho Lowry, and dinner and dancing with the Alex Donner Orchestra. For more information, call 845.809.5750.

The New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund will host its second annual benefit at the Empire Hotel rooftop at 6 p.m. The event will be led by honorary chairs Scarlett Johansson, Vincent Piazza, and Kenan Thompson, along with the Fund’s host committee of young professionals. For more information, call 212.353.9585.


CALENDAR

JUNE 1

ON THE RIVER

Heroes Row the Harlem will take place at the Peter Jay Sharp Boathouse at 11 a.m. For more information, call 718.433.3075.

3

HOLDING HANDS

The Partnership with Children will hold its annual spring gala at the Mandarin Oriental at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.689.9500.

7 On May 8, the Outsider Art Fair will host its V.I.P. vernissage to benefit God’s Love We Deliver at 548 West 22nd Street at 6 p.m. The fair will run from May 9–11. For more information, call 212.729.0834.

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The American Museum of Natural History will hold its annual Museum Dance at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.469.3409.

The Atlantic Cup Inshore Series will take place on May 24–25 on Narragansett Bay on Rhode Island Sound. Teams will race on the bay in the third and final leg of America’s only Class 40 sailing race. For more information, call 401.619.4840.

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM

SCIENTIFIC MINDS

The Rockefeller University will host its 17th annual Women and Science spring lecture and luncheon at the University at noon. For more information, call 212.840.0888.

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CO U RTE S Y O F O U TS I D E R A RT FA I R ; CO U RTE S Y O F A M E R I C A N M U S E U M O F N AT U R A L H I S TO RY

FREE SPEECH

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press will celebrate its First Amendment Awards dinner at the Pierre Hotel. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

WINDWARD

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IN BLOOM

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden will celebrate its annual spring gala along with the 100th anniversary of its beloved Children’s Garden at 5:30 p.m. Gala

co-chairs include: Bevin Cline, Jennifer Eisenstadt, and Kathryn Mattis. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

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POLO AND CLICQUOT

The seventh annual Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic will take place at Liberty State Park. This year’s event will feature three large champagne bars offering Veuve Clicquot by the bottle or glass and other non-alcoholic beverages as well as fare from the city’s most popular food trucks. For more information, call 201.915.3402.

THE BARD’S B-DAY

The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival will take place on the Great Lawn at Boscobel in Garrison, New York. For more information, call 845.809.5750.

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CELEBRATING FASHION

The Fashion Institute of Technology will hold its FIT gala at Cipriani 42nd Street. The event will honor Dr. Jay Baker, Linda Fargo, and Joan Horning. For more information, call 646.683.2479. CHEF’S TABLE

The 29th annual Chef’s Tribute event will take place at the outdoor gardens at Rockefeller Center at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.501.3071.

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COCKTAILS AND COURAGE

The ninth annual Spirit of Helen Keller gala dinner will take place at 583 Park Avenue at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 646.472.0355.

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HATS OFF TO MR. ROSS

The St. George’s Society English Ball honoring Wilbur Ross will take place at 583 Park Avenue at 6:30 p.m. The English Ball continues to be a major fundraiser that enables the Society to fulfill its historical mission of giving advice and relief to those less fortunate British and Commonwealth citizens in the New York area. For more information, call 212.682.3465.

On May 15, New York City’s longest-running junior benefit, the annual Museum Dance, will take place at the American Museum of Natural History at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.496.3409. M AY 2 0 1 4 9 9


REMAINS OF THE DAY P R O D U C E D A N D S T Y L E D B Y D A N I E L C A P P E L L O A N D L I LY H O A G L A N D PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

The Carlyle, completed in 1930 by Bien & Prince and named in honor of the British essayist Thomas Carlyle, has always been an emblem of New York glamour and luxury, not to mention Art Deco style. The hotel’s legendary combination of discretion and grace account for why every American president since Truman has visited, and why international royals think of it as their Manhattan pied-à-terre. Checking in to the spacious Deco Suite, a woman of certain tastes might expect certain comforts and privileges: smoked-salmon brunches, cabaret nights at Café Carlyle, and after-hours cocktails in Bemelmans Bar. Her jewelry­—of equal distinction—would certainly shine bright in any of the meticulously maintained corners of The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel. Here, Quest captures the lively question of where a woman’s jewels might end up throughout the course of a day...or evening.

Van Cleef and Arpels’ Estate necklace in yellow gold with cultured pearls and diamonds and Nil Blanc earrings in emeralds, tsavorites, demantoid garnets, and blue and yellow sapphires in white gold enjoy central seating on the dinner cover, accompanied by bejeweled treats for every course (clockwise from top left): Wempe’s rose gold and diamond BY KIM Helioro pendant and rose gold and diamond bangles atop a green Edie Parker Lara cluch; Van Cleef and Arpels’ Feather Estate clip in coral and yellow gold; Roberto Coin’s Black Jade earrings in rose gold with green agate and diamonds; Wempe’s BY KIM Voyage ring in rose gold and brilliant-cut diamonds; Van Cleef and Arpels’ Rose de Noël clip in white mother-of-pearl, diamonds, and yellow gold; and Roberto Coin’s Cocktail necklace in rose gold, diamonds, and a triplet of amethyst, lapis, and mother-of-pearl.


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The Carlyle helps situate guests with an in-suite copy of Where Guestbook: New York, which offers the perfect perch for these spring jewels to take their own bite of the Big Apple (from left): Van Cleef and Arpels’ sapphire, emerald, and diamond Maelstrom earrings in white gold and Virevolte ring in white gold with diamonds; Wempe’s diamond and white gold necklace; and the Tiffany diamond flower earrings in platinum, the Tiffany Soleste row ring in green tourmaline and diamonds, and the Tiffany pear-shaped green tourmaline and diamond earrings set in platinum.


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This page: An evening of cabaret downstairs at Café Carlyle gives occasion to dress up in J. Mendel’s white long-haired mink pull-through stole; Jimmy Choo’s black satin and crystal Carmen clutch; Van Cleef and Arpels’ Clélia necklace in diamonds and white gold; and Roberto Coin’s Fantasia cluster earrings in white and yellow gold with diamonds. Opposite page: Jimmy Choo’s Karmel sandal in tabasco suede and crystals gets even more gussied up with Wempe’s diamond, white gold, tsavorite, and prenite brooch; Van Cleef and Arpels’ Folie des Prés bracelet with diamonds and yellow and green sapphires in yellow gold; and Asprey’s Oak Leaf earrings in peridot and pavé tsavorite. Asprey’s yellow sapphire and amethyst Daisy Heritage rings with diamonds sit at heel.


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Be it mid-afternoon or the wee hours, nothing makes for a sweeter treat than Ladurée macarons and a spot of Darjeeling tea, especially when paired with (from left) Wempe’s BY KIM Blu Intermezzo earrings in white and rose gold and amethysts; Fred Leighton’s circa-1940s yellow gold, aquamarine, and diamond Bow brooch and aquamarine-and-onyx cocktail ring; and Roberto Coin’s amethyst and prehnite Shanghai bracelets in yellow gold and mother-of-pearl.


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A TIME FOR POWER BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

This page: A young John F. Kennedy wearing his first watch as a student at Harvard University.

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This page, clockwise from above: A Bulova watch with a pink face and gold numerals was given to Kennedy by an admirer at a dinner hosted by Cissy Patterson at 15 DuPont Circle on November 10, 1941; Kennedy received an Omega watch engraved with “President of the United States John F. Kennedy” from friend Grant Stockdale in 1960, before he was elected; President George Washington’s “quarter repeater” is engraved, “1775/G. Washington” (he was elected in 1789); President Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first president to own a Rolex and, here, his Rolex Datejust, personalized by the company with five stars symbolizing his military rank as a five-star general; Eisenhower

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE United States­—from George Washington to Barack Obama—are known for their character, their intelligence, their power, their tenacity. These qualities are emphasized through the ways they choose to present themselves. For men, watches are used to express something about themselves. For presidents, this is truer—because it’s more calculated. (Think Bill Clinton and his Timex.) Here, a selection of watches that do, indeed, serve to represent the representatives who sported them. These are the time-pieces that have defined the times

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L WATC H A N D C LO C K M U S E U M

since 1776—in one- or two-term increments, of course. u

and his Rolex.


Gallet—a watch that is being rereleased by Gallet in 2014 as the Truman Edition Flight Officer; President James Monroe’s pocketwach from Gabriel was a gift from President Thomas Jefferson; in 2009, a pocketwatch belonging to President Abraham Lincoln was discovered to be hiding a message under the dial: “Thank God we have a government —Jonth Dillon”; President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Patek Philippe reads, “Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You”; President Rutherford B. Hayes’s E. Howard & Co. pocketwatch was a gift from his mother-in-law; and its etching includes a picture of his wife (and her daughter); President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Tiffany & Co. watch was a gift from his son-in-law and is engraved, “With loyalty, respect, and affection / January 30, 1945”; President Warren G. Harding’s pocketwatch from Hiram is decorated with Masonic symbols; another view of Truman’s Flight Officer from Gallet; Johnson wearing his watch in 1968.

CO U RTE S Y O F G A LLE T A N D CO M PA NY ( T RU M A N ) ; CO U R E S T Y O F T I F FA NY & CO . A R C H I V E S ( RO O S E V E LT ) ; CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L WATC H A N D C LO C K M U S E U M

This page, clockwise from top left: President Harry S. Truman’s Flight Officer from


Truman outfitted the pilots of World War II with the timepiece he sported, the Flight Officer from Gallet, because he believed it to be unmatched in terms of navigation and precision.

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GREEN

GLOW

BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA 112 QUEST


This page: Sorting emeralds in Zambia at the largest emerald mine in the world. Opposite page: Watch, circa 1600, from the Cheapside Hoard, set in a single large hexagonal Colombian emerald crystal with a hinged lid. The dial plate is enamelled in translucent green and the circular gold suspension loop and button securing the movement at the base are set with small emeralds. The watch has a gold dial overlaid with dark green enamel, through which can be seen an engraved design of radiating lines. The lid is slightly lighter in colour than the body crystal, allowing the watch dial to be seen

CO U RTE S Y O F T H A M E S & H U D S O N

with the lid closed.


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This page: Sita Devi, Maharani of Baroda, commissioned Van Cleef & Arpels to make this, the Baroda Necklace, set with 13 luscious cabochon-emerald drops (above); a Seaman Schepps bracelet found in the collection of Andy Warhol, circa 1940, made of emerald, rock crystal, moonstone, and diamond (below). Opposite page: Raw emeralds in the hands of market traders in Colombia.

THE FIRST TIME I ever saw real emeralds was when I was a very young man living in New York, just out of college. I had a girlfriend who lived with her parents in a very grand Park Avenue apartment. I’d only known the girl for a short while and, when I’d go to pick her up, I’d sometimes see her father, but never the mother—whom, I was told, wasn’t feeling well. Then one night, my friend invited me over for dinner. When the maid came to tell her dinner was being served, she told me we’d be dining in “Mummy’s bedroom” on trays. Mummy’s bedroom was at the end of a long corridor lit by small chandeliers. Her mother was in bed. A beautiful woman, sitting upright in what looked like satin sheets. Her makeup as if she were ready to go out for the evening, although the long brown roots

of her blonde hair had gone unattended. Nevertheless, roots and all, she looked like a movie star set up for a scene in a luxurious bedroom. I was fascinated by her commanding yet vulnerable presence. She was wearing an emerald green silk blouse. I remember the color especially because dangling from her ear lobes were large emerald drop earrings. I much later learned that the emeralds had belonged to her late mother who was reputed to have a collection of jewels to rival the Duchess of Windsor. She wore them as if they were everyday wear for her. Even in bed. The scene was unusually cinematic. She was maybe the most glamorous real person I’d ever seen. She was a beauty and made up to look her best (I later learned she had been very ill),

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hoping to partake of the magic and mystery of the emerald. Not to mention learn of the dramas that have surrounded many a stone. Montezuma had emeralds, and so does Queen Elizabeth II, and so, of course, did Barbara Hutton. Such diverse characters nevertheless shared in the awe it inspires. Connoisseurs, experts, princes, and movie stars reveal their experience of possessing emeralds in these pages. Its history, its possessors, its legends, and its relationship to civilization is all gathered within for one’s reading and looking pleasure. Reading Emeralds, I was sharing in that awe also. So will you. u

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and her emeralds were astounding—as beautiful as the woman who was wearing that deep, bright green. If someone were to ask me if I had a favorite stone—not something I think much about—I guess it would be the emerald. After reading this massive (and beautiful) tome Emerald, I can see that I am not the only one who responds this way. In many ways, the emerald is more mesmerizing than the diamond. It definitely adds a kind of substantive aura to the image of the woman or king or maharaja wearing them. Power refined. Thames & Hudson assembled this fabulous book for anyone


This page: Lamp clip, 1929 by Van Cleef & Arpels. Platinum, ruby, emeralds, moonstone, diamonds, and carved emeralds (left); snake necklace named “Eternity” in diamond and emerald set with two emeralds weighing more than 200 carats each, Cartier 1997 (right). Opposite page: “Tutti fruitti” bracelet designed as a foliate open-work strap set with carved rubies, sapphires, and emeralds with diamond accents, with a diamond and black enamel clasp, by Cartier New York, circa 1928; Emerald (Thames & Hudson) available in bookstrores.

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BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

00 QUEST

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

PHRASING ROCK AND ROLL © B O B G RU E N


Smoking inside: Iggy, Cyrinda Foxe, David Bowie, and Lisa Robinson at a Patti Smith show at the Lower Manhattan Ocean Club (owned by Mickey

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Ruskin), March 1977.

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and John Lennon at their Greenwich Village apartment on Bank Street, January 1973; the original “New York Dolls”—Lisa Robinson, David Johansen (member of the New York Dolls band), and Fran Lebowitz— backstage at the Bottom Line, New York City, July 1978.

MICK JAGGER WAS on the phone, slurring his words. “I’m with two girls and they’ve got a cute guy with them and I’m trying to get a girl for him because he’s lonesome.” It was three in the morning, July 5, 1975. The place, a hotel room in Memphis, Tennessee. The woman he was trying to persuade was Lisa Robinson—a journalist on tour with the Rolling Stones who spent her teenage years listening to Symphony Sid’s jazz radio show under the covers. She declined, chatted with Jagger a few moments longer, and went back to bed. So begins There Goes Gravity: A Life in Rock and Roll (Riverhead), Robinson’s madly entertaining memoir that etches a wild path in the history books of rock journalism. It was 1969 when Lisa Robinson quit her job as a substitute teacher and joined the music business. There was no real plan. She heard Richard Robinson, a syndicated music newspaper columnist, on the radio at night and thought he had a “great voice and great taste in music.” She tracked him down and got a job, which required her to file for Richard every afternoon. Shortly after, he turned over his column for the British music weekly Disc and Music Echo to her. People read it. Concert invitations followed. She explained: “They [the bands] asked their publicists to call me to see if I’d want to come to their show because they wanted their parents or their wives or their girlfriends to see how big they were in America, Led Zeppelin particularly.” Now here it was: a career in music at such a febrile time for the industry. “I never thought I was going to do this,” she told me, and then added, “It all kind of happened.” Soon, she would write for Creem, New Musical Express, the New York Post, Vanity Fair. Her experiences, knowledge, and sharp wit gave her access to the musicians, and, as a New Yorker, she immersed herself in the scene. Her own scene, that is: CBGB, Max’s Kansas City, the Lower Manhattan Ocean Club… The grit of punk meets the glam of Warhol and Co. While this was all going on, she edited— with Lenny Kaye and Richard Robinson, by then her husband— Rock Scene, a personality-driven magazine that was about the places, the people, and the times. “We put out a magazine that was devoted to the social aspects of the music, which is probably just as important as the musical aspect,” Lenny Kaye told me 120 QUEST

on the phone. “We wanted it to be fun; we wanted to have the experience of being there even if someone was somewhere else.” And that’s where Robinson is a master. Her note-perfect, no-nonsense prose has the power to transport you to wherever she is, be it John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Greenwich Village apartment, a Lower East Side bar with Lady Gaga, or a recording studio with Marshall Mathers, a.k.a Eminem. Her words paint vivid pictures. There Goes Gravity, in fact named after a line in Eminem’s “Lose Yourself,” is filled with stories that make you grin (Robinson’s introducing David Bowie to Lou Reed), guffaw (lending Mick Jagger a pair of her underwear), and gasp (safeguarding Patti Smith from the crowd as she peed on the side of a Central Park stage). And no matter where she was, she belonged. She wrote: “Whether I was in a private plane with Led Zeppelin or the Rolling Stones or at a ballroom in Manchester or standing in two inches of beer on the floor at CBGB’s—it was exactly where I wanted to be.” When I spoke to Lisa Robinson, it was 1:20 p.m. For her, that meant it was the first thing in the morning. “I just can’t go to bed before four in the morning,” she admitted. “I never got off that schedule.” We talked about Gen Y’s fascination with the past. “The music was so great and some of it is timeless. If something is really good, whether it’s Frank Sinatra from the ’50s or Led Zeppelin from the ’70s, it lasts.” But she’s not nostalgic for the ’70s. If she loves something, she loves it, regardless of when it was made. “I have Kendrick Lamar’s album or Kanye’s [West] ‘Yeezus’ album on my iPod on a loop,” she said. “I still love some of that stuff as much as when I heard Led Zeppelin.” To call her knowledge of music encyclopedic would be an understatement. The annals Robinson has amassed include notes, photographs, memorabilia, posters, and 5,000 cassettes of taped interviews. “Honestly,”—she pauses—“next to Rolling Stone, I would say this is the biggest archive of the last 40 years of contemporary music that anybody has. Over all these years, I just wanted to get the record down, basically.” Yet, she has done so much more. Her stories are so intimate and focus so intense that we seem to share her all-access backstage pass to the world of rock and roll. And she insists that it’s rock and roll, not rock ’n’ roll (sorry, editors, I’m with Lisa on this one). “You need the ‘and’ in there as much as you need the roll,” she writes. “Because there’s been way too much rock and not enough roll. Rock is up and down. Roll is side to side. It has to be slinky.” Rock fans, meet a real star. u

T H I S PA G E : © B O B G RU E N / O P P O S I T E PA G E : © R I C H A R D RO B I N S O N ; © B O B G RU E N ; © C H R I S TO P H E R S I M O N S Y K E S ; © M I C K RO C K

This page, from left: Lisa Robinson’s first interview with Yoko Ono


This page, clockwise from top left: The cover of There Goes Gravity: A Life in Rock and Roll (Riverhead); Lisa Robinson, the Ramones, and their manager Danny Fields at the Café de Flore in Paris (the Ramones, a long way from Queens, were not happy in Europe because they couldn’t find lasagna); Lisa Robinson and the brilliant Atlantic Records president Ahmet Ertegun on Led Zeppelin’s plane, July 1973; Robinson and Mick Jagger have a laugh over one of the Rolling Stones’ reviews aboard the band’s Starship jet, summer 1975; Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant and Lisa Robinson at Nirvana restaurant, New York City, 1976; out on the town: Lisa Robinson and Elton John in New York City in the 1980s.


TIME AFTER TIME The right timepiece is requisite for the debonair man. Luckily, Quest offers a watch guide so you can look great around the clock. BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

Tiffany & Co. the Atlas© collection and the essence of Tiffany & Co. Both the brand and the collection are iconic, seen and recognized from across the room as a true statement of fashion. Named after the Greek god Atlas, one of the collection’s features is its use of sleek Roman numerals, which are incorporated into jewelry that is at once modern and timeless. This one-of-a-kind timepiece in 18-kt. rose gold includes 76 diamonds, a black dial, and a beautiful black alligator strap that adds delightful texture. The Swissmade Atlas© Dome Watch also features mechanical movement with automatic winding and is water resistant to 50 meters; $13,500.

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ATLAS© DOME WATCH / Bold, clean designs define


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2 1. Patek Philippe’s 5116R Calatrava in rose gold with authentic enamel dial and black Roman numerals; $28,100. 2. Emporio Armani’s Swiss-made timepiece from the men’s collection features a rose gold–tone plated case; $995. 3. Vacheron Constantin’s latest Malte collection watch for men in white gold embodies the simplest possible horological expression; price upon request. 4. Shinola’s Detroit-built timepiece with leather nato strap and royal blue dial; $625 at Shinola’s TriBeCa Flagship: 177 Franklin Street, New York, N.Y. 5. Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Master Ultra Thin Grand Feu, with its case measuring a mere 4.05 mm, is one of the slimmest watches in its category. This year, the Master Ultra Thin line welcomes two new models featuring a blend of mechanical perfection, elegance, and the ultimate expression of minimalism: the Master Ultra Thin 1907 and the Master Ultra Thin Grand Feu (pictured); $32,200.

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1. Asprey’s Ultra-Thin Tourbillon, a co-branded limited-edition timepiece with Arnold & Son; price upon request. 2. Longines’ Lindbergh Atlantic Voyage watch with rose-gold case is a reissue of a historical model in honor of the voyage undertaken by the Lindberghs in 1933 across the far north; price upon request. 3. Audemars Piguet Millenary Minute Repeater with Audemars Piguet Escapement 18-kt. rose-gold case and sapphire crystal caseback on hand-sewn brown crocodile leather strap; $495,800. 4. Breguet’s Classique Tourbillon Ultra-Thin Automatic 5377 in platinum with a finely fluted caseband and sapphire caseback; $163,800. 5. Ulysse Nardin’s Caliber UN-32 features the most advanced perpetual calendar in the history of watchmaking; price upon request.

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Wempe

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CHRONOMETERWERKE POWERRESERVE / The Wempe Glashütte

i/SA brand is deeply rooted in the history of the Saxon watchmaking town of Glashütte. This elegant model is reminiscent of the brand’s renowned ship chronometers in its external appearance as well as its inner workings. Inside its round case, a manufacture caliber equipped with technical refinements and finished with the highest level of craftsmanship ensures the greatest possible accuracy. The Chronometerwerke Power-Reserve pictured here features an 18-kt. yellow-gold case, a silver-plated dial with hour markers, and an anti-reflective sapphire crystal and screw-down sapphire crystal case back. The model stands the test of time and is an officially tested chronometer according to German DIN 8319 standards; $19,950.

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GMT-MASTER II / Echoing the first GMT‑Master bezel of 1955, Rolex introduces a world-first with its Oyster Perpetual GMT-Master II: a red and blue Cerachrom bezel insert. The new model is an exceptional achievement, especially since red is an extremely difficult color to obtain and, therefore, an unusual color for a ceramic. After succeeding with its red insert, Rolex found a way to locally modify the chemical composition of each grain—right to the core of the ceramic—and change the color of half the insert from red to blue, while ensuring a sharp and clean delineation between the two colors. The result is spectacular, a truly modern and stunning timepiece; $38,250.

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Rolex


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1. Autodromo’s Prototipo Chronograph draws aesthetic inspiration from vintage racing chronographs of the late 1960s and early 1970s, with clean, modern detailing at every turn. Powered by an innovative Seiko hybrid meca-quartz movement, the Prototipo features a sweep second hand and instant chronograph reset, thanks to internal mechanical linkages shared with Seiko’s in-house automatic movements; $625. 2. Ralph Lauren’s RL67 39-mm Safari Chronometer in black “aged” finish and steel; $3,150. 3. Carrera and TAG Heuer combine powers for this Calibre 17 Chronograph with silver and blue PVD dial; $5,700. 4. The Omega Seamaster Bullhead Co-Axial Chronograph; $9,600. 5. Breitling’s Navitimer aviation chronograph with 46-mm diameter; price upon request.

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Perfect Timing: The Best of Baselworld 2014

WATCH LOVERS can be an argumentative, if good-natured, lot. They may be prone to debates over the relative merits of this complication, or that new material, but no one contests the importance of the annual Baselworld fair as an essential appointment to see the best launches of the year. At Baselworld, even the smallest tweaks to the underlying technology of a finely tuned timepiece can send the hearts of watch obsessives racing. The tourbillon—a complication created to counteract the impact of gravity on a watch, and therefore improve its accuracy—is always a prime source of cultish fascination. Makers paid extra attention to the mechanism this year. Girard-Perregaux introduced a new tri-axial tourbillon that turns—as one could probably guess from its name—on three different axes. The manufacturer created a distinct 3-D bubble in the sapphire crystal to accommodate the spinning mechanism, which also permits an almost 360-degree view of its mechanics. Jacob & Co., while primarily known for high jewelry (which it still offers in ample supply), made an impressive stride toward elite watchmaking status with the new Astronomia Tourbillon. Each element of the watch, from the tourbillon to the spinning diamond briolette that represents the moon, moves constantly and gives the mystical impression of watching the universe at work from above. Sophisticated technology impresses watch connoisseurs, but housing it in a compact space is the latest mark of prestige. Bulgari set a new benchmark by creating the thinnest tourbillon available on the market: the Octo Finissimo, with a movement that measures just 1.95 mm—the same thickness as a quarter. And Chopard’s latest entry into the category, the L.U.C Tourbillon QF Fairmined, made news because it’s the world’s first watch produced with “fairmined” gold, a label which means its gold was collected in an environmentally sensitive way by miners who were paid fairly. As consumers focus more on all things sustainable, it will not be the last of its kind. “Heritage” is a consistent buzzword in an industry that’s centuries old, but it held significant prominence among watchmakers this year. Omega’s Professional Apollo 11 45th Anniversary Limited Edition commemorates the moon landing (and the Omega Speedmaster that Buzz Aldrin wore on the journey) with a 42-mm chronograph in gray titanium that recalls the color of the moon and the space capsule’s command modules. Bell & Ross, already known for its ties to aviation, teamed up

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CO U RTE S Y O F B A S E LWO R L D

BY TA NYA D U K E S


1 1. Corum’s Heritage Artisans Feather Watch with a red-gold case, 120 round-cut diamonds and a black crocodile strap; price upon request. 2. Harry Winston’s Midnight Moon Phase Diamond Drops watch with 305 brilliant-cut diamonds totaling 1.55 carats; price upon request. 3. De Grisogono’s Allegra watch S04 in steel with PVD coating, red mother-of-pearl dial, and 44 red spinels ($12,000) and Allegra watch S10 with pink-gold case, lacquered white dial, and bezel set with 44 white diamonds; $30,900. 4. Girard-Perregaux’s Tri-Axial Tourbillon in a pink-gold case with a gray anthracite dial; $501,900. 5. Breguet’s Secret de la Reine in 18-kt. white-gold with a floral cameo and 432 brilliant-cut diamonds; $112,600.

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with Harley-Davidson to create the B-Rocket, a sporty watch that touches on the expertise of each. Classicism with a twist has become the signature of Hermès timepieces. The brand’s Dressage L’heure Masquée reveals the time only on its wearer’s terms: the watch hides the hour hand behind the moving minute hand, only to be momentarily revealed when the wearer pushes a button in the crown. And Louis Vuitton’s Escale Worldtime brings the venerable brand’s artisanal savoir-faire to a travel watch with a whimsical hand-painted dial inspired by monogrammed trunks. Buccellati is so bullish on the prospects of the watch market at the highest level that it just launched a bespoke program that permits the customization of elements including case finishes, indexes, dials, and hands. (Beyond its watch offerings, the distinguished Italian house had editors and Instagram feeds buzzing about the decadent diamond and solid-gold iPhone and iPad cases that it launched at Baselworld, too.) Women’s watches—often given short shrift—are beneficiaries of the moment’s exuberance as well. The volume of highly ornamented new options is a reminder that there’s an enthusiastic market of women who see timepieces as an opportunity to invest in functional fine jewelry. De Grisogono’s new launches focused almost entirely on its female clients. The label capitalized on the popularity of its tenyear-old Allegra jewelry collection by adding a watch to the line. A bracelet consisting of 20 leather cords—not to mention a color palette with extroverted colors like electric green and fuchsia— gives it a youthful edge. Breguet revisited one of its standout jewelry pieces from last year. A portrait of Marie Antoinette inspired the romantic Secret de la Reine, on which a carved cameo can move aside with a touch to conceal a diamond-coated dial. For 2014, it’s placed on a bracelet of woven gold that mimics the texture of ribbon. And at Harry Winston, the dial of the new Midnight Moon Phase Diamond Drops is speckled with brilliant-cut diamonds that evoke the look of scattered snow. Painstaking decoration doesn’t mean that the newest women’s watches don’t have the same mechanical chops as the men’s models. The limited Dior VIII Grand Bal Plissé Soleil features an inverted mechanical movement. Its white-gold and mother-of-pearl rotor—the semicircular weight that automatically winds a watch—is visible on the dial of the watch, a technical feat that reverses traditional practice. Meanwhile, Corum’s 1970s-inspired Feather Watch combines a dial meticulously set with peacock feathers and a CO-082 movement, the same in-house–created engine behind some of the brand’s most iconic pieces. Each year there’s quiet speculation about which house boasts the most expensive watch to launch at the fair. This year, that title indisputably goes to Graff. Its one-off Hallucination is composed of 110 carats of colored diamonds and costs $55 million. To be sure, the fact that it tells time seems fairly incidental, but whoever buys it will have bragging rights as the owner of what is estimated to be the most expensive watch ever made. u


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1. Chopard’s L.U.C. Tourbillon QF Fairmined with an 18-kt. 43-mm rose-gold case and hand-sewn alligator strap; $144,570. A LL I M A G E S CO U RT E S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E B R A N D S

2. Buccellati’s Day & Night Bespoke timepiece with two automatic movements on each side and one pavé diamond dial; $250,000. 3. Dior’s VIII Grand Bal Plissé Soleil on a polished stainless steel bracelet with a diamond-set bezel and white-gold and mother-of-pearl rotor; $23,200. 4. Jacob & Co.’s Astronomia Tourbillon with 72-hour power reserve, enamel globe, and diamond briolette moon; price upon request. 5. Whoever buys it will have bragging rights as the owner of what is estimated to be the most expensive watch ever made: Graff Diamonds’ Hallucination

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watch with over 110 carats of colored diamonds; $55,000,000.

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JAR: GENIUS AND MYTHOLOGY B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D 132 QUEST


This page: Poppy Brooch (1982) made with a single diamond, tourmalines, and gold. Joel Arthur Rosenthal enjoys creating designs to surround a stone that inspires him. Opposite page: Raspberry Brooch (2011) with rubies, diamonds, bronze, silver, gold, and platinum, from the collection of Sien M. Chew. An example of Rosenthal’s use of the pavé technique to

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create multidimensional objects with great depth.

HIS CLIENTS WOULD only speak to me on condition of anonymity. “I don’t want to give him any reason to refuse to sell to me,” my companion says quietly, glancing over her shoulder—even though we are in New York, and the jeweler in question, JAR, is in Paris. “It took me so long to get on his good side.” She is a gregarious blonde socialite, but the vivacity that endears her to many apparently worked against her in this case. We flip through pictures of the pieces he made for her, and the floral design of one of them seems appropriate for this sub rosa conversation. This is not just one woman’s paranoia. Joel Arthur Rosenthal, a.k.a. JAR, despises publicity and press, and, until recently, was primarily known to those who had to not only afford his work, but also get his personal seal of approval. He refuses to sell to people he doesn’t like, if he thinks the piece isn’t right for a client, or if he M AY 2 0 1 4 1 3 3


This page: Brooches with natural motifs have long been popular, like the Peacock Feather Brooch dating from around 1860; but Rosenthal creates pieces that resemble life-sized sculptures, like his Tulip Brooch with rubies, diamonds, pink sapphires, garnets, silver, gold, and enamel (inset). Opposite page: He uses stones of multiple sizes in Cameo and Rose Petal Brooch (2011); the technique was famously lauded in Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark’s Bow Brooch (inset).

isn’t inspired by a particular gemstone. No other jeweler is afforded such privilege of power, which adds to the Wizard of Oz-like mystery surrounding the man dubbed “the Fabergé of our time.” Like the Wizard, Rosenthal’s roots are surprisingly humble, having grown up in the Bronx. He spent much of his early life visiting the museums in the city, particularly the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History, and thought he might become a painter. He studied art history and philosophy at Harvard University, then moved to Paris shortly after his graduation in 1966. There Rosenthal met Pierre Jeannet, who would eventually become the other half of the JAR business. In 1973, they opened a needlepoint shop together. For Rosenthal, needlepoint meant painting on a white canvas and playing with the palette of the different colors of the


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wools. The needlepoint shop lasted only 11 months, but during this time Rosenthal would also redesign clients’ jewels. Within a few years, his passion for making jewelry surpassed all else. He briefly returned to New York to work at Bulgari, but moved back to Paris and opened a new jewelry business with Jeannet in 1978. Rosenthal’s unconventionality was apparent from the start. He preferred working with stones in strong colors, even those that people didn’t consider “precious” at the time. He refused to create a collection or line. Though the client would be treated to seeing the custom-made process that went into each piece, any attempts to influence the design or negotiate the price would result in being shown the door. But the pieces he created were so astounding that soon his name was being spoken around the world. One of the aspects that immediately marks a piece as one of JAR’s is the pavé M AY 2 0 1 4 1 3 5


This page: A bracelet of diamonds, silver, and platinum. In his pieces, Rosenthal will mix very, very fine perfectly cut, perfectly flawless gemstones with some that are not in order to create an extraordinary effect. Opposite page: Butterfly Brooch (1994) made with sapphires, fire opals, rubies, amethyst, garnets, diamonds, silver, and gold. The “Jewels by JAR” exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art featured an entire wall of his butterfly brooches.

work, which entails setting diminutive gems in even smaller settings. He builds multidimensional objects in this way, usually flowers, animals (especially butterflies), and other natural motifs. Having such distinctive style means that women wearing his work are able to show their membership to his exclusive club without having to say anything. There is no need for branding or gimmickry—the quality of his pieces is as good as a signature. Now, thanks to a show at the Met this past winter, Rosenthal has become more talked about than ever. “Jewels by JAR” was the first exhibition the museum has ever given a living designer. The pieces were on loan from private collections from women like Stephanie Seymour, Susan Gutfreund, and Quest’s own Hilary Geary Ross. Of course, not all lenders in the exhibit were willing to be identified, conforming 136 QUEST


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to the JAR code of silence. I was able to attend the opening night at the behest of one of his nameless favorites, and spoke with Rosenthal briefly at the cocktails afterwards. Perhaps thanks to his great regard for our mutual acquaintance, he was charming and warm. When I relayed this impression to other clients I talked to, I was met with laughs that I had no idea what the other side of his personality can display. Still, armed with the pleasure of a good encounter, I thought I might be able to break through to the man behind the curtain. Perhaps this was a chance to peek behind the scenes of his unmarked shop in Paris whose doorbell is disguised as a bronze camellia. I reached out through our mutual friend, asking if he might grant me an interview. DĂŠsolĂŠ! Monsieur Rosenthal has a strict policy against opening up to the press. His mythology remains intact. u M AY 2 0 1 4 1 3 7


GUEST APPEARANCES

SIBLING SOCIAL BY DANIELLE SNYDER

This page, from left: Katy Perry and Steven Tyler at Lacoste’s desert pool party; Alexandra Richards at DANNIJO’s handbag launch; Isabella Di Stefano and Hannah

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ple, places, restaurants, and things, which is why it’s so easy to chronicle our most recent excursions AS. A. UNIT. We kicked off February with the amfAR gala, which is always so dynamic. This year they raised a whopping $1.7 million for amfAR’s AIDS research programs. Jodie and I were guests of one of our favorite designers, Gabriela Cadena. That evening we sat with model friend (pun intended) Selita Ebanks as well as Gigi Hadid, Ireland Baldwin, and Karla Barbosa, all of whom wore very different and beautiful designs by Gabriela. It was a memorable night of heartfelt speeches

and show-stopping performances. I don’t think one person was left sitting during Grace Jones’ stair-climbing, hula-hooping “La Vie en Rose” performance. Grace reminded us that you’re only as old as you feel. (If she’s 66, I must be 166!) In March, we were honored at the Love Heals gala alongside John Demsey and Bronson van Wyck. Our good friend and one of our all-time favorite women, Natalie Morales, presented us with the Young Philanthropist Award. Natalie was the first to really put our jewelry line, DANNIJO, on the map when she featured us on the Today show in 2009, so

COURTESY OF DANNIJO; D D I PA S U PI L / G E T T Y I M A G E S

a sister who is your best friend and business partner are that (1) you rarely have to leave home alone (she lives in an apartment directly above me), (2) you get to share a brain (and clothes), and (3) you have a constant person with whom to share your snarky inner monologue. Everyone thinks we’re twins, but we’re not. Still, we’re almost never seen apart, we look alike, and we have the same mannerisms, so I guess one could easily be misled. When you really get to know us, though, we’re two very different people who happen to like a lot of the same peo-

J O E S C A M I C I / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; DAV I D X P RU T T I N G / B FA NYC . CO M

THREE GOOD THINGS about having

B E N J A M I N LO Z OVS K Y / B FA NYC . CO M ;

Bronfman at the DANNIJO dinner; Jodie Snyder Morel and Danielle Snyder get ready for the amfAR gala in Gabriela Cadena; Lydia Fenet at NYFC’s Fool’s Fête.


it was really special to have her celebrate the occasion with us. Hal Rubenstein emceed the evening, which honored the late Alison Gertz, who died of AIDS in 1992. Jodie and I strongly believe in the organization’s mission to empower young people by giving them the knowledge, skills, and confidence to protect themselves and their communities from HIV. It was incredible to be a part of such a powerful evening. The event culled a great mix of friends and family (our adorable parents flew up for it) as well as iconic New Yorkers, including Alina Cho, Bill Cunningham, Rachelle and Sean MacPherson, and Stefani Greenfield. We caught up with Mary-Louise Parker mid-dinner and reminded her that she’s one of our favorite supporters (she’s the reason Nancy Botwin wore so much DANNIJO on Weeds).

from head to toe. I caught up with friends Eva Chen, Rickie De Sole, and Emily Holt before taking a seat between DJs Alexandra Richards and Hannah Bronfman, who filled me in on what tunes I need to add to my playlists. It was one of the most refreshing dinner parties I’ve been to because it was a room full of incredible women who are confident, warm, entertaining, opinionated—and hilarious. Isabella Di Stefano and Kelly Framel helped us close the place down with a late-night Kir Royale girl talk. Leandra Medine popped by our showroom in early April to get a hug, a clutch, and an ear cuff to add to her DANNIJO collection. The three of us headed off for the CFDA x Editorialist dinner at the High Line Hotel, where we caught up with Amanda Weiner, Claire Distenfeld, Rachel Strugatz, Maria Dueñas Jacobs,

had designed the bib necklace Liv gave him for his birthday, and he couldn’t have been more enthusiastic or adorable. A week later, we were back in New York for the annual New Yorkers For Children gala at the Mandarin Oriental. The evening opened with remarks from Katia Steward, who shared a harrowing personal story about the loss of her mother, time spent in foster care, and how a New Yorkers For Children grant turned her life around. In a matter of minutes, Christie’s auctioneer Lydia Fenet, six feet tall and six months pregnant, took over the podium and drummed up the bidding among fashionable guests Emma Roberts, Elettra Wiedemann, Peter Brant, Jr., Atlanta de Cadenet, Laura Love, Camille Rowe, Harley Viera-Newton, Elsa Hosk, Chelsea Leyland, Danielle Bernstein, Crystal Renn, and the musician Oh Land.

This page, from left: Jodie Snyder Morel, Eva Chen, Cannon Hodge, and Danielle Snyder at the dinner for DANNIJO’s handbag launch; scenes from the DANNIJO

K E V I N TAC H M A N / W I R E I M A G E

DAV I D X P RU T T I N G / B FA NYC . CO M ; M I K E CO P P O L A / W I R E I M A G E ;

dinner at Margaux; Grace Jones gives a taste of “La Vie en Rose” at the amfAR gala; Lily Aldridge at amfAR’s gala, which raised $1.7 million for AIDS research.

A few nights later, we celebrated the birth of our latest hashtag, #PutABagOnIt, and introduced the Italian-made DANNIJO handbag collection at an intimate dinner at Margaux, in the Marlton Hotel. Samsung graciously hosted the dinner and gifted our guests with the new Samsung Galaxy phones (because we all need another device to take and share photos with). We dined under a canopy of heavenly flowers created by our favorite floral designer, Michael Putnam. An eclectic crew of women came out to support and, naturally, arrived dripping in DANNIJO

and Editorialist founders Kate Davidson Hudson and Stefania Allen. The next morning, Jodie and I flew to Los Angeles. That afternoon, which happened to be National Sibling Day, we met with sisters Whitney Port and Paige Port for afternoon coffee at Sunset Tower. That night we had sushi at Katsuya with our Friends With Better Lives (her new show) favorite friend, Brooklyn Decker. Then it was off to Coachella for Shop Bazaar’s event at Le Parker Méridien in Palm Springs and Lacoste’s desert pool party in Thermal, where we bumped into rock legend Steven Tyler. We told him we

The past few months have been quite the whirlwind, so we’re looking forward to some pajamas-and-pizza nights in May (though we’ll likely fight our homebody inclination and venture out). I’ll leave you with my favorite Dr. Seussism because no one articulates life’s journey quite like he can: “You’ll get mixed up, of course, as you already know. You’ll get mixed up with many strange birds as you go. So be sure when you step. Step with care and great tact and remember that Life’s a Great Balancing Act. Just never forget to be dexterous and deft. And never mix up your right foot with your left.” u M AY 2 0 1 4 1 3 9


YGL

B FA NYC . CO M

BROWN

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Hannah Bronfrman, Danielle Bernstein, Chelsea Leyland, and Danielle Snyder at A Fool’s Fête.


Vanessa Lawrence and Elettra Weidemann, at tables designed by David Stark at the Mandarin Oriental.

Harley Viera-Newton, Ross One, and Keegan Singh on the dance floor on April 21.

Laura Love and Derek Blasberg supported New Yorkers for Children at the Mandarin Oriental.

Oh Land and Jodie Snyder Morel at New Yorkers for Children’s A Fool’s Fête to benefit youth in foster care.

Atlanta de Cadenet at the event on April 21, which

Andrew Bevan and Rebecca Minkoff at the

benefited youth in foster care.

event, which was presented by Lauren X Khoo.

BETWEEN WATCHING THE New York Rangers in the playoffs, I ventured away from venues such as Blue Haven to see and be seen at a variety of events. Off with the Chris Kreider shirt and on with the black-tie as I whipped around the city to report on the goings-on of the PYTs... On March 31, the Cinema Society screened Captain America: The Winter Soldier with Gucci Guilty. The after-party, which took place at Jimmy at the James Hotel, hosted the cast of the film, including Chris Evans—a crush of mine since Not

Another Teen Movie—as well as Olivia Chantecaille, John Corbett, Matt Harvey, Nicky Hilton, and Amy Sacco. The fact that I made it home before midnight was a Marvel (like, you know, Marvel Comics). On April 3, the Young Folk introduced themselves at their launch, “Bespoke Folk,” at the American Folk Art Museum. The evening was attended by 250 guests, including co-founders Maria Fillas and Abigail Stone, and featured a viewing of the “Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art” exhibition, with

Eva Chen (in Marc Jacobs) and Thomas Bannister at A Fool’s Fête.

M AY 2 0 1 4 1 4 1


contributions from designers such as Michael Bastian and Catherine Malandrino. Intrigued? Check out the Young Folk event for the Outsider Art Fair on May 8. On the 11th, the Cinema Society screened Fading Gigolo with Women’s Health, whose May 2014 cover features Sofia Vergara from the film. The after-party, which took place at Bar Nana with cocktails by Svedka, was aswirl with guests such as Kyle Hotchkiss Carone, Helena Christensen, Carson Griffith, Zani Gugelmann, Vanessa Paradis, Alan Rickman, and Mara Siegler. On the 17th, the East Side House Settle- ment hosted its preview of the New York International Auto Show at the Jacob K. Javits Center, which was attended by John and Karen Klopp, Peter and Barbara Regna, and more. Later, Pirelli fêted the Auto Show by presenting its “Miles and Meals” dinner at Parlor to toast its association with Formula One.

142 QUEST

the New York International Auto Show.

The evening was chaired by Paolo Ferrari, the CEO of Pirelli North America, and featured a meal by Silvano Fiorindo, the executive chef of Cipriani, which included Risotto al Nero di Seppia because, “In the world of cooking, no other dish comes closer to the process of making a tire”—according to the menu. On the 21st, New Yorkers for Children held A Fool’s Fête at the Mandarin Oriental to benefit youth in foster care. The event was chaired by Alina Cho, Natalia Echavarria, Nicole Esposito, Lydia Fenet, Amy McFarland, Elisabeth Noel Jones, Clare McKeon, and Susan Shin and attended by their nearest and dearest—and more. I was honored to be seated between two women I admire, Rebecca Minkoff and Nic Screws (in Brunello Cucinelli), and, later, to have the back of my head featured on Vogue.com. Let’s hear it for New York! u

B FA NYC . CO M ( F O L K ) ; DAV I D LE E ( PI R E LL I ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( C I N E M A )

YGL

Pirelli presented its “Miles and Meals” dinner at Parlor on April 17 in celebration of


DJ Leslie Kirchoff with Young Folk co-founders Maria Fillas and Abigail Stone at the American Folk Art Museum.

Helena Christensen and Andrew Saffir at the Cinema Society after-party at Bar Nana.

Sofia Vergara at the Cinema Society screening of Fading Gigolo.

Kyle Hotchkiss Carone and Johannes Huebl at Bar Nana for the Cinema Society after-party on April 11.

Garrett Neff at the Cinema Society after-party for Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Lindsey Torpey-Cross, Emily Romeyn, and Caitlin Byrnes

Sebastian Stan and Chris Evans at the

at the Young Folk launch, “Bespoke Folk.�

Jimmy at the James Hotel on March 31. M AY 2 0 1 4 1 4 3


SNAPSHOT

Clockwise fom left: Yves Saint Laurent and Nan Kempner, 1978; Nan Kempner, Fran Stark, and Jacqueline de Ribes; Kenneth Jay Lane and Nan Kempner at The Plaza Hotel, 2004.

“I’VE ALWAYS LIKED being noticed, and I work hard at it,” said Nan Kempner in an interview with Annette Tapert in 1999. Mrs. Kempner surely succeeded in her conquest, for she will forever be known for her extraordinary fashion (she is a member of Fashion’s Hall of Fame), charitable giving (she helped raise $75,000,000 for the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center over 30 years), and remarkable dinner parties (Nan’s intimate Sunday-night spaghetti dinners were not to be missed as you never knew who might turn up: Princess Di? Nancy Reagan?). Born Nan Field Schlesinger in San Francisco in 1930, Nan’s father, Albert “Speed” Schlesinger, owned a successful car dealership and reportedly told the young Nan, “You’ll never make it on your face, so you’d better be interesting.” Nan’s mother, Irma Schlesinger, was a San Francisco society fixture who was quite a fashion plate herself. Nan married Thomas Lenox Kempner, a member of the Loeb banking family, in 1952 and had three children. The couple lived in London for a short time before moving to New York City and into a 16-room duplex on Park Avenue and 79th Street, where they resided for over 45 years. Nan was a known force at the Paris couture shows and Yves Saint Laurent became one of her closest friends. “I spend more 144 QUEST

money than I should and less than I’d like to, much less,” she told WWD in 1972. “I couldn’t keep my husband if I spent more.” Nan’s jewelry collection was as famous as her clothing, with names including JAR, Verdura, David Webb, and, of course, her good friend, Kenneth Jay Lane. “If Nan liked something, she would get one in every color,” recalls Mr. Lane. “She had my bamboo hoops in every color.” Wendy Lehman remembers how Nan would fasten her lovely JAR dragonfly pins and David Webb brooches to her headboard at night. Antoinette Guerrini-Maraldi recalls Nan’s having the quickness of mind to hide one bag of jewels beneath her seat when robbers pretending to be florists delivering flowers robbed her at her flat. On another occasion, when intruders broke into the Kempners’ apartment and tied up Nan, she reportedly had the quick wit to hide a JAR diamond earring in her mouth. The Kempners were robbed twice in the seventies but it never hindered Nan’s spirits. Nan loved to dress up and did so until the day she died. In a 1994 interview, Nan recollected, “Our car would drop the kids off at school, then Tommy would pick me up, and he’d say, ‘Now, who are we today?,’ and I’d be Pocahontas, Nanook of the North; I’d be—God knows—the River Boat Queen. It was such fun. Indeed!”—Elizabeth Meigher

P H OTO BY RO B I N P L AT Z E R / T I M E L I F E PI C T U R E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; ROX A N N E LO W I T; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

NAN’S STYLE


“Every prerequisite on our design list was expertly executed with great flexibility and desire to meet our wants and lifestyle needs.” — Tricia and David Rogers —

DESIGNING FINE HOMES, ESTATES, AND APARTMENTS IN CONNECTICUT, NEW YORK CITY, AND PALM BEACH THE KITCHEN OF THIS NEW HOME OVERLOOKS THE BREAKFAST PORCH AND LONG ISLAND SOUND BEYOND WADIAASSOCIATES.COM


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R A L P H L A U R E N . C O M / R I C K Y

Quest May 2014  

The Jewelry Issue

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