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PHILANTHROPY ISSUE GILLIAN HEARST AT HOME WITH HER THREE DAUGHTERS

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FRANK LOBDELL (1921 – 2013) | Pastel Study for Painting No. 3, 1975 | pastel and charcoal on paper | 17 1/8 x 13 3/4 in.

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LY R I C A L A B S T R AC T I O N S O N PA P E R GROUP EXHIBITION

F I N D L AY GA L L E R I E S

32 e a s t 57 t h s t r e e t , 2 n d f l o o r , n e w y o r k , n e w y o r k 10022 · (212) 421 5390

view our gallery online

| www. findlaygalleries. com

VIEWING ROOMS | CATALOGS | ARTISTS | EXHIBITIONS Copyright © 2021, Findlay Galleries, All rights reserved.


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Dimitry Gerrman

The Net bronze on marble base 36 x 13 x 12 in.

F I N D L AY GA L L E R I E S

165 w o rt h av e n u e , pa l m b e a c h , f l o r i d a 33480 · (561) 655 2090

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MARKET, ININ TODAY’S INTODAY’S TODAY’S MARKET, MARKET, HOME HOME VALV CONDON LET THE PALM BEA LET LET THE THE PALM PALM BEACH BEACH EXPERTS EXPER SINCE 1982 THE VALUE YOUR THE THE VALUE VALUE OFOF OF YOUR YOUR HOME HOME TOD T

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


UES ARE SOARING LUES VALUES ARE ARE SOARING SOARING S HELP YOU UNDERSTAND S RTS HELP HELP YOU YOU UNDERSTAND UNDERSTAND AY DAY TODAY

Kevin Condon Broker Associate

Cristina Condon

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor

kevin.condon@sothebyshomes.com

cristina.condon@sothebyshomes.com

646.457.8919

561.301.2211 | cristinacondon.com


O N

“These are grand villas, really. Designed to capture the light, the ocean breezes and views.” — Bernardo Forte-Brescia

F L A G L E R


NE W DIMENSIONS

IN PALM BE ACH LIVING With its inspired design, expansive residences, and three full floors of amenities, Forté on Flagler offers a grand new vision for Palm Beach living.

Jean-Louis Deniot has lent his sophisticated

DENIOT

style and dash to residences from Paris, London, and the Cote D’Azur to Fifth Avenue, Istanbul, New Delhi, and Capri. Lauded as a true visionary, his work has ranked him among Architectural Digest’s 2020 Top 100 Designers.

global architecture, raising the banner of Miami

design in 59 counties around the world. At Forté, he and Jean-Louis Deniot have sculpted a residence inspired by the island’s rich nautical traditions and a unique sense of place.

FORT-BRESCIA

Bernardo Fort-Brescia is a renowned pioneer of

HALF- AND FULL- FLOOR RESIDENCES STARTING FROM $4.9 MILLION SALES GALLERY OPEN DAILY | 1217 South Flagler Drive West Palm Beach, FL 33401 To schedule your private presentation, please call: 561-903-4702 | FORTEWPB.COM ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE SELLER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A SELLER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This project has been filed in the State of Florida and no other State. This is not an offer to sell, or solicitation of offer to buy, condominium units to residents of any jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state aof residency. Artist’s renderings depict proposed views, which vary by unit and surrounding developments, and no guarantee is provided. Prices, availability, dimensions, specifications, and features are subject to change at any time without notice. The developer of this project is Flagler Residential LLC, a Delaware limited liability company formed for that purpose, and Two Roads Development LLC and Alpha Blue Ventures are affiliates of that developer but neither is the developer. Broker Participation is welcomed and encouraged.


MAD IS OPEN! THURSDAYSUNDAY 10 AM6 PM

VISIT AND EXPLORE See the vibrant, stained-glass masterworks in Brian Clarke: The Art of Light. Explore the finest treasures from the Museum’s permanent collection in 45 Stories in Jewelry, 1947–Now. Shop the overflowing cases of The Store at MAD Join TODAY for exclusive Members Only Viewing Hours and 10% discount in The Store.

OUT OF TOWN? Become a Virtual Member and get MAD direct-to-you wherever you are in the world through more than 75 live online programs.

Hover your phone’s camera over this code! www.madmuseum.org for tickets and more information email patrons@madmuseum.org with questions BRIAN CLARKE: THE ART OF LIGHT PHOTO BY JENNA BASCOM 2020


Direct Waterfront Offering Presented by

Fern Fodiman

Rare Oceanfront Offering - In Town

Wide Ocean views from every room! Enjoy the size, scale, and comfort of a private home with all the conveniences of a premier full service condominium. 4 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, plus large media room/office. Exquisite renovation with tasteful finishes throughout Enjoy beautiful sunrises & sensational sunsets from both direct east and south facing balconies. . Double poolside cabana, and private garage offered separately. Offered for: $10,950,000

Fern Fodiman

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor fern.fodiman@sothebyshomes.com 917.400.5624 | fernfodiman.com

#2 Individual Agent at Sotheby’s International Realty Palm Beach Brokerage (2019) Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


Palm Beach Fine Properties

JUST LISTED - A STUNNING COLONIAL RESIDENCE BUILT IN 1940 THAT HAS RECENTLY BEEN RESTORED. BANYAN HOUSE IS SITUATED ON AN EXTRA-LARGE PARCEL LOCATED IN THE MOST EXCLUSIVE NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD ON PALM BEACH. • 3-BEDROOM, 4.5-BATHS • DEDICATED MEDIA ROOM WITH FIREPLACE AND BAR • EAT IN CHEF’S KITCHEN • DINING ROOM WITH BEAUTIFUL HAND PAINTED MURAL • FORMAL LIVING ROOM WITH FIREPLACE • GLORIOUS SUN ROOM WITH WALLS OF WINDOWS • MASTER SUITE ENCOMPASSES THE ENTIRE SECOND FLOOR WITH 2 BATHS AND TERRACE • 100 YEAR-OLD ULTRA FABULOUS BANYAN TREE • GAS HEATED SWIMMING POOL • COVERED DINING TERRACE WITH PLANTED ORCHID WALL • TWO DRIVE-WAYS PROVIDE PARKING FOR 10 CARS • TWO SIDE GARAGES OFF RARE PRIVATE SERVICE ROAD • PRIVATE OCEAN ACCESS FOR OWNERS ONLY • LAKE TRAIL IS JUST A FEW STEPS AWAY THIS EXTREMELY PRIVATE HOME HAS A SOUL AND AMBIENCE THAT CANNOT BE DUPLICATED. IT IS IMMACULATE AND HAS OFTEN BEEN CALLED “THE GARDEN OF EDEN.” EXCLUSIVELY SHOWN BY - WALLY TURNER 561.301.2060

Wally Turner

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor 561.301.2060 wally.turner@sothebyshomes.com


Totally Renovated Palm Beach Residence Presented by

Sonja Stevens

Totally Renovated, new roof, windows, doors, electrical, air conditioning, 14,211 sq.ft., 8 bed, 8.3 bath home, Separate New Guest Suite with Living Room, full Kitchen, Laundry Room and 1/2 bath on first floor. Second level, 2 ensuite bedrooms. New Garage with Staff/guest above with Living room, bedroom and kitchenette. All kitchens, bathrooms and laundry by Waterworks. Full House Generator Gardens by Mario Nievera. Private Beach for Clarendon Residents. $33.500,000 | 110Clarendon.com Exclusive - Sonja Stevens 561.573,9198

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


Sonja Stevens Your Palm Beach Real Estate Liaison

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Sonja Stevens

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Serving Palm Beach and the Surrounding Area For over 20 Years, let Sonja find you the perfect home.

© 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty office is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty.


Locust LocustValley, Valley,NY NY– “Chimneys” – “Chimneys” Located Located onon one one of the of the most most desirable desirable streets streets in Locust in Locust Valley, Valley, thethe long long sweeping sweeping private private driveway driveway leads leads to to thethe impeccable impeccable Colonial Colonial onon 3+3+ professionally professionally landscaped landscaped acres. acres. The The home home boasts boasts many many spacious spacious entertaining entertaining rooms, rooms, wonderful wonderful gathering gathering areas, areas, terraces, terraces, pool pool with with pool pool house, house, and and wine wine cellar. cellar. Filled Filled with with yesteryear’s yesteryear’s charm, charm, high high ceilings, ceilings, open open spaces spaces and and modern modern amenities, amenities, “Chimneys” “Chimneys” is fully is fully updated updated and and in move-in in move-in condition. condition. A Masterpiece A Masterpiece Collection Collection Listing. Listing. MLS# MLS# 3280994. 3280994. $4,995,000. $4,995,000.

Katie Katie Cuddeback Cuddeback Associate Associate Real Real Estate Estate Broker Broker 516.759.4800, 516.759.4800, c.516.238.9919 c.516.238.9919 katiecuddeback@danielgale.com katiecuddeback@danielgale.com Locust Locust Valley Valley Office Office | 1 Buckram | 1 Buckram Road, Road, Locust Locust Valley, Valley, NYNY | 516.759.4800 | 516.759.4800 | danielgale.com | danielgale.com

EachEach officeoffice is independently is independently owned owned and operated. and operated.


Muttontown, Muttontown, NY NY – “Harrow – “Harrow Hill” Hill” Harrow Harrow HillHill - a-columned a columned classic classic 1928 1928 home home onon 7.47.4 acres. acres. The The main main floor floor hashas gracious gracious flow flow with with spacious spacious living living room room with with wood wood burning burning fireplace, fireplace, sophisticated sophisticated sunroom, sunroom, handsome handsome library, library, formal formal dining dining room room and and kitchen kitchen with with breakfast breakfast room. room. Double Double primary primary suite suite with with 2-baths. 2-baths. 5 additional 5 additional bedrooms bedrooms and and 4-baths. 4-baths. heated heated pool, pool, pool pool house house and and tennis tennis court. court. Guest Guest apartment apartment and and 2 private 2 private offices. offices. Not Not to to bebe missed. missed. A Masterpiece A Masterpiece Collection Collection Listing. Listing. MLS# MLS# 3274231. 3274231. $2,995,000. $2,995,000.

Life’s Life’sbetter betterononthe theIsland. Island. SOLD SOLD

SOLD SOLD

SOLD SOLD

SOLD SOLD

334334 Meadow Meadow Lane Lane Mill Mill Neck, Neck, NYNY

312312 Feeks Feeks Lane Lane Mill Mill Neck, Neck, NYNY

34 34 Birch Birch Hill Hill Road Road Locust Locust Valley, Valley, NYNY

2 Wood 2 Wood Lane Lane Locust Locust Valley, Valley, NYNY

MLS# MLS# 3263064. 3263064. $3,000,000. $3,000,000.

MLS# MLS# 3224514. 3224514. $2,700,000. $2,700,000.

MLS# MLS# 3255749. 3255749. $1,525,000. $1,525,000.

MLS# MLS# 3114696. 3114696. $1,525,000. $1,525,000.

Alexis Alexis McAndrew McAndrew Real Real Estate Estate Sales Sales Person Person Locust Locust Valley Valley Office Office 1 Buckram 1 Buckram Road, Road, Locust Locust Valley, Valley, NYNY 516.759.4800, 516.759.4800, c.917.750.8939 c.917.750.8939 alexismcandrew@danielgale.com alexismcandrew@danielgale.com

danielgale.com danielgale.com EachEach officeoffice is independently is independently owned owned and operated. and operated.


94

CONTENTS P hilanthroPy i ssue 94

THE SUBSTANCE OF STYLE

114

Shining a spotlight on the lovely women who are

using their talents, time, and influence to contribute to their communities. This year, we’ve added Gillian Hearst, Brittain Bardes Damgard, and Missie Rennie Taylor. PhotograPhed by

114

harry benson, annie Watt, and Carrie bradburn

NEXT GENERATION OF GENEROSITY

We chat with new generation of philanthropists

who are using their authority to work toward a better tomorrow.

118

GIVING BACK TO QUEST COMMUNITIES

by

brooke kelly

A salute to all the brave frontline

workers who have been tirelessly serving those in need. For 2021, we check in on New York City, Palm Beach, Locust Valley, The Hamptons, Charleston, and Greenwich. by alex travers

118


We look forward to welcoming you to our Pink Paradise—a place where everyone feels at home. And while you are here, take the experience al fresco at Swifty’s POOL. 15 5 H A M M O N AVEN UE PALM B EACH FL 33480 (5 61) 65 5 - 5 430 T HECOLON YPALMB EACH.COM


76

64

CONTENTS 68

C olumns 30

SOCIAL DIARY

64

HARRY BENSON

66

TAKI

68

FRESH FINDS

72

TRAVEL

Casa de Campo launches its private jet service to meet the latest demand to travel.

76

BOOKS

Assouline’s latest book Hamptons Private gets us excited for summer. by JareD brill

82

BOOKS

An excerpt from Deborah Goodrich Royce’s latest thriller, Ruby Falls. by alex travers

84

BROKERS

92

SOCIAL CALENDAR

132

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

136

SNAPSHOT

Updates on New York City—and discovering a new book. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia Our favorite photographer captures Brad Pitt in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Remembering Rupert Hambro, a quintessential English gentleman.

by

taki theoDoraCoPulos

New gifts and chic fashions for spring. by alex travers anD elizabeth meigher

As the weather stays warm and more places begin to open in Palm Beach, inventory is decreasing due to the town’s great lifestyle. by b rooke k elly Good news: the social calendar starts to see some in-person events this April. Small cocktail parties and a virtual Golden Globes. by brooke kelly

Jane Will Teagle Boggs Smith on surviving two pandemics. by Chris meigher


CHOOSE BETTER. MOVE BETTER. How you move is why we’re here. We’ve been U.S. #1 in Orthopedics for 11 years in a row. Here are a few of the reasons why: More successful surgeries on joints and spines than any other hospital The highest expertise in nursing pre- and post-care The lowest readmission rate in orthopedics The fewest orthopedic post-op complications To learn more about our in-person appointments, virtual visits, and enhanced safety protocols, visit HSS.edu

NOW IN FLORIDA NY • NJ • CT


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA DEPUT Y EDITOR

ELIZABETH MEIGHER MANAGING EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS ART DIRECTOR/ PRODUCTION MANAGER

TYKISCHA JACOBS SENIOR EDITOR

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ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY INTERN

JARED BRILL CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN TONY HALL ALEX HITZ ROBERT JANJIGIAN JAMES MACGUIRE HAVEN PELL CHUCK PFEIFER DAISY PRINCE LIZ SMITH (R.I.P.) TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA

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CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN NICK MELE ANNIE WATT


questmag.com PUBLISHER AND C.E.O.

S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN ACCOUNTING MANAGER

LUWAY LU

Dragonfly Farm. Country Compound. c1800's 4 Bedroom Main House. 2 Bedroom Guesthouse. Pool. Pool House. Tennis Court. Barns. 4-6-car Garage. 41.33± Acres. $11.499.000. Peter Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Private Estate. 4 Bedroom Main House. 2 Guest Cottages. Tennis Court. Pool. 2 Hole Golf Course. Garages. 2 Barns. Pond. Views. 86.23± Acres. $7.500.000 Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Exquisite Country Compound. Brick Georgian Manor House. 3 Additional Residences. Barns. Studio. Pool. Tennis. Pond. Views. Privacy. 187± Acres. $6.995.000. Peter Klemm. Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

Renovated & Restored. 1850's Colonial Farmhouse. Pool. Studio/ Pool House. Barn. Patios. Pergola. Spectacular Views. 6.65± Acres. $3.895.000. Maria Taylor. Carolyn Klemm. 860.868.7313.

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Lakeville/Salisbury 860.435.6789 > Litchfield 860.567.5060 > Roxbury 860.354.3263 Sharon 860.364.5993 > Washington Depot 860.868.7313 > Woodbury 203.263.4040

klemmrealestate.com

Source: SmartMLS, CC & DC MLS, MHMLS and Klemm Private Sales 1/1/93 – 3/11/21

CRISTINA CONDON JED H. GARFIELD KIRK HENCKELS KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2021. All rights reserved. Vol. 35, No.4. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

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HE ATO R OF T


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

From left: Britty Bardes Damgard photographed by Harry Benson; Quest’s Art Director, Tykischa Jacobs; Pepe Fanjul, Jr. in the lettuce field; 102-year-old Jane Will Teagle Boggs Smith gets the Covid-19 vaccine in Palm Beach; Grateful Pub and Elizabeth Meigher Zoom with the Quest staff; Katherine

APRIL HAS cometh! There are green sprouts abundant—not only in our gardens, but in our outlook and attitudes as Covidriddled hibernations give way to a world we nearly abandoned, but never forgot. Twelve months ago, in this same Publisher’s Letter, I delivered a vaguely confident message about “safely sheltering in sanctuaries” that belied my most inner fears. In truth, I was scared and worried - about my family, my close friends and my loyal team at Quest. I quietly wondered if, and how, we would persevere through a nightmare which few of us had ever imagined. Yes, I was heartened by the courage shown by so many, but I harbored inner fears as to our ability to create appropriate “journalism,” let alone print, bind and distribute a physical magazine. The year-old photo (seen above) of this pub and Quest’s intrepid staff—taken during our initial Zoom call—was Ground Zero in our challenge to remain relevant and intact. But survive we did, and after a few months of slightly thinner issues we regained our stride and have flourished ever since—due in great part to the support of our steadfast advertisers and the encouragement of our readers and online viewers. We have much to be thankful for at Quest, most especially our unfaltering and faithful audience. As we have for the past fourteen Annual Philanthropy Issues, April is the month when Quest salutes our “Women of Substance and Style,” which has grown into quite a prestigious alumni association. Over the past tumultuous year, their generous and collective efforts in bolstering community initiatives have kept many of these institutions on track, if not literally alive. Every year we photograph each deserving lady (shot mostly by Quest’s revered contributor, Harry Benson) wearing a simple white blouse “because, after all, it’s what’s on the inside that truly matters.” Bless these caring women, one and all. Hardly overshadowed in this April number is the piece by Senior Editor Brooke Kelly celebrating Young Philanthropists, so many of whom have emerged during this Corona year to both give back and “pay it forward.” Seen on this page is Katherine Schwarzenegger, an ambassador for the ASPCA and best-selling children’s book author who encourages her younger readers to: “adopt, don’t shop” when looking for a pet. Further on in the 28 QUEST

issue, Managing Editor Alex Travers salutes several of QUEST’s most supportive cities and towns, and their frontline workers who never wavered in their efforts to reclaim lost ground ... rebuild their communities ... and redistribute local bounty to those in greatest need. Finally, I reflect back on the camaraderie and genuine concern that our staff has shown for each other, effectively operating under remote and often arduous conditions. My kudos here to Tykischa Jacobs (pictured above), who had assumed the critical role as Quest’s Art Director just one month before the Covid curtain so precipitously descended. “TJ,” as she is affectionately known, innately and immediately raised her artistic game while unobtrusively refining Quest’s design throughout the year—a triumph, to be sure. I have always believed that most people sincerely try to do their best within their limits. Throughout this pandemic, our team at Quest has exceeded these limits—a testimony, dear readers, to the composed applause which you have kindly shared with us. We thank you. u

Chris Meigher

ON THE COVER: Gillian Hearst at home with her three daughters—Harper (holding Wicket), Hadley, and Sloane—photographed by Scott Erik Buccheit, with retouching by John Antonini Photography.

H A R RY B E N S O N ; DA M O N H I G G I N S / PA L M B E AC H DA I LY N E W S ; CO U RT E S Y O F K AT H E R I N E S C H WA R Z E N E G G E R

Schwarzenegger and her beloved dog, Maverick.


GRAMERCY HOUSE TRIPLEX LOFT 24E20.com

Nikki Field & Mara Flash Blum Associate Brokers | 212.606.7669/212.431.2447 | NikkiField.com Photography by Travis Mark.

© 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty (SIR) . All Rights Reserved. The SIR trademark is licensed and used with permission. Operated by SIR, Inc. The SIR network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Real estate agents affiliated with SIR are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of SIR.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY WELL, SPRING HAS sprung and the birdies are singing, and what is on my mind—and the minds of many others—is getting back to business. After a year of lockdowns and isolations and masks and “separations” of six or eight or however many feet to get into the food markets—one of the few opportunities to be in the nor-

mal presence of other human beings—a new hope is in the air (one hopes). The “pandemic” has affected millions of people in general, to the point where we have broached universal hostility. Not in everybody, but in a great number of us, most of whom apparently are not even aware of it. Instead we have been in-

wardly suspicious of potential danger. Covid! Death! (Sort of, especially in a year where there was miraculously hardly any flu at all.) The germs all wanted to dance with the Covid and come-n-getcha. The restaurants in the city opened last month, thankfully. At first not full capacity but at least customers inside. This is

crucial in more ways than one. Crucial for business survival and crucial for us creatures to be out and about and living around and amongst us all. Our friends and relatives who were fortunate to head south were able to escape some of that, even maskless, as well as sitting and standing in closer proximity to one another.

B I R T H D AY L U N C H EO N AT L E B I L B O Q U E T I N PA L M B E AC H

Kim Charlton

30 QUEST

Meg McCartney, Danielle Rollins and Lisa Kerkorian

Sue Jin Lee, Sarah McNamara and Gina Vanacore

Bettina Anderson

Maureen Kragt and Alexandra-Dana Gusita

ANNIE WATT

Sharon Bush and Peter Thomas Roth


2345 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD. AT THE PAR 3 GOLF COURSE PALM BEACH 561.273.4130 • ALFRESCOPB.COM

Renato’ s PALM

BEACH

87 VIA MIZNER • WORTH AVENUE 5 61- 6 5 5 - 9 7 5 2 • RENATOSPB.COM

14 VIA MIZNER • WORTH AVENUE 561.832.0032 • PIZZAALFRESCO.COM

2 8 7 5 S O CE A N B LV D 5 61. 5 47. 0 0 0 5 • ACQ UAC A F E P B .CO M


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C O C K TA I L R E C E P T I O N AT T H E B R O O K LY N M U S E U M I N N E W YO R K

David Berliner and Anne Pasternak

We need each other; a simple yet complex reality. In the meantime, in order to find something to keep our readers coming back (“interested”), I’ve had to search high and low. One pleasant method always there for me was to read. One memorable book that came my way from a friend was a memoir titled Look Again by David Bailey, the British fashion photographer. Frankly when I received the book I wondered if I’d ever get around to reading it; lives of fashion photographers are not at the top of my list of mustreads these days. I knew of his success and respected it at the time. He’d emerged along with the British invasion of talent in

32 QUEST

Joe Coleman, Brian Donnelly and Tom Sachs

the early 1960s along with the Rolling Stones, and the Beatles as well as British film stars. As one of the clamoring crowd, I knew that the fashion photographers were living wild and glamorous lives—frequently partaking in the joys and pleasures of being around beauty which was often spelled S-E-X. They were cool and hip (and maybe so were you if you followed them). Even fashion magazines like Vogue and Bazaar took to it. Their world had even become cinematic, immortalized in Antonioni’s hot hit film Blow Up. So, out of respect for my

friend, a few days after receiving the book, and since it was sitting on my desk waiting for some attention, I opened it to take a look. Ha! on me! I read the first 100 pages in what seemed like a few minutes. Bailey’s story is a piece of history of the mid-20th century (he’s three years older than I). And his life and his wives and his work is definitely one for the books. It invites you in, and you don’t want to leave. I should add that I was impressed that his co-author was James Fox, the journalist who wrote White Mischief and also co-authored Keith Richards’ best-selling

Carla Shen and Lawrence Shun

memoir Life. Fox has an interesting background: born in D.C. in the mid-1940s (still a teenager when the Stones and The Beatles came to America). A journalist working in Africa eventually led him to his best-selling “true” story of the murder in Kenya of Lord Erroll that occurred in 1941. The mystery was made into the hit film in the 1980s. He also wrote a biography of The Langhorne Sisters, a.k.a Five Sisters: The Langhornes of Virginia. Fox has a talent for making things interesting. Coincidentally, around the same time Bailey started out in his career, I was dating a girl—whom I later married— who was a stylist for a major

MATTEO PRANDONI/BFA.COM

Olivia Song and Gillian Dubin

Inbal, Galit and Gabriel Safdie


The Koch Team is to real estate what water views are to island living... unrivaled.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A fashion photographer here in New York named William Helburn. Her stories about her job and the people she worked with were always interesting. It was the decade when fashion photographers had become a type, an industry, and all points glamour and celebrity. Like the pop stars, everything associated with fashion burst out like the next season’s line of clothes. A perfect example: Sheila most admired another stylist—a contemporary who worked for a photographer across the avenue (Park Avenue South). Her name was Ali McGraw and she worked for another top fashion photographer Jerry Schatzberg. We all knew what happened to her career that hatched from a series

of test shots her boss did using her as a model for a proposed Chanel ad into movie stardom and legend. That’s probably how I’d first heard the name David Bailey, and ultimately why I decided to have a look. Well, Look Again turned out to be one of the most interesting and c a n ’t - p u t - d o w n able memoirs I’ve ever read. Why? Bailey (as he was known by one and all) is so frank, that the portrait, like his photographs, is true. A kid from the East End of London during the War and after, on the other side of the social world, he was from a world of

ordinary working-class people, many of whom lived in poverty or thereabouts. His mother and father had a typically (for those of us who’ve experienced that) difficult and unhappy marriage. Children coming from that atmosphere often have a difficult and unhappy existence as part of their lot in life. Bailey’s was no exception. But! This is a story about the wonders of a highly creative kid with few advantages except for his own curiosity and a naturally sharp eye. His had to do with discovering the mass-produced camera, which came into popularity the 1940s when he was a child. He

was fascinated and then fixated by picture-taking. Back in those days, the photo camera (the Brownie was what most Americans had) was a novelty for the public. It was used, like the cell phone today, for taking photos of family events and friends and relatives. By the time he was a teenager, David Bailey’s interest— he had very little schooling as was the habit for many of his contemporaries—was what a camera could do for him. By his late teens he had acquired better cameras, and soon the interest of the editors of British Vogue. A whole world opened up for him. And the kid from the East End—who never forgot his beginnings—embarked on

A L Z H E I M E R ’ S D R U G D I S C O V E R Y FO U N D AT I O N H O STS V I R T UA L E V E N T I N PA L M B E AC H

Gina Holzheimer 34 QUEST

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Leonard and Judy Lauder

Nancy Goodes

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C A M I L L A W E B ST E R ’ S B O O K - S I G N I N G PA R T Y I N PA L M B E AC H

William, Ainsley and Elizabeth Hewitt

a spectacular career all over the world with many of the leading players of the time and era, as well as many of the most beautiful and famous women of our age. The first of his “conquests” (wrong word, right idea) was a girl named Jean Shrimpton, a farmer’s daughter who, at age 18, had taken up modeling after avoiding college and failing to find motivation from a secretarial school. So for something to do, she enrolled in a modeling course. Through British Vogue she met Bailey who was looking to make his way. A very tight relationship developed. Within a year or two, the man and the model made a trip to36 QUEST

Fred Karger, David Hochberg, Lindy Gallagher and Tom Gallagher

Steven Larochelle and Jack Lynch

gether to New York to meet American Vogue and specifically Diana Vreeland. So it’s a success story and full of bold-faced names. But what makes it so compelling is the character of this guy Bailey who could mix with the best of them, and the worst of them (including the Kray twins, London gangsters who became their own kind of notorious as murderers if they didn’t like someone), as well as movie stars, socialites, royal personages, and gorgeous women—many of whom he had affairs with

David McClymont with Xiomi and Roby Penn

(sometimes more than one at a time) as well as three marriages. But what makes this book so compelling is the character and personality of this kid who never lost his working class accent or his sense of where he came from. Everything became part of his charm and he was at the right place at the right time in our radically changing contemporary culture. His first photo of Mick Jagger was taken before there was the Rolling Stones. This is not an ordinary memoir because it informs with back-and-forth in-person con-

Blair Late and Valeray Francisco

Nettie Graulich and Ann Bach

versations (revelations) with Bailey’s friends and the women, and family: simple Q & As, as well as Bailey’s habits of expression (slang, etc.). They take you with him into the world of this amazing man. After Shrimpton, on the love-side of the story—and an interview 40 years later with both principals participating—came Catherine Deneuve, (whom he married), Penelope Tree (whose mother Marietta Tree hated him from the first time he came to townhouse door on East 79th Street), and others including his present wife Catherine. So for the reader, You Are There, and the ordinary is fascinating as well. The glamour and

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Barbara Crocker and Camilla Webster


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A prominence of so many characters, as well as those characters without any of that, invite you in to see what’s possible in life. He loved beauty and it loved him back. And while we’re on the subject of the Brits….no matter how fleeting it may turn out to be…what I’ve been fascinated by in this alarming world we’re living is Meghan and Harry. I know several women, all very intelligent, who “hate” Meghan and think Harry’s a big baby—weak or effed-up. This sentiment has been thriving for sometime. I tend to think it’s an emotional outlet and distraction encouraged by the lockdown. I don’t know either principal although a woman friend of mine who has met Harry several times here in New York

and elsewhere tells another story. She liked him very much; said he was not only very nice but neighborly and warm. Just like the impression you can get from his photos. In his heyday as the second son of Princess Di, touring the world for his country, he was not only a hit but a smash. Everyone loved him. And very good for jolly olde U.K. Other than his late beloved mother, he had ascended as the family star, an international ambassador of goodness and kindness. A great way to make friends with the neighbors of the world. Who knows what was in it for him—in his private thoughts, the ones you rarely tell any-

body—when he met Meghan, the actress from L.A. It’s none of our business, anyway. Harry conveys the natural ability to be one of us. He comes from a strange family that live in a kind of giant Georgian movie constantly being updated and photographed. What it is like when staff and photographers have left the room is largely unknown and possibly profoundly ordinary, and full of the same issues and distractions you find in any family. Monarchies are an ancient habit that is on its very last legs in modern history, although who knows. Maybe they’ll come back in style one day in the distant future. Although

its Matron, Her Majesty the Queen, Elizabeth II is possibly the most Powerful Woman in the world simply because of how deftly she has played her ancient role in the U.K. And because she has naturally intelligently handled her role like a real Queen—like no one else! That’s ultimate power among us humans, and there is not one among us billions who could play it better. However, she came into her life role just as the next generation was born, the Post-War generation, and the whole world changed dramatically and continues to change dramatically. That’s the experience of her off-spring and moreso even of their off-spring. So, this young woman, an actress out in Hollywood, comes along and Prince Harry is ob-

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Jordan, Becky and Millie Isiminger

38 QUEST

Sarah Kudisch, Melina Barwick and Maria Pumarejo

Angela Sarlo-Colio, Kat McGinley, Alex Chase, Whitney Pettis Jester and Melissa Kellner

Jean’ette Carrigo and Irma Rex

Robi Jurney and Pamela Adams

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A M E R I C A N H U M A N E TO A STS M I S S I O N M E TA MO R P H O S I S I N PA L M B E AC H

Sharon and Herb Jablin

viously attracted. A coup de foudre! We’ll never know what went on in his head. If you’ve ever had the experience of meeting somebody who just knocked you out on meeting, it’s big. Yes, there’s the sexual attraction, but it’s the inner wow vibe that keeps the memory. He obviously liked her. You can’t blame him for that. Or the fact that maybe she turned on the allure for him. That’s not a new number in our good old world. I obviously don’t know what her impression was, but they married famously and lived happily ever after for the first few months. Or so we thought. But then they had this huge 40 QUEST

Jane, Rita and Herb Krauss

Paul, Irina and Charlie de Quenoy

internationally tabloidal family separation/divorce from Big Mama and her Little Ones. This was all very PR for good ole Buckingham Palace because it highlights once again, an innocent, seemingly normal marriage becomes a soap opera where a battle develops between the in-laws who live in the biggest castle. Then they moved to L.A., apparently to “get away” from the palace life as members of the Royal Family. This already was unacceptable to a

Abigail Trenk with her dog, LuLu, and Warren Belmar

lot of people who are members of the public and don’t know them, although it’s not an uncommon experience with people who marry. Then came the Oprah interview. And the couples’ “revelations” about his family as well as some about her family. This isn’t an uncommon matter either except few of us would have discussed it publicly and internationally, and written about so verbosely. What confounds is, we don’t know the real story of their

Wendy Wegner and Susan Cushing with her dog, Wilie

Robin and Jocelyn Ganzert

life from the palace grounds to their exit to good old Hollywood; anymore than people know the real story of anyone’s marriage relationship. That takes two and remains so privately, and often forever so. Although it’s beginning to look like the bride wasn’t happy marrying into an ancient institution called The Crown (or “The Firm” by its employees. Maybe they’re the 21st century Samson and Delilah. She looks like she could be the boss and he looks like he could be the slave. A lot of marriages look like that because you women are the real smart and clever ones when it comes to the boys, all boys. Although

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Tom Kearney and Marilyn Pelstring


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Meghan, from her interview with Oprah, looks like a very naïve, yet self-centered, woman. (Well, she is an actress and did grow up in Hollywood, where her father was employed in the filmmaking business). Many of us often know what it’s like to be number two, or second, or the little brother. It can be a big challenge in a young man’s life. Harry’s clearly been living that life until he met his Duchess. Whether he made a mistake or not is for him and him alone to judge. Just as it is for all of us millions of current “detractors.” Whatever it is, for us, it’s something else other than how are we dealing with this life in pandemia. Thank God for that,

having been living in a social desert for the last 12 months! The stories I hear—not read— are difficult and confusing and depressing and isolating. Meghan and Harry have become The Neighbors who never wear their masks! Arf! Arf! A number of people—mainly women I know—have strong opinions about Meghan the Duchess, and they are not positive. But that ole Brit himself, Billy Shakespeare once wrote in his hit play As You Like It: “The world is a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts.” Fame’s a bitch. Remember,

we all come from somewhere else. Remember, it’s all entertainment. So’s the Royal Family. Prince Harry’s great-great uncle David, the Duke of Windsor did something very similar more than eighty years ago when he gave up the throne and married that woman (and a divorcee as well). He was also burdened by the Royal family’s attitude and behavior towards him. Meanwhile back home in little ole Manhattan, on Monday late last month, I went over to the Frick Madison—former Breuer-designed Whitney Museum—on Madison and 75th, to see the newly installed Frick Collection. This is not the en-

tire collection but highlights of it which also includes examples of the sculpture, porcelains, and 18th-century furniture— the kind you’d find in some great mansion or even a royal palace (such as Versailles). When it was first announced that the Collection was to be installed in the Met Breuer while the Frick began its project of expansion and renovation, it seemed like a novel choice, and out of context. The Frick is a monument to antiquity in the history of 17th, 18th, and 19th century art and design. I’ve been visiting it for decades as it is not only a museum but also a step back in time and place of a New York ascending from the

CANCER ALLIANCE’S DINNER IN JUPITER, FLORIDA

Rene Paige, Richard Hurtado and Janet Pleasants 42 QUEST

Lois Gackenheimer and Ray Richards

Gloria Herman and Gabrielle Licko

Virginia and John Gildea

Janet and Mark Levy

ANNIE WATT

Richard and Soula Rifkin


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L I F E FO U N D AT I O N ’ S V I R T UA L G A L A I N PA L M B E AC H

Eduardo and Molly Alfonso

Gilded Age. Henry Clay Frick was, born in West Overton, Pennsylvania, 40 miles south of Pittsburgh in 1849. As a young man, after a briefly attending college, he went to work for his grandfather’s whiskey distillery and grandfather in family businesses as a bookkeeper. When he was 21, he and three partners started a business turning coal into coke which was a fuel used in steel manufacturing. A few years later he bought out his partners with money lent by his friend Andrew Mellon. This led to an eventual partnership with Andrew Carnegie in the steel business which eventually became 44 QUEST

Gail Worth and Frank Orenstein

Suzi and Rick Goldsmith

Maude Cook, Bjaye and Frank Pilotte

U.S. Steel. He was a brilliant investor and by the beginning of 20th century he was also the largest individual stockholder in railroad stocks. In 1905 he moved to New York where he leased Willliam H. Vanderbilt’s mansion at 640 Fifth Avenue (now part of Rockefeller Center) and acquired the block of land between 70th and 71st Street on Fifth Avenue where he made plans to build a palatial mansion for his growing art collection. His intention was that it one day would become public known as the Frick Col-

lection. His inspiration was the Wallace Collection in London, a private collection acquired by the first four Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace who, it was believed. It was bequeathed to the British nation in 1897 on the death of Lady Wallace, and opened as a museum in 1900. From Mr. Frick’s original mansion which was “completed” for occupancy in 1913 (Frick died at age 69 in 1919), it officially became a museum in 1935 under the direction of his daughter Helen Clay Frick, and has expanded in size as

George Elmore and Marti LaTour

Amy and Ron Kochman

well as collection over the years right up to the present. The Frick is once again in expansion to reflect its use and popularity with students of art history, as well as a growing public reputation. This Collection at the Frick Madison is expected to remain until 2023– 24. With that in mind, I was anxious to see the “difference,” having seen it many times in the context of the mansion itself. On making my first visit, I was struck by the power of the portraits, thanks to the brilliant talents that created them. For the first time, instead of viewing images of people who lived in previous centuries, reflected in their costume and

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1. Jerry Seay and Pauline Pitt 2. Martin and Audrey Gruss 3. Danielle Moore and Lesly Smith 4. Dave Granville, Jeff Pfeifle, Meg McCartney and James McCartney 5. Percy Steinhart 6. Talbott Maxey and Raysa Fanjul 7. Ralph Destino, Muffy Miller and Joan

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Schnitzer Levy 8. Amanda Skier and Ted Cooney 9. Kate and Hashem Khorsovani

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10. Helena and Roman Martinez 11. Bob Nederlander, David and Jennifer Fischer, and Lynn Foster 12. Lynn and Pascal Tone 13. Scott Sanders and Gil Walsh

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Susan and Tim Malloy 3. Chuck and Deborah Royce 4. Thomas Peterffy and Lynne Wheat 5. Lady Jane Churchill and Leonard Lauder 6. Susie and Vere Gaynor 7. Pepe and Emilia Fanjul 8. Kathryn and Leo Vecellio 9. Brian and Mila Mulroney 10. Gretchen and Howard Leach 11. Kathy and Howie Carr 12. Patricia Hearst and Jamie Figg

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A backgrounds, I was looking at portraits of individuals I had never fully noticed before. The “eyes” make the difference. You see the personality in the eyes, just as it is in real life, giving you a “read” on each individual subject. Now these are mainly individuals of rank and position in another time. Generals, princes, kings, queens and aristocrats in stupendous natural settings and got up in beautifully tailored and designed uniforms, suits, and gowns. Yet all if it directed my attention to the eyes—I was looking at personalities, human attitudes, life choices. The men, outfitted in appropriate costumes and rich fabrics and designs were merely indi-

viduals of another age and era but the faces, the expressions, the eyes, and the physical— such as the hands—revealed real, relatable individuals to my 21st-century experience. The portraitists of the pre-technological age were the human camera lens with detail that we take for granted in photographs. Their work was powerfully accurate and arresting by brush strokes of the geniuses. I found myself wondering what the relationship was like between each painter and his subjects. The eyes of ladies were noticeably different from the eyes of the men. They seemed gentler but also more serene (or more accepting of their roles in a male dominated society).

I know very little about Art History. I have always seen works from other eras and centuries as a reflection of the environment of the time, which were usually attractive and even idealized natural environments and costumes. But this Frick Collection, hanging separately unimpaired by presence of the elegant interiors where they are hung, surrounded by furniture, carpeting, architectural design, the paintings, as well as the sculpture and the furniture in this exhibition, feel alive. You are with these people, and their works of art. You are part of it, taking it in, the way you are when you are out in the world. I see now what Mr. Frick liked and was inspired by—this man who grew up in a small

village in western Pennsylvania 170 years ago. Power, beauty, riches, fantasy...attached not so subtly to reality are Fragonard’s angelic infants; the freshness and freedom of nature surrounding and in background. It was as if the Frick Collection had been liberated for Your Eyes Only. It’s a fantastic feeling; I look forward to another look at those previous (yet familiar) strangers from another time and place, one from which we are all descended. Back to the Calendar: I had dinner one night at Sette Mezzo with my old friend Philip Carlson whom I first met when we were actors together here in New York in the mid-1960s. My story of that venture is too short to be

C A N C E R A L L I A N C E ’ S R EC E P T I O N AT T H E C O L O N Y PA L M B E AC H

Tyler Moynihan and John Herrick 48 QUEST

Virginia and John Gildea

Ricahrd Hurtado and Chris Cox

Ray Richards and Lois Gackenheimer

Dan Drennen and David Sarama

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PEGGY ADAMS HOSTS WALK FOR THE ANIMALS I N PA L M B E AC H

Stylish Spring Elements There’s an array of design styles from vintage to minimalist that you may want for your home’s interiors. At

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riors studio, we’ve mastere them all, so we can design your unique vision. Despite the existence of multiple types of design schools, almost all of them revolve around combining two basic elements: classic and contemporary.

Jessica Gonzalez and Rich Anderson

Marvin

Transitional design is one of the Eastern Seaboard’s most favorite. Its popularity is due to a feeling “of the moment”—and yet it’s timeless. We should note that modern and contemporary are two styles with visible differences, often merged with traditional design to create a transitional look. Modern design, has sharp, clean lines and is often minimal, whereas the contemporary style often has curved lines and is more fluid. As noted, the charm of both styles multiply when touches of carefully curated, classic decorative elements are added. When the design is creatively envisioned and flawlessly executed with fine attention to detail, the effect is impressive. All of Gil Walsh Interiors’ projects for 2021 dramatize the relationship between these

Nicole Legere with adopted dog, Rocky

Peggy Adams staff and volunteers at the finish line

room, most clients will think of neutrals and white. And it’s true that white and most neutrals are timelessly fashionable. In fact, the 2021 color chosen by Pantone for an overall design is “ultimate” gray. Gray hues can be used as a neutral backdrop and with Spring here, just add several pastel elements for the perfect refresh. —Gil Walsh (info@gwifl.com)

told, but Philip has been a man of theatre (so to speak) all his life, and even from childhood when the interest occurred the way they do for us in those childhood years. NYSD readers have already heard ad nauseum how much I loved L.A., having lived here for a number of years. Dyed in the wool New Yorkers (and many others) have no idea why I am so enthusiastic about the place, but I am. It has never lost its allure, although it is distressing to see and consider the state of its spreading homelessness. Philip’s career, however, blossomed here in New York. He starred in an Off-Broadway play Until The Monkey Comes which led to more work as well as a Hollywood contract with Universal Studios. He moved out there with his new wife, Patty Sauers, an actress who grew up out there (Her father was an

actor named Joe Sawyer who appeared in hundreds of films often identified as cops, coaches, cowboys—a face the whole movie-going world was familiar with). It was through Philip that I met another Hollywood persona, Erik Preminger who worked in New York for his father, Otto, who had offices on both coasts. At the invitation of Erik and his wife, Barbara, in the summer of 1970, my wife Sheila and I first visited Los Angeles, as guests of Erik and Barbara. In retrospect it turned out to be more than a trip to visit. Coincidentally before the trip, I had just read Nathanael West’s Day of the Locusts which made a deep visceral impression on my imagination. And so, I was amazed to find, almost upon arrival at LAX, how much the place felt like West’s novel; or rather the book felt like the place. Everything about it—the

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A PA L M B E AC H C O U N T Y FO O D B A N K ’ S E M P T Y B O WL S E V E N T

Danielle Moore and Gail Coniglio

air, the light, the vibes, unreal, even fantastic, and also with a sunny yet gritty dark side. Erik’s mother, Gypsy Rose Lee had died earlier that year and left her estate to him, her only child -- her house, a kind of Spanish/Norman villa surrounded by thick green lawns and palms and gardens that Gypsy had planted and cultivated to beauty all by herself. The interior was bountifully decorated to within an inch of being a Hollywood palace. It was a trip, an elegant yet quirky one, and everything a civilian first-time visitor would dream a star’s house to be. And Gypsy, who was highly creative and able, chose and participated intensely in the décor. Built in 1927 on a hilltop overlooking the vast Doheny 52 QUEST

Rod and Cecie Titcomb

Michael Pucillo and Lew Crampton

Burl Salmon, LaShaundra Highsmith and Robert Norris

estate at the foot of Beverly Hills, looking out toward the ocean, all the corners of the rooms were rounded as was the house’s center, with a winding stone staircase that led finally to the third floor, and a large and round guestroom, with curving bookcases filled with books (Gypsy was a big reader and writer of course). And in the east/center of the room: a large, round, king-size bed covered in maroon velvet. From the casement windows to the west you could look across the canyon to Rock Hudson’s house, and to the north to the house of D.K. Ludwig. All this was exceedingly impressive to this

easterner. I knew from that first experience visiting that I would one day have to live here. Of course, I had experienced Los Angeles in a very intimate, most fortuitous way, staying in the house of a famous person. And for Gypsy Rose Lee, fame was a job: she was a showman through and through. The house was filled with very good high Victoriana, French Regency and occasional middle mid-American furniture— tributes to the aforementioned styles. And an art collection. Joan Miro, Chagall, Malvina Hoffman, Dorothea Tanning, her husband Max Ernst, Picasso

Laura Russell and Eileen Acello

and quite a lot of a little known painter today, Julio de Diego, who was Gypsy’s third and last husband (she never married Erik’s father Otto Preminger). Famous to friends and family for being extremely tight with a buck, all of the art were gifts to the ecdysiast, as the French referred to her. The first morning after arrival, when I came down for breakfast and Barbara told me she had just “seen” Gypsy at the bottom of the staircase. What? Barbara explained that she was coming down the stairs to prepare breakfast and there, she said, was Gypsy— just standing there (she’d died about four months before), big as life. “What did you do?” I asked, not really believing my friend

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Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker 917.678.7042 | lisa.larson@sothebyshomes.com lisailarson.com © 2021 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty office is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE SOCIET Y OF THE FOUR ARTS HOSTS A CONCERT I N PA L M B E AC H

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Johanna and Paul Sjoberg

Bill Murray

Bret Vlazny and Stephen Ziegler

Philippe Quint

telling me she’d just seen a ghost, although I didn’t know her to stretch the truth. “I said ‘good morning Gypsy,’” she said, the way she would speak to her mother-inlaw, with deference. “And what did she do?” “That was it,” Barbara said; “and she was gone.” While Barbara was and remains to this day, an entirely credible person, I found it difficult to believe my trusted friend actually saw the ghost former chatelaine of this very exotic house. Just a few minutes before!!?? I have never known Barbara to be one who embellished or exaggerated, let alone lied, but still ... Eventually Erik sold his mother’s house and many of her eclectic and precious contents. Several years later I read in one of the tabloids (probably the National Enquirer) that the couple who bought Gypsy’s house wanted to sell it because it was “haunted.” Gypsy, they claimed, was always about, often slamming doors and knocking pictures off the wall, or leaving the frames

Howard and Jennifer Stevens

askew. They’d tried everything to get rid of her ghost but tenacious lady that she was in life, she refused to go. Defeated, they sold the place. About ten years later, I was living then in Los Angeles, and I took a friend up to look at the place. I’d heard from a realtor that the next owners also had similar problems with Gypsy’s ghost. They too, put it on the market. For a long time it languished, and was vandalized and neglected until it became a wreck and a relic. Finally it was sold. The buyer knocked the place down, leveled off the hilltop, and built a contemporary concoction twice its size. I don’t know where Gypsy’s ghost went, but this is Hollywood, and there have always been ghosts, but where do they go? Hollywood, Hollywood, Fabulous Follywood. When I was first living out there, in the late 70s, one night I was invited to a dinner given at a restaurant by Ross Hunter, a very successful movie producer in the 1950s and 1960s (Airport, Midnight Lace, Lover Come Back). Ross loved Holly-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A M E R I C A N F R I E N D S O F B R I T I S H A R T ’ S C O C K TA I L PA R T Y AT T H E N O R TO N M U S E U M I N PA L M B E AC H

Roz Clarke and Jane Ylivasker

wood lore and over dinner he told me about Mary Pickford, the movies’ first star, who also had a famous marriage with Douglas Fairbanks, the action adventure hero of the Silents. It was Pickford, Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin, then the three biggest stars in the movies, who had the foresight (and temerity) in the early years of the industry to create their own studio—United Artists, which for years after was an important studio. Fairbanks left the fabled marriage for a beautiful European beauty, Sylvia Ashley, which devastated little Mary (she was something like four feet eight). She was a survivor, however, and she married a younger, handsomer movie 56 QUEST

Dusty and Johnny Dodge

Farley Rentschler and Michael Ridgdill

Stephania Conrad and Natalie Pray

swain of some stature (although nothing like Fairbanks’) named Buddy Rogers, and remained “happily married” for the rest of her long life. Although, according to Ross Hunter, who claimed he was given the story by a night watchman who worked in the Goldwyn Studios over on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood, little Mary never quite recovered from her swashbuckler’s abandonment. According to the night watchman, (according to Hunter), right up to the end of her life (she died in 1979) there were nights, very very

Jennifer Garrigues and Jason Arbuckle

Tim Johnson and Fernando Wong

late—after midnight, when Mary would be driven with her nurse, in her big black limousine, from her famous estate, Pickfair, way up in Beverly Hills, down to the studio on Santa Monica Boulevard. There, with her nurse by her side, she would make her way over to one of the soundstages where both she and Douglas Fairbanks had worked when they were the United Artists. And on that soundstage, on these dark, late, solitary nights, lit only by a single standing lamp, little Mary Pickford would wander about tentatively and call out his name: “Douglas ... Doug-

las ... It’s Mary ... I’m here ...” Mary Pickford’s long gone now, as is Buddy Rogers, and Ross Hunter, and the studio night watchman. Mary’s famous house Pickfair was later bought by Meshulem Riklis for his once-upon-a-time wife Pia Zadora and handed over to New York designer Peter Marino who transformed the Wallace Neff residence into something that had nothing to do with Pickford, Fairbanks, Wallace Neff or anybody else, even Zadora and Riklis. And so, like Gypsy Rose Lee, as it is in Hollywood, as Norma Desmond demonstrated so concisely, it’s all been long replaced by tomorrow. As it seems like it is once again, today. ◆

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Sandra Stella and Michel Witmer


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O P E FO R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N ’ S V I R T UA L PA L M B E AC H R AC E

Peggy Schnack in New Hampshire

Felicia Taylor

Sophia, James and Teresa Remez 58 QUEST

James R. Borynack and Adolfo Zaralegui

Scott Snyder and Audrey Gruss

Tiffany Bufton and William Meyer

Frannie Scaife

Frances Fisher

Gloria Estefan

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compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A O L D B A G S L U N C H EO N AT T H E C O L O N Y PA L M B E AC H

Judy Harpel and Sonja Stevens

Renee Scott and Amanda Polk 60 QUEST

Beth Brown

Daniella Ortiz and Karen Swanson

Laura Moore Tanne and Shawn Jan

Lisa Selby and Robyn Joseph

Sam Cerney and Kent Anderson

Stacey Leuliette and Michael Reinert

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Danielle Rollins and Felicia Taylor


M A D I S O N W O RT H A R CHI T E C T UR E

DPC

M A D I S O N W O RT H A R C H I T E C T U R E

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARGENT PHOTO

Architec t ure - Design - Pl anning

w w w. M a d i s o n Wo r t h A r c h . c o m

2 0 2 1 M i z n er awa r d r e c i p i e n t

4 8 5 M a d i s o n Av e n u e , s u i t e 2 0 0 - N e w Yo r k , N e w Yo r k 1 0 0 2 2 - ( 2 1 2 ) 3 5 5 - 3 2 6 1 1 2 5 Wo r t h Av e n u e , s u i t e 3 0 6 - P a l m B e a c h , F l o r i d a 3 3 4 8 0 - ( 5 6 1 ) 8 3 3 - 3 2 4 2

PA L M BE A C H - N E W Y O R K C I T Y - G R E EN W I C H - L O N G I S L A N D


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C H A M B E R MU S I C S O C I E T Y ’ S V I E W I N G PA R T Y I N PA L M B E AC H

Alexia Varga and Lynn Tishman

Leonard Ackerman and Lisa Brintz

Jane Rothchild, Bill Boggs, Jaynne Keyes, Elizabeth Brenner and Barry Knight

Cameron Lombardi, Grayson Lambert and Jim Verrant 62 QUEST

Jaynne Keyes and Mark Morrow

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H A R RY B E N S O N Brad Pitt in New Orleans, Louisiana, for his “Make It Right” project.

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY IN NEW ORLEANS to photograph Brad Pitt, I found it interesting that no one mobbed him as we walked along Bourbon Street in the Latin Quarter. Even though he is a throwback to the glamour of Old Hollywood, everyone respected his privacy. At ease with the local residents, his priority was his project “Make it Right.” Brad enlisted architects from around the world to design affordable housing for the displaced families whose homes were destroyed near the Industrial Canal by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. He had a determined vision for replacing the lost homes in the Lower Ninth Ward with affordable housing using solar energy to produce electricity. The acclaimed actor told me he wasn’t going to stop until the entire community had been rebuilt. It took tremendous effort and determination with many people coming together to complete the project… and Brad Pitt was there for the duration. One could actually envision the entire endeavor as a film featuring a real Movie Star. And as an aside, I believe we all will be happy when theaters open again—when we can all “go out to the movies” and settle in for a good film…starring Brad Pitt. ◆ APRIL 2021 65


TA K I

WHEN IN ROME

From left: Robyn and Rupert Hambro; Boris Johnson.

I WAS VERY SAD to read of Rupert Hambro’s death. I didn’t know him well, but first met him long ago, along with his younger brother Rick, also gone, both quintessential English gentlemen, handsome, kind, and with a great sense of humor. Rupert invited me to lunch quite a few times, but because of circumstance I was never able to reciprocate. The last one was at Wilton’s, which he owned, I 66 QUEST

believe, but he never gave any indication all was not well. In an age of crybabies and professional victims, Rupert stood out like a saint in hell. He leaves his lovely wife, Robyn, a Philadelphia-born beauty, and two children. I was thinking of Rupert and Wilton’s, where long ago I gave a dinner for my friend Nick Scott to meet some of the Spectator people. Nick was a very funny

man and writer who had not managed to publish his gems, so I decided to turn him into Shakespeare by introducing him to The Spectator’s hierarchy: namely our chairman Andrew Neil, then editor Mathew D’Ancone, and the recently departed editor Boris. Also invited were my then High Life editor Liz, and the love of my life—unknown to her or anyone else at The Speccie—Mary Wakefield. I


TA K I sat between Liz and Mary, placed Boris at the head on one side and Andrew on the other, and some 25 of us began to make merry. Oh yes, I almost forgot. I had most of my Pugs friends for dinner, plus some other sweet young things. Our chairman Andrew was still a bachelor back then, and arrived late from taping his TV show accompanied by two ladies, or perhaps it was three or four or five. Mary, Boris, and I went out for a ciggie at one point, and Boris mentioned he had to decide by the next morning whether to run for mayor or not. If memory serves, Mary said he should. When I asked—begged—Mary

taken to the grape with a vengeance and told some very funny jokes but failed to mention that he’d like to contribute to the magazine, in fact had gone as far as to tell Mathew, Andrew, and yours truly what a lousy job we were doing for Britain’s oldest and greatest weekly. Nick Scott and Tim Hoare have since died, and of course Rupert, but I have such pleasant memories of them that I need to share them. It got worse the next morning when on our flight to Rome Charlie Glass, lefty by political persuasion, decided the lavatory did not have enough headroom, and complained rather bitterly about it. This prompted Bolle Bismarck to ask him if

Mind you, all this was around fifteen years ago; some of the protagonists are dead, Boris is on top, and I’m wondering why supposedly conservative newspapers are making a fuss over decoration and his girlfriend. Why are Lord and Lady Bamford in the news? All they do is help people, their generosity having no bounds. Why is Damian Aspinall, whom I haven’t seen in thirty years, being investigated? All he does is save wild animals that need saving. And while I’m at it, why isn’t Philip Green being investigated for being much too vulgar to be allowed to call his miserable self Sir? Finally, guess what happened to my buddy Charlie Glass?

From left: A view of Rome,

GETT Y IMAGES

Italy; Wilton’s in London.

to come with me to a nightclub, she said that she was off very early to Rome, which was a eureka moment as I, too, was going to the Eternal City. I know, it sounds a bit pathetic, but one has to put one’s best foot forward. I was a married man in his 60s, not exactly a magnet for ladies who didn’t believe that diamonds are a girl’s best friend, so the pitch was: “I have a plane taking me and some friends to Rome early tomorrow,” would she accept a ride? Finally, for the first and last time in her life, she said yes. In the meantime, inside the grand private dining room Wilton’s and Rupert had made available to me, Nick Scott had

his commie friends flew on bigger private jets, which Charlie thought was a cheap shot. Mary made matters worse when she told me the purpose of her trip was in order to attend Gian Carlo Menotti’s Spoleto music festival. The reason for our trip was perhaps less refined, the Valentino ball for the thousand richest but worst-read people in Europe. Charlie Glass was attending an extreme left-wing party’s annual conference whose theme that year was how to sabotage and bring down private jets. When someone asked me at the Valentino bash what was going on in Spoleto, I told them it was a rap concert for ex-felons.

This is unconfirmed, but while addressing the lefties and the commies in Rome the mob went after him when some Roman Judas revealed the fact he had flown in private. What is confirmed is the following: When I rang Charlie Glass up just as I was finishing this, he answered in a very weak voice from a Florence hospital that actually saved his life from a very bad case of Covid. I offered to come over and bring anything he needed, but he said he thought the worst was over, but it had been so bad he at times wished the mob had caught him. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. APRIL 2021 67


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY A LE X T R AV E R S AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

FORGET APRIL SHOWERS—the whims of this season’s

weather have us enjoying the whims of fashion, from the sophisticated splash of color on a Vhernier ring to chic stripes on a J. McLaughlin top. Speaking of stripes, we’re also partial to the beautiful cheetah print loafers by Stubbs & Wootton. Whatever you fancy for the season, we’re confident we have you covered.

Vhernier adds a playful elegance with its Aladino ring in 18-kt. rose gold, lapis, and rock crystals. Shop at vhernier.com.

A classic for the keeping: Persol’s Gradient Tortoiseshell Acetate Folding Sunglasses. $317 at persol.com.

J. McLaughlin has all your spring sartorial needs covered: The Morrison sweater in Mega Lateral Woody ($178), Britt linen shirt ($178), Ivy pants ($158), and Ethel Grasscloth sandals ($158).

We can’t get enough of the Jane True Needlepoint Cheetah slippers, a sure spring staple. $500 at stubbsandwootton.com. 68 QUEST


No suit fits—or feels—better than a Kiton. Shop the latest Spring 2021 looks at kiton.com. The Earth Polo by Ralph Lauren is crafted from thread derived from recycled plastic bottles and dyed in a unique process that uses no water in the application of the dye. Each Earth Polo is made from an average of 12 plastic bottles. Visit ralphlauren.com.

Michael Dunbar’s “Wild Cat,” in mahogany and polished bronze is a perfect companion for your home. Visit findlaygalleries.com for more information, or stop in at Findlay Galleries at 165 Worth Ave in Palm Beach.

Indulge in Rolex’s new Oyster Perpetual Sky-Dweller, fitted with an Oysterflex bracelet for the first time. Shop all

Looking for a long weekend getaway? Book

Oyster models and

your stay at Boca Grande’s The Gasparilla Inn &

more at Wempe:

Club, one of our favorite spots in South Florida.

700 Fifth Avenue.

Visit the-gasparilla-inn.com for reservations. APRIL 2021 69


Fresh Finds Show her your love with Roberto Coin’s Venetian Princess 18-kt. diamond “Open Flower” necklace. $1,700 at robertocoin.com.

Visiting Naples, Florida, this season? Be sure to dine at stunning terrace at D’Amico’s The Continental, a national award-winning restaurant located on the famous Third Street South.

The gold “Lucky” Butterfly by Baccarat is sure to add flair to your home and bring you some good luck in 2021. $175 at neimanmarcus.com.

Charlotte Kellogg has the stunning yet simple touch when it comes to Palm Beach fashion. Shop the look at charlottekellogg.com.

Lana Marks Double Gusset Clutch in Green Alligator. $6,500, available at Lana Marks: 150 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach, Florida, or visit lanamarks.com. 70 QUEST


Keep your drinks extra cool on hot days with this Yeti Tundra 35 Hard Cooler. $249.99 at yeti.com.

There’s nothing more refreshing (or healthy) for your skin than a fragrant face mist. And this sea minerals misting spray by Osea is our favorite. $38 at nordstrom.com. Perfect for the pool—Matouk’s selection of Zebra Palm Beach towels. $85 each at matouk.com.

Simple and stunning: Carolina Herrera’s Mixed Media Wide Chain Bracelet. $490 at neimanmarcus.com.

Entertaining this Easter? Be sure to add these adorable Marshmallow Chick

No one does swimwear better than Shoshanna. Shop the latest pieces,

ornaments by Patience Brewster to

including this Luau Shine Lurex Texture

your table. $88 at neimanmarcus.com.

Belted One-Piece ($278), at shoshanna.com. APRIL 2021 71


CASA DE CAMPO LAUNCHES PRIVATE JET SERVICE CASA DE CAMPO’S 7,000-acre gated compound in La Romana, Dominican Republic, has been known for its unrivaled privacy and exclusive roster of guests since opening in the 1970s—when frequenters Michael Douglas, Henry Kissinger, Joe DiMiaggio, and Frank Sinatra would regularly fly into the resort’s private airstrip. Fast forward half a century 72 QUEST

and private jets remain the preferred method of transportation for the resort’s luxury guests and residents. No time has this been more true than during the pandemic, as privacy and social distancing are paramount and the desire for luxury getaways are at a peak. In order to meet continued demand, the luxury resort, which

CO U RTE S Y O F C A S A D E C A M P O R E S O RT & V I LL A

TN RA AV MEEL


This spread, clockwise from left: One of Casa de Campo’s private, oceanfront villas; the pool area at a private villa; Casa de Campo’s Private Jet Services; boarding a private jet at La Romana Airport.


is located next to La Romana International Airport, has introduced Casa de Campo Private Jet Services, providing turnkey solutions to guests and effortlessly handling all arrangements from pickup to departure. Jason Kycek, senior vice president of sales and marketing at Casa De Campo commented, “With decades of experience, we know exactly how to make our guests’ private jet experience as luxurious and comfortable as possible. Owning La Romana Airport allows us to provide our guests with personalized VIP services that set our service standards above the other regional airports.” The new service offers airline charters worldwide and has access to around 30,000 aircraft providers and planes seating up to 18 passengers. VIP catering, security, and ground transportation services are also offered and available upon request. Casa de Campo’s personal private jet expert is available 24 hours a day and can 74 Q U E S T

arrange a flight with as little as five hours’ notice – no matter the time zone. A trip from London to La Romana, for instance, costs about $55,000 for 10 to 15 passengers. Casa de Campo is also offering a Private Jet and Villa Getaway package, so that the VIP treatment doesn’t end when touching down in La Romana. The current package includes roundtrip flights directly into La Romana Airport, seven nights in an oceanfront villa with maid and butler services, daily breakfast, round trip SUV transportation directly to your villa with a Champagne greeting upon arrival, daily use of a private cabana at Minitas Beach Club, and two complimentary resort golf carts. u For more information, visit casadecampo.com.do or call 866.860.5472.

CO U RTE S Y O F C A S A D E C A M P O R E S O RT & V I LL A

T R AV E L


This spread, clockwise from top left: Family time at a private villa at Casa de Campo;

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Minitas Beach; the exclusive Villa Esplendor.

AUGUST 2019 00


HAMPTONS STYLE BY JARED BRILL

IF YOU’RE desperately searching for a luxurious vacation spot, Daniel Rattiner‘s new book, Hamptons Private, suggests you could do a lot worse than the timeless beachside town. The Hamptons has been a luxury vacation spot of some of the biggest names in the country for generations. The coastal getaway instantly conjures images of poolside soirées, grandiose waterfront estates, and endless days on the beach socializing with the upper echelon. Through Rattiner’s vivid descriptions, one can practically smell the sea air as he discusses the eagles that swoop and soar overhead, the whales that roll up to the surface to spout, the thunder of the sea, and the whistle of the wind. But Rattiner’s love letter to the Hamptons also explores the fascinating history surrounding the peninsuThis spread: Lisa Perry’s Hamptons estate, built in the early 1900s by architect and landscape designer Guy Lowell, is located in a secluded part of North Haven; Eunice Bailey Oakes Gardiner and husband Robert David Lion Gardiner picnic with guests on Gardiners Island, 1968 (inset). 76 QUEST


P I C T U R E C O L L EC T I O N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

C O U R T E SY O F R O BY N L E A ; A L F R E D E I S E N STA E D T / T H E L I F E


70 80 Q U E S T


D E L A N E Y O F K D H A M P TO N S ; YU X I L I U / C O U R T E SY O F T H E B A K E R H O U S E 1 6 5 0

C O U R T E SY O F D E L F I N A B L A Q U I E R ; N I C K H U N T / PAT R I C K MC MU L L A N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; K E L L I

la. Before the New York getaway became the summer haunt of the glitterati, its 40 miles of rolling sand dunes provided the perfect landscape for English settlers. Once New York high society caught wind of the charming hamlets and salty air, its members—from the Fords to the Vanderbilts— soon turned the Hamptons into a summer oasis. Next came the creatives seeking solitude, a place to write and sketch, away from the urban cacophony. Famous names who took root in the Hamptons include famous creatives of the past like John Steinbeck and Andy Warhol, as well as some of the biggest names of today, like Jay-Z and Madonna. What unites these Hamptonites is the locale. It boasts a unique allure that morphs to meet the desires of whoever Clockwise from top left: Delfina Blaquier; a game of croquet at the DETAILS and Jack Purcell event in Sag Harbor, 2010; a day of shopping in the Hamptons; the cover of Hamptons Private. Opposite page: English gardens at The Baker House 1650 in East Hampton.


Director Henry Jaglom on the set of Last Summer in the Hamptons, in 1995; Peter Cohen’s house in East Hampton, designed by Norman Jaffe, 1982. Opposite page: Chartering a yacht for the day is a must-try Hamptons activity.

G E T T Y I M A G E S ; D O U G K U N TZ ; YAC H T K E L P I E

From above: Rolling sand dunes leading to the Atlantic Ocean;

K A R E N FO L E Y P H OTO G R A P H Y / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; M I C H A E L O C H S A R C H I V E S /

should find themselves there. Hamptons Private invites readers to join the big names in absorbing the charms of the Hamptons, from chartering a yacht off the shore of the Springs to attending a polo match in Bridgehampton. Each page envisions the quintessential leisure of the Hamptons and showcases the unique quality of life that artist Willem de Kooning once called a “miracle.” One can almost hear the thwock of tennis balls at The Meadow Club, the whisperings of exclusive parties, the rhythms of seaside music at The Surf Lodge—even the first bite of a lobster roll at Lunch. Rattiner weaves fascinating tales about the history of the island, from the first settlers in the 1640s, to prohibition, to the radar station built to search for Soviet missiles. The rich and untold story of the Hamptons comes to life as not just a hot spot for the elite, but a vibrant retreat that exudes a boho-chic spirit reflected in the beauty of the peninsula. u


APRIL 2021 81


ROYCE’S LATEST PAGETURNER Author Deborah Goodrich Royce’s new thriller, Ruby Falls, is a nail-biting tale of a fragile young actress, the new husband she barely knows, and her growing suspicion that the secrets he harbors may eclipse her own... Here, the author provides Quest with an excerpt of the novel, just named one of the “20 Most Riveting Books of Spring 2021” by Veranda magazine.

I WAS standing with my father in the pitch-black dark— the blackest dark I’d ever seen in the few short years of my young life—and the blackest dark that I’ve seen since, which is a considerably longer span. The surrounding air was dank with flecks from falling water. A disembodied voice rose up from the mist, then swooped back down to submerge in it. First amplified then muffled, the sounds changed places, each taking its turn at prominence. The drone of the voice, the roar of the falls, and the clammy damp came at me from all directions— from the sides, from above and below—to seal me in a viscous coating and stick me to my spot. The waterfall could have been anywhere. Next to me? Yards away? I dared not move a muscle. The woman’s words transfixed me with a tale of scuba divers. Fearless swimmers who, over the years, had plumbed the depths of a fathomless pool. In wet suits and

tanks, in masks and flippers, down they had plunged into icy water, in an effort to find its bottom. No search had been successful. The roiling cascade dropped into a lake that continued, it seemed, to the center of the earth. To China. To horrible depths my imagination was fully engaged in conjuring. Cold drops of perspiration ran down my face, my arms, and the back of my neck. I was concentrating hard—trying to locate the source of her voice, trying to pinpoint the crash of the falls, trying not to move and tumble in, and trying most heartily not to be afraid—when my father let go of my hand. That was it, really—that was all he did. He loosened his hand from my grip. And he disappeared, never to be seen again, while the tour guide never stopped talking. July the 12th, 1968. The last day I saw my father. James Emerson Russell was Sonny to most—from the son in Emerson, I imagine. Or maybe from his position in his


BOOKS family of origin. I don’t really know. He was just Daddy to me, what a little girl calls her father. He was handsome, that Sonny. It is not just my memory. It is what people still say when they don’t stop themselves from talking about him. And, they say it just like that. “He was handsome, that Sonny, I’ll grant him that.” As though his visage were something they grudgingly bestowed on him. Then they change the subject on seeing me. He was long and lanky—six feet even—impossibly tall to me then. A slight stoop to his walk, crinkly blue eyes, and a halfway receding hairline. His taste in attire ran to western and that was how he was dressed that last day. Jeans and a checkered shirt. Madras, my mother had called it. Snaps down the front and a turned-up collar. Cuffed sleeves rolled up to reveal strong forearms, all covered in downy blond fuzz. He wore cowboy boots and he carried a hat. In a nod to convention, he would not have worn it indoors. Men did not do that then. Then again, men did not tend to walk out on their children in the middle of tourist attractions, either, but that hadn’t served to stop him. I guess my daddy picked his proprieties from a smorgasbord of options. He wore a watch and his wedding ring, too, and a belt with a silver buckle. He had surprisingly soft hands for a man. I had held his hand for the longest time, twirling his ring, until the darkness commandeered my attention when the lights were abruptly switched off. Then I just stood still, clutching that hand and willing him to protect me. Those large, soft hands that belonged to a man who would use them to wrest himself free of his daughter. But how, you might ask, could a full-grown man vanish from the middle of a clump of tourists visiting Ruby Falls in Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, on a sweltering summer day? More precisely, how could a man disappear from a cave under Lookout Mountain— when that very act would require accessing the elevator (through the lightless cave), traversing the entrance lobby, crossing the parking lot, starting his car, and driving away—leaving his own flesh and blood child standing frozen under the earth beneath him? In the end, nobody remembered seeing him do any of those things. And his car, a 1962 Cadillac de Ville, in a vibrant shade of turquoise, remained where he—we—had left it in the parking lot. It is an unsolved mystery. And it turns out that people who experience an unsolved mystery in their lives become inordinately keen on unsolved mysteries as a topic in general. I am one of those people. My father disappeared from Ruby Falls in the summer of 1968, when I was six and a half years old. He left me alone and mute, unable to move, even once they put the lights back on and herded the crowd past the stalactites and stalagmites and the Godforsaken falls toward the elevators, en route to the streaming sun above. The tour guides had to pick me up, when it became evident that I was not ambulatory. They groused the whole

way up to the surface that I was stiff as a corpse, which, as they made clear to each other and to me, added to the overall creepiness of my father’s de-materialization. Had they been superstitious people (and who, really, isn’t?) they might have thought some sort of black magic was being performed by us. Lest I forget to mention—my name is Ruby. Not believable, you say? Well, it is true. My name is Ruby (not Falls, if my name were Ruby Falls, that would be unbelievable). My name is Ruby—Eleanor Ruby Russell— but called Ruby from birth, in the way that Southerners do, being extremely fond of middle names. Thus, I became famous for a while at the age of six and the press had a field day with my name. Little Ruby Left in Ruby Falls! Did Ruby’s Father Fall in Ruby Falls? Ruby Took the Fall in Ruby Falls! u Ruby Falls by Deborah Goodrich Royce. Opposite: The author’s photo taken by Capehart Photography. APRIL 2021 83


R E A L E S TAT E PA L M B E A C H

CHARLESTON

NEW YORK

PA L M B E A C H

CHARLESTON

NEW YORK

EVOLVING MARKETS B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

DUE TO THE PANDEMIC, real estate markets in warm weather destinations like Palm Beach and Charleston are more robust than ever. Inventory in Palm Beach is at a historic low, with only 35 homes for sale on the entire island. New Yorkers were already migrating to Florida for tax reasons, and the onset of pandemic only accelerated this move for those looking for a year-round lifestyle. Though as the temperature has steadily risen in New York City and vaccinations have become more widespread, the city has begun to safely reopen for business, incentivizing the return of residents who temporarily left to wait out the pandemic in their nearby second homes. With the work-from-home trend set to continue post-pandemic, buyers are looking for larger coops with emphasis on family rooms, outdoor space, and home offices—as a result, the Manhattan luxury sector has surpassed its pre-COVID activity.

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PA L M B E A C H

PA L M B E A C H

PA L M B E A C H

R E A L E S TAT E

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PA L M B E A C H

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PAULETTE & DANA KOCH The Koch Team at Corcoran Group / 561.379.7718 / dana.koch@corcoran.com

CO U RTE S Y O F CO R CO R A N G RO U P

Q: Is real estate inventory still at a historic low in Palm Beach? A: Yes. We have 35 homes for sale on the entire island of Palm Beach. Out of those 35 homes only 15 are asking below $20M. Normally this time of year we would have five times as many homes on the market. As far as land is concerned, we virtually have no land actively for sale in Palm Beach. The condo market has heated up significantly and inventory levels have been depleted as well.

“cat is out of the bag” and our island has been thrust into the mainstream. Restauranteurs, shop, and gallery owners are following their clientele from New York. We have cultural venues such as the Kravis Center and the Norton Museum. Schools like Palm Beach Day give your children a top notch education. The outdoor lifestyle and quality of life in Palm Beach has always been unparalleled. Combine that with the tax climate and the ability to work from anywhere has made Palm Beach the place to be. It’s civilized here. Wait until we put this pandemic behind us! Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers? A: For Buyers, if you find something you like, buy it immediately, if not someone else will. Demand has far outstripped supply. For sellers, there is no better time in the history of this island to be a seller.

Q: Do you expect many to flee the island by summer? A: I think that we will see many residents stay around for a longer period of time. Palm Beach has become a primary residence for many who will use Palm Beach as their home base throughout the summer. I feel that people who extended last year because of the pandemic really enjoyed themselves and have decided to do it again this year. Q: Tell us about the parallels between New York and Palm Beach—why has Palm Beach become more desirable? A: Palm Beach has always been desirable. I think that the

111 El Brillo in Palm Beach, Florida; $18,500,000.

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KYLE BLACKMON Kyle W. Blackmon Team at Compass / 561.231.7151 / kyleblackmon@compass.com

act quickly. Under current conditions, properties are measured by hours on market, not days. For sellers, there has never been a better time to capitalize on your property. Q: Anything else you’d like to share? A: South Florida offers a strong market, business opportunities, and a spectacular quality of life, but so does New York—and the city is rebounding quickly. Interest rates remain incredibly low, and New York City is bouncing back. With warmer weather on the way, Broadway reopening in April, indoor dining resuming and many more exciting happenings, I’m truly excited for the future of the city that is the cultural and financial capital of the world.

Q: Tell us about the parallels between New York and Palm Beach—why has Palm Beach become more desirable? A: There are many synergies between the New York and Palm Beach markets. The South Florida market has boomed during the pandemic as people now value outdoor space more than ever, coupled with the desire to spend the colder months somewhere warm and sunny. However, not everyone moved to Palm Beach because of the pandemic. Other factors such as numerous financial services and tech companies moving here as well as many residents enrolling their children in local schools play into the equation as well. Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers? A: For buyers moving down to Palm Beach, be prepared to

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Pending: 340 South Ocean Boulevard, #5F in Palm Beach, Florida.

CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

Q: With the summer months approaching, do you expect many to flee the island? A: While the Palm Beach summer market is slower, many residents may stay for the whole year as COVID restrictions are tighter in other places, and travel might not be an option. Many families have enrolled their children into schools here as well, and with school in session from August to May, families will have even more incentive to stay the full year.


NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

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NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

LISA LARSON Sotheby’s International Realty / 917.678.7042 / lisa.larson@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: When do you expect to see people who fled the city in recent months to return? A: The majority of people who left temporarily were those who owned a second home, were able to work from that home and also opted to have their children learn remotely. Many have begun to return to NYC, and I believe we will see that trend continuing after the spring holidays. Buyers in the market are craving human contact and yearning for the spoils of culture and energy that only New York City can offer.

townhouses and boutique buildings, reflective of buyers valuing privacy and outdoor space while also craving an intimate community. Buyers are spending more time close to home, so finding the perfect location is more important than ever. Properties that offer something unique in terms of location, size and design which speak to the needs of local buyers are the standout success stories in an otherwise tough market. Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers? A: For buyers, decide on the one or two key things you cannot live without, and be flexible on the rest. For sellers, price your home right the first time, and remember, looks do matter! Overly ambitious pricing often backfires. For both buyers and sellers, transparency and trust are essential. Find an experienced agent whom you trust to be honest with you.

Q: Where are the best deals right now? A: Deals exist in every market segment and every Manhattan neighborhood. The best deals can be found in two places: select new-development projects and unrenovated prewar coops uptown. It helps to work with an agent who knows where the deals are and who will be strategic about structuring offers that have the best chance of being accepted by developers. If you have the patience to manage a renovation project, this is a perfect chance to get a deal on a prewar apartment close to Central Park. Q: How have buyer preferences shifted during COVID-19? A: In New York City, we are seeing an uptick in demand for

251 West 19th Street, #3D in New York, New York; $3,100,000.

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NEW YORK

NEW YORK

NEW YORK

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KIRK HENCKELS Compass / 917.291.6700 / kirk.henckels@compass.com

have evolved post COVID. Certainly they want more space and there is greater emphasis on offices and family rooms. Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers during this unique market? A: As inventory shrinks, we are trending back to a sellers market with more frequent bidding wars. There is never a great deal of true quality property on the market and it always pays to buy quality. Even if you have to pay full market value, in five years you won’t regret it. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share about the New York City market with our readers? A: “Res upsa loquitor” or, the market speaks for itself.

Q: Where are the best deals right now? A: The best deals continue to be coops as not everyone is willing to do the renovations necessary to update them. Unless properly managed, renovations have become more expensive. Nonetheless, all-in, the price per square foot is still substantially less than a new condo and much more charming. Q: How have buyer preferences shifted during the COVID-19 pandemic? Is there anything in particular that sellers should highlight in their listings? A: It is a bit premature to fully assess how buyer preference

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33 East 70th Street, #8C in New York, New York; $6,495,000.

COURTESY OF COMPASS

Q: When do you expect to see people who fled the city in recent months to return? A: I have already seen many empty nest couples buying four to seven room coops as pied-a-terre’s on the Upper East Side. This is interesting as they were not active pre-COVID. It seems the families who want larger, more expensive coops are just now starting to look as their children are still in school in the country. People are clearly moving back with enthusiasm, as is evidenced by our luxury market being ahead of pre-COVID 2020.


PA L M B E A C H

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PA L M B E A C H

R E A L E S TAT E

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PA L M B E A C H

PA L M B E A C H

LIZA PULITZER & WHITNEY MCGURK Brown Harris Stevens / 561.373.0666 / lpulitzer@bhsusa.com & wmcgurk@bhsusa.com

Q: Is real estate inventory still at a historic low in Palm Beach? A: Yes, inventory is at historically low levels with historically high demand. We are now focused on off-market opportunities since we have so few homes on the market. We have always excelled in putting off-market deals together so we are becoming more and more focused on this approach.

Q: What advice can you offer buyers and sellers in Palm Beach? A: If you are thinking about buying and you find something you like, buy it. If you have a property and thinking about selling, it’s a great opportunity to take advantage of the market to sell. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share about the Palm Beach market with our readers? A: Palm Beach is alive and thriving! People are enjoying all that the island has to offer. Restaurants are packed, the sidewalks are full, and shops and art galleries are all filled with customers. We feel its just the beginning as more and more people are enjoying this beautiful island.

CO U RTE S Y O F B RO W N H A R R I S S TE V E N S

Q: With the summer months approaching, do you expect many to flee the island? A: We feel that some will go back up north and travel this year but the secret is out and more and more people want to be in Palm Beach, seasonally and year around. Q: Tell us about some of the parallels between New York and Palm Beach—why has Palm Beach become more desirable? A: New York and Palm Beach have always been synonymous with each other; just different seasons. Now, seasons are overlapping and New Yorkers are becoming year-round Floridians.

345 Australian Avenue in Palm Beach; $4,950,000.

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SONJA STEVENS Sotheby’s International Realty / 561.573.9198 / sonja.stevens@sothebys.realty

Q: Tell us about the parallels between New York and Palm Beach. Why has Palm Beach become more desirable? A: Palm Beach is exceptionally convenient to New Yorkers by air, closer than any number of other warm weather destinations. The concentration of wealth here has led to many examples of creation of and or duplication of venues that cater to people of wealth such as arts, culture, fine dining, theater, opera symphony, etc. In addition to warm weather and sunshine and beaches in Florida, state laws and tax structure

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create an attractive incentive to wealthy individuals looking towards retirement. No separate state income tax and inheritance tax is a dramatic contrast to the New York situation, and more business entities are recognizing that they too can take advantage of this. This trend is increasing as more businesses recognize that through technology their business does not need to be run out of large metro locations, which has created strong demand for residential real estate here. Q: What advice can you offer sellers? A: My advice for sellers is that if you have been thinking for a while of changing a residence or downsizing, now is the time to maximize your investment, but you have to have a plan in place and the right location for you to move to next, for certainly your property will sell faster than you may anticipate.

110 Clarendon Avenue in Palm Beach; $33,500,000.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: Is real estate inventory still at a historic low in Palm Beach? A: Yes, the Palm Beach real estate market is at a historic level today. In my career in the business, I do not think I have ever seen a market this robust and active with properties selling at or above asking prices in rapid succession. Predictably in markets such as these, the inventory of available homes is at an all time low. I am currently engaged in representing several buyers in the market and I can tell you that the “pickings” are pretty slim. In the past, there is usually some part of the market that is moving less than others, such as homes in certain ranges or condos vs. single family homes, or certain areas of Palm Beach or West Palm Beach. Today, everything is in a robust state with much interest and activity.


CHARLESTON CHARLESTON CHARLESTON

R E A L E S TAT E

CHARLESTON CHARLESTON CHARLESTON

JOHN PAYNE Handsome Properties / 843.708.0897 / johnpayne@handsomeproperties.com

CO U RTE S Y O F H A N D S O M E P RO P E RT I E S

A seventh generation Charlestonian and the third generation in an esteemed Charleston real estate family, John has a deep knowledge of the trends and traditions of the historic neighborhoods, with expertise in downtown sales, renovation, restoration and conversion investment properties. John is an avid outdoor enthusiast, owner of his own country property, and is considered the land and country property specialist at Handsome Properties. Q: Tell me about the country estates outside Charleston that you represent. Why are they so desirable? A: In this part of South Carolina, called the Lowcountry, country estates are quite common and diverse. Within a very short drive from Charleston, South Carolina or Beaufort, South Carolina (15 to 20 minutes), one finds themselves in beautiful, undeveloped countrysides. The landscapes here can change so quickly and dramatically that one country estate can possess a myriad of ecosystems. For example, there are swamplands and old rice impoundments for duck hunting, as well as high, old growth forests with excellent timber value for deer, tur-

key and a plethora of other species, followed by long leaf pine forests that are the native home to the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. All of these environments can exist on a country estate of less than 100 acres. Many of these country estates are full time homes for their owners, and many are weekend getaways, but there are still quite a few that are only used seasonally (November through April generally) due to our relatively mild winters and great hunting. Over the last few decades, several small airports and airstrips have begun dotting the landscapes to meet the increased. Country estate owners and their friends are able to fly in and out, avoiding major airports and putting themselves much closer to their destination. u

A country estate near Charleston, South Carolina.

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CALENDAR

APRIL

From April 29 to May 7, The New York Botanical Garden’s Antique Garden Furniture Fair will feature unique offerings from leading antique dealers. For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Thao Phan at tphan@nybg.org or call 718.817.8774.

7

MEDICAL ADVANCES

The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) will hold its Fourth Annual Memories Matter (a virtual event this year) on Wednesday, April 7 at 7:30 p.m. The event will feature Emmy and Tony award winner Bryan Cranston and include the latest advances in Alzheimer’s research, a look at living with Alzheimer’s, the role music plays in connection to our memory and more. Memories Matter will also feature an ensemble of Broadway musicians, including David Hyde Pierce. For more information or questions please contact rsvp@ alzdiscovery.org.

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Hanley Foundation’s 2021 Golf Classic will take place at 7:30 a.m. at Banyan Cay Resort & Golf in West Palm Beach. The event will help raise money and awareness for the Lifesaver Scholarship Program, which provides financial scholarships for individuals struggling with substance disorders. For more information, visit hanleyfoundation.org.

ArtTable, the foremost professional organization dedicated to the advancement of professional women in the visual arts, will hold the ArtTable 2021 Virtual Benefit on April 16, 2021 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm. Barbara Tober, journalist, philanthropist, and chairman emerita of the Museum

TEE IT UP

WOMEN IN THE ARTS

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MUSIC TO OUR EARS

FLORIDA CREATIVES

The Fourth Annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach will take place from April 8 to May 9 at 7417 South Flagler Drive. All proceed from the Kips Bay Decorator Show House will benefit the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club and Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County. For more information, please visit kipsbaydecoratorshowhouse.org.

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of Art and Design, will be honored with ArtTable’s 2021 Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts Award. ArtTable will also present the 2021 New Leadership Award (NLA) to cultural organizer La Tanya Autry. Ms. Tober will also have a conversation with long-time friend and renowned artist Michele Oka Doner. The 2021 benefit will see the debut of a set of exclusive limited editions supporting ArtTable’s mission and programming, including a Philanthropy Is Beautiful bracelet by Joan Hornig; a scarf produced by Alice Riot celebrating 25 years of Anonymous Was a Woman; and two untitled prints by New York City artist Sara Sosnowy.

On April 19, Palm Beach Symphony will host its virtual gala at 6:30 p.m. The event with feature entertainment and an online auction of exquisite experiences, including a livestreamed Masterworks concert.

Palm Beach Symphony will host its virtual gala at 6:30 p.m. with special guests, entertainment, and an online auction of exquisite experiences, featuring a livestreamed Masterworks concert. Palm Beach Symphony has quickly become one of the South Florida’s leading orchestras and an invaluable part of the fabric of its community. The Symphony overcame the unprecedented challenges of 2020-21 with its first televised performance


CALENDAR

MAY 5

ART IN PERSON

Opening from May 5–9 and hosting over 60 of the world’s leading galleries, Frieze New York at The Shed at Hudson Yards will feature the fair’s much-celebrated section, Frame, devoted to emerging galleries. The fair will also be accompanied by an expanded program of collaborations, special projects, and talks. For those who might not be able to travel to New York next May, Frieze Viewing Room will also run online alongside the fair and will benefit from enhanced digital functionality. For more information, visit frieze.com.

7 The Fourth Annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach will take place from April 8 to May 9 at 7417 South Flagler Drive. For more information, please visit kipsbaydecoratorshowhouse.org. broadcast across the state, stepping up instrument donations to local schools, performances for local hospitals, assisting in virtual classrooms, and more. For more information, please visit palmbeachsymphony.org.

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HELPING STUDENTS

This year, from the comfort and safety of your own home, the 2021 Bernard Baruch Virtual Gala will honor and present Neuberger Berman with The Bernard Baruch Award for Business and Civic Leadership accepted by George Walker, Chairman & CEO. Neuberger Berman’s commitment to equity, inclusion and diversity in the workplace is directly aligned with the mission of Baruch College. As the effects of COVID19 continue to impact Baruch’s students, proceeds from the event will support Stand Up for Baruch, the organization’s $5 million initiative to address critical areas of urgent need, including financial aid, emergency grants, technology assistance, mental health services, and career counseling. For more information, please visit alumni. baruch.cuny.edu.

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RESTORATION

The 2021 French Heritage Society Book Award will take place live on Zoom on Thursday, April 22 from

1 to 2 p.m., honoring A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment by Stéphane Hénaut & Jeni Mitchell. Proceeds from this event will support restoration grants selected for funding by the FHS New York Chapter. For more information, please visit frenchheritagesociety.org.

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PARIS IN PALM BEACH

The French Heritage Society will host its April in Paris”Luncheon on April 26 from 12 to 2 p.m. at The Colony Hotel. Its first in-person event of 2021 will toast a brighter future from the outdoor oasis of The Colony’s hanging garden and guests will enjoy a catered meal featuring favorites from the Swifty’s menu. For more information, please call 561.655.5430.

Plant Auction, curated by NYBG’s expert horticulturists. Proceeds support NYBG and its renowned horticultural programs. For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Thao Phan at tphan@nybg.org or call 718.817.8774. A BIG IMPACT

Impact the Palm Beaches will hold its Impact Awards virtually from 6 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, please visit impactpalmbeaches.org.

WILD RIDES

The South Florida Fair— one of the top fairs in Florida offering an extravaganza of fried foods, tribute bands, dance parties, and great rides—will take place in West Palm Beach from May 7 to May 23. For more information, visit theplambeaces.com.

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OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS

Public Art Project by David Hammons: Days End will take place at the Whitney Museum of American Art from May 10 through August. For more information, please visit whitney.org.

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GARDEN FURNITURE

The New York Botanical Garden’s much-anticipated Antique Garden Furniture Fair will feature unique offerings from leading antique dealers, including classic furniture and fine garden antiques—some with a modern twist, both elegant and inspiring—for the home and garden. The Preview Party on April 29 provides exclusive early access to shop the exhibitors and the renowned Collectors’

The WCS Run for the Wild will take place on Saturday, April 24 at the Bronx Zoo. Online registration can be completed at bronxzoo.com. APRIL 2021 93


H A R RY B E N S O N


The Substance of Style PH OTO G R A PH E D B Y H A R RY B E N S O N S C O T T E R I K B U C C H E I T, C A R R I E B R A D B U R N , A N D J A C K D E U T S C H

Once again, Quest is proud to feature the leading women who champion and support so many charitable causes. And once again, we’ve chosen to photograph them in white shirts—because, after all, it’s what’s on the inside that truly matters.

Gillian Hearst The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering Gillian Hearst, a natural beauty who is as kind-hearted as she is

the Society Campaign, which coincides with The Society’s 75th

attractive, was recently elected Chair of the Associates Committee

anniversary. The money raised by the 2020-21 Society Campaign

of The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering, in addition to being

will help MSK fill funding gaps caused by the pandemic, so that

appointed to the Board of Directors of Hearst  Corporation.

key research programs will be able to resume, allowing doctors

The mother of three equally beautiful young daughters:

to continue finding new ways to fight cancer.

Harper, Hadley, and Sloane—not to mention a Pekingese pup

“I am most excited to launch our newest initiative, Fully

named “Wicket”, a brand new  Doberman Pinscher named

Charged—an exciting fundraising endeavor inspired by frontline

“Phil”, and two ragdoll cats, “Chapo” and “Fluffy”—is also

workers at MSK Kids and their dedication to caring for children

sharp. The Georgetown grad (who also happens to be the

with cancer. For these frontline workers, keeping a phone

daughter of Patty Hearst and great-granddaughter of William

charged is vital throughout long shifts in a high intensity hospital

Randolph Hearst) may sound like she has her hands full, but

environment. They urgently need portable power sources so they

you would never know it. Gillian is always on time (early, in fact)

can keep their phones charged during the COVID-19 pandemic—

and maintains an eternally “cool, calm, and collected” demeanor

while still remaining connected to their loved ones.

while she perseveres as a devoted Mom, caring  friend, loving

“The Society of MSK’s dedication to Fully Charged draws on

daughter and sister, and dedicated Chair of The Society of MSK’s

Society families’ time-honored tradition of instilling a culture of

Associate’s Committee.  

philanthropy from one generation to the next. I launched  this

“Being Chair of The Associate’s Committee means quite a lot

campaign not only to teach my daughters about giving back,

to me. I had always been aware of the remarkable work that MSK

but most importantly to show gratitude to frontline workers

does, but when my father fell ill and needed to seek treatment at

during the pandemic. 

MSK, I was able to see firsthand how much time and attention each patient is given the moment they enter the building.  

“I invite all of Quest’s readers to join me in showing our thanks to MSK Pediatrics frontline workers  by registering  to

“Though going to MSK is something you would never wish

raise money for MSK’s Fully Charged campaign. For every $100

upon a friend, family member, or loved one, I’m grateful that it

contributed to MSK Fully Charged, The Society will provide an

exists. The doctors at MSK constantly strive to find a cure  and

MSK Kids frontline worker with one power bank cell phone

they really do their best to make patient care as pleasant as

charger. Additional funds  raised will support research and

possible. My father was treated for cancer at MSK, and due to the

patient care programs at MSK Kids.”

research and innovations put into practice by his team there, he

To learn more about Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer

was given extra time that we didn’t think we’d have—for that my

Center, visit https://society.mskcc.org/ or to register for MSK’s

family is forever grateful.

Fully Charged Campaign, visit https://society.mskcc.org/fully-

“Our primary focus for MSK in 2021 is raising money for

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Britty Bardes Damgard Landmarks Preservation Commission of Palm Beach, The Blair House Preservation has always been a passion for Brittain Bardes Damgard and her work in the field is impressive, spanning across many cities. Britty grew up in Cincinnati and Palm Beach. For many years she was co-owner of an electrical manufacturing business in Cincinnati and also an owner of a retail business in Washington. She still has a design business, Bardmoor Interiors. Britty raised her three children in Washington D.C., where she was involved with the Kennedy Center and served on the board of the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts and also The Blair House, the Presential guest house. Today, she continues to serve on the Blair House Restoration Fund, where she played a major role in the redecoration of the House and was also an integral part in the publication of the new Blair House book, which tells the rich story of House’s history. Britty served on the board of the Preservation Society of Newport County for 12 years and watched her interest in preservation grow, leading her to serve on the board of The Landmarks Preservation Commission of Palm Beach. She tells Quest, “I have restored six homes in my lifetime, including two in Palm Beach, a landmarked house in West Palm, and an historic house in Newport, Rhode Island, designed by Peabody and Stearns named Hopedene.”

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Missie Rennie Taylor Vassar College, The Asia Foundation Missie Rennie Taylor says that “to be engaged in institutions and causes you cherish is a privilege.” And right now, she notes, “all these institutions need time, support, and commitment even more.” That’s hard in today’s remote/digital world. But even with all the hurdles and Zoom meetings, Rennie Taylor says that she’s not undone by it all. Her passion for the causes she cares deeply for remains unmatched. Missie’s years in television news—she was once at CBS News as the Executive Producer of CBS News Sunday Morning and CBS Weekend News—allowed her to experience so much of the world and find where she wanted to focus her energy. “These areas,” she says, “have consistently been education and international development, particularly Asia, part of the world in which my husband, Zach, and I lived when we were in our twenties.” In Education, she says, “I will be forever dedicated to my alma maters: Miss Porter’s School and Vassar College. They shaped my life in so many ways, gave me a foundation and created my never-ending curiosity about the world.” Rennie Taylor has served on both boards twice and continues today as a proud Vassar Trustee. Along with her many educational interests, Missie’s service on the Teachers College Board and The USTA Foundation—which combines tennis and educational opportunities—has served and benefited young people in urban settings. Missie has always loved tennis. “I even played at Vassar College,” she tells Quest. As a result of her nomination by Vassar College, Missie was selected by the Henry Luce Foundation for a Fellowship to live and work in Manila in the 1970s. “That experience changed my life and gave me a deep interest in all things in Asia. The Asia Foundation does development work with offices in 18 countries in Asia, and I particularly support their work with women.” She says that the Asian Cultural Council covers many of the same countries with cultural exchanges and she also works with the International Rescue Committee, a large refugee organization. Her husband accompanied her to Manila on the fellowship and he devotes much of his time to environmental issues in Asia, particularly in Mongolia. “How lucky I am to have found my two fields of passions and to be able to participate with time—sometimes overwhelming—and generosity.” Through it all, she has P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

made lifelong friendships and met incredible people. “And,” she adds, “I hope to have given as much as I have received from these commitments.”

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HARRY BENSON


“I am particularly passionate about the arts, especially in difficult times.” —Deborah Royce The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from our April 2020 issue. This page, clockwise from top left: Louise Stephaich, Hospital Albert Schweitzer; Deborah Goodrich Royce, supporting The Avon Theater, PRASAD, NYBG, and NYPL; Denise Hanley, Palm Beach Atlantic University and the Ryan Licht Sang Bipolar Foundation. APRIL 2021 101


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“I love to be able to share the zoo’s conservation message through my films.” —Whitney Bylin The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from

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our April 2019 issue, photographed by Harry Benson and Annie Watt. This page, from above: Georgina Bloomberg, The Humane Society of the United States; Whitney Bylin, Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society. Opposite page, from above: Mila Mulroney and her granddaughters (Thea and Minnie Lapham), Cystic Fibrosis Canada; Ritchey Howe, Boys’ Club of New York. APRIL 2019 00


The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from our April 2018 issue, photographed by Harry Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Opposite page, clockwise from above left: Julie Frist, Teach for America; Susan Lloyd, Palm Beach Island Cats; Talbott Maxey, The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach. 00 QUEST

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Barbara Tober, The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

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Benson. This page, from above: Jamee Gregory, The


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“Social advance depends quite as much upon an increase in moral sensibility as it does upon a sense of duty.” —Jane Addams The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from our April 2017 issue, photographed by Harry Benson. This page, above: Frances Scaife, Lighthouse Guild. This page, below: Nancy Brinker, Susan G. Komen. Opposite page, above: Hilary Geary Ross, The Blenheim Foundation U.S.A.,

Foundation of Palm Beach. Opposite page, below: Jacqueline Weld Drake, Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Literacy Partners, and PEN America.

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Women’s Board of the Boys’ Club of New York, Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy, Preservation


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The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from our April 2016 issue, photographed by Harry Benson. This page, top row: Audrey Gruss, Hope for Depression Research Foundation; Dani Moore, Town of Palm Beach United Way, Boys & Girls Clubs

Kettering Cancer Center; Jacqueline Desmarais, The Metropolitan Opera. Bottom row: Edith McBean, African Parks Foundation, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya, Panthera, Rainforest Trust; Michele Kessler, Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society.

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of Palm Beach County. Bottom row: Pauline Baker Pitt, Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach. Opposite page, top row: Mary McDonnell Davidson, Memorial Sloan


The women featured in “The Substance of Style” from our March 2012 issue, photographed by Jack Deutsch and Capehart Photography. This page, top row: Nancy Kissinger, Animal Medical Center; Anne Harrison, Women’s Committee of the Central

American Foundation for Equal Rights; Emma Bloomberg, Robin Hood.

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Schools. Opposite page, top row: Sasha Heinz, Planned Parenthood; Sydney Shuman, Women & Science, Rockefeller University. Bottom row: Jill Kargman,

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Park Conservancy. Bottom row: Louise Grunwald, Lighthouse International; Emilia Fanjul, Everglades Preparatory Academy and Glades Academy Elementary Charter


The women from the April 2009 “The Substance of Style” shoot, photographed by Jack Deutsch. This page, top row: Nancy Paduano, Central Park Conservancy; Lorna Graev, Fountain House; Susan Burden, New Yorkers for Children. Second row: Elizabeth Stribling, French Heritage Society; Cynthia Lufkin, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Bottom row: Liz Smith, Literacy Partners; Blaine Trump, God’s Love We Deliver. Opposite Theatre; Lauren Bush, FEED. Bottom row: Diana Taylor, New York Women’s Foundation; Evelyn Lauder, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

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page, top row: Susan Fales-Hill, American Ballet


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NEXT GENERATION OF GENEROSITY B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

AT A TIME when giving back is paramount, the young individuals in the following pages stand out for their genuine desire to improve the world. Here they discuss the causes closest to their hearts, and how their goals have shifted in the face of the pandemic.

ASHLEY BROWN Selfless Love Foundation

foundation that now helps hundreds of foster children find forever families,” commented Brown.

TO PAY FORWARD the blessing of being adopted, Ashley Brown established the Selfless Love Foundation in Palm Beach in 2015 with her husband, Ed Brown. With more than 100,000 children in foster care in the U.S. waiting to be adopted—and more than 20,000 that will age-out of the system without a family this year—the nonprofit is dedicated to enriching the lives of current and former foster youth. The foundation works with partners to streamline the adoption process to create better matches and reduce the time to adoption. It also provides training and resources for youth who are aging out of the child welfare system. “It’s ironic to think the ‘foundation’ our family was built on is the same 114 QUEST

BK: How has the pandemic impacted your goals? AB: Shockingly, the pandemic has really strengthened our ability to impact even more lives. Our team essentially spends their entire day on Zoom calls and webinars with our youth. In the midst of COVID, we raised over 1.3 million dollars on a virtual event, held the first-ever statewide virtual graduation for foster youth, provided statewide Dale Carnegie leadership training for former foster youth, and launched a youth voice initiative to give former foster youth a platform to use their lived experience in foster care to make recommendations for policy changes. This year we also celebrated over 500 foster children matched with families thanks to our partnership with Adoption-Share and their adoption matching program called Family-Match.

COURTESY OF SELFLESS LOVE FOUNDATION

Brooke Kelly: Tell me about your specific roles within the organization today. Ashley Brown: I am extremely hands-on in every area of our foundation, from spearheading recruitment videos, planning events, assisting in the design of all marketing materials, and always being on the other end of the phone when a child calls for encouragement and support. I even handwrite every single thank you note because I am so grateful to everyone who supports us. My favorite part about Selfless Love is being able to see firsthand the impact we are making in hundreds of children and families’ lives.


KATHERINE SCHWARZENEGGER American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to the Animals (ASPCA)

COURTESY OF KATHERINE SCHWARZENEGGER; PATRICK MCMULLAN; AZUSA TAKANO

AS AN AMBASSADOR for the ASPCA and a New York Times best-selling author, Katherine Schwarzenegger uses her influence to spread awareness about animal rescue. She has shared stories of her own experiences with fostering and adopting pets, including her beloved dog, Maverick. Maverick was just four weeks old when he was found under the freeway in South Central and Schwarzenegger took him in. He was the inspiration for Maverick and Me, a children’s book authored by Schwarzenegger that introduces kids to the “adopt, don’t shop” concept. Brooke Kelly: Tell me about your work with the ASPCA. Katherine Schwarzenegger: Over the past five years, I’ve supported many major initiatives for the ASPCA, ranging from adoption and rescue, ending the sale of puppy mill dogs, to helping victims of hoarding and dogfighting. I’ve also helped support the ASPCA’s work to change the conditions of factory farming. In addition, I played a role in promoting how the ASPCA is working to change laws in California when I co-hosted an ASPCA event at the State Capital in Sacramento and met with state legislators, in an effort to protect vulnerable animals. I also had the pleasure of co-hosting a panel with Jenna Bush Hager at the ASPCA Adoption Center in New York City, featuring the book I wrote called Maverick and Me, about my own experience with fostering and adopting. Each year, millions of dogs find themselves in shelters through no fault of their own, and Maverick empowered many young people to advocate for shelter pups who desperately needed a second chance at life. This theme was also one of the things that inspired my recent book, The Gift of Forgiveness: Inspiring Stories from Those Who

Have Overcome the Unforgivable, a compilation of stories of forgiveness. Seeing an animal’s ability and inclination to forgive cruelty and have the capacity to love and trust again was one of the overriding themes in The Gift of Forgiveness—featuring stories of 22 people including Elizabeth Smart and Tanya Brown (sister of Nicole Brown Simpson), who similarly had to overcome unimaginable tragedy and loss. BK: How has the pandemic affected the ASPCA in the past year and how can our readers help? KS: At the start of the pandemic, the ASPCA launched its $7.5 million COVID-19 Relief & Recovery Initiative to bring lifesaving services to pet owners and animals in need and funding to more than 80 animal welfare organizations across 35 states whose programs, operations, or fundraising capabilities have been severely impacted by the pandemic. As part of its response effort, the ASPCA created regional pet food distribution centers and curbside delivery services in New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, and Asheville, North Carolina to provide more than 1,900 tons of emergency food for dogs, cats, and horses to struggling owners. Please consider making a donation to help the ASPCA be prepared for emergencies and continue their lifesaving work. Photos of Katherine Schwarzenegger with her beloved dog, Maverick, and at an ASPCA event in 2014. Opposite page: Ashley Brown, founder and CEO of the Selfless Love Foundation, with a foster child.


MICHAEL & CASEY GRIFFIN The Corey C. Griffin Charitable Foundation

Brooke Kelly: Tell me more about the foundation’s goals. Michael Griffin: Corey was incredibly gifted at connecting people to meaningful causes, so there was no question that we would continue the philanthropic work that he started: improving the lives of children in need. The Corey C. Griffin Foundation is a 501c3 public charity. We’ve been blessed to positively change the trajectory of the lives of over 18,000 children through our programs that focus on education, leadership development, and medical challenges. We lovingly refer to all the children we have the privilege of working with as “Corey’s Kids,” and our outreach to them is rooted in the belief that every child should have the opportunity to succeed, regardless of their circumstances. We are currently working with Boston Children’s Hospital to build the Corey Griffin House. This initiative will provide housing for families of children undergoing treatment to alleviate financial burdens and keep families together during challenging times. BK: Tell me about your involvement in the organization today. MG: We both serve on the Board of Directors and get involved in all aspects of the Foundation. Each of us has a leadership role

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in our largest events. For me, that is the annual Boston Winter Ball, a black-tie bash for young professionals. This year, even virtually, we are so excited to have raised $1.5 million for Corey’s Kids. Casey’s primary focus is on CoreyFest—a country concert that raises close to a million dollars annually and has featured big name artists such as Old Dominion, Lee Brice, Chris Young, Cole Swindell, and others. Not only do these events get young professionals engaged in experiential philanthropy and in helping kids in need, but they’ve become must-attend events on the Boston social calendar. BK: How has the pandemic shifted your focus in the past year? MG: The pandemic has been eye opening. There is so much need out there, and the “asks” from those requesting our services has never been greater. At the same time, the generosity of our donors has been incredible and record-setting as well. Two of our focus areas are in juvenile mental health and elementary education; both of these segments have been in crisis mode the past year. The pandemic has forced us to think outside the box regarding ways we can assist children and families. And it has caused us to pivot in a creative way to host fun, high-energy events. For example, our 2020 CoreyFest was held at a drive-in with a live band and a 65-foot screen. Guests wore masks and practiced social distancing, but even still it was the event’s most successful fundraising year yet—and it was a blast! Clockwise from top left: A photo of a past Boston Winter Ball; Casey and Michael Griffin; Michael Griffin with a group of “Corey’s Kids.”

COURTESY OF THE COREY C. GRIFFIN FOUNDATION

AFTER THEIR 27-year-old brother Corey passed away in a tragic accident, Michael and Casey Griffin—along with family and close friends—established the Corey C. Griffin Charitable Foundation to honor his incredible dedication to philanthropy. The organization celebrates Corey’s philanthropic spirit and accomplishments, and furthers his original efforts to improve the lives of underprivileged children, primarily in the Boston area.


SARAH HOOVER Gagosian Gallery

COURTESY OF AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE; DANIEL TRESE; ZAC KREVITT

SARAH HOOVER’S passion for the arts began at a young age when she would frequent local Indianapolis museums with her grandfather. Now, she serves as a director at the Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea, where she has worked as an artist liaison and art dealer since 2007. She also sits on the development committee at Recess in Brooklyn, an organization that supports artists by building a more just and equitable creative community, and works with the Art Production Fund, a non-profit organization dedicated to commissioning public art projects. Additionally, Hoover’s passion for ballet growing up inspired her, along with three other founding members, to establish the Accelerator Council of American Ballet Theatre (ABT). Brooke Kelly: What motivated you to establish the Accelerator Council of ABT? Sarah Hoover: I grew up dancing and actually attended an ABT summer intensive as a young teenager, so I’ve always adored ballet, and the mission of ABT in particular—it was founded by a single mom! As a national company, it hosts dancers from all over the world and country. Even though I didn’t quite make it as a professional dancer, I wanted to be able to give back to a community that I have always loved and that has brought me so much happiness as a New York resident. My favorite nights are summer ballet evenings at Lincoln Center, and Champagne on the terrace during intermission. Together with some of my dearest ballet loving friends, like Indré Rockefeller (who actually was a pro ballerina!), CeCe Thompson, and Chai Vasarhelyi, we decided to found a group to share our love with other millennial

New Yorkers, drawing connections between the company and creatives in our own fields, and raising money for women’s choreographic initiatives at the company. BK: Which other organizations are you passionate about? SH: My other great love is Recess in Brooklyn, which is a fabulous nonprofit with an abolitionist stance that disrupts the prison pipeline by providing arts education and training to young adults convicted of crimes, helping them avoid prison time. It also gives grants and exhibition space to artists working on projects about social justice, who collaborate with the youth in the arts programming. I also adore both Coalition for the Homeless and Art Production Fund, and work with them on their annual fundraising events. BK: How have your charity goals evolved due to the pandemic? SH: If anything, the pandemic has intensified the way I feel about nonprofit work, both because it has shown how fragile these systems are, and how much we need them. Living without performance, public art, galleries, and museums has been sad, and showed how bleak the city would become without art in our daily lives. But even worse has been knowing how the very fixable, very avoidable holes in our institutions, policies, and structures have failed so many of our most vulnerable. u Clockwise from top left: Sarah Hoover outside the Gagosian Gallery; Indré Rockefeller, CeCe Thompson, and Sarah Hoover, founding members of ABT’s Accelerator Council; ABT dancers. APRIL 2021 117


L A RY / A F P V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; A P P H OTO / S E T H W E N I G ; A P P H OTO / F R A N K F R A N K L I N I I

GIVING BACK TO QUEST COMMUNITIES BY ALEX TRAVERS

WE ARE GRATEFUL. Grateful for our frontline workers. Grateful for the progress this country is making to combat the deadly coronavirus. And grateful for the people and communities who have sacrificed their time to help those in dire need. As much as we all crave a sense of normalcy, sometimes we have to pause and count our blessings. Here in New York City—along with the other Quest communities featured in this story—people have come together to celebrate the dedicated essential workers. And progress. Crowds of nurses and firemen continue to encourage each other in the street, dating back to the early days of the pandemic when glimmers of hope included the USNS Comfort ship’s arrival in New York City late March to assist hospitals in the fight, and the Blue Angels that flew over the city to honor frontline

workers. Now, as vaccines begin to become readily available, hope abounds. The city is beginning to safely reopen. Of course, reminders of the importance of working together can be seen all over, from messages on boulevards to the masks on iconic monuments like the Wall Street bull. Everyone is united and remains #NYTough. Since the coronavirus reached the United States, people all over New York City have come together to celebrate essential workers. Crowds of nurses and firemen encouraged each other in the streets, and each evening residents cheered on frontline heroes from their windows. Now, as the city begins to get vaccinated, New Yorkers are starting to see new glimmers of hope, remaining grateful for all those who have helped us remain #NYStrong. APRIL 2021 119


PALM BEACH BOYS & GIRLS Clubs of Palm Beach County jumped into action as soon as the pandemic started impacting Club families—and their actions continue to help many. Food security was a top concern as many parents lost their jobs. So far, the Clubs have been able to supply half a million meals (the number continues to grow) to children throughout Palm Beach County with its Grab and Go meal program. Also, more than 55,000 club family members have received a week’s worth of groceries since March 2020 through the Farm to Family Program. Said board member Reid Boren, “We do whatever it takes to make sure our Club families stay healthy. By providing organic, high-quality food, we helped to boost Club members’ immune systems. As the need increased in our community, the Clubs ramped up their efforts, and almost overnight, our 13 Clubs transitioned to become a major food distributor for all of Palm Beach County.” He continued, adding: “Our Farm to Family program not only provides a week’s worth of farm-fresh vegetables, protein and dry goods to our Club Families, but it also helps with the economic recovery in Palm Beach County.”

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Boys & Girls Clubs President and CEO, Jaene Mirando, along with Pepe Fanjul, Jr. (pictured left in the lettuce field), Margaret Duriez, Debbie Thomas, Regina Thompson, Ashley Pierre, and Barbara Dormand are all pictured here helping hand out groceries. Feeding America is also helping take care of families affected by the coronavirus pandemic.


LOCUST VALLEY A GROUP OF friends who had grown out of the St. John’s Country Fair Outreach Program at St. John’s of Lattingtown decided on day two of the COVID lockdown that something must be done to help the community. Sadly, the Men’s Shelter and the Soup Kitchen was forced to shut down, and there was a big gap in services for the at-risk communities of Glen Cove and Locust Valley. So a group of women— from Christine Rice executive Director of the Glen Cove Senior Center to Christine Thomaides Director of Development at Grenville Baker Boys & Girls Club, to members of the vestry at St Johns among others—set out to take care of locals in need. This brave group partnered with local organizations to pack and deliver food, naming their group NOSH. The name was born from North Shore (“No” “Sh”) Neighbors Helping Neighbors in Need. Families pitched in with food packing, tracking down those who needed help, creating menus for the donated bags of food, drawing up maps for the drivers delivering food, and much more. NOSH members include Allison Aston, Veronica Beard, Sarah Blundin, Stephanie Clark, Beth Blake Day, Jenna Bush Hager, Cynthia Murray, Claudine Baldwin, Wibby Sevener, Virginia Apple, and more. Today, NOSH takes care of 400+ families a week and has become a program of the North Shore Soup Kitchen,

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which means NOSH will continue as a full program.


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HAMPTONS

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BEGINNING IN March, many New York residents fled the city to shelter in the Hamptons, making a usually quiet time of year in the East End abnormally busy. Summer-only residents opened their homes early, and rental demand was higher than ever. During this time, essential workers—from the local fire departments to animal shelters—were appreciated more than ever. And now as citizens begin to get vaccinated, their work is appreciated even more. As the sole provider of emergency care on the South Fork, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital is constantly working with the New York Department of Health, setting up a fund to acquire equipment and expand capacity as needed. Now, as the busier season approaches, the Hamptons is regaining some normalcy, with beaches open and resorts and restaurants operating at limited capacities.

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In the Hamptons, essential workers—from the local fire departments to animal shelters to nurses and doctors—helped community members in need. Now, as vaccines begin to roll out in New York, these frontline workers are still very much praised for their help as businesses start to safely reopen.

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CHARLESTON THE CHARLESTON Visitors Bureau issued daily updates to keep business owners, residents, and visitors informed on the state of Charleston’s response and now, as vaccines are underway, normalcy is beginning to return. These updates included information on businesses that were operational and policy changes on the state or local level. The Visitor’s Bureau also provided masks and hand sanitizer to local businesses to keep employees and clients protected. Its local hospital, The Medical University of South Carolina, even developed systems to share with the state and other hospitals to aid in responding to COVID, including 3D print patterns for masks and splash shields and testing systems. Businesses in Charleston stepped up—and continue to do so—to the challenge and assisted the government and medical facilities in helping support the community. Many local breweries and distilleries retrofitted their facilities to produce hand sanitizer free of charge for the public. Conservation group GrowFoodCarolina working with local farmers and distributors to increase the supply chain of local produce and also deliver fresh produce to food banks and neighborhoods in need. The Charleston Visitors Bureau issued daily updates to keep business owners, residents, and visitors informed on the state of Charleston’s response and now, as vaccines are underway, normalcy is beginning to return to the city. Many local breweries and distilleries, now safely reopening, retrofitted their facilities to produce hand sanitizers.

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GREENWICH WITH FRONTLINE medical staff still working around the clock, volunteer firefighters from across the entire town decided to dish up a week’s worth of meals for their fellow first responders and have continued to help throughout the year. The support is still there for those in need. Representatives from Greenwich’s volunteer fire companies banded together to pay for and deliver lunch all week to Greenwich Hospital’s doctors, nurses and staff. And Neighbor to Neighbor, a local food pantry, responded to the increased need for food by temporarily moving their distribution to Greenwich’s Teen Center. As depicted, groceries were packed in bags for delivery, lined up by delivery zone, and then retrieved by bus drivers Monday–Friday. Anticipating the surge in the need for food, Icy Frantz offered to connect Neighbor to Neighbor with Kyle Silver, the Executive Director and CEO of Arch Street Teen Center. “Arch Street cannot do what it normally does—to provide a safe haven and a social outlet for teens,” Mrs. Frantz said in March, adding gratitude to Mr. Silver. “I am glad the space can be repurposed to meet the needs at this time.” u As depicted here, groceries were packed in bags for delivery to families, lined up by delivery zone, and then retrieved by bus drivers Monday–Friday. Anticipating the surge in the need for food, Icy Frantz offered to connect Neighbor to Neighbor with Kyle Silver, the Executive Director and CEO of Arch Street Teen Center.

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ANTIQUE GARDEN FURNITURE FAIR

PRESENTED VIRTUALLY Preview Party featuring the Collectors’ Plant Auction April 29 One Week to Explore Antiques and More April 30–May 7 nybg.org/antiquegardenfair

The much-anticipated Antique Garden Furniture Fair returns online featuring unique offerings from leading antique dealers, including classic furniture and fine garden antiques for the home and garden. The Preview Party on April 29 provides exclusive early access to shop the exhibitors and the renowned Collectors’ Plant Auction, curated by NYBG’s expert horticulturists. Proceeds support NYBG and its renowned horticultural programs. For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Thao Phan at tphan@nybg.org or 718.817.8774.

2021 Exhibitors David Bell Antiques Dinan & Chighine Find Weatherly Finnegan Gallery Garvey Rita Art & Antiques Hawthorne Fine Art Barbara Israel Garden Antiques Glen Leroux Antiques Judith and James Milne-At Home Antiques New England Garden Company Pagoda Red Francis J. Purcell Rayon Roskar Red Fox Fine Art Thistlethwaite Americana Jeffrey Tillou Antiques Earle D. Vandekar of Knightsbridge Inc. Van Roÿen Antiques & Objects Withington & Company List in formation

Special Guest Speaker: Christopher Spitzmiller

With appreciation to our sponsor


honor ary chair

Maureen K. Chilton gal a chairs

Georgina Bloomberg · Lili Buffett · Whitney Clay Kate Davis · Gillian Hearst · Sharon Jacob · Holly Lowen Ashley McDermott · Janet Montag · Marc Porter Ariana Rockefeller · Deborah Royce · Tina Swartz in par tnership with

For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Anita Hall at 914.579.1000 or NYBGEvents@buckleyhallevents.com.

Proceeds support The New York Botanical Garden and its education and outreach programs. Safety is our priority. NYBG continues to carefully monitor City, State, and Federal COVID guidelines; applicable gathering protocols required at the time of the event will be followed.


DISCOVER SPRING

250 acres. 1 million plants. And you.

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature Experience Yayoi Kusama’s profound connection with nature April 10–October 31, 2021 Exclusively at NYBG, Kusama reveals her lifelong fascination with the natural world, beginning with her childhood spent in the greenhouses and fields of her family’s seed nursery. Her artistic concepts of obliteration, infinity, and eternity are inspired by her intimate engagement with the colors, patterns, and life cycles of plants and flowers. Get tickets now at nybg.org

Tom and Janet Montag Delta Air Lines

E.H.A. Foundation, Inc.

Arthur F. and Alice E. Adams Charitable Foundation

LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature

Providing leadership support for year-round programming at NYBG

Kusama with Pumpkin, 2010 © YAYOI KUSAMA. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore / Shanghai; Victoria Miro, London/Venice; David Zwirner, New York


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY

High Goal Luxury Gin Co-Founders Nic Roldan, Diego Urrutia, and Matti Anttila.


Clockwise from top left: Jay and Kelly Holmes; Bobby Zeitler, Robert Jaggers, Lorenzo Borghese, and Ford Schick; Hannah Selleck and Georgina Bloomberg; Jessica Yurocko, Molly Austin, and Kristin Urrutia.

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CELEBRATING HIGH GOAL LUXURY GIN IN PALM BEACH IN EARLY MARCH, High Goal Luxury Gin hosted an intimate launch party in the Colony Hotel’s newly debuted Living Room. Co-Founders Matti Christian Anttila, Diego Urrutia, and Nic Roldan unveiled their “New World” gin to guests with three different cocktails. At the end of the evening, guests voted on their favorite cocktail, the Roldan, which was added to the Colony’s bar menu. APRIL 2021 133


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MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN’S VIEWING PARTY IN NEW YORK LAST MONTH, the Museum of Arts and Design’s (MAD) young patrons group, MAD Luminaries, gathered for a private viewing of Daniel Arsham’s “Time Dilation” at Perrotin on the Lower East Side. The three-story exhibition showcased a range of new works alongside the artist’s signature sculptures cast in geological materials. Terry Skoda, MAD’s Interim Director, commented, “We think it is critical that the art community draws together to support our artists and help NYC recover. Collaborating with Perrotin to share these important new works by Daniel was just the first of our organized outings planned for MAD Luminaries this spring.”

Tatiana Bravo and Ashley Strause

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Alexander Hankin and Polina Proshkina

Christina Senia Alexis Schwartz 134 QUEST


THE 2021 VIRTUAL GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS IN LATE FEBRUARY, the 78th Golden Globe Awards were announced virtually. The evening was co-hosted by Tina Fey, who was live from the Rainbow Room in New York, and Amy Poehler, who was live from the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles. The event featured a virtual red carpet with celebrities participating from around the world, and interviews with nominees and winners who tuned in from their homes. u

Nicole Kidman in a gown by Louis Vuitton for the virtual red carpet

RICH POLK/NBC HANDOUT VIA REUTERS; LOUIS VUITTON

Ben Stiller presenting during the Golden Globes

Laura Dern Tina Fey and Amy Poehler APRIL 2021 135


SNAPSHOT

ONE OF PALM BEACH’S most sporting and loveliest dames is Jane Will Teagle Boggs Smith—a genuine beacon of charm and well-earned wisdom. Not surprisingly for this indomitable whippet of a woman, Jane has survived not one, but TWO pandemics, having been born in 1918 as the Spanish influenza was taking a deadly hold on the world stage. Tragically, her mother Catherine Will had contracted influenza and died at the tender age of 25, less than six months after Jane’s birth. Although symptomatic as a toddler, she and her sister Katherine survived the 1918 pandemic. Moreover, Jane has lived robustly for the 102 years since then. Said Smith: “In those days there was nothing to give you. My grandmother worried that they were burying people alive, just to get them out of the hospitals. I was lucky to survive it and I’ve had a strong immune system ever since.” She’s also been blessed with stamina and will power that’s uncommon 136 QUEST

in most 30-year-olds. A much beloved and celebrated raconteur who has outlived world wars, depressions, charging elephants (when on safari), and lesser plagues—not to mention three upstanding husbands—our intrepid Jane does not take the current global health crisis lightly. And she convincingly encourages others to get vaccinated, commenting: “Just go for it, and don’t be stupid. I wish they’d had a vaccine in 1918; it might have saved my own Mother.” Indeed, “go-for-it” has been Jane’s inspiring credo, trumping the hurdles and speed bumps on her extraordinary life’s journey. —Chris Meigher As printed in the January 7, 2021 issue of The Palm Beach Post, Palm Beach resident Jane Smith, 102, receives the COVID-19 Moderna vaccine. “I didn’t feel a thing,” Smith reportedly said (Damon Higgins/Palm Beach Daily News).

DA M O N H I G G I N S / PA L M B E AC H DA I LY N E W S

SURVIVING TWO PANDEMICS AND STILL GOING STRONG


A Destination of Exceptional Character and Spirit

“One of the 13 Most Luxurious Hotels in the World” –Forbes Travel Guide

natural beauty and a rich heritage have drawn families to this coastal New England resort for more than a century. Unforgettable experiences are infused with lasting traditions, unfaltering attention to detail and uncompromised personal service. Pampered pleasures include award-winning dining, private wine and culinary classes, and other memorable activities including the stunning Atlantic Ocean beach, croquet and art experiences. Enjoy triple Five-Star service with our OH Well program for health and safety. See our website for details, and reserve now for your treasured getaway.

OCEANHOUSERI.COM

For more information about this distinguished destination, please call 855.399.2812


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Profile for QUEST Magazine

Quest Magazine April 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Quest Magazine April 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Profile for questmag