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$5.00 APRIL 2014

THE ART & DESIGN ISSUE

AGNÈS MONPLAISIR OF GALERIE AGNÈS MONPLAISIR, PARIS

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At the Water’s Edge, St Servan, Bretagne, 24 1/4 x 36 1/8 inches, Oil on canvas, 135346

EST. 1870

ART WALLY FINDLAY


120

94 108

CONTENTS The A rt & D esign I ssue 88 The artist who draws—on everything—is a WHO IS SHANTELL MARTIN

94

Elizabeth Quinn Brown

talent to be reckoned with.

by

DELIGHT IN THE ERUDITE

The Morgan Library and Museum is the dream of

bibliophiles in New York and beyond.

by

Lily Hoagland

102

NEW YORK ART GALLERIES

Galleries, Jack Geary Contemporary, and Wally Findlay Galleries, among others.

produced by

108

A guide to the best of the best, featuring Acquavella

Lily Hoagland with Elizabeth Quinn Brown and Alex R. Travers

NEW YORK TRANSFORMED

The brothers of Cross & Cross are revisited

in New York Transformed by Robert A. M. Stern.

112

120 116

126

David Patrick Columbia

Agnès Monplaisir, of the eponymous gallery in Paris,

has an eye for art that is the envy of collectors. by Lily Hoagland

THE TRUE BEAUTY OF ART

by

A FAMILY’S LANDMARKS

On 50 United Nations Plaza. by Lily Hoagland

ENERGIZING THE ART WORLD

The Frieze Art Fair offers a freshness to the

schedule of shows in the city.

Alex R. Travers

by

BESPOKE, BE CREATIVE, BE BETTER

The process of designer David Collins

is praised in ABCDS: David Collins Studio (Assouline).

by

Lily Hoagland

88


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64

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CONTENTS 72

C olumns 24 Reflecting on the life of Bunny Mellon and more. D P C 64 A visit to Benner Island, Maine, to photograph artist Andrew Wyeth. 66 Our columnist discusses the Middle East. T T 68 A retrospective is at the National Academy Museum and School. P J 70 The King Cole Bar is revamped into the King Cole Bar & Salon. D C 72 April showers bring bouquets of gifts. D C E M 76 Celebrating the 100th birthday of William R. Salomon of Salomon Brothers at the 21 Club. 80 Bob Hardwick pursued his passion from finance to founding the Bob Hardwick Sound. 82 In Geoffrey Bradfield: Artistic License, a catalog of work by the designer. 84 On Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park. A R. T 86 A guide to the goings-on in and around town throughout the month of April. 138 Dancing the night away, at Matthew’s birthday and beyond. N H M 140 Our columnist bounces from event to event. E Q B 144 A peek at the desk of explorer Roy Chapman Andrews. E Q B SOCIAL DIARY

by

avid

atrick

olumbia

HARRY BENSON

OIL AND TROUBLE

by

aki

heodoracopulos

ANDERS ZORN

by

CANTEENS

FRESH FINDS

by

by

aniel

appello and

aul eromack

aniel

appello

lizabeth

eigher

AUDAX

SWING AND A HIT

ART OF THE MATTER

AS AMERICANS, WE GO FORWARD

by

lex

ravers

SOCIAL CALENDAR APPEARANCES

by

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST SNAPSHOT

by

by

icole

lizabeth

lizabeth

anley

uinn

uinn

ellon

rown

rown

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Art, culture, and design: The Frieze Art Fair wows art lovers (top left); Jim Jarmusch and Tilda Swinton from Only Lovers Left Alive (top right); the Morgan Library has hidden delights (below).

And since the topic is visual delights, I have to mention Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive. The Cinema Society hosted its New York premiere, where Jarmusch and star Tilda Swinton came off like adorable-but-otherworldly buddies. I’ve been a fan of the director since Down by Law— which, yes, for any film buffs reading, I know is not his first movie but it’s the earliest one I’ve seen—and this was another incredible entry into his canon. The rhythm in his films is as natural as a heartbeat at rest. He picks his settings with the eye of a painter. Catch it if you’re into that sort of thing. Even if winter hasn’t quite let us go yet, look around— there’s so much to enjoy no matter what. u THIS MONTH IT’S all about the visuals. For our Art & Design Issue, we present what’s been catching our eye, what makes us stop to take a second look and why. There’s so much to see in this city, like all those museum exhibits we swear to get to (but only actually make it when weather permits, and there’s nothing else to do after brunch). One of the big events next month was the Frieze art fair, where Alex Travers found the art world revitalized with this off-the-beaten-track show. When the Armory has gotten a little too predictable, but you’re not quite hip enough for the PULSE fair, Frieze has what’s new and interesting while offering context that you can understand. Plus, it’s a great excuse to hop over to Randall’s Island, which is not a place most of us make an effort to go to, unfortunately (again, the weather, and brunches). Speaking of meals, I had the pleasure of dining inside the Morgan Library’s McKim building, surrounded by all those lovely books. The food was great and all, but it was definitely a feast for the eyes. The beautifully renovated rooms sing with stories from every leather-bound spine. 22 QUEST

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Agnès Monplais, owner of the Galerie Agnès Monplaisir at 8 Bis Rue Jacques Callot, Paris, France, offers insight into the history of different art movements and the current state of the art world in “The True Beauty of Art” on page 112. Photograph by David Atlan.


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO C IAL DIARY MARCH WENT OUT like a

lion. Well, sort of. Most of the extreme forecasts turned out to be false alarms. It definitely had its effect on city life. People stayed in or went away (went south), when they could. However, it was New York and New Yorkers go out and go to interesting events

when they’re in town, some big and some small. And then of course, there’s the course of human events... On a Thursday night, Jerry della Femina and his wife, Judy Licht, hosted a book party for their friend Dr. Gerald Imber. Imber has just published his sixth book, a novel

called Wendell Black, MD, in which a New York City police surgeon finds himself in the middle of an international drug smuggling ring. Imber in non-literary life is one of the preeminent plastic surgeons in New York. He’s also an assistant clinical professor of surgery at the Weill

Cornell Medical College. I think I met him for the first time when I interviewed him for a piece. He was known for having a roster of male clients, as he proposed that doing little things early kept the countenance fresh and good for the executive marketplace. I don’t know if he’s ever had

S O C I E T Y O F T H E FO U R A R TS ’ A N N UA L D I N N E R I N PA L M B E AC H

Ed and Susie Elson 24 QUEST

Jimmy Borynack and Maura Benjamin

Lance Mahaney and Edith Dixon

Hillie Mahoney and Tony Bohannon

Michel Witmer and Kit Pannill

Jean and William Matthews

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Marvin and Mary Davidson with Peggy and Dudley Moore


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A anything done, but he wears a “sunny disposish” most times I’ve seen him. If you didn’t know his profession, you’d think the guy is just a laidback businessman, always looking as comfortable in a suit and tie as in a jacket and jeans as he goes on enjoying his visit to this small planet. I describe him thusly because, when we were chatting at the book party, I asked him when—by which I mean at what hour—did he, a working doctor, sit down to write a book? Well, he told me, he gets up at 4 a.m. and sits down to write until 6 a.m. This new book took him about a year. After 6 a.m., he goes either to the gym or for a run in the park (I can’t remember which, already being shocked and amazed by his early-ness). Then, he has breakfast and goes to the office to begin his

day as a doctor. He and his wife travel and keep a house in the country for weekends, where they see friends, lots of friends. There were lots of friends at the della Femina-Licht reception. And not an ounce of anxiety to move things along! On the following night, I went over to Jazz at Lincoln Center, where the Young People’s Chorus of New York City, founded by Francisco J. Nunez, was presenting a gala. The evening, “Celebrating the Next 25 Years,” featured the Young People’s Chorus of New York City with Ashley Brown and Delfeayo Marsalis as well as the New York Pops. It was fundraiser and, at the dinner, they honored Robert E. Moritz (U.S chairman and senior partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers) and gave the Humanitarian

Award to J. B. Harrison. This was new for me. I’d heard of the Young People’s Chorus of New York City and had an idea that it was a chorale group of young people and children from the schools. The first performance featured Delfeayo Marsalis, along with the children who looked to be about all the same age, maybe 11 or 12. In that part of the program, there were several dozen on stage. I saw immediately that this was not just some group of young school kids singing in the choir. This was first-rate, smart, neat, directed, and compelling. The kids don’t know it, of course, but they are being trained brilliantly for the world out there. They were really good, they moved like pros, and acted like good kids. They were into their performance, and it was clearly professionally directed

and executed. But you could also see how much work had gone into the performance; and what a good thing that was for everyone. This was real power. This is where true hope and joy preside. The program, with performances ever changing along with age groups, was sophisticated and diversified but entirely accessible to any music lover. The oldest performers must have been young teenagers and the youngest were possibly five and six years old. All the performers were costumed anddressed for their part of the program. The composers and lyricists ranged from Aaron Copland, the Gershwins, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, and Harold Arlen to Yip Harburg, Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin, Van Morrison, Dave Brubeck, and Stevie Wonder.

S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C H O ST E D T H E B U N N Y H O P AT 5 8 3 PA R K AV E N U E

Martha Sharp and son 26 QUEST

Kate Allen and Palmer O’Sullivan

Ashleigh and Bracie Aston

Emilia Fanjul

Sara Peters and son

A spider entertains the young guests

Josh and Shoshanna Gruss with children

B FA NYC . CO M

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A M E R I C A N I R E L A N D F U N D H O ST E D I TS E M E R A LD I S L E E V E N T I N PA L M B E AC H

Rebecca and Bill Dunn

Nunez’ idea was to make the organization multicultural as a model for an inclusive society that is being replicated globally. That’s what we were watching that night at Jazz at Lincoln Center, and it was joyous and fun and deeply moving. Nunez is the director and also a conductor and composer as well as a MacArthur “Genius.” He is a frequent speaker on the role of music in achieving equality and diversity among children in today’s society. He really is a genius, and you can witness it yourself when you see a Young People’s Chorus of New York City performance. The performance ran about 28 QUEST

John Fitzpatrick and Nancy Brinker

90 minutes. It seemed like there were hundreds of children and young people entering and exiting for the more than 14 numbers. Precision of movement, choreography was everywhere—the work of Jacquelyn Bird who is the director and choreographer. In the past eight years, the multitalented Bird has choreographed numerous performances for the organization, with tours of the Dominican Republic, China, Japan, and France as well as a show at Coca-Cola’s 125th anniversary celebration. And then, the very next night, at about 6 p.m., I went over to the New York Junior League (NYJL) at 130 East

Lore Dodge and Tom Quick

Brian and Eileen Burns

80th Street, where the French Heritage Society was sponsoring a lecture by author, historian, and art critic Olivier Bernier. He was giving a lecture on Madame Pompadour, also known as the Marquise de Pompadour, the mistress of Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774. The NYJL house, itself, is one of the classic New York 20th-century mansions. It was designed by Mott Schmidt (who designed several houses and buildings on the Upper East Side) for Vincent Astor and his first wife, Helen Huntington. I was as curious to get a look at the house’s interior as I was

Robert Crowe and Bridget Baratta

Joe and Sheila Fuchs

to hear Bernier speak. Despite its size, it was a much smaller house than the mansion Astor had grown up in at Fifth Avenue and 65th Street, where the Temple Emanu-el now stands. Bernier was born in this country to French parents. While he doesn’t speak with a French accent, he doesn’t seem “American.” More English, maybe British-ish or European. He’s written several books about 18th-century France and its characters. Guy Robinson of the French Heritage Society introduced me to him. A distinguished-looking man, obviously a scholar, he’s very much a gentleman upon meeting, possessing an almost

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Bill Finneran, Carol Rohrig and Kieran McLoughlin


Art by renowned illustrator Isabelle Arsenault.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A modest demeanor. I’ve read some of his books, as well as several other biographies on the different Louis and the Ancien Régime, with their mistresses and palaces. The drama is enhanced in the imagination, of course, by the French Revolution. I recently read a history with the provocative title of Marie Antoinette’s Head about her hairdresser, a kid from the provinces who serendipitously met the young dauphine and became her hair stylist for the rest of her short life. It was an extraordinary, otherworldly life of extreme etiquette and luxury for everybody in the inner circle, including said hairdresser. (He, by the way, was the one who

came up with the concept of three-foot-tall wigs containing all kinds of things and creatures.) There was corruption everywhere, in the château and all around. That came to an end called the Reign of Terror. All had been inherited from the previous Louis, the XV, who is said to have uttered on his deathbed, in French, of course: “After me, the deluge…!’” I’ve read elsewhere that it was Madame Pompadour who is said to have first uttered that famous line attributed to Louis XV on his deathbed: “Après moi, le deluge...” Either way, one of them called it. True or not, it is the grist for the drama that still attracts readers and

other characters to stories and accounts of the players in this fabulous and dramatic history. Bernier told us that, with the coronation of Louis XIV (1638–1715), France was becoming “civilized.” This was a concept that was “new” in the world, and doesn’t even exist anymore as we are, allegedly, civilized. Women, Bernier told us, were regarded as the more civilized of the genders. Because they were naturally more refined, cleverer. For a girl like Jeanne Antoinette Poisson (a.k.a. Madame de Pompadour), a child of uncertain parentage, the greatest achievement would be to become a mistress of a rich man. Little Jeanne’s mother knew

this and, with the assistance of a man who was or wasn’t her father, she was “educated” about the refinements and the ways of the world that she would enter. She was a year old when a 15-year-old King Louis XV (1710–1774) married his only wife, Marie Lesczcynska, daughter of the King of Poland. Jeanne was 21 and Louis was 30 when they met at Versailles in 1745. She became his official mistress within weeks and she was given the name Marquise de Pompadour, because a king’s mistress had to be titled. That way, she was able to live down the hall, which, in this case, was the Hall of Mirrors.

C I N E M A S O C I E T Y A F T E R - PA R T Y FO R N E E D FO R S P E E D AT J I M MY I N T H E J A M E S H OT E L

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info@biscaynebeachresidences.com | www.BiscayneBeachResidences.com NOW SELLING AT PRE-CONSTRUCTION PRICES | PRIVATE PRESENTATIONS: 305.521.0985 ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. All images and designs depicted herein are artist’s conceptual renderings, which are based upon preliminary development plans, and are subject to change without notice in the manner provided in the offering documents. No guarantees or representations whatsoever are made that existing or future views of the project and surrounding areas, are or will be as depicted, or that any other features, amenities or facilities depicted by any such artist’s conceptual renderings or otherwise described herein, will be provided or, if provided, will be of the same type, size, location or nature as depicted or described herein. These materials are intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy a unit in the condominium. Such an offering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (offering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, offer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. Policy for the achievement of equal housing throughout the nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising, marketing and sales program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, sex, religion, handicap, familial status or national origin. This project is being developed by Biscayne Miami Partners LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company, which was formed solely for such purpose. Eastview Development and GTIS Partners are affiliated with this entity, but neither of them is the developer of this project.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A “ FO R E V E R G L A D E S ” AT T H E P I N E C R E E K S P O R T I N G C L U B I N O K E EC H O B E E

“Porch Members” gearing up

Stephen Myers

Bernier told us that rouge, in those days, was important. The way it was worn was telling. A young girl would wear it very lightly, thereby sending a special message to a male. An older woman, like Marie Leszczynska, might not wear any. She might instead wear a scarf of black lace, which indicated the end of something. But there was a way to wear rouge in their world, and Jeanne Poisson knew how to do it. The new marquise exercised great taste and artfulness. She wore lot of real flowers on her dresses, which were often made up of several pieces of fabric sewn together. 32 QUEST

Jim Smith

Jimbo Fisher

Lia Reed and Tucker Frederickson

To get into them, she was often sewn in. She cultivated and energized Sèvres and the great furniture makers. She was also a friend of Voltaire. Louis moved her into an apartment above his in the vast château. The queen lived in another apartment nearby, and was well aware of the royal mistress. Pompadour, as the mistress, had the power, and was respectful and considerate of the queen, who had already had 10 children with the king and didn’t want to risk her health by having any more. It was understood that, in a civilized world, a royal mistress should have the funds to live luxuriously. Because she

Stephen Myers Jr. and John Reynolds

had the power of the purse, she cultivated influence over policy and had obvious political clout which gave her more power—and more enemies. The king respected her, however, so enemies beware! The royal affair had lost its sexual heat after the first five years, but Pompadour was clever with her power over the king and she kept him. He liked her. She found less clever mistresses to occupy his carnal needs, but remained his comfort. When she died of tuberculosis at age 42, he mourned her. Her legacy, Bernier told us in his talk, was her enormous influence over the arts and culture that still defines France in

terms of style. Tuesday, March 18. A sunny, cold day with no snow. The St. Patrick’s Day parade on Fifth Avenue. Rachel Lambert Mellon, or Bunny Mellon, the widow of philanthropist and art collector Paul Mellon, died early the morning before at her 4,000-acre Oak Spring Farms in Upperville, Virginia. She would have been 104 on August 9. She died peacefully with members of her family present. Americans first heard about Bunny in the 1960s when she worked with Jackie Kennedy on the redecoration of the White House. It was her friendship with Jackie that


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A brought her to the attention of the general public. Her friendship with the Kennedys had been well established and she was known to be a generous and caring friend to the family. Bunny was born Rachel Lowe Lambert in Princeton, New Jersey, on August 9, 1910, the eldest child of Rachel Parkhill Lowe (who bestowed the nickname of Bunny) and Gerard Barnes Lambert. Her grandfather, Jordan Lambert, invented Listerine, which her father marketed before founding Warner-Lambert Pharmaceuticals. Her father became president of Gillette Safety Razor Company, which made several common American household

products, including the razor blades, Listerine mouthwash, and Dentyne gum. The company eventually merged into Pfizer chemicals. Bunny’s first husband, Stacy B. Lloyd, Jr., with whom she had two children (a son, Stacy III, and a daughter, Eliza), was a Philadelphia socialite who served in the Office of Strategic Services during the World War II. The Lloyds were good friends of Paul Mellon, the billionaire heir of Andrew W. Mellon, and his wife, Mary Conover Mellon. When the first Mrs. Mellon died from an asthma attack in 1948, Bunny Lloyd divorced her husband married Paul Mellon within a matter of months.

Paul and Bunny Mellon were well-established members of Eastern United States society, both heirs to great well-established fortunes created from banking and industry. They were very wellknown within their world of society; she was a fulltime client of Paris couture, especially Cristóbal Balenciaga and Hubert de Givenchy, but both inclined to eschew any kind of celebrity, and so they were not famous. They were both connoisseurs of art and the decorative arts and they bred racehorses at the Oak Spring Farms. Mr. Mellon collected 18th- and 19th-century painting and Mrs. Mellon collected modern

art, including many works of Mark Rothko that she purchased at the artist’s studio. Over the years, the couple donated more than a thousand works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., (which had been funded by Andrew Mellon) and to the Yale Center for British Art, which the Mellons established in 1966 (Paul Mellon was a member of the class of 1929). Despite the modest demeanor of their public personalities, the Mellons lived high, wide, and handsome, maintaining fully staffed, sprawling residences in New York, Upperville, Cape Cod, Antigua, Nantucket, and Paris, although their main resi-

Paul and Bunny Mellon with their thoroughbred Mill Reef, the Mellons’ one and only Epsom Derby winner— and the most famous horse that they owned and bred.

Bunny Mellon (August 9, 1910–March 17, 2014) 34 QUEST

Jackie Kennedy with friend Bunny Mellon


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A H O R T I C U LT U R A L S O C I E T Y O F N E W YO R K H E L D I T S G R E E N B E A N B A S H

Annabelle Fowlkes with Mimi

dence seemed to have been at Oak Spring Farms. Their fulltime staffs numbered more than one hundred. Mrs. Mellon liked to move from place to place on a whim and expected the staff to be completely prepared for her arrival at all times. They also had built their own mile-long landing strip on the property in Upperville, much to the dismay of one of their neighbors. A friend of mine was once being given a tour of the property adjacent to Oak Spring when the Mellons’ private jet took off, reminding the neighbor of the annoyance of having their pastoral scene frequently in36 QUEST

Jill Roosevelt, Celeste Boele and Melissa Vlak

terrupted by Mrs. Mellon, who would fly to Reagan National Airport when going to Washington, D.C., 40 miles away from the farm. When my friend was there, the plane returned within 10 minutes, to which the neighbor cracked, “Oh, Bunny Mellon must have forgotten her scarf!” In addition to the interests she shared with her husband—such as the arts and horse breeding—Bunny Mellon had a horticulturist’s interest in gardening and in botany. When she was a young girl, her father designated a small plot of land for her to start a garden. Over her lifetime, she became not only an expert but

Gayle London with Kate

Dana Schiff with Henry and Plum

an archivist of horticulture, building an elaborate private library on the subject at Oak Spring. The Mellon marriage was successful in terms of its longevity and durability, although Paul Mellon was known to have had a long extramarital relationship with a very popular and much liked Washington socialite, Dorcas Hardin. This was not a secret to his wife. There is an oft told story that sometimes, when Paul spoke in a rather loud voice to his wife, she would respond, “Paul, you don’t have to shout, you’re home now…” in reference to his visits with Dorcas, who was known to be

Anya Shiva with Isabel

Katie Tozer with James and Jennifer Argenti with Virginia

hard of hearing. Nevertheless, all matters of matrimonial tradition were upheld religiously (if not according to religious tenets) and respectfully. Furthermore, Bunny had a list of intensely passionate interests that occupied her every spare moment. In many ways, she was a true artist. Along with horticulture, she and her husband shared a deep interest in architecture (she especially loved interior design). Later in life, she was frequently involved with a full-time interior designer, constantly redecorating and refurbishing her houses and evolving their landscapes. She had an artist’s eye for all of it,

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D I N N E R FO R T H E A M E R I C A N F R I E N D S O F T H E LO U V R E I N PA L M B E AC H AT T H E H OM E O F H I L A R Y G E A R Y A N D W I L B U R R O S S

Gigi and Harry Benson

never overlooking the slightest detail, right down to the pruning of the beloved forest of trees that adorned her farm. Paul Mellon died in 1999 after a long illness. Already in her mid-80s, Bunny Mellon soldiered on creating. She also inadvertently gained national attention for having contributed more than $3 million to the presidential campaign of senator John Edwards, whom she had met through Bryan Huffman, an interior designer from North Carolina. It was later revealed that much of her contribution to the campaign was said to have been used by the senator to support a woman with whom he had fathered 38 QUEST

David Aldea, Cynthia Friedman and Paul Yaworsky

Mickey and Harry Breyer

a child in an extramarital relationship. Bunny claimed innocence, making it known that she had met the senator because she liked the national policies he espoused. Others believed that she was the victim of Edwards’ fatal charm. It was true, as friends of hers would intimate, that she remained vulnerable to the charms of good-looking men who were both talented and attentive to her—even at her advanced age. It was a kind of innocence that could make a true, lifelong heiress be vulnerable to guile. Her relationship with events designer Robert Isabell was another example. She and

Ina d’Estaing and Victoria Cummock

Isabell, who was 50 years her junior, were very close pals, sharing the same intense interest in horticulture and interior design. They talked the same creative language and there was a mutual admiration. Isabell was also impressed by Bunny’s knowledge and talented eye, not to mention her awesome wealth and lifestyle. There was a moment when friends of the event planner (who was gay) believed they might actually marry. And when he died suddenly in still questionable circumstances, Bunny insisted that he be buried on her farm. Because she was a woman of great personal fortune

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Llwyd and Diana Ecclestone

all her life, unlike women who claim authority wearing the badge of their husbands’ fortunes, she was never recognized for her ambition. Instead, it was personified via her creative passions and acknowledged for its uniqueness. She was a gentle and generous lady to many, although not without the sense of prerogatives that very rich heiresses possess when it comes to relationships. If Bunny were to be tired of another person, for whatever reason, he or she could find themselves out of the picture—suddenly cut off, with no access to her whatsoever. This happened several times in her life, not only with

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A personal friends but creative people who worked with her. When one man left her employ “to have a life” after more than a decade of working with her, she felt betrayed. At the end of her life she suffered from macular degeneration as well as cancer. She had outlived the stamina demanded by her elaborate and far-flung lifestyle. Several years ago, I was told by a good source, that her advisors had canvassed some of the big banks in New York for a $100 million dollar line of credit backed by a $500-million portfolio of assets, but to no avail. She began to divest herself of her assets, like the townhouse on East 70th Street that has

recently been resold, as well as the properties on Cape Cod and in Paris. She also mistakenly fell prey to the financial wiles and wayward charms of Ken Starr, the so-called financial advisor who relieved a number of her friends and celebrated acquaintances of millions of their fortunes. Despite her fabulous lifestyle, her elaborate personal projects and interests, her fashionable presentation, all enhanced by her vast inherited wealth, Bunny Mellon was unique—a simple girl who lived close to the earth in her daily life and a friend of nature who loved nothing more than pleasing people with her ability to amaze. Many years

ago when her friend Jackie Kennedy took up learning to paint watercolors, Bunny presented her with a small paintbox. Opening the box, Jackie found, in each square where the palette of colors would be located, two precious gems corresponding to those colors: rubies for red, emeralds for green, sapphires for blue, and so on. and in the place where the paintbrush would be kept, two hooks of precious metal earrings to hold each stone. It was a memento designed to delight a precious friend— which is what Bunny was to many. What struck me about her, though I never knew her and never met her, was her im-

age—the elements to provide the imagination with an idea of what someone is like. She appeared very American, almost “down home,” although that was impossible because she had been born into all the trappings of the very rich. There is a famous paparazzi photo of her with her friend Jackie Kennedy that tells you more about who she might have been than anything else. Compared to Jackie, she was almost dowdy, neither sleek nor glamorous like her leonine friend, a natural beauty. Bunny loved beauty, wherever she went. That could explain her soft spot for those good-looking, talented men who knew the ropes of charm about her.

O P E N I N G O F T H E B I E N N I A L AT T H E W H I T N E Y M U S E U M O F A M E R I C A N A R T

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Her will was filed a few days after her death, linked in its entirety by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The woman had a lot to leave, including a lot of jewelry (with a lot of Schlumberger). She bequeathed to her children, grandchildren, and friends. Item by item. “It’s all in the details,” she was evidently fond of saying. Mackenzie Carpenter of the Post-Gazette reported that the will had been revised nine times since 2003. The original said that a lot of jewelry was to go to her daughter, Eliza Lloyd. (Eliza died in 2008 after a longterm coma from being hit by a car.) In the revisions up until 2008, even as her daughter remained comatose, Bunny never altered her bequests to her. She “never gave up hope that Eliza would recover from her coma. That hope is all over this document…right off the bat, it’s about the jewelry. There’s pride of

Jenny Vandekieft and Paula Burchill

ownership, ‘my’ this, ‘my’ that…but more importantly I see a mother handing down beloved things to her only daughter. Never mind that daughter is in a coma. Someday...” Carpenter also pointed out that the original executors were Bunny’s longtime attorney Alexander Folger but that, in the original will, he shared that position with Kenneth Ira Starr, a.k.a. Ken Starr, who was another one of those men who appealed personally to Bunny. She had been introduced to him by a friend who had been impressed by his manner and self-assurance. (This same friend later warned Bunny that Starr had absconded with millions of her mother’s fortune, and advised Bunny to dismiss him. She listened but after that was “cool” to her friend and ignored the warning.) Monday, March 24. A sunny first spring

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Saturday with temperatures reaching up to 60. Sunday got colder and the weatherman was suggesting a snowstorm in a day or two. Nevertheless, spring was here. Was the city quiet? It was in my neighborhood. The private schools on either side of me were closed for vacation. Parents take off, too, for their favorite climes. Nice weather in the city and, aside from the double dog walks along the promenade every day, I stayed in with my books and my media reading. And the ongoing job of culling my books since they have now taken over my humble flat. Wednesday, March 26. The conversation passing my ta-

ble at lunch at Michael’s was mainly about La Grenouille, the ne plus ultra French restaurant around the corner on East 52nd Street. Grub Street of New York magazine had revealed that Charles Masson, son of the founders and manager of the restaurant for the past 40 years, had departed the restaurant and had been replaced by his younger brother Philippe who has been living in France with their mother Giselle. It turns out that Charles Masson never had a share in the restaurant despite all the decades he has put in to taking care of his parents’ business and turning into a restaurant without peer in New York.

Amazing when you think of it. He’s been a paid manager, always requiring his mother’s approval for anything he spent, right down to a light fixture in the kitchen. This, while mother and brother were living across the Atlantic in France on the laurels of the son’s work. Recently, according to the interview, Charles learned that Philippe has become the majority owner of the restaurant (in other words, the mother gave it to him) and had begun micromanaging: “Remember, Charles, you’re just an employee...” Philippe, incidentally, told the New York Post that there was no family rift, adding: “My mother owns this

place, and she has no intention to sell,” he said. But he cryptically added, “She doesn’t want to be in a situation where she can’t sell her baby.” Aha! The plot thickens. It’s a very cruel family squabble. Cruel and curious. The matriarch with her two sons at loggerheads. Whence cometh the conflict? And led by whom? This is of course, in the novel, or the film script. It begs the question, “Why now?” The brother who now owns the “majority” share of the business has spent seven of the past 40 years that Charles has been involved working in the business. He left it in 2000 after a disagreement with his brother that evidently threat-

S U P P E R TO B E N E F I T C I T YM E A L S - O N - W H E E L S AT D A N I E L I N M A N H AT TA N

Leslie Ziff and Robert Grimes 44 QUEST

Colleen Olson and Tom Edelman

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Betsy Bernardaud and Katherine Boulud

Brandon Jones and Lela Rose

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ened violence between the two in the restaurant kitchen—a knife or knives allegedly brandished. In the meantime, the older brother, Charles, without a piece of the action, having built the family business into something that has triumphed down through the decades, is out. All great restaurants have a personality that reflects the owner. There are no exceptions to this rule. Charles Masson, Jr., albeit not an owner, but only a manager, did that. He did that not only to satisfy his vision of the restaurant but to protect the property and tradition of his parents, and his brother. He gave La Gre-

nouille its personality. Now the mother, with whom he evidently has a distant relationship, if that surprises you, has sent his brother back as “majority owner” to be Charles’ boss. Did they actually think he’d just take it any way they handed it out to him, after devoting his entire adult life to building this family business? So what is the real story here? Why have the mother and brother chosen to wrest the running of the business from that son who has so brilliantly managed it ultimately to their benefit? Is it that they just don’t think he’s done a good job managing the family asset? Hard to imagine, considering his achievement,

being the very last of the great French restaurants that blossomed out of Henri Soule’s original Pavillon (where Charles Masson, Sr., worked at as a waiter when he first came to America). The plot smells of something else. Some people think this is a real estate story. The family owns that property at number 3 East 52nd Street. The building was a stable built in 1871: the building where Antoine de Saint-Exupéry wrote Le Petit Prince (he was a friend of Charles Masson, Sr.) and the location where, 120 years ago, in the Gilded Age, the society abortionist Madame Restell performed her procedures to make sure the

gilded names were not cursed with bastards. Charles Masson, Sr., acquired the building when he opened his restaurant in 1962. 52nd Street and Fifth Avenue. Cartier is across the way. Prime, prime New York real estate. The non-participating owners could very conceivably sell the building for a very high price—millions and millions and millions and then can go back to the business of living off the restaurant without even having a restaurant. That’s not an original thought now, is it? Meanwhile, New Yorkers can expect to see Charles Masson enchant them once again with his knowledge, aesthetic, and art as a restaurateur. u

D E S I G N E R S ’ S H O W H O U S E FO R T H E A M E R I C A N R E D C R O S S I N PA L M B E AC H

Lisa Pitney, Bill Kopp and Polly Ober 46 QUEST

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Carol and Tom Kirchhoff

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R I A N M U L R O N E Y ’ S 7 5 T H B I R T H D AY AT C L U B C O L E T T E I N PA L M B E AC H

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Three generations of Mulroneys 48 QUEST

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Barbara Rogoff and Bob Hoak 50 QUEST

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Kate Werlein, Cynthia Smith, Cara Crowley and Grace Fuller 60 QUEST

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1 0 T H A N N U A L K E L LY G A N G S T . PAT R I C K ’ S D A Y B E N E F I T AT M I C H A E L ’ S I N N E W YO R K

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IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 64 QUEST

ON MY WAY to Maine, I thought about how I wanted to photograph the artist Andrew Wyeth. I decided I wanted my photograph to show what he saw when he painted his beloved state. I wanted to see the landscape through his eyes, but


H A R RY B E N S O N Andrew Wyeth at his home in Benner Island, Maine, 1996.

with him in the photograph. In other words, I wanted to evoke the look of an Andrew Wyeth painting and to make you visualize one of his works when you look at my photograph. I came away with a photograph that I

believe accomplished just that. It is how I imagine Andrew Wyeth would have photographed himself, with the late summer day sunshine, the green grass, the mist on the lake, the gray slat house, and, of course, a pad and pencil in tow.

He did a quick sketch of the lake with a boat in the distance and then tore it out of his sketchbook and gave it to me, after signing “Andy Wyeth” at the bottom. I was delighted. We had lunch with his lovely wife, Betsy. At the time, he was painting a series that incorporated feathers into his work, so when she stuck a feather in his ear, they both burst into laughter. There was a mischievous twinkle in his eye when he laughed. You could tell that he was really having fun. When I arrived at Benner Island earlier that day in 1996, I didn’t know what to expect. But by the time left, I knew it had been a very rewarding day, spent with an American gentleman, an artist, an icon. u APRIL 2014 65


TA K I

OIL AND TROUBLE FOR SOME 50 YEARS now, it seems that

God has played a great joke on mankind, granting the best fuel reserves to undeserving desert places run by crooked camel drivers—places such as Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Libya, Turkmenistan, and other such hell holes. Mind you, God plays fair; he has also blessed places like the United States and Norway with black gold and, in order to show his favorite, he

Abu Dhabi, one of the oil-rich mini-states that Uncle Sam appears to protect.

66 QUEST

made Texas the oiliest of all. “Make sure no hole is dry in the Lone Star State,” said the Almighty to his great communicator with us, archangel Gabriel. Now even I, however sure I am of myself, cannot speak for God. In fact, I believe that I am committing a sin to even begin to guess what lies behind His actions but I know He must have regrets, the kind one has after a joke has gone

bad. Making the Saudis and Qataris rich beyond their wildest dreams has been very cruel for the weak, the poor, and those unable to defend themselves. (The very same people the Son of God favors.) This joke has also been a catastrophe for women practicing the oldest profession, waiters, busboys, chauffeurs, jockeys, servants, in general, and anyone coming into contact with the billionaire vermin


TA K I

This page, clockwise from top left: Saudi Arabia, the target of our columnist’s anger; camels in the deserts of the Middle East; Al Jazeera.

that some newspapers refer to as Arab princes, though they should know better. Despicable and poisonous, these ex-camel drivers (who I believe also may have had sex with those unfortunate animals) have been holding the Western world at gun point with their oil reserves, raising the price per barrel and lowering it according to their whims, while buying most of Europe’s exclusive real estate: the best hotels and the grandest country and city houses. Now, however, it looks that the Almighty may have had enough fun. He is no longer amused and He has done what he did to some Greek women 3,000 years ago by getting the oil-rich fighting among themselves. Starting with Egypt, an ancient country that should never be confused with Gulf filth, four Arab states have pulled their ambassadors from Qatar’s capital Doha over the country’s support for the cold-blooded terrorists that the world’s media refers to as freedom fighters in Syria. The Saudis have followed Egypt’s example for the simple reason that even among camel-loving people, it is obvious that financing professional murderers, like on the al-Nusra front, in the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, and via al-Qaeda, will not be healthy for them in the long run. Radical jihadists have only one goal, extreme Sharia law with them at the top. Egypt was the first to see the true

colors of the Muslim brotherhood, and did something about it while the idiots in Washington “deplored the arrest of a democratically elected leader.” Some democrat, some leader. Morsi was to be their Alexander Kerensky until he showed real face as the Egyptian Lenin. But I don’t expect anyone in Washington to have read history, especially when it dates back to 1917. Actually, Qatar tramples on human rights even more than the ghastly Saudis. Ninety percent of its two million and some population is made up of migrant workers who are virtual slaves. Thousands of them are regularly abused, beaten, and starved, and hundreds of them have perished. India, Nepal, and Pakistan, where most of them come from, choose to accept favors from the ruling family and keep quiet about their abused subjects. This is the way of the world. Last summer alone, 44 Nepalese workers died due to heart attacks. Funny, I’ve known Nepalese sailors and they are among the heartiest and strongest and most pleasant of hard workers. Migrant workers face the same conditions in Saudi Arabia and Dubai, not to mention Abu Dhabi, oil-rich ministates that Uncle Sam has chosen to protect against the big bad wolf of Iran, according to the unofficial president and power behind the throne of the United States, Benjamin Netanyahu.

Al Jazeera, the Qatari ruling family’s mouthpiece, poses as an independent news organization, but is no different than the one run by one Goebbels some time ago in Berlin. Al Jazeera supports the Muslim brotherhood in Egypt and the radical jihadists in Syria in order to protect the Thani family that rules Qatar, when and if radical Islam wins out. In Aleppo, where the fighting has been fiercest, Al Jazeera has failed to mention that 45 Christian churches in the city have been desecrated by the jihadists and most Christians driven away by mortal threats. A little bit like Vogue magazine and other glossies, they run flattering pictures of the tarts married to the fat rulers of Qatar with gushing accompanying stories by obsequious journalists. I hope this will all change soon. No, the Saudis are not about to go to war with Qatar. These rich pay others to do their fighting. At least the contest for power in the Middle East will have been split in half. And Uncle Sam will be able to export his God-given oil and gas by the end of this decade, and experience checkmate with the Gulf filth that most likely was behind the horror of 9/11. I sure hope so. When the archangel visits me, I will tell him that enough is enough. As a failed Christian, but a great believer, I’m sure the Almighty will hear me. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. APRIL 2014 67


JEROMACK

ANDERS ZORN:

SWEDEN’S MASTER PAINTER AT THE TURN of the 20th century, few artists enjoyed the fame and success of Anders Zorn (1860–1920). The walrus-whiskered Swedish portrait painter to America’s rich and socially ambitious was an international celebrity whose comings and goings to America were breathlessly reported by the press. “Zorn’s brush...frequently brings the owner $15,000 a week,” crowed the Minneapolis Journal in 1901. (Adjusted for inflation, that’s approximately $415,000.) After his death, Zorn remained a national hero to his native country, but his American fame gradually evaporated in the glare of modernism, as his portraits were gradually relegated to dusty government offices and American museum storerooms. There were exceptions, sort of. For decades, Zorn’s fine portrait of Mrs. John Crosby Brown in the Metropolitan Museum of Art was hung not in the paintings galleries, but on a sidewall of the musical instrument galleries in recognition of her husband’s donation of his huge collection of them to the Met in 1889. Only Zorn’s etchings were treasured by print enthusiasts, with rare impressions commanding thousands of dollars deep into the Depression and beyond. Happily for American audiences, Anders Zorn’s “Grover Cleveland” (1899), oil on canvas, 48 x36 inches. 68 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L P O RT R A I T G A LLE RY, S M I T H S O N I A N I N S T I T U T I O N , WA S H I N G TO N , D C

BY PAUL JEROMACK


Clockwise from left: The façade of the National Academy Museum and School, located at 1083 Fifth Avenue; Zorn’s “Martha Dana” (1899); one

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E N AT I O N A L AC A D E MY M U S E U M A N D S C H O O L

CO U RTE S Y O F M U S E U M O F F I N E A RTS , B O S TO N

of the artist’s watercolors, “Clarence Barker” (1885).

Zorn’s time has come again with a marvelous retrospective at the National Academy Museum and School (through May 18). It is a revelation. In addition to a fine selection of portraits from American collections, generous loans from the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm and the Zornmuseet in Mora (which was founded by the artist and his wife) reveal the Zorn unknown in this country: sparkling watercolors, luscious sun-drenched Impressionist renderings of Venice, Morocco, Paris, and Algiers, and a selection of full-figured blond female nudes of unidealized, unplucked sensuality. The illegitimate son of a German brewer and his Swedish coworker, Zorn began his career as a specialist in watercolors,

and they practically steal the show. His mastery of this difficult medium, broad flowing colors, and washes are amply represented at the National Academy with nearly two dozen examples. Unlike the watercolors of his contemporary and rival John Singer Sargent, Zorn often combined broadly applied veils of washes with refined detailing that gives them an almost three-dimensional presence. Winterweary New Yorkers will find solace in such summery sheets as “Lapping Waves” (1887), an early evening pier of bobbing rowboats and distant houses, which could be awaiting the Fire Island ferry,

the sun-dappled forest glade of “Thorn Bush” (1886) centering on a the artists wife Emma gingerly attempting to free her white dress from the bramble to the amusement of her friend in the distance, and the haunting, overcast “Summer Vacation” (1886) where the freed Madame. Zorn waits a rowboat ride under cloudy, humid skies. In 2010, this haunting vista sold at auction in Stockholm for just over $3.3 million, a record for the artist and over $1 million more than any Sargent watercolor. u APRIL 2014 69


CANTEENS

KING COLE HOLDS COURT

“THEY SEATED ME,” texted a recent diner at the newly revamped King Cole Bar—now the King Cole Bar & Salon—to her dinner partner, who was running late, “behind an urn!” And by “urn,” she was referring to one of the rather dramatic “metal vases,” as they have been called by design connoisseurs—outsize, topiary-stuffed versions of julep-cup vases mounted high on rich wooden pedestals, looking like boxwoods fit for Versailles, part of the modern-décor infusion that accompanied the renovation of the legendary St. Regis bar and eatery. The crisp white walls of the dining space, or salon, are still trimmed with gilded moldings, and crystal chandeliers still reign in all their glory from the scenic ceiling, embellished with a painted rendering of the sky. But new are the graphic carpeting below, the polished-nickel vases, and their imposing larger cousins, stationed in such a way that a Hollywood actress or old-money matriarch angling for 70 QUEST

anonymity can hide out behind one of them quite comfortably. The space has always been a somewhat tricky one. The beloved bar, illustrated by Maxfield Parrish’s iconic “Old King Cole” mural, has long been a haunt of the well-heeled uptown crowd, mixing with midtown moguls and hotel travelers fortunate enough to call the regal St. Regis their home away from home. But the dining room next door has always felt somewhat disparate from the fun-loving King Cole Bar. During the height of the midtown-hotel-houses-Michelin-starred-French-chef era of not so long ago, Alain Ducasse upped the ante of the eating experience to European heights with Adour. Then a somewhat staid dining room tried to simulate what an archetypal “St. Regis” restaurant ought to be. But there was always the looming mural in the background: Old King Cole, that merry old soul, calling for his pipe, his bowl, and his fiddlers of three. He also

CO U RTE S Y O F K I N G CO LE B A R & S A LO N

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS

This spread, from left: A view of the main dining room at the new King Cole Bar & Salon; the Everything-encrusted Salmon; chef John DeLucie’s dinner menu. King Cole Bar & Salon at The St. Regis New York: 2 East 55th Street, Monday–Saturday from 7 a.m. until 1 a.m., Sunday until midnight; 212.339.6857 or kingcolebar.com.

seemed to be calling to patrons in the restaurant, as if to tell them they were missing out on something better in the bar. Now, thanks to acclaimed chef and restaurateur John DeLucie, the King Cole Bar & Salon feels more at one. DeLucie is the master of ambiance and aura: he awakened the neo-speakeasy wave of destination dining with The Waverly Inn, The Lion, and Bill’s. He proved equally adept in more uptown environs, polishing off the swank Crown on East 81st Street. With the new King Cole Bar & Salon, DeLucie marries his downtown chic with his more uptown élan, finding an appropriate yet approachable accommodation for the ritzy St. Regis and its discerning clientele. The signature “Red Snapper” cocktail—a name bestowed by the St. Regis on the much-too-vulgar “Bloody Mary” in 1934, when the drink was perfected and introduced here at the bar—is still a main draw. Perhaps nothing pairs better with this spiced

tomato juice–and–vodka cocktail than a towering seafood platter. The Royal—a medley of oysters, lobster, crab legs, shrimp, and clams—is a semi-indulgent way to go; really indulgent is the Grand Royal, finished off with Osetra caviar for a mere $550. DeLucie’s signature truffled mac-and-cheese, once made famous downtown, is now exclusive to his St. Regis location. Only DeLucie could sneak in an at-home comfort staple like his grandmother’s meatballs with an au-courant take on the trendiest salad du jour—the ubiquitous kale salad (though here it’s a Tuscan kale Caesar, with “hand-torn” croutons). Tuna tartare is taken into the 2010s with Asian pear and Sicilian pistachio, and the filet of beef wrapped in Applewood bacon is good enough to tempt the vegetable-pledged back to meat, even if just for a taste. And all of this before a treat for dessert—or opting to skip straight to after-dinner drinks over in the rollicking bar. u APRIL 2014 71


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

WITH APRIL ARRIVES a wellspring of colors, and, this month, we couldn’t help ourselves when picking out some colorful trends. There’s nothing like turquoise and orange—by way of Carolina Herrera, Wempe, Bonpoint, and Stuart Weitzman—to usher in a bright new wardrobe. And who better than Ralph Lauren and Jimmy Choo to help you stay on trend with a pop of neon? For those with a truly artistic eye, the Newport-based fashion label Isoude offers a day dress so smartly speckled that even Georges Seurat himself would approve. Stack up on Wempe’s 18-kt. rose gold ($875) and 18-kt. white gold ($998) Helioro xs BY KIM (bracelets included). Wempe: Exclusively at Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Spring is calling in Carolina Herrera’s landscape threading viscose organza dress ($2,990) and jacket ($2,590). Carolina Herrera:

Little ones and moms alike will

954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552.

fall for the aqua bucket bag in woven cotton by Miss Mochila for Bonpoint. $150. Miss Mochila for Bonpoint: Available at Bonpoint, 805 Madison Ave.

The naked truth is that Stuart Weitzman’s Nudist heel in palette python patent is one sexy shoe for the season. $398. Stuart Weitzman: Available at stuartweitzman.com.

72 QUEST


The Véronique spherical paperweight by Saint-Louis, synonymous with French

Take time to enjoy the flavorful

sophistication since 1586, is crafted

bouquet of SIMI’s dry rosé, which

using the traditional millefiori technique of

was inspired by SIMI matriarch

the mid-19th century. $3,340. Saint-

Isabelle’s rose garden. $27. SIMI:

Louis: To purchase, call 855.240.9740.

Available at select nationwide on-premise accounts and at simiwinery.com.

The impressive craftsmanship and beauty of Lalique’s midnight blue Medusa vase

Don’t be scared to flirt with color

will make you want to

in Isoude’s limited-edition

pick up one in both sizes,

print silk chiffon Watercolor

large ($4,300) and

day dress with crème

small ($995). Lalique:

lambskin trim. $3,905.

609 Madison Ave.,

Isoude: Available

212.355.6550.

at isoude.com.

Born with a silver spoon in your mouth? It’s time to upgrade, with Puiforcat’s cognac beaker in sterling silver. $3,100. Puiforcat: Available by calling 855.240.9740.

Aerin Lauder’s home line is in bloom with the AERIN for Lenox Dogwood Bloom series: dinner plate ($22), accent plate ($19), and party plate ($13). AERIN for Lenox: At neimanmarcus.com.

No one cares for tresses quite like Fekkai—and now, Fekkai has been reawakened with an overhauled product line, including reinvented favorites like the Brilliant Glossing Styling Crème and its famous PrX Reparatives. $14.99–49.99: At fekkai.com.


Fresh Finds

Naomi Fertitta takes us on a written and

Hand-woven in 100% wool, designer James Tufenkian’s

visual journey through

Volos Winterlake rug is available in two sizes to

landmark architecture,

harmoniously fit any space: 3 x 5’ and 12 x 16’. Tufenkian

pious churches, sparkling

New York Showroom: 919 Third Ave., 212.475.2475,

clubs, vibrant theaters,

or tufenkiannewyork.com.

and bustling restaurants in In the Spirit of Harlem (Assouline). $45. Assouline: At assouline.com.

They’ll be like music to her ears: IPPOLITA’s 18-kt. gold rock candy mini lollipop earrings in turquoise. $650. IPPOLITA: Available at ippolita.com.

Stay on your toes—and on trend—in these Ralph Lauren Collection sandals in patent leather. $495. Ralph Lauren Collection: Available online at ralphlauren.com. No bag is sweeter this season than Jimmy Choo’s Candy clutch in neon flame, peppermint, and lime orchid printed acrylic. $975. Jimmy Choo: Available at jimmychoo.com.

DSQUARED2 has you covered in chic with the Mizhar ’50s coat, high-waist Capri jean, golden leaf earrings, golden leaf pump, and hat and clutch, to boot. Prices upon request. DSQUARED2: At dsquared2.com. Snap and go—and know you’re getting the greatest shots possible in the lightest of cameras, with Leica’s functional and fun C model. $699. Leica: At Leica stores, authorized dealers, and leica-camera.com.


Keep things slim with Mujjo’s tan leather iPhone case, designed to carry your iPhone and most important cards in one sleek package. $55. Mujjo: Available at mujjo.com.

Barton Perreira is continuously on the cutting edge of cool, especially with this Rhyging frame in Matte Midnight with November Rain polarized lenses. $510. Barton Perreira: At Barneys New York, Bergdorf Goodman, and Saks Fifth Avenue.

Pick up and go with Jack Spade’s Swedish M90 Cordura Utility Brief in blue and black. $248. Jack Spade: Available at jackspade.com. It’s all in the details at 3x1, where your every fit and fancy is within easy reach. Put on these M4XX05 low-rise straight jeans, and you won’t want to take them off. $265. 3x1: Available at 3x1.us.

Men’s fashion is made easy-breezy with these linen shirts in a custom-dyed range of colors by Sarah Goodbody, London, in collaboration with CJ Laing. $145 each. CJ Laing: 34 Via Mizner, Palm Beach, 561.820.0039 (with a Nantucket location opening this summer).

Hand-crafted details and whimsical color combinations set George Esquivel’s shoes apart from the pack, like these two-tone leather brogues. $720. Esquivel: Available at net-a-porter.com. APRIL 2014 75


AUDAX

GRAND OLD MAN LEGENDARY FINANCIER Billy Salomon

turned 100 years old this month and, to celebrate, his colleagues hosted a dinner for him at the 21 Club, as they have done since his 90th birthday. “How many partners give a dinner for their old boss every year?” Dale Horowitz asks rhetorically. “That in itself is a statement.” Horowitz came to work for Salomon Brothers & Hutzler after graduating from Columbia Law School in 1955. “My father was in the schmatte business. There was nothing fancy about us. But Billy hired people for what he thought they could contribute to the firm, not based on where they came from. It was a true meritocracy, and at times a very tough meritocracy.” Salomon Brothers was founded by three brothers, Arthur, Percy, and Herbert Salomon, in 1910. They started with $5,000 in capital and functioned, originally, as a money broker. William R. Salomon, known as Billy, joined the firm in 1933 at the age of 19 and worked his way up from the bottom. He started as a runner, shuttling documents up and down Wall Street. He was then promoted to the “cages,” where bond certificates were handled. He next worked on trading desks and then became a salesman, visiting a handful of big banking customers on foot from 10:15 a.m. until noon every day. He was made partner in 1944. After his father’s retirement and the death of the uncle who had run the firm and caused internal upheaval, Billy emerged as a leader in 1957 and was named managing partner in 1963. Billy Salomon wanted to move the 76 QUEST

William R. Salomon, who ran Salomon Brothers in the 1960s and 1970s, celebrated his 100th birthday this month.

firm upmarket and recruited an eminent economist, Sidney Homer, to start a bond research department. Homer soon hired the legendary Henry Kaufman to assist him. Billy ushered in an era of phenomenal growth, expanding from bonds to stocks, venturing outside to find new talent, and leading the charge of upstart firms successfully bidding on issues to take business away from the more patrician houses, like Morgan Stanley. Salomon became active in competitive biddings, and in market making in all forms of short and long–term fixed-income securities. In the late ’60s, their expertise extended into corporate bonds and stocks, using the firm’s trading know-how to bid aggressively for large blocks of business with institutional investors or corporate issuers. In 1965, Salomon Brothers decided to apply its

trading skills to the equity business, especially trading large blocks. It soon became Goldman Sachs’ biggest rival. Michael Bloomberg joined this group upon graduating from Harvard Business School in 1966 and became the first member of his business school class to be made a partner at a major Wall Street firm. Through it all, Billy Salomon insisted on a high ethical standard. As he once explained, “We always felt if we did the right thing, profits would take care of themselves.” Reflecting on the current “flash trades” phenomenon, Salomon himself feels the industry is worse off: “Today, you have lightning-fast trading, which no one understands. It’s a vast difference from our more gentlemanly game.” Under Billy’s leadership, the firm rose from the middle of the pack to become one of Wall Street’s powerhouses. Dale Horowitz recalled, “Salaries were low, and Billy refused to let partners withdraw capital so that we could build it up and compete against the white-shoe outfits like Morgan Stanley and Dillon Read. He didn’t want anyone buying big houses or fancy cars. The only thing he encouraged was the contributing of a significant amount of your income to charity.” During this time, even as he built the firm, Salomon fought several serious illnesses: a brain tumor, hip replacement, and heart disease. “Billy had a nose for talent,” Horowitz continues, “His genius lay in knowing what he didn’t know and hiring those that did. We had mathematicians, physicists and all kinds of other brains he brought


Clockwise, from top left: Salomon Brothers was among Wall Street’s powerhouses; William R. Salomon at Salomon Brothers in 1965; Gedale Horowitz, now an executive vice president of Salomon Brothers; Horowitz, Salomon, and Michael Bloomberg at one of Salomon’s birthday dinners; William Simon worked at Salomon Brothers before becoming Secretary of the Treasury; Vincent Murphy, Jr., who became executive managing partner of Salomon Brothers; Sidney Homer and Henry Kaufman, in Salomon Brothers’ heyday.


AUDAX

This page: William R. Salomon’s 100th birthday at the 21 Club. Opposite page: Row 1: Robert Bernhard, Henry Kaufman, Michael Bloomberg, Billy Salomon, John Gutfreund, Dale Horowitz, Jim Wolfensohn, and Ira Harris. Row 2: Charlie McVeigh, Bob LaBlanc, Bob Salomon, Tom Strauss, Stanley Arkin, Allan Fine, Morris Offit, Tom Marron, and Hans Kertess. Row 3: Dick Schmeelk, Peter Gottsegen, Marty Leibowitz, Ray Golden, Bruce Carp, Ken Lipper, Bill McIntosh, Jon Rotenstreich, Bob Quinn, and Mike Meehan.


J U L I E S K A R R AT T P H OTO G R A P H Y

in. But he also set the moral tone. If you cheated on an expense account or put through a bad trade, you were gone, and there was no appeal.” Partner and friend Hans Kertess describes Billy: “He was beyond elegant and got us all pulling in the same direction.” Salomon’s ethics also impressed Ezra Zilkha, scion of the Babylonian merchant and banking family and friend of Billy since 1951. “Billy is a fine banker, completely honest. If there had ever been a problem on his watch, he would have been down at the Federal Reserve Bank the next morning at 8 a.m. to report it.” Lesly Smith, one of Wall Street’s female pioneers, recalls walking from her office at Eastman Dillon Union Securities and across the Salomon Brothers trading floor to have lunch with Billy as well as future Secretary of the Treasury William Simon and Senator Kenneth Keating. She says, “Billy was incredibly athletic. He ran on the beach every day in Southampton, loved deep-sea fishing, and put himself through an Outward Bound course every year.” Other Salomon partners also chimed in. Ken Wilson, co-chairman of the Hospital for Special Surgery (where Billy

was a trustee for 35 years) praised Billy as “a class act with a great sense of humor and unimpeachable integrity.” (The hospital will honor Billy at a gala in June.) Michael Meehan agreed with Wilson, “I can describe Billy in one word: Integrity.” Dick Schmeelk joined Salomon Brothers from the engine room of a submarine and went to work in the “cages” on his way to becoming “Mr. Canada.” “Billy put on a real youth movement. We didn’t have fancy backgrounds but we were workaholics and, in time, knocked off the upper-crust guys. We bid on large bond offerings and got them distributed. Billy would take these huge positions with enormous risk because he had faith in his people to get the distribution.” Ira Harris said, “Billy was such a great leader. I’m excited to be able to celebrate with him. He instilled a philosophy: 1. Loyalty to our clients; 2. Loyalty to the firm; and 3. The need to give back to the system.” And last but not least, there is Michael Bloomberg, who has come to every dinner for Billy Salomon since his 90th birthday—despite the fact that he was fired by the legend! He calls Billy simply, “The Grand Old Man.” Ad Multos Annos! u APRIL 2014 79


MUSIC

BOB HARDWICK WAS born in Louisville, Kentucky, with the gift of perfect pitch. He discovered a love of composing at the tender age of four, and later attended graduate school for music studies. But rather than throw himself into a career in music, he followed in the family’s footsteps and went into banking. Still, he tried to juggle both his career at the U. S. Trust Company and his musical passion. For over a decade, he would run from the office to late-night gigs and back again in the morning. Then one day in 1989, he was playing a Kentucky Derby party in his hometown when he met film star Gregory Peck. Upon hearing of Hardwick’s dual life, Peck had some advice for the financier-cum-musician: “A career in the arts,” the actor proclaimed, “is always preferable.” Hardwick took those words to heart and walked away from the world of banking to start his band, the Bob Hardwick Sound. Peck’s words of wisdom paid off: Hardwick has become one of high society’s favorite acts to book, has played for 80 QUEST

royalty and presidents, and has collaborated with some of the biggest names in classical and contemporary music, from Luciano Pavarotti to Paul McCartney. Hardwick’s signature throwback style makes him a spiritual descendent of the Dorsey brothers, and recalls all the best that old Hollywood bandleaders used to offer. Whether performing at a Palm Beach cotillion or a gala at the American Museum of Natural History—or even at President Obama’s inaugural ball—he brings a lively and danceable class act to every occasion. He has also recently founded a rock/pop band, the Bob Hardwick Sound Sensation. It’s clear that following where his true passion was the right move for Bab Hardwick. As Quest and Q columnist Liz Smith says, “He is a guy who left banking and went into making people happy with his multi-style dance music. (If only more people had left banking.)” u For more information, visit www.bobhardwick.com.

CO U RTE S Y O F B O B H A R D W I C K

SWING AND A HIT


This page, clockwise from top left: Bob Hardwick has played several Presidential inaugural balls, including that of George Bush, Sr.; the Bob Hardwick Sound performed at Rudy Giuliani and Judith Nathan’s wedding in 2003; Bob with Prince Albert of Monaco; the Literacy Partners Evening of Readings gala in 2010. Opposite page: Bob Hardwick found his true calling in music.


DESIGN

“THE DESIRE TO POSSESS, to collect, is inborn—neither male

nor female,” wrote Judith H. Dobrzynski in a New York Times essay about acquiring art. “And as long as there has been art,” she observed, “there have been art collectors.” Indeed, the auctions of the past two years seem to corroborate the persistence and vigor of this impulse in the human psyche. New records were set for Picasso, Vlaminck, Giacometti, Calder, and Yves Klein, as well as for Rothko, Warhol, Basquiat, and Koons. Impressively, almost all of these artists are represented in the sophisticated residences designed by a singular designer, Geoffrey Bradfield. And, in a new book by Jorge S. Arango, Geoffrey Bradfield: Artistic License (Smallwood + Stewart), we are invited inside the homes that Bradfield has masterfully brought to life with some of the greatest artists of our time. As Arango notes in his introduction, Bradfield has kept well ahead of the ever-accelerating fervor for art, identifying emerg82 QUEST

K I M S A R G E N T ( B E X LE Y, O H I O , I N TE R I O R ) ; D U R S TO N S AY LO R ( COV E R I M A G E )

ART OF THE MATTER


This page: Geoffrey Bradfield’s inventiveness at play at the Academy Mansion in New York City, with multiple portraits from the Belle Époque, Gilded Age, and Edwardian eras converging on a single wall (above); Liao Yibai’s “Rose Bag RF” at home in a living room at a Beacon Court residence in Manhattan (below). Opposite page: A gray-tinted backdrop allows art to speak for itself in a Bexley, Ohio, home (above); the

M A R CO R I CC A ( AC A D E MY M A N S I O N ) ; P E TE R RYM W I D ( B E ACO N CO U RT )

cover of Geoffrey Bradfield: Artistic License (below).

ing talents early in their ascent and encouraging his worldly clientele to invest in their work. More recently, he has enthusiastically championed the vibrant contemporary art of China, which is signaled by the fact that Artistic License is the first American dual-language English/Chinese interior design book. Singling out Bradfield’s incisive flair for gauging the art market, Arango points to Bradfield’s “uncanny” intelligence, his foundational knowledge of history and art, and his unstinting demand for quality. The book’s engaging stories and vibrant images of the homes and spaces Bradfield has designed (photographed, principally, by Kim Sargent) reveal how much the designer and his clients relish the thrill of the hunt, as well as the sheer pleasure of living with art. With Bradfield, we learn, clients are more like willing partners, taking risks to achieve their designer’s strong visual point of view. While honoring the unique expression of the artists featured, the book also explores Bradfield’s finely honed, educated approach to taking liberties—his instinctual awareness of when and how to apply the broad brushstrokes against a canvas of subtlety. In other words, it is, above all, about the unbounded rapture and creativity of Artistic License. u


ARCHITECTURE

AS AMERICANS, WE GO FORWARD LOUIS KAHN WAS an American architect trained in the Beaux-Arts tradition, Franklin Delano Roosevelt an architect of the post-war world, and, to honor both men’s triumphs, Four Freedoms Park—a Kahn-designed memorial dedicated to the late president—stands today as a declaration of America’s optimistic spirit. The park sits on the southernmost tip of New York’s Roosevelt Island, offering views of the city’s skylines and local landmarks. Its entrance is marked by five copper beech trees and a lawn—crisp, neatly cut, and vibrantly green—that forms an acute triangle, which points to the southern hemisphere like a compass needle. Surrounding the lawn are littleleaf linden trees, set in allées. Sloping paths reach down from the lawn’s edge to the river’s surface. As visitors walk south toward the end of the island, they’ll find the focal point of the park, a 1,050-pound bronze bust of President Roosevelt by Jo Davidson. Mounted in a niche, the bust stands at the door of what Kahn called “the room,” a 60-foot open square of granite that looks out across the East River at the Untied Nations complex on Manhattan’s east side. Which is fitting, as President Roosevelt was credited

84 QUEST

with coining the term “United Nations.” (Planning for the U.N. began during his administration, too.) When Kahn finished his architectural designs in the early 1970s, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller and New York City Mayor John Lindsay announced plans for Four Freedoms Park. But after Kahn’s death in 1974, the project was put on pause. In fact, for a few decades, the park’s future seemed highly unlikely. Backed into a corner and on the verge of bankruptcy after Rockefeller left New York for Washington to become vice president, the city didn’t have the financial resources and political leadership it needed to complete the memorial. The delay turned into a full discontinuation. In 2005, however, all that changed when former United States ambassador William J. vanden Heuvel renewed the effort to finish the memorial. He spearheaded the revival and helped raise $53 million for the project. And, in October 2013, the park opened to the public. Four Freedoms Park is a memorial, but its memorial tribute is an exercise in subtlety. The park is meant to raise spirits and to honor the freedoms of speech and worship and the freedoms from want and fear—freedoms that define America today. u

IWAN BA AN; COURTESY OF FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


This page clockwise, from top left: Franklin Delano Roosevelt had a long view for America; an aerial view of Four Freedoms Park; a carved granite stone detailing F.D.R.’s four essential human freedoms. Opposite page: Four Freedoms Park is open to visitors six days a week, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., closed on Tuesdays.


CALENDAR

APRIL

From May 9–12, Frieze Art Fair New York will take place on Randall’s Island. The fair, which is accessible by New York Water Taxi, will be open May 9–11, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and May 12, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.463.7488.

1

4

5

7

New York–Presbyterian Hospital’s annual gala, benefiting cardiac services, will take place at the Waldorf=Astoria at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.921.9070.

The South Florida Science Center will celebrate its Aquarium Gala at the Breakers, Palm Beach at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.370.7738.

The Boys and Girls of Palm Beach County will hosts its Barefoot on the Beach event at the Breakers. For more information, call 561.683.3287.

Figure Skating in Harlem will hold its Skating with the Stars gala at Trump Rink, Central Park, at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 646.679.3769.

HIGH-TECH

FEET IN THE SAND

EDGE JUMPS

2

8

The Global Leadership Awards gala will take place at The Plaza. The event will honor individuals who have made contributions to the global public good. For more information, call 212.851.7998.

Henry Street Settlement will celebrate its annual dinner dance at The Plaza at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

3

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

A PUBLIC AFFAIR

LET’S GO DANCING

9

PUPPY LOVE

Canine Companions for Independence will hold its gala at the Grand Hyatt, New York, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 516.330.6457. 86 QUEST

On May 8–12, Art + Design New York will take place at 82Mercer in SoHo. On May 7, a V.I.P. preview will be held at 82Mercer at 5 p.m. Presented by art galleries and dealers, Art + Design New York showcases the best in 3-D art and design. For more information, call 800.563.7632.

Lenox Hill Neighborhood House will hold its Spring Affair benefit at Cipriani 42nd Street at 7 p.m. The evening will honor longtime president and supporter Thomas J. Edelman. For more information, call 212.754.5957.

CO U RTE S Y O F T E M P O RU B ATO ; K J O R DA N F O R A RT + D E S I G N N E W Y O R K

HEALTHY HEARTS


CALENDAR

APRIL

MAY 1

LOVELY LADIES

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America will host its Women of Distinction luncheon at the Waldorf=Astoria. For more information, call 212.254.6677. BRAVA! TO THE BRAVE

The Women’s Refugee Commission will hold the Voices of Courage Awards at Cipriani 42nd Street at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 212.763.8590.

2

AT THE HELM

The 17th annual Sailor’s Ball will take place at the Downtown Association at 60 Pine Street at 11:15 a.m. For more information, call 212.786.3323.

5

DEVOTED AND DEDICATED

On April 3, Canine Companions for Independence will host its 12th annual Hearts and Heroes gala. This annual fundraising event for Canine Companions makes it possible for children and adults with physical and developmental disabilities to maintain their independence. For more information, call 516.330.6457. CHARACTER SKETCH

Authors in Kind will hold its annual luncheon at the Metropolitan Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 212.294.8162.

10 CO U RTE S Y O F C A N I N E CO M PA N I O N S F O R I N D E P E N D E N C E ; CO U RT E S Y O F LE N OX H I LL N E I G H B O R H O O D H O U S E

STOP BULLYING

The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children will host its spring luncheon at The Pierre at noon. For more information, call 212.838.8000. SPARKLING SONGS

The Glimmerglass Festival will hold its Glimmerata gala at the Metropolitan Club at 6 p.m. For more information, call 607.547.0700.

11

PALM BEACH PLUMES

Palm Beach Day Academy will hold its Feather Ball at the Breakers at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.1188.

16

COTILLION SEASON

The Palm Beach Junior Assembly will celebrate its Red Carpet Ball at the Mar-a-Lago Club at 4:15 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.2600.

17

ENRICHING LIVES

The Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club will host its President’s Dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street. For more information, call 212.957.3005.

Relations will hold its gala at the Metropolitan Club at 7 p.m. The event will host prominent dignitaries and leaders in business and the arts. For more information, call 203.298.4722

The Fountain House will host its symposium at The Pierre at 11:15 a.m. For more information, call 212.874.5457.

7

FEMALE ROLE MODELS

Women Who Care will hold its annual luncheon at Cipriani 42nd Street at 11 a.m. For more information, call 917.626.1300.

24

HEY, SOLE SISTERS

The United Sole Sisters will hold its spring luncheon at the Greenwich Country Club at 10 a.m. For more information, call 917.836.5250.

27

FORWARD STRIDES

The Breast Cancer Alliance will celebrate its ninth annual Walk For Hope at Richards of Greenwich at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 203.861.0014.

28

PICTURE PERFECT

The 30th annual Infinity Awards gala will take place at Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.857.0032.

30

O CANADA

The Council for Canadian American

On April 9, Lenox Hill Neighborhood House will host its spring gala benefit at Cipriani 42nd Street at 7 p.m. The evening will honor Thomas J. Edelman, the longtime Neighborhood House president and supporter. For more information, call 212.754.5957. APRIL 2014 87


WHO IS SHANTELL MARTIN

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

88 QUEST


“I love to draw on everything. I kind of have this problem—or this blessing, I don’t know— but when I look at things, I see my drawing on them. It’s just the way my brain works,”

PAU L B A R B E R A

says Shantell Martin.

A COUPLE OF WOMEN approach David X. Prutting of Billy Farrell Agency at an event on the Upper West Side, requesting a picture of themselves for bfanyc. com. (Our readers, of course, are versed in the rigmarole, where guests vie for the attention of the photographers—coyly, and then, with more punch.) I spotted his camera, which was garnished with a sticker reading, “Who Are You.” The statement was so poetic—so clever—that I demanded an explanation. His response introduced me to a talent by the name of Shantell Martin. Martin is an artist who draws—on everything. (In fact, “Drawing on Everything” is the name of the class that she teaches, as a professor at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University.) Her work has appeared on Prutting’s camera, of course, but also “on walls or cars or planes or shoes” and on things like clothing via collaborations with


This page: Martin, drawing with a Staedtler pen (above); the artist’s shoes are decorated with phrases such as “you be you” and “when will we” (below). Opposite page, clockwise from above: a mural; Martin draws, sometimes to record her dreams; the artist addresses the Bowery with her black-and-white

O P P O S I TE PA G E : C ATA L I N A KU LC Z A R ( M U R A L ) ; PAU L B A R B E R A ( B O O K , D E S K ) ; TA LYA S T E I N ( M A N )

C ATA L I N A KU LC Z A R ( P O RT R A I T ) ; PAU L B A R B E R A ( S H O E S )

words; a collaboration with a makeup brand would make sense for Martin, as she enjoys drawing on people; artwork that mimics a clock.

designers like Suno or on an egg for the Fabergé Big Egg Hunt. The lines that Martin draws are demonstrative of a merging of the conscious and subconscious, as enabled by her technique. “I really like the idea of continuous design and having your drawing almost be like water and flowing,” she says. “The pen is going on and off, but it’s continuous as much as it can be. I say, drawing is meditating.” Martin works in black and white, but addresses the gray by weaving bon mots and other messages into her drawing. “For me, words and lines are the same thing,” she says. “I don’t see a distinction. Also, I’m dyslexic, so the way that I write naturally is almost art because it’s not conforming or how the mainstream writes. It’s interesting because I’ll spell things wrong and people try to correct my writing, but they don’t correct my drawing.” She is recognized for her phrases, “Are You You, “Who Are You,” and “You Are You,” but there’s more to read between the lines. Known, perhaps, for her murals, Martin has brought enlightenment to the walls of everything from her bedroom in Brooklyn to the offices of companies such as Viacom and Young & Rubicam. “I like to say, simply, that I draw, and that the scale and medium changes,” she says. “If I’m drawing a big wall, I have to pump myself up and then it’s all about APRIL 2014 00


“If I’m drawing a big wall, I have to pump myself up and then it’s all about big movements and it’s almost like a race.” —Shantell Martin

big movements and it’s almost like a race. I want to attack it and ‘Come on, let’s get this done!’ because there’s so much physical energy that goes into it.” Ultimately, Martin’s successes as an artist are the culmination of discovering an outlet at the age of eight or nine, as the eldest in a family of six children in London. “I think drawing was a way of reclaiming my own space,” she says. “You know, I could create my own world and give that world a name and put characters and people in there.” By the age of 18 or 19, when she was “angry and younger,” she was exploring graffiti, which transitioned into studies at Camberwell College of Arts and then Central Saint Martins. After graduation, she ventured to Japan to work at a school, without knowing the language. “I had stopped drawing,” she says. “I had stopped creating.” But soon, she rediscovered drawing, pursuing her art in Tokyo before rerouting to New York, where she is today. For Martin, art is about the experience—for herself, as well as for others—so she hesitates when it comes to selling her work. “The system that exists now, with galleries and dealers, it almost cuts out the artist’s feelings, in a way,” she says. “I don’t want my work to end up in someone’s storage as an investment.” But thanks to the draw of her style, she is bypassing the traditions of the industry by collaborating with a variety of brands, like Artspace, where admirers are able to purchase her print entitled, “Only one YOU” starting at $200. In 2014, Martin is eager to continue to explore the possibilities of her craft. Maybe she’ll work on a series of swimming pools (“You know, either drawing in them or designing them, but a black-and-white series of swimming pools.”) or the Bowery Mural (“Every time I walk by there, I’m like, why isn’t my drawing on there yet?”). I, for one, can’t wait. u 92 QUEST

“I discovered that drawing to music that you’re not used to or drawing to music that’s almost uncomfortable in a way really creates a different outcome. And there’s something valuable to that,” says Martin. Here, the artist at the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto.


CO N N I E TS A N G


This page: The Madison Avenue entrance of the Morgan Library & Museum, which was renovated by Renzo Piano in 2006. Opposite page: The McKim building after its own renovation, once the private study and library of financier Pierpont Morgan, is now one of the great interiors in New York.

DELIGHT IN THE ERUDITE IT WAS A BIBLIOPHILE’S dream. I had been invited to a book party, or rather, a dinner party to celebrate a book (the difference being that at the first one you mill around trying to nab passing canapés, whereas this was a sit-down, multi-course affair) at the Morgan Library, inside the McKim building. Anyone dining in this golden palace of volumes, this glittering enclave of tomes, this…well, this giant room packed with books, basically... 94 QUEST

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This page: The study, or West Room, has been enriched by a substantive display of works from the collection that surrounded Pierpont Morgan in the early 1900s, when he used the room for personal business. Opposite page: Pierpont’s portait hangs above the mantel. 96 QUEST

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would feel their poet’s soul inspired. People who treasure the smell of bound paper know how magical these places are. We were lucky enough to have a hostess who could offer this impossible setting for the evening. Located at 225 Madison Avenue, the Morgan Library & Museum was founded upon the vast collections of financier John Pierpont Morgan, who luckily had a sharp-eyed curator in his personal librarian, Belle da Costa Greene. For several decades, the place had the atmosphere of someone’s fantastical attic, with warrens of unconnected buildings holding disjointed groups of priceless prints, books, and drawings. This was the antithesis of museums like the meticulously planned Barnes Foundation, but the Morgan managed to project an


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air of authority because of its disarray: after all, if the most important aspect of a collection is its quality, why be bothered with superficial things like interior design? The museum was like academics whose frizzled hair and crooked glasses prove they would rather spend extra time in the morning on finishing a book than on their appearance. Then, in 2006, Italian architect Renzo Piano came in and gave the place a makeover. He renovated the space to bring cohesion, exhibition space, and some much-needed light to the now-unified campus. The result was a perfect balance of intimate and expansive, where there is room to admire all of the small treasures of the collection. Freestanding display easels offer a wonderful way to closely examine the collection’s impressive medieval pieces and other art, giving the viewer a more personal relationship than if it was left hanging on a wall or behind glass. Following the success of that renovation, the McKim building, which had been Pierpont Morgan’s private study and library, underwent the most extensive restoration since its construction more than one hundred years ago. This page: The marble surfaces and mosaic panels are signature features of the McKim rotunda. Opposite page: Visitors are now allowed to look into the vault that Morgan had built to house his favorite objects. The shelves of the vault have been filled with original storage boxes as well as books and small works of art. APRIL 2014 99


The changes included new lighting, restored period furniture, and opening Belle da Costa Greene’s office to the public. This was a more modern, more approachable library, and one that reflected that McKim was indeed, as Director William M. Griswold puts it, “the heart and soul” of the musuem. The Morgan Library & Museum was reborn as one of New York’s great jewels, not only offering wonderful exhibits—like the current one about everyone’s favorite childhood story, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince—but also a spectacular place to hold events. After dinner, a couple of us snuck off to the study vault. We coerced someone to show us in, though it was very much after hours. We were absolutely not to touch anything. We swore we just wanted to peek in, and must have seemed respectable enough, because we were soon sighing with pleasure at being able to enjoy a place that had obviously been designed by and for those of us who love books. And, despite temptations, we behaved. u This page: The library, or East room, has a decorative ceiling by noted muralist Henry Siddons Mowbray (1858–1928). Opposite page: The room’s grand fireplace and sixteenth-century tapestry, surrounded by display cases that exhibit some of the Morgan’s most valued objects from its medieval holdings and renowned collections of rare books and literary, historical, and music manuscripts. 100 QUEST


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NEW YORK ART GALLERIES P R O D U C E D B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D W I T H ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN AND ALEX R. TRAVERS


New York has long been the perfect place to blend the grit and star radiance of the art world. From SoHo and Chelsea to the storied institutions of the Upper East Side, galleries have the power to touch the nerves of collectors as they continue to refine their tastes.

This spread: An installation of Vadis Turner’s “Swamp” (left) E M I LY A N D R E W S

and “Daybreak” (right) at Jack Geary Contemporary.

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Gallery founder and owner Jack Geary (right) assists with an installation; a view of Jack Geary Contemporary’s window (inset).

JACK GEARY CONTEMPORARY 185 Varick Street; 347.901.9197

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There’s a palpable sense of new beginnings at 185 Varick Street, situated smack on King Street, where SoHo hasn’t quite ended and TriBeCa hasn’t quite begun. It’s a corner of the city nestled squarely in the middle of downtown and yet wholly apart; there’s a vast sense of openness and possibility. Outside, Varick Street shepherds traffic southward to the gateway out of New York City—the Holland Tunnel. Inside, behind floor-to-ceiling glass windows that flood the space with a brilliant natural light, starkly painted white walls surround a russet-hued terrazzo floor. This seems like a gallery space if ever there was one. Equally fresh-faced are Jack Geary, who opened his permanent gallery here just a few months ago, and Dolly Bross Geary, Jack’s wife and the gallery’s director. —Daniel Cappello

Leila Heller with “Healing Blossoms” by Ran Hwang; the gallery with an exhibition by Ayad Alkadhi

LEILA HELLER GALLERY / 568 West 25th Street; 212.249.7695 As a gallery owner my passion has always been helping to establish the careers of young artists. When the work of these artists can really stand alongside the work of the most established contemporary artists and Modern masters, that is a telling sign that these artists will endure the test of time. This is why one of the focuses of my gallery has always been to include my artists in art historical, curated group shows, and to invite some of the most prestigious curators and scholars to collaborate with us on these exhibitions. My expansion to 57th Street will precisely allow me to continue to develop my gallery’s program along these lines, and this is what I am most excited for. —Leila Heller 104 QUEST

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(inset).


ACQUAVELLA GALLERIES

© T H E E S TATE O F J E A N - M I C H E L B A S Q U I AT / A DA G P, PA R I S / A R S , N E W Y O R K 2 0 1 4

18 East 79th Street; 212.734.6300 Founded by Nicholas Acquavella in 1925, this tony, family-run Upper East Side gallery is now directed by his son, William and grandchildren Eleanor, Nicholas and Alexander. On May 1, the gallery will present “Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawings from the Schorr Family Collection,” an exhibition of works by Jean-Michel Basquiat curated by Fred Hoffman. The show will feature 22 works on paper and two paintings from the collection of Herbert and Lenore Schorr, who were the artist’s devoted collectors, supporters, and friends. “We have had the pleasure of knowing Herb and Lenore Schorr for over 30 years, and are delighted to present the first exhibition on their important collection of works by Jean-Michel Basquiat,” says William Acquavella. “Focusing on the significance of drawing in Basquiat’s practice, we are pleased to show these remarkable works on paper, many of which are being exhibited to the public for the first time.”

Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled (Boxing Ring),” one of the highlights of Acquavella Galleries’ “JeanMichel Basquiat Drawings from the Schorr Family Collection” exhibition, which begins May 1. The façade of Acquavella Galleries (inset).

W. M. BRADY & CO.

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22 East 80th Street; 212.249.7212

Guercino’s “St. Francis Hearing Celestial Music”; Mark Brady, W. M. Brady & Co.’s founder (inset).

Established by Mark Brady in 1987 in New York, W. M. Brady & Co. specializes in Old Master and 19th-century drawings, paintings, and sculpture, primarily of the Italian, French, and English schools. “The drawing by Guercino is a fine example of the Bolognese and Baroque artist’s work from the mid-1630s—executed in brush and brown wash and ink, almost like a painting on paper, and characterized by true religious fervour,” says Director Laura Bennett. “Although not connected to any known painting, it was most likely a design for a small, devotional picture.” Another one of the galleries current stars is a drawing by by Eugène Delacroix, “Arab Chieftain.” “The Delacroix drawing is interesting and important in that it dates to his first and seminal trip to Morocco in April 1832. Delacroix was one of the first French artists to take an interest in capturing the people and landscapes of North Africa. The present drawing depicts Sidi Mohammed Ben Abou Ben Abdelmalek, military chief and commander of the Tangiers cavalry, who accompanied Delacroix and the Comte de Mornay on their travels in Morocco in 1832.”—Laura Bennett APRIL 2014 105


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Robert Mangold’s “Compound Ring I,”

PACE GALLERY

2011. Mangold’s exhibition at Pace Gallery’s

32 East 57th Street and 508, 510, and 534 West 25th Street; 212.929.7000

510 West 25th Street location will open on April 4; Pace Gallery’s 534 West 25th Street gallery, which will showcase Adam Pendleton’s silkscreen works and a large-screen video on April 4 (inset).

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Pace Gallery’s exhibitions are one of a kind. They’re artful gifts of observation, inspiration, and culture. Founded by Arne Glimcher in Boston in 1960 and led by Marc Glimcher, Pace Gallery continues to be at the forefront of the art world. In its hands, artworks take on the rich texture of a detailed narrative, not contoured by hype. The gallery puts its focus where it should be: on crafting exquisite shows. From April 4 through May 3, Pace Gallery’s 510 West 25th Street location will present new works by the artist Robert Mangold, all of which were completed between 2011 and 2014. Mangold’s new works (an example is pictured above) “continue to explore the classic elements of composition—shape, line, and color—in a series of 10 canvases.” Today, Pace has seven locations worldwide: four in New York, two in London, and a gallery in Beijing. Over the past five decades, the gallery has mounted more than 700 exhibitions, including scholarly shows that have subsequently travelled to museums, and has published nearly 400 exhibition catalogues. Great galleries. Great artists. Great experiences. —Alex R. Travers


WALLY FINDLAY GALLERIES

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124 East 57th Street; 212.421.5390 Wally Findlay Galleries is celebrating 50 years at its 57th Street location in New York, but its story begins in 1870, which is when the Metropolitan Museum and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts opened their doors and William Wadsworth Findlay founded his first gallery in Kansas City, Missouri. Today, as a dealer to individuals, institutions, and corporate collectors alike, Wally Findlay Galleries identifies and supports artists with extraordinary ability in their respective mediums. The mission of Wally Findlay “is to promote and provide quality works by great artistic talents, which is achieved by practicing the highest standards in our relationships with both the artist and the collector.” It is Wally Findlay’s firm belief that both good taste and uncompromising credibility are priceless commodities. Today, the legacy of committed fine-art excellence is continued by the company’s chairman and C.E.O., James R. Borynack, who acquired the company in late 1998.

“Dans La Rue” by Nicola Simbari; the gallery, which has locations in New York and in Palm Beach.

BONNI BENRUBI GALLERY 41 East 57th Street, 13th Floor; 212.888.6007

“Untitled CO U RTE S Y O F B O N N I B E N RU B I G A LLE RY

(Ceiling Still Life)” by Jed Devine; a view of the gallery, featuring an exhibition of works by Devine (inset).

Bonni Benrubi Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new work by Jed Devine. The exhibition, which will feature images focused on the interior spaces of the artist’s daily life and experience, represents a significant new development in the career of this important photographer. “I switched to smaller cameras when my inner ears stopped working and left me unbalanced,” explained Devine. “I switched to digital cameras when Kodak stopped making my film and started blowing up its buildings. Blessings come disguised. Everything was new again. Captures and shooting raw. More spontaneous, more flexible, more surprising. Now every device is in part a camera and everyone is a photographer. I’m one of them. These pictures were not made as a distinct group or in one location. They were made along with landscapes, interiors, and street photos in Massachusetts, Maine, New York, Tuscany, and Rome. Anything with light on it seems like possible subject matter to me. I photograph where I am and what is there. I prefer the inclusive response to the exclusive concept. I look at pictures and I make pictures because I love to.” APRIL 2014 107


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NEW YORK TRANSFORMED BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

This page: The tower of the RCA Building (now the General Electric Building) at 570 Lexington Avenue. The crown of the tower with its open tracery with gold outlining, copper finials, and 54foot effigies. Robert A. M. Stern calls it “one of the most inventive of all the romantic towers in New York.” Opposite page: Stylized mailboxes in the lobby of the RCA Victor Building (1929–1931).


This page: Park Avenue and 51st Street with its open tracks,before they were buried beneath the avenue, 1905 (top); Eliot and John Cross (inset). Opposite page, clockwise from top left: 25 Sutton Place, built in 1928. Rosario Candela designed the floor plans and façade while Cross & Cross were the supervising architects; the Tiffany Building, begun in 1939, opened to the public in October 1940, the largest column-free merchandising hall in the country; the Central Hanover Bank branch; the George Whitney house at 120 East 80th Street; One Sutton Place South by Cross & Cross and Rosario Candela, completed in 1926; 57th Street and Avenue A (now Sutton Place), circa 1920; 155 East 72nd Street, completed in 1928; in 1919, Cross & Cross partnered with James Carpenter to build 4 East 66th Street; 720 Park Avenue, completed in 1930; the Lewis Spencer Morris House, completed in 1923,

JOHN AND ELIOT CROSS formed their architectural practice in New York in 1907. The Beaux Arts–trained John and Harvard-educated Eliot were soon part of the group of well-connected architects positioned to participate in the rapidly changing cityscape of early 20th–century New York. At that time, the city was on the verge of dramatic change. It was a city of low-rise buildings in neighborhoods rife with tenements, stables, slaughterhouses, breweries, and factories. Two very important developments that were occurring were the building of new subway lines, and the lowering of the Vanderbilts’ New York Central Railroad tracks beneath Park Avenue. Before the latter construction, those tracks were a dirty eyesore running down the middle of Manhattan. Taking advantage of these monumental changes, the Cross brothers, who were already busy designing houses, estates, clubs, offices, and banks, began to take advantage of this progress by initiating and financing their own developments, including participating in the founding of their own real estate firm, Webb & Knapp, which often worked alongside Cross & Cross. Peter Pennoyer and Anne Walker have just published the 110 QUEST

brothers’ story, the fourth of a series of monographs that they have written and published on important American architects— Delano & Aldrich, Warren & Wetmore, Grosvenor Atterbury— with presiding influence in New York. The book is New York Transformed: The Architecture of Cross & Cross (Monacelli Press) with a foreward by Robert A. M. Stern. The least known of the aforementioned architects, the Cross brothers frequently joined other architects in partnership as associate or supervising architects including Candela, Eggers & Higgins, and Warren & Wetmore, to handle the larger and more complex projects than any one firm could handle. Their interest in Webb & Knapp was groundbreaking (although such a thing was then frowned upon by the American Institute of Architects) and also gave them the opportunity to share in the field of property development. Webb & Knapp continues to this day, under an aegis associated with William Zeckendorf, Sr., who joined the firm in 1938. Pennoyer and Walker’s history of these architect brothers in this beautifully illustrated book is the history of real estate development and architecture of New York City in the 20th century. u

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at 116 East 80th Street; 150 East 73rd Street also completed in 1923.


This page: “Burmas” by Olga de Amaral; Agnès Monplaisir (inset). Opposite page: “Estelas” by Olga de Amaral, whose works are “just stunning,” says Monplaisir.


THE TRUE BEAUTY OF ART

DIEGO AMARAL

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“I HAVE BEEN IN love with art ever since I was a teenager,” says Agnès Monplaisir, owner of the Galerie Agnès Monplaisir in Paris. “From then on I knew I wanted to work in the art world and with artists. I have since tried to immerse myself into the history of the art I promote.” As an art dealer, Monplaisir believes it is important to understand the history of the art she represents. She has explored many periods, regions, and types of art, including Modern art, Japanese stamps, and furniture (whether its from the 1800s or of the Art Deco period). She is also educated

on African, pre-Columbian, Egyptian, Roman, and Greek art. This integral knowledge has helped her to marry the right piece to the right collector. “My most important and prized collectors are those who buy with passion, and who utilize all their senses to experience the art they pursue,” Monplaisir explains. And her clientele—a list full of bold-faced names—appreciates that dedication. “I believe that everyone has their own sensibility and tastes. No two collectors or collections are alike. Each collector is unique and his or her collection will reflect that.” APRIL 2014 113


Does Monplaisir have any particular clients who stand out in her memory? “Yves Saint Laurent was a favorite of mine,” she recalls. “When he visited my gallery and browsed my collections he would spend the same amount of time in front of my well-known pieces as he would in front of one of my new artists’ works. Reputation meant less than the quality of the work and the feeling it evoked for him.” Monplaisir is constantly searching for what’s next in the art world. “I like to discover new artists and I am open to finding artists from all walks of life. As it happens, even my collectors have made me discover artists.” And she enjoys this pattern of influence. “It is not just the gallery that can popularize an artist, but much more the public. A gallery promotes an artist and creates a desire and the public adopts it if it sees value. As a gallery owner, my vision is for the public and my collectors to feel that desire to discover the same way I do every day. That is the true beauty of art: the discovery of something you had not seen or experienced before.” Currently Monplaisir is looking forward to the SP-Arte fair next month in São Paulo, Brazil. She proclaims that the reason she loves participating in art fairs is that they entice a wider audience within a select portion of the public that has the same vision as she does. This year, she will be displaying one of her most beloved artists, Olga de Amaral. “Her works are just stunning and represent everything I look for in an artist,” gushes Monplaisir. “I work with artists who focus on the best parts of humanity, nature, the beauty of earth, humor, and dreams. I want humanity to progress with these qualities.” Other favorites of hers include Igor Mitoraj, one of today’s foremost contemporary sculptors; Do König Vassilakis, a German sculptor whose pieces are excecuted with exactness and simplicity; Marcos Coelho Benjamin, who uses worn-out materials with rough surfaces; and Daniel Hourde, whose figures appear to be full of movement. With an eye for the eclectic and a knack for history, Monplaisir is truly a talent for the industry to gravitate around. u Above: “Untitled” (2013) by the Brazilian-born Marcos Coelho Benjamin. The artist uses worn-out materials, like zinc, to add tactile value to his pieces. 114 QUEST

For more information or to learn more about the artists, visit www.agnesmonplaisir.com.


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Above: Marcos Coelho Benjamin’s “Untitled” (2012) in rusted zinc.


A FAMILY’S LANDMARKS B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

THE ZECKENDORF FAMILY have a long history of influencing New York City’s skyline, and now the latest generation carry on this birthright with a new 44-story tower at 50 United Nations Plaza. It all started with William Zeckendorf, Sr., the real-estate mogul who, through his company Webb and Knapp, owned and developed iconic city landmarks like the Chrystler building and the Hotel Astor. He worked with legendary architects like I. M. Pei and Le Corbusier, and seemed to be making his way to the annals of great and glamorous real-estate tycoons. Then he went bankrupt. He had dreamed too big and lacked the funds to follow through on those dreams. His son, William Zeckendorf, Jr., similarly left his fingerprints all over the horizon of Manhattan’s buildings. In the

early ’80s, he gambled that the Upper West Side needed a 35-story luxury condominium when most thought the neighborhood too uncertain for that market. His bet paid off. He is credited with revival of Union Square and other neighborhoods, thanks to his work on the Mayfair Hotel, One Worldwide Plaza, 4 Columbus Circle, and more. But, like his father, his passion was not sufficiently underwritten, and he, too, fell into financial hardship. Learning from their past, the current Zeckendorf developers, Arthur and William Lie, have only had their ancestors’ success, and none of their missteps. By approaching each of their projects one at a time, they have developed some of the toniest addresses in the city. 15 Central Park West, where celebrities, bankers,


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A rendering of the infinity edge swimming pool and lounge of the penthouse of 50 United Nations Plaza, the a 44-story condo tower on the East Side that will be Lord Norman Foster’s first residential commission in the United States. APRIL 2014 117


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This page: The Manhattan skyline that the Zeckendorfs have influenced for generations (above); Arthur and William Lie Zeckendorf with a model of 50 U.N. Plaza (right). Opposite page, clockwise from left: A rendering of the tower; William Zeckendorf, Sr., the first of the family to become a real

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estate mogul; a biography of WIlliam, whose deals were studied and revered.

and bold-faced names call home, was the first ultra-luxury residential tower of theirs that garnered attention. They followed that up with the elite 18 Gramercy Park, which, on top of the incredible amenities their projects are known for, has the cachet of the Gramercy address. Now, the Zuckendorfs have teamed up with Lord Norman Foster and Foster + Partners to create 50 United Nations Plaza. The tower will include 88 condominium residences, ranging from one-bedrooms of 1,100 square feet to full-floor units with two master bedrooms. The residences have deep bay windows that offer breathtaking views of the East River on one side and the Manhattan skyline on the other. Vast expanses of glass and stainless steel make the building feel modern but timeless, and it also offers the best perk for New York: a private motor court and parking garage. Dubbed “the ultimate global address”—because of its location in regards to the United Nations building, which guarantees a world-wide and upscale clientele—the tower is another testament to the family tradition of bringing beauty to the city’s skyline.And they will not be resting on their laurels: now that this development is sure to be a success, they announced their plans for a 51-story luxury condominium at 520 Park Avenue. Clearly, the Zeckendorf name will continue to echo through the streets of New York. u


ENERGIZING THE ART WORLD BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

This page: Blue skies hover above the 280,000square-foot tent that houses Frieze New York on Randall’s Island. Frieze New York will take place May 9–12. Opposite page: This year, kurimanzutto will show Gabriel Kuri’s “Self Portrait as Negative Chart” (2012).


G R A H A M C A R LO W; CO U RT E S Y O F KU R I M A NZ U T TO

THE ARMORY SHOW is over, the Whitney Biennial is winding down, and Frieze

magazine founders Amanda Sharp and Matthew Slotover are on their way to the Big Apple to put the final touches on Frieze New York, one of today’s most innovative art fairs. When they arrive in town, they’ll check on the 280,000-squarefoot tent, revisit a few galleries, take in the museum shows, and eat at some of New York’s hottest restaurants, eateries that will, no doubt, have outposts at the fair when it opens on May 9. Their trip will be filled with adventure. A new kind of adventure, that is. So when visitors disembark on Randall’s Island for the third year of Frieze, they’ll be in for some surprises. That sense of the unexpected is the driving force behind Frieze. The founders make a habit of challenging conventions, first focusing on merit over expansion— throwing down a gauntlet to cash-craving competitors like the Armory Show— then holding Frieze on the hard-to-get-to Randall’s Island, and now underscoring “play” and “free time” as this year’s themes. But it’s not fair to pin the program down as being rebellious or frivolous. So much effort and research goes into APRIL 2014 121


This page, clockwise from top left: This year, a tribute will be devoted to Allen Ruppersberg’s “Al’s Grand Hotel” in the form of a fully functional hotel; Pavel Büchler’s “Honest Work (Parole)”; a five-channel video installation by Zhang Peili. Opposite page: Ella Kruglyanskaya’s “Reading Bather” (above); Lurie’s “Lolita”

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(1962) will be on view at The Box, LA’s booth (below).


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screening galleries that Frieze actually projects a more accurate image of the global, competitive art world in the United States than other party-centric fairs like Art Basel Miami, say, or Scope. “We’ve found that to be a very good discipline for us,” explains Slotover of the vetting process, “especially having seen other fairs grow enormously, because, while you can make more money that way, the quality often goes down and people can’t find anything.” His remark is a testament to the wellspring of stimulating artworks and projects that Frieze offers each year. In fact, the fair’s directors encourage galleries to showcase both emerging and established voices, giving gallerists a new canvas on which to paint. As for the location, says co-founder Sharp, “I think we did something pretty significant by putting it on Randall’s Island. We’ve gone to an area that is intrinsically part of New York—actually a part of Manhattan—and yet it’s unfamiliar to many Manhattanites.” And since the island’s history is associated with recreational activities and sports, Frieze’s themes of play and free time feel entirely appropriate. According to Frieze Projects curator Cecilia Alemani, this year’s site-specific artists are encouraged to react to the location of the fair and to “create new spaces of social interaction.” Which means that the possibilities to provoke are endless. Alemani lets us in on a few secrets, however: The installation artist Naama Tsabar will organize a mini music festival; Koki Tanaka, whose work deals with the possibilities of choice, will invite representatives from local communities to share their experiences and life stories; and Marie Lorenz, a lover of strong tidal currents, will take viewers on boat trips to explore the shores of Randall’s Island. Also, Alemani APRIL 2014 123


This page: Look for Alex Katz’s “Tulips 4,” at the Gavin Brown’s Enterprise booth at Frieze New York this year (above); After David Zwirner’s popular Yayoi Kusama exhibition in 2013, it’s no wonder he’ll be offering more of the artist’s works for sale at Frieze: “Infinity Net GMBKA,” acrylic on canvas (below).

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says, “look out for a surreal soccer field with goals covered by glass.” (Talk about moving the goalposts, artistically and literally.) Since two of Alemani’s passions are philosophy and aesthetics, it’s easy to see why she’s continually tapped to helm Frieze Projects. Each year, the outdoor sculpture program echoes the pioneering spirit of the fair. The restaurants are irresistible, too. Last year the Fat Radish, Frankies Spuntino, Mission Chinese Food, Roberta’s, and Sant Ambroeus all served their signature dishes at the fair. Perhaps a lot of them will return this year, except, obviously, Mission Chinese Food, which closed. In late 2013, however, Mission Chinese Food owner Danny Bowien opened Mission Cantina, and fans followed. But in New York, it’s a known fact that people follow the food. Slotover caught on to this: “We know our people love food, but we didn’t quite realize how much until we did this fair.” (A note to Slotover: One visitor told me she went to Roberta’s at Frieze last year just because there was “never a wait.” She also said, “Oh, and the art was amazing.”) Now, as the dominant figures of the contemporary art world get ready to land on Randall’s Island for Frieze’s third goround, art lovers wait in anticipation. It’s become one of the most talked-about events in the art world; more people—artists, critics, curators, fans—are paying attention, as well. It seems the fair’s directors and curators are keenly aware that New York’s hyper, art-packed month of March is wrapping up. And when the craze ends, Frieze’s story is just beginning. u

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Opposite page: Shana Lutker’s “New Research Concerning the Fistfights of the Surrealists” (above); “Library II-II,” a mixed-media work by Liu Wei (below).


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BESPOKE, BE CREATIVE, BE BETTER B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

WITH A BREAKFAST so legendary A. A. Gill wrote a book about it, The Wolseley’s status as one of London’s most august eateries is well documented. But it’s not just the food or spotting celebrities “having a cuppa” that draws the crowds; it’s the feeling of old-school glamour that the décor engenders. The Art Deco interior evokes the grand cafés of Europe with its vaulted ceilings, polished marble, and huge chandeliers. It’s easy to imagine Ingrid Bergman tucked away at one of the small tables, waiting for Bogie to finally catch up to her. The architect and interior designer responsible for that atmosphere, David Collins, was a man who brought that kind of cozy luxury to spaces around the world. From New York to Moscow, he designed restaurants, hotels, and private homes with an eye to Inspired by the old-world glamour of the grand cafés of Europe, David Collins designed The Wolseley for restaurateurs Chris Corbin and Jeremy King in 2003. 126 QUEST


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make a romantic but grand environment. “I do not deliberately set out to create something glamorous just for the sake of it, but I do think that my role is to try to make sure that anything I do has a sense of quality and aesthetics that contribute towards making people feel good about themselves,” he claimed. “This means that the surroundings, be it the colors, fabrics, or textures are designed to enhance the experience. Beauty surrounds us, but it is often hidden, overwhelmed by the excesses of what else is present. My job is to expose and exploit the beauty in my work.” His particular attention to the details that make people look good—using flattering lighting and aged mirrors to soften reflections—made for a loyal stable of clients, which started with London’s elite and reached to include notable admirers like Madonna. She commissioned him to decorate her homes, design a friend’s nightclub in Miami, and even gave him a The apartment penthouse suite at the Connaught is a prime example of David Collins’ cultivated design aesthetic, combining his signature palette of blues and lavenders with beautifully curated decorative artworks; ABCDCS: David Collins Design will be published in May by Assouline. APRIL 2014 129


writing credit on one of her songs in the late 1990s. The two remained great friends until his death last year at the age of 58, and for his upcoming book, published posthumously this May by Assouline, she wrote a tender and personal introduction. “He took to calling me Muriel after we saw Muriel’s Wedding, because he said it was sacrilegious and downright ridiculous to say my name in public or private,” she wrote. “Yes, I miss his good taste, his recommendations, and his never-ending knowledge of all things chic and beautiful. But mostly I miss his big, beautiful, generous heart.” The book, ABCDCS: David Collins Studio, goes through the alphabet (the “ABC” of the title) of his favorite design ideals, and explains his process of creating the beautiful interiors splashed across every page. A personal look at Collins’ influences and inspirations, the book reveals how he sought to create simple but timeless beauty in the world. The places he designed still resonate with the credo of his design firm: “Bespoke, be creative, be better.” u For more information or to pre-order ABCDCS: David Collins Studio, please visit www.assouline.com 130 QUEST

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“Beauty surrounds us, but it is often hidden, overwhelmed by the excesses of what else is present. My job is to expose and exploit the beauty in my work.”


The Delaunay café-restaurant opened on London’s Aldwych in 2011. Operated by Chris Corbin and Jeremy King, it shares the European grand café aesthetic of the Wolseley, its sister restaurant.


For more information and tickets, please visit nybg.org


GUEST APPEARANCES

DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY BY NICOLE HANLEY MELLON

FOR SELF-PROCLAIMED homebodies such as Matthew and me, 2014 enjoyed quite a whirlwind start. Perhaps it had something to do with Matthew’s turning 50 in January, or the fact that our oneyear-old started not just to walk but run, but the year thus far has been anything but prosaic chez Mellon. Beginning January 28, Matthew’s birthday: We headed downtown to celebrate the launch of La Marque, the brainchild 138 QUEST

of Meredith Melling and Valerie Boster, who left top-tier positions at Vogue to launch their exciting new fashion consultancy venture. At the party, held in Meredith’s new NoHo home, we caught up with what felt like the majority of the fashion industry, including Robert Burke, Stephanie LaCava, Genevieve Jones, Allison Aston, and Lauren Remington Platt. Afterward, I took Matthew to Carbone for a romantic birthday din-

ner, where we bumped into Chris Burch and spotted Kate Hudson across the room—shhh! The very next night, Lesley Schulhof threw a friend-filled birthday for her husband, David Schulhof. We started New York Fashion Week with a perfect night in our neighborhood to attend Antoine Arnault’s opening of the Berluti store, seeing Derek Blasberg, Diana Picasso, Stacy Engman, and Frédéric Fekkai and Shirin von

B I LLY FA R R E LL A G E N C Y

Veronica Miele Beard and Veronica Swanson Beard; Diane von Furstenberg, Anna Wintour, Jenna Lyons, and Tory Burch; Misha Nonoo.


Clockwise from top left: Moncler Grenoble’s Fall 2014 presentation; the Museum of the City of New York co-chairs, including Mark Gilbertson (right);

B I LLY FA R R E LL A G E N C Y / S H A H A R A Z R A N

Nicole and Matthew Mellon; Valerie Boster and Meredith Melling; Steve Van Zandt and Emmanuel Jal; Justin Timberlake; Waris Ahluwalia.

Wulffen before wandering over to a lovely dinner at Doubles, hosted by the always gracious Mark Gilbertson. In attendance were Jill Fairchild, Amy Fine Collins, Elisabeth Saint-Amand, Debbie Bancroft, and Jim Fallon. One of the standout presentations of Fashion Week was Moncler Grenoble, delivering a spectacular presentation that transformed the Hammerstein Ballroom into a unique audio-visual experience featuring the Pendulum Choir. We always look forward to toasting Diane von Furstenberg, who is celebrating the 40th anniversary of her wrap dress, and we were thrilled to congratulate CFDA/ Vogue Fashion Fund finalists Misha Nonoo and the two Veronica Beards on their continued successes in the industry! Speaking of fashion, Matthew and I have been working hard designing our own women’s ready-to-wear line, HANLEY MELLON! In fall 2013, we launched at www.hanleymellon.com, which serves to help our readers “slice through the content noise” by presenting consumers with a clear and confident selection of product and of real-life experience. Our line, which will debut this fall 2014, consists of a 10-piece collection that, together, may be styled to make more than 50 looks. It’s the ultimate building-block wardrobe, particularly well purposed for the woman on the go! (We revealed a sneak peek of the collection at Matthew’s 50th birthday party. My sister, Merrill Curtis, and I wore versions of the top and skirt with signature buttons down the back… Stay tuned!)

Matthew and I are lucky to have enjoyed so many memorable evenings recently, but Matthew’s 50th was one of the best, surrounded by all of our closest friends and family at the Four Seasons Restaurant. We danced the night away under a shower of fireworks to a surprise ABBA tribute band that was sneaked into the evening by my parents, Allie and Lee Hanley, with the hand of Bob Hardwick! (You never know what to expect from this family...) There to join us were Merrill and Ashton Curtis, Icy and Scott Frantz, Hilary Geary and Wilbur Ross, assorted Mellons, the Meigher Family, Harry LeFrak, Travis Acquavella, Travis and Nick Acquavella, Dino Lalvani, Lindsay Lohan, Dori Cooperman, Serena Boardman, Alex von Furstenberg, Ali Kay, Amy Fine Collins, Vikram Chatwal, Laura and Harry Slatkin, the Winklevoss twins, and on and on… Before we had a moment to breathe, we joined Mark Gilbertson along with co-chairs Calvert Moore, Burwell Schorr, Sara Ayres, Alexia Hamm Ryan, Tara Rockefeller, Allison Rockefeller, and Andrew Roosevelt to support the Museum of the City of New York. The event, held at the Pierre and sponsored by Dennis Basso, was the museum’s most successful event to date. It turned into another fantastic night on the dance floor, where we bumped into Frederick Anderson, Marisa Noel Brown, and Alexandra and Louis Rose. We were quite startled to learn that we all knew the words to Miley Cyrus’s latest song—eek! On March 6, we had the great honor of

joining Steve Van Zandt and Emmanuel Jal to celebrate the work of Nancy Hunt and Nile Rodgers (who is fresh off of his three-Grammy win) and their global organization, the We Are Family Foundation (WAFF). WAFF recognizes and honors teen leaders, like Lulu Cerone, who spoke at the event. Their compassion for others has motivated them to make an extraordinary impact in the world. Matthew and I are completely enthused by what these young individuals are accomplishing and love that WAFF nurtures, encourages, and supports these amazing teens as they work as individuals as well as together to make the world a better place. We boogyied to Nile’s “Chic” with Ann Coulter, Elizabeth Meigher, Kimberly and Greg Thornbury, Ben Bram, Simon and Michaela and Simon de Pury, Cornelia Guest, Monique Coleman, Kathy and Teddy Wong, Kate Pierson of the B-52s, Susan Rockefeller, Rosanna Scotto, and Jeni Stepanek (Mattie’s mom). Our final night out, after dropping Minty Mellon off with a friend to the completely rocking sixth-grade dance at Doubles, we headed downtown to the Taymour Grahne Gallery for the Africa Central launch party, which celebrated artist Hassan Jajjaj. We just missed Chelsea Clinton but got to catch up with Hadeel Ibrahim and Ozwald Boateng. Did I mention we managed to squeeze in a Justin Timberlake performance at Madison Square Garden? If the past months have been any indication of what is to come, it looks like we’ll be dancing all the way through to 2015! u APRIL 2014 139


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST From a performance of Sweeney Todd by the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall to the Young Fellows Ball at the Frick Collection, the month was awash with culture for our columnist. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Bryn Terfel and Emma Thompson on stage in Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street at the New York Philharmonic’s Spring

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Gala on March 5.

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Bonnie Morrison and Logan Horne at the Cinema Society after-party of Only Lovers Left Alive.

Drew Grant, Kane Manera, and Savanna Hoge at Chalk Point Kitchen and the Handy Liquor Bar.

Crystal Renn at Chalk Point Kitchen and the Handy Liquor Bar with the Cinema Society.

Ian Bradley, Mike Nouveau, and Steven Rojas dipped into the arts and crafts at Peasant.

James Marshall and Elettra Wiedemann with

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glasses of Modus 2011 from Ruffino Winery.

May Kwok painted a plate at an event hosted by Elettra

Rumbough siblings Siena, Cole, and Kiera at

Wiedemann and Ruffino Winery at Peasant.

a New York City Mission Society event.

ON A DAY in the midwinter—bleak, frosty winds made moan, etc.—I was warmed at Peasant, where Elettra Wiedemann hosted a Tuscan-style dinner with Ruffino Winery. Guests, including Claire Distenfeld, Dana Drori, Katie Gallagher, Darrell Hartman, and Steven Rojas, were wined on Modus 2011 and, also, dined on fare that was fit for a king, or un re, like grilled rib-eye, mushroom risotto, and roast suckling pig. On March 5, Alex Polkinghorn and I attended the Spring Gala for the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall,

which premiered Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street with Bryn Terfel and Emma Thompson in her debut on the stages of New York. The performance was supreme, as was spying Bernadette Peters and Meryl Streep and, oh, Stephen Sondheim in the audience. On the 12th, the Cinema Society and Stefano Tonchi of W magazine hosted a screening of Only Lovers Left Alive starring Tilda Swinton. Set in Detroit and Tangier, the film is about vampires named Adam and Eve and, like Sweeney Todd, is APRIL 2014 141


a tale of blood and gore but, also, of heart. The after-party at Chalk Point Kitchen and the Handy Liquor Bar—the newest in It spots—was attended by people with the nocturnality of the characters in Only Lovers Left Alive, including Waris Ahluwalia, Vikram Chatwal, Shane Kidd, Rachel Roy, and Anna Sui. Also on the 12th, the New York City Mission Society held its Champions for Children gala at the Plaza Hotel. The after-party, which took place at Doubles, featured Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin, Jihad Harkeem, and Cole Rumbough boogying to tunes in a space that has been called the velvet tongue... On the 13th, PAULE KA sponsored the Young Fellows Ball at the Frick Collection, themed the “Celestial Ball.” A pregame with Savannah Engel and Patti Ruiz-Healy as well as Anne de la Mothe Karoubi—who termed the event “our Met

Cat Dewey, and Rebecca Regan at the Frick Collection.

Ball” because, yes—and then a hop, skip, and jump to One East 70th Street. There, chairs Olivia Chantecaille, Astrid Hill Dattilo, Lydia Fenet, Clare McKeon, Sloan Overstrom, Joann Pailey, Maggy Frances Schultz, and Rickie De Sole Webster sparkled beneath a ceiling of constellations. Relishing in a spin around the museum, I bumped into Edward Barsamian, Leah Bourne, Sam Dangremond, Martin Dawson, Stacy Engman, Christie Fennebresque, Carson Griffith, Alixe Laughlin, Melanie Lazenby, Rebecca Regan, and more of the 600 guests— too many of whom complimented my black-and-white dress, designed by the brilliant Wes Gordon (and worn by Kerry Washington to the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner). My evening ended with a box of madeleines, courtesy of Financier Patisserie... u

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Melanie Lazenby, Vanessa Grout,


Alexandra Porter and Tristan Bultman at an event sponsored by PAULE KE at the Frick Collection.

Sara Peters and Alex Overstrom at the Young Fellows Ball, themed the “Celestial Ball.”

Hannah Bronfman at the Young Fellows Ball at the Frick Collection on March 13.

Justin Kush and Margaret Pennoyer beneath a ceiling of constellations.

Caroline Rupert, Jose Sotto Mayor Matoso, and Eugenie York danced to music by DJ Jason Fioto on March 13.

Isabella di Stefano and Carl Evander at the Frick Collection for the “Celestial Ball.”

Kate Horvitz and Chester Patterson enjoyed catering by Olivier Cheng on March 13.

Micaela English, Julia Flynn, and Sudha Chinniah in the

Linnea Wilson and Cator Sparks dressed

Garden Court at the Frick Collection.

in “ethereal” black-tie on March 13. APRIL 2014 143


SNAPSHOT

This page: The desk of explorer Roy Chapman Andrews, director of the American Museum of Natural History, 1935-1942 (above); a behind-thescenes peek at the archives (below).

“I CAN REMEMBER just 10 times when I had really narrow escapes from death,” said explorer Roy Chapman Andrews, who served as director of the American Museum of Natural History from 1935 to 1942. “Two were from drowning in typhoons, one was when our boat was charged by a wounded whale, once my wife and I were nearly eaten by wild dogs, once we were in great danger from fanatical lama priests, two were close calls when I fell over cliffs, once was nearly caught by a huge python, and twice I might have been killed by bandits.” Andrews, who is said to be the inspiration of the character of Dr. Henry Jones, Jr., or Indiana Jones, is known for his expeditions to the region of Gobi throughout the 1920s. In 1923, an assistant on his team by the name of George Olsen 144 QUEST

discovered a batch of dinosaur eggs in the desert, thereby providing the world with evidence about how dinosaurs reproduced. Before his return, Andrews was able to collect 25 dinosaur eggs as well as the skeleton of a dinosaur that was discovered near the nests. Another trek by Andrews to the area reaped a fossil of the largest example of a herbivore mammal in existence, called Indricotherium. Today, these specimens are displayed on the fourth floor of the museum at 79th Street and Central Park West. In his autobiography, Under a Lucky Star, Andrews remembers being “like a rabbit, happy only when I could run out of the doors.” And for that, everyone from historians and scientists to the variety of visitors who continue to explore the museum are thankful. —Elizabeth Quinn Brown

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Quest April 2014  

The Art & Design Issue