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$5.00 MARCH 2017

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THE SPRING STYLE ISSUE

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2016 HAS BEEN OUR BEST YEAR SINCE 1922. 2016 was our single best year since 1922. With closed sales volume of $3.1 billion, Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty ranked #1 of all privately-owned, Long Island-based, residential real estate companies in 2016, and maintained one of the nation’s highest overall average sales prices.

25%

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Sale Volume $3.1B (Up 25%)

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Manhasset, NY – South Strathmore Sunny, brick Center Hall Colonial offering 4 bedrooms, living room with fireplace, formal dining room and eat-in kitchen. This home is set elegantly on a flat property with private yard. Close to school, shopping and transportation. SD #6. MLS# 2912665. $1,399,000. Rose Troia, 516.627.4440 ext.116, c.917.696.2259 Rula Baki, 516.627.4440 ext.229, c.917.674.8984

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140 136

CONTENTS The S pring STyle i SSue 102

KICKING AROUND 212 FIFTH AVENUE

Devoted to environmental causes, Kathleen

“Kick” Kennedy is poised to carry her family name into the future. We found her equally poised in the latest spring fashions at the illustrious new condominiums at 212 Fifth Avenue.

114

QUEST STYLE

by

elizabeTh Meigher,

phoTographed by

Julie SkarraTT

As legendary desinger Ralph Lauren once declared, “Fashion is over

quickly. Style is forever.” Here are some perfect examples. by elizabeTh Meigher

124

J’ADORE, NOW AND EVERMORE

The magic behind the illustrations in the new

book Dior by Mats Gustafson (Rizzoli). Gustafson’s renderings of the fashion house’s collections give a vibrant view of the spirit behind each look. by lily hoagland

132

I WENT TO A MARVELOUS PARTY

From the January 2012 archives, Georgina

Schaeffer’s account of the Preservation of Palm Beach’s dinner dance.

136

PARIS RUNWAYS: THE COUTURE COLLECTION

A look back at some fantastic

styles that dazzled the runways of Paris in 1995, when some very different silhouettes were considered chic and à la mode. phoTographed by Mary hillard

140

ELIZABETH KENNEDY’S CONTEMPORARY CLASSICS

Elizabeth Kennedy is

bringing back a heightened sense of drama to women’s eveningwear, combining sculptural lines with added theatrical twists and trains. by daniel Cappello

124


152

74

78

CONTENTS C oluMnS 26

SOCIAL DIARY

72

HARRY BENSON

74

TAKI

76

CANTEENS

78

FRESH FINDS

Threads and things, ready for spring. by daniel Cappello and elizabeTh Meigher

82

AT THE VEAU

The joys of building, and the pain of dismanteling, a proper library. by MiChael ThoMaS

86

AUDAX

88

ART

90

PALM BEACH STYLE

92

DESIGN

94

LIFESTYLE

98

OPEN HOUSE

100

SOCIAL CALENDAR

148

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

152

SNAPSHOT

New York and Los Angeles and the social scene.

by

david paTriCk ColuMbia

A serendipitous technical malfunction while snapping Princess Diana in Oxford.

Snobbery in society—and how it can be useful in the right hands. by Taki TheodoraCopuloS The beloved brand of Sant Ambroeus finds a home in Palm Beach. by daniel Cappello

Jamie MacGuire’s Real Lace Revisited updates the original history of Society as we know it.

Pablo Zorilla creates works of art as centerpices in the Dominican Republic. by kaTe gubelMann Sitting down with the interior designer Jennifer Garrigues.

Interior designer Gil Walsh tells us about her past and love of color.

by

by

l ily h oagland

a lex TraverS

The residences at the iconic 1 Hotel & Homes South Beach is for the discerning global citizen. This townhome in Carnegie Hill offers a sophisticated lifestyle in a family-friendly atmosphere. Our guide to the gatherings to be seen at through the month of March. Celebrating cinema, music, models, and virtual reality.

by

alex TraverS

From 30,000 feet with love: fashionable designs for the friendly skies. by daniel Cappello

78


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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TERRY ALLEN HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN ANNIE WATT


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EDITOR’S LETTER

This page: Anna Wintour and actress Blake Lively in a cacophony of beautiful prints on the Michael Kors front row this year (left); Jane Fonda and Elsa Martinelli front row at Yves Saint Laurent’s fashion show in Paris, 1965 (left).

24 QUEST

danas to attendees before his show to honor the #tiedtogether movement, which supports solidarity, unity, and inclusiveness; and Mara Hoffman’s show was dedicated “to the women who are constantly creating in the name of change.” Looks like the runway is one of this year’s literal platforms for political statements. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy in Carolina Herrera’s strapless gingham gown and Verdura’s pearl scarf necklace and pearl drop earrings on the penthouse terrace of 212 Fifth Avenue. Photographed by Julie Skarratt as part of our cover story, “Kicking Around 212 Fifth Avenue.”

G I A N C A R LO B OT T I

I IMAGINE SOME wonderfully elegant editor of the old guard being shown to her second-row seat this year at the fashion show of an equally venerable designer—your de la Rentas, your Herreras, your Valentinos—and being dismayed at what has happened to the sanctity of the once-holy front row. She thinks: First, they starting seating celebrities next to me, when the front row was previously reserved for the buyers and editors, and I did not speak out. Then, they started seating models next to me, and I did not speak out. Then, they started seating reality T.V. stars next to me, and I did not speak out (though there was a great deal of eye-rolling, rest assured). Now, they’ve littered the row with social media influencers and style bloggers, with their phones blocking each other’s pictures, and they no longer seat me there at all. A couple of years from now, she will be invited with the status of SRO (standing room only)—the fashion world’s version of Robert Louis Stevenson’s black spot—and she will flee to the hills to live among the Grizzly bears, who will mistake her for one of their own thanks to her outdated fur collection. New York Fashion Week hit the city with its usual shows, pop-up events, and late-night revelry this month. The most noticeable difference from previous years was the tone: many designers put forth a more politically charged collection than we’d seen from them before. For example, Creatures of Comfort had a model wearing a blue long-sleeved shirt that read “We are all Human Beings;” Calvin Klein sent white ban-


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY UPSTAIRS/DOWNSTAIRS and around the town. When I lived in Los Angeles, I knew a woman prominent in the community named Edie Goetz. Edie was the daughter of the ultimate mogul of the glory days of Hollywood, Louis B. Mayer. She and her sister Irene Selznick were real Hol-

lywood princesses by design as well as ambition, and their father was the hands-down king. In her day when she was ne plus ultra as the hostess of the movieland elite. She was famous for her house—which was mainly a social and entertainment center—as well as a large and important art

collection. Most especially she was known for her table where only the crème de la crème of Hollywood and visiting poobahs from New York and elsewhere were seated to dine. Being a child of MGM, Edie liked everything to work like a perfectly edited Technicolor musical.

And it did, for them. Grand as the grandest, her dinner parties were a cut above all others. Billy Wilder once told me that knowing after a day on the set, going to Edie Goetz’ for dinner was fun. Edie’s secret was her management capabilities. Always in the role of the princess,

T H E S I X T H A N N UA L C AT H O L I C C H A R I T I E S C A R I TA S D E I B I S H O P ’ S G A L A AT T H E B R E A K E R S

Mila and Brian Mulroney 26 QUEST

Lourdes and Pepe Fanjul, Jr.

Allegra and Calixto Garcia-Velez IV

Kathy and Paul Leone

Cathie and Andres Fanjul

Leo and Kathryn Vecellio

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Pepe Fanjul, Gerald M. Barbarito and Emilia Fanjul


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連接全球資深買家與曼哈頓豪華地產的橋

East Side Manhattan Brokerage 38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065. © MMXVII Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal housing opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B O B A N D L I Z A P U L I TZ E R C A L H O U N H O ST E D A R EC E P T I O N I N PA L M B E AC H FO R T H E N E W YO R K S C H O O L O F I N T E R I O R D E S I G N

Judith Guest, Stephen Murray and Nellie Benoit

her executive abilities were shrouded in silk chiffon, but they weren’t accidental. I was reminded of this specifically one night when I went up to her house, Holmby, to pick her up to take her R. J. Wagner’s birthday party (his 53rd). While waiting for her in the Billie Haines-designed library with the van Gogh self-portrait over the fireplace, I had a brief conversation with her butler Lodge, who had only recently come to work for Madam having come from the Royal Household in London. I asked him how he liked living in Southern California. “Oh very much sir,” Lodge answered. 28 QUEST

Liza Pulitzer Calhoun, Mark Gilbertson and Grace Meigher

Jodie King, Virginia Burke and David Sprouls

We chatted about the newness of living in Southern California and its culture, compared to the UK. A Yorkshire man by birth, he was a very nice man, kind and efficient. Then I asked him a question that I knew was not “proper” but I was curious, I asked: how did he like working for Madam? “Oh very much, sir; very much,” he replied; then adding, “She’s very much like the Queen.” “The Queen? Queen Elizabeth?” I was surprised because there was nothing about Lodge’s personality to indicate a tendency to exaggerate or flatter.

“No, not the Queen Elizabeth,” Lodge corrected, “but the Queen Mother.” I could tell he was being entirely sincere. Knowing Edie—a very American, very Hollywood persona, royal in a way, in her own serious attitude—I didn’t grasp the similarity. “How is she like the Queen Mother?” “The way she treats her staff, sir. The staff comes first.” Ah, I see. I learned something that made sense. Common sense. He told me the Queen Mother, whom he had worked for, loved the company of her staff and it wasn’t unlike her to spend time with

Clelia Zacharias and Jamie Stream

them at the end of an evening or on weekends in Windsor. On our way over to the Wagner birthday dinner, I told Edie about my conversation with Lodge, how he liked his job and why. “Gee!” she gasped, in the same manner a movie fan would be warmly acknowledged by a major movie star. Edie was very impressed, and highly flattered. That was the ultimate compliment in her book. Recounting this story in my Diary online, I received the following email from a reader in Arizona who recalled another smart woman who managed her staff brilliantly: “I chauffeured Estee Lauder

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A around town from 1979–99. For the first few years it was ‘off-the-books’…cash. Around ’83 we all went ‘on-the-books.’ She took good care of those who worked for her. Great tipper too. Even though I was being paid a great salary, she always slipped me a C-note upon arriving home! In 1999, I retired. When I told Madam that I was retiring and moving to Arizona, she was VERY good to me.That was definitely ‘off-the-books.’ New York Fashion Week. Fall fashion was presented over several days last month. Over the past ten years or so, the NYFW has morphed into an entertainment as much as, if not moreso, than a business proposition where designers

presented their “looks” for the upcoming season. For decades, beginning in the late 1940s after the Second World War, these shows were held in Seventh Avenue designer showrooms in order for retailers to assess and buy their garments for the upcoming merchandising seasons. The audiences were often small, depending on the size of the designer’s showroom. By the 1960s, with the American Fashion industry growing to accommodate the national prosperity and the growing population, the venues began to expand. Some of them took on the accommodation of Show Business. In the mid-1960s, a New York

designer, Cuban-born Luis Estevez, held his Fall Fashion preview in the St. James Theater with its background sets of the smash hit musical Hello Dolly for his runway, although that kind of fashion spectacle was still a rara avis. By the ’90s, with the industry continuing to expand, they were held in the tents in Bryant Park behind the New York Public Library, accommodating literally hundreds attending a show. Moving right along with the transition, some major designers—Marc Jacobs comes to mind—brought the spectacle into fashion. Jacobs’ shows became more than displaying a fashion line, with their inference of social

(with a small “s”) commentary. By then the audience, which still included the industry assessing the marketability of the garments, had become celebrity-conscious to the point where the best seats in the house were given not only to the buyers (and major shoppers) but to T.V., recording, and film and celebrities. If you read about in the papers or magazines (aside from WWD which still focused on the merchandise), you probably would remember the show not from the collection on the runway from who was seated in the front row. A couple of years ago, for example, Kim Kardashian, front row center with infant child on her

THE FRIENDS OF THE BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA’S WINTER PERFORMANCE AT L I N C O L N C E N T E R

Donald and Vera Blinken with Sylvia Hemingway and Ferenc Kumin 30 QUEST

Kristina Ratut, Nicholas Ratut, Cheri Kaufman and George Ledes

Kathryn Forgan and Stanley Rumbough

Noel V. Lateef and Daisy Soros

Julie Tobey, Stephen Benko and Stephanie Stokes

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A knee, next to the child’s father Kanye West. The designer? Who remembers those things? There were, and still are, exceptions to this “fashion” of fashion shows, maintained by at least a dozen major designers such as Carolina Herrera, Oscar de la Renta, Dennis Basso, to name only three. But the tents are gone, and the shows are in all kinds of venues all over town,

mainly in the lower half of Manhattan. Now there are scores, if not hundreds of “shows” staged by designers and design organizations. What is most notable is the change in fashion and what has influenced it, particularly quasi- or semi-nudity—at least partly Kardashian-ized, not to mention popular pornography as well as fetishism (thanks to the Internet).

Just glancing at the photos this season, sent via email by designers and their fashion publicists, many of the “newer” designers’ creations look almost like Halloween costumes. They speak, and sometimes even growl or shriek. They presage a very weird delusion about ourselves. My words are not meant to be caustic or ridiculing. I mean them literally. The fashions

speak in a way that is the polar opposite of the fashions of the era I was born into. These are sociological matters, which is what fashion presages. Those of us the big city are witnessing the departure we’ve made culturally. Fashion speaks all the time, to us and of us. The designers are carrying the message of the Zeitgeist. The current message is often not pretty, quite literally. Some

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Julie Cummings and Dede Merck 32 QUEST

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Cathy Flagg and Pat Johnson

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C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A look more like post-Modern Art. Quite a bit is ugly, as if that were the intention. As a former retailer with an awareness of what the American contemporary women of the past four decades needed and wanted in fashion, it is difficult to grasp the change that has occurred in our collective unconscious. In many instances, much of it has a suggestion of violence to it. Ripped, torn, sharp, dark, harsh strong colors. Fashion, and how it is displayed/worn, are the Truth of our society—how we see it and additionally how others see it on us. When I think of American fashion of the previous era, I think of Babe Paley. A woman who came of age in the third quarter of the 20th cen-

tury, Mrs. Paley was very well known and very well liked, by both men and women. The way she dressed reflected the way she lived. That was her art. She was a privileged woman socially. She was not, in today’s context, a liberated woman. She wasn’t quite of that generation. But she had the liberation of money—able to buy and do things that those of us without money cannot do. Her clothes spoke of it. Her fashion was her pastiche in life. She was a modern woman. But she was also a man’s possession. It’s my guess that it was her natural grace that was the main attraction. You can see it in the face. There is an innocence, but a kind of naivete there. Her fashion was

her art—and of the time in which she lived (1915–1978). It looked so right it looked effortless. Women know that is not the result of effortlessness, but the result of a person, a personality, and a personal relationship to the world around her. All women liked to look at her and marvel. There was no neon, no bling, no loud and clear, or move-over-darlin’. It was simple, innately beautiful, even divine and, worn with that grace that was the woman’s real secret. Those are now diamonds in the Rough. On the books. The bright young woman of New York. One mild night last month I went over to the Upper East Side apartment of Sheila and Tom Wolfe for a book party they were hosting for their

daughter Alexandra who has just published Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story (Simon & Schuster). I knew nothing about the book as I never saw an invitation (mine was an email from the author), nor had I heard about its content. Alexandra and I have known each other for quite a few years (even though she’s a kid to me). We met through one of those phone calls where the journalist calls to ask what I think of this or that social New York character. Very often they’re only looking for a quote they can use to brighten up the story. Alexandra, who is also a person very easy to laugh, was then working for the New York Observer. She is a great interviewer, and she

T H E H O R T I C U LT U R A L S O C I E T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S F I F T H A N N U A L “ G R E E N B E A N B A S H ”

Kim Nemser

Katherine Birch, Kamie Lightburn and Paige Boller 34 QUEST

Paige Betz

Suzanne Dawson

Chris Evans

Amy Pompea and Ashley Rotunno

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E D R E YFO O S S C H O O L O F T H E A R TS AT T H E F L A G L E R ’ S K E N A N PAV I L I O N

Russell Nype and Gail Gordon

also laughs at all my stupid jokes. She must bring that out in people. Anyway, it’s always very flattering. (She has a great laugh too.) So on my way to the party, I got into the elevator with a man who was also going to the same party and had known about the book. He told me that Alexandra had been covering Silicon Valley for quite some time and this book was about a project of Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley tycoon (Hulk Hogan, anybody?), and a backer of Donald Trump’s Presidency, who has made several fortunes from his investments. The project involves showing people how there 36 QUEST

Mary Hilliard with Susan and Bruce Watts

Toby and Janet Pell

Donna Long with Bill and Wendy Fritz

Rick Rose and Anka Palitz

are alternatives to pursuing a future without a college education. Mr. Thiel’s fellows (the twenty chosen) are given $100,000 to spend on whatever project they decide. The idea isn’t to discourage college educations but to encourage innovation, inventiveness, imagination and foresight. Among other characteristics. It’s not so much innovative as a revival of the old tried and true ways. I always use Henry Ford as an example of what people can do without a college degree. Back at the beginning of the Automotive Age, a farmer’s son (whose father consid-

ered him lazy), young Henry (he was a very young man then—with a natural high mechanical aptitude and accompanying curiosity) could see that the Steam Engine could change the life of all farmers (and we were a nation of farmers at the time). His project was making a car. For the people, not the elite. That car grew into a civilizational movement that dominates the entire civilization a century later. I get the impression that Peter Thiel is all for encouraging that kind of life-changing Project. Alexandra’s Valley of the Gods is about some of the individuals who applied for

Rupert and Catherine Vaughan Williams

the Thiel “fellowships.” Brilliance, eccentricity, imagination, foibles and intense personalities often come with the mental package of the simplest inventions. So, I get to the party; the Wolfes’ apartment is jammed – entrance gallery, library, living room. Wall-to-wall people and everyone having a great and jolly chat. Tom Wolfe was in one crowded room surrounded by friends and admirers enjoying pleasant conversation. The author herself was nearby, sporting a glass of champagne and having a laugh with another author, Vicky Ward. Alexandra Wolfe is a very

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Lisa and Jeremy Jeffery


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A smart young woman. I almost want to say “girl” but she’s probably in her early 30s (or late 20s). And she’s an excellent journalist, covering her subjects with a thoroughness that is often concealed by her very bright and sharp conversation. But sometimes it seems there’s something about me that makes her laugh all the time. She was doing that that night. Maybe it was the champagne? I asked her to inscribe my copy of the book and she wrote: “Dear David, Thank you so much for the years of hilarious lunches….Love, A.” I was very flattered that she thought of our lunches that way although I don’t think of myself as that “hilarious”—

leaving me to wonder what it is about me that makes her laugh all the time. Maybe I should look in the mirror? More bright girls of Manhattan. On a Tuesday night, Joy Ingham invited me to go to the opening night of Jill Kargman at the Café Carlyle. A born-and-bred New Yorker— the daughter Coco and Arie Kopelman—she is a familiar social figure in Manhattan because of her parents. I first heard about her talents when she co-wrote some best-selling chick-lit novels. But then Jill, the stand-up comedienne, emerged in the public eye. Six years ago, she spoke at a City Harvest luncheon. She’d just written a

new book, Sometimes I Feel Like a Nut, which was then on the New York Times bestseller list. It was my job to introduce her. I had heard she was a very funny speaker, although I’d never heard her, nor had I read anything she’d written. When she came up to the podium, she made a couple gracious statements about being there. The perfect lady. Then she jumped off into telling us about her life, and soon people are guffawing. The first laughs come as a surprise because at the outset her story sounded very serious. Her material is at times not for the faint-hearted or morally rigid, but the delivery is so in-

geniously, hysterically funny, she’s gotcha whether you like it or not. Special. I can liken her only to Joan Rivers in her approach. She’s a naturally classy lady. But the comedy is zany-brainy, wit-silly hilarious commentary on herself, her family, her world, our world, the world. Off-stage, so to speak, she’s a bright, attractive, young East Side matron in appearance; wife, and mother with three young children. She told me at the time that she doesn’t get but two hours a day to write. The rest of the time is daily life with three little ones. I’d seen her popular BRAVO show, Odd Mom Out (adapted from her novel

S A N F R A N C I S C O G E N E R A L H O S P I TA L ’ S H E R O E S A N D H E A R TS L U N C H EO N

John Noonan and Lisa Hauswirth 38 QUEST

Emily Brakebill and Rich Peterson

Leah Albert and Susie Sarlo

Susan Ehrlich

Nancy Bechtle and Art Agnos

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Charlotte Shultz and Willie Brown


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A THE OVARIAN CANCER “WHISPER” HOSTED ITS 16TH ANNUAL “ T I M E I S O F T H E E S S E N C E L U N C H EO N ” AT M A R - A - L A G O

Laura Linney and Jennifer McGrath

“Momzilla”) which is now going into its third season. She not only stars in it as a Manhattan young mother, but she also created and wrote it. Tuesday night at the Carlyle, however, was to learn more. The Café Carlyle, is a nightclub, a cabaret. Bobby Short reigned there for more than three decades. Woody Allen plays there part of the year on Monday nights with a Jazz Band. Judy Collins plays the Café Carlyle, as does Steve Tyrell. The last time I saw Debbie Reynolds perform was there. The late great Elaine Stritch performed there regularly. And now Jill Kargman, 40 QUEST

Fern Fodiman and Jennifer Ashton

Anne Messer and Alloha McGraw

Manhattan mama, social commentator for her entire generation; former Yalie, chick-lit novelist, T.V. star, is the headliner. And she sings too! She’s also a great impressionist. And she’s got a great voice. Broadway will beckon. There’s a natural ease in her stage presence like that of a veteran. Dressed in black, accompanied by her musical director, Pablo. She sang eight songs to accompany her bits. And you laugh. She’s gotcha, like I said; and always with the big wide sweet warm smile on her face, like she’s having a good time too. I left the Café Carlyle that night with the feeling I had seen at

Kristy Pressly and Liz Yavinsky

an enormous talent that is only beginning to flourish despite her already great success. More Wolfes are around. Early last month, I received a book by Tom Wolfe, called The Kingdom of Speech. I was sent the book by Tom and Diahn McGrath who were hosting a dinner benefiting PEN at their apartment in midmonth, with Mr. Wolfe as the guest of honor. Like many people, I’m a longtime reader of Tom Wolfe. I don’t want to use the word “fan” because it implies “pop,” and although he’s been an innovator in the literary world of “pop” in the 1960s, his novels have the weight

Frances Fisher and Jen Brown

Ted and Gail Cooney

of sharp commentary on the American scene of the last half of the 20th century. So. On a Sunday morning I was having my coffee at my desk, and looking over the Times, and The Kingdom of Speech was sitting there waiting to be read. I had no idea what it was about. I assumed it was a novel. I picked it up thinking I should read enough to get a grasp of it before the McGrath’s dinner. That was about 10:30 a.m. The Kingdom of Speech is not a novel, although the characters therein, like all characters in Tom Wolfe’s stories, could be in a novel. The book is about, what the title says: SPEECH.

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Judy Snyder, Valerie Goldfein and Andrea Stark


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y O F PA L M B E A C H C E L E B R AT E D T H E O P E N I N G O F I T S “ C U B A” E X H I B I T I O N

Wally and Betsy Turner

Words. Sentences. Conversations. Books. Speeches. Life. I could not put this book down. I had no expectations and frankly very little knowledge of that which was imparted therein. It’s not long—170 pages—and at 4:30 in the afternoon I finished it. It’s the first time I can recall ever picking up a book and reading the whole book in one sitting (I did get up to make myself some lunch to eat while reading). The human being is the only animal among us who speaks language. The story as he tells it begins with Charles Darwin (The Origins of Species) and moves into a liter42 QUEST

Diane Brocato with Rene and Jeanie Alonso

David and Kat Dickenson with Jeremy Johnson

ary drama involving Darwin and several other characters, and tells us the story of the study of language. If someone told me that they had read a book about the history (wrong word but it will do) of language and that they couldn’t stop reading it, I would probably first think, that wouldn’t be me. The secret is always in the story, of course, but the “compelling” comes from the author. This is a book about anthropology, and the way Tom Wolfe tells the story, you keep turning the pages to find out what will happen. It could be a novel. It certainly has the characters, and they give you

Carole Lucas

Priscilla Balbinder and Peggy Balla

insight into the characters around us today. In Memoriam. Barbara Carroll, the great American jazz pianist and cabaret artist of the last seventy years, had died here in New York, after a brief illness. She had celebrated her 92nd birthday on January 25th. Barbara was a very good friend and a longtime friend, to me, and to many. She was a woman who kept up her friendships. For example, she and her friend Sylvia Syms, considered by Frank Sinatra to be “the world’s greatest saloon singer,” talked every night by phone, when they were back in their apartments

after their gigs. Until one night in May in 1992, when Sylvia was performing at the Oak Room in the Algonquin, and she died. On stage. Heaven was blessed, was how her friend Barbara put it on hearing the sad news. I first knew of Barbara Carroll from a three-CD album called An Evening with The Erteguns, a collection of recordings of several major cabaret performers, all of whom had been recorded by Ahmet Ertegun on his Atlantic Records label. That was in 1988. I remember it well, because right away I’d bought the CD and was playing it frequently. Lisa Drew, the editor of the

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Jeff Alderton and Ross Meltzer


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A R AYMO N D F . K R AV I S C E N T E R FO R T H E P E R FO R M I N G A R TS PA L M B E AC H AU C T I O N

Colleen and Michael Bracci

Debbie Reynolds book I’d written, was in Los Angeles to help us edit the final manuscript, and staying with me. One night after dinner I told her about this album I’d been listening to a lot, particularly one artist, a woman named Barbara Carroll. “Oh, Barbara Carroll,” Lisa responded, “she’s a friend of mine.” Lisa’s brother had been a music critic for a Milwaukee newspaper and whenever he came to New York to cover the scene, he always wrote about his favorite, Barbara Carroll. Coincidentally, at that moment Lisa told me the story, Barbara happened to be playing at the Westwood Marquis 44 QUEST

Ted and Cindy Mandes

Ed and Jen Dudnyk

JoAnna and Stephen Myers

Hotel over in Westwood. So we went over Westwood to see her. When Barbara took her break, we were introduced. Barbara Carole Coopersmith grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts. I grew up sixty miles west, and we shared the New England sensibility as kids who dreamed of going to the big city (New York) to make our lives. That was part of our original bond. Talking about music and her career one day, she told me that as a teenager who was already planning to make a career of her music. In 1947, when she was 22, the girl decided to come to New York and seek her for-

tunes as a jazz pianist. In those days, the city was still loaded with jazz joints, jazz clubs which were a big part of the draw of Manhattan nightlife. She took the professional name Barbara Carroll. The gentle softness of the sound of it reflects its owner perfectly as a person, and as an artist. In 1947, there were not a lot of women jazz pianists working. When she found an agent who would send her out for gigs, he suggested she go as “Bobby Carroll” because he knew the bookers wouldn’t hire a female jazz musician, piano or no. So she’d show up for the job and the manager would tell

Christine and Martin Rivard

Gina and Jeff Sabean

her, he was waiting for a Bobby Carroll, to which she’d reply, “I’m Bobby Carroll.” Oh. Whatever disappointment the manager might have had in learning her true gender, it quickly passed because the girl good and her music was hot, and sweet, like her heroes and heroines. Leonard Feather, composer, producer and music journalist of the great era in American jazz declared in that Barbara Carroll “was the first girl ever to play bebop.” In 1948, she had her own trio with Chuck Wayne on guitar and Clyde Lombardi on bass. They did a brief gig with Benny Goodman. The

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Bill and Jill Wachter with James Meany


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| 561.301.2211

CRISTINA.CONDON@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM CRISTINACONDON.COM

PALM BEACH BROKERAGE 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

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kid from Worcester was in with the masters and she was only 23. Her style of pianoforte was as gentle as her demeanor. Her power on the keyboard, however, was something else. She had played the ivories for eighty-five years. Her dexterity, her touch was strong as gentle as was the lady playing. The guys in the trio changed. Charlie Byrd replaced Wayne and Joe Shulman replaced Lombardi. In the early 1950s, the trio worked on Broadway onstage in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Me and Juliet. Barbara married Joe Shulman in 1954. Three years later, he died suddenly of a heart attack. He was 33. She was 29. A few years later, she married agent and bandleader Bert Block with whom she had an adored daughter, mother of Barbara’s grandchildren. When I came back to New York to live in the early ’90s, Barbara was playing the

Bemelman’s Bar in Hotel Carlyle, a gig she’d held since the early 1980s. It wasn’t an easy room for a gentle jazz pianist usually without a bass for support. Nevertheless legions of longtime fans returned to the room frequently for years just to quietly revel in the wit and romance and jazz she produced night after night, often competing with the cocktail audience until the later hours when everyone had settled in for her. During the seasonal breaks at Bemelman’s, Barbara toured, playing several engagements across the country, beginning in Palm Beach and ending in Los Angeles/Westwood. She was a very stable, serious girl who loved all culture and especially the theatre and the concerts. As sophisticated as she was as an artist and in her style and manner, that New England upbringing kept her very grounded. She lived her life simply, no matter

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A how comfortable. And the piano was always played and played and played. I was surprised when she turned 90. I hadn’t ever thought of her in terms of age. She was older than I but her youthfulness was so entirely in her spirit, that she had no age; she was just a wonderful friend. In the last few years, she’d grown vaguely frail. It wasn’t as if it were sapping her energy because her innate elegance prevailed. She was playing Birdland on weekends, as well as occasional concerts both public and private. I saw her at Birdland last year. She

gave an hour or ninety minutes concert, with her great friend and long time accompanist Jay Leonhart on bass. She was indefatigable, always gracious, kind, sensitive, and she Loved music. She started playing when she was eight and by the time she was a teenager—the late 1930s when radio was in bloom—she used to walk around the family house saying she wished she had been born black. It upset her Jewish mother so much she’d respond to her daughter, ‘what’s wrong with us?’ She laughed at the memory of those days.

The African-American jazz musicians were her heroes and heroines. Her masters. She was just a lovely, lovely person; like an angel. And when she sat down at that keyboard, and looking it over as if to say, ‘what’re we gonna do today, are you ready for it?’ she’d touch a note, and then another, and then begin to gently riff, falling into a tune, taking us with her. She recorded several albums on the Afternine label. I keep them all on my iTunes. It’s easy to fall under her musical spell, and let her take you to another place. Barbara is survived by her

daughter, her grandchildren, and Mark Stroock, a long time friend, and fan, and companion whom she married several years ago. Her relationship with Mark—who is a couple of years her senior and was always devoted to her and her art—came as a great and wonderful surprise gift to her. She’d been living alone for years, since the death of her husband Mr. Block. After the death of Mark’s wife of many years, he found solace in Barbara’s piano. That transformed into a deeper friendship and eventually marriage and a boon to both. And a joy. u

C O C K TA I L S W I T H F R I E N D S O F T H E U F F I Z I G A L L E RY I N PA L M B E AC H

Mrs. and Mr. Joseph Champ 48 QUEST

William Griswold and Madeline Parker

Michael and Colleen Bracci

Mary Frances and Bill Walde

Ite O’Higgins and John Keane

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Bill Blind and Meredith Marshall


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N I R AV MO D I A N D Q U E ST H O ST E D A L U N C H EO N AT C L U B C O L E T T E

Judith Giuliani

Clelia Zacharias, Robbin Gaudieri and Melinda Hassen

Gretchen Leach and Kit Pannill 50 QUEST

Grace Meigher and Lynne Wheat

Emilia Saint-Amand, Jaime Jimenez and Regina Greeven

Karin Luter and Ann Summers

Emilia Fanjul and Nicole Limbocker

Laurie Grauer, Tospy Taylor and Mariana Kauffman

Letsy Foster

Danny Ponton and Britty Damgard

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Pauline Pitt and Mimi McMakin


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N I R AV MO D I A N D Q U E ST H O ST E D A L U N C H EO N AT C L U B C O L E T T E

GIl Walsh

Querube Clark and Lucy Musso

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Sandy Thompson, Susie Elson and Jay Keith

Betsy Shiverick and Susan Magrino

Kate Gubelmann

Nancy Ellison and Nancy Brinker

Katherine Bryan and Christina Girard

Kate Khosrovani and Hilary Geary Ross

Christina de Caraman

Kathy Prounis, Annette Rickel, Eleanora Kennedy and Klaus-Peter Went

Susan Lloyd, Ann Johnson and Gigi Benson

Jorie Kent and Julie Araskog MARCH 2017 51


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E S O C I E T Y O F M S K H O ST E D T H E I R A N N UA L W I N T E R L U N C H AT T H E R A I N B O W R O OM

Claire Capello and Ferebee Taube

Karolina Kurkova, Alison Loehnis and Gabriela Hearst 52 QUEST

Tory Burch

Aerin Lauder and Tabitha Simmons

Gillian Hearst Simonds, Lavinia Branca Snyder, Robyn Joseph and Marcie Pantzer

Indre Rockefeller

Travis Acquavella

Jordan Foster, Valerie Boster Macauley and Meredith Melling

Candice Postel, Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler and Shoshanna Gruss

B FA . CO M ( A N G E L A P H A M / RO M M E L D E M A N O )

Jill Kargman


LUXURY DEFINED

HARBOR HILL ESTATE Premiere Waterfront Location NaNtucket IslaNd $42,500,000

Harbor Hill Estate. Designed by renowned Jacobsen Architecture with Hugh Newell Jacobsen and Simon Jacobsen. Premiere waterfront location and exceptional execution. Luxurious amenities and state of the art systems contribute to the art that is this compound. Situated on a rare and elevated harborfront 4.5 acre parcel with panoramic views of the action on Nantucket Harbor and direct private stairs to a calm water beach. A supremely intelligent design offers intimate spaces and gathering areas for every time of day and season. A cluster of buildings reminiscent of summer cottages showcasing a modern aesthetic. Tennis court with shaded viewing pavilion, a swimming pool and 2 spas compliment the thoughtful landscape design by Steven Stimson. Oriented to the Northwest for magnificent summer sunsets over Nantucket Harbor. The ultimate in every way!

Donna Barnett Maury People Sotheby’s International Realty 37 Main Street | Nantucket MA 02554 t 508.228.1881 ext 117 | cell 508.221.8995 donna@maurypeople.com | maurypeople.com Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A L E X E I J A WL E N S K Y O P E N I N G R EC E P T I O N AT T H E N E U E G A L E R I E

Allison Morehead and Reinhold Heller

Gerald Vollmer and Patrick Brunner 54 QUEST

Christina Jurasek and Jacqueline Hensel

Lane Brenner, Colin Gray and LeeAna Wolfman

Jacqueline Scalisi, Gil Yang and Mary Lor

Annette de la Renta and Renee Prince

Andre and Lois Nasser

Helen Studley

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Ronald Lauder and Alexandra Penney


® M a d e

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110 East 55 Street • New York, NY 10022 212.755.7372 • www.belgianshoes.com


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E 3 5 T H A N N UA L B OYS A N D G I R L S C L U B S O F PA L M B E AC H C O U N T Y W I N T E R B A L L

WIlbur Ross and Hilary Geary Ross

Brooks Bishop and Olympia Shields 56 QUEST

Rudolph and Judith Giuliani

George Stamas and Hillie Mahoney

Boys and Girls Club kids

Alfonso and Raysa Fanjul

Gretchen and Howard Leach

Eddy Taylor and Tom Quick

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Betsy and Wally Turner


UPPER TIER GRANDEUR

A SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY FROM THE IMAGINATION OF J/HOWARD DESIGN INC. One upper tier, south facing residence is being offered with an interior design by world-renowned designer Judy Howard Harpel the President and founder of the venerable J/Howard Design Inc. firm. They have created a sumptuous sense of bespoke luxury that showcases the stunning views of Biscayne Bay, Miami Beach and Downtown — while also achieving a sense of aesthetic continuity with the overall property. The result is a stunningly harmonious environment comprised of carefully-sourced, rich materials, iconic furniture and evocative artwork.

J/Howard Design Inc.

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SALES GALLERY: 254 NE 30TH ST., MIAMI, FL 33137 USA (305) 767-1414 | INFO@ELYSEEMIAMI.COM | WWW.ELYSEEMIAMI.COM

EXCLUSIVE SALES & MARKETING

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. These materials are not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy a unit in the condominium. Such an offering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (offering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, offer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in, or to residents of, any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. All plans, features and amenities depicted herein are based upon preliminary development plans, and are subject to change without notice in the manner provided in the offering documents. No guarantees or representations whatsoever are made that any plans, features, amenities or facilities will be provided or, if provided, will be of the same type, size, location or nature as depicted or described herein. This project is being developed by 700 Miami Partners LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which was formed solely for such purpose. Two Roads Development LLC, a Florida limited liability company (“Two Roads”), is affiliated with this entity, but is not the developer of this project.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E F R E N C H H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y ’ S PA L M B E AC H G A L A AT C L U B C O L E T T E

Denis De Kergorlay, Elizabeth Stribling and Clément Leclerc

CeCe Black and Timothy Corrigan

Ellen Anne Skinner and Yolande De Bonvouloir

Sarah Stimson Karis and Missy Van Buren 58 QUEST

Norman and Robin Reardon Nelson

India Foster and Fiona West

Ann Van Ness and Judy McLaren

Lynn and John Pohanka

A N N I E WAT T

Chips and Sarah Paige

Jennifer Herlein and Guy Robinson


KHAKUM DRIVE | $7,900,000 | WEB ID: 0068343 Elegant and welcoming 7 bedroom Georgian-inspired home. Luxurious and comfortable. Handsome woodwork, beautiful grounds. Fi Fi Sheridan | 203.869.2927

6 LITTLE COVE PLACE | $7,795,000 | WEB ID: 0068329 This incredible 2015 HOBI award winning ‘BEST CUSTOM HOME’ sits directly Old Greenwich’s coveted Little Cove with dock and mesmerizing water views. Edward Mortimer | 203.618.3160

48 WALSH LANE | $7,150,000 | WEB ID: 0068377 Distinctive custom residence on one acre on a private cul-de-sac in the Belle Haven Peninsula. Yashmin Lloyds | 917.597.0178

FAIRWAY VIEWS | $5,895,000 | WEB ID: 0068157 Cosmopolitan living on a cul-de-sac in a 10,200+/- s.f. Modern Georgian Colonial by Granoff Architects & Silver Properties. Steve Archino | 203.618.3144

HAMPTONS IN GREENWICH | $4,497,000 | WEB ID: 0068131 Casual elegance characterizes this lovely Mid-Country estate sited on 4.61 private acres. Six bedrooms, pool and level lawns. Fran Ehrlich 203.249.5561 | Heather Platt 203.983.3802

PRIVATE DEER PARK ASSOCIATION | $4,450,000 | WEB ID: 0067937 Perfectly set on a quiet cul-de-sac within the sought-after Deer Park Association. Ideal location in a private neighborhood near schools and town. Alice Duff | 203.618.3132

GREENWICH BROKERAGE | 203.869.4343 One Pickwick Plaza | Greenwich, CT 06830

sothebyshomes.com/greenwich

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


The Top Doctor Is In by Castle Connolly Top DoctorsÂŽ Q: I have a labral tear in my shoulder. Do I need surgery?

D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y ’ S W I N T E R L U N C H EO N AT T H E R A I N B O W R O OM

A: A labral tear is a tear of the labrum in the shoulder, a band of connective tissue that surrounds the socket and is torn usually from overhead trauma such as weightlifting or degenerative wear and tear. The need for surgery depends on the patient. When one suffers a labral tear, the problem is micro-instability. Younger patients who are active, especially with overhead activity, will do much better with an arthroscopic repair. Older patients who do not use their arms for overhead activity should try physical therapy first to see how they do. In some cases, those patients do well temporarily, but then fail after they go back to overhead activity. I have found that older patients that enjoy weightlifting have difficulty living with most labral tears. The best approach is to see a board certified orthopedic surgeon that sub-specializes in sports medicine and arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder. Spending enough time with the patient to determine the proper diagnosis prior to an imaging test is critical. The surgeon's clinical judgement is by far the most important factor in the final decision for surgery.

Camille Hellwig and Ainsley Earhardt Proctor

Katherine Birch

Sara Peters and Amory McAndrew

Suzie Aijala and Douglas Blonsky

Tracey Huff, Suzanne Cochran and Neda Navab

Armin Tehrany, M.D. Manhattan Orthopedic Care 515 Madison Ave, Suite 1102 New York NY 10022 212-729-9200 www.mocnyc.com Also in Staten Island Board Certified in Orthopaedic Surgery

Top Doctors Make a Difference www.castleconnolly.com

00 QUEST

Julie Prince Hojlo and Allison Prince

Dolly Bross Geary, Jane Blair Oberle and Lindsay Higgins

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Veronica Gabriel, Courtney Posner and Priscilla Zoullas


America’s Top Doctors at Your Fingertips

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.

Top Doctors Make A Difference

Do you want “second best” healthcare for you or your family? Of course not, but how do you find the best? Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., founded by a medical school board chair and president, has spent more than 20 years surveying physicians to answer that question. We truly know top doctors do make a difference!

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Castle Connolly’s database of more than 48,000 Top Doctor profiles in more than 60 specialties and subspecialties can be accessed at www.castleconnolly.com. The site is available on browser and mobile platforms where consumers like you view more than 35 million physician profiles each year. New Individual Premium Membership plan users receive a 30% discount on all Castle Connolly consumer guides. The plan also allows users to access information on Castle Connolly’s Partnership for Excellence Hospitals. Connect with us on: Physicians do not and cannot pay to be included as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R E A ST C A N C E R R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N ’ S “ P E R F EC T P I N K ” PA L M B E AC H L U N C H EO N

Edith Stickney, Hope Alswang and Louise Braver

Connie Spahn and Ronnie Heyman

Judith Lauder, Leonard Lauder and Sandra Lee

Roberta Server, Leslie Friedland, Myra Biblowit and Laura Lassman

Cyndy Fish, Karen Hale and Simone Winston

Peggy More and Frannie Scaife

Mickey Beyer and Susie Elson

B E N E F I T FO R T H E YO U N G F R I E N D S O F T H E PA L M B E AC H SYM P H O N Y AT F I G U E

Jacqueline Bosch and Carol Anderson 62 QUEST

Lizzi Bickford and Darcy Jones

Tammy Fender and Stephanie von Watzdorf

Jennifer Miller, Katherine Lande and Richard Gaff

Whitney Wolfe and Farley Rentschler

Amory McAndrew, Lilly Bunn and Casey Sills

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Sarah Ely, Liz Hagen, Whitney Austin and Lindsey Musselwhite


Spectacular Penthouse on CPW with 2 Wrap Terraces Unobstructed views N, S, E & W. 15' ceilings, LR w WBFP, DR, library, eat-in kitchen. 4BRs, ensuite baths, staff suite. FS white glove co-op. $20M. Web 16127982. Alexa Lambert 917.403.8819/Merrill Curtis 917.412.7602

4BR, 4.5 Bath CPW Condo w Central Park Views

Absolutely Fabulous!

Grand-Scale, Mint, Prewar 8 on Park Ave/70s

Corner LR/DR, renovated open kitchen. Full service condo. $14.5M. Web 16109125. Susan Ingram 212.452.4453/Bonnie Lindenbaum 212.452.4457

Renovated high floor 10 room in full service WEA prewar co-op. Private elevator, grand proportions. 4BR + library, EIK, CAC, 2 fplcs. $9.6M. Web 16175430. Marcy Grau 212.452.4361

Welcoming entertaining rooms with library, 2BR, 3.5 bath, office, eat-in kitchen, service room. 3000+sf. $6.25M. Web 16170051. Cornelia Eland 212.452.4384

The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. Stribling Private Brokerage is the Stribling & Associates marketing division for properties valued in excess of $5,000,000. It provides services on the level of “private banking” and intensive, customized marketing for luxury properties and discerning clients on a global basis. STRIBLING.COM · UPTOWN 212 570 2440 CHELSEA 212 243 4000 TRIBECA 212 941 8420 BROOKLYN 718 208 1900 · EQUAL HOUSING OPPTY

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E A M E R I C A N S O C I E T Y F O R T H E P R E V E N T I O N O F C R U E LT Y TO A N I M A L S ’ PA L M B E A C H E V E N I N G

Matthew Bershadker and Arriana Boardman

Fred and Laura Tanne 64 QUEST

Frank Orenstien and Gail Worth

Margo Nederlander, Alexis Joel, Billy Joel and Terry Allen Kramer

Jeff Pfeifle and Stephen Jacoby

Mario Deslauriers and Kelly Klein

Judy Taubman and Donna Acquavella

Ross Meltzer and Matthew Bershadker

CO U RTE S Y O F A S P C A

Serena Marron and Savanna Hoge


WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE

Owning a penthouse at the top of Miami’s magnificent Biscayne Beach is a rarified experience. With an exhilarating sense of expansiveness, breathtaking views that stretch from the ocean’s horizon to Miami’s skyline, and world class design, Biscayne Beach residences feature a level of luxury unlike anything anywhere.

FINAL TWO PENTHOUSES DELIVERING FEBRUARY 2017 PRIVATE PRESENTATIONS AVAIL ABLE UPON REQUEST VISIT OUR SALES GALLERY 254 NE 30TH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Developed by: TWO ROADS DEVELOPMENT & GTIS PARTNERS

EXCLUSIVE SALES AND MARKETING BY

Interiors by: THOM FILICIA INC.

305.767.1414 BISCAYNEBEACHRESIDENCES .COM

Exclusive Sales & Marketing by: CERVERA REAL ESTATE

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. Restaurants or any operators are subject to change at any time and no representation is made hereby for reliance and except as the offering materials provide the use of the commercial spaces will be in discretion of their purchasers and there is no assurance that they will be used for any specific purpose or with such operators. These materials are not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy, a unit in the condominium. Such an offering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (offering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless not made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, offer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in, or to residents of, any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising, marketing and sales program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, sex, religion, handicap, familial status,or national origin.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E 6 0 T H A N N UA L I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E D C R O S S B A L L AT M A R - A - L A G O

First Lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump

Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Stuart Bernstein, Samantha Curry and Harvey Oyer

Herme de Wyman Miro and Veronica Atkins

Martin and Audrey Gruss 66 QUEST

RĂŠka SzemerkĂŠnyi and Patrick Park

Patty Myura and Janet Cafaro

Mary Ourisman and Carlos Pareja

Armando and Micaela Varricchio

Lady Henrietta Spencer-Churchill

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Hilary Geary and WIlbur Ross


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M A R YMO U N T S C H O O L O F N E W YO R K B E N E F I T G A L A AT T H E C AT H E D R A L O F S T . J O H N T H E D I V I N E

Andrew Bettwy and Julie Plumb

Kelly Coffey, Jim Cesare and Angela Vallot

Steve Hanson with Melissa and Gustavo Roessler

Judy Chung, Carl Quintanilla, Geoffrey Zakarian and Margaret Zakarian

Chantal Meldrum and Philip Meldrum

Patricia Ryan, Andrew Farnsworth, Debbie Deaver and John Fischetti

Ignacio Sarria, Ana Sarria, Yolanda Gargallo and Manuel Uranga

Andrew Brandman and Gary Stein

David Matera and Paige Davis

Deidre Zaccone, Lillian Reinisch, Aileen Busick and Jennifer Dowd 68 QUEST

Gerry Cunningham and Eric Gies

Alix Samansky and Jaclyn Silverberg

Vanessa Burton and Willie Geist

A N I TA A N D S T E V E S H E V E T T ( V O LU N T E E R S ) ; J E F F Z O R A B E D I A N P H OTO G R A P H Y ( M A RYM O U N T )

VO L U N T E E R S O F A M E R I C A ’ S “A N E W YO R K W I N T E R ’ S E V E ” AT T H E P L A Z A


Impressive Country Estate - Gated drive to over nine level acres.Stun- Historic Bedford Estate - First time offered in over fifty years! ning Shingle Colonial with 7900 square feet of detailed living space. Living Room with Fireplace. Library with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Butler’s Pantry. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace. Separate Guest House. Heated Garages for six cars. Private and serene setting with level lawns and specimen trees. Choice of pool sites. On the Bedford Riding Lanes. $3,150,000

Over ten acres perfectly located on Hook Road, one of Bedford’s finest estate areas. Long drive to perfect privacy. Circa 1920’s Stone and Shingle Country House. Spectacular Great Room with stone fireplace. French doors to 80’ covered porch with views over sweeping lawns. Pool with Cabana. Tennis Court. Cottage. Additional land available. $2,499,000

Breathtaking Views -

First time offered in 40 years! Sited high on Darlington Hill, seven private acres in the heart of horse country. Dramatic Mid-Century Modern with walls of windows to capture light and views. Impressive Living Room with vaulted ceiling, hardwood floors and fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Kitchen with skylit Breakfast Room. Three Bedrooms. Beautifully landscaped grounds with Pool on two separate lots. $1,195,000

Nearly 50 Bedford Acres - A rare opportunity to own 47 pastoral acres in the heart of Bedford’s finest horse country. Endless possibilities. Perfect for sophisticated Country Estate, Family Compound or Equestrian Complex. Belgian block-lined drive over stone bridges. Travel through scenic meadows to spectacular home site. Renovated Guest Cottage with meadow and stream views. Fabulous location on the Bedford Riding Lanes. Exceptional! $4,950,000

A New Classic - Completely renovated Country Colonial finely finished. Gleaming hardwood floors, extensive millwork and perfectly scaled rooms. Sun-filled Living Room with Fireplace. Library. Spectacular Kitchen. Formal Dining Room. Spacious Family Room with Fireplace. Master Bedroom with Fireplace. Three Family Bedrooms. Long drive to nearly three private acres. Moments to the Library, school and town park. $899,000

Sophisticated Style - Over two acres in the heart

(914) 234-9234

of Waccabuc. Stunning Center Hall Colonial with beautifully appointed, sun-filled rooms. Gracious Living Room. Formal Dining Room with Fireplace. Spectacular Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace. Four Family Bedrooms plus Guest/ Au Pair Suite. 1100 square foot mahogany deck overlooking a peaceful pond. Katonah-Lewisboro Schools. $999,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 65 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E PA L M B E AC H ZO O ’ S T R O P I C A L S A FA R I G A L A

BIll and Candy Hamm

Ken and Martha Kessler

Greg Connors with Julie and Mike Connors 70 QUEST

Eric and Whitney Bylin

Tom Quick and Lucy Musso

Marry and Kane Baker with Kim Campbell

David and Brenda Calloway

Wendy and Paul Raether

Michele and Howard Kessler

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Lillian and Luis Fernandez


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY

This spread: A multiple-exposure shot of Princess Diana in Oxford, England, circa 1986. 72 QUEST


SHE WAS, OF COURSE, the most sought after person in entire the world. LIFE magazine wanted a photograph of Princess Diana for an upcoming issue. At the time, she was giving photographers wonderful moments, walking slowly, stopping to pose. She would even phone her favorites telling them to follow her to places like Africa, making certain they had good pictures upon their return. Two British newspaper photographers told me that after her divorce, Diana would occasionally call to tell them when she was going to exercise class. She knew that getting out of her car in her gym clothes with her gym bag slung over her shoulders would make a good photograph—one which would knock Prince Charles off the front page of the London papers when he was at some ribbon-cutting ceremony. She knew how

to make the most of her celebrity. The evening in Oxford, pictured here, I only wanted and needed one good photograph, but that’s not what I got. When the princess stepped out of her limousine, I began to take photographs. My camera went “rattle rattle” and jammed. Instead of having frame after frame of Diana, I have a series of ten images in one frame because the film refused to move forward. The camera was trying, but the film just wasn’t budging. At the time I thought this montage was unusable, but as with many things in life, the passage of time changed my opinion. Now, I find this photograph rather interesting, seeing the different expressions on Diana’s face as she walks along. Using digital cameras today, this could never happen again. Progress. That’s something to think about, too. ◆


TA K I

PUTTING ON AIRS

This page: Eton College is an English boarding school where the upper crust send their precious younglings. Opposite page: Writer Nancy Mitford.

A SNOBBY TYPE high up in the Alps was recently expounding about Americans, when I interrupted him about his own country, France. Yes, I said, Americans owe a great debt to France for Lafayette and all that, but if it weren’t for Uncle Sam, French people would mostly be speaking German by now. Silence followed, as if someone had loudly passed wind in front of an elderly duchess. The snobby type was not saying anything really rude about America, just snotty things about Trump and his vulgarity and the people who voted for him. My negative reaction was because 74 Q U E S T

there is nothing more vulgar—at least in my book—than snobbishness concealing one’s true intentions, which in this case was jealousy and nothing but. Funny how over in the old continent, now sinking under the weight of the Muslim invasion through other means, snobbery is doing a brisk business, especially among those not really very confident about their antecedents, namely the nouveaux riche. Snobbery is basically an effort of imposing one’s self on a social situation, pulling rank, indicating that one’s superior to those around him. In other

words, snobbery is a camouflage for one’s insecurities. Ironically, the snob is more often than not a snob-victim, worsted in conflict with his or her superiors. The distinguishing mark of a snob is faked grandeur, and God only knows how many of these snobs I have met in my long life, first living in Paris as a young man, later on in London. Mind you, the Italians did away with snobbism by inventing titles when there were none, so even a lowly mechanic is addressed as “ingeniere” in the land of pasta. No country has suffered from snob-


TA K I bery more than England, where a class system that I certainly approved of reigned supreme until recently. As late as the 1950s Nancy Mitford’s U and non-U was a publishing sensation. Nancy, born into the middling aristocracy, explained which words were used by the upper classes (hence the U) and the ones practiced by the middle and lower classes (hence the non-U). For example, looking glass was U, mirror non-U, sofa U, couch non-U, radio nonU, wireless U, and so on. The reason the list did not become a bible for snobs and social climbers—although it did for awhile—was because most non-U words or expressions were used by Americans.

Europe, but mostly it is pure unadulterated jealousy. American openness, lack of hypocrisy and getting straight to the point are qualities most good people admire. In my experience, the great aristocratic families of Britain, France, and the rest of Europe were the least snobby of all. The duke and the dustman had a lot in common in their loathing of the middle classes, as the joke goes, but it’s a saying based on truth. It was the snobbishness of the aspiring classes that separated them from the working and aristocratic ones. In England, boys from “good” families went to top schools, learned to speak proper English, as it was called, and

proved that the nobility has always been better fitted for the business of ruling, in Europe, but not in the United States. Now we have a man from Queens, “Noo Yawk,” sitting in the White House, and snobs all over the place, including New York and California, are not best pleased. Some of the bleaters remind me of the snob I shredded couple of weeks ago high up in the Alps. Poor souls, they’ll have to live with it for a while. So let the snobs among us have their day with Trump. I become a snob when I read Page Six about today’s celebrities. Or when I see criminals passing as rap stars, or what is considered as society today. Having good

Until Great Britain reluctantly became just Britain by losing her empire following the last world war, America stood at the wings, like an understudy waiting for his opportunity to show his stuff if the star fell ill. The British lion roared its last sixty years ago, in the Suez crisis, and the American eagle took over: On the field, in the boardroom, and in the drawing room. Americanisms became the rage with the young blades of Eton and Harrow, and non-U words became U overnight. Needless to say, there was and still is a reaction to the Americanization of

then went on with their lives secure in whatever milieu they ended up in. Mind you, the moment a Brit opens his or her mouth, they immediately signal their background. At least they used to. Sometime toward the end of the last century a proper way to speak English became a no-no, thanks to the greatest threat of our time, the encroaching proletarian brutality enforced upon us by political correctness. Thanks to the good old U.S. of A., people are still allowed to express certain truths without being banished to Devil’s Island. History has repeatedly

manners is the opposite of snobbery, something people tend to forget, especially young people. And there are a few good things about being a snob. It is the first step, in a somewhat convoluted way, of establishing one’s identity. In today’s modern age, having an identity is almost expressly inhibited. Even a snob is better than the faceless mobs screaming abuse so they can have their thirty seconds of fame on television. Even snobbery can be a good thing by comparison. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. MARCH 2017 75


CANTEENS

A SANT AMBROEUS FOR THE SUNSHINE STATE

“WE HAVE BEEN GETTING a lot of compliments, like, ‘Wow—this is the most beautiful Sant Ambroeus!’” explains Adil Avunduk, the general manager of Sant Ambroeus Palm Beach, which opened its doors this past December just in time for prime Palm Beach season. The Palm Beach location, at 340 Royal Poinciana Way, marks the first outside the New York market for SA Hospitality Group, Sant Ambroeus’s parent company. “The space really reflects the guests here,” Avunduk tells me. “We have some Southampton regulars, some SoHo 76 QUEST

regulars, some Madison Avenue regulars. They are all down here at the same time in winter, and we designed the restaurant to combine a little of each of the other locations here.” Regulars of the Madison Avenue location might recognize similarities to the café component, while habitués of the swanky SoHo restaurant might notice hints of the dining room from there. Still, the new location is undeniably original and embraces the plush Palm Beach landscape, inviting nature and light indoors, with views of palm trees and bougainvillea. This

CO U RTE S Y O F S A N T A M B RO E U S

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS is decidedly more tropical than the very original Sant Ambroeus, which from its early days in the 1930s served as a sort of stomping ground for Milan’s intelligentsia. That sense of European style and flair has not, however, diminished in any form, especially in the convivial ways of Mr. Avunduk, who greets and charms you at the door. And there are new touches and flavors to be detected at this latest ambassador of Milanese dining and style. “Guests have been noticing the wallpaper on the café side. It’s the first thing people like,” says Avunduk, pointing to how the wallpaper was made using the iconic pink Sant Ambroeus wrapping paper.

Diners who come expecting the famous Vitello Tonnato, Tagliatelle alla Bolognese, or Cotoletta alla Milanese needn’t fear—such staples won’t be swept off the menu by balmy breezes anytime soon. The wine list boasts fine Italian selections, including some esoteric options from more obscure regions. One noticeable difference between the new location and its northern confreres might be found in the drinking habits of its guests. “In Palm Beach, they love their cocktails—especially vodka-based cocktails,” Avunduk points out. “In New York, it’s more about opening a bottle a wine.” No matter what they’re drinking or how they’re eating, we

Other noticeable augmentations of the Sant Ambroeus brand can be found on the menu. Cocktails are discernibly on the refreshing side and have been created around the seasons, based on the availability of local ingredients. The menu here is also reflective of South Florida, with more of an emphasis on seafood and “local citruses and herbs to accentuate the fresh, luminous surroundings that encompass Palm Beach,” as executive chef Marco Barbisotti explains. “Colorful salads with texture, grains, and fruits highlight the simplicity of the local produce.”

all know Palm Beachers have excellent taste. And the opening of a Sant Ambroeus here proves it. u This page, clockwise from top left: The main dining room is a glamorous nod to the Italy of the 1950s; bougainvillea adorning the façade; the dinner menu; the house branzino; the gelato cart awaits. Opposite page: The chic and inviting bar, the largest of any Sant Ambroeus location. Sant Ambroeus Palm Beach: 340 Royal Poinciana Way. Open daily; for reservations: palmbeach@santambroeus.com 561.285.7990. MARCH 2017 77


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

MARCH MARKS our annual Spring Style Issue, and what better way to welcome spring and new styles than in a chic ensemble from Giambattista Valli, or a fetching pair of shades from Ralph Lauren (in spring green, of course)? Flats are in, and we covered a lot of ground in them shopping for the finds in this issue. Check out our suggestions from Jimmy Choo and Belgian Shoes, along with a pair of Stubbs & Wootton for him (or her—the whimsy styles are always available for men and women alike).

David Yurman’s Continuance rings in rose quartz, prasiolite, moon quartz, and milky aquamarine. $1,250 each. David Yurman: 712 Madison Ave. or davidyurman.com.

Complete any look with J.McLaughlin’s 100% rattan Angela clutch in navy (also available in natural and orange). $158 at jmclaughlin.com.

Preparing for Paris? Packing for Milan? Then pick up Giambattista Valli’s cigarette trousers and printed lace shirt with ruffled details. For more, visit giambattistavalli.com.

Stay on pointe in Jimmy Choo’s Garner flat in navy and coarse silver glitter, a ballet pump given an update with an almond-shaped toe. $565 at us.jimmychoo.com. 78 QUEST


This spring’s color is definitely green, so reach for Ralph Lauren’s signature Pony sunglasses in green with acetate frame and embossed pony detail at the temples. $160 at ralphlauren.com.

These Buccellati 18-kt. yellow gold and pink opal Opera pendant earrings are available at Betteridge, Greenwich’s go-to

Fly away with Wempe’s Sapphire Ring, which features sapphires, emeralds, and navettecut emeralds set in white gold. $18,575. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

house of jewelry. Betteridge: 239 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, Conn., 203.869.0124.

Every getaway deserves Lilly Pulitzer’s perfect Getaway Coverup in Toucan Green. $118. Lilly Pulitzer: 1020 Madison Ave., 212.744.4620, or lillypulitzer.com. Vhernier’s Volta Celeste pendant in titanium, blue sapphires, and diamonds. $30,300. Vhernier: 783 Madison Ave., 646.343.9551.

Puddle hop in pink with Hunter’s waterproof Women’s Original Short Rain Boots in natural rubber, in the same form as the Hunter Original Tall, Nirav Modi’s Flamingo Embrace Bracelet features layers of pink sapphire

only shorter. $140 at us.hunterboots.com.

and white diamond flamingo feathers, along with a unique stretch mechanism for an easy fit. Price upon request. Nirav Modi: 727 Madison Ave., 212.603.0000.

MARCH 2017 79


Fresh Finds

Sleek is chic, especially in Hermès. For all your spring shopping needs, head to Hermès New

Be sure to capture a sterling

York Madison Men’s

moment with this brass,

Rock on with a

at 690 Madison Avenue

silver-plate, and gold Bureau

pair of the Plattan 2

(212.308.3585).

headphones from Urbanears, with fabric cord, built-in mic/remote,

d’Architecte picture frame by Joseph Dirand for Puiforcat. $4,600 at puiforcat.com.

and ZoundPlug for instant music sharing. $49 at urbanears.com.

Once you wear them, we’re sure you’ll be hooked: Miansai leather bracelets, which come in a variety of colors, leather, rope, silver, and brass. Miansai: 33 Crosby St., 212.858.9710, or miansai.com.

Get ready to roll and fly with Porsche Design’s French Classic 3.0 Trolley 520 in ganache leather. $2,200 at Porsche Design boutiques and porsche-design.com.

It’s time to toast to an elegant upgrade, in the form of Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual 34 in stainless steel with champagne dial and caliber-3130 movement. For more information, visit rolex.com. 80 QUEST

You’ll strut with pride in the Peacock Metallic Classic Slipper in black linen from Stubbs & Wootton. $495. Stubbs & Wootton: 340 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, Fla., 561.655.6857.


Roberto Coin Venetian Princess

When looking for your next

wide bangle in 18-kt. white gold

interior designer, look

with black and white dia-

no further than Leta Austin

monds, totaling 11.13 cts.

Foster, offering a bespoke

$35,000. Roberto Coin:

eye for style, like

us.robertocoin.com.

these custom linens and canopies. Leta Austin Foster: 561.655.5489.

Perfume maven Chantal Roos and her daughter launch the exclusive Dear Rose collection, including Mentha Religiosa, with peppermint, bergamot, cedarwood, and patchouli. $200 at Aedes De Venustas: 212.206.8674 or aedes.com.

Carolina Herrera’s striped silk gown from her SpringSummer 2017 collection is a keeper. $7,290. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552.

One size fits all: the black and white silk scarf from Akris. $895. Akris: 835 Madison Ave., 212.717.1170.

Gien’s Indigo Japanese teapot in faience, measuring 6 inches high. $250 at La Dentelliere: 35 Popham Rd., Scarsdale, N.Y., 914.723.2902 or ladentelliere.com.

Unleash your inner animal with the black and white animal print Midinette from Belgian Shoes. $390. Belgian Shoes: 110 E. 55th St., 212.755.7372. MARCH 2017 81


AT T H E V E A U

APPRECIATIONS: THE JOYS OF A PROPER LIBRARY

This page: Michael Thomas in front of his beloved library.

I RECENTLY HAD REASON to think seriously about breaking off a relationship with an entity whose claims on my affection and dependency have never lost constancy, indeed have grown and ripened over six decades. I’m speaking of my library. We may be obliged to move, and that has raised the question, “What will we do about the books?” It’s both a short-term and a longer-term problem. If we move in the near future, there are simply too many to fit in any place we’re likely to end up. And if we don’t, when the actuarial table kicks in—I’m about to turn 81—I don’t want my wife and children to have to deal with the problem of getting rid of the 5000 or so books (after it’s settled who gets the Nonesuch Dickens; the signed Patrick O’Brian; the first editions of The Way We Live Now, Vanity Fair, and The Great Gatsby; and the 15-volume scholarly catalogue of the Robert Lehman Collection—a project I conceived and initiated and which took 34 years to complete). We’re talking quantity as well as quality here. Whenever I take a delivery or welcome a first-time visitor, their initial exclamation, inevitably, is: “Wow! Look at all these books!” Books to the left, books to the right, books everywhere, on shelves, ladder rungs, stacked against a corner wall, on every flat surface. We’re talking about 600 or so running feet, floor-to-ceiling (and in this loft the ceilings are high), built for me by Gothic Cabinet when I moved here 16 years ago. When I first went to see the space—the building was then under renovation—my


AT T H E V E A U

This page: A couple of the vast number of shelves containing the many brilliant tomes in Thomas’ personal collection.

main concern was for my books. Would there be enough room for them? And my heart leapt when I saw that there would. My books and I go way, way back. I suppose that my longest-lived bibliophilic love affair is with an Oxford University Press “India paper” Shakespeare that I bought in 1955 in Florence of all places (my boyish signature and the year are written on an endpaper). That volume has followed me into four marriages and out of three; it has sat on God knows how many shelves in in God knows how many domiciles; it’s in our bedroom now, in a row of favorite books that sit on a glass table. Another work I bought at that time was the cutest set, in three pocket volumes, of Longfellow’s translation of The Divine Comedy, but for the life of me I can’t locate it in the ruckus of books we live amid. Books had always been integral to my existence. During World War II, my late brother Jeffrey and I lived with our mother and stepfather on a ranch in Vail, AZ, some 30 miles outside Tucson. The bedroom we shared was lined with books: a

complete set of the Oz books, the Scribner Classics with the great illustrations by Howard Pyle and N.C. Wyeth, Peter Pan, Johnny Tremain, the Just So Stories, and other mainstays. First-class stuff. We were home-schooled, with lessonsby-mail from the Calvert School in Baltimore, and every few weeks, parcels would arrive from Wakefield-Young Books in N.Y.C. Reading became part of our DNA. And from a love of reading flowed a joy in books in and of themselves. Small wonder that my brother would become a distinguished antiquarian bookseller. Somewhere during my Yale years, I realized that I was no longer just accumulating an array of books stuck on shelves after reading (or not—often the case), I was building a library: a serious, constructed collection subject to certain standards of utility and readability. And so it grew into a real library, a proper personal library. I’ve done a lot of things in my life, many of them interesting, some even worthwhile, but I would designate what’s here on the shelves as among my proudest accomplishments.

It’s when I let my gaze wander along my bookshelves that I feel a kind of deep satisfaction. The books are wildly varied—of all vintages, acquired in all sorts of ways, for all sorts of reasons—yet pretty neatly and logically organized: there are sections devoted history and biography; New York City; classical music and recordings (mostly associated with Orpheus Remarkable Recordings, the Lexington Ave. record shop I founded in 1977 and ran for 17 or 18 years); diaries (a complete Pepys, the Allen Nevins edition of George Templeton Strong, Virginia Woolf); and collections of letters (the Hart-Lyttleton correspondence, the 16th century Lisle Letters, Boswell’s letters). In the bedroom, directly across from the glass table is an entire wall of fiction: good reading copies of great and good writing including complete sets of Jane Austen and Conan Doyle. A ton of P.G. Wodehouse, both the new Everyman edition (complete), a number of anthologies (Jeeves, golf), and a bunch of the elegant Herbert Jenkins editions, MARCH 2017 83


AT T H E V E A U

This page: Mikhail Bulgakov, author of The Master and Margarita (inset). Opposite page: The Divine Comedy.

bought years ago in London. Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time, a five-times-read favorite, is here in the paperback editions with dazzling covers by Osbert Lancaster and Mark Boxer (Powell’s diaries and collected criticism are shelved elsewhere). Here are the volumes of John O’Hara’s short stories I acquired, one by one, Thanksgiving after Thanksgiving (O’Hara published on Turkey Day), from Gordon’s bookstore in the old St. Regis, memorably presided over by Alice Stein. And novels by writers I’ve known personally: complete or virtually complete runs of Louis Auchincloss, James Salter, Larry McMurtry, William Boyd. I have a bunch of John Le Carre first editions, starting way back with Call for the Dead, his first book, on a top shelf in the big room, next to a nice set of Ring Lardner, with a shelf of Waugh not far away. I should confess that I’m what’s called “a 84 QUEST

completist:” once I start on a series or set, I see it through to the finish, even if I know I’ll probably (surely) never read the final volumes (step forward again, Virginia Woolf). Here are four books on Irish art by my late chum Desmond Fitzgerald, the Knight of Glin. And on a nearby shelf, collections of criticism and essays, a lot of Hazlitt, and studies on A.E. Housman and T.S. Eliot, poets who took over my soul as a young man and still matter to me. A shelf of and about Shakespeare. My own nine novels, some in elegant bindings commissioned by a former mother-in-law. In my office, an entire wall houses what I think of as my working library: reference books (dictionaries in several languages and thesauruses, atlases and maps, quotation books, etc.), now mainly made obsolete by the speed, convenience, and reach of the Internet but still nice to have; several shelves of travel books and guides, a

number of these too out-of-date in every utilitarian sense (early and later Baedeker, Companion Guides to hither and yon, old Michelins) but possessing undying literary distinction; next are shelves and shelves of books about finance, business, and Wall Street, from Marx (greatest of financial journalists) to Michael Lewis. Moving on, here’s a section of books on society: Cleveland Amory; a first edition of Ward McAllister’s Society as I have Found It (which might be better titled “Society as I have left it”); a run of Slim Aarons’ volumes of photographs. A couple of shelves of golf (I once had a fine collection of golf rarities, but these went, along with a great collection of Modern First Editions and a better-than-fair art library, to finance one or another marital misadventure). I love cartoons, so Calvin and Hobbes, greatest of the greats, is here, and Peanuts, Jules Pfeiffer, Ed Sorel, the incomparable Robert Osborn (my father’s Yale classmate), and the forgotten Gluyas Williams. Here and there you’ll come across the odd volume inscribed by its author to me (for instance a novel by Patrick O’Brian, whom I met some twenty years ago when I flew to London for a dinner in his honor). Along with a scattering of O’Brian “firsts,” I did have a rather nice boxed set, all twenty of the Aubrey-Maturin novels in five volumes, very elegant, but this past Christmas Eve, a beloved grandson, just in the early throes of O’Brian mania, spotted the set and with my blessing bore it off delightedly. Giveth and taketh away: this might be the motto of those who build a library. So, you see: a lot of books, and this just a sampling. Thousands of books in some odd way organically related, with me being the catalyst. My taste, my whims, my curiosity, my needs, my affections. Sourced from every single important bookstore extant in 1955 to the present day, from Periscope-Holliday on 72nd Street to Heywood Hill in London’s Mayfair to Amazon in outer space. There are almost as many memories on these shelves as there are volumes: fond


AT T H E V E A U thoughts of certain shops and certain booksellers—in particular, John Saumarez Smith at Heywood Hill, and another John (last name forgotten) who ran the big Doubleday’s at 57th and Fifth. These thoughts were on my mind when I lunched with my sainted publisher at Le Veau d’Or. He suggested I get in touch with Jane Stubbs. I knew Jane a bit: She’s a leading consultant-executant on forming bespoke personal libraries, some consisting of a limited number of books on a client’s particular enthusiasm or interest, others altogether grander and more diverse. I called Jane and persuaded her to undertake the treacherous East River crossing. She looked over my shelves and agreed that mine is really a firstclass personal library—probably impossible to replicate today. We followed up with lunch, and started by discussing what a proper library isn’t. In a proper library, for instance, you’ll not find serried ranks of the productions of Franklin Mint or the Folio Society. Not that we have anything against grandly-produced books, mind you, but if elaborate books are to your taste, why not go after the real thing? Among the bookshelves that have prompted me to stop and wheeze in admiration are those that hold Susan Gutfreund’s French bindings: these are volumes notable not so much for what’s in them as for what’s on them. Nor is an agglomeration of garishly dust-jacketed best-sellers—row upon row of David Baldacci, James Patterson, Fifty Shades—a library. A library consists of books that come to stay; these mostly don’t. Buy–read–discard. Which is not to disparage popular writing. I love it myself. And that’s where the Kindle has been a blessing: I download thrillers and such, read them, enjoy them, and then— poof!—back into the ether they go. Finally, books are something more than furniture. A library isn’t an accumulation of books, often decorator-driven or stylist-staged, acquired principally to dress up one’s social, intellectual or pecuniary status—or aspirations to what is called “piss-elegance.” Think how often you’ve seen photographs in this magazine and others in which books are arranged artfully in an obvious effort to “class up” the setting. After all, what do they say?

“Books do furnish a room.” That they do, but they also furnish mind and soul, enliven the spirit, offer companionship. I often describe my library as an exercise in applied serendipity. Grazing the shelves, I’ll come across something I’ve completely forgotten I had and—bingo!—I’m hooked. Too many to count are books I’ve only looked at once, may never finish, indeed may never read because the impulse that prompted their acquisition passed before I could get to them. But who knows? Often I’m curious about something and like to look it up without resorting to Wikipedia, because I’ve had the book all along and because I find the physical qualities of a well-printed book alluring. To me a wall full of well-chosen, well-arranged books is as satisfying as a nice picture. A proper personal library is about rereading as much anything else. About having at hand the authors and subjects you find yourself suddenly wanting to revisit. In the last few years, I’ve reread a great deal of Wodehouse, O’Hara’s stories, the great Southern California noirs of Ross Macdonald, Maugham, and many others. When we come home from seeing Shakespeare at BAM or St. Ann’s Warehouse, down will come Marjorie Garber’s Shakespeare After All, or Hazlitt, or Dr. Johnson, or Harold Bloom, or James Shapiro; I want to know what they think/thought about Lear, say, to compare and ponder their ideas, and I want to be able to do it in the moment. Important keywords in building a true personal library might therefore be “immediately” and “sometime.” A library will satisfy both the intentional and the contingent, strike some kind of balance between happy accidents and careful planning. It will incorporate the blessings of yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Yet no matter how nobly intentioned, none of this takes away the certainty that one day, possibly not so far off, my books and I must part company, and longtime shelf mates will take leave of

one another. I don’t know if books themselves have feelings but if they do, that will be a sad moment, given how long and loyally they’ve kept company and what good service they’ve given. As for me, I have no doubt that when the time comes my emotions will replicate those of one of the greatest of all writers, Edward Gibbon. He’s close to my heart; The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is represented chez moi by two splendid editions: the 1994 Allen Lane one, and the Limited Editions Club one of 1946, illustrated with engravings by Piranesi, alongside Gibbon’s Memoirs of My Life and his autobiography. When he finished his great history in 1787, Gibbon put down his pen and went for a walk beside Lake Geneva, and as he did, “a sober melancholy was spread over my mind by the idea that I had taken my everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion.” So it must be for anyone who has invested as much of himself in his bookshelves as this writer. In the pleasure of marrying all these books ultimately must lie the pain of divorce. But the trip has been worth it. u

MARCH 2016 85


AUDAX

REAL LACE REVISITED

OUR LONGTIME CONTRIBUTOR Jamie MacGuire is out with a new book this month, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. Real Lace Revisited is an updating of Stephen Birmingham’s 1973 best seller, Real Lace, which chronicled the rise of the first wealthy Irish families in America. Jamie sat down with Lily Hoagland to talk about the new book. QUEST: Why did you write this book? JAMIE MACGUIRE: My publisher, Jed Lyons of Rowman & Littlefield, was surprisingly impervious to the charms of my other brilliant book proposals (e.g. Great Moments in Curling, Weather in Burundi 1742-46, and Co-Dependent Forever). Eventually he sighed and asked, “Why not swanky places and ritzy people?” I immediately complimented him on his prodigious genius, and had the idea of updating Stephen Birmingham’s books. Our Crowd, about the first German-Jewish fortunes in America, was a huge best seller. Then came Real Lace, about the Irish, which I had discussed with him 20 years ago in Mary Lou Whitney’s box at Saratoga Racecourse. In 2015, I wrote to Steve—then in his early 80s—to propose expanding and updating Real Lace. He was very encouraging and promised to write a foreward. 86 QUEST

Q: Then what happened? JM: Funny you should ask—Stephen Birmingham died suddenly just a few months later, which was sad, and I never got my foreward. On the other hand, it gave me a certain freedom I might not have had otherwise. Q: What were some of the things you learned writing the book? JM: Quite a few really: the real first Irish family was not the Murrays or McDonnells, as Birmingham implied, but the Carrolls, who arrived in Maryland in 1687. Birmingham only mentioned the Kennedys to exclude them for their arriviste bad manners and ethics, but in this book they are treated fully for their virtues as well as their vices, and especially their long record of public service. Caroline, whom I first got to know when we were both studying in England in the 1970s, and whose ambassadorship to Japan was such a characteristically understated triumph, is a recent outstanding example. People forget the intensity of prejudice and bigotry the Irish in America suffered at the hands of Know Nothings, Nativists, the KKK, and others, including during Al Smith’s run for


AUDAX

This page, clockwise from top left: Philip and Joan MacGuire at The Stork Club, 1942; legendary horse breeder and Palm Beach Casino owner Col. E. R. Bradley with grocery magnate James Butler; Caroline Kennedy at Megan McDonnell’s wedding; Murray McDonnell, Jacqueline Onassis, and Audax at same; Father Hilary Martin, “The Good Shepherd,” at Portsmouth Priory, 1955. Opposite page: Philip, Stuart, James, and Beatrice MacGuire, 1930; Schuyler MacGuire after his wedding to Dean Tyndall, with his brothers—Kevin, Jamie, Pierce, Peter, and Philip Jr., 1968.

President as the first Irish Catholic candidate in 1928. Also: the geographical expansion of the Irish throughout the U.S., not just in the Northeast; the surprisingly large number of new Irish-American fortunes that have been made in the last 50 years, even as some families faded; and the decline of religion, especially after the priestly sex abuse scandals. Now, there are signs of a resilience of faith among Irish-Americans, who remain, at their core, a remarkably spiritual people. Q: How has Real Lace Revisited been received so far? JM: Very well, amazingly enough, and much of it undoubtedly undeserved. Al Smith IV said, “James MacGuire’s Real Lace Revisited is a must read. You will appreciate the historical accuracy and hilarious account provided by MacGuire. Dominick Dunne and Thomas Cahill could not compete with MacGuire’s mastery of the subject.” Publisher Charlie Scribner wrote: “MacGuire does for American Irish Catholics what Evelyn Waugh did for those eccentric English recusants at Brideshead: with wit, insight, and critically engaging affection he brings several generations to a life beyond life. But this account has the added authority of a true insider who grew up with the very families he chronicles—from the McDonnells and Murrays to the Kennedys and Buckleys. His personal appraisal rings as pitch-perfect as a Louis Auchincloss novel of WASP society.” And Michael Garvey, author of Confessions of a Catholic Worker, chimed in: “An invaluable and absorbing chronicle filled with rare, elegant historical scholarship… MacGuire

is an attentive, shrewd, and incomparably entertaining companion for anyone who wishes to tour Irish America’s most curious precincts.” Q: Is there anything in the book of special interest to Quest readers? JM: Society Editor Emerita Hilary Ross is a member of the legendary Murray clan and the wife to our new Secretary of Commerce, Wilbur, himself an alumnus of Xavier, the outstanding Jesuit high school downtown. I was also interested to learn that, despite his predominantly New Netherlands Dutch genes, Teddy Roosevelt was an original member of the American Irish Historical Society on Fifth Avenue. Q: Any future projects you’d like to share with us? JM: Oh yes. My publisher showed a distinct lack of enthusiasm for my proposed Encyclopedia of Estonian Billiards, so I am considering another Stephen Birmingham sequel, this time to The Right Places. Also, with the 50th anniversaries looming, I have a tumultuous reconsideration of the late 1960s nearly ready, and I would love to bring that forward next year. Your faithful but mysterious chronicler of yesteryear, Audax, whoever he bloody well may be, is advising me on these projects, and you may shortly hear more about them from him. u Real Lace Revisited (www.amazon.com/Real-Lace-RevisitedAmericas-Aristocracy/dp/1493024906) by James P. MacGuire, will be published by The Lyons Press on March 17. MARCH 2017 87


ART

PABLO ZORILLA: A NATURAL ARTIST

IS THE NATIVE ARTIST a naïve artist? Yes, in the literal sense that the native artist is established in one locale and is unaffected by the vocabulary generated by a school of art or the art world, in general. The naïve artist has a unique vision and he is compelled to create what this inspires. 88 QUEST

It becomes “art for art’s sake.” But make no mistake, the naïve artist has high standards. This is not the Sunday painter. This is dedicated talent finding an outlet. A lovely example of this is Pablo Zorilla, a native Dominican, who never

studied art, nor ever created anything until ten years ago, when his career took him to Casa De Campo, in La Romana. There, inspired by the varied flora, he began to create centerpieces on dining tables. Each unique piece lasts only for a meal. lts ephemeral quality adds to this

K AT E G U B E L M A N N

BY KATE GUBELMANN


ART

This page, clockwise from top left: Pablo Zorilla creates beautiful centerpieces; he uses what he forages; Pablo Zorilla; setting the table’s tableau. Opposite page: They may last only a short while, but the impact of Zorilla’s artwork remains in the memories of those lucky enough to see it.

one off experience and heightens the viewers appreciation knowing it will not be replicated again. Throughout the existence of man, the compulsion to create has taken varied forms. We look to the surviving cave paintings, mandalas, sand paintings, bark cloth, sailor’s valentines, masks, and even tattoos and face paint to catch glimpses of this mostly anonymous but hardly naive creator. This artist is not unsophisticated, he is just unaffected by formal schools of thought. In the 19th century, looking for a “pure” art became an obsession. Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) leaves for Tahiti, searching for this naïve/

native quality, while at the same time in Paris, Henri Rousseau becomes all the rage for his total lack of rigorous academic training. Many native works are ephemeral; made to last only for the symbolic moment: celebrating fertility, the seasons, a victory over an enemy, or even the dead. These local artifacts of flora, fauna, wood, and paint were created for temporary purposes. Collectors have aided in ending the destruction of things like burial masks and totems. The camera—a relatively new invention—has given global recognition to native creations, giving some sort of permanence to their

being. Yet something intrinsic to us still need the “of the moment” experience: fireworks, ice sculptures, and even Snapchat provide this thrill. The native artist creates because he has an aptitude and the discipline to do so. When Zorilla goes out into his Eden, he designs by what he sees and can forage. His understanding of form, color, and scale are as natural to him as his sense of humor. As Pablo says, his work is done with love: love of his environment, love of the flora he finds, and the love he feels when his creations are admired. Zorilla’s art may only last as long as a meal, but he is bringing it to the table, literally. u MARCH 2017 89


PA L M B E A C H S T Y L E

JENNIFER GARRIGUES BLAZES TRAILS did not want to lose the connection and creativity of the design world.

IT’S EASY TO SEE why Jennifer Garrigues had a distinguished career in modeling. But rather than continuing to drape herself in fabrics, she decided to use them to decorate homes. Here, she tells Lily Hoagland the how and why: QUEST: When did you decide to switch from modelling to interior design? JENNIFER GARRIGUES: I have always loved architecture and interior design so it was a natural transition for me. By the time I had reached my late 30s, I decided to start a new career. I still hadn’t given up modelling, so I took classes at the New York School of Design to learn the rudiments of design and business. Loving fabrics, as I do, I 90 QUEST

Q: Any fashion designers who influenced you as an interior designer? JG: Yes! James Galanos, Jean Muir, and of course Christian Dior were very much a part of my modelling career. Jimmy was a master in mixing fabrics. He created exquisite designs mixing tweed, chiffon, silk, and leather. Jean Muir was a master seamstress as well as a phenomenal designer. She understood the construction of how clothes were made. Her perfection in production was something to be admired. Mark Bohan of Christian Dior was another extraordinary talent. His clothes were glamorous and wearable. He, too, mixed many textures, and his attention to detail was beyond words. All of these talents taught me about aesthetics and how they are important for creating beautiful and functional interiors, with a dash of spice! Q: Do you see a rapport in trends on the runway and trends for the home? JG: Always! Most of the fashion design-

ers I worked for sai d that “inspiration comes from the street.” How right they were. In the 1970s, Yves St. Laurent created his sophisticated gypsy look by watching the trends on the streets and his visit to Romania. This was translated into very colorful fabrics flooding the fabric houses. Every interior had to have a special tented room with colorful and exotic fabrics. Annabel’s club in London was a prime example of this. When Calvin Klein became famous for his streamlined clothes in neutral tones. Guess what? We all went to sleeker, simpler and more elegant rooms. Q: Can you tell us about any design projects that you are currently working on that are particularly interesting and exciting to you? JG: All of my interiors are exciting and fun. I have wonderful clients but now I am exceptionally excited about a very contemporary apartment in the West Village. Also, two projects on Long Island, New York, and a beautiful house looking at the ocean in Florida.u


On her travels during her modeling days: “Japan was simplicity and elegance; India was a riot of color. Europe was glamour and sophistication. What else does a girl want for inspiration!”

This page: Jennifer Garrigues had a succesful career modeling for Christian Dior, as seen here, among many others. Opposite page: One of Garrigues’ recent works; Garrigues, now interior designer (inset).

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GIL WALSH’S ARTFUL DESIGN IN HER EARLY LIFE, Gil Walsh wanted to be a fashion and theatrical set designer, but when an opportunity came up, she switched dreams to interior design, which she set about making into a reality shortly after graduating college, by moving to Ohio to work for Irvin & Company, one of the largest in-house interior design firms of the time. She was nothing if not determined, and when she arrived she learned important skills—“how to upholster and how to make drapes,” she explains. “Understanding wood grains… I just took in everything that I could possibly learn from them.” After some time at Irvin & Company, Walsh’s career blossomed, taking on new forms. She worked at a large architecture firm, and then at an interior design firm in Pittsburg, working on several impressive projects like

the interior restoration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic Fallingwater. But after moving to Florida (“My husband had retired,” she clarifies, “and I told him, ‘I don’t do lunch!’”), she decided to start her own firm. She needed money, however. At least six to eight months of runway. So to finance her business, she melted down all of her jewelry and sold it along with her large collection of designer clothes. Gil Walsh Interiors was officially founded in 2008. Walsh is perhaps best known for her use of color and shading. Her friend, the author and designer Steven Stolman, tells me: “She’s a master colorist.” Her first monograph is even titled, Gil Walsh Interiors: A Case for Color. When it comes to explaining her love of color, Walsh will often go all the way back to the small Pennsylvania town, Latrobe, in which she was raised, where Arnold Palmer and Fred Rogers, of the Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood show, were her neighbors. “I began to love the color red,” she tells me, “because of all the time my family spent with Mr. Rogers— especially during our holidays at Christmas time. It probably made a mark on my life in design.” Also, her mother would often take Gil and her sister to Pittsburg, where she would

CO U RTE S Y O F G I L WA L S H

BY ALEX TRAVERS


DESIGN

This spread: Examples of Gil Walsh’s interior design work. Opposite page: Gil Walsh Interiors: A Case for Color (above); Gil Walsh at work (below).

enroll her children in youth art classes. “Since I was four years old,” she remembers, “I was steeped in color.” As a full service design firm, however, she admits that today her company does “do a lot of beige and a lot of off-white.” But it’s her ability to build trust with her clients that allows for a creative and collaborative effort in every project. “When clients come to us and talk about their homes,” she says, “we try and pull enough information from them about what they like and don’t like.” Then, she’ll go consult her library of images. Actually, it’s a massive library of images, one she’s built up over 35 years. “Voluminous files—of rooms, details of bookcases, details of chimneys, fireplaces, kitchens,” she enthuses. Walsh shows these to her clients, and they can point to the photos they like. “It makes it pretty easy.” Right now, she says, her firm is working on 20 projects, “and they’re all different and exiting.” One is the public space of a high-rise building in Fort Lauderdale. Another is a Relais & Châteaux lodge in Pennsylvania. Currently, she has a staff of 14 in her West Palm Beach office and a project manager in her Martha’s Vineyard space. She has homes in New York, Pennsylvania, and Florida. But here in West Palm Beach, she’s actually outgrown her office space. Business is that good. “So,” she declares, “we’re moving.” From where Gil Walsh sits, it has all gone pretty well. The kind of recognition she values most, she’s had plenty. And she’s confident there will be more to come. “We spend a lot of time with our clients,” she reiterates. “They are telling us what to do, but they don’t really know it at first. When they find out they really do have a sense of design, it makes us so happy. Everybody has taste. Sometimes it’s just trapped within us.” u MARCH 2017 93


LIFESTYLE

THE HOMES AT 1 HOTEL South Beach have redefined the luxury lifestyle in South Florida. The trendsetting ecoglam interiors designed by award-winning Brazilian architect Deborah Aguiar are both engaging and immediately soothing as you enter this iconic Miami Beach venue. The hotel and residences are a pioneering project of partners Richard LeFrak and Barry Sternlicht, created to house a new hotel brand, “The 1” that celebrates the connection between nature, design, and wellness. As Richard LeFrak says, “1 Hotel & Homes South Beach is for the discerning global citizen who recognizes the connection between their external surroundings and their intended sense of well-being.” The striking quality of The 1’s interiors is derived from the natural materials throughout the building, including reclaimed woods, elegantly designed stonework, and all-natural fabrics in muted shades of beige and white, and an occasional color of the sea and sky. Beyond the striking decor, owners are surrounded by five-star creature comforts and unsurpassed access to every 94 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F 1 H OT E L & H O M E S

AT 1 WITH MIAMI BEACH


This spread: Images of Penthouse 1610, a spectacularly furnished duplex; a spiritual yoga class (below). The beauty of 1 Hotel & Homes South Beach, with all of its healthy

CO U RTE S Y O F 1 H OT E L & H O M E S

offerings, is unsurpassed.

possible amenity. The endless comforts and services make owners feel like guests—an experience which begins at arrival when a warm and helpful staff greets you, including the 24-hour concierge who is there to satisfy your every wish. Picture for a moment a day in your new home at The 1. Upon request, your refrigerator has been pre-stocked with organic fruit and vegetables just prior to your arrival, even though you might like to take a meal at one of the hotel’s six five-star restaurants. After waking up to the exquisite sunrise over the sea, you choose to go up to the rooftop and join a spiritual class of yoga or meditation, followed by a quick splash in the rooftop pool. The rest of the day can be spent relaxing at the beach, or at one of the four swimming pools. Or you could to jump into a curated workout at the Spartan Gym, a 14,000-square-foot facility focusing on athleticism, balance, and agility, or join a spin class at the on-property SoulCycle. Either way, you’ll reward yourself with an amazing spa treatment at the hotel’s acclaimed Bamford Haybarn Spa, specializing in the use of MARCH 2017 95


This spread: 1 Hotel & Homes’ 14,000-square-foot Spartan Gym (opposite page) and acclaimed Bamford Haybarn Spa, specializing

organic products. “Bamford,” says LeFrak, “has a likeminded commitment to caring for the mind, body, and spirit around a heartfelt connection with nature.” Throughout the day, your meal choices abound among the six restaurants on The 1’s property. You can have lunch at Watr, a sushi-themed restaurant on the roof of the hotel, or at any one of three other poolside restaurants, where healthy food is available. You may wish to take your evening meal at Beachcraft, the hotel’s signature restaurant operated in partnership with award winning chef Tom Colicchio. Beachcraft offers a variety of mouthwatering dishes prepared with organic ingredients sourced from local farms and fishermen. As an owner, you might even decide to have your meal served in the privacy of your own home. Now that’s luxury! The great state of Florida is blessed with white-sand beaches, spectacular bodies of water, and one-of-a-kind sunsets; and the beauty and atmosphere of The 1, with all of its healthy offerings, reflect this sensibility. Its location in and at the heart of Miami Beach is unrivaled: just outside your door is a vibrant, sophisticated, and international city filled with energy and fun. There are hundreds of designer boutiques and popular restaurants within a short walk from The 1, or just ask the concierge to send you over in The 1’s own Tesla. The museums and art galleries in Miami are world-class, the watersports abound, and the nightlife is unsurpassed. Really, 96 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F 1 H OT E L & H O M E S

in the use of organic products.


CO U RTE S Y O F 1 H OT E L & H O M E S

LIFESTYLE

South Beach is the perfect place to embrace and enjoy life. Right now, only a dozen residences at The 1 are still available for purchase. Penthouse 1610, a spectacularly furnished duplex, was recently placed on the market. “It’s one of the most stunning homes available in South Florida,” assures Camille Douglas, a senior managing director at LeFrak. “Its nature-inspired aesthetic inspires a soothing and splendid lifestyle; it literally transports you into another world. It’s the perfect place to call home whether you enjoy entertaining or simply relaxing while you take in breathtaking ocean views.” When STRING executive chairman Ari Horowitz first came to Miami Beach, he, too, was dazzled by all 1 Hotel & Homes had to offer. He liked the pulse of the city and hoped to become a resident at 1 Hotel & Homes. “I fell in love with the 1 Hotel & Homes brand and wanted to own a place there,” he explains. “It matched my style—chic and elegant, but not over the top. Plus I love being able to walk down to the beach to enjoy my kite surfing.” Horowitz also appreciates how The 1’s design fits in with South Florida’s elements—the surrounding nature seamlessly flowing into the lobby and down the hallways. “It’s really something special,” says Horowitz. Christopher Hohmann—another former hotel guest turned homeowner—agrees. “1 Hotel & Homes,” he confirms, “is a true gem.” Come visit The 1 and see for yourself; it’s your dream come true. Only better! u MARCH 2017 97


THIS RARE 25-FOOT-WIDE townhome in Carnegie Hill, distinguished by a bowed façade, offers a sophisticated lifestyle in a family-friendly atmosphere. Originally built in 1901, Mott B. Schmidt, a young architect who would later become one of the city’s premier designers, oversaw a renovation in 1919 for Grenville T. Emmet, a former law partner of Franklin D. Roosevelt and U.S. Minister to the Netherlands and later, Austria. More recently, in 2012, this architectural jewel came fully into the 21st century with an impeccable gut-renovation. Handsome houses distinguish the area, and the surrounding residences on 94th Street all have architectural interest, creating an overall harmonious charm to the lovely tree-lined street. The quiet, relatively private residential section of the Upper East Side boasts fabulous private schools, restaurants, and unique boutiques, but 3 E 94th Street is just steps from the greatest amenity New York has to offer—Central Park. While the location is superb, the house itself is perfection. Boasting 9,850 square feet, 12-foot ceilings, and five wood-burning fireplaces, this residence epitomizes both luxury and comfort, offering everything one could desire for gracious living. There is ample room for a family with six spacious bedrooms, six full bathrooms, and two additional powder rooms, as well as a four-passenger elevator that services all six floors. A fully equipped gym, sauna, mud room, media room, study, as 98 QUEST

well as a landscaped limestone garden terrace, in addition to a sixth-floor rooftop terrace (which possesses outstanding views of Central Park), make this home truly a refuge in the city. For formal entertaining, the parlor floor is ideal. Entering the house through handsome mahogany doors you proceed through a grand limestone gallery, adjacent to a large, sun-flooded dining room. The sumptuous living room boasts an elegant fireplace and a wall of French doors overlooking the garden. For the chef in the family, there is no better place in the home to spend time than in the large eat-in kitchen. Southern sunlight spills through charming bowed windows, while an inviting fireplace beckons on colder days. In addition to a banquette seating area, any chef will delight in the La Cornue five-burner stove with gas/electric ovens and warming drawers, Sub-Zero side-by-side refrigerator with two lateral drawers, and two Miele dishwashers. A full basement includes a large laundry room and a 400-bottle capacity climate-controlled wine cellar. Floors throughout have been finished with French baked oak parquet panels. The house is fully wired for security alarm and central air-conditioning systems. A Savant Pro Automation System manages lighting, heating, air-conditioning, and media systems throughout. u For more information, contact Lois Nasser of Sotheby’s International Realty at 212.606.7706.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

3 EAST 94TH


OPEN HOUSE

Clockwise from top: South-facing, spacious eat-in kitchen with wood-burning fireplace; garden trellised terrace, fully equipped for outdoor entertaining; inviting family room off the kitchen; master bedroom with ensuite baths and abundant closets; glamorous entrance gallery with soaring ceilings with steps up to formal dining room. Opposite page: Stately living room with French doors overlooking the garden; bowed façade of this magnificent home, which is steps away from Central Park (inset). For more information, contact Lois Nasser of Sotheby’s International Realty at 212.606.7706.


CALENDAR

MARCH

On Marhc 18, the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts will present the National Theatre Company of Jamaica. For more information, call 646.765.4773.

GOOD DEED DINNER

The Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center will hold its Annual Palm Beach Celebration at The Breakers. For more information, call 561.655.6611. CHOICE CHARIT Y

and their dedicated female volunteers at The Pierre beginning at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.606.0243.

Club. The evening will be chaired by Bill and Nancy Rollick and Dale and Marietta McNulty. For more information, call 561.515.1527.

VISIONARY OCCASION

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute will be holding its Annual ‘Evening of Vision’ Gala at The Mar-A-Lago

Palm Beach Day Academy will be hosting the Feather Ball on the

The Citizens Committee for New York City will be hosting their New Yorker for New York Gala honoring Tom Israel. For more information, call 212.254.6677. MEDICINAL MATTERS

The Hospital for Special Surgery in Florida will host its annual panel event followed by a cocktail reception at The Breakers beginning at 4:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.774.2650.

3

DANCING SHOES

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will be holding their Annual Dinner Dance at The Breakers beginning at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.6611.

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LEADING LADIES

4

CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION

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6

EXCEPTIONAL EVENING RUFFLING FEATHERS

Massachusetts General Hospital with be hosting its 11th Annual Seminar and Luncheon, featuring talks by leading experts in psychiatry and neuroscience. For more information, call 617.724.6439.

New York Junior League will be hosting their 65th Annual Winter Ball to commemorate groundbreaking community service projects

school’s upper campus. The festivities will begin at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.1188.

On March 6, the Citizens Committee for New York City will host their New Yorker for New York Gala. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

The United Way of NYC’s Women’s Leadership Council will be hosting their Power of Women to Make a Difference Awards Luncheon at Cipriani on 42nd Street. They will honor the achievements of outstanding young women who are giving back to the community. For more information, call 212.921.9070.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

1


CALENDAR

10

APRIL 1

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

The Alzheimer’s Association will host its Third Annual Rita Hayworth Luncheon. There will also be a fashion show featured. The event will be chaired by Princess Yasmin Aga Khan and Carleton Varney. For more information, call 312.604.1680.

TAKING TWILIGHT

Opportunity Inc. will be hosting their ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’ Gala in the Garden beginning at 6:30 p.m. The chairmen will be Allison Wren, Joan Klann, Dr. Carter, and Afsy Pottash. For more information, call 561.712.9221.

ROSE COLORED GLASSES

Rosarian Academy will be hosting their 38th Annual Rose Ball and Auction at The Breakers beginning at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.6611.

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DELICIOUS DONATION

Chef Daniel Boulud will be supporting Citymeals once again by hosting his 20th Annual Sunday Supper at his namesake restaurant, Daniel. Guests will enjoy a cocktail reception and dinner at the infamous restaurant. For more information, call 212.687.1290.

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ARTISTIC ACCOLADE

The Guild Hall Academy of the Arts will be hosting their Award Dinner at The Rainbow Room at Rockefeller Center while celebrating their many artistic achievements and furthering their cause to educate diverse audiences. For more information, call 631.324.0806.

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MEAL OF MELODIES

Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation Guild will be holding

3

STRONG SALUTATION

their Musical Luncheon at the Beach Club in Palm Beach. For more information, call 561.805.6298.

in Haiti will host its Annual Palm Beach Fundraiser Gala at the Sailfish Club. For more information, call 561.702.7471.

The Navy SEAL Foundation and Museum/Memorial will be hosting the 3rd Annual Palm Beach Navy SEAL Evening of Tribute at the Mar-a-Lago Club. This foundation helps the families of fallen SEAL’s. The patriotic evening will include a cocktail reception, seated dinner, and keynote speakers beginning at 5:45 p.m. For more information, call 561.444.8828.

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Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College presents the National Theatre Company of Jamaica. For more information, call 646.765.4773.

The American Lyric Theatre presents InsightALT: Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Fallen Giant. Holmes and Watson will solve a mystery unlike one you have ever seen before. For more information, visit 646.765.4773.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital will be hosting their 8th Annual Palm Beach Dinner at Club Collette. They will be raising funds so that families that come to Saint Jude’s never have to pay a bill. For more information, call 305.537.1429.

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7

The Palm Beach Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will be holding a festive Spring Luncheon and Fashion Show at the Beach Club. For more information, call 561.370.7738.

The Garden Club of Palm Beach will be previewing their Flower Show. The event will take place at the Society of the Four Arts. There will be many exquisite displays of horticultural design. For more information, call 561.655.7227.

On March 12, chef Daniel Boulud will be supporting Citymeals once again by hosting his 20th Annual Sunday Supper at his namesake restaurant, Daniel. For more information, call 212.687.1290.

PEPPY PRESENTATION

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FASHIONABLE FETE

The Fashion Institute of Technology with be hosting its Annual Awards Gala at the New York Marriott Marquis. For more information, call 212.217.4105.

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FUN-FILLED PHILANTHROPY

The Hospital Albert Schweitzer

GET A CLUE

A LOOK TO THE PAST

PARK PART Y

GREEN GARDENS

On April 7, the Garden Club of Palm Beach will be previewing its annual Flower Show. The event will take place at the Society of the Four Arts. There will be many exquisite displays of horticultural design. For more information, call 561.655.7227. MARCH 2017 101


KICKING AROUND 212 FIFTH AVENUE BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

BEAUTIFUL, COOL, and kind—few people can claim that magical triumvirate (and naturally, those who could never would). Kick Kennedy is one of those people. For the March issue of Quest, we had the pleasure of shooting Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy at 212 Fifth Avenue, an iconic pre-war, neo-Gothic landmarked building and newly converted luxury condominium at the crossroads of Fifth Avenue and Madison Square Park. Designed in 1912 by renowned architects Schwartz & Gross as a commercial space and masterfully restored by Helpern Architects, the 24-story building is clad in stately limestone and houses apartments that are open, expansive, and inspiringly loft-like, including a multi-level rooftop penthouse with two levels of outdoor space offering spellbinding views of Manhattan in every direction. For the residences at 212 Fifth, listed exclusively by Nikki Field 102 QUEST

of Sotheby’s International Realty, no attention to detail was spared: there are double-sized windows, Chevron-patterned floors of solid rift-and-quartered oak, Calacatta marble tops, generous thresholds, and even custom brass-finish door handles based on a 1934 Walter Gropius design. Speaking of storied histories moving into the modern day, Kick may be the granddaughter of Robert F. Kennedy and the daughter of Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (her grandmother is Ethel Kennedy, and her great-aunt is Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, after whom she is named), but she is not one to lie back and rest on her family’s laurels. Kick is, well, quite a “kick.” Sometimes I like to call her “Kickles,” just to watch her break into a clever grin. Like her great-aunt Kathleen, who volunteered for the Red Cross, Kick is not only fetching and full of vigor (with an exciting hint of rebellion), but she also gives back to her

© CO R B I S / CO R B I S V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S

HAIR AND MAKEUP BY VALERY JOSEPH


This page: Kick wears a dress by Elizabeth Kennedy, Harry Winston’s Large Diamond Cluster Earrings, Harry Winston’s Diamond Cluster Wreath Necklace, a Harry Winston emerald-cut diamond ring, and Harry Winston’s diamond Red Carpet Bracelet. Opposite page: Joseph Kennedy, Jr., Kathleen Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy, the three eldest children of U.S. Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy, walk to Westminster on September 3, 1939, to hear the British war declaration against Germany.


104 QUEST


This page: Kick wears Carolina Herrera’s strapless gingham gown, a Verdura pearl scarf necklace, Verdura’s pearl drop earrings that originally belonged to Mrs. Jayne Wrightsman, and a Verdura South Sea cultured pearl, diamond, and platinum ring. Opposite page: Kick in Ralph Lauren Collection’s distressed cow leather jacket and rustic lamé dress, Stuart Weitzman’s “Sultry” sandals in black suede, Vhernier’s “Abbraccio” earrings in rose gold, Vhernier’s “Kiss” ring in rose gold, and Vhernier’s “Giunco Due” ring in rose gold.


This page: Kick wears the Carolina Herrera pink v-back gown, Harry Winston’s Cascading Diamond Earrings, and Harry Winston’s diamond Red Carpet Bracelet. Opposite page: Kick in a gold sequin and tulle gown by Oscar de la Renta paired with Jimmy Choo’s “Cloud” clutch and Verdura’s cultured pearl, diamond, platinum, and gold “Tiara Feather” bracelet and diamond “Comet” earclips. Verdura jewelry sits on the dressing table, including the Verdura “Sunburst” cuff in sapphire, ruby, pearl, diamond, enamel, and gold.


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This page: Kick wears the nutmeg floral silk Georgette bias dress by Michael Kors Collection and Vhernier’s “Abbraccio” earclips in rose gold, “Giunco Due” cuff in rose gold, and “Kiss” ring in rose gold. Opposite page: Kick wears Hunter’s Original Tall Gloss Boots and Rubber Raincoat, both in yellow.


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This page: Kick wears Valentino’s Spring/Summer 2017 Look 43 dress; Vhernier’s “Abbraccio” earclips in rose gold; Vhernier’s “Giunco Due” ring in rose gold; a Verdura pink tourmaline, diamond, enamel, chrome, and gold “Maltese Cross” cuff; and a Verdura sapphire, ruby, pearl, diamond, enamel, and gold “Sunburst” cuff. Opposite page: Kick wears Lilly Pulitzer’s Tilly Midi Fit & Flare dress in Tiki Pink, Stuart Weitzman’s “Nudewrap” heels in bisque suede, Verdura’s gold “Double Wrap Curb-Link Bracelet,” Vhernier’s “Giunco Due” ring in rose gold, and Vhernier’s “Pan di Zucchero” bracelet in rose gold and diamonds.


This page: Kick wears a dress by Elizabeth Kennedy; Manolo Blahnik’s “Tondala Wrap” heels in black suede; Vhernier’s “Abbraccio” earclips in white gold and diamonds; Verdura’s vintage diamond, platinum, and gold “Calla Lily” brooch; Verdura’s diamond and platinum “Lace” ring; and Vhernier’s “Tonneau” ring in white gold and pavé diamonds. Opposite page: Kick wears Veronica Beard’s August Boho Dress and Spirit Notched Collar Jacket; Jimmy Choo’s “Kelly” heels in iris perforated suede; Harry Winston’s Large Diamond Cluster Earrings; Verdura’s cultured pearl, diamond, and platinum ring; and Verdura’s diamond and platinum “Lace” ring. Inset: Kathleen Kennedy (1920–1948), later Kathleen Cavendish, Marchioness of Hartington, wearing her American

community. As Legacy Ambassador for the Waterkeeper Alliance, which protects and enhances global waterways, Kick is devoted to maintaining clean water all over the world. She even hiked Mount Kilimanjaro with actors Emile Hirsch and Jessica Biel in 2010 to help raise water shortage awareness. And yes, she is also related to that other pretty, petite, and ever stylish brunette—Jackie Kennedy—Kick’s great-aunt through marriage. It was hard not to draw similarities as delicate and spirited Kick lounged around one of the Pembrooke & Ives–designed modern residences at 212 Fifth. We couldn’t tell which was more inspiring: the sweeping vistas of iconic landmarks like the Flatiron Building, MetLife Tower Clock, Empire State Building, and Madison Square Park—or the sight of Kick in killer looks from the Spring 2017 runways. u 112 QUEST

H O R AC E A B R A H A M S / K E Y S TO N E / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Red Cross uniform in London, 1943.


Quest STYLE BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER

“Style is very personal. It has nothing to do with fashion. Fashion is over quickly. Style is forever.” pages we celebrate Quest’s favorite arbiters of that tricky, five-letter term kown as “style.” Their sense of it has endured throughout the years, and will continue to do so for many years to come. 114 QUEST

CO N D É N A S T

So said renown fashion designer Ralph Lauren, an icon of style himself. In the following


This page, clockwise from top: Marella Agnelli photographed by Horst P. Horst at home, 1967; Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt lights Eleanor Young’s cigarette at the opening of the Sert Room of the Waldorf=Astoria in New York, 1937; an animated Diana Vreeland standing next to Pierre Cardin, 1982; Manuela Hudson Vanderbilt, wife of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt II, at Saratoga Race Course, 1939.

CO N D É N A S T; A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; RO N G A LE LL A / W I R E I M A G E / G E T T Y; A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K

Opposite page: Anouk Aimée photographed by Bert Stern for Vogue, 1965.

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This page, clockwise from top: The Duke and Duchess of Windsor (right) on holiday in Venice with, from left, C. Z. Guest, Christopher Dunchy, and Mrs. Brooks Howe, 1955; image still from Stavisky, directed by Alain Resnais in France and Italy, 1974; Grace Kelly of Monaco and her daughter, Caroline, walking home from school ca. 1970. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Marella Agnelli at Villa Bona, 1969, photographed by Ugo Mulas; Jane Birkin, 1973; Charlotte Rampling at Heathrow

A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; T H E KO B A L CO LLE C T I O N

Airport, London, 1976; Hunter S. Thompson and Roxanne Pulitzer, 1982.

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R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; DAV I D PA R K E R / A S S O C I ATE D N E W S PA P E R S / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K

Quest

STYLE

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A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; H U LTO N - D E U TS C H CO LLE C T I O N / CO R B I S / CO R B I S V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S


Quest

LY N N K A R L I N / P E N S K E M E D I A / R E X / S H U T T E R S TO C K ; RO N G A LE LL A / W I R E I M A G E ; S A L T R A I N A / P E N S K E M E D I A / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; K E Y S TO N E - F R A N C E / G A M M A - K E Y S TO N E V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S

STYLE

This page, clockwise from top left: Slim Keith and Kay Meehan at the opening of an Edward Weston exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, 1975; Caroline Kennedy and John F. Kennedy Jr. leaving their Fifth Avenue apartment en route to a joint birthday party at Le Club for Caroline’s 18th and John’s 21st birthdays, New York, 1978; Babe Paley—sporting a bold plaid jacket, knit gloves, and a Chanel bag—leaving Gertrude’s after lunch with Jean Tailer, 1974; Alain Delon and Romy Schneider, just after their engagement, on their way to Lugano, Switzerland, to meet Delon’s parents, 1959. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Bunny Mellon, close friend of the Kennedy family, directing the placement of flowers at the Robert Kennedy gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery, 1968; Steve McQueen circa 1970; Alice Topping relaxing beside a swimming pool in Palm Beach, Florida, 1959.

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CO N D É N A S T; M A R Q U E TO N / A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; G E O R G E S D E K E E R LE / G E T T Y I M A G E S


Quest

N I C K M AC H A L A B A / P E N S K E M E D I A / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; TO NY PA L M I E R I / P E N S K E M E D I A / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; © G LO B E P H OTO S , D I G I TA L CO LO R I Z AT I O N BY LO R N A C L A R K

STYLE

This page, clockwise from top left: Amanda Burden outside Orsini’s after a lunch, New York, 1972; Bill Blass and Nan Kempner at Mortimer’s for Swifty Lazar’s party celebrating the opening of Porgy and Bess, 1983; Aristotle and Jackie Onassis celebrating the first anniversary of their marriage at Neraida nightclub in Greece, 1969; Elizabeth Taylor and husband Richard Burton arrive at Heathrow Airport, London, 1972. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Getty, Jr. photographed by Patrick Lichfield on the raised walks of a jungly patio at their Marrakech home, 1970; Yul Brynner, Baron Guy de Rothschild, Marie-Helene de Rothschild, and Jerry Lewis (seated) at a party hosted by Baron Guy de Rothschild dubbed “Bonjour la Nuit” at the Lido in Paris, France, 1971; Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales, watching the annual Braemar Highland Games in Scotland, 1983.

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P H NY TO OTOPACLRM ED I EI R T I / P E N S K E M E D I A / R E X / S H U T T E R S TO C K


Quest

K E Y S TO N E - F R A N C E / G A M M A - K E Y S TO N E V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ; CO N D É N A S T; A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; P H I LL I P J AC K S O N / A S S O C I ATE D N E W S PA P E R S / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K

STYLE

This page, clockwise from top left: Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth II watch competitors at the Badminton Horse Trials held at the Duke of Beaufort’s estate, 1968; Nena von Schlebrügge, wearing a pink crêpe jumpsuit and a pistachio green satin housecoat by Arnold Scaasi, photographed by Horst P. Horst for Vogue, 1964; Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, smoking, attends the opening of New York City’s Palladium nightclub with a young Jimmy Donahue, 1936; model Dorthe Koeigsfeldt wearing a look from Pierre Balmain, 1966. Opposite page: Gloria Guinness, wearing a beige felt sombrero from Balenciaga and a made-to-order dress from Courrèges, photographed prior to accepting the J.C. Penny award as the “best fashion journalist for an American magazine,” 1967.

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J’ADORE, NOW AND EVERMORE

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

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This page: Ultra-feminine suits are part of Dior’s tradition of flattering silhouettes; Dior by Mats Gustafson, published by Rizzoli (inset). Opposite page: The 1949 Junon dress, adorned with a skirt reminiscent of a peacock,

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

the Roman goddess Juno’s favorite bird.

“I WANT IT TO LOOK really easy, like I did it in a couple of minutes,” says Swedish illustrator Mats Gustafson about his renderings of Dior’s collections in his new book, Dior by Mats Gustafson (Rizzoli). “But it’s never like that.” With a complex blend of minimalism and sensuality, of abstract shapes and vibrant colors, he brings to life the bold and feminine spirit of the venerable fashion house. Gustafson steps into a role made famous by René Gruau, whose friendship and creative collaboration with Christian Dior began in 1947 with the premiere of Dior’s “New Look,” which emphasized a woman’s curves. But where Gruau was known for using storytelling in his pictures, Gustafson prefers to dig into the essence of a single image, infusing each illustration with a sense of purity. Modern and elegant, his drawings are in keeping with the fashion house’s legacy of design—from Christian Dior to Raf Simons and now today, with Maria Grazia Chiuri as the first female creative director in its 70-year history. In Dior, readers can enjoy the spectral glow of Gustafson’s illustrations, which deftly convey how the allure of Dior has endured, and why we will continue to proclaim, “J’adore!” u

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This page: Gustafson’s illustrations have a sophisticated minimalism that perfectly complements looks like the Frac dress. Opposite page: In 1947, Christian Dior famously created a “New Look,” which was designed to enhance a woman’s curves, and is still a staple of the fashion

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

house’s haute couture line.

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CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I


This page: Modern and fun shapes and collections. Opposite page: A look from the 2015 Spring/Summer collection.

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CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

cuts characterize the ready-to-wear


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CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I


130 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I


This page: The red wool 1948 Arizona coat, with its dramatic scarf-tied neckline, is a fashion classic. Opposite page: A heartfelt look from the 2017 ready-to-

CO U RTE S Y O F R I Z Z O L I

wear Spring/Summer collection.

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I WENT TO A MARVELLOUS PARTY BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER

This year the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will celebrate 30 years of its annual dinner dance. We dug into the archives to find some of the best snapshots to create a photo portfolio for the ages.

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F O U N DAT I O N O F PA L M B E AC H

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E P R E S E RVAT I O N

This page: Earl T. Smith and Sue Whitmore arrive at the party in 1982. Opposite: Jane Dudley, departing from the dinner dance in 1982.

QUEST ARCHIVE: JANUARY 2012


Scenes from the marvelous dinner dance hosted every year by the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach. This page, clockwise from top left: Alyne Massey and Hillie Mahoney stand by the tables before guests arrive, 1992; Estee Lauder and Norman Parkinson on the dance floor, 1986; Opposite, clockwise from top left: Mary Lou Whitney on the dance floor, F O U N DAT I O N O F PA L M B E AC H

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E P R E S E RVAT I O N

Pat Patterson and Guilford Dudley in conversation at the table, 1992. 1982; Polly Ober and C.Z. Guest arriving at the party, 1997; Chessy Patcevitch at dinner, 1994; Pauline Pitt and Arnold Scassi during cocktails, 2005; Scott Snyder and Audrey Gruss standing before dinner, 1992; Kate Ford, Harry Platt, Thorunn Wathne, and Frank Chopin during cocktails, 1996; Jean Tailer and John Loring standing outside, 1993; center, Noreen Drexel and John Mashek seated during dinner, 1986.

QUEST ARCHIVE: JANUARY 2012 MARCH 2017 135


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QUEST ARCHIVE: APRIL 1995


QUEST ARCHIVE: APRIL 1995


ELIZABETH KENNEDY’S CONTEMPORARY CLASSICS BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

FOR 31-YEAR-OLD Elizabeth Kennedy, dresses seem to be her destiny. Elegant, couture-quality dresses, that is. Bitten by the design bug at an early age, Kennedy has been crafting exquisite garments for as long as she can remember, combining the allure of Old Hollywood icons with the savoir-faire of an ’80s supermodel. With 10 collections to date for her namesake brand and a recent exclusive bridal capsule collection for Moda Operandi, Kennedy’s star is on the rise, if not firmly cemented in the fashion horizon. Her collections have caught the eye of a high-caliber clientele that includes Audrey Gruss, Ariana Rockefeller, Georgina Bloomberg, and Amy Fine Collins as well as celebrities like Malin Akerman, Regina King, Giovanna Battaglia, and Molly Sims. “For red-carpet events, a gown needs to be both a work of art and a workhorse,” notes client Ariana Rockefeller, “and Elizabeth strikes this balance perfectly. Every aspect of the construction, from the corsetry to the embellishment, has an impressive level of detail.” For Rockefeller, Kennedy’s style is timeless yet fresh and modern. “I love wearing Elizabeth Kennedy gowns to my events,”

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Opposite page: Elizabeth Kennedy in her showroom with gowns from her Autumn-Winter 2016 collection. This page: Elizabeth Kennedy Gold Embroidered Underskirt with Bi-Colored Over Dress, from the Spring-

B R A N D O N S C H U L M A N ( O P P O S I TE PA G E ) ; CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H K E N N E DY ( T H I S PA G E )

Summer 2017 collection (SS17).


she tells me. “Elizabeth is supremely talented in her design concepts and diligent in the quality of her pieces.” Indeed, Kennedy’s current Spring-Summer 2017 collection is marked by an impressive combination of high concepts and diligent quality. Here, she sits down to talk with me about what inspired this spring’s collection, how she came into fashion, and who she might have been if not a designer.

Q: Can you describe the path that led you to your own label? A: I grew up in Yardley, Pennsylvania, and moved to New York when I was 18 to attend Parsons The New School for Design. I held a number of internships, my favorite being at Zac Posen. After graduating, I landed my first job as an Assistant Designer in the couture division at Isaac Mizrahi, and was eventually Head Designer for the collection. After Isaac, I worked for Donna Karan, J. Mendel, and Max Mara before launching my own collection. I always knew I wanted my own brand—even before college. In

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CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H K E N N E DY

Q: What was your very first fashion design? A: My mother and grandmother were amazing seamstresses and taught me how to sew and make doll clothes when I was very young. I was so fascinated with textiles, and my mother always had remnants lying around that she was using to make costumes and clothes for us as little kids. I remember going into our basement when I was about six or seven years old and draping dresses for myself. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, but the passion to create was there!


This page: Elizabeth Kennedy Organza Parallelogram High-Neck Gown (SS17). Opposite page: Elizabeth Kennedy Color-Block Shoulder Cape Gown (SS17).


Two-Tiered Embroidered Cocktail Dress (SS17). Opposite page: Elizabeth Kennedy Strapless Gathered-Jersey Cape Gown (SS17). 144 QUEST

CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H K E N N E DY

This page: Elizabeth Kennedy


2012 I thought, “Why don’t I just do this for myself?” I had been building a portfolio of work that was all pointing in a similar direction, so I just followed my instincts. I also felt disappointed in the couture/eveningwear options in the market. I wanted to change how eveningwear was perceived. Q: Is your design sense marked by one signature style, or does it change from season to season, collection to collection? A: The collections evolve each season, but there is always an element of drama mixed in with my handcrafted evening silhouettes to set them apart from traditional black-tie dressing. The combination of both graphic and sculptural lines with an added theatrical twist—such as a cascading train, a unique color combination, or over-the-top volume— has become a signature. Q: Was style innate for you, or learned? A: Both. I was born with a desire to create, but my style has evolved throughout my education and career. Q: Can you describe the ideal woman you design for? A: I grew up idolizing supermodels of the ’80s and ’90s—Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Kate Moss are still “it” for me. There are also always Old Hollywood beauties like Audrey Hepburn and Grace Kelly who are mainstays, too. I generally find 20th-century fashion to be full of inspiration—it is so diverse and there are always new things that pique my interest. Q: What is your own personal style like? A: Classic, modern, and elegant without being uncomfortable.


Q: Are there certain colors, fabrics, or designs that you find yourself drawn to over and over again? A: I always love black and white: I think it is the chicest, most timeless combination—it will never grow tired. In terms of actual color, emerald green is becoming signature to the brand.

Q: If you weren’t a designer, what do you think you would be? A: Hard to say, because I pretty much always wanted to be a designer. But when I was young, like six or seven, I had a phase when I was into archeology. I used to collect rocks and fossils. I was also good at math and science (chemistry was my best subject, I was on math team, etc.). So sometimes I think if life had turned out differently for me, I might have pursued a career in archeological research. u

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CO U RTE S Y O F E L I Z A B E T H K E N N E DY

Q: Can you tell us about this Spring-Summer 2017 collection? Inspirations, how it holds together, what story it tells? A: The collection features 20 exquisitely detailed dresses referencing the vibrant backdrop of the French Riviera during the eighties. Many of the details were inspired by vintage swimwear, including brightly colored trims, cutouts, and lace-up backs reimagined for evening. I was inspired by one of my all-time favorite movies, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, which takes place in a fictional town in the South of France. I found the marriage of a classically beautiful setting with the playfulness of eighties fashion to be such an amazing place in time; I loved the bold colors, glamour, and drama set against the backdrop of palm trees and the Cote d’Azur. I imagined an American woman vacationing in the South of France—at the beach by day, and at a black-tie ball or casino by night.


This page: Elizabeth Kennedy Tie-Up Detail Tea-Length Cocktail Dress (SS17). Opposite page: Elizabeth Kennedy Scoop-Neck Scrambled Sequin and Paillette Gown (SS17).


T R AV E R S

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY ALE X TRAVER S Natalie Ludwig and Elizabeth Davidson toast at the premier of Netflix documentary Casablancas: The Man Who Loved Women.


Clockwise from top left: Vogue.com style editor Edward Barsamian; Aaron Finch toasts Elite New York model Teresa Moore; Ashley Smith; Coco Rocha poses with the candy and champagne and party favors; IMG Worldwide model Mariah Strongin with Ross Matsubara.

MOËT AND CHANDON HOST THE PREMIERE OF CASABLANCAS: THE MAN WHO LOVED WOMEN

B FA . CO M

ELITE MODELS FOUNDER John Casablancas would have

loved it. The crowd at the screening party of Casablancas: The Man Who Loved Women—the Netflix biopic chronicling Casablancas’ life—included a chic supermodel-stew, spanning several generations. Veterans such as Carol Alt, Paulina Prizkova, Kim Alexis, Debbie Dickinson, and Frederique van der Wal mingled with modern marvels like Coco Rocha (rocking

a new platinum bob) and Kate Bock. And there were freshfaced newcomers, too, like Mariah Strongin (look out for this one), who recently signed to IMG Worldwide. Plus, there was candy and champagne. Guests helped themselves to popcorn, gummy candies, and Moët Minis from the concession stand walls before the screening. Also spotted: Michele Hicks, Teresa Moore, Ashley Smith, Cipriana Quann, and Kemp Muhl. MARCH 2017 149


some records at the After Party for The Founder; Laura Osnes poses on the red carpet at the premier of The Founder; Joyce Varvatos and Loree Rodkin.

▲ THE FOUNDER AFTER PARTY

▼ POST GOLDEN GLOBES SOIREE

I’M LOVIN’ IT! Michael Keaton ambled around the newly branded Roxy Hotel in downtown Manhattan, stopping to chat with Harvey Weinstein, Gina Gershon, and Patrick Wilson. He was here celebrating the opening of The Founder, the biopic where he plays McDonald’s self-proclaimed founder Ray Kroc, a hustler who never found the right product to hawk until he saw those golden arches. Keaton’s performance as Kroc is electrifying. The movie is pretty damn good too. So cheers to him. This was a celebration well deserved.

SHOW ME THE...dance moves? That’s right, Cuba Gooding,

Kerry Washington, Georgina Chapman, and Naomi Campbell catch up over drinks; Cuba Gooding Jr. provides impromptu entertainment; Emily Ratajkowski enjoys herself at The Weinstein Company and Grey Goose Golden Globes After Party. 150 QUEST

Jr. cut a rug at the official Golden Globes after party on January 8, and then others followed suit. But there was a lot to celebrate, and the stars were looking good that night: Emily Ratajkowski rocked a stunning gold dress (don’t listen to the idiot press who called it a “fashion malfunction”) and Kerry Washington, Georgina Chapman, and Naomi Campbell all caught up over drinks in high style. Now, let’s see what the Oscars—and the after parties—have in store.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

YGL

Michael Keaton and Griffin Dunne; Hayleigh Hatcher spins


Clockwise from top left: Teala Dunn blows a kiss to the cameras; Dillon Margolis and Dylan Jagger Lee strike a silly pose in front of the Sony virtual background; Jared Goff and his sister Lauren Goff; Nick Shanholtz and Robert Gainley of the Lost Kings before their performance; The Lost Kings give a stunning performance.

A VIRTUAL REALITY: SONY’S “LOST IN MUSIC” LAUNCH

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

MUSIC FESTIVALS ARE popular these days. Real popular. But

they usually don’t begin until April. What a drag. So Sony figured, why wait until the weather is warmer to experience the trance-y, trippy, take-your-clothes-off madness that is festival season? Let’s throw a party now, only let’s try it with virtual reality. And they did. Inside a Los Angeles studio. We spotted

Victoria Justice immersed in the new PlayStation VR, where this reality had viewers lost in wild artistic scenes as they listened to music provided by The Chainsmokers (Alex Pall and Andrew Taggart), Vanic and the Lost Kings (Robert Abisi and Nick Shanholtz). Just a note: the DJs were actually there. And hey, if you can’t wait until Ultra, at least there’s PlayStation. u MARCH 2017 151


SNAPSHOT

Clockwise from top left: One of Zac Posen’s new looks for Delta Air Lines; Posen with his Delta models; Balenciaga’s uniforms for Air France in the 1960s; a Delta flight attendant takes to the catwalk; a United Airlines attendant in a uniform by Jean Louis, 1968.

TODAY, WITH ENDLESS security checkpoints and the humbling exercise of removing shoes and belts, we need something to remind us of the more aspirational aspects of flight—which is where a fashionable ensemble from the flight crew comes in. Delta Air Lines recently partnered with the acclaimed designer Zac Posen to overhaul its uniform collection, worn by more than 60,000 of the airline’s frontline employees, including customer service agents, flight attendants, ramp agents, and technicians. The contemporary line features a bold color palette and classic styles that pay homage to Delta’s heritage and sensibilities while elevating the look and brand of its employees. “We wanted Delta employees to look glamorous on the job without sacrificing functionality and style,” Posen explains. And talk about style: where else in today’s terminals will you spot such cutting-edge shades as Passport Plum, Cruising Cardinal, and Groundspeed 152 QUEST

Graphite, with accents of Skyline Slate and Traveling Thistle? Of course, flying and fashion have always enjoyed a symbiotic relationship. When commercial flight was just taking off in the 1930s, air attendants wore the reassuring look of a nurse’s uniform to send a comforting message to customers: that they would be taken care of on this new—if seemingly risky—mode of transportation. As the glamour of flying reached new heights in the 1960s, airlines often called in equally glamorous names to imagine the looks for their attendants, from Cristóbal Balenciaga for Air France to Emilio Pucci for Braniff International Airways. The debut last year of Posen’s collection for Delta brought the relationship one step further with a Fashion Week–worthy runway show, complete with paparazzi flashes, catwalk struts, and hip poses, giving new meaning to that familiar direction: “Flight attendants, please prepare for take-off.” —Daniel Cappello

COURTESY OF DELTA AIR LINES; GET T Y IMAGES; UNITED AIRLINES ARCHIVE

FASHION TAKES FLIGHT


Quest March 2017  

The Spring Style Issue

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