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$5.00 MARCH 2014

THE SPRING STYLE ISSUE

ALEXANDRA RICHARDS IN MICHAEL KORS

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CONTENTS The S pring Style I ssue 98 When not spinning as DJs or swirling CRAZY IN LOVE WITH MICHAEL KORS

on the scene, It girls Hannah Bronfman and Alexandra Richards take time

to catch up with Quest and show off the latest spring looks by Michael Kors.

produced and styled by

Daniel Cappello, photographed by Julie Skarratt

110

AN ANNIVERSARY OF ELEGANCE

Jeanne Lanvin—and 125 years of undeniable Parisian chic.

114

The house of Lanvin celebrates its founding mother,

118

by

Melinda Wang

130 THE TALENTED MR. SNYDER

Men’s wear maven Todd Snyder takes a dip in

the Mediterranean, via Purple Noon, for inspiration.

QUEST STYLE FILE

by

Daniel Cappello

A portfolio of our favorite and most fashionable style arbiters,

mod men, perfectly paired couples, and all-around Quest best through the years.

126

FROM TUBE TOPS TO RICHES

40 years in the biz—and the women he’s dressed along the way. by Alex R. Travers

130

134

INNOVATIVE GLAMOUR

Elie Tahari’s Edition 1974 collection pays homage to

The Museum at FIT reveals how elegance managed to

prevail throughout the 1930s, in spite of trying times. by Alex R. Travers

110

LIKE WE’VE NEVER SEEN HER

In Veruschka: From Vera to Veruschka (Rizzoli),

Johnny Moncada visually chronicles the making of a model.

by

Elizabeth Meigher


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CONTENTS

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C olumns 22 On Eleanor Lambert’s International Best-Dressed List. D P C 68 A guide to all the goings-on throughout the city as the snow begins to fade. 72 Hubert de Givenchy, impossibly elegant even in jeans, at the Waldorf=Astoria. 74 A tale of Sean Connery and Roger Moore. T T 76 Flower-printed everything for spring. D C E M 82 Fashion entrepreneur Carmen Busquets has a gift for luxury. A R. T 86 Yigal Azrouël sets style en pointe, bringing an edgy vibe to ballet. L H 90 Even in winter, Golf & Body will keep you on your game. M M. T 94 Emily Buchanan plunges viewers into an emotional landscape. L H 96 Contemporary conveniences at a carriage house erected by J.P. Morgan. 140 Warming up for Fashion Week and beyond. E Q B 144 Girls were girls and men were men—and raccoon coats all the rage. D C SOCIAL DIARY

by

avid

atrick

olumbia

SOCIAL CALENDAR

HARRY BENSON

BOND, JAMES BOND

FRESH FINDS

by

by

aniel

aki

heodoracopulos

appello and

E-COMMERCE

by

THE ARTS

by

by

ichael

eigher

lex

ravers

ily

oagland

homas

SPORT

lizabeth

ART

by

ily

oagland

OPEN HOUSE

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

SNAPSHOT

by

lizabeth

by

uinn

aniel

rown

appello


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EDITOR’S LETTER

From left: Daniel Cappello adjusting a belt on Hannah Bronfman during our Michael Kors cover shoot; Elizabeth Kurpis, one of Quest’s regular fashionistas, and Lily Hoagland; a suit from the Fashion Institute of Technology’s 1930s clothing exhibit.

an Age of Crisis,” which shows what a moll might have put on to hop over to the hottest speakeasy in town. While looking your best is always preferable, a statistic from this month’s Fashion Week does add a warning to the idea: in a recent New York Times article, Dr. Michael Hausman commented on the rise of people coming in with broken wrists from slipping on ice. “I’m always amazed at how many people I see walking around in the snow with high heels or stiletto-heeled boots, instead of crampons and hiking boots,” he said. Well, doctor, sometimes crampons cramp our style. u

SPRING FASHION IS bustin’ out all over, and we have the per-

fect models to showcase it. Alexandra Richards and Hannah Bronfman strike poses in the latest and greatest by Michael Kors for our cover story by Daniel Cappello. These fresh-faced beauties know how to knock our socks off with a simple cock of the eyebrow or bend of the knee. Also in this issue is the Quest Style File, a roundup of the most stylish people in society. After much clamoring, we’ve decided to include the men this time around—after all, what’s good for the goose is good to take a gander at—and boy, did that make for some delicious eye candy. From style mavens to perfect pairs, we celebrate the ladies and gents who always add a touch of class to every event. Our fashion theme permeates the pages with a look at some never-before-seen images of Veruschka, one of the industry’s most intriguing models; a look at how designer Elie Tahari built an empire founded on tube tops; and the Fashion Institute of Technology’s latest exhibition on 1930s clothing, “Elegance in 20 QUEST

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: Alexandra Richards in a white linen gauze turtleneck from the Michael Kors Spring 2014 collection, part of “Crazy in Love with Michael Kors,” our fashion photo cover shoot with Hannah Bronfman and Alexandra Richards. Produced and styled by Daniel Cappello, photographed by Julie Skarratt.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO C IAL DIARY “The sense of being perfectly well-dressed gives a feeling of inner tranquility, which religion is powerless to bestow. There is one other reason for dressing well, namely that dogs respect it and will not attack you in good clothes.” —Ralph Waldo Emerson ion Week dominated the first two weeks of the month in New York. No, I take that back: the weather—the Polar Vortex—dominated the first two weeks, and beyond. That said, for tens of thousands of New Yorkers and out-oftowners attending, Fashion

Week was their raison d’être, in one way or another. There was a lot of excitement among the throngs in the industry: the people who promote it, the people who sell it, and the people who buy it and generate billions for the companies. The shows are a tradition. In the beginning,

they took place in the showrooms of the manufacturers, where the designer worked. In the past half-century, all the numbers got bigger, way bigger. In 1968, a fashion designer in New York grossing $1.5 million was an astounding success and a star in the market. Today, designers like Michael

Kors and Ralph Lauren have billion-dollar businesses. It all transformed in the 1960s, when the trend of publicizing fashion designers, the name-above-the-title (or, the name on the label) came to be. It was then that John Fairchild, the editor-in-chief of the family trade daily, Women’s

Three of the greatest fashion icons of the American 20th Century. Wallis, Duchess of Windsor, in Chanel; Nan Kempner; and Marella Agnelli. Fashion advice from the duchess: “Dress for yourself, not for your friends—not even for your husband.” Nan Kempner: “Have fun and always look great.” Marella Agnelli preferred tending her gardens over her closets, but naturally referred to the same sensibility when it was required for dress. 22 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Wear Daily (WWD), started promoting the relationship between Seventh Avenue, a.k.a. the Garment District, and society, local and international. Before that, there were very few “brand name” designers in America. The really famous fashion designers were French or, at least, European. The person who really initiated this transformation, more than two decades before Fairchild and WWD, was a tiny little dynamo of a woman named Eleanor Lambert. She was the lady who almost singlehandedly gave birth to the public perception of the fashion industry, as the garment industry of yore is known today. Eleanor was a woman who

came to the big town from Indiana in the late 1920s, a very young woman seeking her fortune. She’d come to New York with dreams of being a journalist. In the middle of the Great Depression in 1934, in an effort to create a job for herself and make her rent, she got the idea of soliciting art galleries to pay her a weekly fee of $25 to get their names into the papers. (There were nine dailies at the time.) Her thinking was that everybody needed a little bit of a shout out in those hard times. Many liked the idea and she was soon in business. She then took herself over to the editorial offices of Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World, which was run by Her-

bert Bayard Swope, who was so famous that he was known as “Swope of the World.” In those days, she once recalled, “You could walk into a newspaper’s editorial room, go right up to the editor’s desk, and introduce yourself.” She sold Swope of the World the idea of having a column that covered art galleries. Business public relations was in its infancy. Eleanor’s innovative way of creating publicity to assist a business was so successful that she would take it to the garment industry, which was flourishing in New York. There were hundreds of manufacturers in the city, but fashion was still “dictated” by the French couturiers out of

Paris and by the stars of Hollywood, separately but together. But Singer’s sewing machine had made it accessible to the public. Many women used it very often to make their own clothes from a dress (or other) pattern. Even so, the lords and ladies of style in the world continued to be acknowledged out of Paris. However, in 1940, the Nazi invasion of France at the beginning of World War II was a crushing blow to the French couturiers. The calamity motivated Eleanor, still a newcomer to the industry, to create an International Best-Dressed List. What is ordinary today was revolutionary 60 years ago. At its inception, it was

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C H I N E S E N E W YE A R W I T H T H E N E W YO R K P H I L H A R MO N I C

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popularly known as the “Ten Best Dressed” list and it was an immediate success. There were 10 women of note— mainly of society—who were named each year. The timing was right: The List, thanks to Eleanor’s distribution of it throughout the nation’s newspapers, became a popular annual announcement. In the first 60 years of the List, Eleanor held the meetings in the living room of her Fifth Avenue apartment with a committee she’d invited to join her in putting it together. Eleanor died over a decade ago in October 2003, two months after her 100th birthday. She worked right up to 26 QUEST

Steven Heyer and Margaret Holmes

Anne and Christopher Flowers

her 100th year. By “worked” I mean to say that she was out there every day, making appointments, taking meetings and luncheons, and starting new projects. She made her own phone calls if she deemed you to be important enough and she was always on time for any lunch date. She had asked me to join her committee in the mid1990s. I really didn’t think I would be much of an asset. While I am, by nature, an observer, I’m not a fashion maven. Nevertheless, I accepted the invitation because I wanted to see how it was done. How do they arrive at a list of Best-Dressed from seven bil-

lion of us? Well, it’s not really seven billion. Perhaps more like 700. Maybe less? There were more than a dozen who attended the annual meeting. Eleanor was obviously the oldest, but she included people ranging in age from their thirties to their seventies. Many were what we’d call social types—boldfaced names you’d see in the social columns. Plus, there were some journalists. We’d all sit around the living room, with its view of Central Park, on sofas and chairs and stools, each with a yellow legal pad and pencil. That’s about as businesslike as it got. Only two or three of the individuals (firstly

Phoebe and Bobby Tudor

Kenneth and Noreen Buckfire

Eleanor) used their pads to record everything. It was a very cozy atmosphere. Eleanor was a consummate hostess. A buffet lunch was set out in the dining room when it came time for a break. There was a bit of a list already prepared as suggestions to launch the discussion. I was surprised to see how casual and arbitrary it was. I’d come to it with the naïve idea that there was some sort of science to the process, but that would imply that there were real experts. And there were not. There were opinion-makers. A name would be put on the table. Someone would suggest, say, Mary Jane Jones.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A There would be a reaction in the room, and it might go something like this: “I love her;” “She’s great;” “She’s fabulous;” “I love her.” And that might be it, all from the mouths of the two or three or six of the most vocal. The rest of us would be silent. I might be thinking to myself, “I don’t know Mrs. Jones,” although I may have seen her around or seen her picture in Quest. She was fabulous. She looked nice, in my humble opinion. Mary Jane Jones would be on the List. Then, somebody might throw out the name of another well-known social woman here in New York. “Lisa Sampson.” (I’m making the names up,

obviously). One man, a wellknown fashion plate himself, might blurt out: “NO! No! No! No! Never!” Another man might say in response: “But she’s very attractive, she wears clothes beautifully, and she buys the best. You just don’t like her…” “No! No! No!” the first man would repeat his objection. And so it was a “no” to Lisa Sampson. In its now long history, there have been many who have aspired to being on the List, and have made an effort to gain notice to get there. Not all are successful. A very clever woman or man can succeed in such a quest but “clever,” in this case, requires a great deal of imagination. Yes, it’s pure

vanity when you want to accomplish something like this, but as the preacher sayeth in Ecclesiastes: “All is vanity.” That said, the main motivation for the individual in this situation is not so much vanity but, rather, the art of personality. Eleanor was fond of a quote that goes: “Fashion is only the attempt to realize art in living forms and social intercourse.” The way we go about expressing ourselves to the world in terms of our likes and dislikes, our passions and our fancies, is our personal artistry. Many of the women and men who make the list are doing just that. One of the most famous of the American Best-Dressed

was Babe Paley. Paley died in 1978 at age 62 but, to this day, she is remembered by every woman who ever saw her, whether they knew who she was or not. The experience had a magic that was comparable to seeing Greta Garbo on the street. It was a wonder. In the case of Paley, it was her costume, her self-presentation, that was the message. Eleanor once described it thusly. “If you took each piece of clothing she was wearing and you hung them next to each other on hangers, you would see an artist’s composition.” A friend once told me about the time she was pushing her baby’s pram for a walk down Fifth Avenue when she spot-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A ted a woman, wearing an ensemble in gray, emerge from one of the canopied co-ops. The woman moved serenely across the pavement and got into a waiting limousine of the same color as her dress. To my friend, it was like watching a fashion shoot for the pages of Vogue or Harper’s Bazaar in motion. As the car pulled away, my friend stopped and asked the doorman, “Who was that woman?” “Oh, that was Mrs. Paley,” he replied. She was so chic that the young mother could only think: “I want to live there someday.” Whether Babe Paley thought of her choices as artistry is unknown to me, but what is apparent, and what is

always apparent among the Best-Dressed, is the pleasure they derive from dressing well—both for themselves and for those around them. The late Nan Kempner was one of those whose love of clothes was almost celebratory. Kempner loved getting dressed up in the latest fashions. That might mean couture (she was crazy about Yves Saint Laurent) or that might mean jeans with a bare midriff (a look which had its vogue about 10 years ago). A few years ago, the Costume Institute exhibited an installation of her wardrobe collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. They were displayed as if in a couture salon, neatly and by style and use:

shirts, sweaters, pants, skirts, dresses, and gowns. Like any great artist’s work, there was a line of style and color that ran through the entire collection, no matter the garment. The exhibition described the personality and visual sensibility of the woman as a work of art. Fashion and style has changed dramatically in ways unimaginable 80 years ago when Eleanor first set foot on Seventh Avenue. The cultural revolutions that occurred in the 1920s were transformed again in the 1960s and again in the late 1990s. Where we are going, and who will be the Best-Dressed, is anybody’s guess. Frank Crowninshield— an American journalist and

theater critic as well as the creator and editor of the original version of Condé Nast’s Vanity Fair from 1914 to 1935, known in his day as the most elegant, endearing, and cultivated man in publishing—may have summed it up for the ages when he wrote (circa 1930): “In another 50 years we’ll all dress alike, talk alike, smell alike, and love alike. It won’t be any fun…” Back to Basics. Fashion Week is over, which means that some of the charity ladies were back on the town. One night down at Michael’s, the “Dream Team” of the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center held its third annual benefit dinner hon-

K R AV I S C E N T E R FO R T H E P E R FO R M I N G A R TS AT N E I M A N M A R C U S I N PA L M B E AC H

Tara Vecellio and Hilary Jordan 30 QUEST

Bill Meyer and Diane Bergner

Terri Mersentes and Shani Core

Lizzi Bickford and Caroline Rafferty

Stirling McCracken and Kelly Kirkpatrick

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Mona Zapper and Hayden Hosford


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A S O C I E T Y O F M S KC C ’ S “ D R E A M T E A M ” D I N N E R AT M I C H A E L ’ S

Stephanie and James Loeffler

oring long-standing Dream Team members Nancy Jarecki and Ashley McDermott, and retired director of social work, Jane Bowling. The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is a volunteer organization within the hospital that is dedicated to promoting the wellbeing of patients, supporting cancer research, and providing public education on the early prevention, detection, and treatment of cancer. Sloan Kettering is one of the premier cancer centers in the world. The society volunteers, from what I’ve observed, are seriously involved in their projects, whatever they may 32 QUEST

Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos and David Patrick Columbia

Susan York and Ashley McDermott

be. It is one of those organizations that promotes optimal service and its members are almost religious in their devotion and participation. The Dream Team was founded with the mission of fulfilling deeply held wishes of adult patients at the hospital. Working with the Department of Social Work, they have fulfilled more than 1,600 “dreams” since starting in 1988. Mrs. Jarecki has been on the Dream Team for 20 years, having joined at the suggestion of Peter and Jamee Gregory, who knew of her lifelong interest in charitable causes. She is also one of those women who

Wanda Brighenti and Libby FItzgerald

Lisa Fine and George Farias

is entrepreneurial and enterprising—which is something that began in her life when she participated in the creation of what is now E! Entertainment Television in Los Angeles. She moved to New York in 1990 and is now married to Andrew Jarecki, with whom she has three children. Mrs. Jarecki serves on the boards for Project A.L.S., New Yorkers for Children, and the Robin Hood Foundation. She is also the creator of Betty Beauty, Inc., which is a specialty beauty products company. Aside from everything else, she is currently writing a memoir about her recent recovery from a subarachnoid hemor-

Chappy Morris and Martha Webster

Woody Greenberg and Jane Bowling

rhage. I don’t know her personally, but anyone can see the energy of this very motivated woman. The night of the dinner she was in a black pantsuit and wearing her chic black bowler hat. With the blond hair showing from under her hat, she reminded me of a very young Elaine Stritch. Ashley Brittingham McDermott is a Los Angeles-raised young woman like Mrs. Jarecki, as well as a mother of four teenagers. She moved to New York in 1992 with her husband Jeff McDermott and joined the Dream Team in 1998 at the suggestion of the late, great Tom Guinzburg, a quintessential New York gen-

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Mary Davidson and Bettina Zilkha


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D O U G L A S E L L I M A N O P E N E D I TS O F F I C E AT R OYA L P O I N C I A N A P L A Z A I N PA L M B E AC H

Kerry Warwick and Dennis Gallo

tleman, scion of the publishing business (Viking Press) and a very active man in charitable causes. She has been on the boards of New Yorkers for Children, Project A.L.S., and the Joyful Heart Foundation. She has just completed her first book—a novel. Dr. Jane Bowling retired last December after 16 years as director of the Department of Social Work at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where she was in charge of a staff of 35, providing a range of psychosocial counseling services to patients and families. In the last several years Dr. Bowling developed the Building Resilience through the 34 QUEST

Dale and Bill Bandel

Marisela Cotilla and Tim Harris

Arts Program, which provided lunch and a respite for the staff. The program included performances by students of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Jazz at Lincoln Center as well as things like piano recitals and presentations from the museums of New York. She also encouraged her staff to develop other hospital-wide programs such as the Bereavement Program, the Caring Canine Program, and the Kids Express Program. Each of the three women spoke briefly about their work and enthusiasm for the Dream Team, which does not advertise itself publicly in the way that I’m doing now. Mrs.

Gail Coniglio and Don Langdon

Pamela Gottfried and Pietro Belmonte

Jarecki, who has a pistol of a personality, told a story about fulfilling a dream for a very young man with cancer. His dream was to meet the heavy metal group Metallica. She was able to arrange his attendance at a Metallica concert at Madison Square Garden, and it turned out to be a very long night of rock dreams come true, extending into the next day—just like all rock dreams—with partying with the band and their friends. There was a big turnout for cocktails and dinner, taking over the entire restaurant: Jeremy and Friederike Biggs, Courtney Arnot, Melisssa and Chappy Morris, Barbara and

Jay Parker and Madeleine Calder

Niki Higgins and Tom Bryan

Kevin McLaughlin, Muffie Potter Aston, Jennifer Creel, Mary and Marvin Davidson (Mary introduced the honorees), Dennis Basso and Michael Cominotto, Alexia Hamm Ryan, Peter and Jamee Gregory, Caroline Dean, Danielle Ganek, Martha Glass (who is the current president of the Society of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center), Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos, George Farias, Lisa Fine, Ann Coley, Beth and Ron Dozoretz, Tom and Alice Tisch, Christine Schwarzman, Victoria Anstead, Thomas and Ingrid Edelman, Mark Gilbertson, Bettina Zilkha, Kamie and Richard Lightburn, Lisa

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Ashley McIntosh and Michael Mason


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A McCarthy, Holly Peterson, Fernanda Kellogg and Kirk Henckels, Wendy Goldberg, Anki Leeds, Amanda Taylor, Kevin and Hampton Luzak, Kalliope Karella, Anne Keating, and Sue Chalom. And there was a table full of Jareckis: Andrew, Henry, Gloria, Donna, and Tom! A good night for a good cause graced with a sense of fellowship and camaraderie in the room. The Michael’s menu: winter risotto with mushrooms and chard; Michael’s cheddar burger with arugula, tomato, pickles, and mounts of very slender fries or organic salmon with bacon-braised red cabbage and Pommery mustard sauce; and chocolate layer

cake, berry compote, and vanilla bean ice cream. I didn’t get to the cake as I wanted to stop by the Four Seasons Restaurant, where Nicole Hanley Mellon was hosting a birthday party for her husband, Matthew Mellon (whose actual birthday is January 28). The party was called for 9:30 p.m. (to midnight), with cocktails, desserts, and dancing. It was just getting started when I got there around 10:15 p.m., thinking I was almost an hour late. They took over the Pool Room with a dance floor and a live rock band. An hour into it, guests were still streaming in. There must have been at least a couple

hundred guests. I stayed for about 45 minutes, thinking I’d pretty much seen everybody. Getting my coat, I discovered a bigger crowd was just arriving. (They were definitely going to get to the midnight hour with the party going full-blast…) It must be have been 11 when I was leaving so I missed the hullabaloo of the late arrivals in the form of the senior tabloid princesses Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan, who are said to be working on a new reality T.V. show, putting their best foot, or feet, forward. When I heard about their arrival, it sounded like they hadn’t been invited. I don’t believe that. Those girls are good for any party, espe-

cially if there’s someone there from the Post, like Richard Johnson. A late party in New York is nothing new, but lately they’re almost exclusively downtown. I don’t get downtown very much (at all), so it was nice to be reminded of that New York nightlife with the crowd of young, active New Yorkers who want to get out, be seen, have fun, and just enjoy the evening where they are. That’s what was going on at Matthew’s birthday bash at the Four Seasons. On another night, I went down to the Pierre where the Museum of the City of New York was holding its annual Winter Ball. The Winter Ball

VA N C L E E F & A R P E L S U N V E I L E D I TS B O U T I Q U E I N C O STA M E S A , C A L I FO R N I A

Chris Gialanella

Michael Polish and Kate Bosworth 36 QUEST

Gail Welch and Eleanor Blase

Nancy Bai and Alain Bernard

Jasmine Hakimi and Minoo Hari

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Judy Chang


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W YO R K ’ S W I N T E R B A L L AT T H E P I E R R E

George and Anne Baker

Leah and Scott Soltas 38 QUEST

Peter Van Ingen and Amanda Taylor

Tara and Michael Rockefeller

Sloan and Alexander Overstrom

Bruce and Teresa Colley

Mary Kathryn Navab

Dana and Larry Creel and Wendy Fentress

Allison and Peter Rockefeller

Lea Brokaw, Mark Gilbertson and Marina Conner

C U T T Y M CG I LL ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Burwell Schorr, Dennis Basso and Ashley McDermott


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

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Clark and Joan Johnson

Christine and Bob Stiller

has long been a favorite on the winter social calendar in New York. It’s generally thought to the baby of social impresario Mark Gilbertson. Mark has been heading up the committee that organizes it for 29 years. His guests, generally, are contemporaries of his who have been attending since they were known as the “junior” group in town. Junior, no more—except for those who are coming up—the Winter Ball is now one of the great galas in the city. A lot of these people socialize with each other throughout the year. Many have grown up together or known each other since college. It’s black-tie and women dress for the occasion, so it’s fashionable. When I first walked into the cocktail hour, which was held in a smaller ballroom in the hotel, all of the progress of the organization came to mind. Plus, it is comfortable. Mark told me that there were

Diane Belfer and Hope Alswang

470 attending and they raised more than $650,000 for the museum’s programs—a record for this gala. The affair was sponsored by Dennis Basso, who was present with his partner Michael Cominotto. The two are longtime members of the same set in Palm Beach and Southampton. The neighborhood. There was a piece in a weekend edition of the New York Post by Julia Marsh about two people I’ve been seeing around the town for the last decade, or maybe two, but never knew. I never met either of them. I’d see them at parties, at events, openings, and at the opera. We might nod hello to one another, but there was never a word between us, let alone a conversation. It’s not unusual in this great city to frequently see the same people you never quite meet—not unlike a familiar face in your neighborhood, a neighbor you’ve seen

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

forever but never talked to. One of the two is someone I’ve written about. She is the Baroness von Langendorff, who has been a fixture in the tonier environs of Manhattan for many a day, long before I ever stepped on the terra firma with my byline. I’ve never seen her in the light of day, although she lights up the night with her flaming tresses and her baubles—always tastefully displayed—reminding one of a real-life diva. The baroness’ fashion choices reflect another age and another era, when women of fashion and independent means wore a lot of that stuff all the time. The other character in this 42 QUEST

unfolding drama, according to the Post, is Shail Upadhya. He was a man whose presence was immediately noticeable in any crowd. He dressed for all occasions in his own style, in well-tailored, colorful suits that often looked like he’d had them made up strictly for himself. I’d see him everywhere. He didn’t seem to be socializing so much as he was standing about and around. I’d wonder what the pleasure of the company was for him. I often concluded that he liked dressing up for parties and milling about. To each his own; it is New York, after all. From the Post article, I learned that he was a longtime

Shail Upadhya

companion of a real estate broker named Karen Bass. They had been a couple for 30 years. When Ms. Bass died two years ago, she left her friend a small fortune of several millions in real estate. According to the Post, she stated in her will: “My dearest Shail… I have always loved you and I will watch over you always.” It was said that Mr. Upadhya took his friend’s death very badly. His health went downhill after that and in January 2013, he died at age 79. (I should add that Mr. Upadhya was a very youthful looking 79.) He was a slender man, small but wiry, and he moved around energetically. He had

been a disarmament expert at the United Nations before he began a career as a “fashion designer.” This was news to me, but then I didn’t know the man. I’ve never thought about what a disarmaments expert would look like, but fashion designer seems to be credible considering. Evidently, after he died, much of Mr. Upadhya’s multi-million dollar estate was reported to be in the hands of the baroness instead of his relatives, who were half-siblings back in Nepal. The relatives believe that the baroness, who had befriended Mr. Upadhya at some time unknown to me, had coerced him into signing

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Baroness von Langendorff


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A over his properties. The baroness was known for her great and not-so-subtle charm. A friend of the late Ms. Bass, Joy Marks was quoted in the Post as saying, “He was so ill, he was like putty in her [the baroness’] hands.” The Upadhya half-siblings believe that the baroness used “force, flattery, and threats” to persuade their brother to disinherit them. The baroness is, from what one can conclude, a very wealthy woman. Her late husband, the baron, was an Austrian fragrance tycoon who created, or at least

owned, the rights to White Shoulders, a very popular fragrance among young women in the ’60s and ’70s. The baroness was also known for having cultivated relationships with other prominent and wealthy businessmen of that era now past, and was respected and admired by some for her shrewdness when it came to investments. I don’t know how the Upadhya relatives will prove the case as the baroness has often held properties that were purchased as investments. No doubt, she knew more about

such things than the late Mr. Upadhya, who really was a more fanciful individual. I’ve been told by someone who knows her well that the baroness has been very generous and helpful to friends in need in the past, including paying for their medical bills and, in one case, buying a small house for a friend who lost his business. But then, there are always two sides (at least) to every story, and sometimes the truth runs away from both. But it’s all conjecture as to what really happened. So it remains a mystery, albeit a quiet and

very glamorous one. In memoriam. This past February 1, Genevieve Livingston Estes duPont of Palm Beach died after a long illness. Always known as “Bunnie” to her family and many friends, she was in her 98th year. Mrs. duPont, who grew up in Jacksonville, made her debut in New York in the 1936 season, when she attended Finch College. The following year, 1937, when she was 21, she became engaged to Nicholas Ridgely duPont, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene duPont of Wilmington.

MEERA GANDHI HOSTED AN EVENING WITH ARTIST JAMES CHILD

Judith Regan and Jeffrey Fass 44 QUEST

Patricia Shiah, Phylicia Rashad and Janet Katzin

CeCe and Lee Black

Joey Jagod and Susan Rose

Tim Lewis and Alisyn Camerota

Junia Doan and Donald Tober

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Meera Gandhi


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A YO U N G C O L L EC TO R S N I G H T AT T H E W I N T E R A N T I Q U E S S H O W TO BENEFIT EA ST SIDE HOUSE SETTLEMENT

Elizabeth Herzberg with James

Emily Pluhar, Courtney Booth and Stephanie Clark

Alexa Hampton

Eugene duPont was a member of the family that owned and/or controlled E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company and he was involved in the family business from 1897 to 1912. That brief period belied Mr. duPont’s place in the world of the nation and its business. In 1930, James Watson Gerard, Woodrow Wilson’s ambassador to Germany, named Eugene du Pont as one of the “sixty-four men who rule the United States.” The young couple, Nicholas and Bunnie, was married the fall of 1937 in Jacksonville. That same year, Nicholas duPont’s sister Ethel duPont 46 QUEST

Lana Smith and Polina Proshkina

married Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr., the son of Eleanor and Franklin, who was then in his second term as President of the United States. As one of the leading and wealthiest industrial families in 20th century America, the duPonts were prominent in the world known as Society, which represented solid wealth as well as social prominence and political power. The newlyweds, naturally, were prominent in that arena in New York, Wilmington, and Palm Beach. Mrs. duPont was a member of the Garden Club of Palm Beach, president of the Garden Club of Wilm-

Courtney Booth and Lacary Sharpe

Catherine Singer and David Woods

ington, and president of the Garden Club of America. She was a credited judge of horticulture for life as a board member emeritus of the Pacific Tropical Botanical Gardens, a member of the advisory committee at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, and a trustee of the American Horticultural Society. She is survived by a daughter, Nicole Limbocker (and husband Derek Limbocker); two granddaughters, Hilary Dick and Ridgely Brode (and husband Charles Brode); and a grandson, Brian Sayer (and wife, Colleen Sayer.) In addition, she is survived by four

Emily Lang and Jeffrey Treut

Keita Turner and Robyn Lawson

great-grandchildren: Sophie and Gigi Dick and Hunter and Cole Brode. She was pre-deceased by her husband and a daughter, Genevieve duPont, who was always known as ViVi. The burial will be in Wilmington on an undetermined date. A memorial service will be held at 5:30 p.m. on March 15 at The Society of Four Arts in Palm Beach. Instead of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to the Garden Club of Palm Beach, P.O. Box 2791, Palm Beach, Florida., 33480 or to Longwood Gardens, P.O. Box 501, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, 19348. u

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Saverio Mancina and Margie Ruddick


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A “A G A R D E N I N T H E W I LD ” B E N E F I T I N G T H E PA L M B E AC H ZO O

Tim and Christie Gannon with an owl

Nancy Rogers and Don Burns 48 QUEST

Dan Ponton and Amy Phelan

Whitney and Eric Bylin

Diana and Llwydd Ecclestone

William and Candy Hamm

Alfy and Raysa Fanjul

Karin Luter and John Bossard

Lillian and Luis Fernandez

Chris and Samantha Storkerson

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Kim Campbell with Kane and Mary Baker


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RED COAT LANE | $6,400,000 Exciting stone and shingle home by Gardiner/Larson beautifully sited on 2 glorious Mid-Country acres. Wonderful floor plan with incredible detail throughout. WEB ID: 0066603 | Lyn Stevens | 203.618.3170

BUENA VISTA | $6,300,000 “The Towers”, as it was also called, was once one of the show-places of Greenwich. Now it is being offered primarily for its land value. Last on the market in 1957. WEB ID: 0066911 | Bill Andruss | 203.618.3101

EUROPEAN ELEGANCE | $5,995,000 This exceptional property is located in the sought-after Mid-Country section of Greenwich. The estate features 2 beautiful level acres. Truly Special. WEB ID: 0066910 | Shelly T. Lynch | 203.618.3103

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MarchQuest.indd 1

1/31/2014 4:58:33 PM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L U N C H EO N AT T H E A N N N O R TO N S C U L P T U R E G A R D E N S I N PA L M B E AC H

Christina MacFarland, Sarah Benitz and Helene Lorentzen

Lourdes Fanjul

Susan Keenan and Paul Milsom

Sally Soter and Jack Staub

Emmy Wolbach and Will Corrente

Simon Teakle and Mieke Van Waveren

Liv Tyler

Andrew Saffir and Daniel Benedict

Savanna Hoge and Kane Manera 50 QUEST

Georgina Chapman and Helena Christensen

Chantal O’Sullivan and Michael Stipe

Paul James

Vanessa Bismarck and Johannes Huebl

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A D O U G L A S E L L I M A N P R E S E N T E D T H E E L L I E A W A R D S AT T H E S K YL A R K

Cory Weiss, Tracy Putormaltas and Fredrik Eklund

Dennis Mangone and Susan DeFranca

Heather McDonough and Stephen Kotler

Neal Sroka, Enzo Morabito and Howard Lorber

Laura Scott and Gabe Pasquale

Jessica Cohen, Dottie Herman and Frances Katzen

Auro Castelli with Sarah and Alec Machiels

Mary Jo Darby, Peter Knerr and Hemal Patel 52 QUEST

Lesley King, Louise Braverman, Steven Glickel and Ken Inadomi

Kathleen Gerard and Fred Clark

Wendy Steiner and Dziwe Ntaba

Sarah Fitzgerald, Deogratias Niyizonkiza and Anne Peretz

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( A B OV E ) ; J E S S E U N T R AC H T- O A K N E R ( B E LO W )

F U N D - R A I S E R F O R V I L L A G E H E A LT H W O R K S AT W A L LY F I N D L A Y G A L L E R I E S I N N E W YO R K


GREENWICH

Steeple Chase Farm

Country English Tudor

Price Upon Request Please visit: www.steeplechasefarm.com

$11,900,000 Please visit: www.northwoodgreenwich.com

Magnificent Greenwich Waterfront

Mid-Country Elegance

$18,225,000 Please visit: www.greenwichwaterfrontdockandpool.com

$14,500,000 Please visit: www.meadowcroftgreenwich.com

33 Acres in Conyers Farm

Ten Acres in Conyers Farm

$17,000,000 Please visit: www.conyersfarm33acres.com

123 Mason Street

$7,950,000 Please visit: www.conyersfarmelegance.com

www.prubhre.com Greenwich, Connecticut 06830

© 2014. An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

203.661.5505

Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L A P E R L A A N D T H E P L AYG R O U N D PA R T N E R S O F C E N T R A L PA R K C O N S E R VA N C Y H O ST E D C O C K TA I L S W I T H Q U E ST

Adelina Wong Ettelson and Leigh Tung

Suzanne Cochran and Laura Hall

Amy Tarr

Melanie Lazenby, Elizabeth Kurpis and Elizabeth Meigher

Nyssa Kourakos and Scott Bennett

Somers Farkas, Martha Glass and Mary Snow 54 QUEST

Alexia Hamm Ryan, Suzy Biszantz, Katie Boes and Muffie Potter Aston

Paige Hardy

Lauren Czerwinski and Heather Rhatigan

Kate Pickett and friend with Cynthia Rutherford

Jennifer Curry and Victoria Hudson

B FA NYC . CO M

Jill Ross and Sarah McGee


Coldwell Banker R esidential B rokerage

The Luxury Division of Coldwell Banker

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Luxurious Waterfront Living 1209 Greacen Point Road, Mamaroneck, New York 10543 $9,995,000 Spectacular Custom Home set serenely on an acre of private property surrounded by the calming waters of a quiet inlet of the Long Island Sound. Exceptional floor plean with floor-to-ceiling windows bringing in endlessvistas. Exquisite architectural details and finishes. Magnificent patio with pergola, inground heated pool/spa and private dock. Fabulous flow for entertaining. Resort living at its best! Only 36 Minutes to NYC. Sula Pearlman 914.393.4104

$9,995,000 1308 Greacen Point Road, Mamaroneck, New York 10543 $9,950,000

Michelle Flood 914.420.6468

Direct Waterfront Gem! Panoramic views of Long Island Sound from every room! Sited on 1.4 acres on idyllic Greacen Point in Mamaroneck. Exquisite traditional & European style combine to offer 10,000 sq. ft. of spectacular waterfront living. The private setting provides multiple levels of outdoor terraces & patios, beautiful views of both open sound & Larchmont Harbor, private dock w/6.5 ft draft, spectacular indoor pool & sauna. A ‘dream come true’ lifestyle! $9,950,000 www.1308GreacenPointRoad.com

25 Purdy Ave, Rye, NY 10580 914.967.0059

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P R E V I E W O F T H E PA L M B E AC H J E W E L RY , A R T , A N D A N T I Q U E S H O W W I T H H O P E FO R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N

James and Margo Nederlander

Darcy Gould and Mariana Kaufman

Wallace and Betsey Turner

Scott Snyder and Audrey Gruss

Annabelle Coleman, Sharon Hoge, Grace Meigher, Muffy Miller and Elisabeth Muhr

Mai Hallingby Harrison with William and Suzanne McDonough

F R E E R A N D S AC K L E R G A L L E R I E S AT R E E M AC R A ’ S S H O W R O OM

Nina Junot, Evelyn Tompkins and Pam Owens

Barbara Tober and Meriel Lari 56 QUEST

Irene Moscahlaidis, Joan Clarke and Kathleen Hearst

Susan Gutfreund

Katie Ziglar

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT ( A B OV E ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( B E LO W )

Karen Burke and Marlene Herring


985 Park Ave Garden Triplex $8,995,000.

Would you give us the secrets to your success? Sharing a similar lifestyle as many of my clients gives me a huge advantage. I am able to strongly connect with them, understand their needs, provide them with a high comfort level and give them the certainty that I will meet or exceed their goals. I am constantly looking for new ways to improve my level of service and engagement with my clients. In addition to my newsletter The Pulse on Manhattan Residential Real Estate I have begun using videos to show my listings and provide valuable market insights. My clients comment on my persistence, creative problem solving, excellent negotiating skills and my outstanding marketing that gets them the best results. My biggest secret is to always put my clients first. Detail for us some of the new and exciting listings you are currently representing. 985 Park Avenue, a three to four bedroom 3,000 SF condo asking $8,995,000, offers all the joy of townhouse living with all the conveniences and security of a luxury doorman boutique condo with just seven residences. The interiors were done by Geoffrey Bradfield and the building was designed by Costas Kondylis. 1049 Fifth Avenue 16B a 3,335 SF 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths plus mahogany paneled library asking $12,900,000, has dramatic park and reservoir views from all the public rooms. 1049 Fifth Avenue is a rare highly coveted prewar condominium.

Carol Staab

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker

Douglas Elliman

575 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10022 OFFICE: 212.891.7205 MOBILE: 917.273.7787 EMAIL: CAROL.STAAB@ELLIMAN.COM

Tell us a shining moment in your professional career. Recently I had the pleasure of selling a penthouse at 1049 Fifth Avenue in the building where I live and sell many apartments. The penthouse had been on the market with a previous broker for six months without success. After I took over the marketing, I was able to obtain four offers. With a very aggressive marketing plan and very strategic negotiations, I was able to achieve a full asking price sale of $14,950,000 for my clients. This was $1,150,000 more than the one offer received by the prior broker. My clients were ecstatic about the outcome. Exceeding my clients’ expectations and getting them the full asking price gave me such joy and a sense of accomplishment.   What real estate trends do you predict this year? Last year was a record year in Manhattan for the number of sales in the luxury market. I feel certain that the luxury market will continue to be strong this year. Inventory levels will continue to be low and buyer demand will remain high. The biggest trends that I am seeing are all the unique amenities that luxury developers are offering in all their new buildings. They are fiercely competing with each other to capture the attention of the $4 million and over buyer. Buyers have greatly raised the bar on the list of amenities they desire in a new building. Buyers are looking for playrooms, catering kitchens, public gathering rooms, and large gyms with spas. In order for buyers not to suffer from the luxury fatigue of the past boom, where finishes were very homogenized, developers are aggressively marketing more personal unique amenities. At the end of the day I always advise my clients that the most important amenities to look for are the best location, views, light, and great layouts in a fine well managed building with excellent service. 


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A F T E R - PA R T Y FO R T H E P R E M I E R E O F T H E MO N U M E N TS M E N AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

Sofia Coppola and George Clooney

Courtney Davis

Joel Coen

Bill Murray and Nora Sagal

Roger Waters and Bob Balaban

Malachy McCourt

Jean Dujardin

Matt Damon and Luciana Barroso

John Goodman

5 7 T H A N N UA L I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E D C R O S S B A L L AT T H E B R E A K E R S I N PA L M B E AC H

Carolyn and John Yurtchuk 58 QUEST

Judi and Ray Richards

Mary Ourisman and Stuart Bernstein

Bonnie McElveen-Hunter with Kathryn and Leo Vecellio

Herme de Wyman Miro and Veronica Atkins

Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein

S TA RT R A K S P H OTO ( A B OV E ) ; LU C I E N C A P E H A RT ( B E LO W )

Monika Preston


My Private Banker from IDB. He’s been there for me. And he’ll be there when my son takes the helm.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A B R E A S T C A N C E R R E S E A R C H F O U N D AT I O N ’ S “ H OT P I N K ” E V E N T AT T H E B R E A K E R S I N PA L M B E A C H

Kate Khosrovani and Pauline Pitt

Dee and Tommy Hilfiger 60 QUEST

Myra Biblowit and Alina Cho

Marlene Strauss and Sydell Miller

Louise Braver and Larry Norton

Beth DeWoody and Leonard Lauder

Dottie Herman and Don Langdon

Harry and Laura Slatkin

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

Susie Elson and Frances Scaife


PRIVATE BROKERAGE & ADVISORS

Stunning 1930’s Brick Estate - Urbane and sophisticated. Formal Sunrise Hill rooms with great ceiling height, fabulous light, period hardwood floors, extensive millwork, crown molding, French doors and four fireplaces. Elegant Entrance Hall. Formal Living and Dining Rooms. Music Room. Library. Chef’s Kitchen. Breakfast Room. Five Bedrooms. Gated drive to seven breathtaking acres with Pool and Pool House. Organic Vegetable Garden. $3,350,000

Long drive to peaceful privacy in desirable neighborhood of country estates. Over eleven estate acres on the Waccabuc River. Specimen trees, level lawns and phenomenal plantings. Elegant Shingle Colonial with meticulously detailed and exceptionally appointed rooms. High ceilings, substantial millwork, hardwood floors and French doors. Six Bedrooms. Pool with waterfall and spa. Tennis Court site. $2,295,000

Estate Area Modern - Four breathtaking acres. Sophisticated Mid-Century design with walls of glass to take in phenomenal property views. 4200 square feet of style with high ceilings, clerestories, oak floors and an open floor plan. Visually stunning Great Room with Fireplace. Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Separate Office Suite. Mahogany Deck. Terrace with fish pond. $1,250,000

Antique Country Farmhouse-

Absolutely Turn-Key - Gracious Country Colonial in absolutely perfect condition. Warm, shingle and brick exterior. Beautifully appointed spaces with large sun-filled rooms and wonderful Southern exposure. Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Chef ’s Kitchen. Four Bedrooms. Recreation Room with exposed beams. Nearly three peaceful acres with Pool. Great family location convenient to commuting arteries. $899,000

French Provincial -

(914) 234-9234

Brimming with local history! Spectacular wide-plank floors, vintage millwork, built-in cupboards and original windows. Beautifully scaled Living Room with stone Fireplace, old beehive oven, exposed beams and a Dutch door to terrace. Library with built-ins. Formal Dining Room. Four Bedrooms. Bucolic three acres with old stonewalls and beautifully landscaped grounds. Swimming Pool. $895,000

Timeless brick façade and handsome exterior. Beautifully-scaled rooms with great light. Entrance Hall with marble floor. Living Room with parquet floor and Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen. Warmly paneled Family Room with Fireplace. Four Bedrooms. Recreation Room with Fireplace. Long drive to four, usable acres. John Jay Schools. $999,000

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W YO R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N ’ S O R C H I D D I N N E R AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Gregory Long and Eliot Nolen

Jeanne Forsythe and Alexandra Squire 62 QUEST

Susan and Henry Johnson

Alison Spear and Philip Gorrivan

David Easton and Katharina Plath

Dave Henley and Whitney Clay

Martha Stewart

Deborah Royce and Jeff Salvman

Danielle Rollins and Caroline Kirschner

B FA NYC . CO M

Dotty and Lionel Goldfrank


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A P O L I C E M A N ’ S B A L L AT M A R - A - L A G O I N PA L M B E AC H

Chief Kirk and Tasha Blouin

Michele and Howard Kessler

Cheryl and Dan Szarszewski

Jan-Marie Cook and Nick Coniglio

Annie and Michael Falk

Brian and Eileen Burns

Color Guard

Bill Koch

L U N C H EO N FO R YO U T H A M E R I C A N G R A N D P R I X AT L E C I R Q U E

Linda Morse 64 QUEST

Kathy Prounis

Kari Tiedemann and Herman Cornejo

Lisa Airan and Trevor Born

Sharon Hoge

Kamie Lightburn, Stephanie Foster and James Whiteside

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT ( A B OV E ) ; A N N I E WAT T ( B E LO W )

Dana Schiff and Margot Takian


Wednesday, March 19, 2014 | The Pierre, NYC 6:00pm Cocktail Reception | 7:30pm Dinner

THE GIVING BACK FOUNDATION “We are to the universe only as much as we give back to it.” Meera Gandhi, CEO & Founder

•Grand Benefactor Table(S) at $100,000 each •Benefactor Table(S) at $50,000 each •Patron Table(S) at $25,000 each •Supporter Table(S) at $15,000 •Individual Tickets are also available at: $10,000; $5,000; $2,500; $1,500

For more information and to make reservations please contact: The Giving Back Foundation Gala Benefit Office Gala2014@TheGivingBackFoundation.net (914) 426-3839 or (917) 593-8617

www.TheGivingBackFoundation.net


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

Nancy Lumsden and Maura Christi

Mary Willis with Loy and Bettina Anderson

Jeffrey Caldwell, Ryan Jones, Frances and Rory Mackay and Jason Ebelthite

Morgan and Marshall Whalen 66 QUEST

Chris and Binkie Orthwein

Mary Baker

Lauriston and Rich Segerson

Sara Groff

Burke Ross, Lore Dodge and John Gay

Bobby and Chris Leidy

L I L A P H OTO

“ROCK THE CASBAH!” WITH THE CONTEMPORARIES OF THE SOCIET Y OF THE FOUR ARTS AT T H E P H I L I P H U L I TA R S C U L P T U R E G A R D E N


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CALENDAR

MARCH

On March 3, the School of American Ballet will hold its 2014 Winter Ball at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater for the seventh consecutive year. Cocktails begin at 7 p.m., to be followed by dinner, dessert, and, of course, dancing. For more information, call 212.769.6610.

THE SILVER SCREEN

The third annual Winter Film Awards Independent Film Festival will host its gala at the Empire Room at 230 Fifth at 8 p.m. For more information, call 212.725.4300.

2

R. Douglas Rice, and the New York Yankees. For more information, call 212.868.8450.

at 7 p.m. For more information, call 212.769.6610. I’M A SOUL MAN

LET’S DANCE

The School of American Ballet will host its annual Winter Ball, sponsered by Van Cleef & Arpels, at the David H. Koch Theater at

The 25th Heart and Soul auction, honoring documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, will take place at the Great Hall of the Cooper Union at 6 p.m. One of the highlights of

WALK FOR A CAUSE

Walk Now For Autism Speaks will hold its 5K run to raise funds for autism awareness at the Meyer Amphitheater in West Palm Beach at 8 a.m. For more information, call 561.833.9730.

HOP TO IT

The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s 23rd annual Bunny Hop will take place at 583 Park Avenue at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.639.7972.

A SOIGNÉ SOIRÉE

The gala benefit for La Maison Française, the most active forum for French-American cultural exchange on any American campus, will be held at NYU’s Kimmel Center. For more information, call 212.998.8751.

The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston’s preview party for its 65th anniversary auction will take place at Christie’s Rockefeller Plaza at 5 p.m. For more information, call 212.868.8450.

6

3

A SAINT’S DINNER

CELEBRATING ART

68 QUEST

4

5

ARTFUL PREVIEW

The Bronx Museum will hold its annual spring gala and art auction at Conrad New York at 6:30 p.m. Honorees include: Aurelia Greene,

the evening will be the presentation of the sixth Forrest Church Award for humanitarian service. For more information, call 917.463.3998.

On March 9, the Hanley Center Foundation will celebrate its annual family picnic at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center at 2:30 p.m. The picnic will include a world-class horse jumping competition. For more information, call 561.278.0850.

St. George’s Society will hold a dinner with author James Snyder at the Chesterfield in Palm Beach at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.6611.

CO U RTE S Y O F S C H O O L O F A M E R I C A N B A LLE T; CO U RTE S Y O F H A N LE Y C E N TE R

1


CALENDAR

MARCH APRIL 2

IN THY LIGHT

Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs will hold its Global Leadership Awards Gala at The Plaza at 6:30 p.m. All proceeds from the gala will provide much-needed financial aid for Columbia students. For more information, call 212.851.7998.

4

MAKING A SPLASH

The South Florida Science Center will host its Aquarium Gala at the Breakers at 6:30 p.m. The kick-off for the gala will be held at the newly renovated and expanded South Florida Science Center and Aquarium. For more information, call 561.370.7738.

5 8

14

The Perlman Music Program will host its Palm Beach dinner with Kristy Clark and Emilia Fanjul. For more information, call 212.877.3230.

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach will host its annual dinner dance at the Breakers at 8 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.6611.

9

15

The Hanley Center Foundation will celebrate its annual family picnic at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center at 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.841.1048.

The American Diabetes Association EXPO will take place at the Jacob Javits Center at 10 a.m. For more information, call 212.725.4925.

MUSIC MATTERS

FAMILY FUN

12

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED

The New York City Mission Society’s annual Champions for Children gala will take place at The Plaza’s Grand Ballroom at 6 p.m. For more information, call 212.580.0835.

13

FOR THE CHAIRS

The Hospice of Palm Beach County Foundation will hold its annual chairman’s reception at the Terrace at the Wally Findlay Galleries (165 Worth Avenue) at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.2090. 70 QUEST

BREAK(ERS) DANCE

A GOOD CAUSE

The Sleeping Beauty. For more information, call 718.951.3331.

26

GETTING CREATIVE

The Center for Creative Education will hold its annual spring luncheon at a private residence at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 561.805.9927.

NO SHOES ALLOWED

The Boys and Girls Club of Palm Beach County will celebrate its “Barefoot on the Beach” event at the Breakers. For more information, call 561.683.3287. ON ICE

Figure Skating Harlem will honor Michelle Kwan, Jeff Tweedy, and Dylan Lauren at the 2014 Skating with the Stars gala, which will take place at Trump Rink in Central Park at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 646.679.3769.

19

LADIES WHO LUNCH

The Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its Palm Beach luncheon at the Beach Club at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 202.628.1776.

21

A SPECIAL EVENING

The Norton Museum of Art will host an event at a private residence at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.5196.

23

BROOKLYN’S BALLET

The Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts will show

On March 15, the American Diabetes Associate EXPO will take place at the Jacob Javits Center from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. The EXPO is free and includes health screenings, cooking demonstrations, and product service exhibitors as well as leading experts discussing diabetes management and prevention. For more information, call 212.725.4925.

CO U RTE S Y O F S O U T H F LO R I DA S C I E N C E C E N TE R ; CO U RTE S Y O F A M E R I C A N D I A B E TE S A S S O C I AT I O N

On April 4, the South Florida Science Center will host its annual Aquarium Gala at the Breakers at 6:30 p.m. The kick-off event will be held at the recently renovated and expanded South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, the first of its kind to take place in the new venue. For more information, call 561.370.7738.


ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY ROBERTA.McCAFFREYREALTY Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS Garrison • Cold Spring, NY • 60 Mins NYC Westchester,Putnam,DutchessMLS

GARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 143MainStreet,ColdSpring,NY10516 Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com Tel:845.265.4113•www.mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com info@mccaffreyrealty.com

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

GARRISON, NY - In addition to stunning Hudson River views, this spacious home, a mix of traditional and contemporary style, offers peace and privacy on 9.12 acres. The open living/dining room features 20 foot ceiling, a soaring stone fireplace and wall of windows. The generous kitchen includes a more informal dining area and access to the screened porch. Outdoors, expansive decks provide the ideal spot to relax and enjoy the calming mountain and river views. Offered at $2,399,000.

GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER VIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features GARRISON, NY - Spacious and open country home with fabulous HUDSON RIVER cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terVIEWS to the west and north to Storm King Mt and Newburgh Bay. The living room features races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, and all living areas enjoy the views and access to stone terThe in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000 races. 4 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths, includes huge master suite privately located on its own level. The in-ground pool and cabana further enhance the 5.6 acre property. Offered at $1,995,000

COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story entry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large COLD SPRING, NY - Masterfully designed contemporary offers massive two story chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushentry, living room and dining room sharing a grand floor to ceiling stone fireplace, large ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout chef’s kitchen and 4 bedrooms. Walls of French doors lead to deck cantilevered over rushthe home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000 ing mountain stream. Delightful details and high quality materials are evident throughout the home which is sited on almost 5 acres. Offered at $1,875,000

Putnamlandmark Valley, NY - Lovely country on almost 5 acres. C. 1935 home offers GARRISON, This rustic stone barn, whose architecture GARRISON,NY NY- -Courtside Enjoy .the ultimate in condo livingdistinctive in The Castle, well-known high above the retreat Hudson River. This This luxurious 2 floor, 2 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious Putnam Valley, NYMountain - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 homeopen offers GARRISON, NYone - Courtside . seven This rustic stone barn, whose distinctive architecture window bedroom unit, of only units in the complex, offers breathtaking views from Bear Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an inliving space. The home features large public rooms, country kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous sets it apart from the ordinary, has been converted into 10,000 square feet of luxurious ground pool with spa and sizeable barbequespaces and patio The property also includes a forarooms, separate12 2 bedroom apartment. The4 beautifully landscaped 4 acre propertyand also offers to 15home foot ceilings, fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, sumptuous baths. also offers outdoor – area. aThe covered a large window seats,Itnooks and crannies for added character. gloriousbalcony backyard and features an inliving space. The features large public rooms,acountry kitchen, 7-8 bedrooms and mer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000 ground pool with spa and sizeable barbeque and patio area. The property also includes a fora separate bedroom apartment. TheOffered beautifully 4 acre property also offers deck, and2 garaging for 2 cars. at landscaped $2,190,000. mer dairy barn and pond. Offered at $1,300,000 a tennis court and gunite pool. Offered at $1,650,000

Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLS • Mid-Hudson MLS (Dutchess County) Greater Hudson Valley MLS • (Orange, Rockland, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) Member of Westchester/Putnam, MLSand • Mid-Hudson MLSmany (Dutchess County) Greaterand Hudson • (Orange, Ulster, Sullivan Counties) For more information on these other listings, with full brochures floor Valley plans, MLS visit our website:Rockland, www.mccaffreyrealty.com For more information on these and other listings, many with full brochures and floor plans, visit our website: www.mccaffreyrealty.com


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY UNQUESTIONABLY ELEGANT in blue jeans and a polo shirt, Hubert de Givenchy stretched out on the floor of the Waldorf=Astoria in New York—the scene of one of his fashion extravaganzas in May 1976. At the time, it had been 10 years since he had shown a collection in America, yet he was very calm when we met. Everything had been planned precisely, and the legendary couturier was simply relaxing before the show began. The dancer Sterling St. Jacques had been added to the mix and was to dance down the runway with the models, twirling and lifting them along the way to a disco beat. Givenchy’s friend and loyal client, Bunny Mellon, had brought flowers from Virginia for the charity event: dogwoods, calla lilies, and white lilacs. (Givenchy had offered to present his collection to 72 QUEST

benefit the Hospital for Special Surgery, where he had been treated several years earlier for a bad back.) It goes without saying that the fashion show—which raised money for charity and mesmerized the audience, once again, with the designs—was a huge success. (The fact that Givenchy had dressed Audrey Hepburn on and off the screen for years had added to the designer’s appeal.) When he walked down the runway at the close of the show, cheers of “bravo” rang out from adoring women in the audience. It’s hard to describe how I perceived Givenchy. He was a combination of pure elegance and complete unaffected, downto-earth common sense. He appeared to know exactly who he was and was completely at ease with the whole idea of work and fame, combined. He enjoyed it all as it existed. u


Hubert de Givenchy at the Waldorf=Astoria in May 1976.


TA K I

BOND, JAMES BOND

This page, from left: Sean Connery, the first James Bond; Dr. No (1962) starred Sean Connery and Ursula Andress.

IN THE MOVIE business, conventional wisdom has it that, in order to succeed at the box office, a film must include profanity, obscenities, blood, gore, blasphemy, and, of course, lots of sex. There’s just one little problem with this theory: empirical data illustrates that the opposite is true. Clean, wholesome, family affairs generally do much better at the till. Yet, motiveless violence and crimes committed at random continue to be the order 74 Q U E S T

of the day. That awful Quentin Tarantino leads the pack among the talentless directors now forming our culture. His dialogue is mostly mindless, he makes no distinction between right and wrong, and most of his characters wallow in violence and brutality. His point is slaughter for slaughter’s sake—and in slow motion to boot, in case we missed any of the gore. The pattern of honoring ugliness, violence, and brutality is a recent phenom-

enon. The message seems to be that portrayals of cruelty and dementia deserve more serious consideration, more automatic respect, than any attempts to convey nobility or goodness. In the past 30 years, the most influential leaders of the entertainment industry have demonstrated a powerful preference for the perverse. And even the stars have followed this pattern. During what may be considered the “golden” era of Hollywood­—the 1930s to


This page, from left: Kill Bill, a film from director Quentin Tarantino that exemplifies his love of blood and gore; Roger Moore on set.

the 1960s—stars were different from you and me. They looked, talked, and lived better, and had replaced the millionaire robber baron as the dream figure in the popular imagination. Now, they look as grubby as the characters they portray on the screen—or better yet, like homeless people. They talk like thugs and act like drug dealers as they menace fans and waiters alike, and are mostly incapable of stringing a sentence together without the word “like” repeated ad nauseam, which brings me to the point of my story. I mostly live in Gstaad, Switzerland, an alpine village that turns ugly only during Christmas and the month of February. The rest of the time the extremely rich people who own chalets here are away elsewhere to screw their fellow man. Two men, both of whom I met in Gstaad and became friends with, have been knighted by the Queen, and have both played 007. Both are gentlemen of the “old school”: Sir Sean Connery and Sir Roger Moore, the latter being a friend of long standing. Let’s start with Sean, the first James Bond. The irony is that the producer, Albert “Cubby” Broccoli, had wanted Roger Moore to play Fleming’s hero, but the actor was unavailable and under contract playing another Bond-like G-Man. So, the unknown Sean Connery got picked, and the rest you already know all about. Sean happens to be a very good actor. He played Bond with confidence and a sense of humor. He openly womanized and chased the fairer sex and ignored the outraged cries of hairy feminists who thought him a male chauvinist pig. “Proud of it,” he’d mumble. In Dr. No, the first ever James Bond picture, women swooned

while he flirted with secretaries, bedded easy women, and ended up with Ursula Andress, a Swiss lassie who emerged from the sea and fell into his powerful arms. He played Bond like a man, never questioning himself because he knew he was on God’s side. Connery, incidentally, told me a funny story about that particular movie. They were shooting in Jamaica, and the master himself, Noël Coward (a longtime resident of the island), came down for a look-see. He introduced himself to Sean and asked if he could come to dinner that evening. Connery accepted with alacrity. Upon arrival, he noticed the dinner table was set for only two. He nevertheless sat down eager to get to know the legend. The first question from his host was, “Are you homosexual?” “Hell, no,” said Sean, fully aware of Coward’s proclivities. “But you were in the navy?” said Noël. “It doesn’t mean a thing, I’m no homo and don’t plan to become one,” thundered the Scot. So, the subject never came up again, and the two of them became great friends and stayed great friends until he died, Sean told me years later. He and his wife—a dynamo who is more politically incorrect than this writer—only come to Gstaad in the summer. What you get is what you see on the screen, a real man who doesn’t suffer fools gladly. Roger Moore used to live in Gstaad but left for a nearby ski resort after a divorce. (I am very close to his son Jeffrey and his family who live nearby.) Roger introduced self-deprecation and lots of humor to the Bond role, and ad libbed most of the double entendres that he alone made famous. He was sardonic, less chauvinistic than

Sean, wore a dinner jacket better and was more romantic. In real life, Roger is simply wonderful. Full of stories and jokes, he is a true gent and has wonderful taste. When he and Jeffrey went to Florence recently, they got lost in one of those endless roundabouts leaving the historic city and stopped traffic as they were desperately looking for an exit sign. The cops soon arrived, whistled them off the road, and an officer approached. When he saw Roger, he did a double take and then yelled into his two-way radior: “Giovanni, ès zero zero sette.” The cops then opened the way for them and with sirens wailing they escorted them all the way to the highway. Noblesse oblige, as they say. The tongue-in-cheek Bond played by Roger Moore contrasted well with the thug-that-walked-like-a-cat Bond played by Sean Connery. The two are good friends, incidentally. They both gave up the role as they aged, however gracefully. And like everything else, Bonds have not improved in these last 30 years. Timothy Dalton was sartorially off the peg as well as too introspective. Pierce Brosnan was much too frothy,  with not enough backbone or grit. Daniel Craig is a reflection of today. He looks like a London cabbie. And the screenwriters have gotten away from the formula. The Bourne Identity syndrome, I’ll call it: the hero who doesn’t know who he is. But, as another hero once said to a pretty woman, “We’ll always have Paris.” So, I say to you, dear readers, we’ll always have the videos, and enjoy two great men playing themselves as Bond. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. MARCH 2014 75


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

MARCH BRINGS forth fairer skies and warmer temps, not to mention our annual Spring Style Issue. Which means we found it fitting to look to all things floral—from printed dresses to python shoes, from earrings and rings to oversized ties for her—in order to help us get in the mood. For the guys, there’s a new travel-friendly suit from J.Crew, a Rolex to match it, and a chic home audio system in the form of McIntosh’s McAire. Fresh blooms are beckoning underneath all that melting snow. We can just feel it, so here’s a bouquet of stylish finds to take us into April...

Every season deserves

We can’t decide which we like better—the

a new scarf, and this Julie

black or the white. So, we’re taking

Vos shell scarf in taupe and coffee will carry you from now through summer. $165. Julie Vos: Available

both: Camélia Galbé Earrings in ceramic and 18-kt. white gold by CHANEL Fine Jewelry. $4,800 per pair. CHANEL Fine Jewelry: 800.550.0005.

at julievos.com. Keep things fresh and new in Stuart Weitzman’s Nouveau heel in rose pearl floral python. $625. Stuart Weitzman: 212.750.2555 or stuartweitzman.com.

Dennis Basso’s black and white silk jacquard dress is frilly, flirty, and feminine—the perfect party dress for spring. Price upon request. Dennis Basso: 825 Madison Ave. or dennisbasso.com. 76 QUEST


The McIntosh McAire integrated audio system delivers the iconic

Trained in the French style at

McIntosh look and sound quality with all the modern

L’École des Beaux-Arts de l’Indo-

convenience of built-in AirPlay for easy pairing with all of your

chine, Vietnamese artist Vu Cao Dam painted “La Famille”

music libraries and devices. $3,000. McIntosh McAire: At www.mcintoshlabs.com.

in 1973. Available now at Wally Findlay Galleries: 124 E. 57th St., 212.421.5390.

Bid adieu to winter for good with an escape to Casa de Campo in the Dominican Republic, where you can take advantage of the Casa Golf Legends packages: casadecampo.com.do.

Step it up a notch in the smart Traveler shoe in black canvas with tan trim, from Belgian Shoes. $415. Belgian Shoes: 110 E. 55th St., 212.755.7372, or belgianshoes.com.

Tailored from specially woven, three-ply wool that resists rumpling, J.Crew’s Ludlow Traveler Suit makes the perfect flying companion. Jacket ($450) and slim pant ($250). J.Crew: Available at jcrew.com.

Rolex’s 41-mm. Oyster Perpetual Day-Date II in platinum with a polished bezel sports a handsome blue face. $62,500. Rolex: Visit rolex.com for official retailers.


Fresh Finds Vive la différence in

Wempe’s Sensual BY KIM Museo

VIVO’s buffalo horn cuff

pendant with brilliant-cut diamonds

with crystal detail.

is a worthy acquisition for

$70. VIVO: Available at

your neckline. Chain hangs

Camilla Dietz Bergeron,

approximately 18 inches.

818 Madison Ave.,

$8,035. Wempe:

212.794.9100.

Exclusively at Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

What girl doesn’t want a few more exotic accents, like this natural python clutch wallet by Presmer? $235. Presmer: Available at presmer.com.

Crippen’s 100% cotton striped sweatshirt is the perfect layering piece for Sunday brunches in the city—and a must-have for trips to the Mediterranean. $285. Crippen for goop: Available at goop.com.

Take a tour of the English countryside—or head upstate to horse country—in the Original Canvas Tour Rain Boots by Hunter Boot. $150. Hunter Boot: Available at hunter-boot.com.

It’s all about layering prints and textures with Ralph Lauren’s black and white leather trench ($10,000), white cotton button-down top ($750), and black patent leather skirt ($1,295). Ralph Lauren Collection: At ralphlauren.com.


From April 1–5 at Betteridge

No luxury is spared at

(236 Worth Ave., Palm Beach,

The Red Door, the

561.655.5850), 15% of

latest spa and beauty

profits from Peggy Stephaich

boutique now open at

Guinness jewelry, like

200 Park Ave. South

this gold and ruby snake ring ($8,550), will

(at 17th St.) in Union Square:

benefit Hôpital

212.388.0222.

Albert Schweitzer (HAS) in Haiti.

Carry Asprey’s Curve clutch in black suede for a touch of sophisticated elegance. $2,000. Asprey: 853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

Things are coming up roses in Carolina Herrera’s black and white silk rose gown. $6,990. Carolina Herrera: 954 Madison Ave., 212.249.6552.

Patricia Peckinpaugh’s crystal petal and pink tourmaline flower ring looks oh-so-pretty on your hand. $750. Patricia Peckinpaugh Jewelry: Available at The Ethereal Room, 2610 Persa, Houston, 713.524.3433.

Fiona Kotur Marin has done it again, this time designing a collection of shoes to pair with her wildly popular clutches. For spring, nothing beats this Jardines heel. $650. KOTUR: At koturltd.com.

MARCH 2014 79


T H E N E X T S T E P R E A LT Y

TAKING THE NEXT STEP WITH CAROLINA ROMMEL A model who has worked for brands ranging from Brooks Brothers to Milly to Theory, Carolina Rommel puts her Columbia University education to use as a writer. Here, for the Fashion Issue, she advises twentysomethings on how to be stylish on a budget.

modeling in

1

London, England.

2

Working as a fit model, I’m used to clothes that are made specifically for my body and I can see what a difference details can do to change the overall look of a garment. A few insider tips: 1. Steam or press your clothes before wearing; 2. If you love something but it does not fit perfectly or doesn’t flatter your shape, spend the extra money to have it altered to fit you properly; 3. Small changes can make a significant difference. How can you add quality to inexpensive items? Switch out ugly or plastic buttons for nicer ones, replace what you don’t like about a piece, or add something to personalize it. Sign up and let yourself be known! Many retailers offer promotions or discounts to loyal customers or those on their email lists. Signing up with your favorite stores can mean big savings via flash sales, free shipping, insider-only deals, and more. If you don’t want your inbox to be inundated with emails, create a separate account that is used only for this purpose.

3

4

Style extends beyond clothes. If the devil is in the details, pay attention and spend your money there. We’ve all seen men and women making the fashion pages wearing blue jeans and a T-shirt—because some people just look expensive or cool. They know that the details can make all the difference: the right accessories, a manicured nail, a great haircut, a unique statement piece, or a cohesive polished look are simple staples that can make any outfit look effortless and chic. Utilize your quality education and killer research skills in the style hunt. Unless you’re buying an item that’s particular to a store, look it up online to see who else may carry it and offer a better price. When doing so, pay attention to possible additional costs, such as shipping and taxes. Also, look at magazines and websites to get an idea of different styles and trends in order to see where you want to spend your money or where you can find a particular trend most inexpensively. Shopstyle.com is a great

J E N S A LT

Carolina Rommel,


website to search for trends as well as a particular type of item to see which different stores carry it—and at what price.

5

6

7

Buy below retail. Often, designers create trends that are ahead of the curve because of the amount of time it takes for the trends to trickle down. When the designers are ending one season or collection, mainstream is just catching on. This can mean that great pieces that are still very much current can be purchased at major discounts. Some of the best websites for discounts include: Gilt.com, TheOutnet.com, HauteLook.com, Ideeli.com, and Bluefly.com. Get money for what you own but no longer want. For more expensive designer items, sell them at a consignment store or online. For lesser valued items which may not be worth the energy or effort listing online or dropping off, swap with a friend or donate and get the tax write-off (not to mention the good karma!). There’s always Ebay.com, but try Crossroads Trading, Buffalo Exchange, Second Time Around, Beacon’s Closet, or TheRealReal.com. In recent years, designer labels (and style icons) have been creating diffusion lines and collaborations with larger more economical retail chains and department stores. The good news is that not only are these labels more affordable, but the cut and style is generally made for a younger, more contemporary fashionista. Some current examples are: Peter Pilotto for Target, Vivienne Westwood for Asos, and Zooey Deschanel for Tommy Hilfiger.

8

9

Calculate and balance! What is your lifestyle like? What is important to you? Where is a large majority of your time spent? If 60 percent of your time is spent at a job where a suit or more conservative clothing must be worn, then it’s worth it to invest in a few key tailored staple pieces. If your work environment is more casual or creative, then purchase pieces that can do double duty by working around the clock. Then, maybe add a few fun trendy lower-priced items to your wardrobe every season and splurge on a few items for dressier occasions. For women, a selfie-worthy dress or a bag or heels. For men, a great blazer or jacket or a pair of pimped-out kicks.

This page, from above: Brigitte Bardot makes blue jeans and a T-shirt look cool; consign with Second Time Around; a look from Peter Pilotto for Target.

Remember, your wardrobe is an extension of your voice and personality; it’s your visual expression to the world. Take a note from William Shakespeare: “To thine own self be true.” The best way you can be mindful about purchases is to first consult yourself rather than trends or magazines. Whether you value comfort, brand names, always being on trend—whatever! Shop from your understanding of yourself and you’re less likely to regret purchases or money spent. MARCH 2014 81


E-COMMERCE

LUXURY ONLINE IMAGINE HAVING a peerless knowledge of the fashion indus-

try, a curator’s eye for collecting art, and a tech-savvy business mind. That will give you an idea of what it’s like to be Carmen Busquets, the ever-elegant fashion entrepreneur and art enthusiast who was presented with the “Individual Outstanding Achievement” at the Luxury Briefing Awards in 2011. Educated in Venezuela, England, Canada, and the United States, Busquets brings a global perspective to all her projects and passions. If Busquets arrived on the comet that was 2000’s Net-aPorter, her career path has followed with even brighter ventures. In 2006, for instance, she founded Couturelab.com, a “laboratory of ideas” (her description) that focuses on supporting craftsmanship and heritage. Then, in 2012, she launched Giftlab.com, a global gifting site that offers clever, unique gift ideas for men and women. She was also an early investor in Moda Operandi, Maiyet, and Artspace. But before her initial investment in Net-a-Porter, Busquets opened a high-end fashion boutique in Caracas, Venezuela, in 1990. After a ten-year ban on foreign imports, her store was one of the first in Venezuela to stock Europe’s top designers. The idea was clever: use her international connections to offer the best in luxury items. And the timing couldn’t have been better. With the meteoric rise of the dot-coms, Busquets soon saw the potential of taking her businesses online. Today, she continues to invest in start-ups and helps entrepreneurs with their ventures, which, of course, she loves. Fashion, art, travel, helping like minds... It’s all business as usual for Busquets. u 82 QUEST


fashion, art, travel, and technology. OppoCO URTE SY O F C AR ME N BUSQUE TS

CO URTE SY O F CO MO SHAMBHAL A E STATE , BALI;

This page: Carmen Busquets has a love for site page, clockwise from top left: A work by one of her beloved artists, Jean-Michel Basquiat; Busquets’ passion for travel often brings her to the Como Shambhala Resort in Bali; “The Two Fridas” by artist Frida Kahlo; another one of her favorite getaways: Gouverneur Beach on St. Bart.


PA L M B E A C H

CHARLOTTE KELLOGG: CRISP AND EFFORTLESS

“MY INSPIRATION COMES directly from the customer. When a customer walks in the door and asks for a specific item or suggests a change to an existing item, the process starts there. We are committed to serving our customers and the reward for us is the kinds words they give back,” says Charlotte Kellogg, who caters to the women of Palm Beach with her designs, which are available at her Palm Beach stores: 256 Worth Avenue and 332 South County Road. Kellogg is known for her crisp, effortless clothing that comes in a rainbow of colors, including hot pink and turquoise—a collection that is a perfect fit for Palm Beach. “My favorite piece is a silk stretch pant that fits so beautifully you can hardly tell you are wearing it,” she says. “We have a new linen tunic that is flying out of the store and a new line of cotton-and-lycra white blouses that are poised to enter the This page: Charlotte Kellogg, the designer behind the eponymous

store in March—all made in the United States.” But while Kellogg admirably produces her wares in the United States, she draws inspiration from her travels around the world. “I, personally, enjoy the opportunity to travel extensively throughout Asia and Europe for new fabrics and pieces that my customers might enjoy,” she says. “At the moment, I’m about to leave for the airport to fly to Paris to attend the Première Vision fabric exhibition. It’s the best in the world. I always search for the best.” Kellogg knows what it means to dress the women of Palm Beach, women who are sophisticated and stylish. “We carry clothing designed for the Palm Beach lifestyle,” she says. “This has been our description for many years and we have stayed true to our roots. Our customers are loyal because we offer them a consistent style that fits with their way of life. They’re elegant women who have style and are confident in themselves.” u

store in the Gucci Courtyard of Worth Avenue. Opposite page: A collection of looks from the current and upcoming seasons, including pieces like a silk tunic (top left) and linen pants (top right). 84 QUEST

For more information, visit 256 Worth Avenue (561.820.2407) or 332 South County Road (561.820.2402).

J AC E K G A N C A R Z P H OTO G R A P H Y

The designer offers a collection of ready-to-wear clothing that promises to brighten up the day-to-day of the women in Palm Beach.


THE ARTS

STYLE EN POINTE B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D

BALLERINAS MAKE GREAT models. They can bring a look to

life in a way that a waif stomping down the catwalk never could. This spring, audiences can watch Yigal Azrouël’s designs flitter and jeté across the stage in two dance works choreographed by Emery LeCrone as part of the Guggenheim’s performing arts series, Works & Process. Azrouël, an Israeli-born designer who achieved success without any formal training in fashion, added a tough-but-chic style to the dancer’s costumes. Rejecting traditional forms like the tutu, he worked with LeCrone to create an edgier silhouette. “I have always been inspired by movement and form and it has been great to work with Emery. We have a very similar modern vision,” he said. “I worked closely with her in fittings with the dancers themselves and got to better understand their movements here in my atelier. It was amazing to hear their feedback as I deconstructed pieces and worked with different fabrics and construction throughout the process.” The result: costumes that feature patchwork patterns inspired by the dancers’ lines. The patches are made of a variety of fabrics like leather, mesh, and lycra—materials Azrouël is currently enamoured with, judging from his Spring 2014 collection. To top the look off, he designed leather headbands that any fashionista in the audience will covet. The performance is composed of two dances set to the same piece of music, Bach’s “Partita No. 2 in C Minor,” performed live by pianist Vassily Primikov. LeCrone choreographed one with traditional ballet movements and the other with a more contemporary style; the two approaches aim at producing an electric study in contrasts. The two-night affair will be held on March 23 and 24 in the Peter B. Lewis Theater at the Guggenheim, with dancers from American Ballet Theatre and the New York City Ballet. u

One of Yigal Azrouël’s sketches for the male dancers’ costume. 86 QUEST

For more information or to purchase tickets, contact the Guggenheim box office at 212.243.3587 or visit worksandprocess.org.


Dancers Kaitlyn Gilliland and Sarah Atkins demonstrate the movement of the costumes Yigael Azrouël designed for the Emery LaCrone Works & Process performances at the Guggenheim on March 23 and 24, 2014 (left); Azrouël’s

P H OTO G R A P H BY E R E Z S A B A G ; I LLU S T R AT I O N S CO U RT E S Y Y I G A L A Z RO U Ë L

sketches for the outfits (right).

MARCH 2014 87


PROFILE

A FASHION FORWARD FOUNDER OF PALM BEACH B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D PHOTOGRAPHS BY LUCIEN CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

proposed, and soon after, Rose THERE WOULD BE no Worth Gold became Rose Sachs. Avenue as we now know it The happy couple lived in without Rose Sachs. She and New York for the first few her husband, Mortimer, bought years of wedded bliss before Via Mizner—Addison Mizner’s Mortimer decided to leave the former digs on Worth—in the family business and move to early 1940s and spent the folPalm Beach. There, the two lowing four decades overseeing emerged not only as among the the arcade’s shops. But Rose largest of landowners in town, was no Manhattan debutante buying more properties after of the wealthy elite; instead, their initial investment on Worth her humble upbringing echoed Avenue, but also as the best parin the Southern accent she ty-givers. Whether a small affair retained throughout her life. for their closest confidants, or a Born Rose Gold just outside lavish soirée for hundreds, the Memphis, Tennessee, she was Sachs quickly became pillars of the youngest of 10 children. the scene. They reveled in their She always claimed to be “just life together, vacationing at their a country girl,” in part because house in Monte Carlo and buildshe never completed any schooling a real estate empire at home. ing beyond the eighth grade. The two lived in total harmoAfter her mother’s death, she ny for 47 years until Mortimer’s moved around the country with Rose Sachs at home in Palm Beach, where she death in 1982. Rose never three of her siblings, working and her husband Mortimer were pillars of the community. remarried. When she celebratat hat shops and demonstrating the skill of a natural saleswoman. manufacturing company. He had joined ed her 100th birthday in 2012, Rose Finally, she ended up living with one of his father there after a brief career as a was bestowed the Woman of Distinction her brothers in New Jersey, just outside professor at Columbia University. One award by Palm Beach Atlantic University. New York City. And that’s when Prince day while out walking, he came across In accepting the award, she said, “I am a young woman shopping for a pocket- convinced that almost anything can be Charming came into her life. Before acquiring the moniker “Mr. book with her sister-in-law. He invited accomplished if one does his or her very Worth Avenue,” Mortimer Sachs ran the her to his showroom to find one and best and perseveres.” All of Palm Beach family business in New York, Paris Style asked her if she wanted to go dancing is delighted by her perserverence, wisLeather, a multimillion-dollar leather that weekend. On their first date he dom, and grace to this day. u 88 QUEST


This page, clockwise from top: Rose and Mortimer Sachs, who enjoyed 47 years together; the two were an integral part of the Palm Beach social scene; Rose at home, in one of her many fashionable gowns she would have made for her in Paris.


SPORT

THE IDES OF GOLF BY MICHAEL M. THOMAS


This spread, clockwise from top: The indoor golf simulators at Golf & Body in New York allow for training and entertaining; club members enjoy benefits ranging from a fully equipped gym to a well-stocked bar;

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outdoor snow golf in 1949.

A FEW MONTHS ago, when the days were short and gloomy and New York was throttled by yet another of the successive bands of dire weather and freezing temperatures mixed with precipitation that were the Northeast Seaboard’s lot this past winter, the publisher of this magazine and I chatted about what passionate golfers in this area do in the winter. On one level, the answer is obvious. They go south and they go west: to Florida, where decent to great golf is available at every level of exclusivity and difficulty; to Arizona, where Scottsdale seems to have 18 holes per thousand people; to Southern California, notably Palm Springs, which duplicates the Florida experience, although is perhaps not as finely

granulated when it comes to social gradations. They leave the country and head for the Caribbean—Punta Cana, Lyford Cay, Tryall, Mill Reef, Nevis—or, increasingly, to Baja, California, where golf seems to have erupted with the force of Popocatépetl in the area around Cabo San Lucas, and to the coastal resorts of Mexico. And yet there is an alternative population of golfers, no less keen, whose business affairs, sporting preferences, or family plebiscites proscribe the pursuit of the sun and the small white ball. I have a friend, for instance, who is the dominant figure in one of the more sought-after golf clubs on Long Island—a man in absolute, hopeless thrall to the old Scots game, you would say if you saw him on the links in

August, but for whom winter sport means skiing, squash, and time devoted to historical research of much praised exhibitions of contemporary art. A person like this is thorough in all things, and loath to let his or her game fall completely out of tune. How does such a one prepare himself against the blessed April day when, as P.G. Wodehouse must have written somewhere, a man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of his mashie-niblick? I speak as a golfer for some 60 years, whose study of the game has remained loving and constant even as my game has deteriorated and I have moved so far forward on the tee that I am practically driving from the fringe. By now I may be beyond help, but there are citybound MARCH 2014 91


golfers of both genders whose determination is sturdier and more oaken than mine. They would like at least to steal an hour or two for swing maintenance and improvement, even when the weather outside is of a ferocity that would daunt a Mameluke. Pondering the matter, I reflected that there are a number of indoor driving and golfing facilities scattered throughout the city, of which Chelsea Piers—a full-service operation with hitting stations extending a hundred yards or so out over the Hudson River—is surely the best-known. The high-end city golf shops such as Golfsmith, World of Golf, and New York Golf (all haunts frequented by your correspondent) maintain hitting bays outfitted, like Chelsea Piers, with the technology that has become a sine qua non when it comes to fitting a golfer with equipment tailored to his particular specifications. Like everything else in life, starting with the governance of this great city by Michael Bloomberg, who is as rabid a golfer as I have ever known, golf has become data-driven—relentlessly so. Launch angle, swing speed, ball speed, and R.P.M.: all are factored into swing analysis, calling for a mastery of I.T. sufficient to qualify one to fly an F-16. It almost makes me yearn for the old days, when pro shops displayed clubs whose allure was mainly based on appearance. Golfers would take one out for a brief spin on the course or practice tee, where the depth of mutual attraction would be quickly affirmed (love is blind, and first love blindest of all.) This would be followed by the inevitable cycle of purchase, a few rhapsodic rounds, a gradual decline as the swain’s native golf92 QUEST

ing deficiencies reasserted themselves and the equipment drew the blame, then end with exile to garage or storage locker, there to join other drivers, wedges, putters, and iron sets that had once gleamed with false, seductive promises of abiding, even magical, game improvement. Along with data, one other postmodern obsession has in recent years shouldered its way into golf, namely that golfers should seek some degree of physical fitness. Ben Hogan may have been the first immortal to recommend “muscle memory” as a central component of the proper golf swing, but one wonders what the “Wee Iceman” would think of today’s emphasis on the “muscle” part. Gone are the days when a golfer like Lloyd Mangrum could win a U.S. Open playing stroke after peerless stroke with a Lucky Strike dangling from his lips. Today it’s off to the gym or yoga studio; even I do pilates twice a week, although I confess this is mainly to save myself embarrassment when it comes to straightening up after placing peg in ground. I mention these matters because it seems to me that the city golfer should have access to both state-of-the-art club fitting and a gym for physical fitness when it comes to off-season work on one’s game. And yet, in golf as in much else, what matters most is the quality of personal instruction: the man or woman standing watchfully off to one side, who manually tweaks the club back on plane or who demonstrates the proper weight shift. On this matter, I must be candid. I haven’t done a head count, but it would surprise me if, among the two leading golf magazines’ annual tabulations of the nation’s top 100 golf teachers, one would find more than a bare handful of professionals affiliated with indoor golf facilities. No doubt there are marvelous teachers to be found at America’s and New York’s golf shops and ranges, but like every other human enterprise, golf instruction has its traditional hierarchies. These may be prejudicial, but there they are. Which is why, while wandering the hills and dales of the Internet in search

of enlightenment on this matter, I stopped short at a post that discussed a new midtown operation, a membership club called Golf & Body. What caught my eye wasn’t the full range of services and technology the place offered, nor the emphasis placed on the conflation of physical well-being and golf instruction and practice, all supported by the best modern technology, but two names: Darrell Kestner and Eden Foster. These are definitively not the sort of golf professionals one associates with a driving range, even a driving range with all the latest bells and whistles in simulators, swing analysis, gym equipment, and training facilities. As it happens, not only are Darrell and Eden two of the best-known and best-regarded teaching professionals in the metropolitan area, on everyone’s “Top 10” list, but I have personally had lessons from both: from Darrell at Deepdale, where he is the regular-season head professional, and where, in better-heeled days, I was once a member; from Eden, thanks to the pitying kindness of a dear friend, in East Hampton at Maidstone, one of American golf’s most revered, venerable venues, where he heads up golf operations. In both instances, the occasion was a productive delight and the results admirable—at least until my congenital loss of concentration kicked in weeks later and, like Lucifer cast out of heaven in Paradise Lost, I fell heavily from golfing grace. A third name on Golf & Body’s teaching strength was also known to me: Ron McDougal, the outfit’s head pro and director of golf services. He had worked with Century Country Club’s incomparable Nelson Long, who serves as the director of golf at Tryall in Jamaica, where my family had a house, and is among my dearest golfing friends. Clearly, it seemed to me, we might be dealing with a species apart. I decided to go take a look and contacted Golf & Body’s personable general manager, Jeannine Harrington, to set up a tour. I must say, I was impressed. Golf & Body was founded by Tom Schiff, a former commodities trader and avid golfer who injured himself playing golf. Yes, that’s possible. The physical movements required by a golf swing are not natural to human physiology. and can do terrible

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SPORT


This page: One of Golf & Body’s three practice putting and chipping greens available to its members, offering a way to keep a golfer’s game sharp during the snow-laden and dreary winter months away from the outdoor courses. Opposite page: The club’s spacious locker rooms.

things to the spine and hips. Additionly, there are the bruises and occasional fractures that result from falling into traps or rotator cuffs torn by the exertion required to hurl one’s driver into the nearest copse after another foozled tee shot. Schiff sensed the need for a golfing venue where golf-specific fitness and healing regimens would be available alongside premier golf instruction and practice resources. The former would be entrusted to Ben Shear, a fitness advisor who works with touring professionals of the caliber of Luke Donald and Webb Simpson, along with a team of golf-centric wellness and training professionals. I’m not going to list all the facilities that Golf & Body offers, but it’s extensive, from sophisticated golf gadgetry to a wellstocked bar that also serves the kind of food one wants in a place like this. Some 27 of the world’s notable courses can be pulled up on its simulators. Perhaps the best feel I can give for the place was conveyed by a “four-ball” of members I observed during my visit. They were playing a match in one of the hitting bays, but

repaired to a table at the rear of the bay between holes where laptops were set up and either a complex corporate takeover or very fancy set of derivatives trades was being engineered. Try doing that in mid-fairway at your local golf club! But then it’s unlikely that at your home club the roar of Broadway traffic and the glare of street ice are but a sheet of noise-suppressing window glass away. Come spring, of course, Darrell and Eden will return to their prestigious club jobs, but Jeannine tells me that plans are afoot to bring in capable Florida pros, perhaps from the Jim McClean Academy, and Golf & Body will operate at a somewhat lower R.P.M. The place is still a work in progress, to some degree: a pilates program has not been settled on and club fitting may be upgraded by an affiliation with Modern Golf, the Toronto-based outfit that is the gold standard among many golf people I know. If what to do about your golf during the winter is a matter of concern, you should give Golf & Body a call and take a tour. The place definitely has the look

and, more importantly, the feel of a private club—and that’s saying something. The fees I was quoted seem reasonable, especially for anyone in whom the golf flame burns hot, ardent, and constant but who is constrained from fleeing Northern winters by pressures or preferences of one sort or another. “Getting and spending,” wrote Wordsworth, “we lay waste our substance.” Clearly the poet was a frustrated golfer. I picture him chained to his winter desk churning out sonnets that would make miserable future generations of schoolboys while watching the snow fall on green and bunker and hearing the moans and whistles of a three-club wind, straining his genius to amass a pittance sufficient to pay greens fees once the first robin appears and the cry of “Fore!” is again heard in the Lake District. Wordsworth, thou shouldst be living at this hour! With what’s available now, there’s no call for the snowbound golfer to fear the coming of spring and what has happened to his swing. You might even say that unlike Caesar, he need no longer fear the Ides of Golf. u MARCH 2014 93


SUBLIME VISTAS B Y L I LY H O A G L A N D very soft, and feels entirely different from the East Coast.” Emily started painting as a child with her grandmother, Eloise Lawrence. After growing up in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, she took her first serious art classes at Middlesex School, which she credits with a phenomenal program. One of her favorite artists, John Singer Sargent, once did a charcoal of her great-grandmother, and you can see his influence in the rich depth of field that Emily’s pictures contain. Clearly, journeying to find her next vista poses no problem for Emily. “It’s so exciting to be painting Lake George in the Adirondacks one week, and then Maine or East Hampton the next.” Her pictures bring all those wonderful places, and the emotions they can evoke, to those who can't be there. u

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LOOKING AT EMILY BUCHANAN’S landscapes, viewers are plunged into panoramas with a sense of tranquility and, often, the comfort of a familiar place. “I’ve always been drawn to landscape,” she explains. “As a student, I did a lot of figure drawing, portrait, and still life. It was important for me to do, and each subject matter has its unique challenges, but landscape inspires me so much more than any other subject.” From the sand dunes of the Hamptons to the parks of Paris, Emily chooses vantage points for her paintings by what best represents the spirit of the region. She looks for interesting compositions and views that are unique to an area. “I’m painting in Malibu right now, for instance. I’m very inspired by the rock outcroppings, and the incredible cliffs as you look back from Point Dume. The light here is

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ART

This page, clockwise from top: Emily Buchanan titles her paintings according to their locale, like “Fishers,” a view of Fishers Island; “Palm Beach;” “Nantucket Driveway;” and “The Narrows.” Opposite page: “Malibu Easel,” with a Magritte-like paintingwithin-a-painting.


OPEN HOUSE

CARRIAGE HOUSE

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As the 20th century gave way to the 21st, times changed, technology transformed lives (as it does), and the lifestyle of the Gilded Age and its modern offshoots morphed into a more informal, relaxed way of life, inspired by a younger demographic of technocrats and the connected class. And so, this fine home experienced a reincarnation. On the ground floor, form and function coalesce and the grand spaces of the great room—living room, dining room, and kitchen—enjoy clean lines, works by artist Bahman Akhavan, a fireplace, a Zen waterfall, a hidden pool, changing surfaces and textures, an uninterrupted space, and skylights. The full-floor master bedroom offers a stunning open space, with sophisticated lighting and a spa-like ambience. The second floor hosts three well appointed bedrooms and the fifth floor offers a loft-like media room, which opens onto a huge terrace with mesmerizing fountains and the smell of jasmine. While many of the 75 carriage houses in the city are squat and without features, this one has it all! A garage, a lovely outdoor space and a swimming pool on the first floor, a planted terrace off of the second floor, and an extensive English basement. u For more information, contact Barbara Evans-Butler or Caleb Loftus of Stribling & Associates at bevansbutler@stribling.com or cloftus@stribling.com.

M I K E TAU B E R

THE INCARNATIONS OF an Upper East Side carriage house: Gilded Age to Anglo-Indian to Global Zen. If you are searching for the quintessential 21st-century luxury home with provenance, a contemporary aesthetic, push-button convenience, sophisticated international decor, and the seductive charm of nearly 8,000 square feet of dramatic, high-ceilinged space, then welcome to this sublimely sleek, recently renovated, highly coveted carriage house, poised between Park and Lexington avenues on 83rd Street. Starting in 1907, J.P. Morgan used this 25 foot–wide property to house the first cars in the city, along with a chauffeur, a cook, and staff. And as Morgan welcomed Edison with his electricity, so, too, did he welcome Ford with his Model T (among other prized cars). Conveniently located near the Metropolitan Museum, which Morgan frequented upon becoming its president in 1906, this carriage house remained in the family until 1994. Over time, various descendents would crash there. In the ’90s, Karan Trehan, a native of India who worked at Alliance Capital and Goldman Sachs in New York, was searching for a unique home. Given the historic provenance, karma, and the inherent drama of a neglected five-storey home, he and his wife immediately saw the possibilities to create a warm and magical Anglo-Raj home, which became a magnet for New York society as well as a venue for many celebrated evenings.


This page, clockwise from top left: The carriage house at 118 East 83rd Street is available for rent at $85,000 per month; the dining room; the master bedroom; the second-floor terrace; the rooftop, which is extensive and multifunctional; the faรงade, with a center garage. Opposite page: The property is graced with works by Bahman Akhavan, an artist defined by the sensitive depiction of human expressions and ideas expressed with allegorical imagery.


CRAZY IN LOVE WITH MICHAEL KORS On the set, blank background paper is being rolled out as the lights go up and our models arrive. Stunningly chic even in break-of-day déshabille, we wonder how it’s possible to look so beautiful this early in the morning. They need no introduction: Hannah Bronfman and Alexandra Richards, both in-demand DJs, stars on the social scene, and entrepreneurs carrying their family names into the next generation. Calling them “It” girls seems like a gross understatement. Quest fell hard for the Spring 2014 Michael Kors collection, and who better to show off the slit skirts, gutsy city sandals, hand-embroideries, and sporty yet romantic spirit of Kors’ clothes than Hannah and Alexandra? As the music plays, Beyoncé trends as a theme for the day, setting the perfect vibe for our girls—and our photographer—to get “Crazy in Love” with Michael Kors…

PRODUCED AND STYLED BY DANIEL CAPPELLO PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIE SKARRATT

Hannah and Alexandra are bright as spring in Michael Kors: Hannah wears the indigo and white jersey mini-paillette vinecap-sleeve gown; Alexandra, the grass and white jersey mini-paillette vine halter gown and foliage nappa and cork Cecily platform sandal.


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Alexandra in Michael Kors’ peanut bonded plongÊ jacket, hemp linen flirt skirt, and peanut vachetta Crista platform sandal, carrying the Michael Kors peanut deer leather top-zip clutch.

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Hannah in Michael Kors’ nutmeg cashmere-cotton vest, nutmeg and white silk Georgette dot shirt and skort, and optic white vachetta leather skinny belt (this page) and white fox chubby, white silk Georgette blouse, and hemp raffia hand-embroidered linen slit skirt (opposite page). Fashion assistant: Alex R. Travers. Beauty styling: Foto Athanasiadis for Valery Joseph Salon (hair); Gina Bettelli, MAC Cosmetics Senior Artist (makeup).


Alexandra is light as a spring breeze in Michael Kors’ white linen gauze turtleneck, white linen crêpe pant, and peanut vachetta Nea city sandal.


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Hannah in the indigo cashmere-cotton vest, white and indigo mini blossom Georgette dress, nutmeg hand-stitched vachetta skinny belt, and nutmeg smooth calf and cork Bretta platform sandal, all by Michael Kors.

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Alexandra sports Michael Kors’ white crushed-cotton stripe oxford boyfriend shirt, indigo bonded denim short, white fox ring, peanut hand-stitched croc-embossed Lance belt, and peanut Nile croc Camelia platform slingbacks, with the Michael Kors honey tortoise Grable sunglasses and peanut Nile croc top-zip satchel.


This page: Hannah wears Michael Kors’ indigo cotton denim pullover, Barley tissue python flirt skirt, and luggage python skinny belt, paired with the Michael Kors peanut python top-zip clutch and luggage python Camelia platform slingbacks. Opposite page: Alexandra in the nutmeg and white linen blossom sheath and nutmeg vachetta flip-tie belt.


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AN ANNIVERSARY OF ELEGANCE JEANNE LANVIN ONCE said, “A design inevitably reflects the artistic motifs

stored in one’s memory, drawing on those which are the most alive, new, and fertile all at the same time.” In celebration of its 125th anniversary this year, the fashion house of Lanvin is sharing the artistic motifs of its founder and taking us on a journey through the memories and experiences that shaped her designs. Lanvin has always embodied a certain whimsy and a balance of elegance and edge. These are aspirational collections made up of clothes that are surprisingly wearable—a hallmark of the house that can be seen in Jeanne’s original 110 QUEST

S T U D I O H A R CO U RT; CO U RTE S Y O F L A N V I N

BY MELINDA WANG


This page: A 1925 gouache painting of the Trianon dress by Jeanne Lanvin. Flowers were a recurring theme; inspired by her daughter, Marguerite (French for “daisy”), Jeanne frequently incorporated daisies and other flowers into her designs. Opposite page: A circa-1934 portrait of Jeanne Lanvin, the house of Lanvin’s founder and namesake, who began her career at the age of 16 as an apprentice milliner at Madame Félix in Paris. In 1909, Lanvin joined the Syndicat de la Couture, marking her formal status as a couturière.


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at the boutique. Jeanne joined the Syndicat de la Couture that same year and formally became a couturière. Her studio was legendary. She assembled books filled with her inspirations and created (and carefully catalogued) a “fabric library” of rare fabrics and clothes, including Indian saris, Coptic embroideries, and Persian silks. Each of her designs had to be executed perfectly. Having developed her own palettes, she opened her own dye factories to produce the exact shades to achieve her vision (including a signature shade of blue now known as Lanvin Blue). She incorporated unexpected materials in her designs so that beading would match the fabric and her motifs. She collaborated with artists, musicians, and writers, and believed fashion and art were one and the same. As part of its 125th anniversary, Lanvin is launching a new section on its website called “Lanvin Heritage,” showcasing archival video footage and Jeanne’s original gouaches of her designs. The house is also featuring special content across its social media accounts, sharing never-before-seen objects from the studio and fabric library. So now, with these glimpses of Jeanne’s original designs and inspirations, we undoubtedly— and fittingly—have a wealth of artistic motifs to store in our own memories. u

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designs all the way through to today, in Alber Elbaz’s voluminous gowns of saturated color, mixed-media embroidered dresses, and lamé cargo jumpsuits. Although each designer throughout Lanvin’s history brought his or her own vision, the spirit of Jeanne Lanvin was the common thread. You get a glimpse of the unique origins of Lanvin in the logo: a mother and daughter dressed in gowns, holding hands. As Elbaz put it, “It’s not a lion, and it’s not a horse. It’s a mother and a daughter.” From the beginning, Jeanne understood that fashion was a way of life, and the house of Lanvin became a lifestyle brand­—one of the first to dress the whole family and the home. Jeanne founded the Parisian fashion house in 1889 on the corner of rue Boissy d’Anglas and rue du Faubourg SaintHonoré. Trained as a milliner, her life changed in 1897 with the birth of her daughter, Marguerite. Motherhood encouraged Jeanne’s entrepreneurship: creating clothes for Marguerite’s dolls, then clothes for Marguerite, she discovered that her millinery clients were interested in these sophisticated clothes for their daughters as well. Soon, her clients wanted their own elegant but wearable haute couture pieces, and, in 1909, she opened a “Young Ladies and Women’s” department


This page: A 1925 gouache painting of a girl model. Jeanne’s designs for her daughter’s clothing attracted wealthy clients who wanted similar clothes for their own children; eventually, the mothers would request clothes by Jeanne for themselves. Opposite page, from left: A 1925 Lanvin gouache painting of mother and child; Lanvin’s 1925 black perfume bottle decorated with a gold Lanvin logo, which was illustrated by Paul Iribe and based on a photo of Jeanne and her daughter, Marguerite.


THE TALENTED MR. SNYDER BY DANIEL CAPPELLO

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DA N I E L K I Y O I ; K E V I N TAC H M A N

THERE ARE SOME MEN who wear the clothes, and some whose

This page: Looks from Todd Snyder’s “Blue Coast” spring collection included

clothes wear them. And then there is the rare occasion where it becomes impossible to distinguish who’s wearing what, or what’s wearing whom—when we cannot tell the dancer from the dance. Think Jude Law as Dickie Greenleaf in Anthony Minghella’s 1999 film version of The Talented Mr. Ripley. Even before Jude Law, there was Alain Delon, whose guile, graft, and good looks gave credence to his own inimitable portrayal of the title character himself, Tom Ripley, in René Clément’s 1960 classic adaptation, Purple Noon. To truly inhabit the skin of the duplicitous Americano, the French-Swiss Delon had to dress the part. Simple, elegant, with a louche disregard for the rules, Delon’s Mr. Ripley turned high-rolled khakis and low-buttoned oxfords into de rigueur staples of the beau monde ex-pat set. For Spring 2014, with his “Blue Coast” collection, designer Todd Snyder channeled that seductive rebel charm with rolled short-sleeve chambray button-downs, crisp nautical striped tees, and an irreverent suite of pants that seem like they were made to live life along the sunny borders of the Mediterranean Sea. With Snyder, it’s no wonder that an inspiration can turn from figurative to literal, then back again, and still work. He is a master of balancing craftsmanship with an on-par sensibility, like in the suiting that launched his career: a perfect combination of Savile Row craftsmanship, military tailoring, and a distinct New York inclination. Everything he constructs, in other words, is always right in place, and has the right sense of place. Snyder, whose surname means “one who makes outer garments” in Dutch, has lived up to his last name throughout his career. From his early days learning to cut and sew at the Des Moines haberdashery Badowers to the two decades in New York spent honing his craft—first as an outerwear designer for Ralph

(below, from left) the blue cotton metal suit with diamond dot print tank; a plaid short with blue linen button-down; and the camel striped cardigan with bolt print tank and maroon tab front chino; a model posing at the presentation (above). Opposite page: Snyder at his “Blue Coast” presentation.


P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E


DA N I E L K I Y O I

Lauren, then as a men’s wear director for the Gap and senior vice president of men’s wear for J.Crew—Snyder has always held fast to the notion that the perfect fit makes the man. In 2011, with a solid reputation for impeccable clothing, he branched out on his own and launched his eponymous men’s wear collection. One nomination for the CFDA Swarovski Award for Menswear, a nod as one of GQ’s Best New Menswear Designers, and a final standing in the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund competition later, Snyder’s sails are truly catching the eye of the wind this spring. Further examination of Blue Coast reveals the designer’s virtuosity: paired with the casual chambray, rolled sleeves, and nautical hints are micro prints, shawl-lapel tuxedo jackets, a

smart single-pleat dress short, and patterned knitwear—all executed with a relaxed tailoring inspired, according to the designer, by David Bowie’s 1978 Stage tour. Blue Coast, in its every look, invokes the cool-breeze vibes of Cinque Terre, the Côte d’Azur, and Cape Cod. Or, put another way, the talented Mr. Snyder is bringing back the adventurous appeal of a certain man of travel and mystery, one protagonist at a time. u This page: Designer Todd Snyder fields questions from the press during the presentation of his Spring 2014 collection at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York. Opposite page, clockwise from top: A model backstage; detail of Snyder’s maroon dot jacket; a program about the Blue Coast collection.

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Quest

STYLE FILE

The Quest Style File aims to bring together the greatest examples of high fashion within high society. These spreads are filled with the well-heeled, the effortlessly stylish, and the trendsetters we know and love. So check out our style mavens, mod men, perfect pairs, and those who are simply the Quest best.


Style Mavens There will always be a select group of women who not only follow the best styles, but create them—think Grace Kelly using an Hermès scarf as a sling. These are the ladies whose fashion prowess naturally shines through, even if it’s in something casual like jeans and a tailored shirt. That je ne sais quoi transforms a jacket into a statement piece with just the right tie of the belt. We salute these style mavens for their impeccable taste. This spread, clockwise from left: Amanda Burden and Cornelia Guest; Jacqueline Kennedy (inset left); Jacqueline Kennedy and Marella Agnelli (inset right); Claiborne Swanson Frank and Genevieve Bahrenburg; Truman Capote and Lee Radziwill,

C L A I B O R N E SWA N S O N F R A N K P H OTO G R A P H Y; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

1968; Minnie Mortimer; Lauren Santo Domingo.

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STYLE FILE

Mod Men While today’s gentleman might not sport a fedora, and canes are no longer required accessories, men can still cut a fine figure with subtle touches and a well-tailored jacket. These are a few of our favorite nattily dressed men we see around town—and on whose arms we would love to be seen. This spread, clockwise: Nick Acquavella, Alejandro Santo Domingo, Topper Mortimer, and Walter Tomenson; Dan Lufkin and David Patrick Columbia; Winston Lapham, Alex Acquavella, Phillip Radziwill, and Chris Randolph; Oscar de la Renta; Richard Johnson and Chuck Pfeifer; Chuck Pfeifer, the Winston man; Clark Gable, Van

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Heflin, Gary Cooper, and Jimmy Stewart.

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Perfect Pairs Sometimes one just isn’t enough. There are certain people who complement each other’s style so well, it’s hard to imagine them apart. This spread, clockwise from top left: Ralph and Ricky Lauren, pictured here in 1977, have always personified classic American style; Matthew and Nicole Hanley Mellon; the recently engaged Johannes Huebl and Olivia Palermo; Reinaldo and Carolina Herrera in La Vega, Venezuela, 1974; Josh and Shoshanna Gruss; Valentino Garavani and Nan Kempner at the Costume Institute’s Spring Gala, April 2003; Christian and Gillian Hearst Simonds; Jon and Eleanor Ylvisaker; David and Lauren Bush Lauren. 122 QUEST


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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

STYLE FILE

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Quest Ladies There are some women who personify the Quest lifestyle so well, we had to give them their own category. Their lives—festive, oh-so-elegant—embody the essence of our magazine. So it was only appropriate to pay homage to the dazzling doyennes who grace our glossy pages. Here’s to the lovely ladies of Quest. This spread, from left: Carolina Herrera, 1973; Mrs. Herrera, today (inset); Aerin Lauder, photographed by Claiborne Swanson Frank; Julia Koch, Carol Mack, and Joanne de Guardiola; Pauline Pitt with daughters Samantha and Serena Boardman; Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler and mother Emilia

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; C L A I B O R N E S WA N S O N F R A N K P H OTO G R A P H Y

Fanjul; Hilary Geary, Blaine Trump, and Jamee Gregory; Emilia Saint-Amand.

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This page: Elie Tahari, always smiling, gratefully welcomes applause at one of his fashion shows. Opposite page: A studio with a view: Tahari finishing a fitting on one of his models; an Elie Tahari magazine advertisement from the 1980s (inset).

FROM TUBE TOPS TO RICHES BY ALEX R. TRAVERS

IT’S EASY TO SAY that, after 40 years, Elie Tahari has it all: the multi-million dollar company that has grown exponentially since it was founded in 1974; the perfect wife (who also acts as his brand’s vice chairman and creative director); and, most recently, a day named after him (September 4 is known as “Elie Tahari Day” in New York). But Tahari’s path to success was not paved in gold. He came to New York City with nothing. That’s why it’s astonishing that after all his accomplishments and accolades, he remains one of the most humble designers alive today. “I’m looking at a sign right now,” he tells me over the phone. “And the sign says: Too much ego will kill your talent.” We sat down a few days before his Fall 2014 Fashion Week presentation to talk about the Elie Tahari Edition 1974 collection, which celebrates his brand’s 40th anniversary. 126 QUEST

ALEX TRAVERS: I’m interested in your past, especially how your move to New York relates to your design aesthetic. What was New York like, in your eyes, in the Seventies? ELIE TAHARI: The Seventies were such a liberating time in New York. Women felt confident and free, they wore flirty dresses to the disco, and they weren’t afraid to bare a little skin. That’s why I had so much success with the tube top. AT: Your Elie Tahari Edition 1974 is a 20-piece capsule collection—tube top, included—that mines the brand’s past. What are some of the biggest challenges when it comes to updating your silhouettes? ET: I wanted to stay true to the original silhouettes so I updated them to make them more modern. The Hudson


PHILIP GREENBERG


This page, clockwise from bottom left: Elie Tahari and Joan Rivers celebrate Elie Tahari Day on September 4, 2013 at 510 Fifth Avenue; the sun fills Tahari’s beautiful East Hampton boutique; before he was a designer, Tahari (who was a mechanic in the Israeli Air Force) dreamed of being a pilot. Opposite page: Two looks from the Elie Tahari Edition 1974 collection. The Hudson jumpsuit (right) is one of Tahari’s favorite pieces.

jumpsuit is one of my favorite pieces from the collection: It stays true to the original Seventies feel with its high waist, but I updated it by adding a silicone insert.

AT: If you could, would you change anything about the past? ET: The evolution of Elie Tahari has been something to cherish, and I have learned so much from my experiences in the business over the past 40 years: From opening to my first boutique on Madison Avenue to my first international boutique in Turkey, I wouldn’t trade any of it. u

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AT: Do you keep archives of all your past collections? ET: Yes, I have a warehouse in New Jersey. It was great to have a few of my pieces from the Seventies and Eighties when I was creating Elie Tahari Edition 1974.


It’s easy to say that, after 40 years, Elie Tahari has it all: the multi-million dollar company that has grown exponentially since it was founded in 1974; the perfect wife (who also acts as vice chairman and creative director); and, most recently, a day named after him.

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INNOVATIVE GLAMOUR

BY ALEX R. TRAVERS


WHETHER YOU’RE FAMILIAR with the garments of the 1930s or not, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology’s latest exhibition, “Elegance in an Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s,” acts as a revelation. The exhibit is a celebration of craftsmanship—with the clothes, clearly, but also with a space that is meticulously set up by curators Bruce Boyer and Patricia Mears to showcase the styles of the era. According to Boyer, “The thirties was the period in which truly modern clothing was created.” And to underscore that notion, the show begins with two heavy, tubular garments from the early 1900s placed next to two modern looks from the decade their exhibition focuses on. “They just don’t have that softness you get in the 1930s,” says Mears of the predecessors. It’s easy to credit that softness you see in the later looks to the advances in fabric technology, but just as important is the show’s emphasis on artisanal efforts and groundbreaking inventions: the hundreds of hours it would take to create one dress, say, or the experimentation of cutting on the bias. For men’s wear, “Elegance in an Age of Crisis” focuses on the deconstruction of heavy wools jackets, which is credited to Gennaro Rubinacci and his tailor, Vincenzo Attolini. For women, the exhibit discusses the removal of the corset, the dimension of fabrics, drapery, cutwork—ideas that translated into clothes that fell naturally on the body. To pick just one example, there’s a cotton dress by Madeleine Vionnet from 1932 with countless tiny, geometric eyelet cuts. When you look at it, all you can see is its beauty and grace, never the seamstresses’ sweat. “It’s all This page: An ivory tulle evening gown, attributed to Augustabernard, 1934. The gown was a licensed French copy made in the United States. Opposite page: A men’s suit from Savile Row tailors Anderson & Sheppard, 1935.

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one piece and then the four quadrants that make up the base of the skirt,” informs Mears. “The fabric was hand-cut, and every little thing was hand-stitched.” Here Vionnet’s cutwork creates a transparency that, like lace, softens the silhouette. The result is empty spaces around solid ones that are then filled by skin. That dress, in fact, clarifies a characteristic of Vionnet’s couture: its precise technicality, in opposition to the ease with which she draped. (“I am more a sculptor than a painter...more sensitive to shape that color,” Vionnet once said in an interview.) With its veil-like quality, Vionnet’s creation winks at you: it reveals something but, at the same time, shows you nothing. And, for 1932, that wasn’t a kind of subtle everyday gesture. It was daring and provocative, even magical. “I’m fascinated by that dress,” admits Boyer. “I showed it to a friend of mine who’s a cardiologist and he said, ‘My surgeons can’t even do that.’” Which is truly a testament to the workmanship of the times. Still, it’s worth mentioning the fabrics—the lightest of chiffons, the silkiest of crêpes, the softest of cashmeres. Oh, the cashmeres? Toward the end of the exhibition you’ll walk by a pair of trousers. “They’re six-ply herringbone cashmere,” informs Boyers. “If you could find that fabric today, it would cost you two or three thousand dollars a yard.” It’s fascinating, in a way, to see so much of this money-is-no-object luxury when we know the ’30s were filled with financial turmoil. But often, in a crisis, beauty prevails. Just look at the success of the film industry during the Depression. Or even the towering heights of high heels in 2009. Over the brassy “Rhapsody in Blue” playing in the background, Boyer points out a collection of Fred Astaire’s shoes, one of the show’s highlights. “The most famous feet of the 20th century,” he says with conviction. Call me old-fashioned, but there’s no way you want to miss the pleasure of Astaire’s company in an exhibition that twirls you through the glamour of the 1930s like only he could. u


This page: The best way to date 1930s swimwear is by the amount of skin exposed. Here a Munchen swimsuit in wool, from 1930, doesn’t bare much; a printed men’s beach robe by McGregor. Opposite page: An ivory silk organza evening gown with black lace insets by Vionnet, 1937; a négligée ensemble in silk chiffon by Hélène Yrande.

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BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHNNY MONCADA

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born on May 14, 1939, in Königsberg, East Prussia. Her mother was the former Countess Gottliebe von Kalnein and her father was Count Heinrich Ahasverus von Lehndorff of Germany, an army reserve officer who became a key member of the German Resistance during World War II after witnessing Jewish children being beaten and killed. For a short time, Vera enjoyed a charmed life with her three sisters, residing at Steinhort, an estate in East Prussia that had been in her family for centuries. In 1944, when Vera was five years old, her father was executed for participating in the famous Operation Valkyrie plot to kill Adolf Hitler inside the Wolf’s Lair military headquarters. Soon, her mother was arrested and Vera and her sisters spent the rest of the war in Nazi labor camps. When World War II ended in 1945, the family was distraught and homeless. Vera attended 13 different schools before studying art at a college in Hamburg. At the age of 20, Vera moved to Florence, Italy, where she was discovered by photographer Ulo Mulas and began a career in modeling. At over six feet, it was difficult for the towering, unconventional-looking Vera to find work. Vera managed to secure a contract with Dorian Leigh’s Parisbased agency, who exclaimed, “You look great, but you have big feet. You are too tall and have too much of a baby face. I

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LIKE WE’VE NEVER SEEN HER

VERA GOTTLIEBE ANNA Gräfin von Lehndorff-Steinort was


This page: Veruschka began her career in Rome in the 1960s. Opposite page: “Even though I had evolved into Veruschka,” the model and icon once noted, “in Johnny Moncada’s photos I always remained Vera.”


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will have a hard time finding jobs for you.” The Ford Modeling Agency in New York worked in collaboration with Dorian Leigh, and the agencies often exchanged models. One day, Eileen Ford happened to be in town and told Vera, “We like tall blondes in America.” Vera gathered all of her savings and headed off to New York City. Today, the model describes her first trip to New York as “tough, disappointing, and totally unsuccessful.” Vera returned to Paris and was fortunate to befriend Denise Sarrault, an elegant and well respected French model. Serrault took the young, struggling Vera under her wing and introduced her to a slew of high-profile photographers, including Italy’s Johnny Moncada. “Later I went back to New York and this time it was a success—I changed and became Veruschka.” After her initial unsuccessful visit, Vera returned to Manhattan in the early sixties with a new, exotic name: Veruschka. She dressed fully in black and went to see all the top photographers, exclaiming: “I am Veruschka, who comes from the border between Russia, Germany, and Poland. I’d like to see what you can do with my face.” The brazen approach of the striking model—with her strong jaw and improbably long limbs—did the trick, and Veruschka went on to become one of the most


This page: “Having a look of sadness in my eyes is my biggest problem in this job. My eyes are indeed sad, even if I’m smiling in the picture. Even if I’m not sad it looks as if I am,” wrote Veruschka in a letter to her mother. Opposite page: Hamish Bowles says of the model: “Strongjawed, towering, magnificent, crowned by a lioness’s mane, Veruschka was, from the beginning, a model chameleon.”


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sought-after models of the era. She appeared on 13 covers of Vogue, and Life famously dubbed her “Veruschka: The Girl Everybody Stares At” when she graced its cover in 1967. She worked with the top photographers, including Irving Penn, Salvador Dalí, Peter Beard, and Richard Avedon, who called her “the most beautiful woman in the world.” But for many years, a large collection of Veruschka’s earliest work went unseen by the public eye—that is, until 40 years later, when Johnny Moncada revealed to his daughter, Valentina, that he had left a trove of extraordinary images of the budding young Veruschka locked in trunks in the attic. After Moncada’s death in 2011, Valentina was able to assemble 3,000 magnificent photos that her father had taken of the young and impressionable Veruschka during a dreamlike journey through Italy that spanned Rome, Capri, Florence, Sardinia, and various locales of la dolce vita. Johnny Moncada’s photos—compiled in Veruschka: From Vera to Veruschka (Rizzoli)—present a rare glimpse of the blossoming Vera, who would transform into the Amazonian icon of style known as Veruschka. Of her enchanting summer spent with Moncada in the early sixties, Veruschka recalls that the kind Italian photographer “allowed me to be myself.” She reminisces: “Perhaps you can see the beginnings of this transformation in Johnny’s photographs.” Today, Veruschka appreciates, “Even though I had evolved into Veruschka, in Johnny’s photos I always remained Vera.” u

This page: Antonio Monfreda, who edited the book, says, “Veruschka, the most fascinating and mysterious model of her generation, is comparable only to Kate Moss: both inspire a strange addiction of sorts.” Opposite page: “It is the story of the professional birth of Veruschka,” says Franca Sozzani of the book.

MARCH 2014 139


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST The weather of the month of February didn’t stop our columnist, who slogged through the snow to explore the scenes, uptown and downtown. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Alan Eckstein and Timo Weiland toasted their Fall 2014 collections at Bar

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Nanà on February 11.


Dominic Couzens and Martin Dawson attended the after-party for Timo Weiland at Bar Nanà.

Lauren Junge and John Munson, wearing something antique-y to the Winter Antiques Show. Ian Bradley partied with the PYTs of Fashion Week at Bar Nanà on February 11.

Kassandra Hannay and Tyler Rowe at the East Side House Settlement event at the Winter Antiques Show.

Thomas Marriott anticipated the Olympics by wearing stars and stripes to Fashion Week.

Georgina Schaeffer, Sam Dangremond, and Micaela

Stacy Engman in a dash of fur at the East Side

English at the Park Avenue Armory on January 30.

House Settlement’s Young Collectors Night.

WALKING IN A winter wonderland? More like slipping on the streets of the city, right? But there were places to go and people to see and, of course, Fashion Week... On January 22, Waris Ahluwalia, of House of Waris and Waris Loves You as well as of The Darjeeling Limited and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, toasted to #FriendsFight, a collaboration between Aldo and Waris Loves You, at the Standard, East Village. There, a collection of bracelets with arrow charms was introduced, with proceeds going to Aldo

Fights AIDS. “The bracelet is an important symbol,” said Aldo Bensadoun of Aldo. “It represents friendship and solidarity. It’s an invitation to join together in the fight against AIDS.” The evening included a performance by Wild Belle. On the 29th, Veuve Clicquot hosted Clicquot in the Snow at the Standard, High Line, which was themed for the Olympics with competitions on the ice. Guests such as Leah Bourne, Carson Griffith, Zosia Mamet, Rebecca Minkoff, and Caitlin Moe warmed themselves with Veuve Clicquot MARCH 2014 141


Yellow Label and cider and cocoa as well as mac ’n‘ cheese and waffles with chocolate. Music by DJ Reach set the stage for what may or may not have been considered ice dancing... On the 30th, the East Side House Settlement hosted its Young Collectors Night at the Winter Antiques Show at the Park Avenue Armory. The event, which was sponsored by Brooks Brothers, attracted 800 PYTs who mingled between booths, cocktails in tow. Among the artsy attendees were Beryl Crofton-Atkins, Cat Henry, Lily Hoagland and Thomas Minc, Betsy Maloney, Alexandra Segalas, and Lacary Sharpe. And then there was Fashion Week or, for some, fashion weak... (I’m talking to you, person in my seat at the show

for Nautica Fall 2014. You want to know what comes between me and my Garrett Neff? Nothing.) The thing happened in a flash, minus my minutes backstage at Thom Browne Fall 2014 with Bumble and bumble’s Jimmy Paul. (White wigs, people. White wigs.) Oh, and the after-party for Timo Weiland at Bar Nanà! There, I bumped into a blur of bests, including Kyle Hotchkiss Carone, Brad Faulkner, Derek Hester, Alecta Hill, Matt McCarty, Ariel Moses, Lauren Painter, Caroline Smith, Matthew Vahidi, and Megan Zilis—and Timo Weiland (duh). Lucas Walters deejayed for revelers, who danced the night away to music from Dr. Dre and more. u

Thom Browne presented its Fall 2014 women’s collection on February 10, with hair by Jimmy Paul of Bumble and bumble.

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Nicole Hanley and Matthew Mellon supported Aldo Fights Aids at the Standard, East Village, on January 22.

Ashley Simko indulged in a sip or two of Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label at

Lindsay Ellingson, sporting a bracelet with an

Clicquot in the Snow on January 29.

arrow charm from Aldo and Waris Loves You.

Joey Lico and Elizabeth Kurpis at the #FriendsFight event hosted by Aldo and Waris Ahluwalia. Chelsea Leyland, with a friend at the #FriendsFight event on January 22.

Waris Ahluwalia and Natalie Bergman of Wild Belle celebrated the collaboration between Aldo and Waris Loves You.

A couple of Clicquot in the Snow-ers competed in a penguin relay at the Standard, High Line.

Leigh Lezark and Randy Damico at the Standard, East

Zosia Mamet and Rebecca Minkoff stayed

Village, for the Aldo Fights Aids event on January 22.

warm at Clicquot in the Snow on January 29. MARCH 2014 143


SNAPSHOT Smith College students prove they never sacrificed style for school, sporting their beloved fur coats with protective sunglasses during an astronomy class in 1929.

“HAIL THE RED, white, and blue jeans / Watch those prontos advance / Shirttails flapping with spirit / Prove our foes don’t have a chance!” So extols one of Smith College’s cheer songs, penned in 1946 by Joan Pennywitt. Indeed, from their blue jeans to their shirttails flapping in the wind, American college girls have been responsible for popularizing a uniquely casual, preppy style that conjures a whole way of life—of being active, comfortable, and capable—the very qualities defined and upheld in the early 20th century by the women at America’s esteemed Seven Sisters colleges: Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley. In a new book due out next month, Seven Sisters Style (Rizzoli), author Rebecca C. Tuite takes us on a sartorial course through the timeless and versatile style evoked by the fairer (and just as smart) sex of college youths. Tuite charts how the “Seven Sisters” look has evolved beyond the campus, exerting its all-American influence around the world, be it in the form of a Ralph Lauren polo coat draped effortlessly over the shoulders for a walk on a cool fall day, or a full silk skirt and cashmere sweater by Michael Kors for an evening cocktail party. This day and age, of course, you might just as easily spot an 144 QUEST

enduring staple of this preppy style as you would have during the midcentury: plaid shirts, cashmere sweaters, knee socks, Weejuns loafers, maybe even a strand of pearls or few. A rarer but oh-so-nostalgically chic sighting might be of some fabulous fur. As with many of their fashion staples, Seven Sisters girls took cues from their male counterparts at the Ivy League schools, and nowhere was this more flamboyant than in the case of the raccoon coat. Along with being a fixture on young men at football stadiums in the 1920s (particularly at Princeton), the raccoon coat enjoyed a similarly iconic status across the women’s campuses. The trend for “Daddy’s fur coat” first emerged in the 1920s, as illustrated by this 1929 photo of Smith students at an astronomy class. The rage would return some 30 years later when, during the 1950s, the raccoon coat reemerged on campus, along with the motto “the older the better.” This time around, the trend for ramshackle coats left newspapers wondering why “beat-up raccoon coats, as old and seedy as possible” were the must-have item of Seven Sisters students. Today, on the heels of a long, Artic-blasted winter—and an almost snow-sabotaged Fashion Week here in New York—perhaps nothing sounds (or looks) better than one of Daddy’s fur coats. —Daniel Cappello

U N D E RWO O D & U N D E R WO O D , CO U RT E S Y O F S M I T H CO LLE G E A R C H I V E S , S M I T H CO LLE G E / R I Z Z O L I

SISTERHOOD STYLE


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Trunk Show & Designer Appearance April 1 - April 5

Betteridge invites you to explore the collections of Peggy S. Guinness. Inspired by living in Brazil and traveling to remote areas of the Orient, her designs are youthful and bold. Betteridge will donate 15% of proceeds from the trunk show to HAS Haiti.


Quest March 2014