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$5.00 JANUARY 2021

THE PALM BEACH ISSUE

MIMI KEMBLE MCMAKIN WITH DAUGHTER AND GRANDDAUGHTER PHOEBE AND DAISY IN PALM BEACH

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Late Afternoon (Moonlight at Marblehead) | oil on canvas | 12 1/4 x 15 3/4 in.

Maurice B. Prendergast

(1859 - 1924) | American Post-Impressionist Painter


F I N D L AY G A L L E R I E S O N

V I E W

P A L M

B E A C H

In Palm Beach Since 1961 Maurice Brazil Prendergast was born in Saint John’s, Newfoundland, in 1859. From 1891 to 1894, Prendergast studied in Paris, first under Gustave Courtois at the Académie Colarossi, and then eventually moved on to the Académie Julian. While in Paris, he developed a sophisticated style inspired by both the PostImpressionist and the Nabis, and was particularly influenced by Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard. Prendergast took several trips to Venice and Paris throughout his artistic career, intermittently returning home to America. He introduced his own artistic style, thus influencing American art, in particular the nascent Modernist movement. His first trip to Venice was in 1898, where he created some of his most enchanting watercolors influenced by the Mediterranean light. Upon returning to America in 1900, the Macbeth Galleries in New York mounted an exhibition of his work. Late afternoon (Moonlight at Marblehead) was executed shortly after Prendergast’s influential 1907 trip to Paris, where he encountered the work of the Fauves and the ideas behind Cézanne’s oeuvre. Prendergast found impetus in this newly discovered vision and integrated this new mode of representation to significant effect. According to art historian Nancy Mowll Mathews, “ [during] 1907 - 1915, the period of greatest European impact on the American Avant-garde, Prendergast adopted a new comprehensive approach that affected color, composition, spatial construction, and figure style”. As one of the significant artists from the ‘The Eight’ exhibition in 1908 alongside Robert Henri and William J. Glackens, Prendergast was sharply criticized for his decidedly more abstract and brightly colored style. He was always a trailblazer and ahead of his time; thus, it wasn’t until the celebrated Armory Show of 1913 (which included seven of his watercolor works) when Prendergast was revealed as a significant figure in American painting, perhaps the greatest of his generation.

view our gallery online www. findlaygalleries. com 165 w o rt h av e n u e pa l m b e a c h , f l o r i d a 33480 • (561) 655 2090 32 e a s t 57 t h s t r e e t , 2 n d f l o o r n e w y o r k , n e w y o r k 10022 • (212) 421 5390 Copyright © 2021, Findlay Galleries, All rights reserved.


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And everywhere they looked, they saw something fantastic.


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compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


118

108

CONTENTS T he P alm B each Issue 108

WE ARE FAMILY

On a recent trip to Palm Beach, we caught up with

our favorite local families—and took them on some adventures—to find out their plans for the season and the New Year.

PhoTograPhed

118

By

carrIe BradBurn TexT

elIzaBeTh meIgher

The island’s booming art scene and its stable of elite galleries only adds to the appeal for younger families and

PALM BEACH’S ART WAVE

businesses looking to relocate to Florida.

124

By

By

Brooke kelly

BARTON & GRAY, A LIFETIME OF ADVENTURE

This exclusive Mariners

Club provides its members unlimited access to a fleet of of more than 50 captained Hinckley Yachts. By alex Travers

128

BEACH BUYS

Taking you on a tour of Palm Beach’s greatest shopping

destinations—all around Worth Ave. and at The Royal. By alex Travers

134

PALM BEACH DESIGN JOURNAL

We’ve rounded up the best interior and

landscape designers in Palm Beach and beyond. Produced By alex Travers

124


THE CHAOS COLLECTION

ASPREY.COM

london

new york beverly hills miami

southampton palm beach


90

96

CONTENTS

78

C olumns 26

SOCIAL DIARY

68

BENSON

70

TAKI

72

NOSTALGIA

78

FRESH FINDS

82

BOOKS

86

FASHION

90

CANTEENS

96

OPEN HOUSE

98

ARCHITECTURE

100

BROKERS

106

SOCIAL CALENDAR

148

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

162

SNAPSHOT

Yearning for the times when we’d gather for the holidays. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia

Harry Benson captures Palm Beach society queen Mary Sanford at home.

A recent journey to Harbour Island yields some wild memories. by t aki t heoDoraCoPulos It’s sad news, but we prefer to recall the happy times at “21”.

by

D aisy P rinCe

Keeping you stylish all winter season. by alex travers anD elizabeth meigher

Chairman Emeritus of Estée Lauder, Leonard Lauder, shares his business and life lessons. An interview with Ala Isham of fashion brand Ala von Auersperg.

by

Reporting on the hottest places to dine out in Palm Beach this season.

r obert J anJigian by

b rooke k elly

Forté overlooks Palm Beach from an idyllic waterfront setting on S. Flagler Drive. The luxurious homes by Madison Worth have firmly established the studio in PB.

Quest’s top brokers tell us how the market continues to evolve.

by

brooke kelly

Our guide to the best virtual galas and social engagements for the month. Decking the halls and some “masked” balls.

by

brooke kelly

The Tropical Fruit Shop offers the most luscious, ripe, and juicy citrus available.


The WEMPE-CUT®

Perfection now comes with 137 facets. 700 FIFTH AVENUE & 55TH STREET • NEW YORK • 212.397.9000 • wempe.com Hamburg Berlin Duesseldorf Frankfurt Munich London Madrid Paris Vienna


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA DEPUT Y EDITOR

ELIZABETH MEIGHER MANAGING EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS ART DIRECTOR/ PRODUCTION MANAGER

TYKISCHA JACOBS SENIOR EDITOR

BROOKE KELLY INTERN

JARED BRILL CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN ALEX HITZ JAMES MACGUIRE HAVEN PELL CHUCK PFEIFER DAISY PRINCE LIZ SMITH (R.I.P.) TAKI THEODORACOPULOS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA

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CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN NICK MELE ANNIE WATT


questmag.com PUBLISHER AND C.E.O.

S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN ACCOUNTING MANAGER

LUWAY LU

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Stunning Shingle-style. 5 Bedrooms. 4 Fireplaces. Infinity Pool & Spa. Stone Patio. Covered Porch. Private & Serene. 42± Acres. $2.400.000. Maria Taylor. 860.868.7313. Sallie Smith. 203.263.4040.

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Private Estate. 4 Bedroom Main House. Barn with Apartment, Office & 2-Stall Horse Facility. Generator. Pool. Pond. 7.16± Acres. $1.395.000. Joseph Lorino. 860.868.7313.

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JED H. GARFIELD KIRK HENCKELS KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF

© QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2020. All rights reserved. Vol. 35, No.1. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

From left: Ala Isham of Ala von Auersperg; Jimmy Borynack of Findlay Galleries; Carrie Bradburn of Capehart; little Christopher with new puppy Remy; The “21” Club at Christmas; Leonard A. Lauder in Colorado.

24 QUEST

Much like the Colossus straddling the two worlds of Palm Beach and New York, the legendary Leonard Lauder has penned his own fascinating biography, not surprisingly in the most modest of tones. Our unflappable Managing Editor, Alex Travers, has created a photo montage of Leonard’s professional and personal experiences—a kind and caring life, dear readers, to be emulated by all. Back up in Manhattan, Contributing Editor Daisy Prince eloquently shares some choice family memories of The “21” Club, including a luncheon where her elegant mother Diana, still a teen on vacation from boarding school, sat next to a very young U.S. Senator by the name of... Jack Kennedy! So into the thick of this long awaited New Year we plunge, dear Quest readers, sobered by our quarantined and sheltered existences, but buoyed by the challenges of rebirth and renewal. Moreover, in this year we will march closer together, comforted by the inner strength of families reunited, and friendships reawakened. And a Country on the cusp of even greater “exceptionalism.” u

Chris Meigher

ON THE COVER: Mimi Kemble McMakin and her daughter, Phoebe Kemble, with Phoebe’s daughter, Daisy Lacoste Kemble du Plessis. Photographed by Carrie Bradburn of CAPEHART Photography.

CO U RTE S Y O F A L A V O N AU E R S P E R G ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; C A R R I E B R A D B U R N

AMERICAN EXCEPTIONALISM is a term this publisher has heard and seen frequently in these final weeks leading up to 2021. I think it’s more comprehensive than just producing two successful vaccines in less than nine months—an unprecedented achievement in the modern medical history of mankind. But fundamentally, it’s more than just the “science.” In laymanlike terms, it loosely, but accurately defines how we—ALL OF US—a divisive nation of red and blue (and rainbow!) allegiances have found our center during this horrific and relentless crisis. And I think it’s why our Country, and our imperfect system of popular democracy will survive and perhaps even thrive in the certain-to-be-trying post-Covid years ahead of us. I fully believe so. And with this first—and thick! :)—issue of Quest’s New Year, I’m cautiously optimistic that we will regain our moral footing, and correct our natural course as a beacon of hope and humanity throughout the free world. As with all Quest Januarys, this issue is aligned with the continued growth of Palm Beach, no longer a “sunny place for shady people” as Noel Coward once quipped. Our annual portfolio of PB’s generational and historic families was again brilliantly shot by the talented Carrie Bradburn, who works seamlessly with every major player on this fabled barrier island. Hopefully, the most viral scene to emerge this Season will be Palm Beach’s significant growth as a bona fide Arts community, with such respected galleries as Acquavella, Pace, Sotheby’s and Wynn joining the 150-year tradition of Findlay Galleries, led by the understated and urbane Jimmy Borynack. Quest’s Senior Editor, Brooke Kelly, and her keen-eyed colleague, Michael Reinert, guide our cultured path through the energized Royal Poinciana Plaza, and down the renowned Worth Avenue. And while on Worth, meander your way into the “Vias” and sample the delectable and dependable fare at Renato’s, still managed by the lovely Arlene Desiderio and her inspired son, Jose. And then crossover Worth to Ala von Auersperg’s charmingly brimming boutique, which the eminent fashion scribe Robert Janjigian enthusiastically reviews in an Ala-colorful feature beginning on page 86.


860 UNITED NATIONS PLAZA 860UNPLAZA3132D.COM

NIKKI FIELD

Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker NikkiField.com © Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. All rights reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. Photography by Travis Mark


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SOCIAL DIARY LOOKING BACK: People, Places and Things. In the year just past, we’ve been living on the edge isolation from our daily lives with each other. When we’re living like that, a friend advised recently: “It’s definitely time for daydreams instead of reality.” My version of daydreams is usually something

from our calendar that sits comfortably in memory, something like a movie. Let’s start with Thanksgiving. It was an unseasonably warm (in the mid- to high 60s) and comfortable Thanksgiving Day here in little ole New York. Midday, many neighbors were out. They were walking, run-

ning, cycling, skootering, dog walking...lots of children and dogs. This was my 28th Thanksgiving in New York (this time around), and it was spent here, solo, at my apartment. Well, not really solo, what with four members of the canine world accompanying me. The first

thing I did that morning was to check out the falling leaves. Yes. The rain from the night before dampened the pavement and the roads (and parked cars), pasted the falling leaves on the surfaces. It’s nature’s art to these eyes. The view from the terrace was beauty everywhere. Thanksgiving has always

A L A VO N AU E R S P E R G ’ S H O L I DAY B A Z A A R I N PA L M B E AC H

Stephanie Stokes and Jacqui Michel

Margot Larkin and Courtney Moss 26 QUEST

Trish Carroll

Whitney Baldwin

Victoria Mele

Lucy Webster and Susan Meyer

ANNIE WATT

Teresa Colley


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A TO A ST I N G C A M I L L A W E B ST E R AT T H E H AV E N I N PA L M B E AC H

Darlene Dzub and Kate Waterhouse

been a day to “be together” as we learned as children with our families, and then later in adulthood with friends and/ or more families. It always has a Sunday sort of feeling, although gilt-edged with all the stuff you can put on your plate and then some more. Until you finally stop yourself knowing you’re going want some of the pies like the pumpkin or the squash or blueberry or apple. Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to be invited to join friends, as well as a variety of other family dinners. Up until this past year, many families in New York had their holiday dinner at restaurants and hotels across the city. For several years, from the mid-90s, some of the most memorable was as a guest of David and Helen 28 QUEST

Camilla Webster and Stephanie Kantis

Andrew Forsyth and Kelly Williams

Gabby and Patrick Darczuk

Gurley Brown at the (old) Four Seasons restaurant in the Seagrams Building. I’d met the Browns through Alice Mason at her famous monthly dinners. They were friendly, congenial people who loved conversation which always included New York, Hollywood, publishing, society and politics. They had the same annual table by the pool in the poolroom, at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day. Helen would call to invite me in April ! “Hello Pussycat,” I’d hear her soft businesslike voice at the other end of the line, “we’d love to have you join us for dinner this year…”

And I would go happily. They were an amazing couple, a real team with separate but co-mingled business lives. Helen had been a “just a little girl from Little Rock” who went West to Los Angeles with her mother and sister when her father died in an elevator accident. After her schooling, she got a job as a secretary at Foote, Cone and Belding, an advertising agency. Her ambition was to become a copywriter. That job was a climb for a young woman in those days. But Helen was a nose-to-thegrindstone girl and eventually her boss, Don Belding promoted her to the role.

Xiomo and Robi Penn

It was out there that she met David who was working for Darryl Zanuck at 20th Century Fox as a story editor and talent scout for properties. As Helen progressed professionally, so did her private life. She was a naturally liberated, self-sustaining woman; and she enjoyed the company of an interesting male—especially one as charming as David Brown. From the first meeting in 1959, their association grew to be also literary. Helen’s experiences socially fascinated David, and he naturally guided her writing a book about it. Sex and the Single Girl which was published, three years later in 1962 to great fanfare and sales figures. Its success was that it was that it was a first to encourage women to become financially

CAPEHART

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A independent and experience sexual relationships before or without marriage. The book sold 2 million copies in the first three weeks. Soon after it was published in 28, countries and remained on the bestseller list for a year. In 1965, it inspired a film of the same name starring Natalie Wood. Helen had a new fulltime job. She was getting thousands of letters from readers seeking advice on all the categories. And she was dutifully answering each letter personally. David, observing this activity could see something else: Why not make a magazine about the subject! He had previously been editor at the old Cosmopolitan Magazine, and he knew how to set up a sale to a publisher.

After putting a publishing plan together they made the rounds to magazine publishers with it. No one picked up on it. Then David heard that Hearst was planning on shutting down the century-old Cosmopolitan. Its circulation had dropped along with its advertising revenues. Hearst was persuaded to re-publish the magazine under Helen’s editorial direction. The rest is history. The magazine was so successful with a circulation in the millions for so long that there was a moment in Hearst’s empire that Cosmo was “paying the rent” so to speak. David Brown who had been a writer and editor later became

famous and hugely successful as a film producer in partnership with Richard Zanuck with The Sting, Jaws, The Sugarland Express, among other films as well as a Broadway producer. Thanksgiving dinner with the Browns, joined by Alice Mason was a great pleasure. There was a wealth of conversation, information, fun, charm, and lots of laughter at their table. It was always a learning for this observer, because the Browns shared their experiences, their insights, and their knowledge as a matter of course. It became a tradition for several years with Helen always getting my commitment on the

first of April, until 2008 when age and ill-health prevented David from attending. He died in 2010 at age 93. That same year I again had dinner with Helen although it was now just the two of us. Fate had got in the way of the future, and finally completed it: Helen died in 2012 at 90, still that “Single Girl” who married and lived a version of Happily Ever After. I remain grateful and thankful for the friendship that day we met brought into my life. Meanwhile, here in New York this year, there was no Parade. There was something, not much, that Macy’s put together to remind us of that traditional holiday celebration. Hollywood Goes New York. That Friday night after Thanks, I was the guest of Gillian and

C A N C E R A L L I A N C E O F PA L M B E AC H H O STS T H A N K S G I V I N G G I V E A W AY

Samuel Fioriello 30 QUEST

Latoya Hobbs

Eduardo Aviala

Manuella Miller And family

Rock Payant

Namiko with a fire fighter

ANNIE WATT

Stanton Collemer, Tom The Turkey and Janet Levy


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A DESIGN MIAMI 2020

Jen Roberts

Sylvester Miniter at Sistina, an excellent high (good) Italian restaurant at 24 East 81st Street between Madison and Fifth, just down the street from the Met. Its owner-chef Giuseppe Bruno has been in business since 1982. Up until a few years ago it was located on Second Avenue in the Eighties where without fanfare it was quietly patronized by the gourmands from the prominent New York worlds of finance, medicine, society and just plain gourmands. More recently its reputation has expanded far and wide because of the HBO 6-episode series The Undoing starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Grant. Long out of the habit of keeping up with great television, I was aware of this series because so many friends were raving about it. I was reminded again that 32 QUEST

Rachael Barrett and Derek Fleming

Anna Michalczyk and Ginger Wang

Friday night with the Miniters, who are ardent fans of the miniseries, told me we were seated at the same table that Nicole Kidman was seated at when they shot a scene for it in Sistina. The restaurant has a great menu and its “new” home is also a great location for dining; it’s beautiful. I’d got there first and was seated facing that double portrait of a couple so I took a photo of it because it’s a great portrait. Maybe, if you’ve been watching The Undoing you saw the portrait too. That’s my long story about a short moment on Thanksgiving Day weekend. A longer moment in that weekend’s social life was the following night—again at an-

other restaurant. (Restaurants are the closest thing to a social life these days.) I was a guest, along with Boaz Mazor of Alex Hitz, in from Atlanta. This was the first time Alex had been in New York last March. His apartment is gone; he gave it up. The hotels he stayed at (in residence) have closed. On this trip he was staying at one of the top hotels in New York. It’s open but currently at 11% of capacity. Its restaurants are closed. Alex filled us in on where he’s been and who he’s seen. In the past nine months he’s been in L.A., St. Louis, Texas, Atlanta, and a couple other towns. He went to Texas for a dinner party given by a friend who was just trying to revive her sense of being

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alive—seeing people. He also gave talks there “virtually” about his most recent book The Art of The Host. That’s a lot of plane rides, and Alex reported that it could not have been better. The planes were “so clean,” and often just half full; and the service was excellent. He said it was almost like having your own plane. He even went up to Lenox, Mass. where some friends for a house party at a large house that had been on the market (Lenox has some really great and beautiful old mansions). They’d invited about a dozen friends to come and stay for a four day weekend. Alexis one of those New Yorkers who is always moving. After Lenox he went back to Atlanta—his hometown—and spent the time testing new recipes for his next book. His life is

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A his research and he’s a stickler for getting it right. Meanwhile he’d come to New York briefly—hoping to get re-acquainted with this great big town and what it used to be. He was also researching a magazine piece he’s doing on Marguerite Lamkin Littman. Littman was a Southern girl who at the beginning of her adult life made a name in the film industry coaching actors with their Southern accents. Paul Newman was one. Most famous was Elizabeth Taylor. Her interests and natural talent opened all kinds of doors of interest to her. In the 1960s she made her way around New York as the entertainment editor for Glamour magazine, a

highly popular fashion and social magazine for young women. Later she married a prominent British lawyer Mark Littman, and became a prominent British socialite as well as an HIV/AIDS activist. I didn’t discuss her over dinner with Alex because I know he’s going to give us the details of this amazing and charming American woman who conquered the world (the one she was interested in). He knew her; that’s the inside that makes a story. On the following December 2, the Park Avenue Association held their annual “Holiday

Lighting” of the trees along the center of the avenue. This has long been one of the hallmarks of the season that always gets people into the spirit of the upcoming holiday. This year there was no lighting ceremony. No New Yorkers out on the corners— especially from the 90s (the top of the hill looking south). The Beautiful Jean. The following Tuesday night I had dinner at Sette Mezzo with Mary Hilliard, one of our favorite photographers who’s been covering New Yorkers— here and abroad as well as in Palm Beach since the 1980s. In

conversation about her business we wandered, through personal association to Jean Howard, a major beauty of mid-20th century in Hollywood, New York, and across the sea, and most notably a photographer whose photos were a visual memoir. After dinner, Mary sent me this photograph she took of Jean in 1989 at Mortimer’s restaurant with its owner Glenn Bernbaum and Lauren Bacall. It was a party for the publication of Jean’s first book of photographs, a photographic memoir, Jean Howard’s Hollywood. The title was apt. A little girl born Ernestine Mahoney in Fort Worth, Texas in 1910,

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who went on to become, in her uniquely quiet way, the newly named Jean Howard became one of the most celebrated beauties (and personalities) in her world in her time. I never heard the details of her childhood, but her father was a traveling salesman, her mother had a serious drug addiction—it may have been morphine; this was in the second decade of the 20th century, dying when Jean was still very young. Jean was born in 1910. When she was old enough, her mother’s condition brought on an early death, and her father often took his daughter on his trips to the big cities, and especially New York. The bright lights caught the young girl’s imagination, and as fate had it, when she was 21 she 36 QUEST

was hired by Florenz Ziegfeld to appear in his 1931 Ziegfeld Follies. It was the last of the Follies, which after more than a decade of productions, had lost its dazzle with the Great Depression. But it was the beginning of a brilliant career/life in the world that was just unfolding for everyone. I don’t know where he first met or spotted her—very possibly attending a performance of the Follies but Louis B. Mayer of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer attended one (or maybe more) of the production, and was besotted by her appearance. It was easy for him to be introduced to her, now a successful mogul now in his late

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40s and shining with stature with his own Studio. Mayer had begun cheating on his wife Margaret, mother of his two daughters, Edie Goetz and Irene Selznick. Now a mogul in progress, hewas looking to return to his youth with such a beauty by his side. Jean, however, did respond to his wishes. She accompanied him to events and even traveled to Paris with him—although at her insistence chaperoned by slightly older woman friend. She was not interested in being his wife or his girlfriend. Frustrated by her rejection, Mayer threatened to kill himself by jumping from their hotel window if she didn’t marry him. Jean and her “guard-

ian” friend were on the first ocean liner back to New York. It was about the same time she met a young, handsome and successful talent agent named Charles Feldman. He’d spotted her one night at a nightclub in the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, and sent a note to her the following morning asking if he could see her the following evening to discuss a very important matter. I don’t know Jean’s side of the story, but she agreed. You could tell by the note he sent her, knowing the after story, that like L.B. Mayer, he was flummoxed on the sight of her. She was a great natural beauty, with charisma suggesting that it was total. I had first read about her in a Cole Porter biography published in the early 60s. I first

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A met her in 1978 at small dinner at the home of Merle Oberon and Robb Wolders in the Malibu Colony. It was like walking into film history for this writer. The guests were William (Willie) Wyler and his wife Tally, Luis Estevez, the fashion designer, a close friend of Merle’s, who was an old friend of mine and had arranged for my presence (knowing my curiosity); and Jean Howard and her second husband Tony Santoro, a guitarist she met when she heard him in small café on the island of Capri where often was a guest of Mona Bismarck. Tony was a very nice, soft spoken man, about fifteen years her junior. Years later she told me of their meeting of that night in

Capri. She was with two gentlemen friends of hers, rich Americans of middle age, both of whom had their eye on the guitarist with thoughts of taking him home. They even flipped a coin over it. Invited to their table after a set, Jean and Tony were at the right place at the right time. They returned to Beverly Hills together and remained in residence to the end of her life. I don’t know much about Jean’s professional career. I knew her because of her association with Cole Porter, and her marriage to Charlie Feldman— who owned the Ashley-Famous Agency and produced the first Woody Allen film. Meeting her that night at Merle’s, I was impressed because

there was a natural serenity in her presence, and her beauty was outshone by that presence. She was open and curious, but warm and friendly, and you had the feeling that she was always like this. It was a subtle charm. As I got to know her throughout the 1970s and ’80s, I was in her thrall. She had the sophistication of her celebrated environment along with the ole Texas girl quiet razz-ma-tazz right underneath—while maybe slipping in an interesting and sharp insight about a personality she was describing. And there was that easy gentle, quiet laugh that came out of that smile. She lived in a wonderful hacienda style house at 2000 Coldwater Canyon which she

and Charlie Feldman bought in 1935. When I knew her, the house had been long before decorated by Elsie De Wolfe/ Lady Mendl, who during the Second World War had settled in house just down the road from the Feldmans. That was when Beverly Hills was mainly countryside and 2000 Coldwater was one of the few houses in the area. After the Feldmans divorced – probably sometime in the late 50s— Jean and Charlie shared use of the residence six months each until he finally, having remarried, gave it to her. There was a black baby grand in one corner of the music gallery overlooking the courtyard. On it was a single silver framed portrait of Cole

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Porter with the handwritten inscription: To the beautiful Jean and signed “Love Cole”. Jean later was heir to several bequests in Cole’s will. His wife Linda, left her collection of jewels to Jean as well as other furniture pieces that fit in to Lady Mendl design. Nights at Jean’s dinners often ended around the piano with the local talent (Judy Garland, Richard Burton, Sammy Davis, and many others over the years). It was relaxed but it was, in keeping with the fashion of the times in Hollywood, long dresses, suit and tie, maybe black tie at times. There was one such dinner party on the night of July 13, 1960 when John F. Kennedy was nominated for the Presidency downtown at the LA Memorial Coliseum. Jean’s guests were celebrating his 40 QUEST

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nomination, and guests had finally gone home long after midnight with the nominee himself arrived at a side door of her rambling hacienda, solo, and happy to be there. She took up photography sometime in the late ’40s or early ’50s, but not from the point of view as a hobby. She was trained by a woman photographer well known in the community. Jean lived and worked around professionals all her life. The objective was to Be Your Best to your audience. This was assumed in all her work. Her book Jean Howard’s Hollywood is now a classic, a piece of art in the sense that her photographs reflect the feeling I’ve described

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about being around her. She’d made a life for herself as a hostess. And it had a quiet glamour that was Hollywood—a name in that age for one of the most glamorous places in the world. Everyone felt comfortable in her presence. It came with her personality. Looking at Mary photo of Jean taken at the book party in Mortimers with Glenn Bernbaum and Lauren Bacall (who is photographed with Humphrey Bogart in the book) taken in the early days of their marriage, I was looking at a much older Jean than I had seen in the days I got to know her. But the face, which looks so perfect, was the same face, and the perfection—perhaps

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assisted later in her life—was the same. It was in the eyes, the way she looked at you in conversation, the eyes on you; that was the charisma. She died shortly before her 90th in the year 2000. Staying Safe: at home looking for a story. Right after the Thanksgiving holiday, I received an email from our friend Louis Bofferding, an antiquarian and antique dealer here in New York. I am neither an antiquarian nor a possessor, nor will I ever be. Louis, however, is one of those guys who is deeply a collector as well as a dealer. Occasionally he sends out a message about his “new inventory offerings.” Although my interest is just this side of peripheral, but among the pieces in his latest inventory is an Art Deco Tiffany desk set which had been

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A owned by Oatsie Charles. If you don’t know whom I’m referring to, we ran a piece on her several months ago with photographs by one of her grandsons. The actual Desk set (1930s) is sterling silver, Porto marble and leather. Its provenance was solely Philip Green Gossler, New York; and Marion “Oatsie” Charles, Newport, R.I. and the price, $10,000. But the story (which is how you can always get DPC’s curiosity) was: “On March 14, 1938, Mrs. Georgia Whiting Saffold Oates—a former Southern belle and a recent divorcee— plighted her troth with Mr. Philip Green Gossler then on his third marriage. If he was, as

they used to say, “a caution,” he was also a man of substance. A utilities magnate, he was “one of fifty-nine men who ruled America,” according to his 1945 obituary in The New York Times. The Tiffany desk set was his. His initials P.P.G are engraved in several places. He was a kid from Columbia, PA who went to local university, studied electrical engineering (at Columbia) and eventually rose through the ranks of Columbia Gas & Electric, becoming chairman. Under his leadership, through mergers and acquisitions, Mr. Gossler turned it into one of the largest utility cartels in the world with 34 companies in eight states.

Mr. Gossler evidently remained in his third marriage until his death in 1945. They lived in townhouse—still standing—on 65th Street just off Fifth. In 1938, Mr Gossler gave his stepdaughter an “extravagant” coming out party at the townhouse and the St. Regis Roof supper dance that followed. Marion, who was already referred to as Oatsie (a name that a fellow debutante Brenda Frazier dubbed her). Marion evidently was one of those who could, like her stepfather, be referred to as a “caution,” painting her fingernails black which reflected her “black moods.” Her friends referred to her as “Black Marion.”

However the black part, Marion married first to a man named Thomas Leiter, a Marshall Field heir whom she divorced after a few years, and she remarried Robert H. Charles an aeronautic executive who became Assistant Secretary of the Air Force under Robert McNamara, Secretary of Defense in the Kennedy Administration. Her husband’s appointment was a bonanza for his very social and sociable wife who became Washington, D.C.’s most celebrated hostess (back in the day when they had hostesses who entertained). Oatsie “hung out the ham” for the likes of Jack and Jackie Kennedy, Ian Fleming, Truman

MO R S E L I F E ’ S G O L F C L A S S I C I N PA L M B E AC H

Peter and Dianne Meckler 42 QUEST

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Will Floersheimer with Bevely and Dan Floersheimer

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Capote, Gore Vidal, Deeda Blair, and many other of that ilk and fame. Her stepfather’s desk set somehow ended up in the possessions of the beautiful step-daughter Marion who never really liked her stepfather (to put it mildly). Nevertheless, she kept the desk set because it was so beautiful. Oatsie died two years ago at 99. Her reputation was known far and wide by the social sets both Washington, Newport, here in New York and across the world. Aside from her possessions, she herself was, as Louis Bofferding describes the once proud possessor, “Fashionable to the bitter end, she enchanted, impressed, and intimidated more than a few.” According to her grandson who took the photos for our piece on New York and greatly admired his grandmother, “children were terrified of her—so were most adults.” With our world being as quiet as it has been these days, I often use some of my

time editing my library of the hundreds of books I’ve acquired (and continue to) over the years. When you have a lot of them, you often forget the little treasures you have on those shelves. One recent week I came upon a book that was published in 2007 called “The Society Portrait; From David to Warhol” with a cover of a Giovanni Boldini portrait of Consuelo Vanderbilt, then the Duchess of Marlborough with her youngest son Lord Ivor sitting on her lap. Consuelo had an interesting and much written about history. I had a strong sense of her because coincidentally her eldest granddaughter, Lady Sarah Consuelo Spencer Churchill— who died in 1999—had been a close friend of mine, and over the years she talked about “Granny” and her influence on her. During the Second World War, when Sarah was a young woman, living at Blenheim where her father, Consuelo’s son Bert was the 10th duke, she met and first mar-

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A J U N I O R L E A G U E O F T H E PA L M B E AC H E S H O STS S H O P P I N G E V E N T

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ried an American serviceman named Edwin Russell during the Second World War. She confided to me years later that her decision was greatly influenced by her grandmother that American women had more independence than British women. Sarah didn’t want to have a life “sitting up country in that cold pile of stone while he—any British male of her ilk—“was down in London having a good time.” Through Granny, Sarah saw that American women had more freedom. After her marriage to Russell, Sarah moved to the Phiadelphia where she brought up her four daughters. Sarah and her daughters in summer stayed in a house on Granny’s property in Southampton. Consuelo had long before di-

vorced the duke and remarried a Frenchman named Jacques Balsan. I once asked Sarah if her grandmother was happier with Balsan. Her response: “oh definitely; it was her show. It was one summer day in Southampton when Granny noticed her granddaughter seemed pre-occupied, spending a lot of time working in the flower gardens as if looking for a distraction. Granny sensed that her granddaughter was unhappy. She finally told Sarah—on a hunch, not even hearsay—that if she wanted to divorce Mr. Russell, Granny would support her financially. And so, shortly thereafter, divorce proceedings began, and a new life began, producing two more husbands—one Chilean, a second Greek, opening up a fasci-

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nating new world with a wider variety of worldly friends and acquaintances (and experiences) including being a friend and frequent guest of Aristotle Onassis on his yacht the Christina. Sarah’s devotion to her grandmother continued to the end of Consuelo’s life. Then in her late 80s, Granny had begun to lose her senses and was bedridden. One day Sarah told her grandmother that Charles de Gaulle—a longtime friend of Conseulo’s whom she’d known for decades—was coming to New York to speak at the UN. Consuelo on hearing the news said she’d like to invite him to come to lunch. Knowing this would be impossible if for no other reason than her grandmother was no longer capable of carry-

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ing on a conversation—Sarah pretended to plan the “luncheon.” As Consuelo was then bedridden, a table for four was set up at the foot of her grandmother’s bed. Menu was discussed and a fourth guest was chosen—all reported to Granny by granddaughter, as if everything were going ahead smoothly. On the appointed date, late in the morning, Sarah reported to her grandmother that General De Gaulle suddenly had to cancel because an emergency meeting had come up for him. Granny understood, feeling still a part of the world her age had left behind. Granny never knew. She died peacefully, shortly thereafter in 1964 in her apartment at 1 Sutton Place. Cared for by her loving granddaughter, Sarah. ◆

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Caroline Toms and Michele Heary

Krystian Von Speidel and Elisabeth Munder

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A “ S C U L P T U R E I N MOT I O N ” E V E N T AT T H E A N N N O R TO N G A R D E N S I N PA L M B E AC H

Martin Gruss

Brendan and Samantha Carroll

Bill and Christine Aylward

Cameron Lickle and LinQing Yang

Harvey and Eve Oyer, Christina Miller and Oliva and Fiona Hooker

Becky and David Gochman

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Tim and Sarah Benitz

Lew and Kathleen Crampton

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William Richards and Beatrice Fairbanks Cayzer

Joan Alleman

Frank Clayton and Monique Ogilvie 54 QUEST

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John Dalsheim, Gigi Dalsheim and Ann Prosser

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Alfonzo De Lada and Elizabeth Hoadley

Michel Witmer and Suzanne Stoll

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Robert Liberman and Kate Coyne 60 QUEST

Dogtor Loki and medical workers

Therapy dog Hunter

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Guests enjoying the gala at home

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Richard and Sandy Bornstein

Mitch Rubenstein and Laurie Silvers 64 QUEST

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A WYNWOOD MURAL FEST’S RECEPTION IN MIAMI

Jayden Nuccitelli

Devon Pawley, Nick Vautier and Michael Towle

Melissa Rye and Vivian Restrepo 66 QUEST

Isaura Pino, Edna Delinois and Berta Petrillo

Sofia Guisasola, Allison Baer and William Read

Danelle Pino with Steven and Gail Osheroff

Giano Currie

RODRIGO GAYA

Daphne Dushane, Ken Dushane III and Michele Nicole Pino


M A D I S O N W O RT H A R CH IT EC T U RE

DPC

M A D I S O N W O RT H A R C H I T E C T U R E Architec t ure - Design - Pl anning

w w w. M a d i s o n Wo r t h A r c h . c o m

4 8 5 M a d i s o n Av e n u e , s u i t e 2 0 0 - N e w Yo r k , N e w Yo r k 1 0 0 2 2 - ( 2 1 2 ) 3 5 5 - 3 2 6 1 1 2 5 Wo r t h Av e n u e , s u i t e 3 0 6 - P a l m B e a c h , F l o r i d a 3 3 4 8 0 - ( 5 6 1 ) 8 3 3 - 3 2 4 2

PA L M BE A C H - N E W Y O R K C I T Y - G R E EN W I C H - L O N G I S L A N D


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY A PHOTO ESSAY on Palm Beach society was to be the lead story in the very first issue of People magazine, to debut on the newsstands on March 4, 1974. The concept for People magazine being the expansion of the popular “People� page in TIME magazine. Off I went to Palm Beach in February to work with famed columnist Sheila Graham, who would do the reporting. At the time Sheila rivaled Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper for the title of Queen of the Hollywood Gossip Columnists. She seemed the perfect choice for this assignment. I was prepped before I left New York to make certain I photographed Mary Sanford, whom some had dubbed the Queen of Palm Beach. She had previously been an actress know as Mary Duncan. Arriving in Palm Beach in 1933 with her dashing, polo-playing husband, Laddie Sanford, she subsequently took Palm Beach by storm, and during her glamourous reign she was invited everywhere and chaired every charity ball you could imagine. An event was not an important event unless and until she graced the room. The extraordinary Mrs. Sanford lived a long, productive life and left her imprint on Palm Beach. I am pleased to have photograph her as she played a significant part in the celebrated history of Palm Beach society. u 68 QUEST


Mary Sanford at home in Palm Beach, 1974.


TA K I

BACK IN THE BAHAMAS

Clockwise from left: HRH Crown Prince Pavlos and HRH Crown Princess Marie-Chantal;Bob Miller;

A SINGER NAMED Shawn Mendes recently announced to millions of his fans that: “The truth is, it’s so hard to be human.” Gee whiz, poor Mendes, and I thought I had drawn the short straw of life. Depressed as I was about how hard it is to be human, friends like Prince Pavlos of Greece and Arki Busson came to my rescue. They picked me up from my hovel on Park Avenue and whisked me to a private airport in White Plains, where Bob Miller’s, Prince Pavlos’ father-in-law, 70 QUEST

magnificent Gulfstream 650 was waiting to transport the three of us to a place where it’s less hard to be human: Harbour Island, a lump of an island on top of a hundred-mile-long reef overgrown with vegetation that is an escape to a simpler way of life. Yippee! America was always a country on the move, starting with the Pilgrims, the Homesteaders pushing west, the gold rush of ’79, Huck and Jim drifting down the Mississippi, and so on. Then the virus

wreaked its havoc and everyone, including the traveling Americans, stayed put. Not your intrepid high-life correspondent, however. I hadn’t visited the Bahamas in fifty or so years. Last time I was there I got into a fight with Margaux Hemingway’s boyfriend outside the casino in Nassau. I already wasn’t mad about the place, a tropical Blighty with an American accent, with some of its parts Yankee-owned. The then-mega-rich Huntington Hartford had purchased Paradise Island, and the poor

W I K I M E D I A CO M M O N S ; G E T T Y I M A G E S

Arki Busson.


TA K I little Greek boy was stepping out with his wife, making me a hated figure to some of his dependents, and there were many. Never mind, that was long ago and time puts a halo on many things. Better yet, Harbour Island turned out to be as far removed from the glitz of Nassau as Margaux’s gigolo was from me. “Time puts a halo on many things.” Back in 1880 Harbour Island had a population of two thousand and three sugar mills. But after the mills were abandoned the green acres of the cane were replaced by bush once again. Today the place has an air of ancient and established peace, a curious conception of then and now, with

man. He invented something most of us could have thought of but never did, duty-free shops in airports, and as a result owns beautiful dwellings the world over, plus a little shoot called Gunnerside in Yorkshire. (The one and only time Geldof was nice to anyone was when he visited there and sent a few kind words to Bob.) My host Arki needs no introduction. His house and multiple cottages—and tents on the bay that rival those of Cleopatra’s—front the ocean, and I was billeted in the Elle Macpherson suite (she’s the mother of two of his boys, Uma Thurman the mother of his little girl). I was a friend of his parents ten years

employ the islanders suffering from the lockdown, hospitality being the island’s main source of income. In a romantic novel the Queen would lift the knighthood from that fraud and bum Philip Green and knight both men, but the last time I rang the palace I was told she was busy. On Thanksgiving Day we had a grand lunch at the Miller house, where his son-in-law Pavlos and I showed off our knowledge of Greek history in front of all the youngsters, and they were many, each one better-looking than the next. It is said that island living tends to lull one’s senses, with a lack of introspection seeping into one, amoeba-like. I looked for that

From left: A Gulfstream G650; Bay Street in Harbour Island, The Bahamas.

men and women loitering and idling in the shade of ancient gnarled trees. It felt like sleepwalking during the ’50s. Some years ago, smart men who foresee things rather than follow trends discovered the place, built houses that blended in with the surroundings, and did not compete with each other over who had the most toys. People like Bob Miller and Arki Busson. Bob is a member of Pugs but also has other attributes: like coming from a very old American family—I saw some pictures of his officer ancestors in Civil War uniforms, alas in blue, or so it seemed, rather than gray—but he’s a self-made

before he was born, which dates me a bit because Arki is in his mid-50s. The day we flew down in record time Arki made a killing in some deal, and promptly fell asleep under a tent. The first thing that I noticed was the sweet nature of the locals, who were all smiles and goodwill. (No Jamaican menacing looks here.) Driving around in a golf cart with Arki was a bit like traveling around India circa 1947 with Gandhi and Jinnah on board. Everyone, but everyone, gave a cheery hello. “How come everyone knows you?” I asked. Easy: He and Bob Miller contributed vast sums to feed and

but didn’t find it, at least among those I rubbed shoulders with down there. They compose their own song and apologize to no one. Their island world is a palimpsest adjusting to the modern world. And speaking of the past, I flew back to Nassau on a tiny twin Piper piloted by a young native with seats whose stuffing was visible, an airplane Papa Hemingway would have refused to fly on. A perfect trip and a perfect landing followed while the pilot was—I think—playing a game on his mobile. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 7 1


MAGIC IN “THE NUMBERS” ‘21’ REMEMBERED

72 QUEST

success at the ‘21’ Club was driven in large part by that spidey sense all good club proprietors have, namely knowing who to let in and who to keep out. And despite being raided by the police many times, the cousins managed never to get caught. They stashed contraband booze behind camouflaged doors, created shelves designed to collapse and sent wine bottles down a hidden chute if the cops arrived. But their pièce de ré·sis·tance was the secret wine cellar in the basement next door. It was barred by a 5,000 pound concrete slab which opened by sticking a thin wire through one of several pockmarked holes in front. Staff could truthfully swear to police no alcohol was stored on the premises. From the moment the ‘21’ Club opened its doors on 21 East 52snd street on January 1, 1930, it was a wild place to go.

S H A W FA M I LY A R C H I V E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; G E T T Y I M A G E S

NEW YORK CITY restaurants have always been about so much more than the food. They are as sacrosanct to this city as any house of worship and no restaurant was more hallowed than the ‘21’ Club. The club’s impending closure in March due to the Pandemic, has caused an understandable uproar, as no one wants New York robbed of one of its iconic spots. For nearly 100 years, the ‘21’ Club managed to retain its title as a leading establishment to “see and be seen.” The lawless origins of the establishment added timeless allure for tourists and locals alike. Something in the pioneering spirit of the American people bucks against the rules, and the speakeasy was the first tangible embrace of pleasure at the expense of Puritan propriety. Founded by Lower East Siders Charlie Berns and Jack Kriendler, cousins and sons of poor Austrian immigrants, their

CO U RTE S Y O F 2 1 C LU B ; T I M E & L I F E PI C T U R E S ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ;

BY DAISY PRINCE


MEMORIES

This page, counter clockwise from top right: ‘21’ Club during Christmas; ‘21’ Club owner (right) with actor James Stewart; Elizabeth Taylor brings glamour to ‘21’; Marilyn Monroe at ‘21’ Club to celebrate her film, The Seven Year Itch, in 1954; Brooke Shields attends the premiere party for Bugsy in 1991. Opposite

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

page: The Bar Room at ‘21’ Club.


MEMORIES


From above: Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Frank Sinatra, and bodyguard Jilly Rizzo arriving at ‘21’ Club after his New York City concert in 1975; ‘21’ Club when it started as a speakeasy. Opposite page, counter clockwise from top right: The once completely secret wine cellar at ‘21,’ which was used for private lunches or dinners in signature ‘21’ style; the toys on the ceiling of the Bar Room at ‘21’; ‘21’ Club burger;

CO U RTE S Y O F 2 1 C LU B ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ; L I F E O FAT R AV E LC Z A R . CO M

Leonard Lauder and friends dining at ‘21’ Club.

Gangsters, bootleggers and their molls (Ernest Hemingway is reputed to have been caught in the act on the kitchen stairs with bootlegger Leg’s Diamond’s girlfriend) and uptown girls escaping their boarding schools, arrived in droves. My family adored the ‘21’ Club, beginning with my actress great-grandmother Vivian Wessell, who, despite having married age 19 to a 45 year-old Boston banker, never saw why matrimony or motherhood should stand in the way of her good time. A close pal of the proprietors, she would sashay right past the heavy set bouncers into the inviting deep red ‘21’ Club interiors on her nights out on the town. 20 years later when the club had evolved from a dive-y hotspot into an establishment mecca, Vivian’s daughter, socialite and ‘Swan’ C.Z. Guest would accompany her friend, Jacqueline Kennedy to lunch, where they would nibble the chicken hash or

have a bite of the ‘21’ Burger (now, $36). One one occasion, C.Z. invited my mother along. Fourteenyears-old and sporting a mouth full of braces, she was not surprised, after the other women traded air kisses and “Mwah, Mwahs” to one another, to find herself with an empty seat to one side. Ten minutes later, a youthful Senator Jack Kennedy bounded in and sat down next to her. For the rest of lunch, my mother basked in the charismatic company in of one of the more important and handsome men in American History. It was clubby in the sense you never knew who you would run into. Case in point is what happened to my father when he took me and six girlfriends there for my 19th birthday party. Somewhat puzzled by the nursery decor of trucks and trains (gifts from patrons who gave the toys with their company logos emblazoned on them) hanging from the ceiling, my friends were J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 7 5


76 QUEST

Edward even stopped by to wish them congratulations. “It was a helluva lunch,” he said. If the joint eventually devolved into a power broker lunch spot, it retained its importance as a place to celebrate life’s rites of passage. Birthdays, engagement drinks, Christmas parties and college graduations were always celebrated at that hallowed address. Elizabeth Meigher (Quest’s Deputy Editor) spent her 21st birthday at ‘21’ with blond twins, Tantivy and Phoebe Gubelmann. Even President Trump came in 2016 for a postvictory burger with the family. Despite the recent closure, rumours are flying that current owners, the Belmond Group, will reopen the Club after a renovation and refurbishment. Let’s hope they do and that it retains some of its original outlaw spirit. New Yorkers wouldn’t accept anything less. u

C H R I S T I A N J O H N S TO N ; G E T T Y I M A G E S

amused and not overtly alarmed at my father’s delight in being spotted by an acquaintance with his ’harem’ of women. If its rakish past was largely lost after the War, the ‘21’ Club never lost the ability as one of the right places to be. Back in the 1960’s agent Swifty Lazar smashed a water glass into the head of Otto Preminger during a lunchtime dust-up over the movie rights to In Cold Blood. Salvador Dalí used to bring his ocelot, Babou. In 1954, Marilyn Monroe turned heads while drinking at the bar during a press party for The Seven Year Itch. In the 1980’s, Gordon Gekko admonishes Bud Fox that “Lunch is for wimps” before letting his protegee order the famous steak tartare. As late as 2006, Jay McInerney and Anne Hearst were married at ‘21’ by then Mayor Rudy Guiliani. McInerney (no stranger to the inside of a clandestine establishment) recalled Prince


MEMORIES

This page, from above: The entrance of ‘21’ Club; the once completely secret wine cellar at ‘21’ Club. Opposite page, clockwise from left: Liza Minelli leaves the ‘21’ Club with third husband Mark Gero; the iconic club wine cellar houses a bottle of wine from 1870; Larry King and Donald Trump at ‘21’ to launch King’s book Powerful Prayers.

J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 7 7


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY A LE X T R AV E R S AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

PALM BEACH swings into the height of the season this month, so we’re keeping it fresh and simple, whether that means breezy tunics, baby blue chinos, or shoes that’ll keep you weightless on your toes. And if things start to get dressy (who doesn’t miss that?) we have you covered on that front—from stunning Vhernier jewelry to stylish Asprey bags, and some of the most fashionable masks you can find. No one is blending comfort and style quite like Ralph Lauren. Visit ralphlauren.com

Ideal for daytime

to shop this sea-

lunches or cocktails by the

sonless look and its

pool: Nouvel Heritage’s

accessories.

18-kt. yellow gold, diamond, and spinel pendant. $1,200 nouvelheritage.com.

Be the talk of the town in Vhernier’s Calla bracelet in 18-kt. rose gold and white diamonds. $8,850 at vhernier.com.

This month’s object of desire—the Walters Faith 18-kt. rose gold and sterling silver ring. $1,650 waltersfaith.com. 78 QUEST


Hit the slopes in style this season with Burton’s latest Chopper Flat Top Snowboard. $199.95 at burton.com.

Delight any bridge or poker player with the exceptional: Larusmiani’s silver-plated Royale-Les-Eaux card deck. Shop at larusmiani.com.

Perfectly preppy for the Palm Beach season: J.McLaughlin’s Parker corduroy Complement any look with Rolex’s

pants. $178 at jmclaughlin.com.

Oyster Perpetual 34. $5,300 at Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave. 212.397.9000.

Step out in comfort and style with these Golden Goose vintage metallic star running sneakers. $530 at bergdorfgoodman.com.

J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 7 9


Fresh Finds Show her you’re truly devoted with these Graziela 18-kt. white gold, diamond, and sapphire earrings. $990 grazielagems.com.

Flaunt your après-ski style with this Banniere Aspen scarf. $250 at banniereco.com.

Sold Out’s “The Just Enough Puff” shortsleeve sweatshirt in rose is a playful piece that will enhance any wardrobe. $145 at soldout.nyc.

Mask up in style with Dolce & Gabbana’s reuseable Majolica print cloth mask. $90 at dolceandgabbana.com.

A few sprays of Aba Love’s Petal toning facial mist will have your skin feeling instantly refreshed. $45 at bergdorfgoodman.com.

Lilly Pulitzer—a name synonymous with Palm Beach—just released this new Totally Blossom stationary set, a perfect gift for any ardent writer. $56 at lillypulitzer.com.


Add a touch of style to any home with this Ostrich

MacKenzie-Childs’ hand-

Feather Lamp from Linda

painted Flower Market two-

Horn, a Hollywood Regency–

quart tea kettle is a stylish

style lamp with hand-dyed

addition to kitchen. $125 at

moss green ostrich plumes in

mackenzie-childs.com.

classic gold finish. $2,900 at Linda Horn: 212.772.1122.

It’s hard not to fall for the latest looks from Veronica Beard—like this light floral dress, a smart and subdued look that’s sure to be a PB staple. Shop collections and more at veronicabeard.com.

These Elegant Strand foam vases come in organic shapes, bubbling with fresh textures, and are inspired by forms straight from the sea. $240 at elegantstrand.com.

From the Beverly Hills Collection, this 1781 This Green Figuier candle by diptyque

Pochette by Asprey is created in hand painted

will surely add a beautiful aroma to your

jade lizard, inspired by palm trees and desert

home. $145 at diptyque.com.

foliage. $6,600 at asprey.com. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 8 1


82 QUEST

into an iconic and beloved brand and ultimately into the world’s largest global prestige beauty company. In its infancy in the 1940s and 50s, the company comprised a handful of products, sold under a single brand in just a few prestigious department stores across the United States. Today, The Estée Lauder Companies constitutes

A N I M P R I N T O F H A R P E R CO LL I N S P U B L I S H E R S

IN HIS much-anticipated memoir, entitled The Company I Keep: My Life in Beauty (Harper Business), Chairman Emeritus and former CEO of The Estée Lauder Companies Leonard Lauder shares the business and life lessons he learned as well as the adventures he had while helping transform the business his mother founded in 1946 in the family kitchen

CO P YR I G H T © 2 0 2 0 BY LE O N A R D L AU D E R / CO U RTE S Y O F H A R P E R B U S I N E S S ,

LEONARD LAUDER’S EYE-OPENING TALES


BOOKS

Clockwise from top left: The Lauder family in Palm Beach Florida, circa 2000; toddler Leonard Lauder with EstĂŠe Lauder, circa 1930; EstĂŠe Lauder in 1951; The Company I Keep: My Life In Beauty (Harper Business). Opposite page: Leonard Lauder with his wife, Evelyn, and son in Palm Beach, Florida, 1972.


Clockwise from top left: Leonard and Evelyn Lauder on their wedding day in 1959; the Lauder family in 1978; an image from Lauder’s time in the U.S. Navy; Lauder with his wife and sons at Hotel Sacher in Vienna, Austria, 1984; William P. Lauder, Leonard A. Lauder and Fabrizio Freda at Brandenburg Gate in 2011. Opposite page: Lauder at an EstÊe Lauder Companies employee event at Vassar College, circa 1995.


B U S I N E S S , A N I M P R I N T O F H A R P E R CO LL I N S P U B L I S H E R S

CO P YR I G H T © 2 0 2 0 BY LE O N A R D L AU D E R / CO U RTE S Y O F H A R P E R

BOOKS

one of the world’s leading manufacturers and marketers of prestige skincare, makeup, fragrance and hair care products, comprised of a diverse portfolio of more than 25 brands whose products are sold in over 150 countries and territories. Its growth and success were led by Leonard Lauder, Estée Lauder’s oldest son, who envisioned and effected this expansion during a remarkable 60-year tenure, including leading the company as CEO and Chairman. In this captivating personal account complete with great stories as only he can tell them, Mr. Lauder, now known as The Estée Lauder Companies’ “Chief Teaching Officer,” reflects on his childhood growing up in the struggles of the

Great Depression, the vibrant decades of the post-World War II boom and his work growing the company into the global beauty powerhouse it is today. Mr. Lauder pays loving tribute to his mother Estée Lauder, the company’s eponymous founder, and The Estée Lauder Companies’ employees—both past and present—while sharing inside stories about the company, including tales of cutthroat rivalry with Charles Revson of Revlon and others. The book offers keen insights on honing ambition, leveraging success, learning from mistakes and growing an international company in an age of economic turbulence, uncertainty and fierce competition. u J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 8 5


ALA VON AUERSPERG, PALM BEACH’S PLAYFUL DESIGNER BY ROBERT JANJIGIAN


FA S H I O N

This spread: A collection of looks from Ala von Auersperg and an image of her boutique in Palm Beach (below), located at 312 Worth Avenue. Visit alavonauersperg.

CO U RTE S Y O F A L A V O N AU E R S P E R G

com for more information.

THOUGH ALA ISHAM, creative director of Ala von Auersperg does translate her artistic expressions onto fabrics for her signature collections of resort wear, thankfully she does not promote her designs using that cringe-worthy term, wearable art. Instead, her vision is to provide a handsome and versatile assortment of casual-to-dressy pieces that are cheerfully vibrant and geared for wear in sunny spots around the globe. “There are no real seasons with my clothes,” she explains, “it’s always warm somewhere.” J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 8 7


FA S H I O N This spread: A collection of

So, her current collection is always “seasonless,” which is how she perceives the lifestyle of her customers, women of a certain means who range in age from their 20s to their 80s. It’s actually her and her friends’ way of life that inspires her creations. She moves from the Hamptons to Newport and Antigua to Palm Beach during the year, with regular stops in Manhattan, where her studio and office are located. Von Auersperg characterizes her clothes as casual and elegant, inherently practical, and a little “flirty.” Comfort and flattering cuts are important to her, as the collection was born five years ago as she was encouraged by her designer friend and collaborator Antonio Gual to apply the subjects of her drawings and paintings to clothes he was making for her to wear at her Caribbean home. “Antonio advised me that there was nothing new with regard to cut, but that my prints would be ‘distinctive.’” she says. “When a woman feels comfortable, she moves differently,” von Auersperg remarks. Her aim is: give her clients clothes they can put on and not think about— 88

QUEST

the no-fuss approach to getting dressed. The first Ala von Auersperg boutique opened on Palm Beach’s fabled and historic main shopping street, Worth Avenue, last winter and, despite a pandemic, has been doing great business. She even designed a selection of digital-print face masks, in deference to the current climate. She sells to a handful of shops and has opened pop ups for what she calls her “coastal” clothes, though the bulk of her sales are via her online site. “We’ve also done many trunk shows to reach women across the country, not just in the places we live and visit.” These trunk shows are usually in-person, but in the time of COVID-19 Ala von Auersperg has pivoted to hosting them virtually—and these trunk shows are a helpful forum to connect with her customers to get specific input on her designs. Her team, in addition to Gual, includes daughter Sunny, responsible for marketing and private sales, and fashion industry veteran Larry Black. Stylist Trish Carroll runs the Palm Beach boutique. ◆

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looks from Ala von Auersperg.


RESTAURANTS REIMAGINED IN PALM BEACH B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

ONCE A SEASONAL TOWN, Palm beach has become one of the country’s most sought after cities for those seeking a permanent residence. The movement has been accelerated by the onset of COVID-19, as many New Yorkers escaped the city for better quality of life, sunnier weather, and more accessible restaurants. The Upper East Side’s favorite restaurants like Swifty’s and soon-to-open Le Bilboquet have made the pilgrimage with their patrons, while iconic mainstay establishments like Renato’s are as popular as ever. While the industry is struggling due to major shutdowns in other areas in the country, Palm Beach residents are safely carrying on. From reimagined classics to the new and noteworthy, here are the dining spots to see and be seen this season in Palm Beach. 90 QUEST


CANTEENS

This spread: Views of the outdoor and indoor setups at Renato’s and classics from its Italian menu.

RENATO’S CO U RTE S Y O F R E N ATO ’ S / A L F R E S CO H O S PI TA L I T Y G RO U P

87 Via Mizner / 561.655.9752 This elegant Italian restaurant has been nestled in Via Mizner—the historic 1923 Worth Avenue courtyard complex featuring shops and apartments—for over 30 years. Where some of the more recent entrants to the Palm Beach dining scene can be categorized as bustling and far-from-relaxing, Renato’s has kept to roots as a cozy establishment, perfect for a special occasion. The outdoor garden, where palm trees are wrapped in bright lights to match their counterparts that line Worth Avenue, evokes a romantic and charming feel, ideal for

a starry night. For those with a preference for indoor dining, the ambiance is traditional but not stuffy, with red and gold coloring throughout, dim lighting, and a pianist. The family-owned restaurant is run by Arlene Desiderio, widow of founder and namesake, Renato Desiderio, as well as her son José Duran of Al Fresco Hospitality Group. Favorite menu items include the Soft-Shell Crab starter and the Rack of Lamb or Spaghettine Frandiablo for entrées, complemented by an extensive wine list and rich Italian desserts. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 9 1


Clockwise from top left: The entrance of Cafe L’Europe; the team inside

CAFÉ L’EUROPE

the kitchen at Cafe L’Europe; restaurant managers Bruce Ramsey and Sergio Cuadros; masked guests at the bar; views of the large U-shaped bar.

Although Café L’Europe is celebrating 40 years on the island, it’s recently been reimagined as a modern bistro. Though involved in the original operation, the Marcello family are new owners and have renovated the restaurant to appeal to a new generation. Once a romantic special occasion spot with a Renato’s-esque atmosphere, it now boasts contemporary elements like an open floor plan, a large u-shaped bar, and velvet furnishing with hints of blue and gold throughout—a more clubby feel. Contrary to the old establishment, the new 92 QUEST

Café L’Europe welcomes guests wearing jeans and looking for a casual bite, while still encouraging diners celebrating milestones. The restaurant hired the former chef of Chez Jean Pierre, Alain Krauss, who brought with him the classic Chez Jean Pierre dishes to the menu in addition to Café L’Europe favorites. Keeping COVID-19 first in mind, the restaurant is operating at 50% capacity, offering outdoor seating, implementing temperature checks at the door, and frequently sanitizing all surfaces.

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331 S County Rd / 561.655.4020


LE BILBOQUET CO U RTE S Y O F LE B I LB O Q U E T; O R I H A R PA Z

247 Worth Avenue / palmbeach@lebilboquetny.com Finding success on the Upper East Side and in Sag Harbor, Philippe Delgrange decided to bring the beloved Le Bilboquet to Worth Avenue, allowing his dedicated clientele to enjoy the hotspot yearround at their winter home. The two-story restaurant, which has been under construction overseen by investor Jane Holzer since 2019, is slated to open in mid-January. The restaurant will offer indoor and outdoor dining, and a French menu with Bilboquet classics like the Cajun Chicken, plus seasonal seafood specials.

Clockwise from top left: The entrance of Le Bilboquet’s Worth Avenue location; the St.-HonorÊ dessert pastry; a rending of the bar at Le Bilboquet Palm Beach; Philippe Delgrange; the Beef Tartare; a rendering of the dining room at Le Bilboquet Palm Beach. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 9 3


SWIFTY’S POOL Once an Upper East Side favorite, Swifty’s opened its doors as a pop-up at The Colony Hotel in Palm Beach for the first time last winter after shuttering its doors in New York in 2016. Following the pop-up’s success, the restaurant, owned by Robert Caravaggi, opened a permanent location at The Colony this year. “Our first season in Palm Beach was a smashing success. It was such a pleasure to see so many familiar faces and wonderful friends in our dining room, and I am elated to evolve the restaurant to meet these unique times with the launch of Swifty’s POOL,” said Caravaggi of the new opening in October. Featuring an outdoor setup poolside (giving the restaurant a 94 QUEST

Clockwise from top left: The Swifty’s menu and watercolor of the original New York location; the setup at Swifty’s POOL; Robert Caravaggi with The Colony’s Executive Chef, Tom Whitaker; the Designer Meatloaf; the pool at The Colony; the entrance of Swifty’s.

much-welcomed Palm Beach twist), Swifty’s has become one of the island’s hottest reservations, attracting the same regulars that once frequented the Upper East Side location. The al fresco setup features live entertainment under the palms, and a menu serving old Swifty’s favorites like the Designer Meatloaf and Crab Cakes.

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155 Hammon Avenue / 561.655.5430


From left: The outdoor setup at Table 26°; some of the restaurant’s comfort dishes, and the owners, Ozzie Medeiros and Eddie Schmidt.

TABLE 26°

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1700 S Dixie Hwy / 561.855.2660 Founded in 2012 by owners Eddie Schmidt and Ozzie Medeiros, Table 26° is situated just over the bridge in West Palm Beach’s Mango Promenade district. Known as a gem among locals, the restaurant serves an extensive menu filled with all-American comfort food like the Buttermilk Fried Chicken and the Spinach and Artichoke Dip under the direction of Chef Martha Encarnacion, as well as an extensive drink list with handcrafted cocktails like the 26° North Martini. “Our commitment to believing in all that West Palm Beach has to offer and superior

training and execution of the best food around will keep us grounded for many years to come. It’s a place that guests can truly call their own,” said Schmidt. In response to the pandemic, the restaurant shifted their setup so that 75% of their seating is outside in its new tented garden area, so that guests can safely enjoy themselves in an open setting. u J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 9 5


OPEN HOUSE

OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH from an idyllic waterfront setting on South Flagler Drive, Forté—a collection of 41 residences—enjoys sweeping views of Worth Avenue, the Intracoastal Waterway, and Atlantic Ocean. Developed by Two Roads Development and Alpha Blue Ventures , Forté rests within a tranquil residential neighborhood just south of the Royal Park Bridge neighboring The Norton Museum of Art, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, and Antique Row Art and Design District. This central location puts Palm Beach’s renowned social and cultural scenes at residents’ fingertips, serving as a perfect stepping-off point for one of the world’s most elegant addresses. Designed by Bernardo Fort-Brescia of Arquitectonica and with interiors curated by International tastemaker Jean-Louis Deniot, Forté will be a sleek, 24-story boutique tower with only two residences on each floor. The expansive four-and fivebedroom residences range from 4,200 to 8,400 square feet with the option to combine residences for a full-floor home. Forté’s six-bedroom penthouse spans 8,900 enclosed square feet and 2,000 square feet of outdoor terrace space that includes a summer kitchen, a cabana bath and 360-degree views from a private pool. With Deniot’s signature elements of opulence and originality, Forté’s social spaces provide superlative settings for celebrating new occasions and honoring cherished traditions. Three full floors of amenities serve as an extension of the home, presenting a variety of opportunities to experience seamless indoor and outdoor living, dining, and entertaining. An elegant great room, private dining room, theater and evening lounge provide the ideal setting for an intimate gathering, spontaneous movie night or catered dinner party with formal seating for up to 24 guests. Designed to foster new levels of fitness, relaxation and rejuvenation, the third floor’s health and wellness spaces include His & Hers spas equipped with a private treatment room, steam room, sauna, relaxation area and lockers. These spainspired amenities are complemented by a state-of-the-art fitness center and yoga studio. A card room, multi-sport simulator room and two fully furnished guest suites create social hubs for family and friends, while a business center offers all the office essentials residents and guests might need. In addition to the many amenities provided at Forte, residents will enjoy basking in the sunshine and sea breezes on an impressive second-story pool deck and more. u Forté residences will be exclusively sold by Douglas Elliman. The Forté Sales Gallery is located at 1217 South Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. For more information, call 561.653.6240 or visit fortewpb.com.

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FORTÉ ON FLAGLER


Clockwise from top left: A master bedroom; a master bathroom; the Forté theater; the Great Room; the second-story pool deck overlooking Palm Beach, complete with a lap pool, heated spa, and outdoor dining and lounge area; Forté's living area. Opposite page: An exterior view of Forté on South Flagler Drive, which features 24 stories and 41 residences.

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THE STRIKING and luxurious homes designed by Madison Worth Architecture have firmly established this up-and-coming Architecture Studio in Palm Beach. Previously known as Gramatan Corp, the firm rebranded to reflect their multistate presence. Offices on Madison Avenue in New York and Worth Avenue in Palm Beach offer clients the flexibility to discuss projects in New York City, Fairfield County, Westchester County, Long Island, and South Florida. The client-architect relationship is a cornerstone of the MWA philosophy. MWA partner, Gerard Beekman, says, “I am constantly inspired by the dialogue with my clients. I am not interested in imposing a stylistic manifesto.” Beekman believes that sophisticated room layouts, elegant sculpting of proportions, and refined detailing transcend architectural styles. “Once a program is set, we source design cues from our clients’ lifestyle—for example, choice of location, apparel, cars, and collections. This information is transformed into the world of space and becomes a photoshoot-worthy setting for our clients.” At the same time, Beekman insists that homes must live comfortably; the spaces function effortlessly, whether hosting a black-tie event or lounging in a bathing suit. To serve this purpose, careful attention is given to creating gracious indoor-outdoor connections and dramatic views. The firm excels at contemporary minimalist detailing but also has in-depth knowledge of classical cannons and propor98 QUEST

tions. MWA partners Christopher DeChiaro and James Hall trained in traditional architecture at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Miami, respectively. Mr. Beekman trained at the Rhode Island School of Design. Greatly attractive is the one-stop-shopping design/ build services MWA offers with sister company, Livingston Builders, Inc., a contracting company renowned for impressive bespoke houses. With over 25 years of experience as a high-end General Contractor, the Livingston principals, Jim Remez and David Palmer guide the design process and keep projects on-budget and on-schedule throughout construction. Additionally, MWA takes pride in its unanimous approval track record for projects considered by the rigorous Architectural Commission and Landmarks Preservation Commission in Palm Beach. The firm is being awarded a Mizner award by the Institute for Classical Architecture and Art for excellence in architecture in the classical tradition. The team thrives on collaborations with interior designers: notable recent projects include homes in Locust Valley with Christina Murphy Interiors and a 20,000 square foot waterfront estate in Greenwich, Connecticut, in collaboration with Steven Gambrel. u For more information, visit www.madisonwortharch.com or call 561.833.3242.

S A R G E N T P H OTO G R A P H Y A N D B R A N T LE Y P H OTO G R A P H Y

HOME MARVELS, MADISON WORTH ARCHITECTURE


Clockwise, from above: An International Style–inspired contemporary house in Palm Beach; bar with lacquer cabinets and German-silver backsplash; modern waterfront home in Palm Beach that completely opens to the swimming pool garden and intracoastal (the glass tile pool is a sculptural element integrated into the design of the Loggia); fountain designed by MWA donated by Mr. Sam Lehrman to the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach for their Earl E. T. Smith Memorial Park; kitchen designed in collaboration with Sara Gilbane Interiors—bleached oak cabinetry and azur Moroccan Zellige tile backsplash, natural and man-made quartz counters. Opposite: A Jamaican-inspired house on the North End of Palm Beach.


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MARKET INSIGHTS B Y B R O O K E K E L LY

DANA KOCH The Koch Team at Corcoran Group / 561.379.7718 / dana.koch@corcoran.com

Q: How much have home values in Palm Beach increased? A: We like to refer to the appreciation that has occurred as the “COVID bump.” Demand has far outstripped supply in the single family home market. I would say in the home market there has been between a 10% to 20% increase.

or reopened recently. La Goulue and Henry’s have been favorites and so have the “new” Cafe L’Europe and Swifty’s Pool at The Colony. Also, we have added to our burgeoning art scene with quite a few galleries like Pace Gallery, Acquavella Galleries, Sotheby’s, Paula Cooper Gallery, and Lehman Maupin opening in town following their clientele. Q: Anything else you’d like to share? A: The real estate market is on fire! I don’t see it slowing down anytime soon. People are coming from all over and some established Palm Beachers are upgrading their current situations. The pandemic has forced people to reevaluate their thought process about how they “work and play” and have realized that Palm Beach has so many advantages (no state income tax, outdoor lifestyle, safety, etc.).

Q: Tell me about the most notable sales since March. A: There has been a recent flurry of high end sales. We just sold the former John Lennon Estate on the ocean and there were a couple of sales above $70 million: the former Kennedy compound and a South Lake Trail estate. Also, the Taubman’s sold their ocean to lake home in the high $40’s and rocker Jon Bon Jovi bought his direct oceanfront home in the low $40’s. The high end of our market is on a roll! Q: What’s new and noteworthy on the island? A: We have a handful of new restaurants that have opened

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234 Eden Road in Palm Beach, Florida; $10,350,000.

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Q: How has the COVID affected the Palm Beach market? A: The pandemic has created unusually high demand in our market. Buyers are prioritizing their quality of life over everything else. As a result, many buyers have decided to make Palm Beach their primary home, especially younger families.


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CRISTINA CONDON Sotheby’s International Realty / 561.301.2211 / cristina.condon@sothebyshomes.com

Q: How has the pandemic affected the Palm Beach market? A: The pandemic has tightened our market and drained our inventory. We are seeing historic lows with under 80 single family homes available, many of which are already in contract. Palm Beach is seeing record sales and home prices across the board that will continue to increase long term.

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: How much have home values in Palm Beach increased? A: At least 10% over the numbers of last year. Properties are selling and entering into contacts extremely close to the listing price. New properties coming to market are being listed higher than the last property sold. Q: Tell me about the most notable listings since March. A: A coveted Dunster House two-bedroom, beautifully renovated furnished apartment with the interior design by David Mitchell Brown, incorporating Holly Hunt furniture throughout. The foyer opens to a gracious living room with a shaded west facing terrace to enjoy the sunset views. The library with sycamore bookshelves and partial ocean views opens from the living room. A separate dining room leads to an eat-in kitchen. The owner’s suite includes walls upholstered in silk, separate closets, and a dressing area.

Q: What’s new and noteworthy on the island? A: Palm Beach is becoming a major player in the art scene with several world class galleries opening this season in town, including Sotheby’s auction house gallery in the Royal Poinciana Plaza. Q: Anything else you’d like to share? A: Palm Beach has always been known as a special community offering privacy, security, and beautiful weather. Now more than ever people are moving into the area to make Palm Beach their home during these challenging times. As technology has allowed people to work remotely, Palm Beach becomes a very desirable destination.

Dunster House at 360 S Ocean Blvd, #3B in Palm Beach; $5,600,000.

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CHRIS LEAVITT & ASHLEY MCINTOSH Douglas Elliman / 917.664.0720 or 561.685.0861 / cleavitt@elliman.com or ashley.mcintosh@elliman.com

Q: How much have home values in Palm Beach increased? A: Over the last three months, property values have increased 36 percent from the same window last year. We can give you an example of something that sold in 2017 and just sold this week for a 46 percent increase in value, and nothing was done to the property other than a coat of paint. Q: Tell me about some of the most notable sales and listings since March. A: We have done a tremendous amount of very large high dollar value off market deals in the $35 to $60m range that seems to be the “hot spot” for these new buyers coming to Palm Beach Island. As Palm Beach residents ourselves,

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our personal relationships with residents across the island have been critical in creating off market opportunities for our clients now more than ever. Q: What’s new and noteworthy on the island? A: We are beyond excited that our favorite restaurants from New York City are now here: La Goulue, Le Bilboquet, and Sant Ambroeus. Q: Anything else you’d like to share about Palm Beach with our readers? A: We are so excited about the new Palm Beach and all the new fresh faces that are moving here in record numbers. We are thrilled about the growth on the Island and across the bridge.

12525 Seminole Beach Road in North Palm Beach; $79,500,000.

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Q: How has the pandemic affected the Palm Beach market for the long term? A: The market is currently experiencing a surge in sales and inventory is at a record low. More and more people are discovering Palm Beach and we feel that this is just the beginning of what’s to come: lower inventory and more demand.


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SHELLY TRETTER LYNCH Compass / 203.550.8508 / shelly.tretterlynch@compass.com

CO U RTE S Y O F CO M PA S S

Q: How has COVID impacted the Greenwich market? A: Since the end of March, demand for Greenwich real estate has witnessed a significant increase. Initially, demand focused on short-term rentals, but by June, potential buyers shifted toward purchasing. People are predominately coming from the city, split pretty evenly between those looking for a permanent move and those looking to remain in New York and use a second home for the weekends or as a potential escape. Q: What kind of homes are selling? A: We have been seeing homes across all prices moving and moving quickly. In the 3rd quarter of 2020, average days on the market has fallen 13% compared to the same quarter last year. Home sales increased 36% over the pervious quarter. The median sale price increased 18% over the 3rd quarter of 2019. While we have not competed this quarter, average days on market has decreased 20% compared to the 4th quarter of 2019. Home sales have increased almost 120% over the same quarter last year, and median sale price has increased 30% over last year’s 4th quarter. Buyers have been focused across the board. We have seen new or newer homes go for full asking for buyers looking for turn-key homes with the

latest. COVID has not impacted sale prices, so some buyers are still able to get great deals on older homes that need some renovation, but are in great location. Q: What advice do you have for buyers and sellers? A: One year ago, Greenwich had an inventory significant enough that the buyer would be able to hold off for a better deal or get a response to low offers. There were great deals to be had then. However, that is not the case anymore. Sitting on the sidelines for prices to fall or putting in low offers is an ineffective strategy. It is beginning to turn towards a seller’s market. Buyers should be prepared to pay full asking and, given the huge surge in mortgage applications delaying many deals, cash offers with flexible closing dates are ideal.

41 Hurlingham Drive, Greenwich, Connecticut; $23,000,000.

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KYLE BLACKMON Kyle W. Blackmon Team at Compass / 561.231.7151 / kyleblackmon@compass.com

Q: Do you see the migration from NYC as permanent? A: I have every confidence the migration is temporary. New York is such an important global cultural, financial, tech, and education hub and will continue to be. Q: Why did you expand your practice to Palm Beach? A: I did so at the request of a number of my clients, as more and more were looking for me to advise them not only in New York but also in Palm Beach.

Q: What’s new and noteworthy on the island? A: Important New York art galleries have expanded here in the last six months, such as Aquavella, Pace, and Paula Cooper. Iconic New York restaurants such as La Goulue and Swifty’s at the Colony have opened on the island. It’s an exciting time to be in Palm Beach! Q: Anything else you’d like to share? A: As of December 9th, we only have 74 single family houses on the market, the lowest in recorded history. Generally, we have approximately 2 to 3 times that amount. If you are an owner of a home in Palm Beach, this is an unprecedented opportunity to sell at high valuations.

Q: What are the most popular residential areas right now? A: All three areas of Palm Beach are in demand and we are a supply constrained island. That said, we have seen more transactions this year on the North End than In-Town or the Estate Section.

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The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, Florida.

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Q: How has COVID affected the Palm Beach market? A: The pandemic accelerated a trend in Palm Beach that was already in place. More people are working from home and they are focused on a great quality of life, security, privacy, backyards, and pools. The reality is that Palm Beach has gone from a seasonal town into a primary residence town, where many residents are staying here year round.


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LIZA PULITZER & WHITNEY MCGURK Brown Harris Stevens / 561.373.0666 / lpulitzer@bhsusa.com & wmcgurk@bhsusa.com

Q: How has the pandemic affected the Palm Beach market for the long term? A: We are continuing to see more and more people move to Palm Beach, daily. Our market is saturated with buyers and very little inventory to choose from. As a consequence, prices and continuing to rise and properties are achieving record sales prices. There is wind in our sails for the foreseeable future as long as we can continue finding off-market opportunities for buyers.

Q: What are the most popular residential areas right now? A: The north end is the hottest area in Palm Beach. The expansive beaches, access to the bike path, and more relaxed lifestyle is drawing more families as permanent residents. Q: What’s new and noteworthy on the island? A: More and more people. Our local businesses should be thriving with all the influx of new people in our area. Q: Anything else you’d like to share? A: We are continuously searching for off-market properties to sell. This year, we will need to be creative in putting deals together. With our minimal inventory and high demand, our life long relationships is what is going to help us find more and more off-market opportunities for buyers. u

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Q: How much have home values in Palm Beach increased? A: Our market is moving so quickly it’s very difficult to quantify. A year or two ago, we used to say that if you can find a home in the north end for $3M, buy it. Now we’re saying, if you can find a home in the north end for $5M, buy it! Q: Tell me about some notable sales since March. A: There have been too many notable sales to even begin thinking about. The most notable numbers are in the total number of single family sales; since 4/1/2020 to 12/10/2020, there have been 138 sales listed in the MLS. During that same time period in 2019, there were only 63 sales listed in the MLS. This does not account for all the off-market sales.

340 S Ocean Blvd. #3A/3B in Palm Beach; $6,200,000.

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JANUARY

On January 7, Morselife Health Systems will hold its annual Golf Classic at The Breakers Ocean Golf Course at 8:30 a.m. An award ceremony will follow the round of golf. For more information, please email events@morselife.org or call 561.242.4661.

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South Street Seaport Museum’s monthly sea-music event, Sea Chanteys and Maritime Music, will continue virtually on Sunday, January 3, 2021 at 2 p.m. From the comforts of our homes, we will be able to join a round-robin of shared songs featuring members of The New York Packet and friends. Listen in, lead a song, and belt out the choruses for your neighbors to hear on the first Sunday of every month. To sign up to receive the Zoom link 24 hours prior, visit southstreetseaportmuseum.org.

Thomas G. O’Brien III and Rabbi Howard Shapiro. To register and for more information, visit plambeachfellowship.net.

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Walk This Way: Historic Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection will be on view at The Flagler Museum through January 9, 2021.

The exhibition from the Stuart Weitzman Collection explores how shoes have transcended their utilitarian purpose to become representations of culture—coveted as objects of desire, designed with artistic consideration, and expressing complicated meanings of femininity, power, and aspiration for women and men alike. Featuring 100 pairs of shoes from iconic designer Stuart Weitzman’s extensive private

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The Palm Beach Round Table with guest speaker Dom Taglialatella, a world-class gallerist for over 40 years, will take place at The Colony at 5:45 p.m. Hermé de Wynman Miro will serve as the event chairman. For more information, visit palmbeachroundtable.weebly.com.

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Palm Beach Fellowship of Christians and Jews will host an interactive session via Zoom, facilitated by 106 QUEST

collection assembled over three decades with his wife Jane Gershon Weitzman, the exhibition covers larger trends in American economic history, from industrialization to the rise of consumer culture, with a focus on women’s contributions as producers, consumers, designers, and entrepreneurs. This exhibition has been organized by the New-York Historical Society. For more information, visit flaglermuseum.us.

The Palm Beach Island Hospice Foundation will celebrate its 2021 Hospice Evening at The Flagler Palm Beach at 7 p.m. For more information, visit pbihf.org. General Admission tickets for The Flagler are also currently available for purchase through February 27.

The 2020 Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach Robert I. Ballinger Award will be presented to Julie and Brian Simmons for the restoration of Ducks Nest. For the first time in the history of the award, the presentation will take place at the award-winning property. The Ballinger Award was created in 1988 to honor the late Robert I. Ballinger Jr., former chairman of the Palm Beach Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Ballinger Award commemorates the restoration of a landmarked estate that best exemplifies the traditions of Palm Beach’s original houses and celebrates the architects who designed


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to the studio and stage. The series will stream nationwide on January 27, and February 3, 10, and 17, at 8pm ET, for free on the ALL ARTS app, allarts.org , and also air in the New York metro area on the ALL ARTS TV channel lineups.

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A GRAND REOPENING

The Kravis Center for the Performing Arts will hold its re-opening gala at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.651.4320.

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VIRTUAL DANCE PARTY

The Kravis Center for the Performing Arts will be re-opening in January with a new calendar of events. Please visit kravis.org to view the new expansion plans and the current Box Office lectures and performances. them. For more information, visit palmbeachpreservation.org. A CLEAR VISION

The Palm Beach Island Hospice Foundation will celebrate its 2021Hospice Evening at The Flagler Palm Beach at 7 p.m. For more information, visit pbihf.org.

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PALM BEACH COMMUNITY

Hanley Foundation will hold its Palm Beach Dreamcatcher Dinner at the Sailfish Club from 6–8 p.m. For more information, visit hanleyfoundation. org or call 561.268.2355.

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ARIAS

Opera Saratoga will host its first performance events as part of the company’s 60th Anniversary Season. In partnership with Caffè Lena, Opera Saratoga will launch “American Sings,” a monthly concert series featuring an array of diverse, internationally acclaimed artists. The series amplifies the voices of artists from racial groups historically underrepresented on the concert stage and features a wide array of classical, jazz, and popular music. To date, the company has performed 104 different fully staged works by 65 different composers, including 42 works by American composers and 14 premiere productions. In 2014, the Board of Directors appointed

Lawrence Edelson Opera Saratoga’s Artistic and General Director. Edelson’s leadership has marked a new chapter in the company’s history, with increased emphasis on community partnerships throughout the year, diversification of the company’s repertoire, and a reaffirmed commitment to both the presentation of American opera For more information, visit operasaratoga.org.

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BREAKTHROUGHS

cated, over fifty artists entered eight Works & Process bubble residencies in rural Hudson Valley after an unprecedented period of isolation. To capture this journey, Works & Process produced a four-part docuseries Isolation to Creation, by filmmaker Nic Petry of Dancing Camera, to provide audiences with the rare opportunity to go into the bubbles and behind the scenes to experience the hope, joy, exhilarating physical struggle, and emotional challenges experienced by performers returning

The No Show Winter Ball will be held virtually this year. Traditionally the Winter Ball is a black-tie event held at The Breakers Palm Beach and is the highlight of the Palm Beach season. All proceeds will benefit Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County. For more information, visit bgcpbc.org/events.

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PUPPY WALK

On February 22, The 19th Annual Barry Crown Walk for the Animals! Fundraiser to benefit Peggy Adams’ lifesaving programs and services will take place at the Meyer Amphitheater at 9 a.m. Participants can walk with their two and four-legged friends! There will be entertainment, vendors, and a silent auction area with fabulous prizes. For more information, visit peddyadams.org.

H.O.W. Hearing the Ovarian Cancer Whisper will hold its “Stay Home, Never Stay Silent” luncheon, with a delicious meal courtesy of Christafaro’s delivered to your door. Hearing the Ovarian Cancer Whisper raises money to support research in ovarian cancer through the Jacquie Liggett Research Fellowship. For more information please contact Jennifer McGrath at 561.406.2109 or jennifer@howflorida.org.

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GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

This past Summer and Fall amidst widespread cancellations, Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, itself facing a shuttered theater, forged a path for artists to safely gather, create and perform together again. Pioneering and producing bubble residencies that have since been widely dupli-

On February 22, The Barry Crown Walk for the Animals! to benefit Peggy Adams’ will take place at the Meyer Amphitheater at 9 a.m. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 0 7


WRITTEN BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY CARRIE BRADBURN OF CAPEHART

THE LEGACIES OF PALM BEACH AS REGAL AND WELL-DRESSED as they may appear, behind

closed doors the storied families of Palm Beach are all about having fun. They laugh and joke (inside jokes are hysterical), little ones get tickled, dogs are beloved (and remarkably well-behaved), and grandparents (the “Pop Pop’s”, the “Gagas”, the “Mimis”…) are always the best- just ask their grandchildren. Most importantly, families love each other. Simple moments spent together are the sweetest moments: a family gathering before dinner, a playful walk in the garden, tea and cookies while Dad reads a favorite book, and a breakfast bar-b-q at the beach. Memories are created that will be shared at dinner tables through generations. If you’re lucky enough to see behind the walls of Palm Beach’s tasteful houses, buildings, and hotels, you will find that families are

what keep Palm Beach ticking. Families are what make Palm Beach the unique and remarkable place it is today, and has been for over 100 years. u

THE FANJUL FAMILY Three generations of Fanjul men. From the left: Peps Fanjul, Pepe Fanjul, and Pepe Fanjul, Jr.; cousins Lulu Fanjul and Francesca Pfeifler. Opposite page, from left to right: Lulu Fanjul, Lourdes Fanjul, Pepe Fanjul, Jr., Emilia Fanjul, Pepe Fanjul, Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler, Emilia Pfeifler, and Francesca Pfeifler. Peps Fanjul and Nico Pfeifler are seated in front, while wellbehaved yellow labrador retriever, Heather Fanjul, and black labrador retriever, Thor Fanjul, are seated mid row. JANU AA PRY I L 22002210 1 0 9 0


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THE SUMMERS/ ROBINSON FAMILY Three generations of women stand in a row. From above, left to right: Annabelle Savage, Missy Robinson Savage, Ann Summers (holding the amazing rescue pup, Daisy Summers), Alexis Robinson Waller, and Nicole Robinson Menges; a family portrait, from left to right: Annabelle

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Savage, Alexis Robinson Waller, Ware Menges, Greer Menges, Missy Robinson Savage, and Carter Savage. Colt Robinson, Ann Summers, Peter Summers, and Nicole Robinson Menges stand happily behind. Opposite page, from left to right: Colt Robinson, Nicole Robinson Menges, Missy Robinson Savage, Ann Summers, Peter Summers, and Alexis Robinson Waller. Cousins Ware Menges, Annabelle Savage, Greer Menges, and Carter Savage are seated together in front by the steps of the pool. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 1 1


THE KEMBLE FAMILY Three generations of Kemble ladies! All dressed in designs from The Kemble Shop in Palm Beach (Phoebe and Mimi wear “Daisy� earrings for baby Daisy). From above: Phoebe Kemble, Mimi Kemble McMakin, and Daisy Lacoste Kemble du Plessis; Daisy has fun chasing Mango McMakin in a garden. Opposite page: Mimi Kemble McMakin, Phoebe Kemble, and Daisy Lacoste Kemble du Plessis wave happily at home, while Anchovie McMakin runs to catch up with her pack!


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THE WETENHALL FAMILY The Wetenhalls always have fun together at The Colony Hotel (mom Sarah Wetenhall happens to be President and CEO)—even their well-behaved King Charles Cavalier puppy, Palmer Wetenhall, plays along! From above, left to right: Palmer Wetenhall, Amelia Wetenhall, Drew Wetenhall, Maggie Wetenhall, Sarah Wetenhall, and Andrew Wetenhall on the steps of The Colony Hotel; teatime at The Colony for Maggie, Drew, Emilia, and Palmer. Opposite page: Andrew and Sarah stand beside the fireplace, inside of which Maggie, Drew, Palmer, and Emilia are about to emerge. The room has been beautifully redesigned by Mimi McMakin of Kemble Interiors (as seen on our previous pages) with spectacular de Gournay walls featuring Palmer Wetenhall, as well as The Colony’s mascot, Johnnie Brown. Visit The Colony to see if you can find them! 114 QUEST


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THE PULITZER FAMILY Two Pulitzer sisters and three generations spend a happy day at the beach! Clockwise from top left: Bob Calhoun, Liza Pulitzer Calhoun, Cayla Leidy (about to give birth to Zephyr Lee Leidy!), Chris Leidy, Bob Leidy with his daughter–Lilly Leidy–on his shoulders, Bob Leidy, Jr. in front, and Ivey Leidy; sisters Liza Pulitzer Calhoun and Minnie Pulitzer watch from behind as their five grandchildren: Bob Leidy,

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Jr., Lilly Leidy, Beau Leas, Lilly Ferreira, and Luke Leas impressively balance on a surf board; all together now!; Liza Pulitzer Calhoun on the beachwalk with her granddaughter, Lilly Leidy. On the way to the beach! Opposite page, from left to right: Cayla Leidy, Liza Pulitzer Calhoun, Ivey Leidy, Bob Leidy, Lilly Leidy, Lulu Ferreira, Bob Leidy, Jr., Beau Leas, Luke Leas, Minnie Pulitzer, Sean Ferreira, Rodman Leas, Serin Leas, Jack McCluskey, and Chris Leidy, seated center. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 1 7


PALM BEACH’S ART WAVE B Y B R O O K E K E L LY A N D M I C H A E L G R E G S O N R E I N E R T THE PANDEMIC has brought event cancellations around the globe, and major art fairs like Art Basel in Miami are no exception. But just 70 miles north in Palm Beach, art galleries with clientele from Manhattan and the Hamptons have migrated with their buyers to the island, as northerners have flocked to Florida in droves. Tighter knit and less spread out than its neighbor to the south, dealers and collectors alike have found the island to be the perfect art destination. New transplants such as Acquavella along with old faithfuls like Findlay Galleries have now established Palm Beach as a major new player in the art world. Already famous for its high-end shopping, renowned dining, and year-round beach life, Palm Beach’s new art wave only adds to the island’s appeal for younger families and businesses looking to relocate.

WALLY FINDLAY GALLERIES AS THE OLDEST operating art gallery in Florida (and the second oldest in the country), no other art institution screams “Palm Beach” quite like Findlay. This year, the family-owned gallery, which has been situated at its current Worth Avenue location for 70 years, is toasting its 150th anniversary in the business. Current CEO James Borynack acquired the company from a third generation Findlay in 1998. The gallery, which also boasts a permanent location in New York, represents more than 100 artists, including Nicola Simbari and Gustavo Novoa, who have produced some of Palm Beach’s most recognizable works. Artwork ranges from Impressionism, European Modernism, l’Ecole de Rouen, l’Ecole de Paris, and 20th Century American Art, with representation of contemporary artists and artist estates. While the Palm Beach Gallery is currently open for in-person showings for exhibitions like Henry Maïk’s “Magical Safari,” it is also offering virtual viewing rooms on its website. After the pandemic, the gallery will resume its charitable viewing parties that have become an iconic part of Palm Beach social scene. Photos of the entrance and interiors of Wally Findlay Galleries on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach. Opposite page, from above: Gallery view of Acquavella’s Palm Beach location; Acquavella’s Upper East Side location. 10108QQUUEES STT

CO U RTE S Y O F WA LLY F I N D L AY G A LLE R I E S

165 Worth Avenue / 561.655.2090


ACQUAVELLA

CO U RTE S Y O F AC Q UAV E LL A G A LLE R I E S

340 Royal Poinciana Way / 561.283.3415 Acquavella is among a handful of galleries that decided to park at The Royal Poinciana–its first brick-and-mortar space outside of New York since Nicholas Acquavella founded the institution in the early 1920s. Now a three-generation, family-owned business, the gallery is famous for its 19th, 20th, and 21st century art. Its current exhibition, “Wayne Thiebaud,” pays homage to the artist (who just celebrated his 100th birthday this fall) and his ability to reimagine American subjects with vibrant colors and unique perspectives. The subjects of the 19 works range from ice cream sundaes to cityscapes of San Francisco. The exhibition, which is the gallery’s first dedicated to a living artist, will be on display through February 20th. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 0 0


Items available for purchase inside the Sotheby’s Palm Beach location, including fine art and watches by Rolex and Patek Philippe. Opposite page, from above: The entrance of Sotheby’s at The Royal Poinciana Plaza; views of the gallery space inside Sotheby’s Palm Beach.

SOTHEBY’S

150 Royal Poinciana Plaza / sothebys.com

Sotheby’s—a leader in fine art since 1744—also opened a 2,700+ square-foot gallery this fall at The Royal Poinciana Plaza. The auction house showcases select auction items for preview, plus fine art, design, jewelry, luxury cars, and watches that are rotated regularly and available for immediate purchase. David Schrader, Sotheby’s Head of Private Sales, exuded excitement about the gallery’s opening in Palm Beach, “This historic city has always been a popular destination for our clients, and with many of them staying longer-term under present circumstances, we’re thrilled to directly bring them a selection of fine art and luxury goods in a curated and shoppable setting, alongside our distinguished peers at Pace and Acquavella.”


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CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S


COE + CO 217 Royal Poinciana Way / 561.249.1664 Photographer Nathan Coe is known for breaking the rules. Originally celebrated for photographing beautiful landscapes, he is now known for combining these landscapes with the female form to tell a more captivating, provocative story. The combination of the striking and nude figures create oneof-a-kind photographs by mixing the contemporary with traditional. Originally based in Nantucket, Coe has expanded his practice into Palm Beach. His latest collection of nudes have been photographed in front of the island’s iconic landmarks, like The Breakers and The Colony Hotels. He also collaborated with Ron Cavalier to open a gallery on Royal Poinciana Way, which showcases his works as well as those of additional leading art photographers like Harry Benson, Tyler Shields, Nick Brandt, and more. This page, clockwise from top right: Work on display at Coe + Co gallery; the entrance of Coe + Co in Palm Beach; the entrance of The Colony Palm Beach, where the Voltz Clarke Gallery is located; works by Joshua

155 Hammon Avenue / 561.655.5430 Founded in 2002 by Blair Clarke, Voltz Clarke established its first permanent gallery space on the Upper East Side in 2015. The gallery features diverse works by both emerging and midcareer artists, with a focus on introducing international artists to New York—an increasingly globalized market. In November, Voltz Clarke expanded into the Palm Beach market as many New Yorkers relocated for the season. The solo exhibition, which is on display at The Colony Hotel, features paintings by Joshua Avery Webster, who uses color to create unforgettable visual experiences. 122 QUEST

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VOLTZ CLARKE

CO U RTE S Y O F V O LT Z C L A R K E G A LLE RY; CO E + CO ; CO U RT E S Y O F J A M E S T U R R E LL / PAC E G A LLE RY

Avery Webster at the exhibition at The Colony Palm Beach.


PACE 340 Royal Poinciana Way #333 / 561.444.3922 Alongside Acquavella and Sotheby’s, Pace Gallery opened a seasonal space at The Royal Poinciana Plaza. With nine locations around the globe, Pace has established itself as a leader in representing 20th and 21st century artists. “Our new venture is primarily an opportunity to re-engage with our collectors and other colleagues in South Florida, a place that has become vital to the international arts ecology. There are remarkable works being made in our artists’ studios and we felt compelled to show them this season—Palm Beach seemed the ideal place,” said Pace Vice President Adam Sheffer. The Palm Beach location launched with a presentation of a wall installation by James Turrell, a Los Angeles-based artist associated with the Light and Space movement during the 1960s. Now through January 3rd, the gallery is displaying an exhibition of six watercolors by Sam Gillian. The gallery will continue to rotate its series of artists presentations throughout the season and is strictly following the guidelines to protect visitors from the spread of COVID-19. u From above: The entrance of Pace Gallery at The Royal Poinciana Plaza in Palm Beach; James Turrell, Andromeda, Medium Circle Glass, 2019; James Turrell, MORS-SOMNUS (07), Medium Diamond Glass, 2017. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 2 3


BARTON & GRAY, A LIFETIME OF ADVENTURE


BARTON & GRAY Mariners Club provides its members unlimited access to a fleet of more than 50 captained Hinckley Yachts ranging in size from 36’–44’ in 28 locations along the East Coast and Great Lakes. Harbors include Palm Beach, Vero Beach, Key Largo, Naples, Boston, New York City, The Hamptons, Chicago and beyond. The yachts are berthed at the finest marinas and resorts available, and there is no limit to the number of trips a member can take. An in-house concierge team curates each outing to ensure unforgettable experiences on the water.

CO U RTE S Y O F B A RTO N & G R AY

LAUNCHING NEW HARBORS FORT LAUDERDALE B&G’s expansion along the East Coast of Florida continues this season with the addition of Fort Lauderdale. As one of the most yachty communities in the world, Fort Lauderdale has miles and miles of waterfront, dining options, incredible architecture, and beautiful waters. Boca Raton, Hollywood, Bal Harbour, and more are within reach, offering members one-of-a-kind experiences. ISLAMORADA The Club’s love for the Florida Keys continues to flourish with this splashing of a Hinckley Picnic Boat at Islands of Islamorada resort. B&G members can now explore the best of the Keys. Come enjoy all the townhome-style accommodations, pool, tennis, marina—all complemented by a B&G Hinckley at the ready.

Clockwise, from top left: A family enjoys a cruise on one of Barton & Gray’s Hinckley Yachts; relaxing on the bow; tying up to a dock outside a restaurant in Chicago. Opposite page: Barton and Gray’s expansion along the East Coast of Florida continues, with Fort Lauderdale as a new port of call. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 2 5


sometimes you just want to take the helm of a runabout and mess around on the water. The B&G Nauset 17’s will be available for member use in Boca Grande during the winter season to explore the island and cruise the shallows.

WHITE ELEPHANT PALM BEACH White Elephant has opened a new resort in Palm Beach, and B&G members have exclusive access to some unique services and offers. Reciprocal pricing, catering from Lola, and their famous hospitality, now all available in Palm Beach.

LOBSTER BOILS Relax on the sand with family and friends and enjoy an authentic Lobster Boil—all bookended with cruises to and from the beach aboard B&G’s stunning yachts. Everything you need is included—food, libations, water-sports, and more—all you need to do is show up at the dock! u

B&G NAUSET 17’S Luxuriating on a captained Hinckley is the gold standard, but

To join, please contact info@bartonandgray.com or call Barton & Gray at 617.728.3555.

CO U RTE S Y O F B A RTO N & G R AY

EXCLUSIVE ESCAPES & EXPERIENCES Working with top resorts, culinary partners, and travel experts allows B&G to craft unforgettable, and completely exclusive, experiences for its members. This winter B&G is proud to offer a few new options, in addition to the tried and true.


Barton & Gray Mariners Club provides its members unlimited access to a fleet of more than 50 captained Hinckley Yachts ranging in size from 36’–44’ in 28 locations along the East Coast and Great Lakes. Opposite page, clockwise from above: A lunchtime picnic aboard a Barton & Gray yacht; soaking in the sun in Florida; anchoring on an island makes for a great adventure.

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BEACHY BUYS PRODUCED BY ALEX TRAVERS

Between the tony designer shops that line Addison Mizner’s Worth Avenue, award-winning interior design showrooms, and the expanding Royal Poinciana Plaza, Palm Beach is any shopper’s dream destination. Above: Images of Worth Avenue and the entrance of The Royal Poinciana Plaza (inset left). Below: Worth Avenue (left) and the lawn at The Royal Poinciana Plaza (right).

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RALPH LAUREN 300 Worth Avenue / 561.651.3900 Ralph Lauren might be said to have invented modern American style. For more than 40 years, the brand has embodied luxury. Certain accessories—like the elegantly modern Ricky bag—have become so popular, they’re iconic. This Worth Avenue location boasts a beautiful Beaux-Arts façade and an imported European stone fountain. As with all Ralph Lauren stores, you can find apparel for a glamorous evening on the town or a few classic cotton piqué polos for tennis.

JENNIFER GARRIGUES 308 Peruvian Avenue / 561.659.7085 Interior designer Jennifer Garrigues began her career as a fashion model with Christian Dior. It’s no surprise that she has a trained and talented eye for sumptuous things. Known for her creative taste that blends style and comfort, Garrigues offers design services for residential, commercial, and hospitality projects. She has designed locally for the Palm Beach Polo and Country Club and in New York for The Carlyle. Her showroom is a treasure trove of unexpected discoveries. From luxurious textiles and pillows to one-ofa-kind furniture pieces and decorative objects (which make great hostess gifts), there’s something for every type of living space at Jennifer Garrigues.

J.MCLAUGHLIN

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E B R A N D S

225 Worth Avenue / 561.655.5973 The first J.McLaughlin store, located in an Ivy League–riddled enclave on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, was a small place with a welcoming, faded-paint feel. It was preppy. It was rustic. People loved it. Today, with bricks-and-mortar retail locations in communities across the country—not to mention a flourishing e-commerce business—J. McLaughlin celebrates its continued success as a classic American clothier and one of the country’s last great first-name-basis retailers. Their clothes are simple and smart. J.McLaughlin describes its own style as “innovatively nostalgic.”


LINDROTH DESIGN 312-B South County Road / 561.249.1205 Amanda Lindroth’a earliest memories of her native Florida include its beautiful nature and the glamour of Palm Beach. She has lived in Paris, worked for both Women’s Wear Daily and W, and served Tom Ford in public relations. Today she takes inspiration from the islands (most notably Nassau) and designs interiors that are comfortable and breezy. Her store, here in Palm Beach on South County Road, offers an array of inspired goods (think raffia baskets and island trays) that are right at home in this relaxed yet elegant community.

LETA AUSTIN FOSTER BOUTIQUE 64 Via Mizner / 561.655.5489 A leading authority on style and design, Leta Austin Foster opened her boutique in the 1990s to be able to finish her interior design projects. As a result, the boutique specializes in beautiful custom items for the home. Foster loves fine linens and it shows: we always have a hard time narrowing it down here because any selection of hers could truly make a bedroom (in addition to carrying other custom Italian and French linens, this is the Porthault store for Florida and the Southeast). Then there’s the fine china and porcelain, not to mention writing papers, candles, and room sprays. Foster is also known for her wonderful selection of children’s clothes.

STUBBS & WOOTTON 340 Worth Avenue / 561.655.6857 Purveyors of the handmade slipper—which can be spotted both day and night, on men and women alike—Stubbs & Wootton is a favorite among locals (or anyone looking for an authentic touch of Palm Beach style). The brand’s iconic designs embody everything you want on this island: fine quality and fashion sense mixed with wit, humor, and flair. Whether in velvet or needlepoint, prepare to turn heads when stepping out in your Stubbs. Stroll into the handsome store at 340 Worth Avenue, and you’ll find a perfect match.


ROLLER RABBIT 340 Royal Poinciana Way / 561.833.4643 Roller Rabbit—a bohemian and travel-inspired brand complete with relaxed clothing, accessories, and home goods covered with vibrant, feel-good color—was founded in 2003 after Roberta Freymann was inspired by a piece of discarded fabric she came across in India. The brand’s goal of producing clothing that will put a smile of each customer’s face is evident in the comfort and playful patterns that define Roller Rabbit’s apparel. In the Royal Poinciana Plaza boutique, you will likely come across the brand’s staple animal-print pajama sets now iconic in Palm Beach.

BETTERIDGE 236 Worth Avenue / 561.655.5850 Betteridge is one of America’s most historic fine jewelers. The Betteridge name has been associated with jewelry for centuries: the company’s president, Terry Betteridge, is a fourthgeneration jeweler whose roots date back to the 1700s in Birmingham, England, where the name was synonymous with fine jewelry design and silversmithing. Today, the Betteridge boutique in Palm Beach is a joy to visit, offering all types of fine jewelry, by both classic and contemporary designers. Then, of course, there are pearls, pre-owned watches, and the brand’s own Betteridge Collection—in short, something is sure to catch your eye under one of the vitrines.

CHARLOTTE KELLOGG

CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E B R A N D S

226 Worth Avenue / 561.820.2402 It’s the reliable destination for tropical colors in linen, silk, and cotton. Located on Palm Beach’s famous Worth Avenue, Charlotte Kellogg’s fanciful boutique offers casual clothing designed for the lifestyle of South Florida and other bright-hued resort communities like Naples and Newport. Her cheerful and breathable designs have been making a colorful splash on the Palm Beach scene since the boutique opened in 1998. Now, the store is a true Palm Beach tradition, offering laid-back attire and accessories, including linen blouses, silk pants, quilted jackets, cashmere scarves, and more. Stop in to see what’s in store. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 3 1


AERIN 33 Via Mizner / 561.623.0906 Aerin Lauder’s eponymous luxury brand was inspired by her signature style and appreciation for beautiful living. Based on the premise that such a lifestyle should come effortlessly, Aerin develops curated collections in beauty, fashion accessories, and home décor. Inside the Palm Beach boutique, you will find a wide range of sophisticated buys, including straw hats, sunglasses, statement jewelry, and clutches, that will have you blending in perfectly on the island. Be sure to also check out the latest perfumes before your next big event.

KIRNA ZABÊTE 340 Royal Poinciana Way / 561.791.6075 Founded in 1999, Kirna Zabête is a premier fashion destination, featuring clothing, accessories, and jewelry—for both day and evening— from established and emerging designers, including Alexander Wang, Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta, Hunting Season, Gucci, Tibi, Paris Texas, Common Leisure, and Stella McCartney. All pieces in the warm and welcoming Royal Poinciana Plaza boutique are personally selected by the brand’s founder Beth Buccini, who aims to inspire and guide each customer. The brand’s logo, “the best edit of the best designers,” sums up the shop in a nutshell.

ALA VON AUERSPERG 312 Worth Avenue 561.429.4987 / alavonauersperg.com Ala Von Auersperg didn’t come from the fashion world, but her mother, Sunny Crawford von Bülow, and grandmother, Annie Laurie Aitken, had innate style. They valued beautiful craftsmanship, knew what looked good on them, and understood that you can be comfortable and still look fabulous. These early lessons trained AvA’s eye and helped inspire her line, which makes clothes that are elegant and versatile: you can wear a garment to the beach, make it fancier if you go out, then add another layer to make it even dressier. AvA’s goal is to help all women realize that they can be glamorous. 132 QUEST


KITON 340 Royal Poinciana Way / 561.247.7392 Founded by Ciro Paone in Naples in 1968, Kiton represents the excellence of Italian haute couture, offering a wide range of handcrafted readyto-wear garments for both men and women. Kiton’s new elegant boutique in The Royal Poinciana Plaza is a reflection of the top-of-the-line garments sold within; the space is beautifully decorated with stunning artwork as well as furnishing and drapes made of the brand’s high-end fabrics.

ASPREY 340 Royal Poinciana Way 561.440.5441 / asprey.com Exciting news: Asprey—London’s luxury lifestyle brand known for its silverware, home goods, timepieces, and high-end jewelry—recently opened an “ephemeral” store at the Royal Poinciana Plaza in Palm Beach on November 1. Asprey is famous for being the British royal family’s jewelry supplier since Queen Victoria. But the brand also has a lighthearted, quirky side, especially when it comes to its accessories. Animal heads sit on top of colored crystal decanters. There are even cufflinks and cocktail shakers shaped like rockets. (It’s easy to get distracted browsing their website.)

ASSOULINE

PHU CO OTO RTECSRYEO D FI TRGEO SE PS E CHTEI V R E B R A N D S ; C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

340 Royal Poinciana Way 561.791.6051 / assouline.com Assouline supplies everything for the modern library, including accessories and furniture. In its early days, the publishing house started working with top perfumers for scented candles, with Goyard for a book trunk, and with Chanel on a quilted leather slipcase. But today the Assouline lifestyle brand has stores all over the world, including right here in Palm Beach at The Royal Poinciana Plaza. Assouline loves and believes in books, extending its vision to create beautiful special editions that are works of art themselves. Assouline books make great luxury gift items, and the brand’s presence continues to flourish and grow. u


PA L M B E A C H D E S I G N J O U R NA L

Above: An interior by Gil Walsh. Below: Gil Walsh.

THROUGHOUT HER impressive career, one message is always repeated in Gil Walsh’s mind: “No design is new; all design is rooted in the past.” Along with her talented team of designers, Walsh interprets clients’ vision in an array of design styles; such as Coastal, Old Palm Beach, British West Indies, Spanish/Mediterranean, Traditional, Transitional, Modern, and Mid Century. “Since the 70s,” she says, “there is one style that I have admired the most— the California Coastal style.” The popularity of the minimalist, sophisticated-yet-welcoming look of the California style has grown immensely over the past few years. Interior designer, Michael Taylor, infused his own style with those of the great decorators of the past. Despite passing away more than two decades ago, his work is continuously featured in prestigious publications such 134 QUEST

as Architectural Digest. Taylor’s use of the color white was inspired by a British interior decorator of the 19020s, famous for her all white drawing room in London, England. Elsie De Wolfe, America’s first decorator also ushered in a new age of lighter, brighter, more feminine interiors—aptly mixing white painted furniture with large mirrors and clean surfaces. Frances Elkins, a legendary decorator of the 20th century, known on the West Coast for her eclectic mix of modern and traditional, also greatly influenced Taylor’s use of mixed period pieces. She works with her team to create Gil’s version of the California Coastal style. They blend coastal elements with tailored, sophisticated furnishings then highlight natural light to produce a bright and airy room design.

CO U RTE S Y O F G I L WA L S H

GIL WALSH


WHERE STYLE LIVES

T O L I S T E N . T O E N V I S I O N . T O C R E AT E . T O C O L L A B O R AT E . W W W. G I LWA L S H . C O M

PALM BEACH | MARTHA'S VINEYARD | NEW YORK

561.932.0631


PA L M B E A C H D E S I G N J O U R NA L

Above: Ashley’s favorite interiors by Jim Aman and John Meeks. Below:

ASHLEY STARK @ashleytstark STARK CARPET ASHLEY STARK is the Creative Director of Stark Carpet, the fabric and carpet company founded by her grandparents, Arthur and Nadia Stark, in 1938. Ashley Stark, with a million follwers on her instagram, is one of the most important influencers of interior design. Appearing on television symposiums and in-stoe apprearances (pre-Covid), and chairing showhouses like the holiday house and known for spotting trends, which she shares with over one million followers on her Instagram. Ashley has been endorsing companies such as Mielle, Kohler, Amazon, and beauty brands such as Aerin. With a background in both fashion and design, Ashley represents many products and, as she says, “brings the much-needed feminine touch” to Stark Carpet. As creative director of Stark Carpet, 136 QUEST

Ashley is involved with every aspect of the business—from trends, to materials, to production. She is constantly ensuring that the business is growing with the dynamic market. Her social media presence (be sure to follow her Instagram @ashleytstark) is a joy to scroll through, inspiring many to change the way they look at both interiors and exteriors. She also has great fashion. Ashley always trusts herself and her instincts when it comes to design, allowing a certain ease and freedom to her projects. As a leader and influencer, Ashley knows that Stark is the best in both products and design and with her influence Stark will continue to be the leader in interior design. Along with her own endorsements and projects, Ashley is going to keep building on the legacy of the Stark family.


H A L I A G R E E K K E Y I N O AT M E A L 100% SILK HANDMADE BROADLOOM 18’ WIDE 8 4 4 . 4 0 . STA R K | S TA R KC A R P E T. C O M


PA L M B E A C H DESIGN PREVIEW

Above: Designs by SHIZEN, inspired by tropical surroundings. Below: India Foster.

AS AN INTERIOR DESIGNER in Palm Beach for the last 15 years with my mother’s renowned firm, Leta Austin Foster & Associates, I worked on projects that ran the gamut from traditional to contemporary. No matter what the style, my clients always wanted their houses to be outfitted with unique designs of the highest quality, so I often had the pleasure of working with accomplished artists and master craftspeople and built up quite a network. In the last decade, consumers have been losing interest in factory-produced designs that are available everywhere. Instead, people have been turning to their own communities as a source for inspiration and sense of identity. People want to eat locally grown food, support native artists, and buy products that reflect their own way of life. I conceived of SHIZEN as a platform to showcase the talented 138 QUEST

makers and creators working in SoFlo today by creating sustainable, vernacular designs for the home. I collaborate with metal, wood, ceramic and textile artists to make handmade furniture and objects that incorporate locally sourced materials and tell a story about the beautiful place we live. Roughly a thousand people move to Florida every day, so it’s really important that we try to protect our unique ecosystem and celebrate our cultural legacy. SHIZEN designs are inspired by our tropical surroundings and are meticulously crafted in studios all over South Florida. Each piece is one of a kind or available in a limited edition. See the current collection by appointment or at one of our seasonal pop ups in Palm Beach and Miami. Check out shizenstudio.com or follow @shizen_studio.

CO U RTE S Y O F S H I Z E N

SHIZEN, BY INDIA FOSTER


PA L M B E A C H D E S I G N J O U R NA L

Above: An interior by Scott Snyder.

SCOTT SNYDER

Below: Scott Snyder

TE XT BY H IL A RY G E A RY RO S S PHOTO GR A P H Y BY H A R RY BEN S O N

PALM BEACH HAS BECOME the fastest-growing, most popular town on the planet. The real estate market is on fire. We’re have friends coming down in droves from New York City, California, etc. to our little slice of paradise. Offshoots of NYC’s chicest watering holes like La Goulue, Swifty’s, and Le Bilboquet are here or about to open. Big Financial firms like Goldman Sachs are en route to follow the lead from Paul Singer’s firm, Citadel, Paul Tudor Jones, and more. Plus, top art galleries and auction houses like Sotheby’s, Acquavella, Pace, White Cube, Wynn, Hauser & Wirth have opened their doors. We know the quality of life is sublime and it is drop dead beautiful, but it’s the people who live there that make the magic. Scott Snyder—the international interior designer whose work has graced the cover of endless design magazines and was named one of AD’s 100 top designers—is definitely one of PB’s shining stars. We all know gifted designers, decorators, architects, and artists (and this gentleman is one of the most gifted), but to find someone who is also organized and talented is truly 140 QUEST

a rarity. I know from personal experience, as he has exquisitely furnished (I mean soup-to-nuts) for us a 10,000-square-foot house in less than 120 days. Just recently he worked his magic on my son and daughter-in-law’s house, decorating at neck-breaking warp speed—a three-week period! Now, this talented and charming designer also gives back to the community and has been deeply involved with both Palm Beach Preservation and is Co-Chair of the Chairman’s Council of Hope for Depression, a foundation started by Palm Beach’s own Audrey Gruss. Right now Scott is working hard on his latest philanthropic endeavor, donating his limitless design expertise and raising funds for Lake Park Drive, the new park adjacent to the new Town Marina, which will open in a year. Scott has teamed up with his pals Mario Nievera and Keith Williams to help, too. Scott also transformed the Par 3 Golf Course which is a do-not-miss big destination in our town. It is such a treat to play the ocean-to-lake Par 3 Course then dine at the oceanfront al fresco restaurant beautifully designed by Scott.


PA L M B E A C H D E S I G N J O U R NA L

Above: Living spaces designed by Garrigues. Below: Jennifer Garrigues.

JENNIFER GARRIGUES’ love of color and one-of-a-kind interiors makes her designs special. As a passionate traveler, she has a great eye for detail, allowing her to create stunning living spaces. One of her clients, for instance, had a red room, which, Garrigues explained, “was a perfect place for her four Picasso paintings, as they just jumped off of the wall.” Like Garrigues, her client prefers clean lines, but also likes unusual pieces of furniture. “The mixture of styles is a love of mine,” Garrigues enthused. “It’s like a cocktail party with all kinds of people…it’s much more interesting and creates a great atmosphere.” Garrigues was excited when she first saw her client’s apartment because of its 142 QUEST

unusual architecture. “She loves contemporary design, so this was a perfect setting for her existing art.” Garrigues was also careful not to overcrowd the rooms as the views from the apt were spectacular. These days, we are all spending more time at home, which, notes Garrigues, “makes you realize how grateful we are to have a home.” But, she says, “after you have been staring at the same things everyday it makes you feel you need a change. Out with the old and in with the new.” “Life has been difficult this last year and I believe 2021 will bring a different focus on your homes,” she continued. “Calm and clean with interesting global finds. After all we hopefully will be traveling the world again!”

CO U RTE S Y O F J E N N I F E R G A R R I G U E S

JENNIFER GARRIGUES


JENNIFER GARRIGUES Interior Design

308 Peruvian Avenue | Palm Beach, FL 33480 | Tel.(561)659-7085 954 Lexington Avenue, Ste 225 | New York, NY 10021 www.jennifergarrigues.com


PA L M B E A C H DESIGN PREVIEW

Above: A landscape design by Nievera Williams; The Graphic Garden by Keith Williams. Below: Mario Nievera (left) and Keith Williams.

MARIO NIEVERA was able to fulfill his childhood dream of designing impeccable landscapes and gardens when he founded his eponymous architecture firm in 1996. Nievera’s firm—now Nievera Williams Design after partnering with longtime colleague Keith Williams in 2011—is one of the leading landscape architectural companies in the country, renowned for its ability to balance color, light, form, and texture in the environment for an understated yet elegant feel in both residential and commercial landscapes. This year, Keith Williams came out with The Graphic Garden, his first monograph. “In The Graphic Garden,” Williams tells Quest, “I highlight my most impressive projects to date, which include the revitalization of several historically landmarked homes and properties.” The book was Published by Pointed Leaf press, led by founder Suzy Slesin. All of the projects in the book are in Palm Beach, Florida. Says Williams: “Each has its own specific story, unique in their own way. There’s a story of passion and dedication from the client and myself that I describe in the book for each project. My clients excite me the most; I’m so lucky to be able to work with some of the most talented and successful people in the world. Witnessing my clients in their gardens, using their out144 QUEST

door spaces is also just as exciting and most rewarding.” Nievera and William like to keep their designs clean, simple, and sustainable, acknowledging the site and its history and architecture. “I believe this type of design approach leads to a timeless design. Most of our clients who used to have multiple seasonal homes, are now locating to one location and wanting to design all of the amenities they could find at clubs and or in the city. They are creating their own personal lifestyle at home.” Adds Nievera: “I take great joy in seeing the sparkle in the eyes of a client once their garden is unveiled! Everyone has a connection to nature and their environment, which is evident when they connect with their personal private outdoor space.” Aside from their design skills, the pair’s success can also be attributed to their ability to connect with their clients on a personal level. As engaged community members, Nievera and Williams are both actively involved in the American Society of Landscape Architects and often donate the firm’s services to non-profit organizations. The duo—both personable, driven, undeniably talented and now managing a staff of 20 and more than 40 projects at a time—are truly a dream team.

CO U RTE S Y O F N I E V E R A W I LL I A M S D E S I G N

MARIO NIEVERA & KEITH WILLIAMS


PA L M B E A C H D E S I G N J O U R NA L

Above: Designs by Branca. Below: Alessandra Branca.

“NOW MORE than ever,” says Alessandra Branca, founder of the design firm Branca, “people are engaged with their homes.” Our living spaces are no longer just a dropping-off spot, she explains, adding that we are all living with everything we own in the spaces we have—all the time. And hopefully, we are falling in love with our homes and décor again. “Otherwise,” she jokes, “call us!” Born and raised in Rome, Alessandra Branca has called Chicago home for 30plus years, personally overseeing each design project from offices in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles. Branca has also just opened a design office and showroom for her Casa Branca collection in Palm Beach. Her designs are anchored by classical details, rich colors, patterns, and textures—all paired with antique and custom furnishings, modern and European art, and distinctive accessories. Branca acquired her love of classical beauty from her Italian 146 QUEST

upbringing and those roots still speak to her today. She believes living well involves comfort, elegance, and a touch of whimsy, as shown here (center) in her room from The Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach 2020. The blue and white wallpaper design was the launch of Alessandra’s “Summer Collection” with de Gournay, one of four seasonal collections they are working on together. Inspired by Alessandra’s travels to Portugal, the walls are hand painted to look like Portuguese Azulejos Tiles. The room is fresh and light, a novel take on an old story, classic yet new. When asked what she sees for design and lifestyle trends in 2021, Branca suggests that “people will be very excited to share time and space together again.” She believes there will be a return to quality and entertaining at home, and a desire to expand our friend groups. “Not that we don’t love the ones we already have,” she adds.

N I C K M E LE ; C A R M E L B R A N T LE Y

BRANCA


K E L LY

YGL

THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY BROOKE KELLY

Alexander Hankin, Olga Sorokina, Yan Assoun, Polina Proshkina, and Justin Conner.

00 QUEST


Clockwise from top left: Lizzie Asher and Daniel Ezra; Claire Muroni and Fabian Doliger; Di Mondo; Christopher Young and Danielle Hankin; guests dining at Majorelle at the Lowell in New York.

M AT TE O P R A N D O N I / B FA . CO M

IRFE’S HOLIDAY DINNER AT MAJORELLE IN NEW YORK FRENCH FASHION house IRFE held an elegant dinner at Majorelle to celebrate the holidays. The evening was hosted by Olga Sorokina, the brand’s Creative Director, who gathered friends for a preview of her couture designs. Lizzie Asher, Polina Proshkina, Di Mondo, and Danielle Hankin were among the guests on-hand. The brand’s roots date back to 1924 when it was founded by Irina Romanova, the niece of Tsar Nicholas II. J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 49


ROBIN HOOD hosted a virtual “Heroes of New York” event to spotlight the city’s selfless residents and their generous efforts during the pandemic. The video included speakers like Governor Andrew Cuomo, Andy Cohen, Eli Manning, and performances by Andra Day, Mariah Carey, and Tony Bennett. The show, which raised funds for COVID relief efforts, closed with the debut of “We Will Rise,” a tribute to the sacrifices of the frontline workers.

RO B I N H O O D

YGL

ROBIN HOOD’S VIRTUAL FUNDRAISER

Mariah Carey Jimmy Fallon

Wes Moore

Tina Fey Eli Manning 150 QUEST

Andy Cohen


SEFLESS LOVE FOUNDATION’S CELEBRATION AT THE ROYAL POINCIANA PLAZA LAST MONTH, the Selfless Love Foundation hosted its National Adoption Day at The Royal in Palm Beach. The outdoor sip and shop toasted the 400 children who have been matched with families across the state through the organization. The family-friendly event also included live entertainment, a scavenger hunt, cookie decorating, a raffle, and hand painted custom Champagne bottles by Olivia Hughes. u

Jason and Stefanie Rosenzweig

C A P E H A RT

April Stevenson and Lisa Grondahl

Ed and Ashley Brown

Artist Olivia Hughes

DJ & Electric Violinist, Kat V J A N U A RY 2 0 2 1 1 5 1


SNAPSHOT

THE JUICY PALM BEACH FRUIT ESTABLISHED IN 1915, the Tropical Fruit Shop is the oldest store in Palm Beach, Florida. This community landmark has never changed its address in all that time, even as it has changed hands, remaining at 277 Royal Poinciana Way for nearly a century. With its bright, cheery décor and authentically retro style, the shop encapsulates the very essence of the Palm Beach of yore. What is the secret to this little store’s success? Freshness. From the end of October through the end of May, the Tropical Fruit Shop offers the most luscious, ripe, and juicy citrus available. The best-seller is, naturally, the oranges everyone associates with the state, which you can have squeezed into a glass of scrumptious juice or order a basket of them to be delivered to the poor, deprived Northerners you know. With a variety of grapefruits and tangerines in stock as well, this store could have cured the pirates’ curse of scurvy if they’d made it a regular stop 152 QUEST

on their sea-faring routes. The shop’s current owner, Stephanie Bojokles, purchased the place in 1995. She has added coffee, vegetables, and baked goods to the menu, as well as cute souvenirs and outdoor seating. In 2010, she won the “Business Leader of the Year” award from the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce and insists that her employees have her same friendly and attentive attitude. For example, she insists they all learn proper phone etiquette because “you only get one chance to make a first impression.” Certainly, the impression this store has made on Palm Beach is a lasting one. u The colorful outdoor seating welcomes customers to sit and enjoy fresh-squeezed juice; an old pink Cadillac complements the Tropical Fruit Store’s (561.832.3449) style.


F I N D L AY G A L L E R I E S

O N L I N E A RT A U C T I O N

January 13th – Preview Collection / January 15th – Bidding Opens / January 17th– Bidding Closes

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WORKS INCLUDED IN THE ONLINE ART AUCTION

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Profile for QUEST Magazine

Quest Magazine January 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Quest Magazine January 2021  

Like the scion of a once-great dynasty, Quest is the last magazine devoted to Society with a capital S, covering the socially prominent in N...

Profile for questmag