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$5.00 JANUARY 2017

THE PALM BEACH ISSUE

PIPER QUINN AND SARA GROFF WITH SIENNA IN PALM BEACH questmag.com


saunders.com | hamptonsrealestate.com /SaundersAssociates

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main street, southampton village, new york (631) 283-5050 montauk highway, bridgehampton, new york (631) 537-5454 26 montauk highway, east hampton, new york (631) 324-7575

14

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“Saunders, A Higher Form of Realty,� is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Saunders.com

sagaponack village south 8 Bedrooms | 8 Baths, 2 Half | 8,000+/- sq. ft. | 1.24 Acres New construction, borders reserve, heated gunite pool, wine cellar, gym, theater, 2-car garage, 1 mile to beach

Co-Exclusive $11,995,000 | 46MasefieldClose.com

Nancy Mizrahi

Terry Cohen

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker Cell:

(917) 854-9933 | NMizrahi@Saunders.com

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson Cell:

(631) 804-6100 | TCohen@Saunders.com


PA LM B EACH

Elegant Palm Beach Jewel

Via Tortuga Estate

Price Upon Request | Web: 0076985 | elvedadojewel.com The epitome of Palm Beach’s grace and beauty, this Venetian-inspired villa is situated on Prestigious El Vedado Road, one of the three streets of the Estate Section called “The Elegant Els,” sought after for their historic character, seclusion, and prime in-town location near world famous Worth Avenue.

$8,100,000 | Web: 0077041 | viatortugaestate.com Nestled in the private Phipps Estates, this one story residence is situated on a beautiful lot. The home was recently renovated with beautiful architectural details and perfect proportions. High hedges and lush landscaping give this estate a true Palm Beach feel.

D E B O RA H CA PL E N O R

KIM RAIC H

615.491.7288

561.718.1216

debbie.caplenor@sothebyshomes.com

kim.raich@sothebyshomes.com

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


PA LM B EACH

Everglades Club Golf Course $6,900,000 | Web: 0076806 | 19golfviewroad.com

Outstanding Trump Plaza Offerings Trump Plaza is a full service, luxury building with 24 hour security, valet parking, concierge, billiard room, two swimming pools, fitness room, and tennis court. Pet friendly building. Easy distance to all that the area has to offer: shops, restaurants, CityPlace, ocean beaches and Palm Beach nightlife. Penthouse 32A| $4,200,000 | Web: 0076895 15 FGH | $3,995,000 | Web: 0076744 6F | $1,300,000 | Web: 0077099 8F | $1,000,000 | Web: 0076744

Palm Beach Grande Dame Web ID: 0076991 | $5,900,000 | 991northlakeway.com

ANDREW THOMKA-GAZDIK

WA L LY T U R N E R

561.714.8955

561.301.2060

andrew.thomka-gazdik.caplenor@sothebyshomes.com

w a l l y. t u r n e r @ s o t h e b y s h o m e s . c o m

PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480 | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach


T HR I L L S

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Luxury Condominiums with Legendary Services. The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Long Island, North Hills is conveniently situated within the Great Neck School District in the Village of North Hills on Long Island’s legendary North Shore. 20 miles from Manhattan. 60 miles from the Hamptons. See for yourself what luxury feels like every day. Residences starting at $1,500,000. Select residences remain in Phase 1. Now selling Phase 2.

516.486.6100 · TheResidencesLongIsland.com The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Long Island, North Hills are not owned, developed or sold by The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. or any of its affiliates (“Ritz-Carlton”). RXR North Hills Phase I Owner LLC uses The Ritz-Carlton marks under a license from Ritz-Carlton, which has not confirmed the accuracy of any of the statements or representations made herein. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File No. CD-14-0036.


danielgale.com

Cutchogue, NY – Sophisticated Country Chic

Mill Neck, NY

Old Brookville, NY

Old Westbury, NY – “Hastings House”

Beautifully updated Colonial in bucolic North Fork setting with private heated gunite pool, hot tub, solid construction and minimalist design. A truly special home in a great location. SD #9. MLS# 2900611. $1,100,000. Cheryl Schneider, 631.298.4130, c.631.766.2598

Set on the original property of a Gold Coast Estate, this majestic brick Colonial features a double bridal staircase, indoor and outdoor pools, and is sequestered on 6+ lush acres. SD #1. MLS# 2835262. $7,800,000. Sandi Lefkowitz, 516.674.2000 ext.221, c.516.816.3461 Huailing Deng, 516.759.4800 ext.173, c.917.859.7718

Surrounded by 11+ acres overlooking Francis Pond sits this majestic, brick Manor home. Updated dream kitchen, today’s baths, indoor and outdoor pools and spa room. Detached Cottage and 8-car garage. SD #3. MLS# 2841397. $3,900,000. Margaret Mateyaschuk, 516.759.4800 ext.146, c.516.972.1891 Kathryn (Cottie) Maxwell Pournaras, 516.759.4800 ext.131, c.516.857.3011 Kathryn K. (Kathy) Zoller, 516.759.4800 ext.128, c.516.987.8203

Prominent Estate situated on 19+ secluded acres. The Compound includes a stalely French Country Manor, 2 renovated guest Cottages, outdoor entertainment rooms, gunite pool, tennis court and 3-car garage with chauffeur apartment. Masterpiece Listing. SD #15. MLS# 2888451. $7,995,000. Kathleen (Kathe) Dodd, 516.759.4800, c.516.504.8771 Margaret Mateyaschuk, 516.759.4800 ext.146, c.516.972.1891

Each office is independently owned and operated. We are pledged to provide equal opportunity for housing to any prospective customer or client, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.


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118

CONTENTS The Palm B eac h I ssue 94

A FAMILY AFFAIR

Though known for sunning, lunching, and shopping among the

nation’s well-heeled elite, the true heart of Palm Beach lies in its tightly knit families. Produced By elIzaBeTh meIgher, PhoTograPhed By caPeharT PhoTograPhy

106

QUEST PALM BEACH STYLE

Palm Beach has a sense of style all its own. Here, we

present Quest’s best—in photos—through the years. By elIzaBeTh meIgher

114

AN AGENDA FOR EXCELLENCE

114

A conversation with Palm Beach Day Academy’s

new Head of School, Dr. Edwin Gordon. By alex Travers

118

A FORGOTTEN HISTORY COMES TO LIGHT

Palm Beach Country Club, a golf club with

a fascinating history, gets ready to celebrate 100 years. By alex Travers

124

A WINTER BALL’S WORTHWHILE CAUSE

Supporting our future—the children—at an

annual gala for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County. By danIel caPPello

126

A LOVE OF LEARNING

Clementine Goutal tells us about Upper Echelon Academy,

her tutoring business catered to student athletes. By alex Travers

130

PALM BEACH 1927–1928

Ellen Ordway memorialized 20th-century society in

photographs of her friends, her family, and her milieu. By davId PaTrIck columBIa

136

P.B. SHOPPING IS WORTH THE WHILE

Stopping in the stores along Palm Beach’s

venerated Worth Avenue. By danIel caPPello and alex Travers

130 114


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72

152

CONTENTS 76

C olumns 20

SOCIAL DIARY

70

HARRY BENSON

72

TAKI

74

CANTEENS

76

FRESH FINDS

82

RETAIL

84

REAL ESTATE

Quest checks in for a market update by brokers from Miami to Palm Beach to Greenwich.

90

OPEN HOUSE

Taking a look inside an exquisite property for sale at 528 North Lake Way, in Palm Beach.

92

SOCIAL CALENDAR

140

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

144

SNAPSHOT

A memorable trip to New York’s East Harlem School. by DaviD PatriCk Columbia A fond memory of photographing Donald Trump in 1992 at Trump Towers.

From Taki with Love: Our columnist has lunch with a lady journalist from Russia Today. From outdoor dining to indoor serenades, Renato’s of Palm Beach satisfies. by Daniel CaPPello Packing a punch of color for P.B. season. by Daniel CaPPello anD elizabeth meigher

A mother-and-daughter team opens up shop at 249 Royal Poinciana Way. by DeDe merCk

The galas of Palm Beach are in full swing, so be sure you’re attnding the best. Miami’s party scene heats up—and Coach celebrates 75. by alex travers

The enduring mark of Addison Mizner’s monkey, Johnnie Brown. by elizabeth brown

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PA L M B E AC H • NA P L E S • V E R O B E AC H • O C E A N R E E F • A M E L I A I S L A N D • B O C A G R A N D E


questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

LILY HOAGLAND FA SHION DIRECTOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO ART DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX F E AT U R E S E D I TO R

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN A S S O C I AT E FA S H I O N E D I TO R

ALEX TRAVERS CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

ROBERT BENDER P H OTO G R A P H E R - AT - L A R G E

JULIE SKARRATT SOCIET Y EDITOR

HILARY GEARY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

HARRY BENSON KATE GUBELMANN ALEX HITZ BILL HUSTED PAUL JEROMACK JAMES MACGUIRE ELIZABETH MEIGHER LIZ SMITH TAKI THEODORACOPULOS MICHAEL THOMAS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

TERRY ALLEN HARRY BENSON CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLIARD CRISTINA MACAYA CUTTY MCGILL PATRICK MCMULLAN ANNIE WATT


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Georgian Colonial. 4 Bedrooms. Infinity Pool. Pond. $1.365.000 860.868.7313. Stonewalls. 8.26± Acres. Gael Hammer. Gorgeous Mini Estate. Victorian Farmhouse. Guest/Pool House. Pool. Barn. 3± Acres. Maria Taylor. 860.868.7313.

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HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS ELIZABETH STRIBLING WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF © QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2017. All rights reserved. Vol. 31, No. 1. Quest—New York From The Inside is published monthly, 12 times a year. Yearly subscription rate: $96.00. Quest, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Quest—New York From The Inside, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

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A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN


EDITOR’S LETTER

From top left: The Mackay family posed for our feature shoot; sizzling South Florida style; former World Light Heavyweight champion Tommy Loughran at Palm Beach Country Club; a vintage view of Worth Avenue.

mindsets, and fresh breezes from Quest’s favorite place to relax in the winter, Palm Beach. A Monet of Impressionist Lilly Pulitzer colors paints the same shoulders and thighs that in New York would cover themselves in black. And though the political landscape might have everyone wincing at the word “party,” down here, only the fun ones are encouraged. Back at the turn of the last century, Henry Flagler replaced the coconut groves and pineapple fields with roads and hotels, and the area became a haven for people who sought sunshine in the winter season, but who didn’t want to abandon their kids. Enter Palm Beach Day Academy, which is celebrating its 95th anniversary. The Academy as we know it today actually began in 1921, when two schools were established: the Adirondack-Palm Beach School for Boys and the Palm Beach School for Girls. Those schools merged in 1930 to become the Palm Beach Private School, which then changed its name in 1966 to Palm Beach Day School. In 2006, Palm Beach Day School merged with the Academy of the Palm Beaches on Flagler Drive to become Palm Beach Day Academy, now fostering the young minds of the next generation. Today, young families have so much on offer in Palm Beach. There’s the venerable Palm Beach Country Club, where you might spot the next Arnold Palmer or Annika Sorenstam; the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center, where tots can learn to fly like the wind; and, of course, the 18 QUEST

stores along Worth Avenue—always worth popping into on your way back from lunch. We also look back at the inimitable Palm Beach style and those who pulled it off so well, from the Duke of Windsor and John F. Kennedy to Estée Lauder and C. Z. Guest. These were the masterpieces—or the Water Lilies, if you will—of the group. u

Lily Hoagland

ON THE COVER: All smiles, little Sienna swings happily from the arms of her parents, Oliver “Piper” Quinn and Sara Groff, at their home in Palm Beach. From “A Family Affair,” produced by Elizabeth Meigher, photographed by Capehart Photography.

C A P E H E A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

THE DAWN OF THE NEW YEAR brings fresh ideas, fresh


AT HOM E ON SO UT H BEACH CUSTOM DESIGNED PENTHOUSE RESIDENCES FURNISHED AND AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY STARTING AT $3.2 MILLION

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ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO A PURCHASE CONTRACT AND THE OTHER DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE AN OFFER TO SELL CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN ANY STATE WHERE PROHIBITED BY LOCAL LAW AND YOUR ELIGIBILITY FOR PURCHASE WILL DEPEND UPON YOUR STATE OF RESIDENCY. FOR NEW YORK PURCHASERS ONLY, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE CPS-12 APPLICATION FOR THE CONDOMINIUM FILED WITH THE STATE OF NEW YORK, DEPARTMENT OF LAW FILE NO. CP16-0063. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY PALM BEACH NEWS and history. This month’s Quest features a chapter from the photo archives of Ellen Ordway, who first visited Palm Beach when it was still a tiny village in development—by Henry Flagler and friends—in the second decade of the 20th century. Mrs. Ordway, who was born Ellen

Glendinning in Philadelphia, first went to Palm Beach with her parents who had built a house on the lakeside. A proficient amateur photographer, she methodically accumulated in photo albums over the next six decades a fascinating photo-diary archive of life in in American Society, including in

this special American village. The chapter in this current issues revolves around 1927, when the Bath and Tennis was completed and in full swing. The major news this season is about the election and Donald Trump whose presence in Palm Beach is always nearby, especially through his

Mar-a-Lago Club, originally the home of one of the most famous American heiresses of the 20th century, Marjorie Merriweather Post. It is assumed that the new President may use his residence there as a “Winter White House.” Up until Bill Clinton and later Barack

THE PEGGY ADAMS ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE’S 4 5 T H A N N UA L C H R I ST M A S B A L L AT T H E S A I L F I S H C L U B I N PA L M B E AC H

Jack and Cathy Flagg 20 QUEST

Lesly Smith and Philip Tilearico

Joanie and Paul Van der Grift

Bill and Candy Hamm

Ophelia

Pauline Pitt and Jerry Seay

Rich Anderson and Nellie Benoit

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Vicky and Sam Hunt


Portrait by renowned illustrator Joseph Adolphe.

WILMINGTON TRUST RENOWNED INSIGHT

“You treasure your collection. But what’s it really worth?”

Kemp Stickney Chief Fiduciary Officer Kemp oversees all Fiduciary Services for Wealth Advisory, which includes responsibility for trust administration, estate settlement, fiduciary tax, Delaware trust matters, and our multigenerational initiatives across Wilmington Trust. For access to knowledgeable professionals like Kemp and the rest of our team, contact Sharon Klein at 212-415-0547.

If you collect items that you’re passionate about – whether it’s wine, cars, jewelry, or even autographed sports memorabilia – you may be wondering about the actual worth of your collection. Not to mention how it fits into your overall plan for financial security. And, what do you do with your collection when keeping it is no longer feasible? While certainly a difficult decision, the old adage “you can’t take it with you” holds significant truth. Financial considerations. It’s natural to get attached to items in your collection, making it difficult to sell them when they become overvalued. It’s also common for collectors to become so enthusiastic about a new piece that they’re willing to overpay for it. That’s part of collecting, and the emotional appeal may be the reason why you began in the first place. Collectibles don’t produce income, and they’re different from marketable securities in that it can take longer and cost more to sell them. So they’re not an ideal investment for funding a retirement. It’s important to recognize that collecting is different from other types of investing,

and that decisions aren’t always based on typical investment criteria.

ABOUT

61%

OF COLLECTORS INVEST I N T H E I R T R E A S U R E S P R I M A R I LY FOR THEIR OWN PLEASURE Source: The Wealth Report 2014

Passing it on. If you want your collection to live on, you’ll have to plan carefully. You’ll need to determine if your family members are interested in inheriting your collection – or if there’s a charity or museum suited to take it on. Your estate plan should designate who’ll receive the collection and, if necessary, arrange financing for storage and insurance costs. Wilmington Trust can help. We’ve been working with successful families since our founding by the duPont family more than a century ago, and can guide you through the challenges and complexities of this and other important issues when managing your wealth. For more insight on how we can help you enjoy your collection today and prepare for its home tomorrow, visit wilmingtontrust.com/legacy.

F I D U C I A R Y S E R V I C E S | W E A LT H P L A N N I N G | I N V E S T M E N T M A N A G E M E N T | P R I VAT E B A N K I N G

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the sale of any financial product or service. This article is not designed or intended to provide financial, tax, legal, accounting, or other professional advice since such advice always requires consideration of individual circumstances. If professional advice is needed, the services of your professional advisor should be sought. Private Banking is the marketing name for an offering of M&T Bank deposit and loan products and services. Investments: • Are NOT FDIC-Insured • Have NO Bank Guarantee • May Lose Value Wilmington Trust is a registered service mark. Wilmington Trust Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of M&T Bank Corporation. Wilmington Trust Company, operating in Delaware only, Wilmington Trust, N.A., M&T Bank, and certain other affiliates, provide various fiduciary and non-fiduciary services, including trustee, custodial, agency, investment management, and other services. International corporate and institutional services are offered through Wilmington Trust Corporation’s international affiliates. Loans, credit cards, retail and business deposits, and other business and personal banking services and products are offered by M&T Bank, member FDIC. ©2017 Wilmington Trust Corporation and its affiliates. All rights reserved.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E 2 0 1 6 B R I T I S H FA S H I O N A W A R D S H O N O R E D R A L P H L AU R E N W I T H T H E O U TSTA N D I N G AC H I E V E M E N T A W A R D AT R OYA L A L B E R T H A L L

Phoebe Collings-James and Molly Goddard

Jenna Coleman

Obama, American presidents have often had “Winter White Houses” or personal getaways from Washington. Florida has long been a popular choice. John F. Kennedy used his father’s house up the road from Mar-a-Lago as his Winter White House. He worked on Profiles in Courage there. In December 1960, a man loaded his Buick with dynamite and waited for the president-elect to walk out of the estate, intending to ram Kennedy’s limousine. He aborted his objective because Kennedy was with his wife and children. Three years later, 22 QUEST

Olivia Palermo

London’s Royal Albert Hall

Kennedy spent the weekend in Palm Beach before being assassinated. Harry Truman, ordered by his doctor to get some rest, took over a Naval residence in Key West in November of 1946 and spent 11 working vacations (spanning 175 days) at the “Little White House,” as it was referred to in the press, meeting with top officials and discussing legislation, including the Marshall Plan. Warren G. Harding vacationed in St. Augustine after his election in November 1920, and often returned to Florida. Richard Nixon, an avid golfer, purchased a home in Key Bis-

cayne during his Presidency from Democratic Florida Sen. George Smathers, and visited at least 50 times. He discussed the Watergate break-in there and when the crisis deepened in Washington, Nixon retreated to Florida. Palm Beach provenance. 1927 was a seminal year in our nation in many ways culturally, architecturally, and real estate development-wise. It was also the year that Marjorie Merriweather Post built Mar-a-Lago (at a cost of $3 million) with her then-husband, Wall Street financier Edward F. Hutton. The name Marjorie Merri-

Ralph and Ricky Lauren

Kate Moss

weather Post was already a legend in her early lifetime. She was popularly known as the “Post-Toasties” heiress, and at one time regarded as the richest American with a fortune of more than $250 million (or $5 billion in today’s dollars). By the time she’d married her fourth husband, Herbert May, she had five last names, which the press always published all together. When she was 27, and still married to her first husband, Edward Bennett Close, her father died in 1914, leaving her the very prosperous Postum Cereal Company he’d founded in 1895.

B R I T I S H FA S H I O N CO U N C I L : DA R R E N G E R R I S H / M I K E M A R S L A N D / E E VA R I N N E ; G Q . CO M

Lady Gaga


INTRODUCING OUR JUNIOR COLLECTION


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Divorcing Close in 1919, she married Mr. Hutton, a Wall Street financier, in 1920. In 1923, Hutton became the chairman of the board of the company. Very soon after, they began acquiring a larger variety of food products, including Birdseye Frozen Foods, which was revolutionary at the time. In 1929, the company became General Foods Corporation. The couple was famous for their lifestyle. Traveling by Rolls Royce, private railroad car, or private plane, they also owned Sea Cloud (Hussar V), the largest privately owned sea-going sailing yacht in the world. In 1920, the year of their marriage, she bought Camp Topridge on Upper

St. Regis Lake in the Adirondacks (only accessible by boat or plane)—which she considered her “rustic retreat.” It had a fully staffed main lodge and private guest cabins, each staffed by its own butler. Topridge would eventually contain 68 buildings on 300 acres—as well as a Russian dacha (which she had built for her third husband, Joseph Davies, who had been U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union under Stalin. There was also a mansion on Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street, which in 1925 she sold to a real estate developer with the proviso that he build his apartment house with a 50room triplex penthouse on the top, with its own private drive-

in entrance for her use only. She also had an estate in Long Island, which later became C.W. Post College. Later there was an estate in Washington, D.C. that she shared with Ambassador Davies. After that divorce she bought Hillwood in Washington, where she spent Spring and Autumn. But Mara-Lago was the jewel in her real estate crown. The name Mar-a-Lago is a Spanish word-for-word translation of “Sea-to-Lake.” In1924 Marion Sims Wyeth, the prominent Palm Beach architect of the era, was hired to design it, and Joseph Urban was hired to create the interior design and exterior decorations.

It is Urban’s influence that distinguishes the property visually. The designer, who was based in New York, was a Viennese-born architect and set designer of great prominence. His first architectural commission came at age 19 when he was selected to design the new wing of the Abdeen Palace in Cairo, which is one of the official residences—as well as a workplace—of the President of Egypt today. Urban’s career soared after that commission, designing buildings across the world from the Esterhazy Castle in Hungary to the Ziegfeld Theatre (no longer extant) in New York. He became known for his pointillist technique and

T H E T E N T H A N N U A L H O P E F O R D E P R E S S I O N R E S E A R C H L U N C H E O N S E M I N A R AT T H E P L A Z A

Arthur Dunnam and Richard Ziegelasch

Ritchey Howe, Carol Mack, Caroline Dean and Danielle Ganek 24 QUEST

Janna Bullock, Zoe Bullock and Nicole Miller

Chuck Scarborough, Audrey Gruss and Anderson Cooper

Stephanie Krieger, Elizabeth Thompson, Margo Langenberg and Roberta Sandeman

J A R E D S I S K I N F O R PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Andrea Greeven Douzet and Laura Nicklas


NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A innovative use of color. Additionally, with his brother-inlaw, he created what is now regarded as seminal examples of children’s book illustrations. By the time he emigrated to the U.S. at age 38, Joseph Urban was world famous as an architect, illustrator, and theatre set designer of more than 50 productions of the Vienna Royal Opera, the Champs Elysee Opera, and Covent Garden. With his innovative use of color, his pointillist technique, and his decorative use of line he was able to create theatrical sets reminiscent of the works of Monet and Seurat. Here in New York, he designed productions for the Metropolitan Opera and the Ziegfeld Follies.

William Randolph Hearst was a major client and by the late 1920s when Mrs. Post (then Hutton) hired him, he’d worked on 25 of the Hearst produced films starring his famous mistress Marion Davies. Before construction, Mrs. Post (then Mrs. Hutton) had spent month crawling through swamplands on what was then a deserted island to find the site for her mansion. She wanted it anchored to a coral reef between the island and the mainland to assure it would withstand the worst hurricanes. It took three years to complete. The main house was 110,000 square feet, with 126 rooms. Stone for the building

was imported from Italy and one authority said the 36,000 Spanish-Mooresque tiles used lavishly inside and out were unrivaled anywhere except by the Alcázar in Spain. On the ocean side of the property, a tunnel cuts under South Ocean Boulevard to a private beach with cabanas and a swimming pool bordering the north side, and on the south side by the Bath and Tennis Club. Mrs. Post’s Spanish palace was an entertainment palace extraordinaire. Her dinners might be for 40 or 60 or even more. The guest lists were resplendent with foreign dignitaries, kings, presidents, movie stars, and socialites, as

well as family members and friends. A strict hostess, if an invited guest was not present to be seated when dinner was served, his or her seat was removed and stayed that way, and life went on without them. All kinds of entertainment followed dinner including one of her favorites: Square Dancing (you had to dress for it). The first time I went to Palm Beach in 1966, I was at a lunch one day seated next to a woman named Marge Dye. Marjorie by birth, and granddaughter by name, she told me that the night before her grandmother had a big dinner and among the guests was Johnny Carson, then the hot new star of the “Tonight

T H E P R E S E R VAT I O N L E A G U E ’ S 2 7 T H A N N UA L P I L L A R O F N E W YO R K A W A R D S AT T H E R A I N B O W R O OM

John and Ann Coffin with Adele Chatfield 26 QUEST

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Lisa Hunt and Susan Nitze

Joel Bell and Marife Hernandez

Michael Pashby and Sandra Amann

Norman Mintz and Erin Tobin

C U T T Y M CG I LL

Derek Moore and Stephanie Stokes


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E F R E N C H H E R I TA G E S O C I E T Y H O ST E D I TS P R O U ST B A L L AT T H E P L A Z A

Valeriya Lyutaya and Olivier Nourani

Show.” Afterward, there was a square dance. When she died in 1973, Mrs. Post willed the 17-acre estate to the U.S. Government as a retreat for presidents and visiting dignitaries. The property had been assessed in 1972 at $4.2 million, which all assessors thought anyone would pay for it. In July 1974, President Richard Nixon paid a visit to the property, coming up by helicopter from Key Biscayne where he kept his “Winter White House.” Sometime after Nixon’s visit, it was decided that the government did not want or need Mar-a-Lago as a sensible expense, and the prop28 QUEST

Gigi Fisdell and Craig Dix

Stinelli Castaneda and Michel Cox Witmer

erty was returned to Mrs. Post’s heirs—principally her three daughters. Now the Mar-a-Lago Club is a members-only club with guest rooms, a spa, and other hotel-style amenities. The Trump family maintains private quarters in a separate, closed-off area of the house and grounds. In 1982, 10 years after the death of Mrs. Post and her bequest, Donald Trump bid $15 million for the estate. But the bid was rejected. Three years later, in 1985 He got the place for between $5 and 7 million, including $3 million for the furnishings. Last year, the club reported gross income

Victoria Wyman

Patricia Rose and Bill Fine

Hunter and Susan Cushing

Countess Dorothea de La Houssaye, Joan Kahn and Franck Laverdin

of more than $29 million. After acquiring the property, Mr. Trump had the property renovated, with 58 bedrooms, 33 bathrooms, a 29-foot-long pietra dura marble top dining table, and 12 fireplaces. The club also has five clay tennis courts and a waterfront pool. Further additions have been made since then, including a 20,000-square-foot ballroom, which is a highly popular venue for Palm Beach charitable dinners and dances. In 1994, Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie Presley spent their honeymoon at Mar-a-Lago. On April 18, 2012, the American Institute of Architects’ Florida Chapter ranked Mar-

a-Lago fifth on it’s list of Florida Architecture: 100 Years. 100 Places. There goes the neighborhood—to a new and better place. On a Wednesday morning last month, my friend Eve Stuart took me up to the East Harlem School on East 103rd Street between First and Second avenues. Eve is on the school’s board. I’d heard of the school vaguely because another friend Bronson van Wyck had recently been honored by them at one of their fundraisers. The school is located on the site of Exodus House, which was founded in 1963 by Dr. Lynn and Mrs. Leola Hage-

A N N I E WAT T

CeCe Black, Ann Van Ness and Elizabeth Stribling


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A man as a drug addiction center. In 1984, out of “concern for the welfare and well-being of the community’s many underserved, at-risk children,” the Hagemans converted the site into an after-school and summer program facility. Then nine years later, the Hagemans’ sons Ivan and Hans Hageman opened a year-round middle school on the original site as way of better addressing the needs of these children and their families. The East Harlem School— or EHS, as the kids call it—is chartered by the New York State Department of Education and accredited by the

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. EHS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. I add that bit of information because if the thought of helping the young ones get a better grip on their futures in this miasmic world of ours is one to consider. I’ve “covered” a lot of charities and philanthropic ventures, as a regular reader knows. I am especially drawn to those organizations that assist people with their dayto-day survival with matters of food, care, children, and the animals. I grew up in an emotionally and financially stressed household and re-

main sensitive to the matters that children confront—especially today. I was fortunate. I had a mother who did everything in her power (and while working) to keep us fed, clothed, and sheltered. She also was a reader by nature and got me on the road by reading to me before I went to sleep—until I could read myself. I also had sisters and aunts who looked after my welfare and assisted my mother. All children need this to progress in life. I had a father who had more problems than I can enumerate and was deeply troubled by them. This brought a lot of

friction into the household, some of it violent. Fortunately, my father was never unkind or cruel to me. I relate these matters of personal experience because they are commonplace. They are very often at the center of what confront children growing up in what is many ways a very hostile world, often both in home and outside; they can be decisive in a child’s future. Unless the child gets assistance in the form of attention (kindness) and affection (kind attention), so they can learn about something better out there. Eve Stuart loves this school

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Alison Minton

Sibylle Eschapasse and Roy Kean 30 QUEST

Kevin and Barbara McLaughlin

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A N N I E WAT T

Robert Liberman


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E H O S P I TA L FO R S P EC I A L S U R G E R Y ’ S AU T U M N B E N E F I T AT G UA STAV I N O ’ S

Ann Jackson and Ken Wilson

and really wanted me to see what it was like. I had no expectations and morning appointments are not appealing to me since I have late nights. But I went because I knew it would be good for me to tell you about it. We were met by one of the school’s staff, who introduced us to two students: Alejandro and Camille. Both were my tour guides of the school. Alejandro and Camille are in the eighth grade and in the process of preparing to graduate to high school next year. Alejandro lives in the neighborhood and Camille has a 50-minute commute from her home in the Bronx. 32 QUEST

Barbara and Todd Albert

Anne and David Altchek

Monica Keany, Thomas Sculco and Kate Doerge

The school has 150 students from Grades Four to Eight. There are never more than 18 in a classroom. Because class was in session, we couldn’t go into any classrooms that were in use. Although we did see the Science Room where they learn about growing hydroponically and study modern science. I was thinking: What a great environment in which to be a student and learn. We also saw the cafeteria where the lunches are prepared with the help of the students and the menu is entirely vegetarian. We also saw the art classroom and some of the works of the students, where talent becomes recognizable. The

entire school starts the day with a “moment of silence.” Then everyone is transported to Randall’s Island nearby where they have an hour and a half of what we used to call Phys Ed. Then it’s back to the classrooms. We happened to be there when there was a change of classes. While Camille was showing us the lockers and explaining how they had no locks on them, a class broke; the hallway filled with students moving to their next classroom. They were orderly and matter-of-factly quiet. I never saw that before. In my life. What impressed me most

John and Carol Lyden

Louis and Mary Lee Shapiro

that these children were being taught obligation to themselves and to others, as well as the idea that challenge strengthens commitment, and they are capable of meeting it. The school sends home a report every week on every student. If there is an issue, the family comes in to discuss it. Everyone is in on the solutions. The school year runs through July. The program is altered to accommodate the time of year. Ivan Hageman who runs the school now told me that they often accept children whose numbers are not so encouraging. Hageman is naturally drawn to the challenge

D O N P O LL A R D

Matthew and Ann Roberts with Jo Hannafin


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A L I G H T H O U S E G U I L D ’ S 2 0 1 6 L I G H T YE A R S G A L A AT T H E M A N D A R I N O R I E N TA L

Barbara Kelly and Lucas Matthiessen

of transformation and providing it for the children. Admission is based on character, not a lottery or test. When high school graduation draws near, they are all prepared to take their SATs and succeed. All of their graduates—100%—go on to college. All families must pay to attend this private school, which is neither a charter school nor a public school. Ten dollars a week, if that is all you can afford. I’ve been told that some have paid in change because it was about scraping together those 10 bucks. Self-respect is promised. Others pay more when they can afford it. But the main source of running the 34 QUEST

Mark and June Ackerman with Charlie

Bernie and Marianne Holland

school is through fundraising. As the world now knows, Fidel Castro died the day after Thanksgiving. His death came as no real surprise. He was 90, and had been out of the public eye for sometime with rumors that he had cancer. Much can be said about the man, and will be. In the early the days of Castro’s reign he had become a kind of international celebrity, a kind of anti-hero; politically controversial but nevertheless a kind of “hero.” He had ended another long political dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, where the rich got rich and the poor stayed poor. His departure was a reason to celebrate.

Lawrence Yannuzzi

In the meantime, Castro’s “look”—his dress—was popular with a lot of the military-minded, at least in public appearances. Our friend out in Montecito, Penny Bianchi sent us a reminder of a story (of hers) that she told us long ago. Penny’s mother-in-law lived in Portland, Maine, where she served on the board of the symphony in the 1960s. Once, when the symphony was having a fund-raising auction, mother-in-law had the bright idea of writing Fidel Castro and asking him if he’d give up his hat, which he wore with his military garb for the auction. She did, and

Doreen and Gilbert Bassin

Tom and Lesley Gimbel

he sent her the hat! When the auction occurred nobody bid on the hat except Bette Davis who was then living in Portland with her husband, Gary Merrill, who had been her co-star in All About Eve. Years later, Penny’s motherin-law was visiting her in Los Angeles and one day invited Penny to tea with a “dear old friend from Maine.” When they got to the friend’s apartment in Los Angeles, Bette Davis answered the door. This came as a great surprise to Penny of course, who had no idea that her mother-in-law was a friend of the great star. During the teatime conversation, the

A N N I E WAT T

Tom Barry and Susan Waltman


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A story of Castro’s hat came up, and Bette was reminded she still had it somewhere. She got up and did a brief search, fishing it out of a drawer…. “This dirty old fatigue hat!” “None of those old biddys understood what a value it was,” Davis explained to Penny, “so I had to buy it.” Leaving the Davis apartment afterwards, Penny remained shocked that she’d just had tea with Bette Davis and that she had Castro’s hat. “Why didn’t you tell me your dear old friend from Maine was Bette Davis?” she

asked her mother-in-law. “Darling, that was a test!” said mother-in-law, adding, “Anyone would have taken me to have tea with Bette Davis. You passed!” On a Thursday at the beginning of last month, at the Beekman Theater on 66th and Second Avenue, the Cinema Society hosted a premiere screening in New York of Harry Benson: Shoot First, a documentary on the life of the great international photographic journalist Harry Benson (who celebrated his 87th birthday the following day).

I’ve known Harry’s work— and you probably have too, no matter your age, since he came to America with the Beatles when they first appeared on “Ed Sullivan” in 1964. Many of us who were born in the fourth and fifth decades of the 20th century grew up on Ed Sullivan and his Sunday night variety show at 8 o’clock on CBS, sponsored by Lincoln-Mercury. Television was still a special event in American life. Sullivan, a famous Broadway columnist for the New York Daily News, hosted an old time

show, a descendent of vaudeville, that featured a variety of talent of singers, dancers, Broadway musicals, opera stars, ballet stars, Las Vegas, and Borscht Belt comedians. All on the same hour-long show. The talent was timely, and it was one of the ways America kept up with the world of entertainment. All in one hour you might see a live clip of a current Broadway musical, a five minute ballet number with Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev—famous comedians who were still part of the

MO R S E L I F E ’ S A N N UA L D I N N E R D A N C E AT M A R - A - L A G O

Bonnie and Donald Dwares 36 QUEST

Pamela and Edward Pantzer

Petra and Stephen Levin

Judy and Larry Schlager

Heidi and Scott Schuster

David and Sondra Mack

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Bill and Phyllis Mack


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E YO U N G F E L LO W S O F T H E MO R G A N H O ST E D “ M R . MO R G A N ’ S W I N T E R G A L A”

Nicole Arnot and Helen Cousar

nightclub circuit—acrobats, ventriloquists, Sophie Tucker, and Elvis Presley. Elvis made the big time as a legitimate entertainer and rock star when he first appeared on “Ed Sullivan.” About eight years later, the Beatles coming to America, where their song “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” was Number 1 on the charts, was a major career indemnification for the Fab Four in the world. It not only established them a major American entertain38 QUEST

Morgan Alden and Peter Will

Hannah Conklin and Dietrich Nascimento

ment act, but it also was a life changer to a fifth man in the Beatle party whose career was ignited by the trip. And that was Harry Benson, a Scotsman and a Fleet Street photojournalist in his early 30s who had been assigned the job of following the Beatles on their first American tour. His photos of their arrival and appearance produced several now classic photos of them. This documentary is a story of a man at the center observ-

Alexander Hurst and Diana Cohen

Adelaide Freeman and Leckie Roberts

ing life before and around us. It records the journey of this man’s life behind the lens. It’s been an adventure. His subjects were many of the last century’s most famous figures, as well as the world at large. The film is very entertaining because the audience is taken on one man’s odyssey through the last six decades of celebritydom, as Harry has photographed many of the famous faces of these past decades including every President since

Dwight D. Eisenhower, and many leaders of the world including Queen Elizabeth II. Glitz, glamour, and the celebrated aside, the film gives you a sense of the man and his motivations that created this brilliant career. Harry was born in Glasgow and grew up in a lovely seaside town not far from Glasgow called Troon. There is a scene toward the end of the film where he travels back to his home village. The house he grew up in still

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Stephanie Kirsch and Catelyn Kelly


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A stands. He knocked on the door several times but no one answered. He then walked around the side of the narrow property to get to the backyard. There was a weathered wooden wall that he recalled his father erecting more than 75 years ago—aged and darkened by the glum Scottish weather. In the back of the house is a small shed next to the back door, also very weathered. Harry explains that his father erected it so that the boy could have a dark room to develop his photos. That interested me. Harry was 13 or 14 then. I’m not

clear when he got his first camera, but he was very young. It didn’t hold up well and didn’t last long. But he got another, a better one, and continued to take pictures. He was officially finished with school at age 13, and got a job as a messenger boy. And had a camera. His father, a founder of the local zoo, used a camera to photograph the animals. He had enough natural imagination to encourage his boy by building him a dark room. The hand of approval. Thinking about the film, I was left with a new impression of his celebrated works, and

of Harry, whom I have known now for a number of years. Along with the famous and glamorous, his archive is a rich visual and emotional record of the times we’ve been living through. Ethel Kennedy’s left hand splayed in front of the lens, as if to hide the image of her husband as he lay fatally wounded by an assassin’s bullet on the kitchen floor of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles in June 1968. And Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. who lay dying only two months before almost to the day, from assassin’s gun in Memphis. Then there are the haunting refugee

camps in Mogadishu where many thousands, including children were dying of starvation. He was there with Willy Brandt, then Mayor of Berlin, on the day the Berlin Wall officially cut off the East from the West. Death and despair all around him. And us. Through Harry’s eyes, I was also left with a feeling of deep sadness and the profound sense of injustice we foist on one another, deluding ourselves. Harry’s whole life has been an adventure following his curiosity with his camera, all over the world, in all kinds of situations. He tweaks and

AC R I A H O N O R E D T H E R O B E R T M A P P L E T H O R P E FO U N D AT I O N AT T H E PA R K AV E N U E A R MO R Y

Courtney Culkin and Tom Murro 40 QUEST

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Judith Light and Zachary Quinto

Calvin Klein and Kevin Baker

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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pulls on our memories and nostalgia, feeding our curiosity with the images he photographed, from Winston Churchill, to the Queen, to Frank Sinatra along with his then wife Mia Farrow in masks while entering the famous Truman Capote Black and White Ball. Then there’s the light and the hope in Muhammad Ali, in full force of personality and young manhood declaring: “I am beautiful!” And he was, indeed he was, in many ways. He was the light for that moment in our history when we were enmeshed in a war of our own choice in Southeast Asia. And Harry was there too, photographing Viet Cong in South Viet

Nam. In his natural Everyman approach, he conversed with his subjects who told him that when they spied on American soldiers at their rest in the bush, their curiosity was kept not by any conversations of those Americans, but by their music, which the Viet Cong loved. Harry Benson’s photography is the messenger, with a camera instead of a pen (or nowadays, a keyboard). The medium is the message of his life and our lives. Harry has been our messenger for more than 50 years. We have names and explanations for his celebrated images, but beyond forever it is his message about us. We are them, and they are us. u

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nationalcar.com *At participating locations and subject to availability and other restrictions. Requires enrollment in the complimentary Emerald Club. ©2015 National Car Rental. All other marks are property of their respective owners.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C E L E B R AT I N G T H E M I L L B R O O K H U N T B A L L AT YE L L O W F R A M E FA R M

Jackie and Nick Drexel

Barbara Tober and Laureen Knutsen

Diana Niles King, Lucy Tower, Kirk Henckels and Fernanda Kellogg

Stephanie Clark and Carol Holmes Delouvrier

John and Karen Klopp with Adam Klopp 44 QUEST

Bill and Nancy Stahl with Bonnie Step

Mita and Jerry Bland

Helen Blodgett and Everett Cook

Jeff Hood and Parker Gentry

The Klopp Table

Andrea Walton and John Robert Massie

A N N I E WAT T

Donald Tober, Jonathan Thorne and Oakleigh Thorne


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Exclusive Sales Agent: Douglas Elliman Development Marketing. The Ritz- Carlton Residences, Miami Beach are not owned, developed or sold by The Ritz- Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. or its affiliates (“Ritz- Carlton”). 4701 North Meridian, L.L.C. uses The Ritz- Carlton marks under a license from Ritz- Carlton, which has not confirmed the accuracy of any of the statements or representations made herein. This graphic is an “artist’s rendering” and is for conceptual purposes only. THIS OFFERING IS MADE ONLY BY THE OFFERING DOCUMENTS FOR THE CONDOMINIUM AND NO STATEMENT SHOULD BE RELIED UPON IF NOT MADE IN THE OFFERING DOCUMENTS. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, THE CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN STATES WHERE SUCH OFFER OR SOLICITATION CANNOT BE MADE. PRICES, PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. OR AL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE M ADE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. Additionally, for New York purchasers, the complete offering terms are available in an offering plan available from Sponsor. CD16 - 0120.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A V E R D U R A H O S T E D T H E “ I F YO U G I V E A M O U S E A M A LT E S E C R O S S ” H O L I D AY PA R T Y

Liza Deangelis, Leo Capraro and Lyss Stern

Bryan Carey, Catherine Carey and Paul Carey

Katherine Birch, William Birch and Annabelle Birch

Cathleen Smith Bresciani, Nico Landrigan and Rory Landrigan

Alatia Bach, James Bach and Laura Numeroff

Laura-Ann and Luke Tordy with Dragon

DJ and Alison McCutcheon with Lucy McCutcheon

Francis Green and Linda Hoffman

Genevieve Piturro and Christina Rose

Manuel Grande, Julie Hayek and Gilbert Holmes 46 QUEST

Carla Hall and Jane Weitzman

Judith Campbell and Francis Green

Tom and Patricia Shiah

Martha Johnston, Ann Van Ness and Josephine Hall

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( V E R D U R A ) ; A N N I E WAT T ( PA J A M A P RO G R A M )

A N N A N D B I L L VA N N E S S ’ F U N D R A I S E R FO R T H E PA J A M A P R O G R A M


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A G EO R G E FA R I A S A N D A N N E A N D J AY MC I N E R N E Y ’ S “ H O L I D AY C H E E R ” AT D O U B L E S

Wilbur and Hilary Geary Ross with Jay McInerney

Tom Quick and Michael Donnell

Lisa Fine and Bettina Zilkha 48 QUEST

Barbara Bancroft

Alex Hitz and Amy Fine Collins

Anne Hearst McInerney, George Farias and Gillian Hearst Shaw

Monica Crowley and Pamela Gross

Sydie Lansing and Agnes Gund

Averell Mortimer and Shelley Wanger

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Tom and Caroline Dean


Setai South Beach

Unit 3709 Lourdes Gutierrez 305.206.8096

OFFERED AT $13,500,0000 3 BED | 3 BATH | 2,521 SQ FT Real estate agents affiliated with Compass Florida LLC are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Compass. Equal Housing Opportunity. Compass Florida LLC is a licensed real estate broker located at 605 Lincoln Road, 7th Floor, Miami Beach FL 33139. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or regarding fi nancing is from sources deemed reliable, but Compass makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property information is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and withdrawal of the property from the market, without notice.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M A G N O L I A P I C T U R E S A N D T H E C I N E M A S O C I E T Y ’ S A F T E R PA R T Y F O R “ H A R R Y B E N S O N : S H O O T F I R S T ” AT T H E C A R LY L E

Deborah Norville and Karl Wellner

Edwina Sandys 50 QUEST

Bryant Gumbel

Nate Ruess and Ann Dexter-Jones

Cornelia Guest

Harry Benson and Dan Rather

Mick Jones, Charlotte Ronson and Shoshanna Lonstein Gruss

Cristina Cuomo and Kerry Kennedy

Lee Radziwill

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Wendy Benson-Landes, Gigi Benson and Tessa Benson Tooley


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A:

Castle Connolly Private Health Partners, LLC* concierge physicians add value to patients through enhanced services, such as health coaching tools, tele-health capability and access to a variety of wellness services. CCPHP physicians can even provide house calls. Most importantly, though, CCPHP’s concierge or membership model enables patients and physicians to collaborate more closely on working towards patients’ personalized health care goals. The CCPHP concierge membership program allows health care to be more focused on prevention and wellness. Each patient is provided with a host of services not covered under traditional practices, such as convenient appointment scheduling, direct private phone line, and help dealing with health related administrative and insurance issues. At the same time, physicians have more time to provide an in-depth wellness-focused physical exam, which becomes the foundation of care, and to oversee greater care coordination between specialists, among other things.

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Kathy Hilton and Sharon Bush

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By managing the volume of patients I see, no one is rushed, so visits can be more rewarding for both physician and patient. The added time I can devote to patients can improve the likeliness of healthier outcomes, and in the process, both parties can benefit from a more connected partnership.

The Holly Hunt Table

Bernard Schayes, MD

*Castle Connolly Private Health Partners, LLC (CCPHP) works with physicians/practices through collaborations (or “companies”) that offer certain non-medical amenities or enhancements to members for a fee. All medical services are provided by the physicians and their practices, which bill separately for those medical services.

00 QUEST

Bonnie Pope and Adaline Frelinghuysen

Debbie Bancroft, Wendy Carduner, Geoffrey Bradfield and Roric Tobin

A N N I E WAT T

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Castle Connolly Private Health Partners, LLC works with physicians/practices through collaborations (or “companies”) that offer certain non-medical amenities or enhancements. All medical services are provided by the physicians and their practices.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E B R I C K C H U R C H A N D T H E F U N D FO R PA R K AV E N U E ’ S A N N UA L C A R O L S I N G

Mikel and Joe Witte

Outside Brick Church

Tom Leeds, Christine Leeds and Heather Leeds

The Brick Presbyterian Church Choir 54 QUEST

Emily Hottensen with Bob and Jane Hottensen

Ashleigh Aston, Muffie Potter Aston, Bracie Aston and Sherrell J. Aston

Michael Lindvall

Julie Ovadia, Chaundra Steven and Liza Gottlieb

Knickerbocker Grey Cadets

A N N I E WAT T

Jack Lynch and Dee Schwab


1197 N. Lake Way Palm Beach, Florida. Built in 2003 to the highest standards, this impressive 5BR/8BA lakefront estate is characterized by high ceilings, deep overhangs, large porches, and numerous windows taking in spectacular Intracoastal Waterway and sunset views. Offered at $27,000,000. Liza Pulitzer 561-373-0666 Whitney McGurk 561-310-7919

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Palm Beach, Florida. Located just 2 blocks from Worth Avenue and 1 block from the beach, this stunning home built in 2001 boasts 5BR/6.5BA. Offered at $8,250,000. John O. Pickett III 561-301-5266, KC Pickett 561-676-2874

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Palm Beach, Florida. Elegant 4BR/3.3BA gated Mediterranean townhome in much desired location, on ocean block and next to Worth Avenue. Offered at $5,499,000. Ashley Copeland 561-596-5959

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T E A W I T H N I R AV MO D I AT T H E I R M A D I S O N AV E N U E B O U T I Q U E

Tinsley Mortimer

Kari Tiedemann and Eleanora Kennedy 56 QUEST

Mary Snow

Joannie Jakobson

Grace Meigher and Nirav Modi

Margo Langenberg, Lauren Lawrence and Lauren Day Roberts

Lisa McCarthy

Jean Shafiroff and Victor de Sousa

B FA . CO M

Susan Gutfreund


2657 Square Foot 4BR, 4.5 Bath at 35 West 15th Panoramic views, custom kitchen, Crestron system. Full service condo. Immediate close. Sponsor file CD 12-0108. $6.395M. Web 15352466. John Barbato 917.254.7630

Magnificent Neo-Georgian Townhouse on East 70th

Park Avenue/60s Bright 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath

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Living room with wood-burning fireplace, formal dining room & eat-in kitchen. White glove co-op. Web 14827481. Joan Merrill 212.434.7082/Elizabeth Paul 212.452.4419

The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. Stribling Private Brokerage is the Stribling & Associates marketing division for properties valued in excess of $5,000,000. It provides services on the level of “private banking” and intensive, customized marketing for luxury properties and discerning clients on a global basis. STRIBLING.COM · UPTOWN 212 570 2440 CHELSEA 212 243 4000 TRIBECA 212 941 8420 BROOKLYN 718 208 1900 · EQUAL HOUSING OPPTY

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E P R O STAT E C A N C E R R E S E A R C H FO U N D AT I O N ’ S B E N E F I T D I N N E R AT D A N I E L

Bernadette Peters and Matthew Morrison

Sibylle Eschapasse and Larry Leeds 58 QUEST

Mitchell Modell and Mira Tzur

Tom Lee and Mike Milken

Cynthia Ott and James Coleman

Gwen Marcus and Andy Barnard

Glenn Myles and Lori Milken

Jerry and Gene Jones

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

David and Julia Koch


Where Every Child is Known

... and Inspired to Excel, to Lead, to Care

Since 1923, e Green Vale School

has been Long Island’s premier independent Nursery-8th Grade school. With superior academics and emphasis on character education, athletics, performing and visual arts at every age, graduates excel at top secondary schools nationwide. Visit our 40-acre campus in Nassau County to see why families choose Green Vale as the foundation for their children’s education. 250 Valentine’s Lane, Old Brookville, NY 11545 greenvaleschool.org 516-628-5176


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E F U N D F O R PA R K A V E N U E AT 5 2 0 PA R K A V E N U E

Tom and Paula Burchill

Lillian Heidenberg, Robert A. M. Stern and Barbara Dixon

Barbara McLaughlin and Will Zeckendorf 60 QUEST

Thor Thors

Konrad Keesee

Julia Cahill

Suzanne Stephens and Duane Hampton

Randall Gianopulos and Martha McLanahan

Karen and Clay Tompkins

C U T T Y M CG I LL ; A N N I E WAT T

Polly Sheehan


#1 IN THE COUNTRY

100 YEARS I N

M A N H A T T A N

We are excited to announce that the New York School of Interior Design is now ranked the #1 interior design program in the entire country. We are thrilled to be recognized for successfully preparing students for the business of design for 100 years. Let’s rejoice in this remarkable achievement together.

NYSID ANNUAL BENEFIT DINNER M O N DAY, M A R C H 6 , 2 0 17 Join us as we toast our future and honor interior designers David Kleinberg and Charlotte Moss; Sawyer|Berson Architecture and Landscape Architecture, LLP; and Delos™. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C O L D S P R I N G H A R B O R L A B O R ATO R Y ’ S D O U B L E H E L I X M E D A L S AT T H E A M E R I C A N M U S E U M O F N AT U R A L H I STO R Y

Phil Donahue and Marlo Thomas

Brenda Von Schweickhardt and Mort Zuckerman

James D. Watson and Alan Alda

Bob Wright

Danielle and Paul Taubman

Dagnia Zeidlickis and Jillian Mestre

Dill Ayres, Lesley Stahl and Roy Vagelos

THE INSTITUTE OF CL A SSIC AL ARCHITECTURE AND ART TOA STED “THE CL A SSICIST NO. 13” AT T H E G EO R G E F . B A K E R H O U S E S

Adrian Taylor and Alexa Hampton 62 QUEST

Peter Kenny, Margize Howell and Mark Ferguson

Suzanne Santry, Peter Dixon and Camille McDuffie

Peter Lyden, Karen Pascoe and Gary Darden

John Rosselli

Albert Simons and Bunny Williams

Diane Flynn and John Burt

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ( CO L D S P R I N G ) ; A N N I E WAT T

Emma Sweeney and Theodora Simons


Belgian Shoes 1 1 0 E a s t 5 5 S t r e e t • N e w Y o r k, N Y 1 0 0 2 2 2 1 2 .7 5 5 .7 3 7 2 • b e l g i a n s h o e s .c o m


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E N E W YO R K B OTA N I C A L G A R D E N ’ S W I N T E R WO N D E R L A N D B A L L

Meredith Ostrom and Mary Snow

Genevieve Bahrenburg and Kick Kennedy

Alexandra Scott and Elizabeth Steel 64 QUEST

Anne Hathaway and Justin Conner

Ariana Rockefeller, Hannah Selleck and Georgina Bloomberg

Wilfred Frost and Julia Fehrenbach

Daniel Cappello

Michael and Alexandra Toccin

Lauren Astry

Danielle Naftali and Andrew Warren

Richard and Maureen Chilton

B FA . CO M

May Kwok


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A TO A ST I N G T H E S Q U I R R E LW O O D EQ U I N E S A N C T UA R Y FO U N D E R S AT L E C I R Q U E

Ashley Cannon and Sharon Park

Ken Rock and Emery Westfall

Ed and Cathy Kangas with Bob Kerrey

Jake Money and Courtney Budd

Bill and Pamela Hunnicutt

Charlie Gill and Linda Goddard

Topsy Taylor and Diana Feldman

Rainer Greevan and Charlotte Ford 66 QUEST

Regina Greevan and John K. Castle

Jim Mitchell and Margo Langenberg

Jack Carley and Pia Lindstrom

Renato and Marion Tichauer

A N N I E WAT T ( S Q U I R R E LWO O D ) ; M AT T H E W C A R A S E LL A / S O C I A L S H U T TE R B U G . CO M

J I M M I T C H E L L ’ S H O L I D AY D I N N E R AT P R I MO L A


BECAUSE TOMORROW HAPPENS IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE

TOP 10 PLACES TO BUY A SECOND HOME -

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Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Void where prohibited by law. An offering statement has been filed with the Department of State of the State of New York. A copy of the offering statement is available, upon request, from the subdivider. The filing of the verified statement and offering statement with the Department of State of the State of New York does not constitute approval of the sale or lease or offer for sale or lease by the Department of State or any officer thereof, or that the Department of State has in any way passed upon the merits of such offering. This project is registered with the New Jersey Real Estate Commission. Registration does not constitute an endorsement of the merits or value of the project. Obtain and read the NJ Public Offering Statement and read it before signing anything. (NJ Reg #89/15-175). AN AFFILIATE OF KIAWAH PARTNERS


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A N E W H O P E C H A R I T I E S A N N UA L H O L I DAY B A Z A A R I N PA L M B E AC H

Alfy and Raysa Fanjul

Silvia and Marc Rich

Pepe and Emilia Fanjul, Pepe Fanjul Jr. and Lourdes Fanjul

Doug and Teresa Wedgworth with Henry Rionda

Elizabeth Dennis, Brandon Rinker, Ruby Rinker and Father John

Lian Fanjul de Azqueta, Lyanne Azqueta and Lian Azqueta

Toby and Toni Basore

C O C K TA I L S B E N E F I T I N G T H E H Ô P I TA L A L B E R T S C H W E I TZ E R H A I T I

Laura Ault and Fern de Narvaez 68 QUEST

Louise Stephaich and Carey Clark

Pauline Stephaich and Jackie Drexel

Peter Stephaich and Ottavio Serena di Lapigio

Anna Burke and Justin Patterson

Jay Mellon and John Walton

C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Didi Hitchcock and Zibby Tozer


CLAPBOARD RIDGE ROAD | $29,500,000 | WEB ID: 0068195 Custom built stone 6 bedroom Georgian on 5.34 acres with 2 bedroom pool house and pool in mid-country Greenwich. Architectural details and refinements suggest Pre-war substance, yet the house features every modern amenity plus a 5 car garage. Sumptuous master suite with 2 luxurious baths and 2 dressing rooms. Lower level comprised of home theatre, wine cellar, gym, family room, indoor pool with 2 changing rooms, baths and sauna. Visit www.110CRR.com. Leslie McElwreath 917.539.3654 | Joseph Barbieri 203.940.2025

EXQUISITE COUNTRY ESTATE | $10,400,000 | WEB ID: 0068291 A shining jewel in the heart of Round Hill, this exquisite country estate encompasses over 5 private acres. Over 11,000 square feet of elegantly inviting, sun-filled interiors marries a thoughtful renovation of the original antique house with a spectacular new addition to create an unparalleled residence. A huge, two-level vintage barn offering a magnificent party venue & a comfortable 2-bedroom apartment & elegant heated pool are just a few amenities of this exceptional compound. Brad Hvolbeck 203.618.3110 GREENWICH BROKERAGE | 203.869.4343 One Pickwick Plaza | Greenwich, CT 06830

sothebyshomes.com/greenwich

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


This spread: President-elect Donald Trump photographed in front of a canvas backdrop in Trump Tower, 1992.


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY THERE IS NO DOUBT in my mind that President-elect Donald Trump will be good for photographers. They will no longer be unemployed at the end of the week for the next four years. At the end of every day, photographers will bring a new presidential story to their newspaper or magazine or website, and we should all get ready for a roller coaster ride! Over the last 30-plus years, I have photographed the President-elect at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City; in his New York office; at construction sites; on the roof of Trump Tower; in his homes in New York and the beautiful Mara-Lago in Palm Beach; in his helicopter; and in his limo—sometimes alone, and sometimes with his family. I am pleased to say that the President-elect knows exactly what a photographer wants (a picture people will stop and look at) and he never disappoints; he willingly obliges. I wasn’t surprised when Donald Trump announced his candidacy for the president of the United States. I’m not exactly sure why, but I just wasn’t surprised. Now that the election is over, Mar-a-Lago will become the summer White House—a fitting tribute to a magnificent Palm Beach landmark. I think Marjorie Merriweather Post would love every minute of it! ◆ J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 7 1


TA K I

PARTIES AND POLITICS

This page: A NATO summit meeting. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Vladimir Putin on Russia’s television network Russian Today; Richard Nixon; a scenic shot of Russia.

JUST ABOUT six months ago, at a Spectator party in London, I was introduced to a very attractive young woman by the name of Olga. She was Russian, very bubbly, and friendly, and when I told her in no uncertain terms that I was for Trump, she became even friendlier. I took her to dinner and her manners were exquisite, a rarity among Russian women I have known in the past. Olga told me she worked for Russia Today or RT, Russia’s main English-language sat72 QUEST

ellite network, and an alternative to the Western media. I of course asked her if she was a spy— as she was far better looking than Mata Hari—and told her that if she were one, I’d never look at another woman ever again. To my surprise she was not complimented at all, and insisted that she was a hard working journalist who believed in freedom and independence from state interference as much as I did. “But please be a spy,” I begged her, “and to hell with

journalists. They’re all liars and phonies, with their bullshit about independence and all that.” Olga was not amused. We parted friends but I had blown it. In my Cold War mentality, I had assumed that everyone in Russia works for the government, like in the bad old days, but having fought the Soviet system throughout my life, it had suddenly paid me back in spades. Olga remained not amused. My father was a Cold War enemy of the Soviets par excellence. Father’s


factories had been blown up by the communists in 1944, despite the fact that he had shut them down once Greece fell to the Axis powers. (Unlike most French and Belgian industrialists, who benefitted greatly and paid no price afterwards.) Yet by 1980, he had sensed a change and had even accepted an invitation to the Moscow Olympics of that year by the then president Tikhonov. Daddy’s friend, the journalist Georgi Arbatov, told him at the time that the West had nothing to worry about. “Our enemy is militant Islam, and we have forty million hardcore Islamists living in our midst as I speak.” Thirty-seven years later, as the Donald

from the desert 84 years ago, as royals. I am speaking, of course, of the Saudi ruling family and their murderous religion, Wahhabism. Just think: 16 of 19 terrorists who blew up the World Trade Center were Saudis, yet the first thing that George W’s administration did was to sneak Saudi moneybags out of the country. George W himself was pictured holding hands with the Saudi ruler Abdullah a bit later, while fully aware that the Saudi ambassador to Washington had been discovered to have contributed money to the terrorists. Just imagine if the Russians had done something similar.

one can find anywhere that is not called a dictatorship by a useful idiot like the New York Times. Incidentally, have any of you gentle Quest readers heard of something called the Monroe Doctrine? It was our invention of our country’s sphere of influence. An ancient nation like Russia surely has the same right to its own sphere of influence, yet the unelected “buraucrooks” of Brussels mounted a coup against a democratically elected government in the Ukraine in order to bring that recently created (1920) nation into the EU family. Some family, where the rich North supports the poor South and over 50 percent of the South’s

is about to take over and subversive newspapers such as the Times are stirring anti-Putin sentiments among their naïve readers, the words of Arbatov keep coming back to me. What is it that makes sane people fear Putin when we have an enemy who finances militant Islam right in front of us, paying for terror while we give them air support and guidance in Yemen, allow them free access to our schools and institutions, and even refer to those bipedal hominids who came out

Before his death, President Richard Nixon had told me that the biggest mistake we, the U.S., had made was not to encourage Russia’s new freedom and pour money into her economy. Instead we had expanded NATO into the countries of the former Soviet block to within 100 miles of St Petersburg. (George Kennan, who knew a thing or two about the Soviets, agreed.) Even worse were those unelected clowns that run the EU, as stifling and autocratic an institution as

youths are unemployed while the crooks in Brussels enjoy their perks. Putin is a nationalist, just like our 45th president is. In the past, the two countries won a World War at the cost of 20 million Russian dead. Uncle Sam’s enemy is Islam and Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Russia is, or could be at a stroke, our friend. Let’s do it. And perhaps I could get Olga back.u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 7 3


CANTEENS

RIGHT AT HOME AT RENATO’S

74 Q U E S T

things—like a storybook Italian restaurant, complete with crisp white linens, bow-tied waiters in black and white, and ample ambient light and fresh flowers—never go out of fashion. The ambiance is upscale but the attitude is more down-home: welcoming and good-hearted, as affable as any Italian eatery you might stumble upon on a trip along the Amalfi Coast. Warm, congenial, cheerful, and clubby—Renato’s is all these things. For many, Renato’s is the first destination when touching down in Palm Beach. After a morning flight, returning guests

CO U RTE S Y O F R E N ATO ’ S

IT HAS BEEN LIKENED to the ideal dining spot—a place filled with the fresh scents of a kitchen on Capri, the sophisticated décor of a Manhattan dining room, and the elegance of a breezy Palm Beach terrace. For almost 30 years, Palm Beach’s Renato’s—tucked away at the back of the bougainvillea-rimmed Via Mizner—has been perfecting the art fine dining. For an enclave like Palm Beach, which prides itself on preserving tradition and clinging to the old school, Renato’s doesn’t disappoint. In fact, it remains a healthy reminder of why some

F OTO G R A P H I C I M A G E S ;

BY DANIEL CAPPELLO


CANTEENS flock here for lunch in the courtyard, where you can settle in between the orchid- and ivy-lined walls and get a welcoming kiss from the sun. If you’re lucky enough to land on one of those perfect Palm Beach nights, the French doors of the restaurant are left open to create an indoor-outdoor dining experience while a piano player serenades with soft melodies. Romance is always in the air at Renato’s, along with the savory scent of that craved-for cuisine. Italian staples like Caprese salad and prosciutto with melon are of course on offer, but the restaurant likes to remind you that this is a world-class experience for a worldly clientele. If you’re starting with Champagne

croutons, Parmesan cheese, white anchovy, and the delectable homemade dressing. You can’t really go wrong with any of the homemade pastas or risotto dishes, but the saffron risotto with Maine lobster, crabmeat, sweet peas, and tomato remains exceptional. The secondi are succulent, from the Dover sole to the Ossobucco Milanese, and a house favorite remains the center-cut veal chop with porcini-truffle sauce, potato croquette, and broccoli rabe. The extensive menu doesn’t end with dessert (they just keep coming)—but there’s something about a crème brûlée with tropical flair that always calls our name in Palm Beach. Finish it

instead of Prosecco, you might want to forego the mixed antipasto and opt for the foie gras instead—a knock–your–taste buds–to–the–floor pan-seared foie gras with caramelized figs and cranberries, drizzled with a blackberry brandy sauce. If the Mediterranean is calling your name, there’s the Misto di Mare—a cocktail of jumbo shrimp, crab claws, and jumbo lump crabmeat with appropriate cocktail sauces. Or a plate of broiled prawns with mustard aioli and crispy capers. Or a classic Caesar salad, all crispy Romaine topped with herbed

off with a bubbly toast to the season—and remind yourself that you’ll soon be back to Renato’s. u This page, clockwise from bottom left: Dinner is served; crème brûlée gets a tropical twist; a selection from the wine list; looking out to the courtyard; the front entrance. Opposite page, clockwise from left: Al fresco courtyard dining; the extensive bread basket; the signature veal chop. Renato’s Palm Beach: 87 Via Mizner. Lunch served Monday– Saturday, dinner nightly; for reservations, call 561.655.9752. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 7 5


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO A N D E L I Z A B E T H M E I G H E R

PALM BEACH SEASON hits a high this month as snowbirds flock south and the party circuit

heats up, along with the sunny temps, which is why we’re keeping things colorful and light. From beautifully adorned necklaces in a dazzling array of colors to a colorblock dress, you’ll sense a theme. It’s not just you who deserves a splash of something bright, which is why we’ve combed the stores for some inspired finds for the home as well. For the man on the go, we’ve found some classic and cool staples to carry him back and forth on plane rides to and fro—or whatever adventures may lie in wait. Color things up with this 18-kt. white gold and white diamond multicolor necklace by EFFY Hematian New York, featuring various topazes, quartzes, amethyst, and citrine. $88,988 at 877.ASK.EFFY.

Salvatore Ferragamo’s new optical frames allow for ample style and personality with a special color-customization process featuring exclusive geometric patterns. $230 at marchon.com.

Where do you want to go? The Clicquot Arrow can point the way through a collection of 29 destinations from New York to Tokyo to Paris—showing the distance separating you from Reims, the center of the Veuve Clicquot’s production. $49 at sherry-lehmann.com. 76 QUEST

The greatest look on the block? The Litchfield by Novis, an ivory, black, blue, and marigold buttonfront seamed colorblock dress. $1,395. Novis: At bergdorfgoodman.com in early February.


Reservoir Views - Stunning Country Estate with an imposing brick Spectacular Hilltop Estate façade and Palladian architectural elements. Nearly 9200 square feet. Substantial millwork, 12’ ceilings, Venetian plaster, reclaimed wood floors and six fireplaces. Perfect for entertaining on the grand scale. Opulent Entrance Hall. Impressive Library finished in rare Cuban Mahogany. Chef ’s Kitchen open to Family Room.Sun Room with aviary.Five Bedrooms.Nine acres with Pool. $4,650,000

Breathtaking views. Sophisticated Center Hall Colonial with beautiful appointments and tremendous “oldhouse feel.” Walnut and antique chestnut floors, oversize windows, recessed halogen lighting and French doors. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace. Five Bedrooms. Gym. Endless Pool. Wine Cellar. Long, gated drive to over four acres with Pool. Foremost estate area. $2,195,000

A Village Treasure -

On the outskirts of historic Bedford Village within walking distance to school, shops and theater. Circa 1840 Carriage House graciously renovated. Original barn beams and period details. Magnificent Living Room. Formal Dining Room. Remarkable Kitchen with antique Parisian floors. Six Bedrooms. Wisteria Arbor overlooking the grounds. Four breathtaking acres of gorgeous, level meadow with spectacular gardens. Charming Teahouse at pool’s edge. $1,857,000

Nantucket Style -

On the Old Mill Pond -

The Silo - Lovely Country Colonial connected to original grain silo. Rocking Chair Porch. Center Entrance Hall. Living Room with Fireplace and doors to Sun Deck. Formal Dining Room. Country Kitchen open to Family Room with Fireplace. Five Bedrooms. Silo with Media/Movie Room. Pole Barn with Recreation Room. Long drive to five landscaped acres overlooking scenic pond stocked with Bass. Pool. Heart of North Salem. $1,395,000

Circa 1790 Farmhouse perfectly situated overlooking the mill pond and a rushing waterfall. Renovated by Hiram Halle in the 1930’s incorporating incredible period detailing. Wide board floors, plaster walls, bow windows and a fireplace with antique mantle and delft-tile surround. Charming stone shed, flowering gardens and path to the trout-stocked river. Moments to the riding lanes, Bedford Village, Katonah and the train.$979,500

(914) 234-9234

Handsome lines and perfect proportions. Stone and Shingle Colonial with high ceilings, substantial millwork, hardwood floors and French doors. Sun-filled Living Room with Fireplace, herringbone floor and French doors. Family Room with stone Fireplace. Library. Study with Fireplace. Chef’s Kitchen. Five Bedrooms.Terrace overlooking the Swimming Pool. Sport Court. Beautiful grounds with level lawns and specimen trees. $1,659,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 65 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


Fresh Finds

Give your room a new attitude with the Arlequin 18-light chandelier by Saint-Louis in amethyst, chartreuse

Kendall Conrad keeps things spinning

green, and flannel gray.

with her evolving line of chain

$42,100. Saint-Louis:

bracelets, in solid brass. $290 at

855.240.9740.

kendallconraddesign.com.

Trina Turk keeps things tropically light with her colorful and quirky Shangri La patchwork print, put to winning effect on a number of sundresses. $298–358 at trinaturk.com.

SOCAPRI’s 100% silk Georgette floral stole in red, made in Italy, is sure to steal your heart. $340. SOCAPRI: 235 Worth Ave., Suite C, Palm Beach, Fla., or socapri.com.

Tweedy yarn gives a subtle ikat effect to the diamond design of Crate & Barrel’s styleconscious Flynn pillow (22 x 15”). $39.95 at crateandbarrel.com. Freshen up any room with hints of bright citrus, lilies, freesia, sandalwood, and muscs in Monique Lhuillier’s Citrus Lily diffuser, developed with Agraria. $150 at moniquelhuillier.com.

We’re wild for Sea Star Beachwear’s Beachcomber espadrille, a classic design reimagined with a soft, fitted neoprene upper and protective rubber deck-shoe sole. $89 at seastarbeachwear.com. 78 QUEST


Every wardrobe is sure to benefit from

A stunning statement piece:

a classic staple—like David

Patek Philippe’s 5980/1AR-001

Yurman’s Cable Classics cufflinks

Nautilus Chronograph in

in 18-kt. gold. $2,500. David

stainless steel, rose gold,

Yurman: 114 Prince St. or

blue gradient dial, and

davidyurman.com.

gold-applied hour markers. $62,370 at Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Allied Metal Works offers the most stylish new way to shield your eyes from those Florida rays— the A020 in stainless steel, black hec gradient, and gray lenses. $590 (polarized) at alliedmetalworks.com.

Longchamp’s Le Foulonné bicolor is a compact document holder made from supple Foulonnégrained leather that’s perfect for documents and a laptop or tablet. $645 at longchamp.com.

Daydream in a gray dream: Ralph Lauren’s gray cashmere crewneck sweater ($1,495), cream wool trouser ($695), and gray linen/silk unlined sport coat ($4,995), at select Ralph Lauren stores.

Catch their attention in Stubbs & Wootton’s “Alligator” drab linen classic slipper. $495. Stubbs & Wootton: 340 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, Fla., 561.655.6857.

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Fresh Finds It’s hard not to get carried away with J.McLaughlin’s Mia laser-cut leather tote with leather body and bamboo handle in bone/natural. $328 at jmclaughlin.com.

Spa at home with the Tonic Scented Candle by Clarins, a new and exclusive blend of bitter orange, geranium, basil, and chamomile essential oils. $75 at clarins.com.

You’ll love the timeless Jasper Crescent Necklace from Cabi—a perfect complement to any look, casual or elegant. $68 at cabionline.com.

Lavish and lush, the intriguing Mod bowl from The Wooden Palate is handmade in Los Angeles from black walnut with brass inlay. $390 at thewoodenpalate.com.

Head to Betteridge for these 18-kt. yellow gold and copper earrings by Nicholas Varney with emeralds, eggshell, and demantoid garnets. $55,000 at Betteridge, 236 Worth Ave., 561.655.5850.

Charlotte Kellogg’s brocade evening jacket in 100% silk is perfect for mild evenings out on the town. $750 at Charlotte Kellogg boutiques and charlottekellogg.com. 80 QUEST


WISHING YOU A BRILLIANT 2017!

THE GIVING CANDLE BY MEERA GANDHI

TO PURCHASE THE BEST CANDLE IN THE WORLD VISIT: WWW.GIVINGBACKCANDLE.COM OR THE FOUNDATION WEBSITE: THE GIVINGBACKFOUNDATION.NET


R E TA I L

THE GLORY OF GRACE BY DEDE MERCK

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exclusive, custom pieces just for us! (Del Toro, Mariella Vilar, Strong Boalt, Allegra Fanjul Designs…). We’ve taken the time to hand pick special pieces in a variety of styles so that everyone, of any age, will surely find something that suits them. Our prices are reasonable and quality is our top priority. We are always looking for ways to give back to our community, as well as to other less fortunate communities that need help. For example, this past Black Friday, we donated 50% of all proceeds made to Wholehearted Orphanage in Haiti, an organization whose founders are close friends with GRACE’s manager, Kaela, and her mother, Michelle. Additionally, in mid-December we are hosting a holiday event to benefit a mission trip to Cuba that I intend to join at some point during the first couple of months of 2017. My ministry, The Palm Beach Prayer Team Ministries Inc., will match each purchase of $100 or more to put toward the mission. With every coming holiday, we hope to host some form of charitable event at GRACE that will either match profits and/or donate funds in order to benefit others in need. We are delighted and grateful for all of the love and support we’ve felt throughout the past month, and we are beyond excited for what will come in the future for GRACE! With love, Dede and Grace. This page: Mother-and-daughter team Dede and Grace Merck. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Beachy shoes, bags, swimwear, and jewelry available at GRACE (first 3 photos); Lauren Layne, Grace Merck, George Merck, and Dede Marck; items for sale in the window of GRACE; GRACE’s storefront at 249 Royal Poinciana Way; Charlotte Lewis and Ariana Stein of clothing label Paloma Blue.

N I CO LE CO N N AU G H TO N

MY DAUGHTER, GRACE, had been living in New York for two years (after graduating from SMU in 2014), when she flew down to Palm Beach for a wedding this past April. I had been eyeing a storefront that had become available for rent, and I thought it would be absolutely perfect for our boutique. I brought Grace to see the spot and she instantly fell in love as well. From that moment onward, everything started to happen at lightening speed. Grace came home for the summer and we headed straight to LA to embark on our first buying trip (before we had even signed the lease!). We had discussed opening some kind of small business together for years, but the time never presented itself until now. By the grace of God we were able to transform the vacant space into a cozy, beautiful, island-y, locale that we absolutely adore coming to everyday (and hope others will too!). We wanted the store to have a St. Barth’s, Capri, Amalfi Coast vibe. In order to achieve that feel, we tried to stick with beachy, breezy pieces that can easily be thrown on every day. We are lucky to reside in a warm climate that allows us to offer resort and swimwear year-round (Frankie’s Bikinis, PilyQ, Paloma Blue, Juliet Dunn, Melissa Odabash, Cali Dreaming, Reina Olga…). Nevertheless, chillier winter evenings afford the chance for us to branch out into warmer, more seasonal pieces, such as lightweight cashmere sweaters and embroidered denim (Sandrine Rose, Flannel, Line, Muche et Muchette…). We have also done our best to find and provide unique accessories, jewelry, and leather goods at GRACE, along the lines of tote bags, clutches, footwear, pouches, beaded bracelets, straw bags, etc. (ASHA by ADM, CocoBella, Marte Frisnes…). Many of our items come from local vendors (from people who we grew up with in Palm Beach—and from their children) who have created


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MARKET WATCH WITH QUEST’S BEST BROKERS BY THE EDITORS

OUR TRUSTED REALTORS once again welcome us to their towns, where we survey the land (and the markets) in the states of Florida and Connecticut. Our readers continue to show a distinct interest in the markets of Palm Beach, greater Miami, and the Tri-state area— especially Greenwich. Our experts represent a wealth of knowledge and a spectrum of renowned firms, including Sotheby’s International Realty, Douglas Elliman Real Estate, and the Brissi Group. Not only do they know their respective markets, but they are “of” their enclaves, allowing them to assist with the brokering of a home while recommending the best schools and places to eat. From northern shores to southern islands, we ask Quest’s best brokers to weigh in. 84 QUEST


PA L M B E A C H

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PA L M B E A C H

R E A L E S TAT E

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WALLY TURNER Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Sotheby’s International Realty / T: 561.301.2060 / wally.turner@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: How is the market is doing? A: The Palm Beach real estate market is very much alive and quite well. Although the summer was a little slower than usual, I am expecting that there will be a very strong first and second quarter of 2017. Most of the transactions are done in the first six months of the year. That is considered our “season,” although business is brisk throughout the year. Q: What makes this such an attractive market? A: The demographics here are tremendous as baby boomers and millennials are ready to escape the taxation of their states. Of course, our climate can’t be beat. But, mostly, I think buyers are coming for the very fine lifestyle and sheer beauty of Palm Beach. Over the years, the area has become a hub for culture. We host some of the most celebrated art exhibitions, musical artists, and lecturers. New schools have opened to accommodate the surge of so many young families moving down. It is truly a world-class community. Q: What options are there for buyers today? A: The current market has a wonderful selection for buyers, unlike recent years when the inventory was a bit tight. Apartments located in the village and newly built hous-

Abington Preserve, a 3,640-acre ranch in Okeechobee, Fla.: $18 million.

es all over the island are particularly strong. Palm Beach has something for everyone: small apartments starting at around $200,000 and houses up to nearly $200 million. Q: Do you have a typical client or client relationship? A: I have been with Sotheby’s International Realty in Palm Beach for almost 25 years. I am considered by my clients to be a consultant, not a salesman. They tell me that they trust my judgment and sense of value when they refer me to their friends and colleagues. My clients mostly come from New York and Greenwich, but many are from the U.K., France, Germany, and Italy. Some come to buy just a holiday house, while others are relocating for most of the year.

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PA L M B E A C H

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PA L M B E A C H

R E A L E S TAT E

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CHRISTOPHER LEAVITT Douglas Elliman Real Estate / C: 917.664.0720 / T: 561.653.6224 / cleavitt@elliman.com

Q: What is particularly exciting about the Palm Beach market right now? A: What is so exciting about the Palm Beach market is that we don’t necessarily rely on the international buyers as other markets do, and we are not necessarily at the mercy of the constant fluctuations in the global economy. Most of the buyers are from the Northeast and know Palm Beach very well and only want to be here.

finest finishings and amenities—such as The Bristol. The Bristol is selling at a very fast pace and at huge prices. I’m lucky enough to be the Ambassador for the project and to promote it in New York and Palm Beach. Q: Who is the standard buyer for your area? A: Buyers tend to be from New York, the Tri-state area, Boston, and Chicago. Recently I have seen some from Dallas and Houston. What I find very interesting is that this is a very small town and many of the residents and future buyers—especially at The Bristol—know each other and seem to share a commonality of homes in Aspen, the Hamptons, Manhattan, and Palm Beach.

Q: Which areas or types of properties are experiencing popularity at the moment? A: Palm Beach will always be hot and in high demand; it will always be selling well. What Palm Beach and West Palm Beach have not seen in over 10 years, however, are high-end luxury condos with the

86 QUEST

The Bristol: 1100 South Flagler Drive in Palm Beach, from $5 million to over $20 million.

CO U RTE S Y O F D O U G L A S E LL I M A N

Q: What makes the Palm Beach market so robust and perennial? A: Palm Beach and the prime locations in West Palm Beach are extremely limited. It’s a simple supply-and-demand issue, which makes it a very robust market.


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CRISTINA CONDON Sotheby’s International Realty / T: 561.301.2211 / cristina.condon@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S I N TE R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y

Q: What are the current trends for the Quest reader? A: New construction and completely renovated homes are currently in great demand in Palm Beach. The north end of the island has been particularly desirable. Q: What is your advice to buyers and sellers, given the state of the market in the town of Palm Beach? A: My advice to buyers is, when they find a property they like, to make an offer. Palm Beach properties are special and may not be readily replicated, should the opportunity to purchase be lost. My advice to sellers is to take all offers seriously: even an initial low offer can (and often does) blossom into a sale. Q: What are the most exciting “new builds” in Palm Beach? Why? A: One of the breathtaking, newly completed, direct oceanfront estates is a British Colonial situated on approximately 3.49 =/- acres with 142 feet of ocean frontage. The elegant residence offers 28,500 square feet of luxurious living space as well as spectacular ocean views. It also features a two-bedroom guest house that overlooks the pool and the gorgeous gardens.

Q: What are the gems in your current stable of properties? A: Among the many gems are two “ocean to lake” properties, Il Palmetto and Casa Riviera. Il Palmetto is an estate on 5.46 =/- acres built in 1930—a meticulously restored Italian Renaissance–style palazzo. The result is an estate without peer in Palm Beach. Il Palmetto now includes a majestic main residence, a serene beach house with a 345-foot ocean front seawall, a waterfront boathouse, and manicured lawns. Casa Riviera is a 2.25-acre Mediterranean estate with 274 feet of both ocean and lake frontage. European elegance and Old World craftsmanship are hallmarks of this palatial, one-of-a-kind residence.

101 Indian Road in Palm Beach, Fla.: $59 million.

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MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI

R E A L E S TAT E

MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI MIAMI

THE BRISSI GROUP Ben Brissi (right) & Zach Joslin (left) / Ben: 561.870.2211 / Zach: 561.222.5240 / info@brissigroup.com

Q: What’s exciting about the Miami market? A: Incredible options. From collaborations with renowned brands like Porsche, Aston Martin, Armani, Fendi, and Missoni, to buildings designed by acclaimed “starchitects” like Zaha Hadid, Herzog and de Meuron, and Renzo Piano, among others, Miami has raised the bar and can satisfy even the most sophisticated and demanding buyer.

demand and a shortage of inventory, creating a seller’s market. For condos and luxury properties, we have a buyer’s market. Q: Who is the standard buyer for your area? A: The world. Miami’s evolution over the last few years has seen the market change from one that was primarily dominated by buyers from the Northeastern United States and Latin America to one that attracts buyers from every corner of the globe. We’ve recently seen a large influx of buyers from the Middle East and China. Our amazing climate, diverse culture, and secure and stable economic and political environment make buyers from around the world feel confident in investing here.

Q: Which areas are currently popular? A: Urban, walkable neighborhoods. Downtown Miami is a classic example; the downtown population has tripled since 2000. Affluent, young professionals are attracted by employment opportunities, luxury shopping, fine dining, green space, and nightlife—all within walking distance. Q: How is the current market doing? A: For single-family homes under $1 million, we have strong

88 QUEST

310 Jackson Street in Hollywood, Fla., listed at $1,580,000.

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E B R I S S I G RO U P

Q: What makes the Miami market so robust and perennial? A: Population growth. Florida ranks second nationally for population growth, with an average of over 1,000 new residents per day—23% of whom are moving to metro Miami.


CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

R E A L E S TAT E

CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

BRAD HVOLBECK Sotheby’s International Realty / T: 203.940.0015 / brad.hvolbeck@sothebyshomes.com

CO U RTE S Y O F S OT H E BY ’ S H O M E S

Q: Why should Tri-state buyers consider Greenwich? A: Greenwich, known as the “Gateway to New England,” is a quiet, picturesque town with a sophisticated social scene. Offering 32 miles of Long Island shoreline, 4 public beaches, a public golf course, and over 1,500 acres of parks, Greenwich is known for a variety of unique properties in all price ranges. The thriving, pedestrian-friendly downtown business district features world-class shopping and award-winning restaurants. The highly rated public school system provides top-notch education to students from around the world. All this, and yet only 40 minutes from Manhattan. Q: What areas or types of properties do you focus on? A: I focus on luxury properties of all prices, from townhomes to estates, in all sections of Greenwich. I sold over 40 percent of the properties located in Conyers Farm, where the average sales price exceeds $10 million. I am currently marketing some exceptional mid-country land listings: a dramatic contemporary on four acres with pool and tennis court for $3.995 million; a completely renovated 1930s Tudor with cottage, pool, and tennis court for $11.45 million; and the exquisite country compound seen here—an

11,000-square-foot farmhouse for $10.4 million. Q: What is your background in Greenwich? A: I am very fortunate to be a fourth-generation resident of Greenwich, which provides me with a wealth of local knowledge. Having been involved in over 800 real estate transactions that total in excess of $1 billion provides me with a unique perspective of the real estate market. I am currently on the board of the Greenwich Leadership Forum and a trustee emeritus of Eagle Hill School after serving on the board for 25 years. I am an avid sportsman and athlete, having played ice hockey, lacrosse, and polo at the highest amateur level, and have coached youth hockey and lacrosse.

A farmhouse on Round Hill Road in Greenwich, Conn.: $10.4 million.

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WE ALL KNOW Palm Beach is a one-of-a-kind real estate market—even more so than ever, according to the Corcoran Group’s Dana Koch. “Right now, Palm Beach is a relative bargain compared to the New York market,” Koch explains. “We sit on a barrier island in one of the wealthiest enclaves in the world and have incredible weather, beautiful beaches, and an advantageous tax situation.” Close to world-class shopping, dining, and cultural attractions, Palm Beach is also

one of the safest places to live, not to mention just a quick 10-minute drive to the airport. With all it has going for it, who wouldn’t want to live here? Now there’s even more incentive, with the listing of 528 North Lake Way. In a prime location and in impeccable condition, the pristine property is the epitome of luxury in the near North End, boasting 6 bedrooms (plus staff), 8.5 bathrooms, a pool, detailed crown moldings, high ceilings, French doors, a formal living and dining room, eat-in kitchen, den, and separate second-story guest wing. With more than ample storage, a 2-car garage, and full house generator, every living need is met. Some of the real selling points of such an attractive property, according to Koch? The gracious living spaces—both indoor and outdoor—which are conducive to formal and casual entertaining. Also, “the house has amazing wall space,” Koch says, “making it perfect for the art collector.” u For more information about this property at 528 North Lake Way in Palm Beach, Florida, please contact listing agents Dana Koch (561.379.7718) or Paulette Koch (561.346.8639) at Corcoran Group Palm Beach (www.corcoran.com/florida).

CO U RTE S Y O F CO R CO R A N

AN EXQUISITE REGENCY RETREAT


OPEN HOUSE

Opposite page: The front entrance to 528 North Lake Way in Palm Beach, Florida (above); the property’s listing agents, Dana Koch and Paulette Koch, of Corcoran Group Palm Beach (below). This page, clockwise from above: Light bathes the bright, open living room and spaces; a circular outdoor pool; the lush tropical feel of Palm Beach is on view from the dining room; the warm entertainment room. 528 North Lake Way in Palm Beach is on the market for $9,300,000.

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CALENDAR

JANUARY

On January 9, the Wally Findlay Galleries (165 Worth Ave) will host Palm Beach Symphony’s annual gala kickoff honoring the organization’s chairwomen and committee members. For more information, call 561.655.2657.

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The Brooklyn Art Song Society (BASS) will continue its concert series Wein III at the Brooklyn Historical Society (128 Pierrepont Street). For more information, call 917.509.6258.

The 2017 YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund Awards Gala will take place at the Grand Hyatt New York (109 E 42nd Street). Cocktails will be served at 6 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony and dinner at 7 p.m.

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ADVANCING FASHION

For more information, call 914.834.2868. LEADERS IN MEDICINE

Brigham and Women’s Hospital will celebrate its annual BWH Dinner at The Breakers at 6 p.m. For more information, call 61.655.6611.

DINE UNDER THE STARS

The Hanley Center Foundation will hold its Palm Beach Dinner at The Beach Club. For more information, call 561.841.1212.

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MAIN STAGE

The Glades Academy Foundation, Inc. will hold its Evening of Great Expectations at Café Boulud (301 Australian Ave). The Glades Academy is designated as a Title One school, which enables the school to expand the opportunities for students to meet the state achievement standards in math, science, reading, and writing. Its primary purpose is to educate each student to the highest possible level of academic achievement. For more information, call 212.752.4840.

PRETT Y IN PINK

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FOSTERING AWARENESS

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NEW OPPORTUNITIES

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The Palm Beach Symphony will host its 15th annual gala kickoff event at the Wally Findlay Galleries. For more information, call 561.655.2657.

The Ryan Licht Sang Bipolar Foundation will host its Palm Beach Medical Briefing Luncheon at Mar-a-Lago. For more information, call 212.278.0008.

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On January 20, the Winter Antiques Show, one of America’s leading art and design shows, will celebrate its 63rd year at the Park Avenue Armory. For more information, call 212.987.0046.

Susan G. Komen will present the seventh annual Perfect Pink Party at Mar-a-Lago at 7 p.m. The event will recreate the supper club experience reminiscent of Cuba’s famous Tropicana Club, and guests will be able to dance the night away with the help of accomplished professional dancers and musicians. For more information, call 561.307.8000.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

SING A SONG


CALENDAR

Evening at the Flagler Museum at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.8585.

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HAVE FAITH

Catholic Charities will host its sixth annual Bishop Gala at The Breakers. For more information, call 561.630.2695.

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HEALTHY LIVING

On February 2, the Palm Beach Opera will host its gala with Michael Fabiano of the Metropolitan Opera at the Flagler Museum at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.2833.

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The Palm Beach Civic Association will host its annual awards luncheon with guest speaker Tommy Hilfiger at The Breakers at noon. The association was founded in 1944 by a handful of civic-minded Palm Beachers who wished to preserve, protect, and enhance the special qualities of the island. For more information, call 561.655.0820.

The Winter Antiques Show will celebrate its 63rd year as America’s leading art, antiques, and design fair. This year’s fair will feature over 70 renowned experts in fine and decorative arts from around the world. All proceeds from the show will benefit East Side Settlement. For more information, call 212.987.0446.

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A GOOD CAUSE

PROTECTING THE LAND

SHOWTIME

The Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, a distinguished performing arts center located in downtown West Palm Beach, Florida, with a growing national and international reputation, will hold its 25th anniversary gala kickoff reception at Neiman Marcus (151 Worth Avenue) at 6 p.m. For more information, call 561.805.6150.

GONE ANTIQUING

The Hospice Foundation of Palm Beach will host is 2017 Hospice

The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society will hold its gala at Mar-a-Lago (1100 South Ocean Boulevard)at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.2600.

FEBRUARY 2 GARDEN TOURS

The Palm Beach Civic Association and Palm Beach Garden Club will host their Tea and Gardens Tour at the Society of the Four Arts. For more information, call 561.655.7227. A MASTERPIECE

The Palm Beach Opera will host its annual gala with Michael Fabiano of the Metropolitan Opera at the Flagler Museum (1 Whitehall Way) at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.655.2833.

3

A HELPING HAND

The American Red Cross will hold its Diplomats Dinner for the International Red Cross Ball at a private residence. For more information, call 877.733.2767. WINTER PALM TREES

The Boys and Girls Club of Palm Beach County will celebrate its Winter Ball at The Breakers at 7 p.m. Judith Giuliani, Julie Connors, Danielle Moore, and Pauline Pitt will serve as honorary chairwomen. The event will be black-tie. For more information, call 561.683.3287.

4

DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER

The American Red Cross will host its Diamond Centennial Red Cross Ball at Mar-a-Lago at 7 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.2600. FOR THE ARTS

The Norton Museum of Art will host its annual gala at the museum at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.832.6196.

7

HOLISTIC HEALING

The Children’s Healing Institute will hold its second Breakfast at Tiffany’s Tea Party at The Chesterfield at 2 p.m. For more information, call 561.659.5800.

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A CLEAR VISION

Lighthouse Guild will host a cocktail reception to kickoff its ninth annual Palm Beach Dinner Dance honoring Frances Scaife and Jenny Scaife at the Silver Fund (330 Worth Avenue). Lighthouse Guild is a leading not-for-profit vision and healthcare organization with a long-standing heritage of addressing the needs of people who are blind or visually impaired, including those with multiple disabilities or chronic medical conditions. For more information, call 561.828.1522.

On January 27, the Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society will host its annual gala at the Mar-a-Lago Club at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 561.533.0887. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 9 3


Opposite page: Bobby and Ivey Leidy at home in Palm Beach with their three children: Little Bobby, Charlie, and Lilly.

A FAMILY AFFAIR PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

Nobel Prize–winning playwright George Bernard Shaw wrote:

“A happy family is but an earlier heaven.” Wise words from a wise man. Although largely known for being the winter haven of choice for sunning, lunching, and shopping among the nation’s well-heeled elite for over 100 years, those who know Palm Beach well also know that the heart of Palm Beach lies in its loving and devoted families. u   9 4  Q U E S T


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This page: Annabelle, Missy, and Carter Savage enjoying time together outdoors (look fast or you may miss Carter zipping by!). Opposite page: Animal portrait artist Rory Mackay and his wife, Francie, paint a perfect picture with their two boys, Harley and Jasper .

9 6  Q U E S T


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Pepe Fanjul, Jr. and Lourdes Fanjul sitting outside by the pool with their son, “Peps,” and daughter, Lulu—and three beloved extended family members (from left to right) Turner, Casper, and Zac.


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This page: The Bickford family all together at home in Palm Beach. Christopher Bickford (center front); Devon Suozzi (left); Michael Suozzi IV (far left); Mike Suozzi (center back); Christopher Suozzi (in Mike’s arms); Lizzi Bickford (right). Opposite page: Nick and Briggs Coleman monkeying around with their two daughters, Annabelle and Wynnie.


This page: Elisabeth Munder spends a day with her two boys, Grant and Lee. Opposite page: Annie Soper (riding Sky Blue), Harrison, Linda, and Jared Soper together at home in West Palm Beach.

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This page: The Moss family— Abby, Madeline, Judge, Ali, and George—having fun at the beach. Opposite page: Sienna entertains her parents, Piper Quinn and Sara Groff.


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Quest PALM BEACH STYLE

In the early 1880s Henry Flagler, a wealthy Northern industrialist, founded the Town of Palm Beach with the extension of Flagler’s East Coast Railway. Enchanted by Palm Beach’s warm weather and tropical environment, Flagler envisioned Palm Beach as a playground for wealthy Northerners during the cold winter months. As Palm Beach evolved into the premier winter retreat for American aristocracy, the island developed a style all of its own. Here’s a Key lime slice of Quest’s best through the years. 106 QUEST

S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S

BY ELIZABETH MEIGHER


This page, clockwise from top left: Mrs. F.C. Winston “C.Z.” Guest and her son, Alexander, at Villa Artemis in Palm Beach, Florida, 1955; Lilly McKim Pulitzer and her daughters, Minnie and Liza, photographed by Howell Conant in Palm Beach, 1963; Mrs. T. Dennie Boardman and her children, Sam and Sarah, at the home of Boardman’s parents in Palm Beach, 1985; British aviator Claude Graham White and former Vaudeville actress Ethel White outside their cottage in Palm Beach, 1922; Lisa Taylor and Jerry Hall photographed by Helmut Newton at the Royal Biscayne Hotel in Key Biscayne, Florida, 1975. Opposite page: Jim Kimberly, his

U N D E RWO O D A R C H I V E S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; CO N D É N A S T

S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ;

wife (far left), and friends beside Lake Worth in Palm Beach, 1968.

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This page, clockwise from top: Prince Charles (third from right), with Princess Diana at a polo match in Palm Beach (Wellington) during the royal visit to America, 1986; Julia and David Koch at The Coconuts, the annual black-tie party held at The Flagler Museum on New Year’s Eve in Palm Beach; George Hamilton walking in Palm Beach with his mother, Ann Stevens, and step-brother, William Potter, 1960. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: John D. Rockefeller playing golf on his private course at the Casements, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1932; Gilded Age women playing tennis dressed in long, white dresses with billowy sleeves and wide-brim hats at the now-gone Royal Poinciana resort hotel in Palm Beach; Jackie Kennedy watches her daughter, Caroline, play in the living room of their Palm Beach home as newly inaugurated President Kennedy emerges from a dip in the ocean, 1961; D O U G J E N N I N G S / A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y; B E RT M O R G A N / A L A MY

Estée Lauder at home in 1985, as seen in ESTEE A Success Story by Estée Lauder.

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U N D E RWO O D A R C H I V E S / U I G / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K

U N D E RWO O D A R C H I V E S / R E X / S H U T T E R S TO C K ; H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y O F PA L M B E AC H CO U N T Y;

Quest

PALM BEACH STYLE

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S L I M A A RO N S / H U LTO N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y O F PA L M B E AC H CO U N T Y


Quest

PALM BEACH STYLE

This page, clockwise from top left: Dina Merrill and actor Cliff Robertson smile after their wedding at the estate of her mother, cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, in Washington, 1966; Lavinia Baker, greatgranddaughter of George Fisher Baker, taking a turn on the dance floor at her coming out party in New York, 1977; friends (and first cousins once removed) Nick Fouquet and Fern Tailer walking on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, photographed by Susanna Howe, 2013; Grace Pulitzer Amory and T. Dennie Boardman in the Wheelchair Marathon at The Everglades Club, 1937. Opposite page, clockwise from top: Palm Beach style mavens and influencers—including Rodney Dillard, Lesly Smith, Bob Leidy, and Emilia

W H E N G L A M O U R WA S B O R N BY D I A N A O SWA L D ; H E A R S T; U N D E R WO O D A R C H I V E S / U I G / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K

H E N RY B U R RO U G H S / A P / R E X / S H U T T E R S TO C K ; P H OTO CO U RTE S Y O F D E B U TA N TE S :

and Pepe Fanjul—wearing looks by Lilly Pulitzer on the croquet lawn of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Phipps’ North End Moroccan villa, 1970; the Duke of Windsor and a friend walking on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach; Mrs. George Whitney, Jr. photographed by Horst P. Horst, 1946.

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A P / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; C A P E H A RT P H OTO G R A P H Y

Quest

PALM BEACH STYLE

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This page, clockwise from top: Society women board a fishing cruiser at the Key Largo Anglers Club, Florida, 1924; Wendy Vanderbilt photographed by Slim Aarons at home in Palm Beach, 1964; Porfirio Rubirosa (right) and his fourth wife, Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton, arrive at West Palm Beach airport for a delayed honeymoon on January 13, 1954 (at left is their friend S. Leland Rosenberg). The couple married in 1953 and the marriage lasted 53 days. Opposite page, clockwise from top: President-elect John F. Kennedy attending Christmas Day mass at St. Edwards Catholic Church in Palm Beach, 1960; Countess U N D E RWO O D A R C H I V E S / U I G / R E X / S H U T TE R S TO C K ; S L I M A A RO N S / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; A P

Haugwitz- Reventlow, the former Barbara Hutton, and former British amateur golfer Robert Sweeney watch a tennis match at The Everglades Club, 1940; Wilbur and Hilary Geary Ross photographed by Harry Benson at The Coconuts.

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AN AGENDA FOR EXCELLENCE RECENTLY, IN THE TOWN of Palm Beach, a group of citizens was selected to make a presentation to the Town Council Committee on Standards and Ordinances about banning the use of plastic bags at the local Publix. It’s an issue that’s been raised in other areas of the country, and there are already some incentives in several communities for shoppers to bring their own reusable canvas bags. The members of this nominated group presenting, however, were not professional activists. They were eighth and ninth graders at Palm Beach Day Academy. This summer, Palm Beach Day Academy—an independent 114 QUEST

day school with a curriculum for Preprimary through Ninth grade—announced the appointment of Dr. Edwin Gordon as its new Head of School. Gordon has been in Palm Beach for most of the year, getting to know the community. “I began July 1, officially,” he says. “Although from the moment I accepted the position in November of last year, I was coming down monthly. It was one of the best decisions that the school and I made.” Now that the academic year is in full swing, I ask how it’s going. “We’re in a strong position as a school. No crises that we’re trying to manage, and I deal with the best students because these

E R I K A H A N D LE Y

BY ALEX TRAVERS


This page: Shea Vila. Opposite page: Palm Beach Day Academy Head of School Dr. Edwin Gordon with Preprimary students.


This page: Eloise and Thomas Forrest during Palm Beach Day Academy’s STEAM Family BBQ. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Topher and Piper Cook packaging meals at 2016’s Palm Beach Unites; Lourdes Fanjul, Emilia Fanjul, Lyanne Azqueta, Lian Fanjul Azqueta, and Lian Azqueta during an Ambassadors Circle Assembly; Palm Beach Day Academy’s 85th Annual Walter H. Butler Field Day; primary students Rosie Goldberg and Jean Louise Macfarland; fifth grade students at Palm Beach Day Academy’s Election Day “Teach In”; Norberto Azqueta III “Bertie”;

kids have the work ethic of their parents. From my youngest to my oldest, I am convinced these are some of the hardest working students I’ve ever seen.” That’s a strong statement from Gordon, whose career as an educator is impressive. Previously, he directed the Executive Education Program at the University of Pennsylvania and served as a board member of the National Association of Independent Schools. Right before PBDA, he served as the Head of Lower School at Riverdale Country School in New York. “The kids at Palm Beach Day Academy are happy,” he enthuses. “They find learning to be joyful.” As a New Yorker who’s new to Palm Beach, Gordon is especially impressed by the community, where local clubs and recreational centers help form long-lasting friendships. “All of these clubs not only serve as a place to have lunch or do business, but they also serve as a place for families to come together and socialize. The kids get to know each other and find they have a lot in common. At school, we don’t have to introduce people to each other.” Still, Gordon has plans to advance PBDA, and he feels fortunate to work with a board that supports his vision. The 116 QUEST

Agenda for the Future: Strategic Priorities for 2016–2019, he calls it. First, he wants to ensure that the school’s academic programs are both rigorous and relevant. “Especially,” he notes, “in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math.” He also wants to develop the faculty and improve the school’s facilities. Right now, in fact, the school is in the midst of a major project. “A 16,000 square-foot education center will be going up soon.” And then, there is Gordon’s commitment to partnership opportunities with organizations outside of PBDA. “Working together through service and programs,” he explains. “Collaborating with faculty, doing more across campuses, more interdisciplinary work. We always need to look at ways to improve what we do.” At Palm Beach Day Academy, the mission of the school emphasizes developing the mind, body, and character of the students. “All three are very important,” voices Gordon. And that ethos gels well with his Agenda for the Future. “It’s not just about preparing boys and girls for the next grade or high school,” he stresses. “It’s about preparing them for life and a love of learning.” u

C A P E H A RT; E R I K A H A N D LE Y; R I C H A R D T U M M O N

kindergarten students play at the Teddy Bear Picnic.


A FORGOTTEN HISTORY COMES TO LIGHT BY ALEX TRAVERS WITH RESEARCH BY ANDREW B. MACK AS FALL TURNED to winter in 1915, in the early months of Palm Beach Country Club’s construction, the popularity of golf in South Florida was growing. Getting a tee time at Florida’s famous Palm Beach Golf Club was becoming an impossible task. In the normal course of events, you might have expected the construction of Palm Beach Country Club to be rushed in order to meet demand. But when the celebrated architect Donald Ross was commissioned to design a track, the normal course of events rarely applied. For Palm Beach Country Club, Ross chose a plot of land near Lake Worth with a ridge of hills. The land once belonged to the Palm Beach Gun Club. Unfortunately, it was also set on several acres of swampland—not ideal for a golf course. But Ross had a plan. He would pump sand, eventually stacking it eight feet high, across the 30-acre wetlands of the property. “I have no idea how he did that,” remarks Andrew B. Mack, a golf architecture aficionado who spent time at college researching the history of PBCC. Ross then incorporated the sand into the design of the golf course, shaping it into a system of man-made dunes. This flat, dull area of land was now scenic, presenting a wonderful experience for golfers. “It ended up costing half

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a million dollars—back then,” exclaims Mack. The estate of Henry Flagler paid for the construction, and when Palm Beach Country Club opened its first nine holes in 1917, the who’s who of society flocked to the course. During his research, Mack was able to find pictures of Warren G. Harding, James Roosevelt II, and Joe Kennedy playing at PBCC. He found that several tournaments and outings were held there as well. Today, as the course prepares to celebrate 100 years, Palm Beach Country Club, which was purchased from the Flagler estate in 1954, is getting ready to embrace its history. According to Mack, the club didn’t have much interest in the events that took place before 1954, mainly because of its exclusionary practices. But with a little convincing, the club is now planning to publish a book. After all, according to Mack, Palm Beach Country Club should be considered as one of Ross’ best courses. Since its inception, Palm Beach Country Club has been redesigned, but much of Ross’ original routing still remains. And for Mack, a PBCC member, that is what makes the course great. “Palm Beach Country Club,” he tells me, “is kind of a miracle of golf course architecture.” u


This page: Three-time major champion Ralph Guhldahl putting on the ninth green in 1938 (above); five frequent participants pictured together at the 1929 Writers and Artists Association Annual Golf Tournament, held at PBCC (pictured from left to right): Tex Rickard, Grantland Rice, Ring Lardner, Gene Tunney, and Rube Goldberg (below). Opposite page: The original Palm Beach Country Club clubhouse.

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UNDERWOOD ARCHIVES; TUF TS ARCHIVE

HISTORIC AL SOCIET Y OF PALM BE ACH COUNT Y;


This page, clockwise from above: An aerial shot of Palm Beach Country Club after Dick Wilson’s renovations shows that the grassed-over dunes had yet to be covered up with fill from the lake construction; Edgar Selwyn, Hollywood producer, director, and co-founder of Goldwyn Pictures, playing at PBCC in 1928; teeing off on the first hole in 1921; Consuelo Vanderbilt, Duchess of Marlborough, at PBCC in 1939. Opposite page, clockwise from above: A view down Palm Beach Country Club’s 10th fairway in 1933; James Roosevelt, II, teeing up in front of the club house while his father, Franklin, met with Joe Kennedy, Sr., nearby; the first hole, 1921; part of R. Kawashima’s painting of Palm Beach Country Club, showing the Donald Ross course design.

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This page: An aerial shot of Palm Beach Country Club taken in March of 1934 (above); Tommy Loughran, the former World Light Heavyweight champion, takes a shot from the sand, 1930 (below). Opposite page: A view down Palm Beach Country Club’s 10th fairway, taken in 1935;

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S H E R E

Palm Beach Country Club, designed by the celebrated architect Donald Ross, circa late 1940s.

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J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 1 2 3

H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y O F PA L M B E AC H CO U N T Y


A WINTER BALL’S WORTHWHILE CAUSE BY DANIEL CAPPELLO JUDITH GIULIANI, a registered nurse whose charitable interests are in healthcare philanthropy, does not take to lending her name casually to organizations. For the majority of her professional career, she has focused her support on causes that benefit children with special needs. As the wife of former New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani, her profile isn’t just high—it carries with it a sense of civic duty and obligation. Which is why she’s agreed to serve as Chairwoman for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County’s annual gala, The Winter Ball, to be held on February 3 at The Breakers, Palm Beach. “Children are the cornerstone of our society and the future of our country,” Giuliani tells me, “and this organization is truly making a difference in the lives of children.” As a healthcare practitioner who understands developmental needs, she explains “just how important it is for kids to have something to do after school, and the 13 Clubs in the Palm Beach area provide just that.” Last year, nearly 8,000 young people benefitted from one of the Clubs or its programming. “Sixty percent of our kids say they would be left alone otherwise if it weren’t for the Clubs,” Giuliani explains. “And almost ninety percent of the money we raise goes directly to youth programing.” Board Chairman Wally Turner, who tapped Giuliani to lead this year’s Winter Ball, expands on the importance of the evening’s success: “Last year we netted over one million dollars, which helps to sustain us as the largest children’s service organization in the county.” 124 QUEST

Founded in 1971, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County is a not-for-profit youth-development organization dedicated to promoting the educational, vocational, health, and leadership needs of boys and girls in a secure, nurturing environment. The Clubs provide a safe, fun, and constructive alternative to being home alone—and offer award-winning developmental programs to help build skills, self-esteem, and character during critical periods of growth. Though a highlight of the social season, The Winter Ball is really all about the kids, according to Giuliani, which is why she’s planning to make them a focus of the evening. “They will be performing for us that night and have been working with a professional choreographer.” For many of the participants, it will be a chance to show off a talent they might want to pursue professionally one day. And that is what it’s all about, according to Giuliani. “You want to give them a chance to directly participate in whatever field it is that they want to pursue.” Turning the spotlight on its members come February 3 will naturally emphasize the organization’s achievements. “They’re such terrific kids,” Giuliani gushes. “I can’t say that enough!” u To support The Winter Ball and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County, please contact Lily Holt Dillon (561.308.3919 or lilyholtinc@gmail.com) or visit bgcpbc.org.


The Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County will host The Winter Ball on Friday, February 3, 2017, at The Breakers, Palm Beach. Mrs. Rudolph W. Giuliani will serve as Chair. On these pages, scenes from last year’s Winter Ball, which was held on February 5, 2016. Opposite page: Dancing followed dinner at The Breakers; Judith Giuliani, this year’s Chair. This page, first row (l-r): Club members lend a hand; board member Tom Quick; Betsy and Wally Turner, who is Chairman of the Board. Second row (l-r): Rudolph and Judith Giuliani with Julie and Mike Connors; Lesly Smith and Danielle Hickox Moore; Talbot Maxey, Greg Connors, and Karin Luter. Third row (l-r): Michael Crimi with a Club member; Jennifer Fischer. Fourth row (l-r): Club member Demetreous gives a speech; Robert and Lydia Forbes; Hillie Mahoney and Jorie Kent.


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CO U RTE S Y O F C LE M E N T I N E G O U TA L ;


This page: An Upper Echelon Academy student jumping. Opposite page: Clementine Goutal.

A LOVE OF LEARNING BY ALEX TRAVERS


Q: What makes UEA different than other tutoring programs? A: Most of our clients are student athletes so we coordinate with their schools, coaches, parents, and anyone else who might play a role in scheduling and conflicts. UEA helps our clients organize their priorities, balance their commitments, manage their time. Q: What prompted you to start this business? A: When I finished my studies at Brown, I was disappointed in the career sacrifices I saw my equestrian peers making. Many of them—and they had the opportunity and capability to attend great schools—either skipped higher education all together or elected to enroll in online programs they wouldn’t likely complete. In addition, I saw so many shortcuts in the education provided to students. Most of our students really do want to have it all. We have this juggling act down to a science and get our clients on track so they can give it their all in the show ring, in the class room, and in any other domain for which 128 QUEST

they need time and focus. I get so much joy seeing kids who were once hardly willing to do math homework—because they only had time to ride—suddenly volunteering to help with our philanthropic projects, having already done all their schoolwork. Q: When you were a student, did you have a mentor? A: Yes, and he is now my partner. Andy Bowers started tutoring me when I would come down to Wellington for horse shows, and he taught me how to manage my time and maintain my grades while I was competing nationally, and eventually internationally. Q: What do you like about riding? A: I love my horses more than I could ever express. Being able to jump on a horse and go for a ride has gotten me through the worst days of my life. The connection we can establish with these animals is astonishing and therapeutic. Q: How does being an athlete help sharpen your focus in school and other aspects of life? A: Learning to perform under pressure is the first thing that comes to mind. Athletes work day in and day out to give their best demonstrations at competitions. Walking into an exam, needing to deliver information you spent weeks or months learning, seems a lot less daunting once you get used to what we do. I also think the way athletes learn to lose is really important. Anyone can have fun winning, but staying motivated and finding positives...on bad days...well that’s different. The nature of athletics is that you cannot win all the time, but we have to learn from mistakes and grow from them. Finally, athletes learn to ask for help. We all need advice, support, and guidance, and there’s no shame in reaching out. u

S H A W N M C M I LLE N ; A N N E G I T T E N S ; CO U RTE S Y O F C LE M E N T I N E G O U TA L

ONE OF CLEMENTINE GOUTAL’S many gifts is the way she has managed to balance her career and her love for all things equestrian. Her business, Upper Echelon Academy, a tutoring service catered to student athletes, helps high school and college students do the same. And although finding a healthy equilibrium between sports and studies will always remain a challenge, Goutal is living proof that you can succeed at both—and still have time for the other things you love. “I connect with a lot of our students because I am addicted to the horses,” she says, “and yet I demanded excellence of myself in school.” That credo— that the full contours of life, including its pleasures, obligations, highs, and lows, are nothing to shy away from—appears central to her business and how she prefers to live her life.


This page: Clementine tutors a student (above); Clementine, who competed both nationally and internationally on the equestrian circuit, jumping (below). Opposite page: Reilly Gogul; a UEA student jumps a hurdle.


PALM BEACH 1927–1928 BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

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Breakers. In April 1911, the town of Palm Beach was officially incorporated, and Henry Flagler’s vision had become a reality. By the 1920s, Palm Beach had become the winter retreat for the members of the new American Industrial Revolution wealth who came mainly from the northeast and specifically from New York and Philadelphia. Mansions to hold the new arrivals, designed by Addison Mizner, Maurice Fatio, Marion Sims Wyeth, and others set the tone and the style. After World War I, as the town was becoming a mecca for these tycoons and their families, private clubs like the Bath and Tennis, Bradley’s Beach Club, the Everglades, and the Sailfish Club were created to provide social activity for them.

LU C I U S O R D WAY F R A Z E R CO LLE C T I O N

IN THE EARLY 1880s, Henry Morrison Flagler, a co-founder with John D. Rockefeller of what would become Standard Oil, discovered the island that would become famous to the world as Palm Beach. By then, Mr. Flagler’s business interests included the founding the East Coast Railway, and he was actively involved in the development of real estate (and towns) along the east coast of Florida. Palm Beach was already very sparsely populated with settlers but Flagler, who was taken with the warm, balmy weather, could see that it was an ideal island to create a playground for wealthy Northerners in the wintertime. He built his first hotels there, one of which survived—in a couple of incarnations—as The

CO U RTE S Y O F T H E

PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE LUCIUS ORDW AY FRA ZER COLLECTION


This page: At Casa de Leoni, the Glendinning family’s Worth Avenue villa overlooking Singer Basin. Left to right: Mary Glendinning Cooke and her daughter Nini; Ellen Glendinning Frazer with son Perkie and daughter Bettina. Opposite page: In 1928, Vogue magazine featured this drawing, illustrating the oceanfront cabanas at the Bath and Tennis Club. Far left: Ellen Glendinning Frazer holding the hand of her son Perkie Frazer. On the boardwalk, right, Mrs. Edward MacLean; beside her, in a complete white outfit, Mary Brown Wanamaker Warburton.


CO U RTE S Y O F T H E LU C I U S O R D WAY F R A Z E R CO LLE C T I O N

This page: Jimmie Cromwell’s Comic Costume Party at El Mirasol, February 1928. From left: Winston Guest, Ellen Glendinning Frazer, Evie Shaffer, and Jay Carlisle. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Designed by Joseph Urban, the million-dollar Bath and Tennis Club was open for two brief seasons before the damage from the September 1928 hurricane resulted in much of it being rebuilt; in their Palm Beach wheelchairs, the family heads over to El Mirasol where Eva Stotesbury invited the children to visit their private zoo. Left to right, Robert Glendinning, on the bicycle, his mother Elizabeth “Bessie” Carpenter Glendinning with her grandchildren, Perkie and Bettina; Ellen’s sister Mary Cooke and her daughter Nini, and the nanny, Mrs. Smith; Julia Brokaw, the daughter of the Howard and Edna Loew Brokaw, photographed February 1927, the club’s inaugural season; with more than 100 cabanas lining the beach, the B&T was designed to offer a more casual informal gathering place. Pictured above, Jim Blair, Alistair “Allie” Mackintosh, Ellen Glendinning Frazer, Susan “Burks” Yuille Carstairs, Mabel Cochran, and Prince Hohenlohe; Jacques Bonstetton at Otto Kahn’s Oheka Cottage, a block north of The Breakers beach. 132 QUEST


This page, clockwise from top left: Morris Legendre, Gertrude Sanford Legendre, and Sidney Legendre; Carrol and Burks Carstairs (Burks’s sister Ellen married Wolcott Blair); Robert Glendinning making an iron shot on the Everglades Golf Course with the Oswald Birley art studio overlooking Singer Basin in the background. One of the club’s board members, Ellen’s father was one of the syndicate owners of the club who owned the club for a decade after they bought out the interest of the Singer family and the bankruptcy trustees. Eventually,

Her subject was the life around her— her friends, her family, her milieu. 134 QUEST

Among the many wintertime visitors was a young woman from Philadelphia, Ellen Glendinning Frazer (later Ordway), who first visited with her parents, who had built a winter home there. After marrying and starting a family, Palm Beach became an annual visit to the point that, one day, she and her new family would become permanent residents. Mrs. Frazer Ordway also had a new hobby, one that was quite the rage after George Eastman developed his Kodak camera. Her subject, as it was with most who were buying Mr. Eastman’s revolutionary creation, was the life around her— her friends, her family, her milieu. She took her hobby quite seriously, although she never regarded herself as a professional photographer. Still, her interest was intense, and from those early days, Ellen Ordway, as she became known in her world of society with her second marriage, photographed her environment down through the next five decades. On these pages, we see the beginnings of what became—unbeknownst and unrealized by Mrs. Ordway—a major photographic archive of society of 20th-century America. u

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the club became member-owned.


This page, far left: By 1928, Winston Guest was an eight-goal polo player who took to the field at Phipps Field, Gulf Stream, and at Meadowbrook, Long Island. Top right: The center of attention, architect Maurice Fatio and Marjorie Oelrichs, to his left, celebrate the 1927 opening of the Bath and Tennis Club. Under the guidance of Anthony Drexel Biddle, the B&T’s founding membership included the New York–Philadelphia social axis with Wall Street scions, Hollywood personalities, and Broadway stars, including Flo Ziegfeld, Mortimer Schiff, Jules Bache, Vincent Youmans, and Otto Kahn, who was also a partner with Biddle in the company that owned the club. Middle right: Tobacco heiress Ellen Daniel Yuille Blair’s sketch portrait appeared in the October 1927 issue of Harper’s Bazaar. A close friend of Ellen Glendinning Frazer’s, Ellen and her husband, Wolcott Blair, hosted the Duke and Duchess of Windsor years later during their annual Palm Beach pilgrimages. Ellen and the duchess were old school chums from Oldfields School. Bottom right: The open-air cafeteria at the Bath and Tennis Club. Ellen Glendinning Frazer, left, Persifor “Persi” Frazer III, far right, and to his left, with his back turned, Howard Whitney.


Clockwise from left: Elizabeth Brinton Kent Van Alen, wife of William Van Alen, shown on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, 1931; Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Goodman of New York—and Bergdorf Goodman fame—pause during a stroll on Worth Avenue; a more modern view of the famous Palm Beach strip.

P.B. SHOPPING IS WORTH THE WHILE BY DANIEL CAPPELLO AND ALEX TRAVERS

AS FAR AS TONY shopping streets go, it doesn’t get much better than Palm Beach’s Worth Avenue. Not only is it the jewel of Addison Mizner’s Mediterranean and Spanish Revival–style architecture, but it’s also the birthplace of Lilly Pulitzer’s first boutique and home to today’s most fashionable and exclusive brands, not to mention a fine-dining spot or few. Even the shoppers themselves tend to give off a golden, colorful glow. 136 QUEST

Here, moms still abide by Pulitzer’s colorful mode of dress, and dads appear to deem lime green cashmere sweaters de rigueur. Fortunately, new brands must embrace the architecture when they move in, which lends character and individuality to their special locale. There’s a comfort in knowing it’s business as usual here—and by that, we mean a shopping destination where brands hold on to a tradition of courtesy and congeniality. u


RALPH LAUREN 300 Worth Avenue / 561.651.3900 Ralph Lauren can be credited with inventing modern American style. For over 40 years, the brand has provided quality products that embody luxury. Certain accessories—like the modernly elegant Ricky bag—have become so popular, they’re iconic. This Worth Avenue location boasts a beautiful Beaux-Arts façade and an imported European stone fountain. As with all Ralph Lauren stores, you can find apparel for a glamorous evening on the town or a few classic cotton piqué polos for the tennis club. Also, because this is Palm Beach, you can never go wrong with a brightly colored cableknit cashmere sweater (or few).

JENNIFER GARRIGUES 308 Peruvian Avenue / 561.659.7085 Interior designer Jennifer Garrigues began her career as a high-fashion model, working for Christian Dior. It comes as little surprise, then, that she has a trained and talented eye for sumptuous things. Known for her creative taste that harmoniously blends style and comfort, Garrigues offers design services for residential, commercial, and hospitality projects. She has designed locally for the Palm Beach Polo and Country Club and in New York for The Carlyle. Her showroom is the perfect place to find that item you didn’t know you needed to have for your home. From luxurious textiles and pillows to one-of-a-kind furniture pieces and decorative objects (which make great hostess gifts), there’s something for every type of living space at Jennifer Garrigues.

J.MCLAUGHLIN E N T E RTA I N M E N T O N E F I L M S U . S . ; CO U RTE S Y O F R E S P E C T I V E B R A N D S

225 B Worth Avenue / 561.655.5973 The first J.McLaughlin store, located in an Ivy League–riddled enclave on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, was a small place with a welcoming, faded-paint feel. It was preppy. It was rustic. People loved it. Today, with close to 100 stores and a flourishing e-commerce business, J.McLaughlin celebrates its continued success as classic American clothiers and one of the country’s last great first-name-basis retailers. Their clothes, as they were from day one, are simple and smart. (The J.McLaughlin website describes them as “innovatively nostalgic.”) And that means they’re a perfect match for Palm Beach style—as timeless and effortless as it is chic.


LINDROTH DESIGN 312-B S. County Road / 561.249.1205 Amanda Lindroth’a earliest memories of her native Florida include its beautiful nature and the glamour of Palm Beach. She has lived in Paris, worked for both Women’s Wear Daily and W, and served Tom Ford in public relations. Today she takes inspiration from the islands (most notably Nassau) and designs interiors that are comfortable and breezy. Her store, on S. County Road, offers an array of inspired goods (think raffia baskets and island trays) that are right at home in Palm Beach.

BETTERIDGE 236 Worth Avenue / 561.655.5850 Betteridge is one of America’s most historic fine jewelers. The Betteridge name has been associated with jewelry for centuries: the company’s president, Terry Betteridge, is a fourth-generation jeweler whose roots date back to the 1700s in Birmingham, England, where the name was synonymous with fine jewelry design and silversmithing. Today, the Betteridge boutique in Palm Beach is a joy to visit, offering all types of fine jewelry, by both classic and contemporary designers. Then, of course, there are pearls, pre-owned watches, and the brand’s own Betteridge Collection. They also offer many on-site services, such as repairs and appraisals. A true treasure trove on Worth Avenue, Betteridge is worth the stop.

STUBBS & WOOTTON

P H OTO C R E D I T G O E S

Purveyors of the handmade slipper— which can be spotted both day and night, on men and women alike— Stubbs & Wootton is a favorite among locals (or anyone in the market for an authentic touch of Palm Beach style). The brand’s iconic designs embody everything you want on this island: fine quality and fashion sense mixed with equal parts wit, humor, and flair. Whether in velvet or needlepoint, prepare to turn heads when you step out in your Stubbs. With a handsome new store that just opened at 340 Worth Avenue, you’re sure to find a perfect matc.

HERE

340 Worth Ave. / 561.655.6857


VILEBREQUIN 335 Worth Avenue / 561.835.0170 Since 1971, from the shores of St. Tropez, Vilebrequin has devoted itself to the art of swimwear and beachwear—without ever losing its place on the cutting edge. Its founders realized that spinnaker cloth, originally used for kite fabric and boat sails, dried extremely well in the sun and wind, and decided to use it to fashion sporty swimwear. The brand has become famous for its father-and-son matching concept, which today extends to moms and daughters as well. Its Worth Avenue store hosts the latest of Vilebrequin’s fine offerings, bringing a touch of Côte d’Azur élan to Palm Beach’s sunny shores.

SOCAPRI 235 Worth Avenue / 561.802.9940 SOCAPRI is a lifestyle brand offering a full collection of men’s and women’s resortwear inspired by its namesake island. Each unique piece embodies the essence of Capri and the spirit of endless summer. The brand seamlessly marries the spirit of high Italian fashion with a dream-like allure of idyllic leisure—perfect for Palm Beach—and is built on a foundation of artisanal craftsmanship passed down through generations. Each piece is hand-crafted using only the finest linens, silks, cottons, and cashmeres. If you’re looking for a label that combines the most contemporary designs with a fresh take on timeless elegance, look no further.

CHARLOTTE KELLOGG

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256 Worth Avenue / 561.820.2407 332 South County Road / 561.820.2402 It’s the fashion destination for tropical colors in linen, silk, and cotton. Tucked away in a corner of the Amore Courtyard, Charlotte Kellogg’s fanciful boutique offers casual clothing designed for the lifestyle of South Florida and other bright-hued resort communities. Her cheerful and breathable designs have been making a colorful splash on the Palm Beach scene since the boutique opened in 1998. Now, the store has become a true Palm Beach tradition for fashionable pieces that will suit every occasion, from sportswear to eveningwear. Stop in for one of Kellogg’s iconic shirt dresses—or more formal jacket for dinner. J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 1 3 9


T R AV E R S

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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST BY ALE X TRAVER S

A smiling DJ Jubilee on the decks at Artsy and SoundCloud’s Collective Reality

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event in Miami.

140 QUEST


Clockwise from top left: Mia Moretti; Sebastian Faena; Alan Faena and Ursula Corbero; Alley Biehl; Ryan McGinley and Derek Blasberg.

STYLISH SYNESTHESIA: ARTSY AND SOUNDCLOUD CREATE A “COLLECTIVE REALITY” TALK ABOUT A TRIP—Artsy and SoundCloud’s “Collective

Reality” was just that. Taking place at Miami’s Faena Art Dome, projections of odd floaty shapes and robotic faces swirled across screens, surrounding partygoers. But as strange as it was, the space felt alive, bursting with the euphoric joy that can get us lost in a work of art. Familiar faces, developer Alana Faena and

permanent party fixture Derek Blasberg, made cameos. And the gorgeous Elena Soboleva, who curated this collective reality, answered questions about the artworks. As always, a party lives or dies depending on how much we give a damn or don’t about the music, and DJ Jubilee kept the crowd on its feet all night. Who’d want it any other way? J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7


Natalia Bonifacci; Marc Homs signs a copy of his

▲ MARC HOM’S “PROFILES” BOOK LAUNCH

▼ COACH TURNS 75

EXCITED. ENERGIZED. ALIVE. Those are the sensations you feel when you look at Marc Hom’s photographs. There’s beauty in them, as well as spontaneity and heat. Hom was on hand December 8 at BookMarc in Los Angeles to sign copies of his latest book, Profiles. Mads Mikkelsen, Natalia Bonifacci and Olga Pancenko all showed support and posed for pics. But can you guess which one is featured inside Profiles?

SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS OLD. That’s like a million in fashion years, where success and fame can easily come and go. So hats off to Coach, who celebrated 75 at Manhattan’s Pier 94 on a cool December night. The evening started with a fashion show—the Pre-Fall season for both men and women—and ended with a party. Spotted: Drew Barrymore, Olivia Culpo, and Riley Keough, Diplo, Mark Ronson, and Zoe Kravitz.

From left to right: The set of Coach’s Pre-Fall fashion show, celebrating the brand’s 75th anniversary; Mark Ronson; Drew Barrymore. 142 QUEST

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latest book, “Profiles” at Bookmarc in Los Angeles.

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From left to right: Lauren Anderson; model


Clockwise from top left: Amirah Kassem, owner and founder of the Flour Shop; Grace Mahary and Paolo Roldan; Kate Young and Brooke Garber Neidich; New York Giants receiver Odell Beckham, Jr.; Lainy Hedaya and Simon Doonan.

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SUCH GEMS: BARNEYS NEW YORK CELEBRATES SIDNEY GARBER’S FIRST MEN’S COLLECTION IN 2008, Brooke Garber Neidich inherited her father’s Chicago-based jewelry store. Sidney Garber Fine Jewelry, it was called, and Brooke, who once stood behind the counter as a little girl, is now keeping the family tradition alive. She recently launched Sidney Garber’s first men’s collection, exclusively available at Barneys. On December 13, the luxury department

store hosted a party for Brooke, celebrating the new line. At the event, the designs caught the attention of New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. But what’s even better is that all the proceeds earned are donated to non-for-profit organizations for children’s mental health and wellness, education, and the arts. u J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 1 4 3


SNAPSHOT

ONLY TWO GRAVESTONES rest on all of Palm Beach, and

both are dedicated to pets: Johnnie Brown, a spider monkey, and Laddie, a dog. The two markers are positioned next to one another in the courtyard of Pizza Al Fresco, an Italian restaurant at 14 Via Mizner. Johnnie Brown belonged to Addison Mizner, an architect who largely defined the Palm Beach landscape as it exists today. Mizner completed his first major project, the Everglades Club, upon his arrival in Palm Beach in 1918. He was immediately commissioned for a series of structures that would serve as residences for the community’s elite. Members of the Kennedy and Vanderbilt families, as well as John Lennon, have lived in his homes. By the mid-1920s, Mizner had designed buildings throughout the area, including the Boca Raton Resort, which is now a member of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotels and Resorts. During construction, Mizner would regularly tour the property in 144 QUEST

silk pajamas with Johnnie Brown perched atop his shoulder. A true eccentric, Mizner owned two other monkeys, Deuteronomy and Ethel, as well as anteaters, macaws, and raccoons. Stephen Sondheim was so intrigued by Mizner’s character that he based his musical Road Show on his life. Johnnie Brown died on April 30, 1927, and was memorialized as “The Human Monkey” on his gravestone. By honoring this burial, Palm Beach recognized Mizner and Johnnie Brown’s everlasting influence on the community. After Mizner died, in 1933, Morton and Rose Sachs purchased his house on Via Mizner. When the Sachs’s dog, Laddie, died on December 1, 1959, he was buried next to Johnnie Brown with the gravestone inscribed, simply, “We miss you so.” —Elizabeth Brown Monkeys, both actual and representational, are an enduring part of Palm Beach history because of one spider monkey named Johnnie Brown.

C A R R I E B R A D B U R N ( H E A D S TO N E )

MIZNER’S MONKEY


www.parklimo.net | (561) 832-2222 | (800) 462-9929 www.parklimo.net | (561) 832-2222 | (800) 462-9929

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Quest January 2017