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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E SPRING ISSUE 2012 > $5.00

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SPRING CLASSICS

MODEL SUSAN MURRAY WEARING A DRESS BY TIZIANI


RALPH LAUREN Collection


RALPH LAUREN Collection

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F E A T U R E S

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40 LIVING LEGEND Liz Smith examines the remarkarble career and love lives of Elizabeth Taylor, a self-proclaimed survivor who was once dubbed “the most beautiful woman in the world” and is the focus of Q’s Living Legend this issue. 50 HOW TO BUY ART Helena Gautier walks us through the 14th annual Armory Arts Week, one of the boldest and most high-powered fairs in the world that has made New York an obligatory destination for artists, collectors and critics alike. 54 ALL-AMERICAN TEAM Elizabeth Quinn Brown schools readers on the game of lacrosse, tracing the sport all the way to its North American roots as an exercise in combat.

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60 THE MEN AND THE MONOGRAM Stefan Doyno explores the collaboration between Louis Vuitton and Marc Jacobs as it has evolved over the years. 66 AHEAD FOR FALL: 2012 From J. Mendel and Ralph Lauren to Katie Ermilio and Tibi, Daniel Cappello heads to the tents at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York to take in and report on all the trends ahead for Fall collections.

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78 IT’S ALL IN THE BAG Sisters Cecilia and Giulia Maresca take advantage of their experience in the fashion industry by founding a handbag company called Lemaresca. 82 CROWNING MOMENT Q fêtes By Invitation Only: How We Built Gilt and Changed the Way Millions Shop, a book by Alexandra Wilkis Wilson and Alexis Maybank, with a luncheon co-hosted by Stuart Weitzman for ladies at Crown. 88 9 LIVES OF STYLE Elizabeth Meigher interviews Daniel Benedict, Andrew Saffir, Kick Kennedy, Chuck Pfeifer, and other New York personalities about their style.

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Model Susan Murray wearing full-skirted striped silk evening dress by Tiziani, circa 1966. Courtesy of Condé Nast Archive/Corbis. Photographed by Henry Clarke.


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21 NOSTALGIA A montage of spring scenes that bring to life some of the season’s most memorable activities. 24 JEWELRY All that glitters is gold (and silver!) as we take a peek at the best offerings from leading jewelry houses from Madison Avenue to Austria, from costume to high-end collections. 28 TREND A rundown of this season’s inspirations, which include Deco Flair and Neon. 32 SUNGLASSES From Mondrian-inspired specs to Miu Mius and more, this spring you can block out the rays in style.

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34 BAGS In patchwork prints and color-blocked leathers, totes can take you from work to the beach—so, carry on! 36 SHOES Stand tall this spring with some statement shoes. Fortune—and your figure—favor the bold at heart. 38 MEN’S APPAREL Know the true meaning of business casual after surveying these lightweight suits and looks for spring.

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98 Q FOCUS Behind the scenes of the hippest parties across the country, from Miami for the opening of a new St. Regis resort in Bal Harbour to New York for a private celebration of Assouline’s touted title The Ivy League. 104 BEAUTY The loveliest (and loveliest smelling) products to make you look and feel your best. 106 EVENING LOOKS Whether you’re an Audrey or a Joan, you’ll find inspiration for dressing up from the ladies who went before you—and the designers at your fingertips. 110 SHOPPING INDEX Where to shop in order to find the looks from these pages.

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112 HOROSCOPES The stars align in our horoscopes column. Find out what they have in store for you!


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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EDITOR

JAMES STOFFEL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

GEORGINA SCHAEFFER EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN A SSOCIATE EDITOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO FA SHION DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX A SSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR

CHRISTIAN CHENSVOLD

STEFAN DOYNO

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

A SSI STANT EDITOR

HILARY GEARY SOCIET Y EDITOR

SAVANNAH SYSKA INTERN

JOANNA BAKER CO-FOUNDING EDITOR

Quest Media, LLC. S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III CHAIRMAN AND C.E.O.

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ARLENE LEFKOE ACCOUNTING MANAGER BOARD OF ADVISORS

BRUCIE BOALT EDWARD LEE CAVE BARBARA CORCORAN JED H. GARFIELD CLARK HALSTEAD HOWARD LORBER PAMELA LIEBMAN ELIZABETH STRIBLING ROGER W. TUCKERMAN PETER TURINO WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF LISA ROSENBERG 917.576.8951 GREENWICH

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© QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2012. All rights reserved. Vol. 7, No. 1. Q-Quintessential Style is published quarterly, 4 times a year. Yearly subscription rate $32.00. Two year rate $50.00. Q, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. For address changes, please call: 646.840.3404. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Q-Quintessential Style, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

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EDITOR’S LETTER

The Prussian general and military theorist Carl von Clausewitz claimed that “Courage, above all things, is the first Th quality of a warrior.” I remember this quote from a history class I took in high school—we were studying the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. I had a particularly terrific teacher that year, and even though I don’t remember much else from the class or even from that year, this quote about courage has always stayed with me. This issue is full of warriors of every age, type, and era, and rings with a courageous spirit—from its abundance of bright and bold fashion; heroes battling it out on the lacrosse fields; artists revealing radical designs and cutting-edge techniques; fashion designers exploring unchartered territory with revolutionary ideas; and two young ladies proving that the modern woman truly can have it all: marriage, motherhood, and “mogul-hood.” Beginning with her career as one of the world’s most famous film stars, there’s no denying Elizabeth Taylor was a warrior. Clad in Cartier and Bulgari diamonds, Taylor won battle after battle and fought through the end—abuse, eight marriages, bad health, several life-threatening illnesses, and the remarkable war she waged on HIV and AIDS. “I’m a survivor,” she said, “a living example of what people can go through and survive.” Liz Smith, Q’s beloved voice of reason and common sense, shares a straightforward and sincere account of her legendary friend Elizabeth Taylor. Despite many struggles and cruel press over her changing looks (at 17, she was dubbed “The Most Beautiful Woman In The World”), Taylor courageously resisted seclusion and displayed her aging self for the world to see. Liz recalls Taylor boldly stating, “This is it, folks. Deal with it. If you don’t like it, don’t look. Get a life; I’ve got mine.” Chuck Pfeifer, one of my favorite warriors (literally—he battled as a combat officer with SOG in Vietnam, where he daringly rescued downed pilots and reconnaissance teams in trouble), also makes an appearance in this issue. Although wounded three times, Pfeifer made his way home and went on to become one of Y&R’s original “Mad Men” (minus the dark side), an awardwinning journalist, Ford model, film actor, and executive producer. Today Pfeifer is the same handsome, clever, kind, and sharply dressed man he was when Ford wisely scooped him up. Read more about him in my story on style. Speaking of style, Q contributor (and our newest assistant editor) Stefan Doyno discusses the synergy between Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton with a look at Rizzoli’s new book, Louis Vuitton/Marc Jacobs. For ultimate fashion, Q’s own Daniel Cappello reports from the Fall 2012 runways, with inspired looks from an array of fashion’s new and storied designers. Think Oscar, Ralph, r and a impressive newcomer Katie Ermilio. Daniel is also a newly minted author with his publication of The Ivy League (Assouline). See S photos from his book launch party in our Coast To Coast: New York section. On the heels of fashion week’s buzz and excitement, frequent Q contributor Helena Gautier heads to Armory Arts Week, New York’s Clockwise, from bottom: Manolo Blahnik pump; Tory Burch leading international art fair devoted to showcasing the most important necklace; an advertisement showcasing Louis Vuitton’s collaborworks of art from the 20th and 21st centuries. Gautier consults with ation with Marc Jacobs; a Bulgari purse; a vintage image of experts in the field on what to consider and what steps to take when Chuck Pfeifer; a Hunter Boot bag; the Little Red Lighthouse in building a collection. Jeffrey’s Hook, New York; a Carolina Herrera runway look; Prada “I feel very adventurous. There are so many doors to be opened, sunglasses; a portrait of Elizabeth Taylor, this issue’s “Living and I’m not afraid to look behind them.” Take a cue from Elizabeth Legend”; artwork from Armory Arts Week; the Alice in WonderTaylor, and channel your adventurous spirit this season. X land sculpture in Central Park; Gucci rings.

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EL EDITOR


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CONTRIBUTORS

Liz Smith > Liz calls herself the 2,000-year-old gossip columnist. These days she’s been having fun with her website, which features twenty famous women: WowOWow.com (aimed at the largest demographic coming on the web—women who weren’t born yesterday!). In her latest “Living Legend” column for Q, Liz tells the story of Elizabeth Taylor, with whom she was friends. The actress, recognized as The Most Beautiful Woman in the World, rose from a child actress in National Velvet to an international star, always remembering to devote herself to helping others along the way.

50 Stefan Doyno > As the newest and youngest member of the Quest and Q editorial team, Stefan recently took on the role of assistant editor. Raised on the Upper East Side and in Scarsdale, Stefan is currently pursuing his master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism at Columbia University. He comes to Quest and Q with a vast experience in media and is thrilled to be able to cover stories in his favorite city. In this issue of Q, Stefan explores the longlived synergy that exists between Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton. You can follow him on Twitter: @TheWriteStefan.

66 Patrick McMullan > The premiere nightlife photographer in New York City, longtime Quest and Q contributor Patrick McMullan’s work appears regularly in New York, Allure, Interview, Details, Tatler, Paper, Hamptons, Ocean Drive, and Gotham. A contributing editor at Vanity Fair, McMullan’s book, Kiss Kiss, is a compilation of over 1,000 blackand-white and color images from his vast body of work, capturing the famous, the infamous, the beautiful, the talented, and everyone in between puckering up. Said the late, great Andy Warhol, “If you don’t know Patrick McMullan, you ought to get out more!”

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40 < Helena Gautier is a social commentary freelance writer whose work often takes her around the world. Her passion for travel keeps her in touch with people, situations, and events that help shape her knowledge and opinions on the latest interests of today’s society. In addition to Q, her work has appeared in Paris Match and on “A Small World.” She lives in New York City with her husband, Adrien Gautier, and their two dogs. She is currently working on her first novel. This issue, Helena writes two stories, including one about a handbag line called Lemaresca.

60 < Daniel Cappello is the fashion director of Quest and Q, and is the author of The Ivy League (Assouline), which was published earlier this spring. In this issue of Q, Daniel reports back from the runways at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, giving us his take on some of the latest trends for Fall 2012 from some of his favorite fashion designers. In addition to his runway report, you can see some of the highlights in Q Focus from the launch party for his new book, which was celebrated in true Ivy League style (with a special appearance from the Columbia Kingsmen).

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MEERA GANDHI’S GIVING BACK BOOK WITH FOREWORD BY CHERIE BLAIR.

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N O S TA L G I A

S P R IN G AC T IVI T I E S A couple sheds a layer or two, sunning by the Seine

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as they enjoy the spring weather in Paris, 1956.

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This page: 1. A pop of color, the Little Red Lighthouse watches over Jeffreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hook, New York, and is the focus of The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Swift; 2. A drive to the field for a picnic in the 19th century; 3. A stewardess assists passengers after their flight in the 1940s; 4. A graduating class throws their caps in the air in celebration of their achievement. > Opposite page: 1. Yankees Mickey Mantle and Phil Rizzuto; 2. The Alice in Wonderland sculpture in Central Park was gifted in 1959; 3. Gene Kelly danced with Leslie Caron to a score by George Gershwin in An American in Paris (1959); 4. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Graham begins as Mole, tired of Spring cleaning, ventures outside; 5. A scene of motorized boats, making their way around a pond in Central Park.

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2 5 4 1 3 Hedy Lamarr, born on November 9, 1913, as Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler in Austria-Hungary, was usually cast as the glamorous and seductive woman. She made her American debut in 1938 in Algiers. Her many films include Boom Town, with Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy; Comrade X, also with Clark Gable; White Cargo; and Tortilla Flat, with Spencer Tracy and John Garfield, based on the novel by John Steinbeck. Lamarr came to define MGM’s Golden Age; for the rest of us, any age can be golden with the right jewelry, like some of these gold (and silver) beauties.

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1. FREYWILLE Magic Sphinx Luna Piena yellow gold chain necklace; $1,290. 2. CARTIER Trinity pendant in platinum, 18-kt. white gold, diamonds, and black ceramic; $18,060. 3. BUCCELLATI Blossom Gardenia necklace, measuring 46 inches long; $1,950. 4. TIFFANY & CO. Paloma’s Marrakesh bangle in 18-kt. yellow gold by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co.; $7,000. 5. WHITING + DAVIS The Signature Ring necklace in sterling silver, from the 135-year-old American brand; $750. 6. SLANE The Column Stack Rings: 18-kt. gold column stack rings with pavé diamond band; $6,000. 7. MARCO BICEGO The diamond Jaipur Link earrings in 18-kt. yellow gold with pavé diamonds; $3,500.


New York Ǧ Hamptons Ǧ Palm Beach


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Ava Gardner is listed twenth-fifth among the American Am Film

1. DANNIJO Wrap this number around your finger: DANNIJO’s Elsa ring;

Institute’s Greatest female f m l stars. Sh She was nominated in 1953 for an Academy Award for her role in Mogambo, though the award went to Audrey Hepburn, for Roman Holiday. Gardner, of course, also delivered a critically acclaimed portrayal of Maxine Faulk in The Night of the Iguana, in 1964. Apart from her career as an actress, she enjoyed several marriages, with Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw, and Frank Sinatra among her multiple husbands. This spring, why not indulge in a different sort of collection—with some colorful new jewels?

$80. 2. LIA SOPHIA Family Tree pendant necklace in antique gold; $48.

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3. DAVID YURMAN Hammered Chain necklace, crafted from hammered sterling silver and 18-kt. gold; $3,900. 4. BULGARI From Bulgari’s High Jewelry Collection: a necklace in pink gold, turquoise, ruby beads, emerald beads, and pavé diamonds; price upon request. 5. DE GRISOGONO “Tubetto” ring in 18-kt. pink gold and pink sapphires; $13,800. 6. SEQUIN The micro pavé pearl palm frond earrings; $48. 7. GUCCI Horsebit Cocktail rings in 18-kt. yellow gold and smoky quartz, amethyst, and diamonds and onyx; $2,275 - 7,350.


CHARLOTTE KELLOGG for the Palm Beach Lifestyle

Jewelry by Helga Wagner

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TREND

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1. ALICE CEE + OLIVIA G Gett your fl flap on in alice + olivia’s above-the-knee salmon beaded dress. 2. DENNIS BASSO The navy satin and chiffon dress with feathers and embroidery from Dennis Basso; $5,800. 3. BULGARI Add a touch of Deco flair to a night out with Bulgari’s evening bag in gold satin and light gold

Joan Crawford played opposite Johnny Mack Brown in Our Danc-

metal; $2,450. 4. GUCCI Black symmetric strap dress on georgette base with a

ing Daughters, a 1928 film about the loosening of morals in the 1920s that launched her into the spotlight. The actress’s character, “Dangerous Diana” Medford, was outwardly daring but inwardly reserved. She was downright virtuous and idealistic, even warning her parents not to stay out too late. You, too, can be both daring and reserved when dressed up in something that calls to mind the Roaring ’20s.

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graphic pattern of sequins and chain fringes; $9,500. 5. RALPH LAUREN Ivory tulle beaded long dress from Ralph Lauren Collection; ralphlaurencollection. com. 6. CAROLINA HERRERA A winning combo is this grass green silk geometric jacquard top with beading detail ($4,990) with grass green organza gazaar floor-length skirt ($5,690). 7. ETRO Take a cue from the runway and shimmy and sway your own way in Etro’s silk fringed flapper dress.

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1. MANOLO BLAHNIK Manolo Blahnik’s BB shoes come in an array of neon colors; $595. 2. 7 FOR ALL MANKIND Neon skinny jeans in citron; $169. 3. NANETTE LEPORE Pair Lepore’s citron tie top ($198) with the purple multiprint crop pant ($298). 4. J.CREW Luxe silk crêpe blouse in neon azalea; $198. 5. Z SPOKE BY ZAC POSEN This polyester chiffon dress offers a flirty, ruffled way to get your neon on; $490. 6. CAMBRIDGE STREET SATCHEL COMPANY Mixed satchels; $155. 7. DIANE VON FURSTERNBERG Be sure to chase your blues away in DVF’s Karin kimono-sleeve crêpe shirt dress; $365.

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Madonna, the original Material Girl and master of stage presence, knows how to dress to make a scene. She could change her look like no one else, going from a blonde bombshell one minute to a darkhaired vixen the next. Whether playing a rough-and-tumble baseball player in A League of Their Own, or the more stately and powerwielding Eva Perón in Evita, Madonna always looked the part. One of the roles we’ll never forget is the one she played as herself, lighting up the mic in her early career in a wash of ’80s neon. This spring, neon is back, but all you need is a little splash to stay on trend.

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SUNGLASSES

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Sophia Loren has been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as “Italy’s Most Awarded Actress.” And she’s certainly more than earned it. Over the years, she’s won a Grammy and a Golden Globe, not to mention the Academy Award for Best Actress, in 1962, for her role in Two Women, which also made her the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English-speaking performance. Acting accolades aside, Loren has also triumphed as one of the greatest ambassadors of Italian style, beauty, and panache. She will always be remembered for her fetching glasses and ray-blocking shades. This spring, tap your inner Sophia and you’ll be walking on the sun.

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1. CHANEL Chanel’s 5219 sunglasses are like a tweed skirtsuit for the eyes; $290. 2. D&G D&G’s red-hot 8093 sunglasses; $150. 3. RAY BAN Channel your inner artist by slipping on Ray Ban’s 2140 Rare Prints sunglasses, modeled after Mondrian’s non-representational Neo-Plasticist grids; $160. 4. DAVID YURMAN How chic: David Yurman’s Chiclet handmade acetate oval sunglasses in ametrine with sterling silver accents, moonquartz stones, and white sapphires; $995. 5. MIU MIU The cat’s got your tongue—and your eyes, with Miu Miu’s 01N sunglasses; $340. 6. TORY BURCH Tory Burch’s expanding accessories empire includes her 7042 sunglasses in a sublime green; $165. 7. PRADA Blue is cool in Prada’s 090 sunglasses; $302.

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BAGS

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Princess Diana dressed with true royal authority, leaving a legacy

1. MARK CROSS Perfect as a little black dress: the black Marina clutch, available

of stylishness to Kate Middleton. Complementing her dress with accessories like chokers and hats—when in England!—as well as clutches, her looks were streamlined and seamless. As Diana knew well, nothing feels more ladylike than a reliable day clutch close at hand, worthy of packing the essentials while showing off individual style. And, with offerings from the likes of VBH and Ralph Lauren to Nancy Gonzalez and newly landed British invader L.K. Bennett, you won’t need a crown this spring to look like a royal. Pick up any one of these day clutches, and you’ll be ready to steal hearts just like Diana.

at Barneys; $1,495. 2. VBH The D3 clutch; $2,750. 3. PRADA Have some

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fashion-forward fun by carrying Prada’s nouveau take on a patent blue clutch with bows; $2,280. 4. L.K. BENNETT The British are coming, and have arrived: L.K. Bennett, a London favorite, has just opened a store on Columbus Circle, where you’ll find this Jasmine bag in taupe patent; $495. 5. RALPH LAUREN Crafted in Italy, the suede fold-over Zip Clutch in camel is supple, chic, and goes with everything; $495. 6. NANCY GONZALEZ This Nancy Gonzalez python clutch is available at Bergdorf Goodman; $2,385. 7. J.CREW The almond stripe Envelope Clutch in luxurious Italian snakeskin; $525.

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Tote It And Go Leighton Meester launched her career in the role of Blair Waldorf on the CW’s hit teen drama Gossip Girl, where she learned how to look and play the part of an Upper East Sider. Headbands and knee socks may come and go, but bags big enough for a Madison Avenue shopping spree are forever. In the months ahead, take a cue from Leighton and play your own part with a big and colorfully bold tote from any of the designers here. From stripes to patchwork, bold colors to safe tans, this spring, get your tote on.

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1. J.CREW J.Crew’s striped canvas Boardwalk beach tote is a must-have sidekick at the beach, and transitions perfectly to post-pool gatherings; $59.50. 2. HUNTER BOOT Hunter’s Gena bag in vermillion and navy; $385. 3. CH CAROLINA HERRERA Designed by Carolina Herrera Baez, daughter of and consultant for Carolina Herrera, the Mini Matryoshka bag made a splash on the spring runway. 4. DOONEY & BOURKE The East-West shopper in this patchwork pattern is a preppy way to go; $198. 5. TORY BURCH Designed in collaboration with New York street artist De La Vega, Burch’s De La Vega tote benefits Burch’s foundation and charities; $295. 6. RALPH LAUREN Keep it cool with the canvas and linen Big Pony Tote; $295. 7. TARGET The bright Striped Beach Tote in pink and green from Target is available in select stores; $34.99.

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SHOES

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Making A Statement Marilyn Monroe began her career as a model, and eventually signed with Twentieth Century-Fox. It wasn’t until 1950, with the film All About Eve, that she started to gain attention. She was often cast in the role of the “dumb blonde,” but her dramatic performance in the 1956 film Bus Stop was noticed by the critics and earned her a Golden Globe nomination. By 1959, she went on to receive a Golden Globe Award for her performance in Some Like It Hot. Whether playing into the typecast or breaking the mold, Monroe knew how to keep things hot in a good pair of statement shoes. So break out a pair yourself, and gain an inch (or four).

1. PRADA This spring, take off in Prada’s Flame wedge sandal; $1,100. 2. MANOLO BLAHNIK The Odalisca heel by Manolo Blahnik can be yours by special order for $1,075 at Manolo Blahnik New York: 212.582.3007. 3. J.CREW Make a bold statement in a bright strappy red wedge from J.Crew: jcrew.com. 4. JUST FAB The Laetitia platform heel; $39.95. 5. RALPH LAUREN The Erista wedge features allover polka dots that will keep you sky-high for a fun, preppy look; $595. 6. STUART WEITZMAN Like a sorbet swirl for spring and summer: the Laniard striped wedge; $385. 7. MARCHEZ VOUS Actress Yeardley Smith brings us the Marchez Vous shoe line, with this season’s can’t-be-missed Claudette wedge; $395. 8. KATE SPADE Like a rainbow on a summer’s day: Kate Spade’s Lindsay wedge is 4-inches high of fun; $275.

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Mark Edward Partners an insurance brokerage ďŹ rm founded upon the core values of innovation, service and trust.

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1. MARNI FOR H+M Beloved Italian label Marni offers up a crisp chino and striped sweater at H+M. 2. RALPH LAUREN Play the good guy in white (or cream), with a warm-weather suit from Ralph Lauren Purple Label.

Man’s Honor John Garfield grew up on Manhattan’s Lower East Side and moved to the Bronx as a teenager. His experience as a member of a gang shaped the personality he would project on screen when he joined the roster of actors at Warner Brothers. He was among the Hollywood actors called to testify before the U.S. Congressional House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC), but denied any Communist affiliation and refused to name any names, which effectively meant the end of his film career. This season, stand your own ground and go confidently in a look that not only suits you, but emboldens you.

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3. J.CREW Stay cool and crisp in J.Crew’s wildly popular Ludlow suit, here in Italian chino (jacket, $298; pants, $158). 4. ETRO Linen button-down shirt, denim pin-striped trousers, striped silk and cotton scarf. 5. MICHAEL BASTIAN Mix it up in Michael Bastian’s beige linen herringbone notch lapel jacket, washed indigo chambray box-pleat formal shirt, and red motocross pants.

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“I’m Mother Courage. I’ll be dragging my sable coat behind me into old age!” said Elizabeth Taylor around the time of her fortieth birthday. It was celebrated with empress-like ostentation in Budapest. Of course, she was not “Mother Courage.” For one thing, Bertolt Brecht’s much put-upon heroine had a child named “Swiss Cheese.” If Elizabeth had ever named a child after a food, it would probably have been “Chocolate Mousse.” But Miss Taylor endured her fair share of Brechtian woe, even with the heady compensations of wealth, privilege, and glamour. Exploited, abused, widowed, condemned, regenerated, and crippled by bad health, her life was more than an endless visit to Bulgari or Cartier. On March 23, 2011, at age 79, Elizabeth Taylor closed those fabled, thickly lashed, blue-gray-violet eyes for the

The Legend Of Elizabeth Taylor

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LIZ SMITH

last time. Velvet Brown, the exquisite, ecstatic child of National Velvet, was gone... As was the sylph of Father of The Bride… The matriarch of Giant… The sex-starved wife of Cat On A Hot Tin Roof… The voluptuous victim of Suddenly Last Summer… The implausible ruler of Egypt… The all-too-plausible drinkdrenched virago of Virginia Woolf… The delicious campqueen of Boom! and X Y & Zee. It’s a miracle that the actress even made it to 30 since she was, after all, pronounced dead of pneumonia in a London clinic at age 29. Then she got a tracheotomy. Then she got an Oscar for playing the overripe hooker of Butterfield 8. The reality of Elizabeth’s actually being gone didn’t hit me


This page: Elizabeth Taylor, whose career launched with National Velvet, photographed while ďŹ lming the 1967 ďŹ lm, Reflections in a Golden Eye. > Opposite page: The actress loved wearing fur on any occasion.


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fully until I attended a private showing of her belongings, up for auction at Christie’s. I wrote the farewell columns, and I went to the memorial service in L.A. But Christie’s was something else. There it all was—the jewels, the gowns, the caftans, the handbags, the luggage. Her life laid out as it was seen through the eyes of millions. The warm and arrogant and bawdy and serious and silly and sexy woman I’d known had escaped her mortal coil. But what a life! What a woman! From pristine ingénue to The Wife of Bath, Elizabeth ruled. If she had done nothing more than spearhead the fight against AIDS, she would have been one for the history books. Ordinary stars did their charity duty for ordinary disease—heart disease, cancer, diabetes. AIDS, the horrifying mystery virus, landed in Taylor’s hands. Who else could handle it? Elizabeth once confessed to me, with some emotion: “Liz,

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every single scandal and headline, the bad press, the intrusive paparazzi—all that I hated about fame—I am now so grateful for. Without all of that, I never would have been able to do what I’m doing today for AIDS. It’s nice that my ridiculous fame finally makes sense. Because it never made sense to me before.” On the day the news of her death broke, many of us recalled that she was more than what the current generation knows of her. She was not just the AIDS lady, or the perfume lady, or the lady who has accidents, or the lady on Turner Classic Movies; she lived a life more sensually dramatic than any of her films roles. Rising and falling and rising and falling, a violet-eyed phoenix whose gaze was fixed eternally on the here and now. She lived only for day: the past done with, the future plump with promise. Her robust vulgarity, childish greed, multiple addictions, multiple marriages, and, most of all, her apparent disregard for public opinion together made her absolutely unique among stars. The Vatican denounced her in 1962 after she had an affair while married to Eddie Fisher, trysting with Richard Burton


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This page, clockwise from top left: Elizabeth Taylor in Trafalgar Square, 1948; the actress and husband Eddie Fisher at Chasen’s in Beverly Hills, 1959; Elizabeth Taylor aboard the USS Worcester in France; the actress on the set of National Velvet (1944); Elizabeth Taylor was known as “the most beautiful woman in the world.” > Opposite page: The actress faces photographers from inside of her town car; Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, together, at an award show (inset).


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as she impersonated an infamous historical femme fatale onscreen. This happened after she—an adored widow—had lured Eddie from his wife, Debbie Reynolds. (Taylor asked tartly, after the Vatican weighed in: “Can I sue the Pope?”) The public, fascinated by her transitions, couldn’t get enough of this short, stocky woman who often dressed abominably and took other women’s husbands. Scandal only enhanced her. Mike Todd, Elizabeth’s third husband and one she mythologized to the nth degree because he didn’t live to become a casualty of divorce, taught her that “audacity makes the star.” She took this dictum and ran with it for the rest of her life. And it paid off. Taylor revolutionized—for better or worse—the financial power of the independent movie star. She got her million-dollar salaries that she demanded and her perks and her glitzy presents. Every indulged diva—and divo!—of today owes his or her own

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“demands” to Miss Taylor, who was in her bathtub when she declared, “I’ll do Cleopatra for a million dollars and 10 percent of the gross. And, Eddie, hand me the sponge.” Even after her film career faded, she stayed famous—perhaps becoming even more famous. She extended and prolonged her hold on the media longer than any other star whose image has rested upon glamour, beauty, and sex. For example, Lana Turner finally faded when she was about 41, an age at which Taylor was still holding world headlines with her up-and-down marriage to Burton. When it seemed the media might tire of the Liz n‘ Dick soap opera, she went off and got herself John Warner, a staid Republican whom she elevated to the Senate. When she got fat during that marriage, it was as if she no longer had permission to live in this country as editorials denounced her right to be Rubenesque. But when she lost weight, everybody fell at her feet all over again. She triumphed on Broadway, in The Little Foxes, and created a fragrance line that made her more money than she had in her film career. She was rehab’d at Betty Ford. Twice. Pneumonia, again, nearly took her life, this time in California. Newscasts grimly trumpeted the deathwatch: “Liz Gets Worse!” “Liz On Life Support!” “Liz Rallies!” The year was 1989, but it was really 1960 all over again. Taylor’s power to command the world’s attention was unrivaled. Her friendship with Malcolm Forbes lifted him to a place of fame even he had never enjoyed. How well I remember Malcolm’s starstudded Moroccan-themed birthday party, with Elizabeth as hostess. He had given her millions toward the AIDS fight, so she smiled through gritted teeth. (She looked opulent and queenly, despite her discomfort.) George Hamilton saw his own image reinvented when he became her consort. Miss Taylor benefited, too—never had she dressed so beautifully, or remained so slim, as during the years of their relationship. Her marriage to Larry Fortensky, a construction worker 20 years her junior, was front-page news, and the sky above her wedding resembled a war zone with helicopters buzzing, telephoto lenses zooming in, reporters parachuting. The bride was 59 and looked 35. It was her eighth marriage and she had been a star for 40 years. Movies? Who needed movies? Miss Taylor saved her genius for her life. I have to admit I had high hopes for Elizabeth’s marriage to Larry. I felt it was her first “sober” marriage, and I’d never seen


NEW NEW

This page, clockwise from top left: Elizabeth Taylor on a day off; the actress played the role of Cleopatra; Elizabeth Taylor atop her horse “The Pie” in National Velvet (1944); the actress celebrating a film with a “Good Luck” cake; Elizabeth Taylor backstage on the set of Love Is Better Than Ever (1952); the actress in wardrobe for Cat On A Hot Tin Roof (1958); Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor filming Giant (1965). > Opposite page: The actress as a child; Clark Gable and Elizabeth Taylor during filming for Callaway Went Thataway (1951).


her more ravishing or relaxed as in the beginning of that affair. Having traveled the world, literally, interviewing both Elizabeth and Richard Burton, I almost felt I was a member of their elaborate entourage. I thought “regular guy” Larry might work out for her. When I attended the wedding, with Michael Jackson as Elizabeth’s best man, looking more feminine than the bride, I did wonder what Larry must have been thinking. I was the only press person in the world allowed into the wedding. I’d come a long way since the day I first met Elizabeth and Richard in Paris during the filming of The Sandpiper. He was gregarious, and adored press attention. She, at the pinnacle of her fame and power, was more wary. In the wake of that first rowdy, wine-soaked lunch, after decades of interviews and secrets kept, she came to trust me. I suppose I became a contemporary historian of all matters Elizabethan. My favorite memory was being assigned by Cosmopolitan to interview her in Paris on the set of The Only Game In Town. She was at her lush apogee—eating, drinking, laughing, shopping, tending to her four children and her menagerie of animals.


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This page: Elizabeth Taylor, posing; the actress with Richard Burton (inset, above); Elizabeth Taylor starred in The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954) with Roger Moore (inset, below). > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The actress with her sons, Christopher and Michael; Elizabeth Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career launched with National Velvet (1944); Richard Burton and the actress met on set; Elizabeth Taylor with her child.

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Elizabeth was The Greatest Show On Earth. And she knew it. The raucous cackle of her laughter still rings in my ears. The last 15 years of her life took a toll on the star of stars. Friends died, as did another marriage. Health problems multiplied (three hip replacements, an oft-fractured back, a brain tumor). Her body, weary at last, didn’t bounce back as it once did. One minute she was wearing tight jeans and spike heels, riding the carousel at Disneyland to celebrate her sixtieth birthday, and the next, it seemed, she was swathed in silks, hobbling with effort. Elizabeth was the living proof that a life of excess is great, but be prepared for the payback. It really is a bitch. Yet she remained a constant in our lives and in the media, always walking the tightrope. We watched with our breath held, admiring her guts, sad about what time and illness can do. She continued to make the rounds and we covered her comings and goings dutifully. She had been a constant since 1944. And on her hand she always wore the huge Krupp diamond, symbolic of her Halcyon days as the riot-inducing “Liz.” Given the intense and often cruel press scrutiny her face and body inspired, it was astonishing she didn’t hide herself away

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as age and infirmity took hold. There was great courage in her resistance to seclusion; how much easier it would have been to stay at home in her Bel Air mansion than to face a world that worships youthful beauty and vigorous health, demanding physical immortality of its icons. Garbo and Dietrich fled. Monroe died before the encroachments of age humbled her. But Elizabeth, burdened at 17 as “The Most Beautiful Woman In The World,” displayed her aging self boldly, her presence stating: “This is it, folks. Deal with it; Get a life, I’ve got mine.” As to Mother Courage—Bertolt Brecht remarked that his had learned nothing at the play’s end, despite her misfortunes. But Elizabeth learned plenty! The woman who burst into spoilt, childish tears when it seemed Richard Burton might not outbid Aristotle Onassis for a diamond had finally morphed into a more thoughtful person. She grew up. Yet, in her, to the end, existed the heart of a 16year-old. She was generous to a fault with family and friends and especially loved anybody who seemed unprotected. (I always felt she never really overcame her childhood, which she classified as “abusive,” or her first honeymoon with Nicky Hilton, the hotel heir who beat her so badly that she miscarried their child.) And yet, despite wisdom gained through suffering, I have no doubt that, upon reaching heaven’s gate, had she been given another chance—a chance to live a life of sensible decisions and moderate passions—this is how it would go: “You mean I can’t drink?” “Well, not so much, Elizabeth.” “And I always have to watch my weight?” “Again, it’s a matter of balance, dear.” “Men?” “Oh, Elizabeth, all those marriages, all that unhappiness?” “And in return I get…?” “You’ll never be sick a day in your life.” “Sorry, buster,” our girl would say, clinking her cocktail, eating her bangers and mash, wiggling her fingers at Mike and Richard and who knows who else. “That’s not living to me!” X


This page: Elizabeth Taylor won an Academy Award for Best Actress after Butterfield 8 (1960); the actress in the sun (inset). > Opposite page, from left: Elizabeth Taylor played opposite Spencer Tracy in Father Of The Bride (1950); the actress and Grace Kelly at the Actors Fund’s “Night of 100 Stars” at Radio City Music Hall, 1982.


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Enamored: Magic Of The Armory Show BY

HELENA GAUTIER

Seasons spin as if on a merry-go-round, picking up speed with every passing year. In New York, they are not just weather-related. It is a continuous flow of events that take place annually and eventually come to define the time of year. As the frenzy of Fashion Week ends and with spring around the corner, one event looms large on the horizon. An international art fair, one that brings visitors from all over the world and gives the city that vague and unmistakable patina of edgy chic—the annual Armory Arts Week. This year, the event took place from March 8 to March 11, celebrating its 14th anniversary. It has become one of the most exciting, boldest, and most high-powered fairs in the world, making New York an obligatory destination for artists, galleries, collectors, critics, curators, and art lovers from all over. Last year, according to an independent survey, the fair attracted over 65,000 visitors, a third of them from outside the U.S. The buzz begins early with smaller and exclusive V.I.P. events that take place before and during the week. One of them, the Rooms At The NeverLodge, took place on March 6 at the stunning neo-Italian Renaissance mansion on the Upper East Side. A new solo exhibition from Parisian artist Nicolas Pol presented by Vladimir Restoin Roitfeld attracted a swanky crowd that mingled in the large empty rooms where pale, bare walls were sharply juxtaposed by large-scale, colorful paintings.

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This page: “Force Decuplee Open” by Arman (1995) is one of a cast of 5; “Eine Klein Nacht Musik” by Arman features a piano cut into halves with candelabras and a framed bed with satin bedding (inset). > Opposite page: “Force Decuplee Open” by Arman (1995); Judith Pears0n of Aris (inset).

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This page, clockwise from top: “Concetto Spaziale, Attese” by Lucio Fontana (1968); Bettina Prentice of Prentice Art Communications; “Untitled Pink Piece” by Tom Burr (2012), made of wool tacked on plywood. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Heidi Lee of Heidi Lee Art Advisory; “Fuji 839-16” by Gerhard Richter (1996), made with oil on alucobond; a black-and-white photograph shown by Heidi Lee Art Advisory.

The main attraction at the Armory Arts Week occupies two vast piers on the West Side Highway and is split into two categories: contemporary and modern. The buzz and excitement in the air is palpable when walking through these long, brightly lit hallways surrounded by varied and equally stunning installations. Hours can be spent wandering through the gallery stands, each presenting their best, most unique, and most exciting works. The atmosphere is absolutely electrifying. Armory Arts Week also includes events such as Volta, The Independent, Scope, and the ADAA Art Show, which is housed in the stunning Park Avenue Armory building. “ADAA is a very elegant fair that sometime gets overlooked because it is smaller but it is extremely respected and a must see,” says Bettina Prentice of Prentice Art Communications. “It is one of the highlights of the Armory Week and all the top galleries participate, including Acquavella Galleries, L&M Arts, and David Zwirner Gallery. They bring the crème de la crème of their inventory and it is a really exciting time in New York to see art.” It’s also important to save time to attend some of the smaller events that are taking place in conjunction with the fair, such as Afro Burri Fontana, an exhibition of rarely shown works by Italian artists Afro, Alberto Burri, and Lucio Fontana and an exhibition of Tom Burr’s work presented by Bortolami Gallery. Carolyn Blitz of Daniel Bottero Studio says, “It’s always great to see solo projects which promise to be interesting, fresh and new!” In addition to artists, galleries, and curators, fairs as large and important as this one usually attract a lot of seasoned art collectors who usually tend to know what they want and what they are looking for. For those in the nascent stages of collecting, fairs of such scale and amount of work presented may seem daunting if not intimidating. However, if going on your own do not feel discouraged. “You have to love it or hate it but you can not be apathetic about it. That’s the worst

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Co u r t es y o f H e i di Le e Ar t A dv i so r y ; Co ur te s y o f Pren ti ce Ar t C om m u n i ca ti o n s

thing,” says Heidi Lee of Heidi Lee Art Advisory. “When you hate something people make a mistake thinking it’s a bad work but it actually can end up being a surprise because through it one can learn about themselves because it hits an emotional chord. It can be very satisfying.” As emotional as buying art can be this is also a place where business should not be too far from pleasure: “My advice to young collectors is to make sure they truly own what they buy and purchase title insurance,” advises Judith Pearson, president and co-founder of Aris. “It is almost like a birth certificate, it starts the chain of ownership.” With that in mind, browse freely and enjoy the process. It is, after all, part of the fun. Every year the fair is evolving and every year more and more people descend upon the city to join in. The joy of art can be as simple as looking at a painting and appreciating its colors or as complex as admiring a photograph or an installation and all of a sudden feel a jolt or connection. There are no guidelines and no rules; we just have to start and see where the journey will lead us. After a week-long extravaganza, the fair is over and visitors go home, some laden with new acquisitions some bringing back only memories and impressions. This moveable feast moves on and something else takes its place in this constantly active apparatus that is New York City. But, fear not! There’s always next year. X


A player on the Kent Denver School team plays defense during a game in Colorado. > Opposite page: A vintage photograph taken at the United States Naval Academy in Maryland.


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All-American Team BY

The game of lacrosse originated in the 15th century, when the Huron and Iroquois tribes of North America played what was called baggataway. Hundreds, sometimes thousands, of players would participate for days in the game, considered an exercise in combat (the Cherokee tribe termed the sport “the little brother of war”). Lacrosse received its name when French settlers compared the sticks to the crosiers used by the church, or “la crosse.” By the mid-1800s, the Montreal Lacrosse Club formed, establishing a set of rules. In 1877, Manhattan College played New York University—the first intercollegiate game. In 1882, the Lawrenceville School, Phillips Academy Andover, and Phillips Exeter Academy founded teams.

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Parker McKee Occupation? > RBS analyst and Major League Lacrosse player What position do you play? > Defense Where do you play? > The Long Island Lizards Favorite memory? > Winning the NCAA championship my senior year at Duke University. What kind of stick did you use? > Swizzle shaft/Edge head What speed could you throw at? > 103 m.p.h.

William McKee Occupation? > Wealth Management, UBS What position did you play? > Midfielder

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Two players collide on the field at Fairfield University in Connecticut (above); players improve their skills at lacrosse camp (below). > Opposite page, clockwise from top: A referee oversees a face-off during a game; students toss a ball on the lawn at Columbia University; the Columbia University team, 1908.

Where did you play? > Duke University Favorite memory? > Winning the NCAA championship! What kind of stick did you use? > Brine Clutch head What speed could you throw at? > What speed can Chuck Norris throw at?

Tatiana Smith Occupation? > Hedge Fund Investor Relations What position did you play? > Center (and Varsity Captain!) Where did you play? > I played for the Winsor School in Boston. Senior year, we were undefeated! It just wasn’t the same when I went to Duke women’s lacrosse... Favorite memory? > How could I possibly pick one memory? My children will be born with a lax stick in their hands. My father was a super-fan and my whole team loved him, always yelling on the side lines: “Run her down!” or “Knock her over!” He never missed a game. Anyway, one of our last games my junior year of high school, we were playing Dana Hall (our rival) and warm-up was almost over and my father hadn’t arrived. My


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co-captain ran over and said in a panic, “Where is your father? We can’t start without your father!” A moment later, we could hear and see his Porsche—a hunter green 911 Carrera—driving up, honking and waving. What kind of stick did you use? > I started with my mother’s wooden stick. So old-school and beautiful. At school, we had to use a wooden stick before we could buy a plastic one. What speed could you throw at? > I can throw the ball fast enough to beat Dana Hall (our rival)...

Sarah Fincke Occupation? > Recruiting and Philanthropy at SoulCycle What position did you play? > Forward Favorite memory? > At a playoff game, my friend Dani threw a really long pass to me from almost the middle of the field and I caught it, shot, and scored. Everything happened really fast and right before the whistle so it was really fun. What kind of stick did you use? > STX Surgeon shaft

Mike Gilbane Matt Harrigan Occupation? > Fundraising Consulting What position did you play? > Goalie Where did you play? > Landon High School, Phillips Exeter Academy, and Tufts University Favorite memory? > Bringing Tufts to the NCAA tournament for the first time, or beating Georgetown Prep after four overtimes. Not many games go into four overtimes! What kind of stick did you use? > Kryptolite shaft/Edge head What speed could you throw at? > With a goalie stick, 50 m.p.h. But with a middie stick, 70 m.p.h. I’m not a shooter!

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Occupation? > Real Estate Development What position did you play? > Goalie Where did you play? > Deerfield ’00 and Princeton ’04 Favorite memory? > Being a part of Princeton University’s NCAA championship team in 2001 and spending time with my teammates, including fellow NYCers Tommy Einhorn and Benji Griswold. What kind of stick did you use? > The latest-greatest-lightest-largest one that I could find. What speed could you throw at? > Not nearly as fast as those who used to shoot the ball at me... X


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An intercollegiate game, 1837; a couple of girls practice throwing at summer camp (inset). > Opposite page: An offensive player approaches the goal from behind the net, as a University of California at Santa Barbara player attempts to intercept the ball.


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The Men And The Monogram Les Arts Décoratifs in Paris showcases the relationship between Louis Vuitton and Marc Jacobs with its exhibition and accompanying book, Louis Vuitton / Marc Jacobs (Rizzoli). If you can’t visit Paris before September 16, then the book is the next best thing! The first half of the book introduces the readers to Monsieur Vuitton, covering his biography and discussing his innovations. The second half introduces Marc Jacobs, who has acted as creative director of the house since 1997. Jacobs helped turn the company into the luxury powerhouse it is today by reinvigorat-

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STEFAN DOYNO

ing the brand and bags by respectfully playing with the logo and collaborating with contemporary artists: Stephen Sprouse’s graffiti was famously spray painted across luggage; Takashi Murakami shook up the logo by adding 33 colors on black-andwhite backgrounds; and Richard Prince’s nurses, dirty jokes, and comics inspired the Spring Summer 2008 collection. The work examines how a traditional company was able to fuse with a new designer to create highly coveted products. Filled with 300 illustrations, the book is an inspirational must-read for all the creative minds and innovators out in the world. X

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This page: Graffiti Alma bag with matching gloves. > Opposite page: A picture of Marc Jacobs and Naomi Campbell by Jean-Paul Goude, 2007.


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Models wearing white looks while riding on a carousel during Louis Vuittonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring Summer 2012 fashion show in Paris.


Several colorful dresses from Louis Vuittonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring Summer 2003 collection. Takashi Murakamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous monogram multicolor handbags are also featured in this vibrant spread.


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Ahead For Fall: Tibi / Minimalism reigned on

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the Tibi runway, as evidenced by this

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sampling of looks from designer Amy

DANIEL CAPPELLO

Smilovic, who remains rather sympathetic to the bare-essentials ’90s. With a consistently pared-down color palette (if not black and white, then dark jeweltoned shades and white), cropped pants, layered turtlenecks, elbow-length sleeves, and mini and maxi skirts, Tibi proved that a runway show doesn’t

Form-fitting, fur-clad,

and flapper-fringed were just a few of the trends that shined through during the Fall 2012 runway shows at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in February. The female figure was celebrated in narrow silhouettes from designers who traditionally favor the minimal, like Francisco Costa of Calvin Klein. Still, the season’s cinched waistlines were a welcome innovation from others like Charlotte Ronson, who typically fancies loose-fitting boho drapes and flouncy flairs. Designers drew inspiration from other time periods and other art forms, even. The Roaring Twenties made an appearance down several Fall runways, including Dennis Basso and Ralph Lauren, and a 19th-century painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau inspired the design duo at Marchesa. The scene, A Soul Brought to Heaven, portrays two angels carrying off a young woman through the clouds. True to the celestial and ethereal, Marchesa’s collection featured a fair amount of heaven-sent fabric, billowing out from everywhere. Ralph Lauren, meanwhile, kicked off his show with the soundtrack from Downton Abbey and channeled the style of World War I-era England down to hunting plaids and hats for girls (and boys). Elsewhere, young designers like Katie Ermilio aimed for the ultimate in classic chic, while classic designers like Carolina Herrera forayed into edgier, more contemporary styles. X

Co u r t es y o f Ti bi ; C o ur te sy o f M ar ch e s a (o p p o si te )

need a dress to be a runaway success.


Marchesa / From red-hot, bodice-hugging, cap-sleeved, mermaidflairing short dresses to signature red carpet explosions of fabric and fantasy, Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig sent their collection down the runway for the second time, bringing to life their ethereal creations. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder why celebrities vie to show up in Marchesa, but this season showed off some shorter dresses with broader appeal and functionality, like a sweet high-necked, tothe-shoulder sleeveless white dress with gathered details (top, second from left).

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Dennis Basso / With a house built on fur, it’s hard not to get lost in Dennis Basso’s decadent take on that sumptuous cold-weather staple, but recently the designer has been expanding into ready-to-wear with elegant simplicity and fashionable flair. A knee-length white dress for fall looks great with a slightly spotted fur (top right), and Basso’s shimmery grays and beiges elevated fall color staples to a luxe level (bottom right). The master of mink also tapped into the Deco craze, sending a feather-bottomed flapper-style number down the runway wholly on its

Co u r t es y o f D e nn i s Ba ss o

own (left). From flappers to fur, Basso dreamed up consummate luxury.

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Milly / Every trip down Michelle Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s runway feels like a fantasy Parisian moment brought to life. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but think of a young, school-girl version of Audrey Hepburn dashing across the Seine in some sort of fashion-forward, ultra-Technicolor version of Funny Face. For fall, Smith showed off her characteristically colorful side, like a neon-mustard flared skirt with hot-pink jacket with scalloped edging and

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elbow-length sleeves (center) and a hot chartreuse sort of sleeved sheath dress covered in black lace (top, middle). Voluminous mini skirts played with abstract patterns and bold solid colors, and, as always, ladylike hats and gloves added a throwback touch.


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J. Mendel / It was fun to see the neutral tones and fluid forms of designer Gilles Mendel’s Fall collection float down the runway. While introducing new touches like a range of handbags—large croc numbers lined with mink and alpaca—Mendel showed off his talent for evening dresses that always manage to drape and fit perfectly. A one-shoulder evening look as only Mendel could do it (center, right) was pulled off in a rich pearl gray with a gathered bow detail near the waist. Paneled jackets, fur skirts, long sleeves, and fall crêpes and wools made a sumptuous statement in autumnal hues.

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And a certain gold-beaded strapless gown seemed just ready for Oscar night.


Katie Ermilio / Women’s readyto-wear designer Katie Ermilio, known for her balance of feminine silhouettes with intricate men’swear techniques, presented her Autumn 2012 collection against white walls and blanched floors. The line was developed around Ermilio’s handdrawn pearl-inspired print, with a juxtaposition of black on white that was a clear move away from her sorbet-colored Spring 2012 collection. Ermilio has the touch and grace of a Givenchy, and her bold, mermaid-style training skirt with capsleeved black top (right) could have descended

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directly from a Paris atelier, or heaven itself.

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Calvin Klein / Against a dark-gray backdrop, among a flotilla of minimalism, in a sea of solid colors, it was hard to pick out front-row celebrities from models at the Calvin Klein Fall 2012 runway show. But Lara Stone (bottom, left) along with Emma Stone and Rooney Mara

Fall showed off designer Francisco Costa’s agility for the modest silhouette, with a focus on cinched waists, constructed wools, inverted darts on top, and a pleat or few extending below the torso. Costa even gave a nod to fall’s must-have everywhere: the turtleneck (middle, center).

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Co u r t es y o f Ca lv i n Kl ei n

(top, left) were certainly standouts in characteristic Calvin.


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Carolina Herrera / Carolina Herrera has always represented the epitome of a certain kind of grace and gracefulness: a semi-mythic combination of glamour, beauty, worldliness, and culture. Her Fall collection seemed to encourage that worldly woman into the future, with extremely deep necklines cutting almost to the waist, then ďŹ&#x201A;aring out in full skirts, or feathered skirts paired with print-designed tops. A slight top in the form of an altered, sleeveless cardigan, paired with a ballgown skirt, showed Herreraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daring, but always with her delicate touch (bottom, second from left). Still, a perfectly pleated and form-fitting evening dress with

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gathered bow belt (bottom, second from right) was unmistakably Carolina.


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Oscar de la Renta / Baby blues and pinks shuffled in among the solid fall tweeds and expected grays and blues of fall at Oscar de la Renta’s runway show, indicating that perhaps the designer had a younger set on his mind for next season. That assumption could be bolstered by the babydoll skirt that bounced down in almost baby blue (center, left), or the fallingsleeve dollhouse dream of a girl’s fantasy in cotton-candy pink and swirling full skirt (center, second from left). Still, this being Oscar de la Renta, there was ample room for the ’60s-inspired, bateau-neck-loving mom in an elegantly accented pink day dress (top right), as well as for the Upper East Side lady

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who lunches in a fashionably appropriate skirtsuit (bottom right).

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Charlotte Ronson / Charlotte Ronson, the darling of elevated bohemianchic, proved herself capable of a more grownup and sophisticatedly serious look on her Fall runway. Moving away from the drapey, Ronson made a decidedly welcomed move away from the grunge look that’s defined her. Silhouettes were brought in to a modern girl’s refinement, and form was central in several belted looks (top right, bottom left). Hugging knits with fancifully flavored designs and pops of color added a touch of edge to a clean slate of fall staples. Cowls,

Co u r t es y o f Ch a r lo tte Ro n so n

of course, added a punch of the playful.


Yigal Azrouël / It was time for mystery and glamour on Yigal Azrouël’s Fall runway, which celebrated the spirit of French icon Françoise Hardy. Sure, it could be easy to imagine Hardy hopping off a motorcycle in sunglasses and a draped dark coat (top, middle), though maybe those elegant high-waisted blue pants would be a little more difficult. A stunning long-sleeved silk gown in a python print (bottom, right)

and Azrouël certainly delighted by playing with his signature leathers, including mid-calf leather skirts (top left). The runway also relished in a covered-up, fur-hidden fantasy ripe for fall.

Cour tesy of Yig al Azrouël

channeled a certain new-age Hardy appeal,


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Ralph Lauren / Familiar Ralph Lauren themes were at play on the designer’s Fall runway, though always with a nuanced or slightly different twist. Bowler hats and cloches topped off men’s-inspired day looks, Co u r t es y o f Ra lp h L au re n

complete with men’s suiting details like houndstooth, plaids, and tweeds. The meeting of masculine-feminine launched retro-inspired women into the boardroom, but by the time evening looks fell, the focus was solely—and sprucely—on women, and a certain kind of “Ralph” woman, at that. Still taking inspiration from another time, Mr. Lauren introduced ’20s embroideries for a flapper flair; in more modern takes, black and gold ruled.

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It’s All In The Bag BY

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HELENA GAUTIER

It is not often that a brand-new line comes into the world and immediately creates that magical “must have” effect. Such is the case of the newly minted Lemaresca, an Italian-made line of luxurious, über chic, high-end accessories. Only a year old and already boasting a faithful following of clients everywhere from London to São Paulo, Lemaresca is taking the world by storm, one city at a time. The creative force behind the brand is the stunning and stylish sister duo, Giulia and Cecilia Maresca. Originally from Genoa in Italy, they both ended up living in London as they began pursuing their respective careers. For years, Giulia had been working as a head handbag designer for such heavy hitters as Christian Louboutin, Tod’s, and Moncler while Cecilia ran


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P.R. and communications for Vivienne Westwood, Annoushka, and Farfetch.com while regularly contributing to Vogue Italia. “Having both worked for other brands and designers for a long time, we decided it was about time to start our own label,” says Cecilia. And so, in March 2011, they did. They debuted with an incredible collection of delectable shoulder bags, totes, clutches, and cuffs. Every piece is highly crafted and offers a distinct touch of luxury, from unique embellishments of fine chain and stud detailing to materials like exceptionally soft calf leather as well as suede, pony hair, and snakeskin. “Our absolute priority is the attention to detail and quality,” asserts Cecilia. “We started Lemaresca with the conviction that

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This page: The Karla bag in burgundy, made from exotic skins with stud detail. > Opposite page: The Stephanie clutch in gun metal, made from “baseball” skin.


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This page: The Gigi bag in beige with chain detail. > Opposite, clockwise from top left: The Franca bag, made from pony hair with a leopard print; the Sofia bag, made from lamé snakeskin; an image from Lemaresca’s advertising campaign; the Fiamma clutch in a leopard print; the Fiamma clutch in gold; the Bubba cuff in navy.

accessories are key ingredients to empowering a woman’s style. Our woman is fashion conscious, buys into luxury, and wants the best quality.” When asked about their creative process, she explains: “The two of us complement each in terms of style—Giulia has a more classic and traditional approach whereas I am more contemporary and edgy.” The result is a timeless and sexy look that’s never overdone, creating an unmistakable statement. If this isn’t enough to make you want to have a few of these creations in your closet immediately, the sisters add another twistLemaresca offers a unique bespoke service where customers can personalize their chosen bags with initials and choose from an extensive variety of materials, styles, and colors. One can stop by their exclusive atelier in London or simply

go online and visit www.lemaresca.com. There is absolutely nothing as elegant and special as a personalized tote! After returning from Paris Fashion Week where they collaborated with the designer Osman Youzefada for his show, the sisters are already planning for the future. “Our goal is to open a store in London within the next year with an entire area dedicated to bespoke services. We have recently introduced belts and cuffs, the next step would be shoes!” Cecilia says. Their fans, who include the sultry Sofia Vargara, cannot wait and neither can I. The good news is that, as of this year, their products will also be available at select stores and before long I expect the beauty of Lemaresca to be here, on the streets of New York. The bag as an essential accessory is not a new concept; in fact, it is as old as anyone can remember and bags are something that have been carried literally and figuratively throughout history. The evolution of luxury has carved a path for all that we wear today. It is undeniable that Lemaresca creations are truly the epitome of today’s contemporary chic and are well on their way to becoming a modern classic. X


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Crowning Moment BY

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

By Invitation Only / On a bright spring afternoon in April, Quest and Stuart Weitzman hosted a lunch at Crown to toast By Invitation Only: How We Built Stuart Weitzman calling her on her cell phone out of the blue in the early days of Gilt Groupe’s founding. That instant marked one of the defining moments when Alexandra and Alexis knew they had really “made it.” Friends and colleagues of all industries—fashion, art, design, business, photography, media, film—came to celebrate. Guests chose from a menu that included a beet salad and the restaurant’s signature hamburger. This page: Guests applaud Chris Meigher, Quest’s CEO and publisher, following his toast to new authors Alexandra Wilkis Wilson and Alexis Maybank. Opposite Page: Alexandra Wilkis Wilson looks on affectionately as Chris Meigher delivers his speech.

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Gilt and Changed the Way Millions Shop, a book by Gilt Groupe founders Alexandra Wilkis Wilson and Alexis Maybank. In the book, Alexandra recalls a funny anecdote about


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Frank and Genevieve Bahrenburg 4. Ladies who lunch. > Opposite page: 1. Caroline Berthet, Dani Stahl, Emily Smith, and Dori Cooperman 2. Dani Stahl 3. Lydia Fenet and Blair Husain 4. Chris Meigher and Muffie Potter Aston 5. Sara Armenta and Jane DeFlorio 6. Lesley Schulhof 7. Copies of Quest and By Invitation Only 8. Kari Talley, Flo Fulton, and Tantivy Gubelmann 9. Alexandra Lebenthal and Chris Meigher 10. Stuart Weitzman’s “Capsize” shoe in blush 11. Kick Kennedy.

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By Invitation Only / This page: 1. Elizabeth Meigher, Jackie Giusti Seaman, Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, and Alexis Maybank 2. Mingling before lunch 3. Blair Husain and Karen Klopp 4. Mary Snow and Tatiana Perkin 5. Claiborne Swanson Frank and Georgina Schaeffer 6. Kristen Henning, Maria Allen, Jackie Giusti Seaman, Tamela Greene, and Karen Ferko 7. Jennifer Carlston, Susan Duffy, and Paula Rosado 8. Vivian Duenas and Lisa Salzer. > Opposite page: Rachael Sage and her mother, Jane Weitzman.

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9 Lives Of Style NAME GOES HERE ELIZABETH MEIGHER

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“The only real elegance is in the mind; if you’ve got that, the rest really comes from it.” — DIANA VREELAND

“Style is an expression of individualism mixed with charisma. Fashion is something that comes after style.” — JOHN FAIRCHILD

Lately I’ve been thinking about “style”—what it means, how to spot it and who has it. In today’s high-tech world, we are inundated with tips and trends that change daily—even hourly. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by so many varying views and essential to remember that personal style comes from within and is—most importantly—personal. In an effort to remember and reflect on the essence of style, I reached out to a number of friends from various vocations such as fashion, photography, cinematography, and film, who I believe possess great style. I asked them all to share their thoughts about style with Q...

taken!” Even if it means wearing pink skinny jeans with a short sleeve button down and a bow tie, own it! (And yes, I would definitely wear that!) Your exterior is a shell for you to express yourself however you please for that day, so have fun with it! Style advice to last for all seasons? > Always wear kool shoes. (Yes! “Kool” with a “K”!) Something most people don’t know about you? > I don’t wear underwear, I travel everywhere, I sleep with a baby pillow, and I love tattoos.

Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I am an underwater photo artist, surfer, conservationist, and apparently a man who has kick-ass style. Recent purchase? > Hmm... Where do I begin? My new hot hunting item is shoes. I am a huge buyer of n.d.c. boat shoes, boots, and moccassins. I have two closets for my shoes. Does that make me a shoe whore? Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > Own your own style... “Be yourself because everyone else is

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Ch r i s Le i dy ; Ru sh Z i m m e r m an

Chris Leidy >


This page: A portrait of Chris Leidy. > Opposite page: “Silhouette” by Chris Leidy


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Daniel Benedict and Andrew Saffir at Vanity Fair’s 2012 Oscar Party at the Sunsett Tower Hotel in Los Angeles, California, on February y 26, 2012.

< Daniel el Benedict Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I was recently named Brand Ambassador for the Leading Hotels of the World. [Editor’s Note: The group includes Rocco Forte Hotels’ Balmoral in Edinburgh, see above.] I was not only honored to be named, but happy since I have an insatiable passion for travel. Recent purchase? > A new MacBook Air—which I love! My daily bag now feels five pounds lighter! Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > My father taught me to always wear polished shoes and my mother taught me to always wear freshly pressed clothing. Wrinkles were a no-no in my house! Style advice to last for all seasons? > Lightweight cashmere sweaters are good all year long, as are lightweight cashmere scarves. Also, have a good cobbler. Good shoes and good cashmere will last a lifetime. Something most people don’t know about you? > I’m a pretty good gardener, and I’m working on my green thumb. My future goal is to ward off the deer that nibble on all my hard work in East Hampton!

< Andrew Saffir Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > Well, my interests include movies for one, but I think most people know that! Daniel and I also love to travel. France and Italy are our favorite destinations, but any secluded island will also do! Recent purchase? > A moleskin hacking jacket and corduroy trousers from Michele Negri in Florence, a grosgrain-trimmed grey flannel sportcoat from Daniel Cremieux in Paris, and a midnight-blue dinner jacket from Yves Saint Laurent (also in Paris). Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > Don’t buy cheap shoes! (Maybe that’s why I’m a sucker for John Lobbs.) Style advice to last for all seasons? > Have a good tailor! Something most people don’t know about you? > Je parle français couramment.

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Mary Hilliard > Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I was born and raised in Miami and love to be outdoors: running —well, OK, now I guess it’s jogging, tennis, skiing, working in my garden. But I also love to read, especially when it rains! Recent purchase? > Great blue and white cotton shirt from J.Crew and navy print silk dress from Anthropologie which garners many compliments. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > “Less is more,” but can’t remember where I learned it. Also “Stand up straight”—from my mother. Style advice to last for all seasons? > See above! I copied my mother who loved clothes, wore beautiful things, and bought lovely dresses for me when I was young. Something most people don’t know about you? > My nickname! [For those who don’t know, Mary’s nickname is Cookie!]

Clockwise from top: Mary Hilliard and Bill Cunningham at the International Fine Arts Fair at The Armory on May 11, 2000; Mary Hilliard as a young girl getting ready, as photographed by her mother; Kick Kennedy at Save Venice’s Un Ballo in Maschera on March 15, 2011.

< Kick Kennedy Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I love acting and writing. My friends and family are the most important things in the world to me. And I love New York City. Recent purchase? > A Louise Green cloche in chestnut with camel lace and feather trim. Very romantic and cool. Always been a hat girl. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > “Fashion can be bought. Style one must possess.”—Edna W. Chase Style advice to last for all seasons? > When in doubt, wear black. Something most people don’t know about you? > I am one of six children. What fun!

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Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I am a born-and-bred New York City girl. After college I worked in the fashion department of Harper’s Bazaar and Lucky before going in-house at Paper Denim & Cloth. In 2004, I co-founded Earnest Sewn, where I worked for five years before I had my two children. This January, I launched a personal styling web-site with Ferebee Taube called Feyt. Recent purchase? > I recently bought a floral print blouse from Celine that I am currently obsessed with. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > I think the most important fashion tip I ever got was to not be overly trend-driven. Stick to what works for you. Own your style, and interpret the changing fashions within that sensibility. Style advice to last for all seasons? > I would have to go with the same answer as above: Don’t be afraid to take risks, but understand your personal style, and don’t try too hard to be someone you’re not. Something most people don’t know about you? > The first company I started was a watch label. I made logo cuffs out of vintage Louis Vuitton and Gucci bags, threaded ribbon bands through them with a gun-barrel watch face that opened up to tell the time.

This page, cl0ckwise from top: Eleanor Ylvisaker at The Apollo Circle Benefit at the Met on November 12, 2009; Céline’s Spring 2011 campaign featuring Daria Werbowy; Charlotte Ronson at her Fall 2010 show at Bryant Park; a look from Charlotte Ronson’s Fall 2012 collection. > Opposite page: A self-portrait of Claiborne Swanson Frank.

Charlotte Ronson > Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I come from a creative family, and it exposed me to lots of different areas from music to art and fashion. I felt most like myself, and found a sense of freedom, in fashion. I started off creating custom vintage Ts for friends and haven’t looked back since. Recent purchase? > A vintage 1980’s D&G printed slip dress—feather-light and sheer in all the right places. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > “ Embrace your individual style.” Style advice to last for all seasons? > Keep it simple and wear it with confidence. Something most people don’t know about you? > I make the best scrap books! They are filled with all of my inspirations and I take at least two with me at all times.

Patrick McMullan; Juerg en Teller; Marcus Tondo (GoRu n wa y. co m )

< Eleanor Ylvisaker


C lai bo r n e Sw a n so n Fra n k

Claiborne Swanson Frank Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > I am a portrait photographer. I am from California. I am passionate about art, fashion, interior design, and dogs. My great love is photography and portraiture. Recent purchase? > A handmade panama straw hat to add to my hat collection. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > Wear the clothes—never let the clothes wear you.

Style advice to last for all seasons? > Invest in pieces that you can wear year after year—classic, iconic, timeless—clothes you live your life in. Never follow trends. Develop your own personal style. Something most people don’t know about you? > I love tennis and grew up playing throughout the greater part of my life. I love sports and was always athletic. I need to find my way back to the court!

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Chuck Pfeifer Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > My father was a world-class athlete and I came from an athletic and competitive family. Every year we gathered at our home in Darien for “Pfeifer Bowl,” where Dad and my four brothers (all jocks) would duke it out as my sisters cheered us on. I always played football—when I left Dartmouth I was accepted to West Point on account of football and good grades. I graduated in ’65 and was an average cadet but morphed into an excellent combat officer with SOG in Vietnam. I commanded a battalion of Chinese mercenaries called Nungs. We worked behind enemy lines rescuing recon teams in trouble, destroying targets of opportunity and picking up downed pilots. I was wounded three times and earned two silver stars, two bronze stars, two purple hearts, and air medals. After the war, I took a position in advertising as an AE at Y&R. Over the years, through media contacts, I’ve worked as an awardwinning journalist, Ford model and character actor in TV and films. I have made dozens of television appearances and been in 30-40 or so movies, 5 with Oliver Stone. In both of Oliver Stone’s Wall Street film’s I played “Chuckie.” I am a self-proclaimed “anthropomorphic prop” when it comes to my acting. I most enjoy being behind the camera however, and am currently the executive producer of a picture called Border Crosses, written and about to be directed by my partner Gary

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Lankford. It is story of drugs, duplicity and conflict that takes place on the Tex-Mex border starring Sam Shepard. My favorite pastimes are bird hunting and fly fishing- my place in South Dakota is known for the best pheasant shooting in the world. I also love ranches (read “Cowboy Chuck’s Home on the Range” in March QUEST) and always look forward to my annual lunch, to which I invite a melting pot of actors, players and personalities. Recent purchase? > My wife, Lisa, and I recently purchased a place in West Palm Beach for total escape, rest and relaxation. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > Thirty-five years ago actor Michael Nourri introduced me to famous tailor Tommy Nutter. I still wear some of those same suits and blazers today. David Cameron Clark, a former associate of Tommy, now makes all of my clothes. Tommy Nutter was a genius and I will always remember one Chinese tailor describing his work perfectly: “Ah lee-tle beet Eeen-gleesh, ah lee-tle beet Ha-lee-wood.” Style advice to last for all seasons? > Simplicity- it’s not the clothes, it’s the man. Something most people don’t know about you? > I always wear suits and own shoes from Lobbs but would rather be at home with my wife in sweats. Also, I am a talented songwriter and a pretty good guitarist.


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This spread, clockwise from top left: Chuck Pfeiffer in a Winston advertisement in 1978; him as Chuckie in Wall Street with Charlie Sheen; him on his first SOG mission in 1968; him with Anthony Hopkins and James Woods in Oliver Stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nixon.


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Cornelia Guest with several of her pets at her family home, Templeton, as photographed for the November 2011 issue of Quest.

Cornelia Guest > Tell me about you in a few words or sentences? > My passion in life is animals… All shapes and sizes, two-footed and more-footed. My brand, Cornelia Guest, is completely cruelty-free. I have a line of accessories that I launched last fall at Bloomingdales, and a book, Simple Pleasures, coming out in June. I also have Cornelia Guest Cookies, with cruelty-free chocolate chip cookies, and Cornelia Guest Events where we do it all! I intend to be doing many other cruelty-free things very soon. I’m interested in showing the world that there are many intelligent alternatives. Of course, my accessories line is one of them! Recent purchase? > I just got an office. So I’ve been working with Daniel Romualdez getting it ready and getting office furniture. He’s the best to work with and I’m having a ball getting things for my office. Memorable fashion tip you learned from someone else? > Halston… “Beauty knows no pain,” He’s right! Style advice to last for all seasons? > I’m always cold so I always bring a sweater or something to throw over my shoulders, especially in the summer when air conditioning is blasting away! Something most people don’t know about you? > I love to clean. It relaxes me. Scrub, rearrange, iron, vacuum, you name it... I love it! I also love to give all of my dogs baths and blow dries. This makes me happier than it does them! And I also love to bake!


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J oy J a co b s

Philadelphia On March 14, a group arrived in Philadelphia to toast the history of Veuve Clicquot, introduced to the U.S. in 1782. Two-hundred and thirty years later, the brand continues to bubble, from sea to shining sea. The exciting event took place aboard Moshulu, a ship from 1904 that presently serves as a restaurant, and featured a three-course meal paired with glasses of Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Rosé 1978, Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Vintage Blanc 1990, and Demi-Sec—all scheduled to be released in the fall. Champagne for my real friends...

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1. Andrew Hoover 2. Kelly Framel 3. Kate Evans 4. Becky Katz 5. A selection of Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée vintages 6. Christine Kaculis

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COAST TO COAST FLORIDA

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COAST TO COAST FLORIDA

C o u r te sy o f St. Re gis

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A mid-March getaway was attended by posh guests who celebrated the St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort and Residences grand opening. In addition to taking advantage of the desirable weather, guests also enjoyed live music by Jonathan Batiste of Jazz at Lincoln Center as well as hors d’oeuvres from J&G Grill by Jean-Georges Vongerichten. The vibrant energy of Miami was the ideal setting for the firework show— and signature Bloody Marys! The evening was a perfect combination of sophisticated and upbeat luxury, as hosted by general manager Marco Sleva and St. Regis “connoisseurs” Jason Wu and Nacho Figueras.

1. Fireworks 2. Joseph Motta and Mary Alice Stephenson 3. Arizona Muse 4. Olivia Chantecaille and Ren Grady 5. Sam Robins, Ann Caruso, and Iran Issa-Khan 6. Diane Kruger with Nacho Figueras and Delfina Blaquier 7. Stephanie Sayfie and Morten Aagaard 8. Tina Carlo and Christina Getty-Maercks 9. Lisa Petrillo and Bill McCue

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New York On April 5, Candace and Rick Beinecke honored Daniel Cappello and his new book, The Ivy League (Assouline), at their residence on Fifth Avenue. Some wore collegiate-themed ties, others wore pink oxfords and navy blazers with brass buttons. From the Upper East Side and beyond, guests gathered to celebrate the author as the Kingsmen, an a cappella group from Columbia University, set the tone with songs like “Barbara Ann” by the Beach Boys and “Runaround Sue” by Dion. A copy of The Ivy League autographed by Daniel Cappello is the new yearbook signing.

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1. Candace and Rick Beinecke with Daniel Cappello 2. Jaymere Stein, Jeffrey Caldwell, and Christian Langbein 3. Scott Rothkopf and Megan Lewis 4. Brian Mazza and Georgia Mack 5. Arthur Wayne and Christian Leone 6. Mimi Ritzen Crawford and Brett Fahlgren 7. Kelly Rutherford

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B E A U T Y FA C E

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said, “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.” Well, maybe. But looking lovely feels better than good—clear skin, full heart, can’t lose! 2. PERRICONE MD Following the brand’s No Foundation Foundation, No Concealer Concealer combats any and all imperfections with a formula that works for everyone; $38. 3. PETER THOMAS ROTH The Laser-Free Retexturizer with dragon’s blood, glycolic acid, and papaya enzyme encourages a radiant complexion; $38. 4. LA BELLA FIGURA Containing Omega-3 and Omega-6 to support anti-aging, Barbary Fig Renewal Serum is the best that nature has to offer; $125. 5. FRESH The Sugar Lip Treatment, in coral for spring and summer, is sensational against any skin tone; $22.50. 6. CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ Forget diamonds! The Enriched Lip Luminizer, available in twenty hues, is a girl’s best friend; $60. 7. CLARISONIC The Mia 2, the newest in the line of cleansing systems, leaves skin easy, breezy, beautiful—with adjustable speeds for exfoliation that are just right; $149. 1. KATE MOSS

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BEAUTY BODY

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1. JANE RUSSELL starred opposite Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). Despite being a brunette, the actress looked as beautiful as her fair-haired co-star. 2. BLISS The FatGirlSlim cream firms and slims (and addresses cellulite) with caffeine and other ingredients—bye-bye, butt, in 28 days or less; $32. 3. LUSH The No Drought dry shampoo will save the day (or night), leaving locks oil-free—sprinkle, brush, repeat; $12.95. 4. BURBERRY BODY Freshen up with a spritz or more of sweetsmelling Body Mist, packaged with trademark tartan; $30. 5. ROGER & GALLET The parfumerie is celebrating 150 years with products like Citron Perfumed Liquid Soap, a zesty scent…for men and women; $25. 6. ESSIE The brand’s Poppy Razzi collection includes poppin’ colors like Bazooka, Lights, Camera, and Action; $8. 7. CHLOÉ L’Eau de Chloé, a version of the fashion house’s signature rose scent reinterpretted with notes of citrus, is the perfect complement to bare feet on the dock; $85.

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EVENING LOOKS

1 On a clear day, you can see forever, and on a spring night,

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you can dance forever. When getting dressed for the most important social events of the season, don’t forget to take some inspiration from the iconic ladies who went before you—or the iconic designers in front of you. 1. JOAN CRAWFORD staged a comeback in 1945 after a two-year absence from the silver screen by starring in Mildred Pierce, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress. Stage your own comeback this spring with some dazzling jewels and dresses like these. 2. TIFFANY & CO. Archives-inspired bangle with an oval tanzanite, pink sapphires, diamonds, and enamel in 18-kt. gold; price upon request. 3. RALPH LAUREN Ralph Lauren Collection antique pale blue Donaldson silk georgette dress with a fixed wrap silhouette, finished with a wave of tiered georgette layers that will skim the floor; $5,000. 4. DENNIS BASSO Dress things up with a feathered golden gown from Dennis Basso. 5. MARINA B Marina B’s TWIN ring in 18-kt. yellow and white gold with amethyst and blue topaz; $7,900.

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1. RITA HAYWORTH first achieved widespread fame as an actress during the 1940s. Audiences first knew her as Rita Cansino, but she eventually agreed to change her name to Rita Hayworth and her hair color to dark red in order to land a greater range of roles. Apparently the changes did the trick; Hayworth would go on to be featured on the cover of Life magazine five times. You, too, can be cover-worthy with a whole new look starting here. 2. KATE SPADE The glittery I Kissed A Frog multi clutch adds a whisper of whimsy to any night on the town; $328. 3. MARCHESA Wow them in this deep teal off-shoulder silk gazar draped column dress with cascade bodice; price upon request. 4. ROGER VIVIER The Prismick T-Bar Chic Bronze peep-toe pumps come in bronzed leather on black suede t-straps; $925. 5. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS The Marisa necklace from the Van Cleef & Arpels’ High Jewelry Collection “Bals de Légende” features round- and baguette-cut diamonds and one rose-cut diamond of 10.32 carats; price upon request.

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was born Lucy Johnson on Christmas Eve 1922, the youngest of seven children on a tobacco farm in Grabtown, North Carolina. In 1941, her brother-in-law, a professional photographer, snapped her portriat and put it in the window of his New York studio, where an MGM scout spotted it and launched Gardner’s career. This spring, gain some notice for yourself with the help of these designer labels and luxury brands. 2. ASPREY Emerald earrings set in platinum; $51,000. 3. J.CREW The Rory strappy sandal from J.Crew in soft fucshia offers a touch of sophistication and an elegantly proportioned heel to dance the night away in; $188. 4. YIGAL AZROUEL From his Spring 2012 collection, Yigal Azrouël’s white halter blouse ($495) and silk maxi skirt ($1,250) are a modern alternative for a traditional black-tie look. 5. HARRY WINSTON No one says “talk to me” quite like Harry Winston, and you can’t help but listen when it’s the diamond Carpet Fashion ring in 7.62 carats set in platinum; price upon request. 1. AVA GARDNER

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set the standard for simple yet timeless beauty and elegance. Her classic grace and unpretentious way of being are an inspiration to anyone looking for a sense of style. 2. STUART WEITZMAN Slip on Stuart Weitzman’s light-as-air Pavé evening sandal; $560. 3. FABERGÉ The Russian maison is back, with a new store at 694 Madison Avenue. There you’ll find treasures fit for a queen, like these Les Saisons Russes Impérial diamond and pearl earrings; price upon request. 4. CAROLINA HERRERA You’ll have cause for popping some bubbly in this draped-shoulder bubble-print Carolina Herrera dress from the designer’s Resort collection. 5. L.K. BENNETT A favorite of style-conscious royalty (a.k.a. Kate Middleton) and New York trend-setters alike, British sensation L.K. Bennett has finally landed on our shores, with a new shop on Columbus Circle. Next time black-tie calls, head to L.K. Bennett’s New York flagship for the Leola clutch, in gold metallic printed snakeskin; $325. 1. AUDREY HEPBURN

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SHOPPING INDEX

> Bliss: At Sephora, 877.SEPHORA or sephora.com. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Bottega Veneta: 212.371.5511 or bottegaveneta.com. > Buccellati: buccellati.com. > Bulgari: 800.BVGLARI or bulgari.com. > Burberry Beauty: 212.407.7100 or burberry.com.

C > Calvin Klein: 866.513.0513 or calvinklein.com. > Cambridge Street Satchel Company: At Bloomingdale’s. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Cartier: 212.446.3400 or cartier.com. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Charlotte Ronson: 212.789.9606 or charlotteronson.com. > Chloe: 212.717.8220 or chloe.com. > Christian Dior: 212.249.5822 or dior.com. > Christian Louboutin: 212.396.1884 or christianlouboutin.com. > Clarisonic: clarisonic.com. > Clé de Peau: At Bergdorf Goodman, 888.774.2424 or bergdorfgoodman.com.

D Spring cleaning means spring shopping. This season, when going through your closet for a quick sprucing up (or a much-needed overhaul), be sure to check these pages for where to find the products featured in this issue, from jewelry to accessories, day dresses to evening gowns, makeup to a new bottle of perfume. Also, don’t forget to join the Quest and Q pages on Facebook, check in for daily updates on our blog at questmag.com, or follow us on Twitter: @QuestMag.

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SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP!

> DANNIJO: 646.755.8909 or dannijo.com. > David Yurman: 877.908.1177 or davidyurman.com.

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> de Grisogono: 212.439.4220 or

> alice + olivia: aliceandolivia.com.

degrisogono.com.

> Angel Sanchez: angelsanchezusa.com.

> Dennis Basso: 212.794.4500 or

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> Diane von Furstenberg: At Bloomingdale’s, or

dennisbasso.com.

> Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com.

888.472.2383 or dvf.com.

> Baume & Mercier: 800.683.2286 or

> Dolce & Gabbana: 212.249.4100 or

baume-et-mercier.com.

dolceandgabbana.com.

> Bergdorf Goodman: 888.774.2424 or

> Dooney & Bourke: 800.347.5000 or

bergdorfgoodman.com.

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> Marc Jacobs: 212.343.1490 or

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or rogervivier.com.

> Elie Tahari: 212.334.4441 or elietahari.com.

marcjacobs.com.

> Ruby Kobo: At Bergdorf Goodman Men’s

> Etro: 212.317.9096 or etro.it.

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus and

Store or rubykobo.com.

Saks Fifth Avenue, 877.551.SAKS or saks.com.

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> Marchez Vous: marchezvous.com.

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> Fabergé: 646.559.8848 or 694 Madison Ave.

> Marco Bicego: At Neiman Marcus or

> 7 For All Mankind: At Bloomingdale’s.

> Fresh: 800.FRESH20 or fresh.com.

marcobicego.com.

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> FreyWille: 646.682.9030 or 727 Madison Ave.

> Mark Cross: 212.288.1180 or markcross1845.

saksfifthavenue.com.

> Marina B: 212.644.1155 or marinab.com.

> Salvatore Ferragamo: 866.908.1188 or

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> Marni for H+M: hm.com and select H+M stores.

ferragamo.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

> Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman,

> Sequin: 561.833.7300 or sequin-nyc.com.

Saks Fifth Avenue, or michaelbastiannyc.com.

> Slane: slane.com.

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> Milly: 212.921.7800 or millyny.com.

> Stuart Weitzman: 212.823.9560 or

> Harry Winston: harrywinston.com.

> Miu Miu: miumiu.com.

stuartweitzman.com.

> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

> Montblanc: 212.223.8888 or montblanc.com.

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> Hunter Boot: hunter-boot.com.

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> Target: target.com.

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> Nancy Gonzalez: At Bergdorf Goodman or

> Tibi: 212.966.3773 or tibi.com.

> J. Mendel: 212.832.5830 or jmendel.com.

nancygonzalez.com.

> Tiffany & Co.: 561.659.6090 or tiffany.com.

> J.Crew: 800.562.0258 or jcrew.com.

> Nanette Lepore: At Bloomingdale’s.

> Tod’s: 650 Madison Ave.,

> Jack Rogers: jackrogersusa.com.

> Neiman Marcus: 800.533.1312 or

212.644.5945, or tods.com.

> Jimmy Choo: 866.JCHOO.US or jimmychoo.com.

neimanmarcus.com.

> Tory Burch: 866.480.TORY or toryburch.com.

> JustFab: justfab.com.

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> Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or

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> Kate Spade: 866.999.KATE or katespade.com.

oscardelarenta.com.

> Van Cleef & Arpels: 877.VANCLEEF or

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> VBH: 212.717.9800 or vbh-luxury.com.

> Katie Ermilio: katieermilio.com.

vancleef-arpels.com.

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> Palma: 305.439.3379 or palma-nyc.com.

> La Bella Figura: labellafigura.myshopify.com.

> Perricone MD: 888.823.7837 or

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> L.K. Bennett: 212.201.1961, Ten Columbus Circle, or

perriconemd.com.

> Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

lkbennett.com.

> Peter Thomas Roth: peterthomasroth.com.

> Whiting + Davis: whitinganddavis.com.

> Lia Sophia: liasophia.com.

> Prada: 888.977.1900 or prada.com.

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> Lilly Pulitzer: 888.PB.LILLY or lillypulitzer.com. > Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

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> LUSH: lush.com.

> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or

yigal-azrouel.com.

ralphlauren.com.

> Yves Saint Laurent: 212.832.7100 or ysl.com.

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> Yigal Azrouël: 212.929.7525 or

> Ray Ban: Available at Sunglass Hut

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or

(sunglasshut.com) and select retailers nationwide.

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manoloblahnik.com.

> Roger & Gallett: roger-gallet.com.

> Z Spoke By Zac Posen: couture.zappos.com.

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SPRING HOROSCOPES

Capricorn Dec. 22 to Jan. 19 Recently you’ve been itching to start a new business venture. Don’t be afraid to take a risk, or reach into that Hermès wallet of yours. Creative energy is all around you and now is the perfect time to sit down and think about how you are going to get those ideas out of your head and into the world. An app perhaps?

Cancer June 21 to July 22

Aquarius Jan. 20 to Feb. 18

Leo July 23 to Aug. 23

You’ve been down recently, everyone can tell. Maybe it’s the change in season? Maybe it’s something deeper. Either way, treat yourself to something nice. Invest in that Celine bag or that watch you’ve always wanted. Maybe, all you need is a day at the spa? A vacation? You’ll be glad you took the time for yourself.

Looking for a change of scenery? Maybe you need a job change. I’m not saying you should quit your job at J.P. Morgan. That would be hasty. I am saying, however, that if your passions lie somewhere else, then it might be worth figuring out what you want, and how you can get it. You’ll never work a day in your life if you love what you do!

Pisces Feb. 19 to Mar. 20 Pisces, you need to get out more. All this hibernation was a fine excuse in the winter, but was it, though? We had an unusually warm winter and you still stayed in. Hit up a new spot like Ken and Cook and then take yourself to a bar where you can air out some of that lameness you’ve been harboring.

Virgo Aug. 24 to Sept. 22 The summer is a great time to meet new people and make new friends. Put yourself out there and don’t be afraid to join a new circle. Maybe invest in a Hamptons share? What was that saying from nursery school? Make new friends, but keep the old, one is silver, the other gold? Whatever. Keep striving until you reach platinum.

Aries Mar. 21 to Apr. 19 So, yes. Pictures of Kate Upton in bikinis are polluting the Internet, reminding you of swimsuit season in a really, really mean way. Luckily, there’s enough time before Memorial Day to tighten and tone yourself into a 10. Get motivated, but be kind to yourself. You’re already beautiful inside and out.

Libra Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 Libra’s are positive extroverts by nature. You’re the life of the party, so make sure you spend your time soaking up the sun and bringing a smile to everyone’s face. Enjoy your summer and forget about all of life’s little problems and start focusing on life’s little enjoyments. Like macarons. Now if only there wasn’t such a long line at Ladurée.

Taurus Apr. 20 to May 20

Scorpio Oct. 23 to Nov. 21 You know that one friend that you keep around even though they don’t really contribute anything positive to your life? Maybe you should start standing up for yourself more. Now is the perfect time to be more outspoken. Don’t be afraid to call them out on their bad behavior. Remember, you’re a Scorpio, have some sting.

Gemini May 21 to June 20 You! Yes, you. You’re a gem. Start giving yourself a little more credit for all the hard work you do. I’m not sure exactly what it is you do, but I’ll bet it’s hard, and I bet no one can do it half as well! You are special! Do you feel better about yourself? Well, we tried. Maybe an ice-cream sundae will do the trick? Extra sprinkles?

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Sagittarius Nov. 22 to Dec. 21 When the moon is in the seventh house and Jupiter aligns with Mars, then peace will guide the planets and love will steer the stars. Just kidding! That’s a song. But this is your month to find true love. What are you waiting for? Hurry up! The month is almost over! Spritz on your favorite scent and get going already!

Zod i ac c ha r m s co u r te s y o f Bla i r H usa i n J e we lr y

All that Twitters is not gold, dear Taurus. Oversharing is not caring—maybe you should think twice and forgo that update or upload! If you’re really out there being awesome, you’d be out there being awesome—not tweeting about it every 10 minutes. And don’t even think about getting on the Instagram train. #sorrynotsorry

Stressing out about your birthday plans? Do you know how lucky you are to have a summer birthday? Grab some close friends and family, find a backyard and pop a few bottles. Don’t worry about that one restaurant and whether or not you’ll get a table for 27. Sometimes the best birthdays are the simplest.


%*45*/(6*4)"#-: 4 ) & 3 - & 8" ( / & 3  $ 0 . 

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MONTBLANC. THE TIMEWRITERS.

In 1821, Nicolas Rieussec changed watchmaking forever with the invention of the first chronograph. Since “chronograph” literally means “writing time”, the Montblanc Nicolas Rieussec Chronograph rewrites timepiece history. Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland, this masterpiece is a worthy tribute to its visionary namesake. Monopusher chronograph, self-winding manufacture movement. 30 min. and 60 sec. rotating disc counters fixed on the counter bridge.

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Q Spring 2012