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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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SPRING ISSUE 2019 > $5.00

BROOKE SHIELDS PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOHN G. ZIMMERMAN, 1979 questmag.com

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YACHT CARE CENTERS YACHT CARE CENTERS YSouthwest A CYHATCHarbor, C R Portsmouth, ST E R S HA T RCEME AC R E NCT E N RI Southwest Harbor, ME Portsmouth, RI Northeast Harbor, ME Stamford, CT Southwest Harbor, ME ME Portsmouth, Northeast Harbor, ME Stamford, CT RI Southwest Harbor, Portsmouth, RI Northeast Harbor, ME ME Northeast Harbor,

Stamford, CT Stamford, CT

Annapolis, MD Annapolis, MD Oxford, MD Annapolis, Oxford, MD MD MD Annapolis, Oxford, MD MD Oxford,

Savannah, GA Savannah, GA Stuart, FL Savannah, GA GA Stuart, FL Savannah, Stuart,Stuart, FL FL

Naples, FL Naples, FL Fort Myers, FL Naples, FL FL FL Fort Myers, Naples, Fort Myers, FL Fort Myers, FL


EST. 1870

ART F I N D L AY

MOHAMADOU M’BAYE • Les Sacrifiees 5/8 • Aubusson tapestry • 63 5/8 x 48 in

WALL HANGINGS The African Motifs and More

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GILLES GORRITI (1939-2019) • Le pichet bleu • Mixed media on canvas • 28 3/4 x 36 1/4 in

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EST. 1870

ART F I N D L AY


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F E A T U R E S

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44 LIVING LEGEND Q celebrates California girl Christie Brinkley, whose modeling career has spanned four decades (and counting!). 56 PARTY STARTERS Terry Allen Kramer dispenses timeless advice on entertaining, originally published in Q in Spring 2007. 58 WINING AND DINING Women-centric wine and social club LBV is evolving into an entire lifestyle brand.

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64 INTRODUCING A NEW PASSION PROJECT: –– NANTUCKET CANDLE COMPANY With scents inspired by Nantucket locations, these candles ensure that the spirit of everyone’s favorite island is always with you. 66 BARBIE: INSPIRING GIRLS SINCE ’59 A new book celebrates the 60-year history of the doll that once scandalized many and has since evolved into a role model for today’s young girls. 72 FASHION GOES GREEN While the fashion industry is notably detrimental to the environment, these companies prove that fashion and sustainability can go hand-in-hand.

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82 L’AVENUE AT SAKS’ STAR POWER The New York outpost of Paris’ favorite haunt of the fashion set dazzles with its desserts and designer-clad crowd. 86 FASHION FOR THE THRONE As the decade’s most talkedabout television show charges toward a conclusion, we delve into the costume design behind the characters. 90 FASHION REVIEW The Fall 2019 runway shows brought maximum glam: sequins, shine, and strong colors.

C O V E R

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American actress Brooke Shields roller skating while carrying an ice cream cone in New York City’s Central Park, photographed by John G. Zimmerman, 1979 (© John G. Zimmerman Archive).


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29 NOSTALGIA Famous families and faces celebrate springs of years past in this smile-filled collage of snaps. 32 JEWELRY For spring’s warm days and cool nights, these colorful pieces will let you sparkle and shine. 34 SWIMWEAR It’s time to show off your beach body in these fun suits and flowing cover-up dresses. 36 SHOES Put your best foot forward with our favorite picks in glimmering metallics and sunny brights.

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37 SUNGLASSES Get prepped for spring’s brightest days. 38 MEN’S ACCESSORIES Pieces to welcome warm weather. 39 WOMEN’S ACCESSORIES Classics never go out of style. 40 HANDBAGS Stroll into summer with these clutches and handbags in chic hues and fun textures.

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42 MEN’S APPAREL Spring’s best looks for men lighten up as the days get longer, in shades of beige and tan. 94 Q FOCUS From the Met Gala to a celebration of the miniskirt, the best parties from London to New York and more. 104 BEAUTY A few of our favorites to keep you looking your finest and smelling your most beautiful. 106 EVENING LOOKS Get ready for your close-up in these looks inspired by the work of photographer Irving Penn.

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110 SHOPPING INDEX To help you locate the fabulous looks featured in our pages. 112 HOROSCOPES Advice from the stars this season.


CAROLINAHERRER CAROLINAHERRERA.COM


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EDITOR

JAMES STOFFEL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

KATHRYN MAIER SENIOR EDITOR

BROOKE KELLY F E AT U R E S E D I TO R

TYKISCHA JACOBS GRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION MANAGER

ROBERT BENDER CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

JULIE SKARRATT PHOTOGR APHER-AT-L ARGE

HILARY GEARY SOCIET Y EDITOR

JOANNA BAKER CO-FOUNDING EDITOR

Quest Media, LLC S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III CHAIRMAN AND C.E.O.

KATHLEEN SHERIDAN A SSI STANT TO THE C.E.O.

LUWAY LU NOCITO ACCOUNTING MANAGER BOARD OF ADVISORS

EDWARD LEE CAVE CRIS CONDON JED H. GARFIELD ELIZABETH STRIBLING-KIVLAN KATHY KORTE PAMELA LIEBMAN HOWARD LORBER ANDREW SAUNDERS WILLIAM LIE ZECKENDORF

LISA ROSENBERG 917.576.8951 MIAMI AND GREENWICH

BINA GUPTA 852.2868.1555 HONG KONG

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN ELIZABETH KURPIS JAMES MACGUIRE TAKI THEODORACOPULOS MICHAEL THOMAS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

HARRY BENSON BILLY FARRELL MARY HILLARD PATRICK MCMULLAN ANNIE WATT LINDA LANE SOPER 612.308.4159 PALM BEACH

EMILIO ZERBONI 011.39.031.267.797 MILAN

© QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2019. All rights reserved. Vol. 15, No. 2 . Q–Quintessential Style is published quarterly, 4 times a year. Yearly subscription rate $32.00. Two-year rate $50.00. Q, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. For address changes, please call: 646.840.3404. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Q–Quintessential Style, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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EDITOR’S LETTER

I sat next to Brooke Shields at a dinner once. My mom had invited our friends and neighbors, Frank and Didi Shields, over for dinner in Palm Beach. The Shieldses lived down the block from us and Frank was a close friend of my father (and a favorite and never ending source of entertainment for our entire family). I knew his three lovely and beautiful daughters: Marina, Christiana, and Olympia. But I had never met their half-sister, Brooke (according to my dad, Brooke was named after one of Frank’s old school private clubs—but that’s a story for another time). Of course I had heard of Brooke, having watched The Blue Lagoon countless times—not to mention her famously full brows and cheeky Calvin Klein ads. Around the world, young and old listened intently as a teenage Brooke Shields murmured, “You want to know what comes between me and my Calvins? Nothing.” Those ads would help catapult Klein’s career to super-designer status. In 1980, 14-year-old Shields was the youngest model ever to appear on the cover of Vogue. And when I met Brooke, she was nothing but wide-eyed and sweet, and surprisingly down to earth (even at 6 feet tall). Brooke was dating tennis great Andre Agassi at the time, and I was an awkward teenager in my first year at boarding school (coincidentally, where her father Frank had gone). Brooke was totally honest about the “freshman 15”—the battle is real and she admitted it was rough. She also told me that enrolling at Princeton had been difficult—she was not received with open arms by her fellow classmates, who weren’t used to being in the presence of a famous actress (Brooke explained the situation in much humbler terms, but I got the gist). I remember feeling shocked upon hearing that lunchtime was initially her least favorite activity—cafeteria fear and anxiety about who to sit with were not foreign concepts to her. Luckily, Brooke befriended fellow actor Dean Cain at Princeton (the two went on to date), and it was helpful having another well-known actor in her midst. In recent years, I would run into Brooke at Terry Allen Kramer’s famous Thanksgiving Day dinner parties in Palm Beach. To say that Brooke has aged well would be an understatement. The model, actress, mother, and businesswoman is positively luminous and going strong—assuredly for years to come. And speaking of timeless beauties, returning Q contributor Elizabeth Quinn Brown celebrates the achievements of classic California girl Christie Brinkley, whose modeling career has spanned four decades—and counting! But the original blonde bombshell—Mattel’s illustrious Barbie doll—is, in fact, made of plastic. Q contributor and features editor Brooke Kelly reports on a new book celebrating 60 years of the doll that initially scandalized nations. These days, Barbie is less busy tending to Ken and her dream house, and more focused on inspiring young girls around the globe to be anything they want to become. From princess to president, astronaut to zoologist, there isn’t a plastic ceiling Barbie hasn’t broken. I am also proud to introduce Kathryn Maier, Quest’s senior editor and new Q contributor. Kathryn proves that style and sustainability can go hand-in-hand in “Fashion Goes Green.” Although it’s a widely known fact that fashion is the world’s secCounterclockwise from top right: Van Cleef & Arpels Butterfly ond most polluting industry (behind oil), Kathryn rounds up ring in yellow gold and diamonds; Christie Brinkley in the 1981 a few helpful—and unequivocally stylish—options to help you Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue; Casadei’s “Blade” heel in start shopping sustainably. gold; Ralph Lauren’s Striped Bikini Top and Hipster Bikini BotAnd please don’t miss Terry Allen Kramer’s article on entom; Jackie Onassis and Lee Radziwill strolling down a street tertaining, which we fondly reprinted from Spring 2007 Q in in London, 1970; Maja Du Brul Dragonfly V Opal Earrings; Old memory of the late, great Terry. Oh Terry, how we will miss North Wharf on Nantucket; An emerald gown from Oscar de you—your advice on entertaining is timeless and will remain la Renta’s Fall 2019 collection; Barbie: Sixty Years of Inspiration so forever! u (Assouline); Terry Allen Kramer and Sean Connery at a party hosted by the late grande dame in her Southampton home.

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EDITOR


When t he answer me ans t he world.

GREENWICH

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CONTRIBUTORS

Elizabeth Quinn Brown > Having started her career at Quest, Lizzie is now a freelance editor/writer who contributes to publications including Architectural Digest, GQ, and USA Today. In Spring Q, Brown chronicles “Living Legend” Christie Brinkley—model, actress, and businesswoman. Brinkley gained worldwide fame with her appearances in Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues, featured on an unprecedented three consecutive covers starting in 1979. She spent 25 years as the face of CoverGirl, has appeared on over 500 magazine covers, and has signed contracts with major brands—both fashion and non-fashion.

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< Brooke Kelly A graduate of Tufts University, Brooke is the features editor of Quest and Q magazines. In this issue, she celebrates 60 years of Barbie—the mother of all role models since she emerged in ’59. Also not to be missed are Brooke’s selection of sunglasses, shoes, swimwear, and accessories to help you transition stylishly into summer; her coverage of the hottest parties; or her roundup of the best new beauty products. Outside the office, you can find Brooke exploring the Upper East Side or on the golf course, from Palm Beach to Quogue.

82 Justin O’Neill > Originally from Bronxville, New York, Justin is a graduate of Hampden-Sydney College and current resident of New York City’s Upper East Side. A full-time editor at Assouline, Justin has published books on travel, food, and luxury brands, from Aerin Lauder’s Aspen Style to In the Spirit of Gstaad. In this issue, Justin applauds the fashion in HBO’s Game of Thrones—executed by Emmy award-winning lead costume designer Michele Clapton—as we dolefully bid farewell to the final series of a show of a lifetime.

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44 < Hayden Arnot was born and raised on New York City’s Upper East Side. A frequenter of Palm Beach and Nantucket, Hayden reports on his new Nantucket Candle Company, which is set to take off in July. In addition to earning degrees from Choate Rosemary Hall and Wake Forest University, Hayden has worked tirelessly to support Save the Children’s mission to advance education for underserved children around the globe, and recently established the organization’s Young Patrons Committee. He has also been a longtime volunteer for Memorial Sloan Kettering.

66 < Kathryn Maier We’re pleased to introduce Kathryn Maier as the new senior editor of Quest and Q. She joins our staff after holding editorial roles at other luxury lifestyle publications, including the Robb Report and Condé Nast Traveler, and eating her way through New York as Manhattan’s monthly restaurant critic. In this issue, she explores New York’s most fashionable new spot for ladies who lunch (and sup) and delves into the steps that clothing brands like Ralph Lauren and Stella McCartney are taking toward sustainability.

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BY K ATE KU H N ER AN D STEVE N STO L M AN , RE PR I N TED BY PE R MISSIO N O F GIBB S SMITH

P H OTO G R AP H ED BY BET T Y KUH N E R FRO M B ET T Y KUH N E R : THE AME R IC AN FAMILY PO RTRAIT

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Dixon and Pauline Boardman with daughters

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Samantha and Serena, Palm Beach, Florida, 1978.

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This page: 1. Brigitte Bardot and Dario Moreno dance the mambo in the film Come Dance With Me, 1959. 2. A waiter serves drinks on the beach at the Mill Reef Club on Antigua in the West Indies, 1960. 3. Karen Morley and Robert Young courtside, 1932. 4. Veruschka photographed by Horst P. Horst for Vogue, 1965. 5. “Del Mar Daffy” by Hugh Holland, 1975. > Opposite page: 1. Tiger Morse photographed by Mark Shaw in New York City, New York, 1962. 2. Farrah Fawcett, Kate Jackson, and Jaclyn Smith in a scene from “Charlie’s Angels,” 1976. 3. Tantivy, Bingo, and Phoebe Gubelmann in Palm Beach, Florida, 1982. 4. Sisters Lee Radziwill and Jacqueline Kennedy on a camel in Karachi, Pakistan, 1962. 5. Babe Paley sitting in her garden, photographed by Horst P. Horst, 1964.

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Su n se t B o ule va rd/ Co r b i s vi a G e tty Im age s ; Sli m A a ro n s /H u lto n A r c h i ve / Ge tty Im age s ; Ko bal Collection; Horst P. Horst/Cond e Nast via Getty Imag es; Hug h Holland

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Ma r k Sh a w Ar c h i ve s; AB C P h o to Ar ch i ves ; P h o to grap h e d b y Be tt y Kuh n e r f ro m Be t ty Ku h ne r: The American Family Por trait by Kate Kuhner and Steven Stolman, rep rinted by p ermission of Gibbs Smith; Asso cia te d Pre ss; Ho rst P. Ho rst

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4 Marisa Berenson Dubbed an “It Girl” by Yves Saint Laurent in the early 1970s, Marisa Berenson has lived her life within the vicinity of a camera’s lens since her earliest days (even her christening portrait was published in Vogue). Her grandmother was Elsa Schiaparelli, the Italian-born fashion designer who became famous for her Surrealist fashions of the 1930s (as well as her bitter rivalry with fellow designer Coco Chanel). Here, photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri captures Berenson modeling a Capucci blouse and Bulgari jewelry for Vogue in 1969.

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1. TIFFANY & CO. Paper Flowers diamond and tanzanite open cluster necklace in platinum; $7,500. 2. MAJA DU BRUL Dragonfly V Opal Earrings with Moonstone Cabochon, Czech Danburite, and Peruvian opal in rhodium-plated 18-kt. white gold; $22,000. 3. ROBERTO COIN Pois Moi Luna diamond bangle in 18-kt. white gold; $14,500. 4. LALIQUE Cabochon Ring; $160. 5. BETTERIDGE Diamond Fringe Drop Earrings, with 4.40 total carats of diamonds in platinum; $19,000. 6. LUSSO BY FABIO ANGRI Swirling Diamond Dolphin Ring with blue, white, and black diamonds in 18-kt. white gold; $24,000.

Gi a n Pa o lo B ar b i e r i /C o n dé N a st vi a G et ty I ma ge s )

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Britt Ekland poses for Slim Aarons in Porto Ercole in 1969. A 20th Century Fox talent scout spotted the Swedish beauty in Italy and sent her to London for a film, where she met actor Peter Sellers. He was 38, she was 21, and they were married within 11 days. Ekland later had affairs with notorious playboys including Warren Beatty and Ryan O’Neal, then spent three years as the blonde on Rod Stewart’s arm. Ekland’s legacy lives on as the muse for Stewart’s hit song “Tonight’s the Night” and as Bond girl Mary Goodnight in 1974’s The Man with the Golden Gun.

1. CARTIER Clash de Cartier earrings in 18-kt. pink gold, each set with 14 brilliant-cut diamonds totaling 0.41 carats; $13,700. 2. MONICA VINADER An assortment of Pendant Charms; visit monicavinader.com for details. 3. VENDORAFA Anaconda Cuff, with 18-kt. yellow gold and round brilliant diamonds; $7,950 at Neiman Marcus. 4. VHERNIER Freccia Bracelet in 18-kt. pink gold, cornelian, and rock crystal; $20,100 at 783 Madison Avenue or vhernier.com. 5. BLAIR HUSAIN Signature Star Earrings with Diamonds; $1,600. 6. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS Two Butterfly ring featuring diamonds set in 18-kt. yellow gold; $13,800 at vancleefarpels.com and select Van Cleef & Arpels boutiques.

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Beachy Keen Elle Macpherson Nicknamed “The Body”—the result of a Time magazine cover that dubbed her as such (a nickname she’d carry with her for a lifetime)—six-foot-tall Macpherson is one of a handful of figures credited with putting the “super” in the word “supermodel.” Here, the leggy superstar skips along the beach while posing for Sports Illustrated’s 2006 swimsuit issue at the Coral Sands Hotel in Harbour Island, Bahamas. And to think it all started when, as an 18-year-old law school student in her hometown of Sydney, Australia, Elle moved to New York City to model for a year—the idea being she’d earn a little extra money for textbooks...

1. LILLY PULITZER The Natalie Shirtdress Cover-up in Resort White is a printed tunic perfect for wearing over your swimsuit; available for $118 at lillypulitzer.com. 2. SHOSHANNA The Tossed Daisy Embroidery Cover Up Off The Shoulder Dress features rope tassel ties at the neck and feminine embroidery all over, all ideal for the beach; $275 at shoshanna.com. 3. KIINI The Chacha Bikini Top ($165) and Bottom ($120); available at kiini.com. 4. TORY BURCH The Printed Tank Suit features a nod to exotic ports of call and features vibrant toucans; $198 at toryburch.com. 5. RALPH LAUREN Striped Bikini Top ($68) and Hipster Bikini Bottom ($62); available at ralphlauren.com. 6. MARYSIA The Wainscott Tie in Multi Cloud Gingham Top ($198) and Bottom ($189); available at marysia.com.

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T H E COLONY PALMBE ACH.COM

COPYRIGHT © 2018 KATE SCHELTER


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SHOES

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2 1. SAM EDELMAN The Delaney Block Heel Mule in Gold Crinkle is a classic sandal with a block heel and thick straps; $120 at samedelman.com. 2. MANOLO BLAHNIK The Dark Pink Suede Scalloped Sandals are open-toe

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slip-ons finished with scalloped edges and a slender stiletto heels; $825 at manoloblahnik.com. 3. STUBBS & WOOTTON The King Natural (JD) Women’s Slippers were meticulously Hand-crafted in Spain and feature the finest Natural Italian Linen Upper with a Natural Nappa Leather Trim, finished with King embroidery; $600 at stubbandwootton.com. 4. SARAH FLINT The limited edition Iris heel in Color Rainbow Suede; $525 at sarahflint.com. 5. OSCAR DE LA RENTA The Metallic Silver Nappa Leather Mohawk Sandal; price upon request at personalshopper@odlr.com.

Stylish Stepping Sophie Malgat, born Simone Steur in Nice, was a prominent French model during the 1950s, known for her petite physique and natural comfort in front of the camera. With just a brief history in swimwear, Malgat’s career took off as the face for Hermès. She eventually walked in a number of high profile runway shows and regularly posed for top magazines like L’Officiel and Vogue Paris. Here, Malgat is seen being shot for House & Garden in February of 1950.

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Summer & Sunlight Cheryl Tiegs, considered the first American supermodel by many, was best known for her bikini shots—with her “pink bikini poster” becoming one of the most talked-about images of the ’70s. Tiegs, who graced the covers of a number of top publications, from Sports Illustrated to TIME, is seen here sporting aviators with her then-husband, photographer Peter Beard, as they vacation in Turks and Caicos in 1982.

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1. BOTTEGA VENETA These Bottega Veneta sunglasses are defined by a thin acetate front with flat lenses; $415 by calling 800.845.6790. 2. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN The Jeweled Spider Round Frames are rimless sunglasses embel-

Co u r te sy o f Sli m Aa ro ns

lished with a crystal-encrusted spider; $790 at alexandermcqueen.com. 3. SAINT

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LAURENT The iconic SL 51 shape evolves with the precious twist of ayers leather and a sophisticated double Saint Laurent signature; $945 at ysl.com. 4. STELLA MCCARTNEY Feminine cat-eye sunglasses with metal double pin signature on lenses; $215 at stellamccartney.com. 5. CARTIER This sophisticated round frame design is characterized by a light semi-rim construction that is accentuated sculptural touches inspired by the Maison’s jewelry expertise; $1,195 at cartier.com.

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Seriously Stylish James Dean attends the Thalian Ball on August 29, 1955 at Ciro’s nightclub in Los Angeles, California; he died one month later. James Dean was the quintessential Hollywood bad boy of the 1950s. He is remembered as a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment and social estrangement, as expressed in the title of his most celebrated film, Rebel Without a Cause (1955). The Hollywood wonder’s life tragically ended at the age of 24 when his Porsche hit a Ford Tudor sedan at an intersection in Cholame, California. Although it has now been 61 years since his death, Dean’s style is still widely celebrated and imitated by men all over the world.

1. T. ANTHONY The Classic Duffle in Black/Tan is ideal for weekend getaways; $450 at tanthony.com. 2. HARRY’S OF LONDON One of the brand’s most popular styles, the Basel shoe in Kudu Suede Tobacco makes for the perfect weekend wear or travel shoe; $395 at harrysoflondon.com. 3. SMATHERS AND BRANSON The needlepoint can coolers from Smathers and Branson will keep your drink cold on a hot summer day; $29.50 at smathersandbranson.com. 4. MOUNT VEEDER WINERY The Mount Veeder Winery Cabernet Sauvignon is perfect for Father’s Day; $44 at wine.com. 5. STUBBS & WOOTTON IN COLLABORATION WITH YORK RIVER TRADERS Martini Cufflinks; $150 at stubbsandwootton.com. 6. PETER MILLAR The Skull and Clubs Canvas belt; $125 at petermillar.com.

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Bookish Beauty Candice Bergen is candid. The beautiful blonde star could perhaps have coasted on her debutante-like looks. But she has more character than that. One cool, sophisticated, eternally elegant lady, Candice Bergen was poised for trendy “ice princess” stardom when she first arrived on the ’60s screen. However, she gradually reshaped that cookie-cutter image in the ‘70s, both onand off-camera. A staunch, outspoken feminist with a decisive edge, she went on to take a sizable portion of those contradicting qualities to film and, most memorably, to late 1980s TV.

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1. HERMÈS The Robe du Soir POP Scarf in silk twill features clean lines and pure, flat-tinted colors; $810 at hermes.com. 2. J.MCLAUGHLIN The Arena Hat in Natural/ Blue/White with an artful crochet ribbon that adds a stylish touch; $98 at jmclaughlin.com. 3. JOHN ROBSHAW The Sakala Decorative Pillow with a hand-beaded element; $195 at johnrobshaw.com. 4. CARTIER The Panthère de Cartier watch in yellow gold and steel; $7,350 at cartier.com. 5. NICOLAS FEUILLATTE The Réserve Exclusive Rosé is a delicately nuanced Champagne bursting with red summer fruit flavours; $56 at nicolas-feuillatte.com. 6. LAFCO The Signature 15.5oz Watermint Agave Candle notes sprigs of mint and tomato leaf and adds a luxurious touch to any coffee table at home; $65 at lafco.com.

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CLUTCHES

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1. COMPLET The Valery Micro Belt Bag in Neon Green; $450 at shopbop.com. 2. PRADA The Basket Clutch with wicker construction that adds charm to this structured crossbody bag with signature logo detailing; $1,420 at sakfifthavenue.com. 3. OSCAR DE LA RENTA The Cornflower Leather Mini TRO bag will infuse modern elegance into any look; $1,790 at oscardelarenta.com. 4. HERMĂ&#x2C6;S The Jige Elan 29 Clutch; $3,675 at hermes.com. 5. J.MCLAUGHLIN The woven cane Claire Clutch is a favorite carry-on that offers luggage leather, snap closure, and interior pockets; $128 at jmclaughlin.com and select J.McLaughlin boutiques.

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4 5 Pa ram o un t Š 1 978 Bo b Wi l lo ugh b y

Audrey Hepburn photographed by Bob Willoughby on the set of Paris When It Sizzles, Paris, 1962. Hotshot Hollywood screenwriter Richard Benson (William Holden) is in trouble. He sold a script idea to decadent producer Alexander Meyerheim (Noel Coward), but wasted all the time he had to finish the screenplay traipsing around Paris. With just a couple of days left before his deadline, Benson gets a new assistant named Gabrielle Simpson (Audrey Hepburn), who helps him put together a love story by acting out all the possible scenarios. But life eventually begins to imitate art...


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Stroll Into Summer Sisters Jackie Kennedy Onassis and Princess Lee Radziwill strolling down a street in London in 1970. In their heyday, the Bouvier sisters were the most famous sisters in the world. As young girls, they called each other “Jacks” and “Pekes.” Two things they shared were fantastic style and a soft, whispery way of speaking. Lee’s voice was slightly huskier; Jackie’s had a breathy, little-girl quality (which belied her strong intelligence). “When I was seven and we lived in New York, I ran away,” Lee, who passed away in February, once told Gloria Steinem. “I took my dog and started out across the Brooklyn Bridge…. I didn’t get very far…. It’s rather difficult to run away in your mother’s high heels.”

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1. RALPH LAUREN The RL50 Python Medium Handbag—defined by its belted silhouette and elegantly curved bar topline—is equipped with two python top handles, each with a 4” drop, and a removable, adjustable python crossbody strap with a 26” maximum drop; $4,200 at ralphlauren.com. 2. CARTIER The Guirlande de Cartier mini sized black calfskin bag with golden garland motif and golden hot stamped “Cartier” signature inside; $2,020 at cartier.com. 3. BRAHMIN Brahmin’s Brinkley Arden Satchel in light gold; visit brahmin.com for more information. 4. MULBERRY The Amberley Satchel was inspired by British countryside pursuits and equestrian styling, and can be worn over the shoulder or across body; $1,250 at mulberry.com. 5. FENDI The iconic Fendi Baguette bag in blue suede with vintage gold finished; $2,390 at fendi.com.

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M E N ’ S A P PA R E L

Ride In Style Cy Twombly was an American painter, sculptor, and photographer. Born Edwin Twombly Jr., he was nicknamed “Cy” after the legendary National Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher, Cy Young. His father, Edwin Parker Twombly, Sr. (who was also nicknamed “Cy”), was a Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Chicago White Sox. German-American fashion photographer Horst P. Horst captured Twombly Jr. seated in a green Alfa Romeo car in Rome in 1966.

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1. . RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL Cashmere Cap d’Antibes Bear Hoodie. Ralph Lauren’s iconic Polo Bear wears a linen jacket, patent leather sunglasses, and suede espadrilles for the French Riviera; $1,695 at ralphlauren.com. 2. HERMÈS A look from Hermès’ Spring 2019 runway show, illustrating sportswear’s ability to infiltrate the urban wardrobe. For more information visit hermes.com. 3. TOM FORD Trench Coat With Leather Trim in color Butter; $4,990 at tomford.com. 4. BILLY REID Waxed Trench featuring a custom print on the interior ($425), shown with Teton Print Short Sleeve Camp Shirt ($225), at billyreid.com. 5. BRUNELLO CUCINELLI Délavé linen chevron Smooth suit comprised of one-and-a-half-breasted jacket and trousers with double pleats ($4,035), and canvas and grained calfskin Country bag ($3,995) at brunellocucinelli.com. 6. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO A look from Salvatore Ferragamo’s Spring 2019 runway show. For more information visit ferragamo.com.

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Kim Weston Arnold /Ind ig ital.tv

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LIVE PASSIONATELY. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2019. BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI AND COMPANY LIMITED. RUM - 40% ALC. BY VOL.


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This page: Christie Brinkley poses for the 1980 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue on November 23, 1979 in the British Virgin Islands. > Opposite page: Brinkley seated on a wicker couch and wearing a dress by Callaghan, Vogue, 1977.

Christie Brinkley continues to be the blond babe with the dream bod—and she’s 65. She’s so timeless that, in 2005, CoverGirl renewed the 25-year contract that Brinkley signed in 1980 to establish the most long-lived modeling contract in existence: She’s modeled with them for almost four decades! Christie Lee Hudson was born on February 2, 1954, in Monroe, Michigan, to Marjorie and Herbert Hudson. Christie and her brother, Gregory, acquired new last names when Christie was one year old and Marjorie became remarried to Don Brinkley. The Brinkleys resided in Los Angeles, California (where Don had a career as a TV writer). Christie, who considers Don her father, has praised him (in Dan’s Papers): “He was very respected, well-known, and loved […] He wrote for everything from ‘Ben Casey’ to ‘the Kraft Suspense Theatre’ and, for radio,

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‘The Shadow Knows.’ He did a lot of doctor and cowboy shows. He wrote for ‘The Fugitive,’ ‘Ironside,’ ‘Bonanza,’ and many others […] I remember hearing my dad typing away late at night and I’d fall asleep listening to it.” She continued, describing her parents: “People just felt good being around them. They’d light up a room. And they were so madly in love with each other. He was the king; she was the queen. They called one another endearing names like ‘Darling,’ ‘Sweetheart’ and ‘Wild Thing.’ I called them the best parents in the world.” The blonde excelled in her interests (which included art, French, and surfing) and she studied at Le Lycée Français de Los Angeles. She followed her love of France and French culture to Paris once she had graduated. She has shared (in Dan’s

Th i s p ag e : J oh n G . Z i m me r m an / Co n t ou r b y G e tty Im ag e s.

Living Legend Christie Brinkley


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Th i s p ag e : A nd re a B lan c h / Ge tt y I m a ge s; J o h n G . Z i m m e r m a n f or Spo r ts I llu s trate d ; C ove rG i r l.

Papers): “I was so happy. I thought, ‘I BELONG here.’ In California, you don’t have old things. Everything is clean and new and shiny. In Paris, I just wanted to rush up and touch the walls of these old buildings and think about who else might have touched them—Matisse! Victor Hugo! Henry Miller!” There, she studied to become an illustrator until she was discovered by a modeling agent in 1973. Eileen Ford (of Ford Modeling Agency) heard about Brinkley and flew her back to Los Angeles, California, to meet with one of her agents, Nina Blanchard. In one lunch, Christie booked three campaigns: Max Factor, Noxzema, and Yucca-Dew. She has shared (to Into The Gloss): “When I became a model, the reason I was successful was because I was not skinny like the other girls... I could barely fit into the sample clothes because I was what they called back then ‘athletic.’ This was about 43 years ago—in the late ’70s. That’s when everybody was starting to do the exercise thing. Jane Fonda was coming out with the workout tapes and Olivia Newton-John was singing, ‘Let’s get physical!’ I had that newer look—I was getting booked for things because you couldn’t see my bones through my skin. I was healthy, I was a surfer girl from Malibu. I went skiing and I liked being active and doing things. I just had that California look.” Brinkley remained in France—where she married her first husband, Jean-François Allaux, in 1973 (the two would divorce in 1981). Her famous break came in 1979, when she appeared


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

This page, clockwise from top left: Christie Brinkley and Chevy Chase on the set of National Lampoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vacation in 1983; Brinkley takes pictures with a Polaroid camera as her boyfriend, singer and songwriter Billy Joel, looks on, May 4, 1983; Brinkley wears Geoffrey Beene pajamas while posing with a Doberman Pinscher for Vogue in 1977; Brinkley smiles with Mark Ronsn and Ann Dexter-Jones at the Tribeca Grand Hotel in 2006; Brinkley during a photoshoot for the 1979 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, Seychelles, 1978. > Opposite page, from top: Brinkley sits on a couch while rolling a cigarette, 1980; Brinkley wearing a swimsuit and reversible jacket by Gottex in the 1981 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue; Brinkley shines in a 2005 advertisement for CoverGirl.

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“When I became a model, the reason I was successful was because I was not skinny like the other girls... I could barely fit into the sample clothes because I was what they called back then ‘athletic...”

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Ann Clif f ord /DMI/The LIFE Picture C olle ctio n / Ge tty I m a ge s; I co n ix Bra n d Gro u p

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This page, from top: Brinkley and her husband, singer/songwriter Billy Joel, in a stonefaced pose, 1982. > This page and opposite: Christie Brinkley starring in Danskin’s “Move for Change” Fall 2011 campaign. As part of the campaign, Danskin formed the “Move for Change” initiative, a goodwill movement dedicated to the health and wellness of women and children.

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This page, from left: Christie Brinkley getting glam for a photoshoot in New York City, New York, circa 1985; Brinkley graces Cosmopolitan’s May, 1978 cover; the model looking fierce in a pair of Venetian-blind sunglasses by R&D Volpini, 1973. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Sailor Brinkley-Cook and Christie Brinkley attend Cushnie’s Spring 2019 runway show; Brinkley and Peter Cook in New York City, New York, 2005; Brinkley and Olivier Chandon de Brailles (heir to the Moët & Chandon Champagne fortune), ride off on a motorcycle after dining at Joanna’s Restaurant in New York City, September 28, 1982; Brinkley attends a car race while dating Olivier Chandon; Brinkley poses for the 1981 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue; Christie Brinkley and John Mellencamp walking in Soho, New York, 2015; Brinkley attends “The Police Athletic League Honors Mayor David Dinkins” at The Plaza Hotel in New York, New York, 1991; Brinkley wearing red in 1990; Brinkley at the opening night of Broadway musical Rent, 1986.

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on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit issue. She was a success, returning to cover the following two years’ swimsuit issues as well. The blond babe’s career has since included 500 covers for publications like Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Glamour, LIFE, Rolling Stone, and Vogue. Brinkley resonated with brands, too: She has inked contracts with the likes of Chanel, Diet Coke, and MasterCard—not to mention CoverGirl. Brinkley’s film debut came in National Lampoon’s Vacation (1983), which starred Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo. She returned to her character (“The Girl In The Ferrari”) in Vegas Vacation (1997). She has since performed the roles of Gayle Gergich in NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” and Roxie Hart in Broadway’s Chicago. While hosting a party at Studio 54 to promote her 1982 calendar, Brinkley met Chandon de Brailles—a French race car driver and only son of Frederic Chandon de Brailles, making him heir to the Moët & Chandon Champagne fortune. Brinkley and Chandon embarked on an intense affair. The two were said to be deeply in love, but tragically Chandon was killed in a 1983 motor-racing crash. Brinkley’s anguish provided the window for her most famous husband, Billy Joel, to enter the scene. He soon became—and remains—the most influential man in Brinkley’s life. In the early 1980s, Brinkley and Joel (who was in a relation-

L ar r y B us ac ca / Wi re I m age vi a G e tty I m age s; H e a rs t Co m m un i c ati o n s I nc .;

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This page, clockwise from top left: Christie Brinkley outside of La Pulperia Restaurant in New York City, 2018; Brinkley smiling in 1988; Brinkley poses for the 1980 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue; Sailor Lee Brinkley-Cook and her mom, Christie Brinkley, enjoy an afternoon in the waters outside of France’s Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc; Sarah Ferguson and Christie Brinkley at The Heart Truth Fall 2005 Red Dress Collection at Bryant Park, New York, 2005; in an iconic scene from National Lampoon’s Vacation, Christie Brinkley played “The Girl In The Ferrari” (which sported “Love Me” license plates) driving alongside Chevy Chase’s car during his family road trip; Jack Brinkley-Cook, Christie Brinkley, Peter Cook, and Sailor Lee Brinkley-Cook in Southampton, New York, 2004. > Opposite page: Brinkley at home in New York City, 2019; Alexa Ray Joel and Sailor Lee Brinkley-Cook hold hands on either side of their mom, Christie Brinkley (inset).


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This page, from above: Sailor Brinkley-Cook, Christie Brinkley, Alexa Ray Joel, and Nina Agdal at The Surf Lodge in Montauk, New York, for the launch of Christie Brinkley’s Bellisima Prosecco Bambinis; Brinkley attends a Cartier watch launch in 1996. > Opposite page, counterclockwise from top right: Christie Brinkley photographed by Arthur Elgort for Vogue in 1977; at the age of 63 years old, Christie Brinkley poses with nothing but a big leaf; Brinkley photographed by Juergen Teller for the September 2006 issue of W.

ship with Elle MacPherson at the time) began to date. The rock star and the blond model had met in a bar in St. Bart’s when Brinkley was still with Chandon. Upon hearing the news about her boyfriend, Joel reached out to Brinkley to offer sympathy. Gradually, a romance blossomed. After starring in a number of his music videos, including “Uptown Girl” (1983), Brinkley married the musician and gave birth to her first child, Alexa Ray Joel. Brinkley and Joel divorced in 1994. In 1995, Brinkley married her third husband, Richard Taubman, and had her second child, Jack Paris Brinkley Taubman. Brinkley and Taubman divorced that same year. In 1996, Brinkley married her fourth husband, Peter Cook, and had her third and final child, Sailor Lee Brinkley Cook, in 1998 (Peter Cook adopted Brinkley’s second child, Jack, who now goes by Jack Paris Brinkley Cook). Brinkley and Cook divorced in 2008. During these decades (and with these husbands), Brinkley resided in the Hamptons—where she and her children have become fans of the New York Islanders. Brinkley currently lives in a house in Sag Harbor, where she continues to be one of the smiliest, sunniest—and starriest—celebs on the East End’s social scene. u

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Party Starters Originally Printed in Spring Q 2007

I have always felt that the most important ingredient to a successful party is the “people mix.” In real estate, they say “location, location, location.” In home entertaining, it is “people mix.” Young, old, pretty, smart, simple—diversification is the not-so-secret ingredient that will guarantee the success of an event. I have been to some of the most beautiful parties where nothing was left to the imagination—the food and the music were first rate, and the party was a complete flop. Why? The “people mix” simply was not there; there was no diversity. Any major catastrophe (a collapsing soufflé, running out of vodka, etc.) can be overcome with humor and grace providing the diversification of the guests is the focal point. I’ve done it myself! I gave a party for my late husband’s 70th birthday and the guest list was not at all adventurous. The group was too homogenous—no oddballs, no characters, no slightly ditsy out-of-left-field friends. It was the most beautiful and well-planned party that I have ever given—it was also the most

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Terry Allen KrAmer

boring. I have never repeated that unfortunate mistake. Another important consideration is the décor. I simply cannot condone going into someone’s home (or ballroom) and being overwhelmed by flowers. It’s like walking into a room that shouts at you, “Look how much money I’ve spent on flowers and decor.” One of the most elegant parties that I have ever been to was done like an extravaganza (the Queen of England was a guest), but somehow there was nothing that reeked of ostentation. It was held in a castle, and a fortune must have been spent on it. The food was magnificent, the entertainment incredible, and while the surroundings themselves indicated great wealth, the simplicity of the floral arrangements somehow balanced the overall effect and removed any possible feelings of being over the top. It was beautiful and novel and it made a statement—less is better if done with taste. I learned a lesson from that very special evening.

I ma ge s Co u r t e sy o f Te r r y All e n Kram er ; B row n e Trad i n g C o. ; AFP / Ge t ty Im a ge s

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Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Frank Sinatra was known to enjoy an artful dinner party in his day; The author (right) with guests including Rod Stewart (left) and Penny Lancaster (second from left); Donald and Melania Trump and friend at a Kramer event; The hostess with Don King. > This page, clockwise from left: Kramer with Sean Connery at a party she hosted in her Southampton home; A handwritten menu from a memorable event; Browne Trading Co. caviar; Alfonso Fanjul and Dixon Boardman.

When I was a young bride, our apartment was small, and all entertaining was “plate-on-your-lap” style. That didn’t matter, though. The group was fun, the food simple and delicious, and I had cooked it! But as I got older and moved on to larger quarters, it was only natural that my style of entertaining would become more sophisticated. Lap juggling no longer fits in my life, although buffet-style dinners are still an integral part of it. At Thanksgiving, I usually give a party for up to 100 people, including their houseguests and children, and while the buffet line is the only way to accommodate the large number at home, place cards are never used. Obviously, food plays a very important part in the mix. Good, simple food should be the rule, but sometimes an exotic dish can be introduced with great success. I tend to overdo the hors d’oeuvres bit, but I find that my guests really enjoy them, especially if I am feeling flush and treat them to really good caviar. For an evening at home with friends, I try to locate some food that my guests will love and will not turn off their taste buds. Originality is the key—stay away from strong herbs and stinky accents. It’s horrible trying to have a conversation with the person next to you if one of you reeks of garlic or onions. I have always thought that if you are going to have a dinner party with a “heavy on smells” menu, somehow try and make sure that your guests like this sort of cuisine. Also, when I have guests from Europe at my home in Florida, I try and make sure that they are introduced to a local specialty that perhaps they might not have had before. Staff, even though expensive, is a must. We are not talking about a backyard BBQ, we are talking about a refined dinner party. The hosts cannot have an enjoyable evening if they are jumping up and down to greet people, attend to guests, finish last minute preparations, and serve drinks and food. Hire help if you can, and enjoy yourself. Believe me, I know! u

Sourcing The Best I am very lucky in that there are so many superb purveyors of first class foods available on the internet, as well as specialty shops both in New York and Palm Beach. For beef and veal, Lobel’s of New York is the ultimate supplier (877.783.4512; lobels.com). For fresh foie gras, whether duck or goose, there is D’Artagnan (800.327.8246; dartagnan.com). For fresh imported fish, the purveyor is Browne Trading Company in Maine (800.944.7848; brownetrading.com). They have fresh Dover sole and the greatest small langoustine, as well as wild turbot and superb smoked salmon, oysters, clams, and bay scallops. And now, about the caviar. It’s really first rate, never salty or mushy. If you are willing to splurge, go for it. Another great source for a wonderful selection of cheese and great smoked salmon is William Poll (212.288.0501; williampoll.com). And, they make the best tea sandwiches. In Palm Beach, we have a shop called Bleu Provence (300 South Country Road; 561.651.1491) that also sells great cheese and a special cut of cooked salmon that is as good or better than the conventional smoked variety. Eating it atop a good bread is akin to biting into a buttery slice of heaven. S P R I N G 20 1 9 /

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This page: Joss Sackler, the founder of LBV, photographed at the Metropolitan Building. > Opposite page, from top: The set table at an LBV dinner; a server at the pre-dinner cocktail hour; Sackler chats with Alexandra Richards, a party guest.

Wining And Dining


M adi s o n Vo elk e l/BFA.com

It started, as many great ideas do, with wine. Or more accurately, as a small group of friends who really enjoy wine. Joss Sackler, who holds a sommelier certification from the Court of Master Sommeliers, belongs to several highbrow wine societies— Commanderie des Côtes du Rhône, Commanderie de Bordeaux, and Confrerie des Chevaliers du Tastevin Sous-Commanderie de New York—of which the members are primarily men. During the black-tie dinners that members’ spouses are allowed to attend, Sackler began to befriend the other members’ wives, and started holding what one early attendee characterized as “wine and cheese nights at home” with a handful of these women in order to socialize further with them outside of the societies. The gatherings stayed humble for some time—the friends would convene and each bring wine to share, often high-end bottles from their personal cellars. The ladies at the gatherings recommended friends to join the group. “When we started,” says Sackler, “I think everybody was kind of craving it. It was that time in New York when women were SPRING 2019/

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(and connections) of LBV’s members, who range from fashion designers to gym owners, and stylists to mountaineers. “I look at Joss as the new Amy Sacco,” said a party guest. “She’s gathering together like-minded people.” Less wine-focused and more a cultural society now, LBV is on the verge of becoming an entire lifestyle brand. In fact, Sackler recently launched a streetwear line: LBV care of Joss Sackler, with design help from another LBV member. Although the group’s focus has expanded, members still gather over good wine. On a recent evening, the venue was the Metropolitan Building in Long Island City, a former warehouse that’s been transformed by interior designer Eleanor Ambos into a shabbily elegant spot popular for weddings and photo shoots. The evening began with a cocktail hour during which members were joined by friends as well as members of an artists’ collective from Bushwick, and Sackler was the centerpiece of a performance in which her couture gown—designed by her friend Elizabeth Kennedy, also an LBV member—was shredded with scissors and painted by artist Tom Taylor. Afterward, a core group of about 30 people (a few men among them) moved upstairs to a long table, adorned with tall taper candles and set with exquisitely thin-stemmed Zalto glasses, for a four-course

M adi son Voelkel/BFA.com

like, I’ve been a spouse to somebody who’s a member in one of the other wine societies, and it’s my time now. So when I was like, ‘Hey everybody, it’s women-only, or it’s made for women,’ the interest kind of grew.” LBV can be thought of as an extension of those fancy wine societies, says Sackler’s spokeswoman, who asked not to be named. “Joss created the afterparty.” Sackler concurs. “I wanted it to be fashionable, experimental,” she says. “Like, let’s play some music!” Now, those informal gatherings have evolved into an official private social club, with a name (LBV—short for Les Bouledogues Vigneronnes, or “the winemaking bulldogs”; Sackler owns a Frenchie); 43 members at the time of the recent dinner, a handful of whom are men; and membership fees and annual dues. “Joss is a very modern young woman,” says Sackler’s spokesperson, “who’s redefining what this whole club/society thing means, especially for women.” Membership confers access to four formal dinners a year, plus an expanding number of other group outings of ever-increasing frequency and range—a visit to an artist’s studio, say, or a preview of a major fashion designer’s upcoming collection, or a workout at Manhattan’s most elite gym—reflecting the interests


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This page, clockwise from above: The menu at a recent LBV dinner; one of the wines served at the dinner; party guests chat during the cocktail hour. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Charlynne Kovach and guest; one of Sacklerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent climbing adventures was projected onto a wall during the cocktail hour; Elizabeth Kennedy (center) chats with Theodora and Alexandra Richards; Elizabeth Tuke, Alexandra Richards, Kennedy, and Sackler.

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meal prepared by a notable private chef who once boasted in an interview that he flies in his chickens from France via private jet. The wines were provided by Charlynne Kovach, an LBV member; that responsibility—or privilege, depending on your outlook—rotates around the group. The pours started with a Piper-Heidsieck Rare Millésime 2002 (widely considered to be the finest Champagne vintage of the current millennium) and moved on to a 2014 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet Clavoillon 1er Cru (which retails for around $200 a bottle)… and only got better from there. Just before the servers brought out dessert—a raspberry and maple millefeuille—the opening notes of Beyoncé’s “Run the World (Girls)” rang out over the speakers. The table erupted in cheers—because here, tonight, women indeed ran a cultured world of their own making. u

This page: A tabletop scene at a recent LBV dinner. > Opposite page, clockwise from top: Guests chat during cocktail hour; a server pours drinks for the pre-dinner crowd;

M adi s o n Vo el k el / BFA. co m

one of the wines served at the dinner.

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Introducing A New Passion Project:

Nantucket Candle Company by

a mere 30 miles off the coast of Massachusetts, but locals and visitors alike agree it feels much farther away. In fact, it’s believed that the name “Nantucket” is taken from the native Wampanoag tribe’s word for “Faraway Island.” Nantucket Candle Company (NCC) seemed an appropriate name for my newest venture, indeed. Having spent a large chunk of my life on the island—a secluded place that to me, felt light-years away, filled with magic and wonder—and wanting to protect the place that played a significant role in shaping me, I created Nantucket Candle Co. I had always wanted to capture the Nantucket experience in a product, and I found that I would be able to do so by tapping into the connection between scent and memory. The initial three scents for Nantucket Candle Co.—Cisco, Sconset, and Polpis—are named for locations on the island, all of which have their own distinct vegetation and landscape. Cisco’s scent takes its inspiration from mixed wildflowers, saltspray rose, bayberry foliage, blueberries, rose hip, and the scent of seaweed and the ocean. Sconset smells of clean and simple daffodils, green grass, and rugosa roses, while Polpis has notes of sweet pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia), swamp

azalea (Rhododendron viscosum), grape blossoms, honeysuckle, sweet fern, and sassafras. With a range of fragrances mimicking natural elements found throughout Nantucket’s most precious places, NCC ensures that whether you’re near or far, the spirit of the island is always with you. To safeguard that spirit for years to come, a portion of the proceeds from each candle are also donated to the Nantucket Conservation Foundation. That’s a little something I like to call giving bACK. Nantucket Candle Company proves that history really does repeat itself. Since the island served as a whaling capital and hub for business in the 19th century, Nantucket’s most treasured commodities included whale oil and beeswax candles—considered akin to fine china of the day. Wanting to pay homage to the island’s heritage, NCC has ushered this tradition into the 21st century in a more sustainable way. I’ve done this by using a blend of soy, coconut oil, and Nantucket beeswax. These candles represent the transition of Nantucket’s rich history from an island for commerce to the escapist hideaway we all know and love today: A pretty bright idea for a foggy little island. u

This page, left to right: An aerial shot of Nantucket Island, off the coast of Cape Cod; a rendering of Nantucket Candle Company’s product, which will be available for purchase on the island this summer. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Brant Point Lighthouse; Nantucket hotels; Madaket Beach; Nantucket shopping; Hayden Arnot, founder of Nantucket Candle Company (inset).

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Ge t ty Im a ge s

Nantucket Island lies

H ay d e n a rnot


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This page: Barbie attends the opening of the Barbie exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, 2016, pictured in Assouline’s new book, Barbie: Sixty Years of Inspiration. > Opposite page, above to below: Vitrine from the exhibition “Barbie” at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, 2016; cover of Vogue, January 1950, with model Jean Patchett, photographed by Erwin Blumenfeld (left) and 1959 (right).

Co u r te sy o f As so u li n e P ub li s hi n g; Ma tte l; H arald Go tt sc h alk

the original Barbie in


Barbie: Inspiring Girls Since ’59 by

b r o o k e k e l ly

Some girls aspire to be Beyoncé or Kendall Jenner when they grow up, while others long to be the next Amelia Earhart or first female president. On March 9, 1959, as the fight for equal rights was at a peak, the mother of all role models for women was born—a doll that was not only something that girls could look at and play with, but a toy with much more meaning. While society was dominated by men, and women were mainly seen as caretakers who were to act and dress conservatively, Ruth Handler, co-founder of Mattel, debuted the norm-defying plastic doll known as Barbie. SPRING 2019/

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Barbie emerged with a matured body that angered mothers all over, with many taken aback by the plastic dollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adult dimensions that had never before been introduced in a toy. Her fashion was equally provocative, as she sported a black-andwhite swimsuit, high heels, and hoop earrings to complement her sassy expression and conspicuous makeup. Barbie had a look that many girls and women quietly hoped to emulate and, despite widespread skepticism, her individuality and rebellious nature made her even more popular and iconic. As time passed and women came to take on more dynamic roles, so too did Barbie. Over time, she evolved from a

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Cour tesy of Assou line P u b lish in g; M a tte l

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The 2016 Barbie Fashionistas line; Assoulineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new book, Barbie: Sixty Years of Inspiration (inset).


Co u r te sy o f As so u li n e P ub li s hi n g; Ma tte l

fashion model to the first female astronaut, firewoman, chef, pilot, doctor, director—and, now, first female president. She was successful in whichever career she filled, living a life of luxury in her dream house and vacationing on her private jet. She was independent—showing girls they could be anything if they put their mind to it. “My whole philosophy of Barbie was that…a little girl could be anything she wanted to be. Barbie always represented the fact that a woman has choices,” says Ruth Handler. This year, as the world celebrated the doll’s birthday, Assouline published a new book, Barbie: Sixty Years of Inspiration, that beautifully depicts Barbie’s story and progression through the years. While the book shows her in her most glorious moments, there’s still progress to be made for women, and you can be sure that Barbie will be leading the charge. u


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This page: Presidential Candidate Barbie with her VP, 2016. > Opposite page: Police Officer Barbie, 1993; Airline Pilot Barbie, 1999 (inset).

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Fashion Goes Green BY KATHRYN MAIER

It’s an oft-cited stat that fashion is the world’s second-most-polluting industry (behind oil), and fabric-sourcing practices are often detrimental to the environment in other ways as well. There’s a good chance the wood pulp used to make the viscose in your dress is from an endangered forest; 150 million trees are felled each year to create the fabric. The cashmere in your sweater may have been farmed in a way that is contributing to the desertification of Mongolia. Fortunately, you don’t have to relinquish style for sustainability. We’ve rounded up a few options to get you started shopping sustainably.


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Courtesy of AMUR

AMUR Amanda Hearst names AMUR as one of her current favorites. It’s carried by the likes of Nordstrom, Intermix, and Moda Operandi. This relatively new brand has not only quickly become beloved among sustainability-centered folks, it’s found itself solidly in the fashion mainstream as well. Its name stands for A Mindful Use of Resources, and “It’s with that conscious mindset that we approach the sourcing process for the materials we use,” says a representative for the brand. Sofia Shannon, the brand’s initial creative director, designed the current Spring collection; Stephanie Suberville, with a CV that includes Elizabeth and James and Rag & Bone, has now taken the reins as design director, and Pre-Fall 2019 will be her first collection for the label. “I will continue to design the feminine pieces that our customer has come to love,” Suberville promises. She says she’ll also be offering more separates, as well as introducing new categories such as knitwear and outerwear. She’ll also be maintaining the brand’s focus on its fabrics. “We hope to bring to light the harm the fashion industry can do to the environment,” Suberville says, “and focus on alternative fabrics and production processes that lessen the impact.” Everything produced by the brand is made with natural fibers (organic cotton, silk, linen, and hemp), forestfriendly cellulose fibers (such as cupro, made with leftover fibers from the cotton production process), or regenerated

Opposite page: A dress from AMUR’s Spring 2019 collection. > This page, from left: Three looks from AMUR’s Spring 2019 collection; Stephanie Suberville; a look from AMUR’s Pre-Fall 2019 collection.

fibers, in which waste material is spun into fiber. This produces some unique challenges for the brand: “The questions we have to ask ourselves don’t just stop at, ‘What style would this look good in?’ or ‘Is this fabric special enough?’ We have to dig deeper and ask things like ‘Where is the content of this fabric sourced from?’ and ‘Can this be developed organically or with regenerated yarns?’ If we want to use a tweed or metallic fabric, we can’t just go with anything we find that we like. Instead, we need to work with our mills to develop the material in an environmentally friendly way—which could mean replacing even just 30 percent of polyester in a blended fabric with 30 percent recycled polyester.” Some of the fabrics AMUR uses, including its duchess satin and crinkle chiffon, are made with Italian yarn engineered from post-consumer plastic bottles. Compared with virgin polyester, says Suberville, water wastage is reduced by 94 percent, energy use by 60 percent, and greenhouse gas emissions by 32 percent. “We hope that AMUR will help people be more mindful of their choices in fashion,” Suberville says, “and realize that buying sustainable fashion doesn’t mean sacrificing your style.” SPRING 2019/

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MAISON DE MODE

C t eCs re y odif tA m a n d a H e a r s t / M a i s o n d e M o d e Po h uotr 0

Maison de Mode, the sustainable shopping site cofounded by Amanda Hearst, is essentially a onestop shopping portal for ethical and chic clothes and accessories. Ten years ago, Hearst, then an editor at Marie Claire, teamed up with Hassan Pierre (who had his own sustainable fashion line) to curate a temporary boutique at Art Basel Miami, showcasing their favorite sustainable brands. “We wanted to push our message that ‘eco-fashion’ could be sexy, chic, and cool,” says Hearst. It led to another pop-up, and another, and the two cofounders eventually realized they needed a permanent retail platform. In 2016, maison-de-mode. com was born. That first pop-up featured only six brands, but Maison de Mode now offers more than 70 on its website. “Sustainable fashion has come a long way,” says Hearst, “and so have we!” The company works with a few nonprofits, such as NEST, who help vet the brands. New ones are found, Hearst says, via showroom visits, travel, and word-of-mouth. “We discover a lot of cool fashion on Instagram,” Hearst adds. New brands are selected according to a variety of criteria that can include anything from vegan textiles to fair-trade

Opposite page: Maison de Mode co-founder Amanda Hearst. > This page, clockwise from above: Maison de Mode’s website; a Fanm Mon handbag available on maison-de-mode.com; dresses available on maisonde-mode.com; a SVNR earring available on mais0n-de-mode.com.

practices. Item listings each include symbols to denote which sustainability criteria they meet. Hearst cites AMUR (see preceding pages) as one of her current favorites: “It’s a great brand for dresses and eveningwear that are both sustainable and chic.” She also loves the fine jewelry collection Penelope Cruz designed for Swarovski, which uses only conflict-free and lab-grown stones. “Everybody wears clothes,” Hearst points out, “and the fashion industry touches every sector of our lives— the environment, comm unities, even our health. So once consumers are more informed, I believe they will inevitably make better choices in where they shop.” Maison de Mode continues to open pop-up shops in addition to its online retail platform. The next one is opening in Palo Alto in May; more information will be available on the website.


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from conventional fabric-dyeing processes is a major source of pollution: It produces around 20 percent of all industrial water pollution in the world, according to the World Bank. Waterless treatments, in addition to cutting water use to near-zero, can also reduce energy and chemical use by 50 percent or more. Ideally, this is a concept that will take off within the company, with additional sustainable pieces on the way from Ralph Lauren: The brand plans to continue the program, says a spokesperson. The Earth Polo is available in green, white, navy, and light blue, for $89.50, in global retail stores and on ralphlauren.com.

O p p o s i t e p a g e : Pa t r i c k M c M u l l a n

America’s favorite sportswear brand is taking a step toward sustainability: Polo Ralph Lauren is reimagining its most iconic style in the name of plastic waste reduction. Just in time for Earth Day on April 22nd, the brand released what they’ve dubbed the Earth Polo. Created by Ralph Lauren’s innovation team in collaboration with First Mile, the shirt is made from thread derived entirely from recycled plastic, and dyed using a high-tech waterless treatment process. Each Earth Polo is made with an average of 12 plastic bottles that would otherwise end up in landfills or in the ocean. “Ralph Lauren will commit to removing at least 170 million bottles from landfills and oceans by 2025,” says David Lauren, Ralph Lauren’s chief innovation officer. “Plastic waste is a major issue threatening the environment—we want to be part of the solution and utilize an innovative approach to create something valuable.” The waterless dyeing process is a crucial measure because fabric dyeing uses an enormous amount of water and electricity. It’s estimated that 100 to 150 liters of water are required to process one kilogram of fabric, and wastewater

T h i s p a g e : C o u r t e s y o f Ra l p h L a u r e n ;

POLO RALPH LAUREN


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Fashion Goes Green This page: David Lauren, chief innovation officer at Ralph Lauren. > Opposite page: The Earth Polo by Polo Ralph Lauren.


“Fashion helps shape our identities. What we wear signifies who we are and what we stand for. I support Good On You because I need to know my clothes do not harm our precious planet or its people.” —Emma Watson

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Fashion Goes Green

Opposite page: Sandra Capponi and Gordon Renouf, Good On You’s co-founders. > This page: As seen on goodonyou.eco.

GOOD ON YOU

C o u r t e s y o f G o o d O n Yo u

We’ve brought a few sustainable brands to your attention, as well as a retail platform where you can find—and buy—more. But how can you know whether your favorite brand checks out? Well, like everything else these days, there’s an app for that. Founded by Sandra Capponi and Gordon Renouf, and first launched in Australia in 2015, Good On You (goodonyou. eco) rates fashion brands, from high street (think Zara) to high fashion (Louis Vuitton, for instance) on three main criteria: labor practices, environmental impact, and use of animal products. The aim: making it easier to shop more sustainably. Good On You gets the info for its ratings from certification programs such as Fair Trade USA, organizations like PETA, and from the brands’ own reported data. Its ratings system assigns one to five stars in each category, and also explains why the brand received its score. The app has been downloaded about 300,000 times so far, and currently offers ratings for around 2,200 brands and counting; the founders say they’re aiming to rate 10,000 brands by 2020. Of the more mainstream brands they’ve

evaluated thus far, the ones with the best ratings include Patagonia, Stella McCartney, and Adidas. On Good On You’s app and website, users can search by label or category (jackets, for instance, or denim), or browse its tips and guides, or read roundups such as “The Swimwear Brands Fighting Ocean Plastic.” It’s handy for discovering new brands as well as checking on ones you’re already familiar with. Actress Emma Watson, long a promoter of ethical fashion, became an official supporter of Good On You this spring. “She has been a tireless advocate for sustainable and ethical fashion for many years,” the app’s founders tell us, “and we’re delighted that she’s adopted our ratings as her benchmark.” “Fashion helps shape our identities. What we wear signifies who we are and what we stand for. I support Good On You because I need to know my clothes do not harm our precious planet or its people,” says Watson. “Fashion is a creative force. It has the power to persuade, to influence, and transform. When fashion truly embraces transparency and sustainability, other spheres will follow.” SPRING 2019/

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STELLA MCCARTNEY

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This page: Designer Stella McCartney (second from right) with models. > Opposite page: Looks from Stella McCartney’s Summer 2019 runway show, incorporating fabrics including sustainable viscose and organic cotton.

covetable. So show-off-able. You want to wear them, to be seen in them, regardless of whether you care about the plight of angora rabbits or goat farmers in Mongolia. See, for instance, her most recent collaboration with Adidas. She’s been teaming with the company for more than a decade, well before the current fad for fashionable sneakers. The latest collection, which dropped earlier this spring, is made with almost 70 percent recycled materials—the most of any collection to date. It includes the UltraBOOST X 3D shoe made with over 40 percent recycled materials, a sports bra made from 91 percent recycled polyester, training tights made with 76 percent recycled nylon, an asymmetrically zipped jacket in a cotton/recycled-polyester blend… We could go on. And it all looks good. “I believe we all have a responsibility to work towards creating the future that we want,” McCartney explains. “This shared belief is why Adidas and I continue to innovate and grow together. We are constantly evolving our commitment to sustainability, which goes back over a decade, by finding new ways to create ethical performance sportswear that women can not only look good in, but also feel good about wearing.” u

O p o0s iCtre e di p atg e : C o u r t e s y o f S t e l l a M c C a r t n e y P hpot

eponymous brand stands at the forefront of both style and sustainability. After receiving acclaim as the creative head of Chloé, McCartney spun off on her own, quickly proving that elegance and environmentalism can go hand-in-hand. It’s already well-known that she doesn’t use animal products (leather, fur, feathers) in her designs, but she takes things much further, teaming with organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council to ensure her company’s environmental impact is minimized. Her nylon and polyester fabrics are recycled from water bottles, industrial plastic, and fishing nets recovered from oceans; she aims to use 100 percent regenerated nylon by next year, and 100 percent recycled polyester by 2025. The wood pulp in her viscose is from certified sustainably managed forests in Sweden. She uses only re-engineered cashmere, made from Italian post-factory cashmere waste—and who knew it takes four goats one year to produce enough fiber to make a single cashmere sweater? Her company is working on creating new technologies for fake leather (mushrooms!), fake fur (corn!), and a silk substitute (sugar and yeast!), to name just a few. “We want to be the house of technology,” McCartney has told Wired. “Technology is, for me, the future of the conversation that we started in the fashion industry a very, very long time ago.” And beyond all that, her designs are so wearable. So

T h i s p a g e : Pa t r i c k M c M u l l a n ;

Stella McCartney’s


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From above: Avocat / thon épicé (avocado and spicy tuna tartare); SaintJacques dorées Provençale. > Opposite page: The dining room at L’Avenue at Saks.

L’Avenue At Saks’ Star Power by

K at h ry n M a i e r

The original L’Avenue, on the Avenue Montaigne in Paris, serves as a de facto hub for the global fashion elite. Located kitty-corner from a Dior boutique, and within stiletto-heeled strolling distance from Celine, Chanel, Fendi, Givenchy, and seemingly every other covetable brand, it draws diners who gather to see and be seen. It’s the place for the style set to power-lunch; an impossible table during Fashion Week. L’Avenue’s new NYC location—the only one outside Paris— sits in even closer proximity to many of those labels: It occupies the ninth floor of Saks Fifth Avenue. One can, if one chooses, enter via the restaurant’s separate entrance on 50th Street, but one also can enter directly from within the store for some post-shopping sustenance. From the elevator, stained-glass murals by the daughter of Philippe Starck line the runway-like hallway. At the restaurant’s entrance, you’ll find both the de rigeur host’s stand and also a counter peddling confections from famed Parisian pâtissier Pierre Hermé—the only place to get these treats Stateside. To the right, a curving staircase descends to the eighth-floor cocktail lounge, Le Chalet, seemingly transported straight from St. Moritz, offering creative drinks by star bartender Nico de Soto (also a French import, and the cocktail genius behind bars like Mace, in the East Village). Starck himself designed the restaurant’s interior, in a more contemporary style than its eldest French sister, employing colors from cream to chestnut and lingering on tones of honey and caramel. Expensively maintained diners clad in conspicuous designer logos occupy luxuriously well-spaced tables. Throughout the room, glass vitrines display clothing and other wares, lest you forget you’re dining within a department store. The menu here hews closely to that of the Parisian original: vaguely French with Italian and pan-Asian inflections, full of crowd-pleasing dishes such as rigatoni aux morilles (morel rigatoni), saumon miso gingembre sésame (miso salmon), and

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Co u r te sy o f L’ Ave n ue . Fo o d i ma ge s (c ) M e li s sa H o m .

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For reservations, call 212.940.4099 or book through resy.com.

Co u r te sy o f L’ Ave n ue . Fo o d i ma ge s (c ) M e li s sa H o m .

risotto crémeux aux gambas (shrimp risotto). It’s all technically well-rendered, but you’ve had these dishes elsewhere a hundred times before. This is not food that will surprise you—but the unexpectedly generous portions might, as may the well-selected wine list with an especially fine sparkling section. It’s familiar comfort food for a certain class of restaurant-goer, calibrated so as not to distract from conversation or the restaurant’s real focus: observing your preposterously chic fellow diners. That is, until you get to the desserts by Pierre Hermé, and only a fool would forgo them. That’s when what’s on the plate steals the spotlight, when the conversation turns to what’s before you, when you’ll want to pull out your phone for a photo. Order the Sensation Chloé, and a server presents you with a sphere of chocolate, over which warm chocolate sauce is slowly poured until the shell collapses, revealing the decadent raspberry sorbet encased within. The “Costes crackers cheesecake,” described on the menu simply as “the famous one,” certainly deserves its reputation. “Is it heretical to bring a cheesecake to NYC?” I mused to my dining companion, thinking of the old saw about coals and Newcastle. “Not if it’s better than New York cheesecake,” he replied. This one was. Those desserts serve as an exclamation mark at the end of your meal. They’re game-changing for L’Avenue at Saks, largely because the food traditionally was kind of beside the point at the original Parisian fashion power hub. It’s the people-watching: the diners’ obvious glamour and influence, wielding the power to change the face of fashion—and also to nab a coveted reservation—that matters most. And by those standards, certainly, L’Avenue has another success with its NYC location. u


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Clockwise from above: The dining room at L’Avenue at Saks; the eighth-floor cocktail lounge Le Chalet; Pierre Hermé’s famed Ispahan dessert. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The horseshoe-shaped bar at Le Chalet; spicy lobster pasta; the stairwell descending from L’Avenue at Saks to Le Chalet.

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This page: Lena Headey as Cersei Lannister in Season 8 of Game of Thrones. > Opposite page, clockwise from above left: Sophie Turner as Sansa Stark in the final season of Game of Thrones; Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister; Lena Headey as Cersei Lannister in Season 4.

Fashion For The Throne by

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Justin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;neill


C o ur te sy of H e l en Slo a n; H BO

Among the slew of strong aspects that have landed this show in the annals of television history, Game of Thrones has been most revered by fans of the series for its well-developed characters, intelligent plot and pacing, and incredible visual dynamism. However, a facet of the show that has perhaps been undeservedly overlooked by fans is the astounding costume design that Emmy-award winning Michele Clapton and her team have labored over nigh-on a decade. Critics, however, have praised this element, and have awarded the lead costume designer, Clapton, and her team, for their work SPRING 2019/

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on numerous occasions. Further, the work that goes into what each character has worn on the hit show is incredibly specific and lends a crucial narrative to the overall plot of the series. One key agenda behind specific costume choices is to signify a certain character’s allegiance or newfound allegiance. The Lannisters, the richest family in the Seven Kingdoms, can afford rich textiles, elaborate embroideries, and fine jewelry. The North, and particularly House Stark, is much more modest in wealth and thus their presentation consists of muted colors, necessary furs, little jewelry, and long hair and beards to protect from the harsh climate. With regards to the shifting fealty of central characters exhibited through costume design, both Tyrion and Jaimie Lannister began the series as colorful, richly adorned, and clean-shaven individuals loyal to their family and to King’s Landing. Now, season eight finds these two as gruff, world-weary soldiers fighting in the North for the opposing side—adapting the muted grays, blues, blacks, and even beards inherent in the North to signify their shifted allegiance. Cersei Lannister’s costume design is a prime example of a character’s evolution through their story arc. Starting Season 1 as queen and wife of Robert Baratheon in striking crimson dresses flowing with jewels and long golden hair, we see her shift towards somber tones and black clothing to reflect her mood after the death of her son, Joffrey. She eventually loses all of her children, her father, and even her hair over

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This page, left to right: Lena Headey as Cersei Lannister in Season 8 of Game of Thrones; Sophie Turner as Sansa Stark on her wedding day in Season 3. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen, otherwise known as “The Mother of Dragons”; Kit Harington as Jon Snow and Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen; Maisie Williams as Arya Stark; Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Jaime Lannister. All photos from Game of Thrones Season 8.

progressive seasons, leading us to the Season 8 Cersei that is a queen on the Iron Throne adorned in black, armor-like dresses with hard edges as though they were meant to protect her from the world. This is further exhibited by Sansa Stark. At the shows onset, Cersei and the lavish attire of the royal court was Sansa’s prime outfit inspiration—sewing herself fashionable clothes to mimic the court dress and even going so far as to resent the utilitarian clothing of the North and her family. Eventually, after the trials and tribulations she endures, Sansa readopted the dark and gritty style of the North and therefore realigned herself away from the Lannisters and back into the fold of her family. Game of Thrones’ costume designers worked tirelessly to weave in these subtle indications of a character’s evolution and achieve an astounding visual accomplishment to boot— and as we bid farewell to the show, we highlight here its fashion in a most special light. u

Co u r te sy o f H e le n S lo an ; H B O

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Co ur te s y o f Ra lp h L au ren ; A r m a nd o Gr i l lo /G o runway.com

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With a wide-ranging mix of Fall 2019 runway collections, there seemed to be something for everyone’s taste and style this season. Are you more flou and frou or tailored midi skirts and suiting? Embellishments and metallics or minimalist monochrome? Whatever your preference, the best Women’s Fall 2019 runway shows seemed to call for maximum glam: bright happy colors, shine, sequins, and streamlined appeal characterized the most coveted collections.

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This page: A bucket hat seen on Valentino’s Fall 2019 runway; a sequined gown at Ralph Lauren’s Spring 2019 show (inset); a yellow ensemble paired with a white handbag at Valentino’s Fall 2019 show. > Opposite page: Looks from Carolina Herrera’s Fall 2019 collection.


Ale ss an dro Lu ci o n i / Go r u n w ay.c o m ; Co re y Te n o ld ; Pe t er W h i te / G e tty I m ag es

> Carolina Herrera Wes Gordon, who took the brand’s design helm last year, created a Fall 2019 runway show that was “informed by the minimal poise and maximal drama of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe’s floral still lifes.” Gordon’s floral interpretation took shape in pieces that moved with grace and ease. For his second runway show, Gordon hearkened a particular concept. “It’s the idea of grand gestures and dramatic silhouettes, but in a way that’s not overdone or overdesigned,” he said during a preview. “I call it minimalist maximalism.” Gordon’s approach remained true to Mrs. Herrera’s character and code, with looks that appeared polished but with a relaxed feel. Vibrant posies opened the show in a voluminous floor-length trapeze, followed by a smattering of sunny mini shift dress with ’60s-ish proportions, slim pants with colorful built-in brightly colored taffeta cummerbunds (paired with Herrera’s signature crisp white blouse), and pastel sheer tuxedo shirts atop billowing trousers. Naturally, there were gowns for evening—most notably a one-shouldered pale pink tulle dress and a sequined floor-length T-shirt with an iris running up its front and back. SPRING 2019/

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This page: Valentino’s Fall 2019 runway show during Paris Fashion Week. > Opposite page: Ralph Lauren’s Spring 2019 collection, which debuted at Ralph’s Coffee

> Valentino Everybody loves a secret. The notion that only you—and the lucky few to whom you grant access— share something wildly exciting, or personal, or tender, or terrifying (or all of the aforementioned), is delightfully exhilarating. Valentino’s creative director of nearly three years, Pierpaolo Piccioli, elicited these emotions when he commissioned Scottish poet and artist Robert Montgomery to contribute to a book of poetry called Valentino ON LOVE, a copy of which was left on each audience seat. A billboard with lines by Montgomery stood at the end of the runway, stating, “The people you love become ghosts inside of you and like this you keep them alive.” Piccioli printed or embroidered lines from the volume inside of the collection’s coats, on mid-layers of tulle, or inside bags and boots—so that only the wearer would know of their existence. And while Valentino’s creations are undeniably lovely every season, Piccioli heightened the emotion in his latest line. A series of bucket hats couldn’t help but evoke The Handmaid’s Tale- yet it was a happy nod, drawing on the scarce beauty in the show, rather than its overwhelming darkness.

> Ralph Lauren Ralph Lauren welcomed guests to take in his elegant spring show at Ralph’s Coffee, a charming brasserie tucked ino his women’s flagship store on Madison Avenue. The designer is known for elaborate themes, channeling his audiences to a different time and place with his collections—yet his latest show exuded an assuredly effortless tone. Models glided by leather-covered banquettes and trays of freshly baked croissants while dressed in neatly tailored jackets, crewneck vestments cinched with shiny gold belts, black organza ensembles embellished with an understated floral motif, and shimmering tuxedo suits and sequined dresses. Ralph Lauren seems to reject the universally espoused approach of an Instagram-first agenda (even though, in fact, he crushes it on social media). With more than 50 years of experience as a leader in global fashion, he understands how to acclimate to keep up with changing times. Nevertheless, everything about a Ralph Lauren occasion suggests that, at that moment, there’s no one more important than the people in the room. In the words of the designer himself, “This is my world and I do what I love…[there’s] an honesty to it.” u

An d re a A dr i a n i / Go r u nw a y.c om ; C ou r te sy o f Ralp h L a ure n

during New York Fashion Week.


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This year’s Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute benefit, familiarly referred to as the Met Gala, was campthemed, and attendees were urged to dress with “studied triviality” in mind. Anna Wintour, who defined the theme simply as “fun,” donned a pink, crystal-embellished Chanel gown designed by Lagerfeld with a matching pink feathered cape. As celebrities strutted across the red carpet, we also saw Kendall and Kylie Jenner covered in feathers, Lady Gaga in not one but four outfits as she continued to strip down, Katy Perry as a chandelier, and Jared Leto holding his own head.

1. Lady Gaga 2. Kylie and Kendall Jenner 3. Gigi Hadid 4. Katy Perry 5. Jared Leto 6. Emily Ratajkowski

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Dorado Beach To celebrate their new resort collection fea-

turing swimwear, peplum skirts, and accessories, Helena Christensen and Camilla Staerk hosted a weekend at Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve, in Puerto Rico—where the line will be sold exclusively. The getaway was filled with beachside dinners and lunches, and a runway show displaying the new line’s “dark romance theme.” The fashionable guest list included Daniel Benedict, who co-hosted the event with the designers, along with Brooke Shields, Malin Akerman, Jack Donnelly, Carolyn Murphy, Andrew Saffir, and Adrien Brody.

1. Kiara Liz Ortega 2. Oscar Henquet 3. Brooke Shields 4. Jack Donnelly and Malin Akerman 5. Helena Christensen and Georgina Chapman 6. Andrew Saffir, Carolyn Murphy, Daniel Benedict, and Waris Ahluwalia 7. Kate Lanphear, and David X Prutting 8. Maye Musk and Alexandra Agoston 9. Alina Baikova

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With the debut of its new jewelry collection, Clash de Cartier, the Paris-based brand hosted its annual extravaganza at la Conciergerie in the City of Lights. As suggested in the collection’s name, the designs—featuring beaded embellishments, spikes, and, in some cases, bold colors—delightfully clashed with Cartier’s fine classic jewels that have come to define the house. Throughout the evening, guests, including Sofia Coppola, Natalia Dyer, Bianca Brandolini, Rami Malek, and Lucy Boynton, enjoyed an over-the-top dinner, dancing, a surprise performance by Billy Idol, and cocktails all night long.

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1. Clash de Cartier celebration 2. Bianca Brandolini, Cyrille Vigneron, and Jake Gyllenhaal 3. Mariana Zaragoza 4. One of the many performers that evening 5. Eiza Gonzalez 6. Charlie Heaton and Natalia Dyer 7. Sofia Coppola, Rami Malek, and Lucy Boynt

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Last month, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London held a private preview party in anticipation of its new Mary Quant exhibition, which highlights the years between 1955 and 1975—a time when the legendary fashion designer revolutionized high street fashion. Maximizing on the playful attitude of Swinging London during the ’60s, Quant’s designs challenged societal norms and introduced a new look for women: tailored trousers, colorful tights, and, of course, the miniskirt, which became the most iconic look of all. Attendees that evening included Lady Amelia Windsor, Zara Martin, and more.

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1. Tristram Hunt and Michael Ward 2. Hermione Corfield 3. Zara Martin and Pam Hogg 4. Lady Amelia Windsor (right) with a guest 5. Ciara Charteris 6. Georgia Metcalfe, Sophie Cecily Coleridge, and Nicholas Coleridge 7. Azzi Glasser and Tiphaine de Lussy 8. Pippa Bennett-Warner 9. Gizzi Erskine and Daisy Lewis

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Considered the â&#x20AC;&#x153;new Met Galaâ&#x20AC;? by many, the annual Save Venice masquerade ball took place in the grand ballroom of The Plaza, raising a record-breaking $1.2 million for preservation of historical art in Venice. The evening was sponsored by Moda Operandi, Oscar de la Renta, and BVLGARI, with Italian Renaissance designs by Bronson van Wyck; a regal winged Lion of Venice was suspended over the entrance; and velvet drapes, candles, and a cascade of red flowers set the ambience. Attendees included Hamish Bowles, Lizzie da Trindade-Asher, Nicky Hilton Rothschild, and more.

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in L’ours et la poupée (1970). 2. GUCCI The Gucci Alchemist’s Garden unfolds within an imagined laboratory filled with curious jars and mesmerizing scents; $330 at gucci.com. 3. ORIBE The Styling Butter Curl Enhancing Crème instantly melts into hair and defines coily curls; $46 at oribe.com. 4. AERIN Memories of walks in the South of France, with a landscape filled with luxuriant green trees and beautiful flowers, gave rise to the Éclat De Vert perfume; $315 at aerin.com. 5. HERMÈS Un Jardin sur la Lagune is a floral and woody Eau de Toilette; $139 at hermes.com. 6. CHANEL The Les Exclusifs de Chanel 1957 fragrance offers notes of cedar, powdery accents and a hint of honey; $350 at chanel. com. 7. R+CO The Moisture + Shine Lotion is a light yet intensely hydrating lotion designed for fine to medium and extra long hair; $29 at randco.com. 8. JO MALONE LONDON Silk Blossom cologne; $72 at jomalone.com.

1. BRIGITTE BARDOT


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models in Halston designs, photographed for Vogue in 1972. 2. LA PRAIRIE White Caviar Illuminating Pearl Infusion serum; $570 at laprairie.com. 3. CHARLOTTE TILBURY The lacquered, highly pigmented, hydrating Latex Love lip gloss; $34 at charlottetilbury.com. 4. GUINOT The Clean Logic Toning Lotion reinvigorates the skin with a gentle exfoliating effect; $36 at allbeauty.com and select Guinot spas. 5. CHANTECAILLE The Future Skin foundation is an oil-free gel formula with an ultra lightweight, refreshing texture; $78 at chantecaille.com. 6. TOM FORD The Badass Mascara pumps lashes up to the extreme with biker jacket-black intensity; $46 at tomford.com. 7. ESTÉE LAUDER Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II; $100 atesteelauder.com. 8. GIORGIO ARMANI The Eye Tint Eyeshadow delivers creaseproof, vibrant eye color in a comfortable, creamy formula; $28 at giorgioarmani.com. 1. HALSTON

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In the words of late actor Robin Williams, “Spring is

nature’s way of saying, ‘Let’s Party!’” The springtime swirl of social events is upon us. 1. MODEL JEAN PATCHETT photographed by Norman Parkinson for Vogue, 1950. Patchett was famous for being one of the first high-fashion models to appear remote; previously, models had endeavored to seem warm and friendly. Irving Penn described her as “a young American goddess in Paris couture.” 2. TOM FORD Snake Chain Envelope Clutch crafted of metallic python, $2,650 at tomford.com. 3. SABOO 18-kt. White Gold, Emerald, Amethyst, and Diamond Earrings. $42,000 at modaoperandi.com. 4. PAMELLA ROLAND A feathered look made for the red carpet from Pamella Roland’s Fall 2019 collection. For more information visit pamellaroland.com.

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1 Prior to filming The Prince and the Showgirl, American actress Marilyn Monroe and British actor Lawrence Olivier held a press conference in the Waldorf Astoria’s grand ballroom. American photojournalist Eve Arnold captured them seated together during the conference in 1956. 2. MIU MIU Metallic Jeweled High-Heel Sandals, featuring a 4.1” covered stiletto heel. $450 at bergdorfgoodman.com. 3. CHANEL A sparkling, sequined ensemble emenating “shrugged-on elegance” from Karl Lagerfeld’s final collection for Chanel, as seen on Chanel’s Fall 2019 runway. Visit chanel.com. 4. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS Socrate Between the Finger ring in white gold and diamonds. $12,500 at vancleefarpels.com. 1. EVE ARNOLD

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Famed American photographer Irving Penn was most known for his fashion photography, portraits and still lifes. His group portraits for Vogue were tough assignments, and given the competitive nature of many fashion models, this one could have been harrowing. Yet Penn relished this particular job, not only for its challenges but also because it was here that he met Lisa Fonssagrives (back row, center left, in profile). They were married in London three years later. 2. VERDURA Grape Earclips inspired by the lush vegetation in Verduraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native Sicily, made of emeralds, diamonds, and 18-kt. gold. $67,950 at verdura.com. 3. OSCAR DE LA RENTA An emerald gown from Oscar de la Rentaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall 2019 collection. Visit oscardelarenta.com. 4. MARZOOK Mini spherical ball bag covered with 2,000 pieces of Swarovski crystals. Calf leather lining, gold plated hardware, and drop in chain crossbody strap. $2,195 at marzook.co. 1. IRVING PENN

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1. MARISA BERENSON, wearing a look by Pierre Balmain, photographed by Irving Penn for Vogue, 1967. 2. BLAIR HUSAIN Large Bangle Bracelets in 18kt. gold and diamonds. Blair Husain creates memorable, one-of-a-kind Roman numeral pendants and bracelets to honor special occasions. Visit blairhusain.com. 3. GIAMBATTISTA VALLI A sweeping, blush colored look from Giambattista Valli’s Fall 2019 runway. Visit giambattistavalli.com. 4. JUDITH LEIBER Rose Apricot Crystal Clutch Bag beaded in Austrian crystals with a removable 8.3” drop strap. $4,995, available at neimanmarcus.com. 5. CASADEI “Blade” heel in stainless steel, 4.5” heel with a .4” concealed platform. $725 at casadei.com.

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SHOPPING INDEX

> Betteridge: betteridge.com. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Bottega Veneta: 212.371.5511 or bottegaveneta.com. > Brunello Cucinelli: brunellocucinelli.com. > Bulgari: bulgari.com. > Burberry: 877.217.4085 or burberry.com.

C > Calvin Klein: 866.513.0513 or calvinklein.com. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Cartier: 800-227-8437 or cartier.us. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Chopard: 212.223.2304 or us.chopard.com. > Christian Louboutin: us.christianlouboutin.com. > Christofle: christofle.com/us. > Corneliani: corneliani.com.

D > David Yurman: 888.398.7626 or davidyurman.com. > Dennis Basso: 825 Madison Ave., 212.794.4500. > Diane von Furstenberg: dvf.com. > Dior: 212.931.2950 or dior.com.

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SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP! A > Aerin: aerin.com.

> DKNY: dkny.com. > Dolce & Gabbana: 212.249.4100 or dolceandgabbana.com.

> Akris: 835 Madison Ave. or akris.ch.

E

> A La Vieille Russie: alvr.com.

> EF Collection: efcollection.com.

> Alexandra Mor: alexandramor.com.

> Elie Saab: eliesaab.com.

B > Badgley Mischka: badgleymischka.com.

> Emilio Pucci: 212.901.5004 or emiliopucci.com.

> Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com.

F

> Bergdorf Goodman: bergdorfgoodman.com.

> Fabergé: 579 5th Ave., 646.559.8848.

Alla n Gra nt / Th e LI FE Im a ge s Co lle cti o n / G et ty I ma ge s

Grace Kelly—seen here carrying one of the now-iconic Hermès bags named for her—has been admired for her eternal style from her Hollywood days through her time as Princess of Monaco. Get inspired by her style and that of the other icons throughout these pages—we’ve helped by compiling a list of vendors featured in this issue. Between shopping trips, be sure to keep up with Quest and Q online for the latest fashion news: Visit questmag.com and follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @questmag.

> Diptyque: 971 Madison Ave., 212.879.3330.


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> Lightbox: lightboxjewelry.com.

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> Linda Horn: 1327 Madison Ave. or lindahorn.com.

> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or ralphlauren.com.

> Loro Piana: At Bergdorf Goodman.

> Riedel: riedelusa.net.

> GANT: 646.367.5416 or us.gant.com.

> Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

> Rizzoli: 1133 Broadway or rizzoliusa.com.

> Gauhar Jewelry: gauharjewelry.com.

> Lusso by Fabio Angri: lussobyfabioangri.com.

> Robert Marc: 1225 Madison Ave. or

> Fendi: 598 Madison Ave. or fendi.com.

G > Ghurka: 831 Madison Ave. or ghurka.com.

robertmarc.com

> Gianvito Rossi: gianvitorossi.com.

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> Giorgio Armani: 877.361.1176 or armani.com.

> M. Dumas & Sons: 843.723.8603.

800.853.5958 and us.robertocoin.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

> Maja DuBrul: 325 E. Hopkins Ave., Aspen, Colo.,

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or

970.920.1133.

ogervivier.com.

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or

> Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX or rolex.com.

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> Roberto Coin: At Neiman Marcus or Roberto Coin,

> H. Stern: hstern.net.

manoloblahnik.com.

> Harry Winston: harrywinston.com.

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus and

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> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

marchesa.com.

> Saint Laurent Paris: 212.980.2970 or ysl.com.

> Hueb: 717 Madison Ave. or hueb.com.

> Marni: At Bergdorf Goodman or marni.com.

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> Hunter Boot: us.hunterboots.com.

> Miansai: At Bergdorf Goodman or miansai.com.

saksfifthavenue.com.

> Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman,

> Salvatore Ferragamo: ferragamo.com.

Barneys New York, 212.228.3400, or

> Smythson: 212.265.4573 or

> Ippolita: ippolita.com.

michaelbastiannyc.com.

smythson.com.

> Irene Neuwirth: At Jeffrey New York,

> Michael Kors: 800.908.1157 or michaelkors.com.

> Stella McCartney: stellamccartney.com.

212.206.1272.

> Mikimoto: 844.341.0579 or

> Stuart Weitzman: 212.823.9560 or

mikimotoamerica.com.

www.stuartweitzman.com.

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J > J.McLaughlin: 844.532.5625 or jmclaughlin.com. > J. Mendel: 212.832.5830 or jmendel.com.

> Misha Nonoo: mishanonoo.com. > Moncler: moncler.com.

T > Tibi: 888.420.3334 or tibi.com.

> Jaguar: jaguarusa.com.

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> Jil Sander: 818 Madison Ave. or jilsander.com.

> Neiman Marcus: 888.888.4757 or neimanmarcus.com.

> Tod’s: 650 Madison Ave. or tods.com.

> Jimmy Choo: 877.955.2466 or jimmychoo.com.

> Nouvel Heritage: nouvelheritage.com.

> Tom Ford: 212.359.0300 or tomford.com.

> John Varvatos: johnvarvatos.com. > Judith Leiber: judithleiber.com.

K > Kotur: koturltd.com.

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> Tiffany & Co.: 800.843.3269 or tiffany.com.

> Tory Burch: toryburch.com.

> Orlebar Brown: At The Royal Poinciana Plaza in Palm

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Beach (561.328.3204) or orlebarbrown.com.

> Valentino: 212.772.6969 or valentino.com.

> Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or

> Van Cleef & Arpels: vancleefarpels.com.

oscardelarenta.com.

> Verdura: 745 Fifth Ave. or verdura.com. > Veronica Beard: 988 Madison Ave., 646.930.4746,

> L’Objet: 370 Bleecker St., 212.659.0316, or

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l-objet.com.

> P. Johnson: pjt.com.

> La Perla: laperla.com.

> Patek Philippe: At Wempe New York or patek.com.

> Lalique: 888.488.2580 or lalique.com.

> Prada: 611 Fifth Ave., 212.318.3062, or prada.com.

W

> Lanvin: 646.439.0380 or lanvin.com.

> PT Pantaloni: At Sid Mashburn, Dallas, 214.443.6101.

> Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

or veronicabeard.com. > Vhernier: vhernier.com.

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Capricorn Dec. 22 to Jan. 19 Winter was a “Heartbreak Hotel” for Capricorns. “They’ll be so lonely, they could die,” sang Elvis Presley. But for spring, the stars are humming a new tune... It’s the season of beginnings, so begin by saying “yes” to a date— and, soon, to a proposal of marriage. > Elvis Presley: January 8, 1935.

Cancer June 21 to July 22

Aquarius Jan. 20 to Feb. 18 Mercury isn’t in retrograde, but you are, dear Aquarius—and you need an outlet. Try Barry’s Bootcamp and/or Mile High Run Club if exercise is your medicine. Or maybe you’re itching to express yourself by being creative. You know, art for the sake of art (and stress). > Jane Seymour: February 15, 1951.

Leo July 23 to Aug. 23 You’re admired by others, whether it’s for your career, or for your talents in the kitchen. (Hey, hosting a multi-course dinner is a feat.) Relish this apprecation, and acknowledge its source with grace. Maybe there’s a mentee in the market for a mentor? Win, win. > Jackie Kennedy: July 28, 1929.

Pisces Feb. 19 to Mar. 20 You’re accustomed to compliments, but seriously. You’re garnering the attention of a model, like Cindy Crawford. (Not that you’re complaining.) Welcome the boost of confidence and do what the stars want you to do: sparkle. And maybe do karaoke. > Cindy Crawford: February 20, 1966.

Virgo Aug. 24 to Sept. 22 You’ve been dramatic for a couple of months, but remember: drama is for sorority sisters and, well, Sophia Loren. Ditch the theatrics because positivity begets positivity. This spring, be prepared to be surrounded by sunny personalities and, well, sun. Ahh. > Sophia Loren: September 20, 1934.

Aries Mar. 21 to Apr. 19 So, you think everything is “la vie en rose” because, well, it has been. However, what goes up must come down. Your test will be how you navigate the peaks and valleys of time... You know, it’s all about grace under pressure and diamonds and such. > Marlon Brando: April 3, 1924.

Libra Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 To everything there is a season (turn, turn, turn) and, for you, this season isn’t a time to embrace but a time to refrain from embracing. We’re talking about significant others, people. Concentrate on your career and do you! You’ll reap the rewards for your focus. > Brigitte Bardot: September 28, 1934.

Taurus Apr. 20 to May 20 The market (well, the “meet” market) is bullish for you, dear Taurus. Now is not the time to be in your apartment—especially if it resembles that of Holly Golightly, as played by Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. March yourself to the bar, and into the arms of a stranger. > Audrey Hepburn: May 4, 1929.

Scorpio Oct. 23 to Nov. 21 Like Grace Kelly—who married Prince Ranier III of Monaco to become Princess Grace of Monaco—you deserve a crown. Better to earn your millions than marry them, but whatever. The stars favors the bold, and you, dear Scorpio, are the boldest. Onward and upward. > Grace Kelly: November 12, 1929.

Gemini May 21 to June 20

Sagittarius Nov. 22 to Dec. 21

If you were a wine, you’d be a rosé: something in the middle of red and white. You represent a dichotomy, dear Gemini, which is to be embraced. There is pleasure—as well as complexity—in the multifaceted, which is to be appreciated. What’s boredom, anyway? > Naomi Campbell: May 22, 1970.

Why make plans, dear Sagittarius, when you are so famous for flaking? Rethink your relationship with Seamless and reroute to a restaurant. Friendships are like flowers, because they need watering—and wining—to grow. So, say Chardon-hey to your GFs for us. > Jim Morrison: December 8, 1943.

/ SPRING 2019

You’ve been suspicious about something and, sometimes, where there’s smoke there’s fire. Worried about your job? Or maybe, your relationship? Be present—and be proactive. The stars are rooting for you, so advocate for your success. There are decisions to be made. > Anjelica Huston: July 8, 1951.


Model treated with JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC in the cheeks, JUVÉDERM® XC in the lines around the nose and mouth, and JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC in the lips. Results may vary.

LIFT IT SMOOTH IT PLUMP IT CHEEKS • JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC

LINES • JUVÉDERM ® XC

LIPS • JUVÉDERM ® Ultra XC

JUVÉDERM IT ®

Let JUVÉDERM® injectable gel fillers help you get the results you want.* FIND YOUR AESTHETIC SPECIALIST AT JUVEDERM.COM

APPROVED USES JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC injectable gel is for deep injection in the cheek area to correct age-related volume loss in adults over 21. ®

JUVÉDERM® XC injectable gel is for injection into the facial tissue for the correction of moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds. JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC is for injection into the lips and perioral area for lip augmentation in adults over 21.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Do not use if you have a history of severe allergies/allergic reactions, or are allergic to lidocaine or gram-positive bacterial proteins used to make these products. The safety of use while pregnant or breastfeeding has not been studied. The safety for use in patients with excessive scarring or pigmentation disorders has not been studied and may result in additional scars or pigmentation changes. Unintentional injection into a blood vessel can occur and, while rare, could result in serious complications which may be permanent. These include vision abnormalities, blindness, stroke, temporary scabs, or permanent scarring. Tell your doctor if you are

on medications to decrease the body’s immune response or prolong bleeding, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or blood thinners. There is a risk of infection from skin injection procedures. The most common side effects include tenderness, swelling, firmness, lumps/bumps, bruising, pain, redness, discoloration, and itching. Most JUVÉDERM® XC side effects were mild or moderate, and lasted 7 days or less. Most JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC side effects were mild or moderate, and lasted 14 days or less. Most JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC side effects were moderate and lasted 2 to 4 weeks. To report a side effect, please call Allergan Product Surveillance at 1-800-624-4261. For more information, please see Juvederm.com or call Allergan Medical Information at 1-800-433-8871. Available by prescription only. *With optimal treatment. ©2018 Allergan. All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. JUV117757 10/18


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Spring Classics

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