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ALI MACGRAW PHOTOGRAPHED BY SAUL LEITER, 1967

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44 LIVING LEGEND GLORIA VANDERBILT Q’s legendary contributor Liz Smith (a.k.a. “The Grand Dame of Dish”), traces the remarkable but also very complicated life of Gloria Vanderbilt. Here, Smith writes about Vanderbilt’s similarities to the famous fictional character Holly Golightly. 56 SAVORING FRANCE & ITALY WITH RÉMY MARTIN Q contributor Elizabeth Kurpis travels to Europe to discover the many facets of cognac producer Rémy Martin.

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64 TODAY’S TRENDS Elizabeth Meigher and Alex Travers deliver a comprehensive look at the best trends from Fall 2016 Fashion Week. Whether you’re mad for all the menswearinspired looks, sailing off in a new pea coat, or stepping out in a chic puffer coat, you’ll be sure to walk in style. 74 BIG STARTUPS ON CAMPUS Betsy O’Reilly, Andra Newman, and Bridie Loverro—the founders of QuadJobs—are making it easier for college students to find work. 78 90 YEARS OF FENDI FASHION The Roman house of Fendi began 90 years ago with a vision and a dream. Today, as Daniel Cappello reports, a new book from Assouline, Fendi Roma, catalogs nearly a century of an Italian fashion legend.

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86 LE CALL’S NEW WORKOUT PLAN The 100s Pilates, a chic new fitness studio named after a core-crunching exercise, debuts at 53 West 28th Street. Elizabeth Quinn Brown talks with its owner, Le Call, who shares a few of her fitness secrets. 90 COUTURE’S CROWNING ACHIEVEMENTS From Paris to Rome, Alex Travers reviews some of the most talked-about couture shows, including Chanel, Fendi, and Armani Privé. In Rome, Fendi designers Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi held their show at the Trevi Fountain.

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Ali MacGraw photographed by Saul Leiter for Glamour wearing a bright red blazer and pleated navy skirt by Jr. Sophisticates with a white neck scarf by Vera and kid gloves by Wear-Right, 1967. (Saul Leiter/Condé Nast via Getty Images)


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29 NOSTALGIA A collage of fallscapes and scenes past, from Beatles rocker Ringo Starr on a Magical Mystery Tour in the ’60s to a couple of royal newlyweds in the ’80s. 32 JEWELRY In search of gold Fred Paris bracelets past and H.Stern blue topaz Arena rings present, we comb jewelry boxes and jewelry stores around the world in search of some of the latest and greatest baubles, along with some vintage. 34 COATS Jackie O knew how to make a statement, especially when stepping out in fur. Here, we channel our inner Jackie with a few fur-fringed coats and jackets sure to keep you snug.

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36 SUNGLASSES Even though the summer sun has set, autumnal rays mean it’s time to step it up in fashion glasses. 41 HANDBAGS Looking for classic handle-top handbags to last a lifetime (or two), as well as some more surprising tote designs to keep things interesting. 42 MEN’S APPAREL Clint Eastwood has always had a macho sense of style, and we’re seeing hints of Clint’s cool in the latest offerings from Brunello Cucinelli to Ralph Lauren.

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94 Q FOCUS From Southampton to Monte Carlo, Provence to Montauk, we leaf through the photo albums of some of this past summer’s swankiest and hippest affairs. 104 BEAUTY A selection of products—from haircare and skincare to makeup—to help you look as timeless as our icons. 106 EVENING LOOKS Bold combinations for black-tie affairs. 110 SHOPPING INDEX To help you on your fashion journey, a listing of where to buy the looks featured in our pages.

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112 HOROSCOPES Advice from the universe as the stars begin to collide and the temperatures start to cool off, with some familiar faces of celebrities who share our astrological signs.


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EDITOR

JAMES STOFFEL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LILY HOAGLAND EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN FEATURE S EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS A SSOCIATE FA SHION EDITOR

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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EDITOR’S LETTER

“Aprils have never meant much to me, autumns seem that season of beginning, spring; which is how I felt sitting with Holly on the railings of the boathouse porch. I thought of the future, and spoke of the past. Because Holly wanted to know about my childhood. She talked of her own, too; but it was elusive, nameless, placeless, an impressionistic recital, though the impression received was contrary to what one expected, for she gave an almost voluptuous account of swimming and summer… In short, happy in a way that she was not, and never certainly, the background of a child who had run away.” —Truman Capote, Breakfast at Tiffany’s In the Fall issue of Q, the legendary Liz Smith writes about another legend: Gloria Vanderbilt. Similarly to Truman’s Holly Golightly (who was said to be based on an array Capote’s close friends, including those eponymous “swans”), Vanderbilt was also a child who “ran away”—from a cold, emotionally unavailable mother. At the tender age of 10, the well-heeled heiress was released from the custody of her mother in what came to be known as “one of the trials of the century.” And like Holly, as a young woman, Gloria was callow and lovely, too. She even lived in a brownstone like Holly’s, often entertaining houseguest Russell Hurd, a charming gay man with, as she wrote, “the looks of Charlton Heston and the wit of Noel Coward.” Most similarly, the two ingénues endured an emotionally disheveled adolescence that morphed into an unrealistic and overly romanticized sense of self. And yet each somehow managed to continually reinvent themselves, arising again and again, and never backing down—just like the new beginnings that Capote describes with the arrival of every autumn. And so once again, it is time to begin anew… In this issue of Q, regular Q Contributor Elizabeth Kurpis—a fashion lawyer by trade, as well as a contributing writer, travel chronologist, philanthropist, and mother—recounts her recent trip to Paris and Cognac with esteemed cognac label Rémy Martin. Kurpis lunched at Café de le Paix, dined at Michelin-starred L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon, and savored afterdinner Sidecars (made with Rémy Martin, of course) at Bar Hemingway in the newly reopened Ritz Paris. Then Kurpis jetted off to a three-day, enchanted wedding in Venice- quite a delicious trip. Another recurring Q Contributor, Bridie Clark Loverro (author of The Overnight Socialite and Because She Can), discusses her latest venture, QuadJobs, which she co-founded with fellow Greenwich entrepreneurs Andra Newman and Betsy O’Reilly. QuadJobs is an online job board that resourcefully links employment-seeking undergrads with local families and businesses in need of hired help for positions, including everything from babysitting and dog-walking, to tutoring and tech support. For the best fall style, check out fashion editor Alex Travers’ Counterclockwise, from top right: Jean Shrimpton and a fellow round-up of what’s hot from the runways, as well as what’s model strike a pose in Swinging London, 1960s; Aerin black top trending now (slick leather, sailor coats, menswear-inspired handle bag; Stuart Weitzman ankle boot in cranberry; The Rémy women’s wear). And if you want to get toned like a supermodel, Martin Club in Cognac, France; a look from Ralph Lauren Fall 2016; read features editor Lizzie Brown’s story on supermodel Le Call a look from Calvin Klein Fall 2016; the runway at Fendi Couture and her penchant for pilates at newly opened The 100s Pilates. Fall 2016, Paris; QuadJobs co-founders: Andra Newman, Betsy Whether you’re tailgating in tweed, traveling, or working up a O’Reilly, and Bridie Loverro; Fendi Roma (Assouline); a family photo sexy sweat, it’s all happening this fall... u of Gloria Vanderbilt and her son, Carter Cooper.

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EDITOR


NEW NEW YORK HAMPTONS GREENWICH NEW YORK YORK ||| HAMPTONS HAMPTONS ||| GREENWICH GREENWICH


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CONTRIBUTORS

These days she’s been having fun with her website, featuring 20 famous women: WowOWow.com (aimed at one of the most important demographics on the web—women who weren’t born yesterday!). In her latest column for Q, Liz takes a look at Gloria Vanderbilt. Despite the loss of her father when Gloria was less than two years old (leaving her to become one of the world’s wealthiest toddlers), courthouse battles with her mother, widowhood, death of a son, and financial woes, Smith writes that “Gloria Vanderbilt was seen, still, to live a charmed life.”

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Bridie Clarke Loverro > Bridie Clark Loverro is a co-founder of QuadJobs, an online marketplace that makes it easy for households and businesses to hire local college students for a wide range of jobs—everything from babysitting and dolgwalking to tutoring and tech help. She and her partners are passionate about providing students access to jobs that defray the cost of their education. Bridie has previously published six books, including the novels Because She Can and The Overnight Socialite. She lives in Greenwich with her husband and four children.

86 Alex Travers > Alex is the associate fashion editor of Q and Quest In this issue, he reviews the Fall 2016 couture shows, a fashion tributary where the big runway spectacle still shines. “Things are changing,” he notes. “Some designers skipped their shows altogether and sold their fall collections online. I don’t blame them. Shows can cost a fortune. But there is something special about a great runway outing, so to see that style of presentation go away is a little sad. You just have to hope guys like Marc Jacobs and Raf Simons won’t stop. Their shows are a type of visual theater that always bubble over with the unexpected.”

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44 < Elizabeth Kurpis may be a high-profile lawyer by day, but she is equally known for her involvement in the New York charity, art, and fashion scenes. She has spent the last seven years donating her time to the American Museum of Natural History, The Frick Collection, and Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Associates Committee. When she has a moment to spare, she enjoys traveling with her husband and her daughter, Chicky. Elizabeth’s passion for travel and adventure recently brought her from Paris to Cognac with Rémy Martin, and then to Normandy, Venice, and the great lakes of Italy.

74 < Elizabeth Quinn Brown serves as the features editor of Q and Quest, where she writes the “Young and the Guest List” column. For this issue, she chatted with the enterprising Le Call about The 100s Pilates—a boutique studio in NoMad that caters to keeping the “who’s who” of the city fit. Also, as beauty editor, she curates a collection of the greatest in potions for beautifying as the weather gets cooler and cooler… Elizabeth resides in the East Village, where she pretends to go for runs but, instead, wanders into the shops on East 9th Street, like Enchantments.

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J uli e Ska r ra tt ( Al ex Trave r s)

Liz Smith > Liz calls herself the 2,000-year-old gossip columnist.


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This page: 1. Princess Stephanie, Prince Rainier, and Grace Kelly (Princess Grace of Monaco), 1971; 2. Katharine Ross and Dustin Hoffman star in The Graduate, 1967; 3. Barbra Streisand at a Chanel fashion show in Paris in 1966; 4. Jean Shrimpton and a fellow model strike a pose in Swinging London style mod fashion in the 1960s; 5. Goldie Hawn photographed by Terry O’Neill in London while filming There’s A Girl In My Soup, 1970. > Opposite page: 1. Students at Smith College, 1948; 2. Diane von Furstenberg and Barry Diller at Studio 54, 1978; 3. Ringo Starr plays with a soccer ball while filming Magical Mystery Tour, 1967; 4. Two girls on a roadtrip driving a classic Opel Olympia Rekord P1, 1957; 5. Brigitte Bardot walking in Deauville, France, with her third husband, Gunther Sachs, 1967.

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Ge tt y Im a ge s; D a vi d Re df er n; G e org e s M e le t/ Pa ri s M at ch v i a Ge t ty Im a ge s

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3 2 4 Birgitta Sayn af Klercker Wittgenstein Fouret was a beloved muse of photographers like Richard Avedon, Francesco Scavullo, Irving Penn, and Horst P. Horst, who snapped this 1965 fashion portrait. The bold Bill Blass ensemble and outsize jewels were no match for af Klercker’s classic features and stunning gaze. After modeling, af Klercker became a respected interior designer for clients around the world and owned the famous Parisian antique store Haga on Rue de Grenelle. Tap into your own sense of design—be it bold or delicate—and use some jewels to make a muse-worthy statement.

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1. H. STERN The diamond and 18-kt. gold Arena ring in blue topaz, amethyst, and prasiolite; $4,900 each. 2. SAMMIE JO COXON The triangle motif Sito bracelet in white or yellow gold; $560 each. 3. DANA REBECCA DESIGNS Bold enough for night, but simple enough for day: the Lindsay Allison necklace; $2,640. 4. GRAZIELA GEMS Something Blue ring; $9,680. 5. JENNIFER MEYER The 18-kt. gold Lapis Inlay Circle necklace with diamond surround; $5,625. 6. TIFFANY & CO. Plique-a-jour dragonfly brooch in sapphires, emeralds, and diamonds; $42,000. 7. BULGARI Divas’ Dream gold earrings in pavé and mother of pearl; $2,050.


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5 4 Britt Ekland, the Swedish actress, achieved fame in the 1971 British crime film Get Carter, which cemented her status as a silver-screen sex symbol. Among other roles, she went on to appear as a Bond girl in the 1974 flick The Man with the Golden Gun. With thoughts of the inimitable Ms. Ekland on our minds—and that golden Bond title—we found ourselves reaching for some classic 18-kt. yellow gold, namely in the form of a 1970s Fred Paris panther bangle, available from vintage dealer Eleuteri. Of course, we’ve never been ones to say no to something silver-tinged either.

6 1. RALPH LAUREN Brown and silver oval wood necklace in sculpted wood and silver-plated brass beads; $1,500. 2. BETTERIDGE Greenwich’s favorite go-to jewelry house offers a stunning array of Mark Davis bakelite bangles with precious stones; wide bangles from $1,380. 3. OSCAR DE LA RENTA Light gold flower earrings; $190 at Oscar de la Renta boutiques. 4. ELEUTERI Fred Paris panther bangle from Eleuteri in gold, diamonds, rubies, and black enamel, circa 1970s; $25,000. 5. PRIYA HIMATSINGKA The Vivienne 2-row ring; $1,139. 6. TED MUEHLING Inspired by the natural elements, the large carnelian chip earrings are a study in form and proportion; $370.

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Layering Up: Fit As A Fox Jackie Onassis never ceased to wonder. Even though the world came to expect her foolproof sense of fashion, whenever she stepped out, she managed to elicit a sense of surprise. It’s no coincidence the press loved calling her “Jackie O,” since you could always hear someone gasp, upon seeing her, “Oh, Jackie!” Here, Jackie and Aristotle Onassis are about as luxe as you could get, from the sunglasses down to every last thread. We think slipping into any of these jackets and coats might help to bring some wow factor your way.

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1. KATIE ERMILIO Double-lapel trench; $4,485. 2. GANT The Diamond G reversible handstitched coat in camel and gray melange; $595. 3. J.MENDEL Navy/ivoire pinstriped zibeline jacket with double-faced seam detail with noirdyed silver fox and arctic marble fox stripped shawl collar; price on request. 4. VALENTINO Mink fur coat from Valeninto Fall-Winter 2016; $64,000. 5. CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION Plaid and leather coat with embellished collar; $3,495. 6. RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION Jacquard Beacon ranch coat; $2,990 at select Ralph Lauren stores. 7. BELSTAFF The Pender patchwork fur jacket in fox, coyote, rabbit, and shearling; $7,800. 8. VERONICA BEARD The Antares convertible DB coat with fur in navy wool cashmere coating; $1,595.


from the

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Former New York Yankee and Jazz Musician

Emmy, Tony and Golden Globe Nominated Artist

LESLIE ODOM, JR.

BERNIE WILLIAMS

M AT T H E W M O R R I S O N

SEPT E M B E R 30

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For Tickets Visit RainbowRoom.com 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 65th Floor, New York, NY 10112 | 212.632.5000 | @RainbowRoomNYC


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SUNGLASSES

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Styling In The Sun Grace Kelly, against her father’s wishes, decided to pursue a career in acting at the encouragement of her two uncles, Walter C. Kelly, a vaudevillian performer, and George Kelly, a Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright. It was a move that paid off; not only did the future fashion icon succeed with an Academy Award in 1955, but she became, as the story goes, a princess (of Monaco). In the glare of the spotlight, Kelly frequently sought refuge behind a pair of stylish sunglasses. Don’t forget to take a cue from the princess and find your own fashionable refuge from autumn’s rays.

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1. MARNI The Marni Cromo D-Frame two-tone sunglasses in pink and red, with gradient lenses, wide contrast arms, and thin ear pieces; $450. 2. ALLIED METAL WORKS The metal and zyl frames, style no. A080, by Allied Metal Works; $565. 3. BURBERRY The BE 3088 1005/8G from Burberry; $330 at Burberry boutiques and burberry.com. 4. MICHAEL KORS The MK 2027 3173/8H from Michael Kors; $187 at Michael Kors stores and at michaelkors.com. 5. TORY BURCH Tory Burch’s TY 7097 1613/13; $175 at Tory Burch stores nationwide and toryburch.com. 6. BARTON PERREIRA You’ll say, “Grazie!” for Barton Perreira’s Graziana sunglasses, in fetching red zyl; $395. 7. DKNY Donna Karan’s DY 4136 3691/87 by DKNY; $109 at DKNY.com. 8. ROBERT MARC The Robert Marc style 919 in onyx; at Robert Marc boutiques throughout Manhattan.

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E BOOTS

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Jane Birkin is perhaps best known for her relationship and musical partnership with Serge Gainsbourg in the 1970s—and, in the world of luxury fashion, as being the namesake of the popular Hermès Birkin bag. Besides handbags, the British-born singer and actress has become a muse for designers of all kinds. This season, we fell hard for the way she rocked it in boots.

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4 1. STUART WEITZMAN You’re sure to look sharp in Stuart Weitzman’s Looksharp boot in cranberry aniline, offering a colorfully polished look in a season that tends to be full of tans and beiges; $498. 2. VALENTINO Be a star in Valentino’s sequined star-embellished leather boots with center-seam detail, three-inch covered heel, and square toe; $1,895. 3. MANOLO BLAHNIK You’ll spin in circles for Manolo Blahnik’s embellished Celesta boot, with sequined detailing; $3,595. 4. ROGER VIVIER The Bootie Chunky Pied de Coq by Roger Vivier, a sequined purple and pink hound’s-tooth bootie fit enough to pass any fashion test; $2,350. 5. JIMMY CHOO Zip up and be on your way in Jimmy Choo’s daring Dayton 100

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John F. Kennedy was as dashing as he was daring. Who, for instance, wouldn’t believe that a man would land on the moon and return safely to Earth after listening to Kennedy’s persuasive May 25, 1961, speech before a joint session of Congress? It didn’t hurt that he was always the picture of calm, cool, and collected, be it in suits or more casual looks. His attention to the details extended all the way down to his accessories, like a smart pair of shades or the watch on his wrist.

1. TIFFANY & CO. Paloma’s Groove cuff links in 18-kt. gold; $3,000. 2. GOODMAN’S Fingerless cashmere gloves in brown, from Bergdorf Goodman’s own label; $125. 3. BARTON PERREIRA The master eyewear maven of the moment’s Goodman style in zyl; $565. 4. TROUBADOUR Fabric and leather khaki canvas and black leather tote; $295. 5. SMYTHSON The Maddox medium pouch in tan ($435) and Maddox card holder in tan ($245). 6. LORO PIANA Windmate Storm System baseball hat in navy; $315. 7. PATEK PHILIPPE The Gondolo (Ref. 5124G) in white gold with blue sunburst dial and navy alligator

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strap; $27,220. 8. BODILEYS The Westminster in dark brown burnished calf, a handsome balmoral boot with a punched toe cap, suits both casual and dressy occasions; $470.

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Tender Touches Twiggy was a golden girl of modeling before enjoying a successful screen career, for which she won two Golden Globes. The English model’s thin build, big eyes, and short hair made her a symbol of London in the ’60s. Long before Citi Bikes, Twiggy made it look easy to dash around town on two wheels—and we’re following suit, thanks to Creme Cycle. We’re also looking at some ways to spruce up things back at home thanks to these tender trimmings.

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1. RIZZOLI Domus: A Journey Into Italy’s Most Creative Interiors (Rizzoli), by photographer Oberto Gili, is a visual feast of Italy’s greatest rooms; $65. 2. CREME CYCLES Handmade in Poland, the peachy Molly bicycle is a lightweight take on the classic Dutch city-bike style; $689.99 at mikesbikes.com. 3. SEVDA LONDON The Butterflies scarf in coral pink can be styled as a headscarf, worn around the neck, or tied to the handle of your favorite bag; $270. 4. ERIC BUTERBAUGH The acclaimed florist turns his signagure flower into Sultry Rose, a hauntingly beautiful fragrance; from $295. 5. LINDA HORN Brighten up your boudoir with this dome-shaped tri-fold turquoise stingray shagreen mirror; $1,900. 6. KIM SEYBERT The 54-oz. gold paillette wine decanter; $182. 7. LALIQUE The small-size Rooster sculpture in gold lustre crystal; $295.

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Sarah Jessica Parker might be forever tied to Carrie Bradshaw, the character she played on HBO’s Sex and the City. Even today, 12 years after the series’ final show, in a time where fads and fashions are as instantaneous and impermanent as an Instagram update, women everywhere still find themselves asking, “What would Carrie wear?” This fall, we know a very good answer: one of these fabulous clutches.

1 1. J. MCLAUGHLIN The Harris clutch in one-hundred-percent waterproof suede; $198. 2. JIMMY CHOO Prints are always in—especially at Jimmy Choo, and especially with the leopard-print pony Celeste clutch with Jimmy Choo crystal clasp, made in Italy; $1,795. 3. EDIE PARKER The queen of the rectangular acrylic clutch proves that she can hold her own in other shapes and finishes, including the Rebekah matte croc clutch, a keeper for time to come; $1,295. 4. BRUNELLO CUCINELLI We’re so smitten by the evening shearling clutch from Brunello Cucinelli that we’re holding on to it all day long; $2,995. 5. KOTUR Gold tones never fail, especially from clutch connoisseur Fiona Kotur, who offers the Espey embossed croc leather clutch in gold; $695.

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Armed With Appeal William Helburn was the go-to photographer for many of the top ad agencies in the ’50s and ’60s. He knew how to play on shock value and was a pioneer in the golden age of advertising. His work also graced editorial pages and magazine covers. Though we might not all be packing a bag with a stylish car and canoe on top (you get Helburn’s whimsy now), we can agree that the handbags here have a unique sense of character or charm all their own.

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1. RALPH LAUREN The Equestrian Suede Hobo, made of English suede with buckled Italian-leather straps, puts a modern Polo spin on the iconic hobo; $478. 2. ROGER VIVIER The Pilgrim du Jour Pied de Coq white and black large hound’s-tooth bag; $4,050. 3. SEVDA Designed in London, handmade in Italy, the Victoria is a large calf tote for keeps; $1,352. 4. NANCY GONZALEZ Calf hair and crocodile Daisy bag; $3,375 by special order at Bergdorf Goodman. 5. AERIN From Aerin Lauder’s namesake brand comes this black leather and suede top handle bag; $1,850. 6. SMYTHSON The Grosvenor mini crossbody bag in teal; $1,295. 7. BULGARI The Serpenti Viper by Bulgari is a top-handle bag in black and desert quartz smooth calf with brass light gold–plated hardware and snap closure with push buttons in green malachite; $3,000.

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Fall Moods Clint Eastwood will always be remembered as the anti-hero cop Harry Callahan from the five Dirty Harry films of the 1970s and ’80s. Throughout his life and many roles, he’s always adhered to a strong sense of style. It’s no wonder that, even today, Eastwood remains an enduring cultural icon of masculinity. This fall, get into an Eastwood mood of cool with the help of these labels.

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1. BRUNELLO CUCINELLI Leather nylon vest ($2,995), 1.5–breasted striped sport jacket ($3,645), single-pocket cargo pant ($945). 2. GANT Lambswool blazer ($495), tailored slim slacks ($195), and foulard fitted shirt ($125). 3. RALPH LAUREN Taupe cashmere sport coat ($2,995), trouser ($995), and jacquard vest ($995). 4. TODD SNYDER Long suede shearling coat ($2,298), pocket tee ($78), and sanded twill chino ($168). 5. HERMÈS Narrow camel gabardine trousers ($650), cashmere pullover in charcoal ($1,675). 6. MICHAEL KORS Boiled wool jersey trench ($1,495), cashmere pullover ($395), flannel trouser ($295). 7. BILLY REID Philips trench in olive ($995), suede workshirt in mud gray ($995), and navy Hollywood print pant ($450). 8. J.CREW Camelhair double-breasted topcoat ($1,250), cashmere cable front turtleneck ($438), corduroy trouser ($128).

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This page: Gloria Vanderbilt photographed by Gianni Penati in her dressing room, 1978. > Opposite page: Gloria Vanderbilt in “Everything is Copy,” photo courtesy of HBO.

“I don’t want to own anything until I know the place where me and things belong together. I’m not quite sure where that is just yet. But I know what it’s like.” That was Holly Golightly, the heroine of Truman Capote’s brilliant novella, Breakfast at Tiffany’s (which became a less brilliant but hugely successful movie). Capote, a well-known flatterer and fantasist, at various times cited various women as the inspiration for Holly—these included his great friend Babe Paley; the actress Marilyn Monroe (whom he also knew, likely less well than he indicated, however); and Gloria Vanderbilt. At first glance, Miss Vanderbilt, born to wealth and privilege, seems an unlikely muse for Miss Golightly, whose roots are, as we discover, far from the bright lights of big cities. Holly’s childhood and adolescence were hardscrabble and emotionally disordered. Her adulthood—what we learn of

by

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it—is a blend of hard-boiled cynicism masking a yearning, perhaps unrealistic romanticism and sense of self. Hmmm…wait a minute! Truman Capote probably based Holly on aspects of a number of women—and more than likely a few men—but envisioning Gloria as Holly or vice versa isn’t such a stretch, really. Scarred by her childhood, fighting forever to be both hard and soft, open to love but not so open as to be hurt; attempting to avoid the sins of emotional omission that were heaped upon her, but finding that escape was not always possible. In fact, Gloria is rather perfect on most levels, if one wishes to take Truman at his word. Like Holly, Gloria—although she owned many fabulous

Co n d é N as t

Living Legend Gloria Vanderbilt


er. Gloria and her half-sister Cathleen (from Reginald’s first marriage) would both inherit more than $4 million when they reached the age of 21. The rights to Gloria’s trust were put in the hands of her mother, to whom the word frugality was a foreign phrase she’d never care to utter or define. Big Gloria also, apparently, didn’t cotton much to maternity, or the responsibilities of constant, affectionate mothering. She did take little Gloria with her on frequent trips to abroad, but there were separations as well. And even when present, physically, little Gloria’s mother was distant, unloving. That is certainly how the child came to see it. More than that, the emotional distance and the loneliness that came from it morphed into a physical fear of her mother. This irrational notion, that her mother would somehow do her harm—or that she would come to harm because of her mother’s careless ways—appeared to have been fostered by her supremely devoted nanny Emma Kieslich (“Dodo”) and her aunt, sculptor and art connoisseur Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. (In the era of the Lindbergh kidnapping, the sensitive Gloria was ripe to be terrorized.) Inevitably, Aunt Gertrude, encouraged by tales from abroad (and from the nanny) of big Gloria’s louche lifestyle, sued for custody of little Gloria. It became one the “trials of

Horst P. Horst/Cond e Nast v ia Getty I m a ge s

things—never seemed quite comfortable in her ownership. She was waiting to find that place where things and people (mothers, governesses, husbands, lovers, children) “belonged together.” Belonged to her, and with her, making uncomplicated sense. Well, that’s not life. Gloria Vanderbilt learned that lesson early. But being a child, she healed quickly—on the surface, anyway—and put her hand back in the fire again and again, looking for a place to store her “things”—her heart and her soul. Gloria Vanderbilt was born in 1924, during an eclipse. This, she has said, was a sign her life would be chaotic. Given Gloria’s penchant for poetic prose and remembrance, her claim to be a child of a total lunar eclipse might seem fanciful, but check it out—it’s true, and whatever one thinks about signs and portents, it didn’t take long for Gloria’s life to descend into chaos. (Actually, Gloria imbues everything she says and writes with a kind of magical sincerity. If she’d said unicorns attended her birth I’d find it difficult to disbelieve her.) Gloria was the only child of railroad fortune heir Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt and the beautiful Gloria Morgan. Gloria Junior became one the world’s wealthiest toddlers at 18 months. Reginald had succumbed to cirrhosis of the liv-

Imag no/Getty Imag es; Jack Rob inso n / Hu lto n Arch ive / Ge tty I m a ge s; C B S P h o to Arch ive / Ge tty I m a ge s;

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This page, clockwise from top left: Young Gloria Vanderbilt sitting in a horse-drawn carriage in Locust Valley, New York, 1935; Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt (widow of Reginald Vanderbilt) holding her daughter, Gloria Laura, 1926; Vanderbilt married her fourth husband, author Wyatt Emory Cooper, on December 24, 1963; a portrait of Vanderbilt at age 44; Vanderbilt on the CBS Radio program â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Music Room,â&#x20AC;? 1953; Vanderbilt posing for Richard Avedon in a Mainboucher column dress; Horst P. Horstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photo of Vanderbilt perched in front of a large portrait of her mother in her penthouse in Gracie Square, 1985. > Opposite page: Richard Avedon (left, lighting a cigarette), Gloria Vanderbilt, and Sidney Lumet at a party celebrating the premiere of East of Eden, 1955.


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This page, left to right: Truman Capote and Gloria Vanderbilt Lumet arrive at New York’s 54th Street Theatre for the opening performance of Caligula, 1960; 18 models dressed in Gloria Vanderbilt denim surround the designer and heiress, 1979. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Gloria Vanderbilt with her 3rd husband, Sidney Lumet; Gloria Vanderbilt and her aunt, Gertrud VanderbiltWhitney, return from a trip to Cuba, 1939; Vanderbilt and her first husband, Pat DeCicco, on their wedding day, January 12, 1942; Vanderbilt at a New York Film Festival Opening at Alice Tully Hall, 1969; Vanderbilt photographed by Horst P. Horst for Vogue in her living room, 1975; Frank Sinatra and Gloria Vanderbilt at The Alvin Theater, New York, 1954; Bill Blass and Gloria Vanderbilt

the century” with a ten-year millionairess at the center, called upon to testify against her mother. The particulars were sordid, sensational: tailor made for tabloid journalism and screaming headlines. Big Gloria lost full custody of her daughter, and would only spend summers with the child. She also lost a good deal of the use of her daughter’s trust fund. Not seeing her mother, who by then was a figure of nightmares and deeply conflicted emotions, was not nearly as traumatic as the banishment of her beloved “Dodo.” In the end, the nanny’s love for her charge was seen as overwhelming, a detriment. Gloria Vanderbilt became the nation’s new “Poor Little Rich Girl.” (That moniker had been first attached to the even wealthier, and in time, far more troubled, Barbara Hutton.) Would little Gloria have emerged as scarred, as she did, had her life not been turned into gossip fodder? Was Big Gloria much different than other wealthy, “liberated” women of

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her time and place? (Her sister Thelma was another goodtime girl, infamously mistressing The Prince of Wales before her “dear friend” Wallis Simpson stepped in.) We’ll never know, because neither Gloria emerged unscathed. Between them was a roiling ocean of court litigations, fantasies, fears, resentments, accusations, truths, half-truths and lies. Little Gloria would cut her mother off entirely, once she reached her majority. In later years, she would provide support, but the two women would never be close. Having experienced—or at least witnessed—her mother’s gadabout existence, Gloria lived within the confines of a more sedate life with Grandma Gertrude. This conflict of lifestyles seemed to form a fascinating personality. Gloria was intelligent and gifted. She was also beautiful. Not classically beautiful, but with porcelain skin, a ripe mouth, and enormous eyes. “Men were caught by her charm,” as Margaret Mitchell wrote of Scarlet O’ Hara in the

Be t tm an / G et ty ; Eve ly n F lo re t/ Th e LIFE I m ag es C o lle ct i on /G e tty Im ag e s

at the Council of Fashion Designers of America Awards at The New York Public Library, 1968.


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Hulton Archive/Getty I m a ge s; AP P h o to ; Ke y sto n e - Fra n ce / Ga m m a - Ke y sto n e v ia


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This page: A family photo of Gloria Vanderbilt and her son, Carter Cooper. Carter Cooper committed suicide in 1988 at the age of 23. > Opposite page: Gloria Vanderbilt reads to her two sons, Carter and Anderson, on a bed in their

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ly been very fortunate with the men I’ve been involved with. They’ve always treated me very, very wonderfully. And whenever anything broke up, I was always the one to leave.” And she didn’t just mean husbands. Gloria, sensitive and sensuous, had a number of affairs, including liaisons with Frank Sinatra (she never saw his unpleasant side), Howard Hughes, Rudolph Nureyev, Roald Dahl Gordon Parks, and Marlon Brando. (It was only one night with Brando, and when later asked about it, she remarked bluntly, “We had no long philosophical conversations!”) Gloria’s longest, happiest marriage occurred in 1963 (she allowed for very little overlap or free time between wedlocks). This was to the writer Wyatt Emory Cooper. He was, she declared with conviction, the love of her life, and together they had two sons, Carter and Anderson Cooper. After 15 years of marriage, Wyatt Cooper died during open-heart surgery. Gloria was devastated, but fate was still being kind. She

O P po s i te p a ge : J ac k Ro b i n so n / H ult on Ar c h i ve / G e tty I m age s

famous first sentence of Gone With the Wind. By the time Gloria was 17, she was not only famous for her childhood scandal and her blossoming career as a model, she up and married a most unsuitable man, Pat DiCicco, who was rumored to have mob connections. He was abusive, she later claimed, and they divorced. (In future years, Gloria would be quoted as saying “I don’t know anything about men.” Perhaps, but she never gave up.) Within weeks of shedding DiCicco—the marriage officially lasted until 1945—Gloria married fabled conductor Leopold Stokowski. Ten years and two sons later, they divorced. He was too dominating. In 1956, Gloria married film director Sidney Lumet. They divorced in 1963. During both marriages, whatever the problems, Gloria continued honing her talents for designing, acting, painting, and writing. And her presence on any social scene, on any continent, was news. Gloria once remarked: “I’ve real-

Th i s p ag e : P h ot o co u r t es y o f H BO .

home, Southampton, Long Island, New York, 1972.


had become, during their marriage, a famous name in fashion and beauty products, launching everything from shoes to liqueurs, but her greatest contribution to the culture was the close-fitting jeans with the Vanderbilt name on the rear. She had come a long way from the girl Richard Avedon photographed as a debutante, but she was still one of the most famous women in the world. Fame and (more) money could not assuage her grief, but it kept her from the abyss. Despite her widowhood, and even the unhappy consequences of her financial partners defrauding her, leading to debt and millions in owned back taxes, Gloria Vanderbilt was seen still to live a charmed life. That perception changed on July 22, 1988, when her son Carter, threw himself from the 22nd floor window of his mother’s apartment. She watched it happen, helplessly. No drugs or alcohol were found in his system and Gloria herself has come to believe that Carter, who suffered from asthma, might has been affected by a new inhaler. In any case, a horror. And yet she survived. And it was not mere survival. Gloria seemed more determined than ever to express herself, to explain herself, for herself. There were art shows and more books—fiction and autobiography. Her prose was poetic, evasive, raw, sometimes deliberately childish, candid but veiled,

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humorous but dark, disjointed and cohesive. She even wrote a frankly sexual fiction, Obsession: An Erotic Tale. This raised eyebrows. Hers remained firmly in place. Although one of her memoirs, It Seemed Important at the Time, dealt frankly with her own lively love life, it was fairly erotic (and romantic) itself—without apologies or tiresome false regrets. Gloria Vanderbilt is now 92. With her son, CNN’s Anderson Cooper, she recently delivered what is perhaps her most revealing work, The Rainbow Comes and Goes. This book is a series of emails between mother and son, in which they candidly discuss almost every aspect of their lives—they say what hadn’t been said before. Or they say with more honesty, now that time is shorter. I have rarely been as moved by a book as I was by this joint memoir. I didn’t think I could further admire or be more fascinated by Gloria than I have been for so many years, but, surprise! I was in tears. And I came away with a great new appreciation for Anderson Cooper, more reticent than his mother, but willing to open up bravely and with deep affection. What struck me was the fragility and strength of both Gloria and Anderson, and Gloria’s regrets. Not for anything she’d done—no climbing on the cross for her—but that she somehow hadn’t fulfilled herself, plugged the hole

O p po s i te p a ge : S us an Wo o d/ G e tty Im age s ; FP G/ Ge tt y I m a ge s; H o r s t P. H or s t/ C on dé N a st v i a Getty Imag es

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Th i s p ag e : Ro n Gale lla / Ge tty I m ag es ; A P P h ot o; NY D ai ly N ew s v i a Ge tt y Im a ge s .

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This page, clockwise from top left: Gloria Vanderbilt and her two sons, Carter and Anderson, in New York, 1976; Ralph Lauren and Gloria Vanderbilt at a party hosted by the designer to celebrate the publication of The World of Gloria Vanderbilt, 2010; Vanderbilt wearing pearls while holding a kettle, circa 1950; Vanderbilt in her apartment in the South Penthouse at 10 Gracie Square, photographed by Richard Avedon, New York, 1956; Vanderbilt at a Bill Blass Fall fashion show, 1995; Mrs. Wyatt Cooper (aka Gloria Vanderbilt) photographed by Horst P. Horst wearing a white lace dress by Mainbocher, 1966. > Opposite page, clockwise from lower left: Gloria Vanderbilt at a gala honoring Charlie Chaplin at Lincoln Center, 1972; Gloria Vanderbilt Lumet, 1959; Vanderbilt and her first husband, Pat de Cicco, at El Morocco before they were married, 1941; George Montgomery arriving at the premiere of Charleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aunt, escorted by 17-year-old railroad heiress Gloria Vanderbilt, Hollywood, California, 1941.


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in her soul, and in doing so, made it easier for herself, her husbands, her children. Not guilt, really, but a melancholy to which she has become somewhat accustomed but not resigned. Because within her pain and melancholy is this, from the child of an eclipse: “Chaos does not frighten me. On the contrary I am comfortable with it. Chaos is my natural habitat. Part of me does long for stability, and always has. But when I have achieved it I haven’t been able to let it last. Restlessness is rooted in my nature. Dorothy Parker wrote: “They sicken of the calm, who knew the storm. And I think that is very true. I was formed by chaos. It is a part of me, like a tattoo.” In reading The Rainbow Comes and Goes I realized that a great deal of the public fascination with Gloria, my own fascination with her, was not her iconic, disordered childhood or adolescence. Not the beauty or the money or the ease at which she seemed to attract men. Not her talents, not her name on the ass of millions of women who should never have worn her

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jeans. It was her endless searching, her restlessness. Her unquiet soul opened itself up as much as it could, but for safety’s sake, it could never bloom fully. And yet, within her edgy restlessness there is optimism and youth. “I always feel something wonderful is going to happen, and it always does,” said Gloria at some point in her life. It could have been 30 years ago, it could have been much more recently. A childhood can’t be recaptured; a tragedy cannot be undone or unseen. But if you believe in the creative power and notion that “something wonderful” will happen, you are living a life in the now, you are looking forward, and when you look back you see it as a sometimes fantastic, sometimes horrible journey that did not kill you or blunt your curiosity or the need to understand. It kept you human. “Little Gloria” never became “happy at last.” How dreary. She simply stayed human. u

Th i s p ag e : J ac k Ro bi ns o n/ H ult on Ar ch i ve / G et ty I ma ge s . Op p o si te pa ge : AP P h o to

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This page, clockwise from top: A portrait of railroad heiress Gloria Vanderbilt Cooper taken in 1964; Anderson Cooper and his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, photographed by Jean Roy for Vogue in Vanderbiltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art studio, 2016; Vanderbilt with her two sons, Anderson (left) and Carter (right); Gloria Laura Vanderbilt as a young girl. > Opposite page: Gloria Vanderbilt and husband Wyatt Cooper savoring a little couch time with sons Anderson (left) and Carter (right) at their home in Southampton, Long Island, New York, 1972.


Savoring France & Italy With Rémy Martin by

ElizabEth Kurpis

photographEd by

b E r at t u n c

“What do you do?” is an ubiquitous question that floats around cocktail parties from New York to Palm Beach. Once upon a time, the answers were simple and straightforward: banker, doctor, art dealer, whatever. However, the times are a-changin’, as they say. Now, it is all about the “VSPs,” or, the “Very Slash People,” a phrase I encountered during my recent jaunt through Europe, starting in France with Maison Rémy Martin. It was pointed out that I too am a true slash person. Not only a fashion lawyer by trade, I am also a contributing writer /

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This page: The Maison Rémy Martin compound and vineyard (above); Mustafa Kacar assembling barrels at Seguin Moreau Cooperage, which will be used to store cognac. > Opposite page: The group in the vineyards of one of Maison Rémy Martin’s main growers in Cognac, France (above); Elizabeth Kurpis on the train from Paris to Cognac (inset).


This page: The Rémy Martin Club, the house’s private club in Cognac, France (above); Maison Rémy Martin’s head distiller smiling in the house’s distillery (below). > Opposite page: Baptist Loiseau, Cellar Master, standing in one of Maison Rémy Martin’s 29 cellars where cognac sits to age (above); a tasting of three differently aged cognacs with Cellar Master Baptist Loiseau (below).

travel chronologist / philanthropist / mother. This concept became more obvious to me after Rémy Martin chauffeured a small group of VSPs around Paris for a visit to the famous Café de le Paix for lunch, Michelin-starred L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon for dinner, and Bar Hemingway at the newly reopened Ritz Paris for some after-dinner Sidecars (made with Rémy Martin, of course). After getting acquainted with the other guests, it was clear that none could check just one box: there was the photographer / writer, lifestyle blogger / medical salesman and so on. After enjoying one another’s company the day before, we were then given a little free time of our own. With a need to beat the heat, I decided to take a ride on the aerial swings in the Jardin des Tuileries, part of the annual Fête des Tuileries that arrives each summer. The views over the Jardin, Musée du Louvre, and Rue de Rivoli were beyond refreshing. From there, I decided to check out the new Fou de Pâtisserie, Paris’s first concept pastry shop on the pedestrian Rue Montorgueil. While everyone else would be chowing down on basic hotel fare, I knew from where my breakfast pastry would be coming the next morning! The following day we set out by train to the Cognac region of France. Three hours through countryside terrain later, we had arrived, warmly greeted by our Rémy Martin brand ambassador. We first toured a vineyard of one of their 1,500 growers on contract. We learned that she is a one-woman show, operating the vineyard and tending to the vines all on her own. From there we learned the proper way to examine, smell, and taste the cognac, and after a beautifully presented lunch at the Rémy Martin com-


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This page: Berat Tunc walking through the streets of Cognac, France (above); pre-dinner drinks at Chateau de L’Yeuse with the house’s brand ambassador (below). > Opposite page: The Opulence Reveal, a presentation of foods meant to bring out the cognac’s varying tastes and aromas (above); Jenn Brady in the gardens of Chateau de L’Yeuse (below).

pound, we visited the house distillery. This is where eaux-de-vie is produced, a grape wine that forms the basis of the cognac. However, this is only where half the magic happens. The other half is up to Cellar Master Baptist Loiseau, who approves of only the best eaux-de-vie that comes out of the distilling process. With this in mind, the following day we visited the Merpins cellars. It is there where Loiseau rendezvouses with the eaux-de-vie from countless years before. For our viewing (and tasting!) pleasure, we pulled cognac of three different ages from the barrels. Each has been maturing in oak casks that were assembled next door at Seguin Moreau Cooperage, the secret to what gives the clear eaux-de-vie its golden hue. Amazingly, some of these casks were the size of a small New York apartment. I’m not sure what that says about cognac drinking habits or the typical New York abode… After a long day in the field, I had a wonderful stay in the penthouse suite of Château de l’Yeuse and a final farewell at the Rémy Martin Club. First we were presented with an “Opulence Reveal,” a smorgasbord of treats that served to bring out the cognac’s varying tastes and aromas. Then came an exquisite


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lunch prepared by the Maison’s in-house chef: three courses, all incorporating the “slash” ideology. As the night drew near, we headed back to Paris and went our separate ways. My journey did not end there, however. I was to meet up with a few more of my fellow VSPs in Italy after a quick trip to Normandy: who can resist those Claude Monet gardens in Giverny?! Monet purchased the land “for the pleasure of the eye and also for motifs to paint.” The result was the Japanese footbridge and water lily garden, which he began painting in a series of 18 different views. Sound familiar? Once I got my Impressionism fix, I took a quick jet over to Venice for a whimsical destination wedding. Situated on a private island off the Giudecca Canal, we had three fun-filled days with 200 of the bride’s and groom’s closest friends / VSPs, all flown in from New York, Miami, and Los Angeles. The best part? Post–wedding dinner, 15 private boats stocked with bottles of champagne were brought in to cruise through the Canal to witness the Festa Del Redentore, a fireworks display for a flotilla of sorts under the starry Venice skies. After the wedding, we were brought back down to Earth and settled into the lake region of Italy. First stop: Villa Feltrinelli in Lake Garda, where Mussolini, the fascist dictator, also dined and dallied until he was ultimately captured there. After a fulsome six-course meal, which included an impressive 100-ingredient salad, all grown on premise, we got back on the road heading straight for Lake Como. Our villa tour would not

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This page: Lunch at the Rémy Martin Club, prepared by the in-house chef. > Opposite page: The first course is served during lunch at the Rémy Martin Club, incorporating the Maison’s “slash” ideology (above); Berat Tunc enjoying a Bar Hemingway Sidecar at the Ritz Paris (below).

have been complete without a visit to Villa Del Balbianello the next day, a shoot location for both the Star Wars and Casino Royale films. If it works for James Bond, it certainly works for us. We moved on to the botanical gardens of Villa Carlotta next, and finally had one last dinner with both new and old friends in the lake town of Bellagio. After a night of drinking and general over-indulgence, we rolled ourselves onto a plane back to New York the following day (with [false] promises to ourselves of diets and exercise upon our return). If there is one thing I learned from my time in Europe this past summer, it’s that no person this day and age is defined by one talent, passion, or skill. In Maison Rémy Martin’s words, it is a “slash” type of life. That is, don’t be defined by one thing that you do, but all that you do. Meet new people. Go to new places. Try new things. Why be one thing, when you can be many. You only get one life. Live them. Well said, Rémy Martin, if I do say so myself. #OneLifeLiveThem u For additional photos from my journey, visit QuestMag.com.


Top Trends by

Alex TrAvers

And

B o t t e g a Ve n e t a

elizAbeTh Meigher

The orig ins o le. H f str ere, eet s a gro tyle: show up o chee off t f mo tah i he s dels nac tayin in ou oncr g po tfits ete wer by C of th hrist e tim ina D eles ior s tre nd.

jung


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P ra d a

Calvin Klein

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Fancy Felines Fashionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obsession with felines never ceases, and this fall, designers were D r i e s va n N o t e n

mad for leopard. However, an unpredictable decorative touch was the addition of printed lynx at Calvin Klein that infused some coats

House of Holland

C ou r te sy o f re sp e cti ve de si gn e r s

Moschino

Anna Sui

with a fresh, alluring hue.


To r y B u r c h

Emilio Pucci

Burberry Acne Studios

The Puffer Jacket Snow season may seem far away, but once it hits, you’ll have plenty of warm winter coats to choose from— especially in the puffer variety. Long, cropped, colorful, neutral...take your pick. Seems like the once-famous

Chanel

Courrèges

DKNY

this year.

Ye e z y

style is making a big comeback


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C o u r te sy o f re sp e ctive de sign e rs

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Balenciaga

to lo ok ed ba ck ha ve lo ng D es ig ne rs is t. Th es r. ea fin s rw it e ou te Sk i st yl e at to re pu rp os d si ze s. Va lle y ch ic y sh ap es an an cl as si c Su n m in e m ca at co e pu ff er se as on , th

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C P oh ur ot te 0 Cs yreodif tre s pe c ti ve de s i gn e r s

ChloĂŠ Proenza Schouler

rl y s an ea rd y w a a H e na o is h e re o r F ra n ç d. Seen g. p io n e e n e n tr io r h tu n n in e n fa s t le a th im p ly s n s te s a k P a ri s ia p o r lo th e / s in g e ia s t o f a c tr e s s e n th u s 6 2 , th e 9 1 in y c le m o to rc


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Slick Leathers The patent leather trend has arrived again. No longer

Ve r s a c e Lo u i s Vu i t t o n

Emporio Armani

C re a t u re s o f t h e Wi n d

Nina Ricci

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is the glossy varnished surface fated to exist only on shoes and bags. This season, coats, dresses, skirts, and pants all had a slick sheen that was entirely enticing, especially in M a x M a ra

Burberry

bright colors such as orange

To m e

Lacoste

A n t h o n y Va c c a re l l o

Escada

and yellow.

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Nina Ricci

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Sailor Coats Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be honest: almost all wardrobes need a smart sailor coat. Luckily, designers went overboard this season, casting a wide net over the popular style. From military capes to pea coats, the timeless trend

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received a nice upgrade.

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John Galliano

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Burberry

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A Menswear Moment Designers made a major effort this season to put a unique spin on 3.1 Phillip Lim

menswear-inspired pieces, like blazers, pinstripes, and tailored trousers. And the results, styled with feminine flair, were

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QuadJobs Co-founders Andra Newman (left), Betsy O’Reilly, and Bridie Loverro believe connecting New York City employers with talented local college students who

Big Startups On Campus by

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birdie Clarke

On a sunny day in June, a week when newly minted college graduates are taking their first steps into real life, my QuadJobs co-founders Betsy O’Reilly and Andra Newman have just returned from the NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) conference in Chicago, where they’ve connected with higher education and Career Service professionals from around the country. We’re catching up at our office, steps away from Greenwich Avenue, eating lunch around the pingpong table that’s served as a communal desk since we launched QuadJobs in October 2014. On the walls surrounding us hang brightly colored University pennants—in our early days, Betsy made a habit of hanging one each time a new college joined the

Tr i sh a Est i ll

need income is “a win-win.”


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TRENDING ON QUADJOBS:

QuadJobs platform. It was a great day when we realized we’d run out of wall space. Talk to any college Career Services or Financial Aid administrator, and they’ll tell you how critical it is that their students find opportunities to work during school, how desperately both the income and experience is needed. Eighty-five percent of college students in this country receive financial aid, and a high percenbtage also graduate with student debt. They need to work during school, but 20 hours a week at Starbucks—and other traditional part-time jobs—can be tough to swing when a student has clinicals, exam periods, or soccer games. That’s why we started QuadJobs, an online and mobile platform connecting

Babysitting

Party help (from bartending to face-painting)

Organizing (photos, playrooms, summer clothes)

Tech assistance

Errands

Sports coaches (soccer, football, etc.)

Internships

Dog walking

Personal assistants

Music lessons

Moving help

Social media support / guidance

Running buddies (cheaper than a trainer, hire a college student to get you moving!)

Restaurant / catering staff

HOW IT WORKS: 1.

Post a job (An annual membership of $35 gets you unlimited posts).

2. Hear back from local college students who are interested in your post.

3. Review a student’s past work experience (including ratings and comments from past employers). Reach out to the student/s you wish to hire. FA L L 2 0 1 6 /

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“Babysitting is my all-time favorite job. Kids are very spontaneous and entertaining. And any QuadJob that requires two or more people is really fun. Hopefully I can snag a dog-walking job (or anything pet-related) soon… that’s a QuadJob dream right there.” - Travis Clarke, Manhattanville College “I worked with a tech startup and loved it. The atmosphere of the office was amazing, and it really helped solidify my decision to go into computer engineering.” - Imani Greaves, New York University “I loved working as a real estate website developer last summer as well as teaching two young boys to bike ride in an afternoon. The range of jobs is great.” - Julian Adveney, University of Pennsylvania

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BRIDIE CLARK LOVERRO: QuadJobs is approaching its second anniversary. Betsy, what’s the most memorable job you’ve seen posted on the site? BETSY O’REILLY: I liked the recent post from a Greenwich family looking for a QuadJobber to drive a beloved stuffed animal to Tribeca. Friends must have visited for the weekend and left the toy behind, and clearly it was very missed! They had 10-15 students apply for that job within hours. BCL: Andra, what about you? ANDRA NEWMAN: All the jobs that the three of us would have jumped at in college: Ski weekends, helping get kids in skis

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STUDENTS ARE SAYING:

students to local jobs that fit into whatever free time they have. Well, that was one reason we started the business. The other was admittedly more self-serving: As busy parents, we wanted to tap into the army of college helpers living right in our community, but found this was surprisingly hard to do. Maybe you’ve had the same wish: You’re sending out 300 holiday cards, and would love to hire an NYU student to manage the task and save you a few hours. Or you’re having a party and there are errands to run, food to prep, drinks to serve—if only you could hire a Barnard kid for a few hours. As you pack the family car for the Hamptons, you think about how your kids would want a fun college student to swim, play, and ride bikes with—and you’d love to go out to dinner with friends. QuadJobs is the easy way to find the ideal college helper for any job, and at $35 per year for unlimited posts, it’s indisputably a deal. And of course, it’s a great resource for businesses, too, in search of talented interns, graphic designers, social media experts, and extra hands to unpack boxes during a move.


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and on the mountain; mother’s helper jobs in Nantucket or the Hamptons or Spain; temp work at hot startups and well-established companies. But the best thing about QuadJobs is that no jobs are too small. You have a couch to move—post it and it’s done. We’ve had people use QuadJobbers to organize photos into albums, or teach their parents how to use their new iPhones.

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BCL: We call Andra, who headed recruitment for J.Crew and ran her own executive search firm, our “ace in the hole.” How did your previous career prepare you to start QuadJobs? AN: Well, my background has been useful in terms of building a solid team of tech developers, marketing ambassadors, and staff. And successful recruiting is all about matching two sets of needs. That’s how we approach working with colleges [who provide the platform to their students for an annual fee]. We listen to what Career Services need, what Financial Aid needs, what their particular challenges are—and then we work with that. Our partnerships are not one-size-fits-all. BCL: Our whole team hero-worships Betsy, our CEO. Bets, you were a Managing Director at Deutsche Bank, with 18 years of experience in investment banking. What drew you to start QuadJobs? BO: I was involved in recruitment at Deutsche Bank, and we’d receive thousands of glittering, impressive resumes for just a handful of entry-level openings. Hiring a student out of college can be a guessing game—just because a student’s interned at high-profile companies doesn’t mean they’ll prove to be a strong full-time hire. So I saw the value in quantifying a student’s professional work ethic during college, and capturing

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Students don blue QuadJobs T-shirts bearing the QuadJobs logo on the front and their respective assigned positions on the back.

that important piece of the puzzle. QuadJobs tracks every job a student takes and gathers performance reviews from employers, which are then visible as “instant references” to the next potential employer. These reviews and ratings are very meaningful. A student who shows up on time, is professional, courteous, hardworking… I want to see that student succeed. The cream rises to the top very quickly on QuadJobs and it’s exciting to watch that kind of meritocracy in action. BCL: What’s next for QuadJobs? BO: More partnerships with colleges around the country. Career Services and Financial Aid are using QuadJobs to manage all the on-demand jobs around campus that frankly, they don’t have time to think about. And our platform transforms these odd jobs into something real for students, a track record of job performance and experience that they can take into interviews. It levels the playing field for athletes and busy students who wouldn’t otherwise have time to work during the academic year. AN: And we’re all eagerly awaiting the launch of our app, which will allow employers to post and award jobs on the go. BCL: Which colleges in NYC have students using the platform? AN: Columbia, Barnard, FIT, Fordham, NYU, and the New School are our primary colleges in the city, but we’re always growing. u FA L L 2 0 1 6 /

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90 Years Of Fendi Fashion by

Daniel Cappello

“Fashion is a form of expression,” explains Silvia Venturini Fendi, a third-generation member of the fabled Fendi family and the creative director for the house’s accessories and men’s lines, “so it is always important to keep the soul in design. It is also important to take risks and challenge innovation in experimental ways. It is a magic mix between creativity and savoir-faire, innovation, and tradition. Here at Fendi, since ever, we have the motto, ‘Nothing is impossible.’” Indeed, at Fendi, nothing ever does seem impossible. And now, on the heels of the house’s 90th anniversary, it has just printed a handsome slipcovered book, in conjunction with the publisher Assouline, which celebrates and catalogs nearly a century of the fashion brand’s transformation and creativity. Released this September, Fendi Roma is an expression of the house’s 90 years of daring creativity, femininity, cinematic inspiration, avant-garde techniques, timeless craftsmanship, and focus on the future. Always one to remain true to testing the limits of possibility, the story of the house of Fendi is neatly described in the book, which hooks us from the start on a sartorial maze through haute Italian design. The book begins where the Fendi journey begins: with Adele and Edoardo Fendi, the son of a lady-in-waiting to Queen Margherita of Savoy. Originally Turkish, the Fendi name means “lord”—perhaps a prophetic etymology. It was certainly destined to become famous, as Edoardo firmly believed it would. In 1926, together with his wife, Adele Casagrande, he opened a fur and leather boutique with an atelier inside in the center of Rome, on Via del Plebiscito. In 1932, Edoardo created the Selleria line of leather

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The model Lindsey Wixson in the Fendi Spring-Summer 2015 advertising campaign.


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This page: Tools of the Fendi artisans, masters of the trade. > Opposite page: Two views of the Fendi Peekaboo bag (above); the cover of Fendi Roma (Assouline), a handsomely packaged 272-page hardcover in a luxury slipcase with over 300 illustrations, available in Fendi boutiques worldwide and at assouline.com (inset).

goods and luggage. That same year, the shop, together with the workshop, moved to the emerging area of Via Piave, and in 1964 they opened a larger one on Via Borgognona. By this time, Edoardo and Adele had passed the baton to the second generation: their daughters Paola, Anna, Franca, Carla, and Alda. The sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roles subsequently grew from their personal strengths. Paola worked in the Via Piave headquarters and expressed an interest in the fur department. She became one of the sectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top specialists, and one of very few women in a male-dominated world to take part in the international fur auctions. She was also the undisputed expert in experimental


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new techniques, and revolutionized the tanning process. Anna—creative, intuitive, and exceptionally quick to learn—became the executive director of bags and leather goods (a talent she passed on her to daughter Silvia, the mastermind behind the incredibly successful 1996 Fendi Baguette, a colorful, dainty, under-the-arm handbag that was the first to attract a waiting list in the days before waiting lists became a made-up marketing ploy). Anna developed an innovative pleating technique that involved passing a ribbon through small perforations to create an accordion effect. Franca’s retail experience made her the perfect manager for FA L L 2 0 1 6 /

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This page: Fendi recently helped to restore the Trevi Fountain in Rome by investing more than 2 million euros. “It’s about tying us with a city that makes millions of people dream,” Fendi CEO Pietro Beccari said of the philanthropic gesture. > Opposite page: A sketch by Karl Lagerfeldfor for Fendi’s Fall-WInter 1970–71 collection.

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50,000 sketches for Fendi. Of the brand, Lagerfeld has said, “Fendi is my Italian version of creativity. It’s Italian to its core. It is not only Italian, it’s Roman.” > Opposite page: “Big Bang” pattern fur tablet from the Fendi Spring-Summer 2013 collection, in printed calf, mink, fox, and kidassia.

the boutiques, where she graciously assisted customers with their choices. Carla was Fendi’s strategist and the head of communications, advertising, and image. Alda, the youngest, went on to run the fur workshop and the atelier to assist clients. The Fendi sisters had a remarkable ability to move the company forward in a single direction while maintaining their own points of view. It was family business at its finest. They made every decision together, including the one in 1965 to hire a young Karl Lagerfeld, a natural-born innovator and creative force who would test the limits of creativity in true Fendi style.

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The hiring of Lagerfeld made for one of the greatest symbiotic alliances in fashion history—not to mention fodder for countless tales. This particular tale is but one of many in the 90 years of incredible and fascinating stories divided into five chapters in Fendi Roma: the first, “Rome: Eternal Inspiration;” the second, “Creativity: Experimentation and Innovation;” the third, “Femininity: A Fashionable Force;” followed by the fourth, “Ieri Oggi Domani” (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow); and, finally, “A Family Affair.” Since 2001, Fendi became a multinational luxury brand and member of the LVMH group, but Fendi Roma brings us to the familial core of the brand. In an age when fashion houses change creative course faster than the seasons themselves, and when the corporate bottom line carries more weight than longstanding institutional know-how, Fendi Roma is a reminder today for anyone steering a reputable brand that the greatest mark of true luxury is not the price tag, but the brand’s inimitable DNA. u

© Fe n di A r c h i ve s

This page: For over 50 years, the designer Karl Lagerfeld has made over


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Le Call’s New Workout Plan by

ElizabEth Quinn brown

photographEd by

The 100s Pilates (a new studio named for “the hundred,” a core exercise that crunches the abs) has debuted at 53 West 28th Street: a gem in the midst of metro-meccas including the Ace Hotel and the NoMad Hotel, with their esteemed brand of chic. The vibe of the area is realized at The 100s Pilates, which—thanks to the charisma and talent of its owner, Le Call—boasts a roster of clients that represents the “who’s who” of New York. Call—a stunner who has modeled for glossies, from Elle and Marie Claire to Glamour and Vogue—is sharing the secret

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(O.K., one of the secrets) to her 15-year career in fashion: pilates. And the editors at Q are eager to entertain her advice, given the nods that she (and her bod) have received from authorities like GQ, who announced her “sexiest woman”— twice. Plus, she claims to have grown an inch from the exercise. So, yeah. What’s 5’10’’ when we could be 5’11’’? Pilates is a discipline that trains the muscles to be lean through moves that abduct (not adduct). “The advantage of pilates is that the movement is away from the body and the majority of the exercise is about lengthening,” she explains.


This page: A sign that embodies the vibe at The 100s Pilates (above); Le Call instructs her clients at her studio (below). > Opposite page: Owner Le Call (center) outside The 100s Pilates, which thrives on the vibe of cool that exists in the heart of NoMad.


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This page: The name of the game at The 100s Pilates? Strenghtening, for lean muscles. > Opposite page: Pilates, as an exercise, centers around the core (above); a couple of shots of Le Call from Glamour Italia’s August 2016 issue (below).

of breathlessness to the burn). So, should you spot Le Call in NoMad, wearing Alo or Live the Process—“I love the current athleisure trend. Love it, love it, love it. I think its flattering. I think it looks good. And I think it lets people know that you’re active and want to be healthy.”—be sure to compliment her outfit and, also, ask about her classes. Or offer to buy her a jalapeño margarita because, well, she’s been working her butt off... u

O p p osite: Cour tesy of Glamour Italia (Aug ust 2016) Photog rap her: Luca Babini

“It’s the opposite of weight-lifting, which contracts those muscles and makes them shorter and more rounded. We’re pushing away from the body, which is making the muscle longer and stronger at the same time.” The impetus for The 100s Pilates came from the realization that there was an absence of studios that were effective and engaging. “I just like teaching really fun classes and I find it lacking in New York,” she gushes. “I want to provide a service for women who felt like I did: that they weren’t getting enough freaking content in a 55-minute pilates class!” Call has paired her approach—one that’s characterized by enthusiasm and expertise—with the best in equipment at her studio: a series of reformers from Stott Pilates, featuring accessories such as the “cardio-tramp” (for adding an element

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Couture’s Crowning Achievements by

Alex TrAvers

This page: Members of the Chanel atelier at work during the Fall 2016 couture show at the Grand Palais (above); models backstage at Armani Privé (below). > Opposite page: Images from Chanel’s Fall 2016 couture show.

Let’s consider the improbable premise that the most revelatory moment of the Fall 2016 couture shows came from the behind-the-scenes action at Chanel—members of the brand’s atelier visibly at work as their designs were presented to the press. A good deal of how we come away thinking of a couture show must hang on what we think of the designers’ relationships with fashion and its role in the world. Arguably, with our dress codes tumbling into informality, the idea of a fashion show dedicated entirely to extravagant evening gowns seems dated and highly impractical. And yet, if it weren’t for these shows certain crafts—the beautiful feather work done by Lemarié, for instance—would go the way of the dodo. Instead, the couture shows allow these skills to be celebrated, and that’s something worth cherishing.


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> Chanel Karl Lagerfeld seems to live in some kind of half-shadow where his dazzling legacy as a designer is continually celebrated but his clothes for Chanel rarely appear outside of runway spectacles and glossy editorials. Still, one of Lagerfeld’s strengths is his sharp sense of how completely the small idiocies and preoccupations of fashion are entwined with the big serious stuff. In pervious shows he has used clothing to highlight international relationships, reference the power of protests, and critique pop-culture. For his Fall 2016 couture show, he brought out members of Chanel’s atelier, les petites mains, and put them front and center in the massive Grand Palais. In total, there were over 200 of them. (Sometimes it’s easy to forget how many people fashion employs.) At face value, the clothes admittedly appeared costume-y, but the brand continually pushes the boundaries of what the hand is capable of creating (in the past, Chanel has made clothing with concrete!). Here, what appeared to be tweed was really hand-stitched embroidery: thousands of little dodads pieced together to form a coherent whole, all of it courtesy of the unrelenting work of the atelier. And it was les petites mains who the audience faced as the models walked by peripherally. That evening, they were the stars of the show.

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> Fendi On a Thursday night in July, a group of models and Fendi’s fashion designers, Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi, left their hotel rooms in Rome and walked on the water of the Trevi Fountain. But the oddest, most remarkable thing about the couture show Fendi and Lagerfeld presented that night was the lightness of the clothes, most notably the furs, Fendi’s hallowed hallmark. As different as one Fendi show may be from another, followers of the brand have become primed to expect certain patterns. First, the lavish set. Then, the big furs. The furs are never the same, of course, but generally, as furs tend to do, they offer a heavy, opulent layer of protection. Whether used for a coat or fashioned into a full-gown skirt, something made out of fur swiftly emerges on a Fendi runway. And then, as the show goes on, we try to pinpoint the myriad references—Liz Taylor in the 1960s, Diana Ross in the ’70s, Joan Collins and Ivana Trump in the ’80s. Icons and moments we can easily picture. But as Lagerfeld pointed out, fur garments— coats, especially—weren’t as bulky in the early decades of the 20th century. While he was doing research for Fendi’s Fall 2016 couture show, which he later titled “Legends and Fairytales,” Lagerfeld came across images from East of the Sun, West of the Moon, a Norwegian folk tale illustrated in the early 20th century by Kay Nielsen. He liked how the “pictures were something in between Art Nouveau and Art Deco.” And the clothes depicted appeared as light as air. Intrigued, he got permission to use the images and recreated their whimsy: insects, intarsia-ed and embroidered, flew across fur coats, illuminated by a sable sun. On dresses, mink flowers bloomed. Floating across the Trevi’s backdrop, the clothes looked magical. It was the kind of show dreamt up by legends, only found in a fairy tale. > Armani Privé Sometimes at a couture show, you find the opposite of what you might expect: practicality. Journalists have pointed out that as Armani ages, his designs appear more restrained. This time, though, there was a slight caveat. Yes, the silhouettes were traditional, but the embroidery on those traditional dresses gave them a needed flair. The conceptual can capture our attention, but timelessness triumphs. u


This page: Scenes from Fendiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall 2016 couture show, held in Rome on July 7, 2016. > Opposite page: Runway and backstage shots from the Armani PrivĂŠ show, which took place in Paris.

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Armarium—the premiere destination for on-demand luxury that provides members with access to the runway’s most rarefied and coveted pieces (all of which can be borrowed when needed, without the hassle of dry cleaning, storage, or that age old question: “When will I ever wear this again?”)—hosted an evening “al fresco” at the home of Marigay McKee and Bill Ford in Southampton. The event (which toasted the introduction of Missoni with Ottavio Missoni, Jr.) was a chance to celebrate the brand’s “pop-up” shop at Baron’s Cove in Sag Harbor: a charming, all-American resort on the water.

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1. Trisha Gregory, Eleanor Lambert, and Alexandra Lind Rose; 2. Maria Papathanasiou; 3. Annelise Peterson Winter, Jennifer Creel, and Christian Leone; 4. Reya Benitez, Candice Miller, and Jenna Crespi; 5. Peter Davis; 6. Kimberly Guilfoyle; 7. Violetta Komyshan, Ansel Elgort, and Sophie Elgort; 8. Marigay McKee and Ottavio Missoni, Jr.

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Monte Carlo

The Monaco Red Cross (which, in 1948, was established by Prince Louis II of Monaco) hosted its 68th annual ballâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; an effort to expresses its gratitude toward its generous donors, paying tribute to the work it has been able to carry out with the donations, which finance its actions both locally and internationally. The occasion at the Salle des Etoiles at the Sporting Monte-Carlo was as glam as ever: it opened with a nod from H.S.H. Prince Albert II, and it featured a performance by Lana Del Rey. She didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear blue jeans or a white shirt, but when she walked into the room she made our eyes burn...

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1. H.S.H. Prince Albert II and H.S.H. Princess Charlene; 2. Bernard Montiel; 3. Lana Del Rey; 4. Yalda Golsharifi 5. Stephane Valeri and guest; 6. Sophie Taylor and Fawaz Gruosi.

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Provence Sacha Lichine, the so-called king of rosé, and his wife,

Mathilde, hosted 300 guests this July at Château d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine Whispering Angel in Provence to celebrate its 10-year anniversary. Christine and Steve Schwarzman and crystal magnate Maximilian Reidel were among the guests who drank, dined, and danced the night away to Pete Moore’s 10-piece swing band, Martini Nation. A dinner was catered by Chez Bruno of Lorgues, and guests enjoyed nonstop pours of the estate’s Whispering Angel, Château d’Esclans Rock Angel, Les Clans, and Garrus—the world’s most expensive rosé.

1. The atmosphere at Château d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine Whispering Angel in Provence; 2. Over 600 bottles of Whispering Angel were poured throughout the night, alongside 375 pounds of black truffles; 3. Leonel Piraino; 4. Mathilde Lichine; 5. Le Marquis et La Marquise d’Oncieu de Chaffardon; 6. Katie Dunning, James Dunning III, David Dunning, James Dunning, and Susan Magrino Dunning; 7. Nina Griscom; 8. Matjaz Jerovsek and Teja Kastelic Merhar.

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The town at the end of the Hamptons beckoned to the chicest of the chic (including editors and other “influencers”) for “A Bikini Kinda Life”—a surf-themed weekend that was presented by Billabong and John Frieda, with festivities at Gurney’s Montauk Resort and Seawater Spa and The Surf Lodge. The three-day event included a chance to “ride” with the likes of pros Courtney Conlogue, Laura Enever, Felicity Palmateer, and Alessa Quizon. Come Sunday, the #squad was smiling and sun-kissed—and hesitant to say “vaya con dios” to the breeziness of the Hamptons.

1. Gurney’s Montauk Resort and Seawater Spa; 2. A surfer; 3. Makie Wright and Adrienne Faurote; 4. Laura Enever; 5. Lauren Valenti; 6. Surfing the waves; 7. Felicity Palmateer, Alessa Quizon, Laura Enever, and Courtney Conlogue; 8. A sunbather; 9. Scouting the waves.

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Krug—and designer Naeem Khan—welcomed a cross-section of the city’s chicest for an evening of elegance that included a performance by musician Jon Batiste. The event featured a menu by chef Gabriel Kreuther and, of course, champagne by Krug. Guests (who included: Waris Ahluwalia, Chuck Close, Linda Fargo, and Fred and Michele Oka Doner) were treated to a meal of Scottish Langoustine Crudo; Everglade Frog Legs and Chanterelles; and Roasted Maine Lobster. For dessert? A presentation of sweets were paired with Krug Grand Cuvée (159th Edition).

1. The terrace, which sparkled with glasses of Krug Grand Cuvée; 2. Chef Gabriel Kreuther and team; 3. Haniya Riaz-Khan; 4. Waris Ahluwalia; 5. Hope Smith; 6. Julia Loomis; 7. Jon Batiste; 8. Chuck Close and Naeem Khan.

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1. JANE RUSSELL was versed in attraction, saying: “Sex appeal is good—but not in bad taste. Then it’s ugly.” 2. RALPH LAUREN A collection of eaux de parfums from the “worlds” of the designer, including Oud (inspired by the “Treasures of Safari”); $140–240. 3. BUMBLE AND BUMBLE This spray features “Hairdresser’s Invisible Oil,” for nourishment that’s soft and subtle; $34. 4. ORIBE A classic product with a pink twist—to benefit the National Breast Cancer Foundation; $44. 5. SHU UEMURA Moisturize your mane with the “Urban Moisture” treatment; $68. 6. PHILIP KINGSLEY A formula that transitions from balm to serum: a solution for smooth strands; $33. 7. LUSH Baths are festive with the “Sparkly Pumpkin” bar (which features juniper berry plus grapefruit and lime); $7.95. 8. CHARLOTTE TILBURY The designer introduces “Scent of a Dream” with Kate Moss as her muse; $100. 9. AERIN Become “awash” with the scents of Morocco, which bursts with spices like cinnamon, saffron, and vanilla; $50.


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is the definition of glam—on the go. 2. NARS Presenting the “Velvet Lip Glide”—a series of shades that are as bold and saturated as they are slick; $26. 3. LA MER This new moisturizer is comprised of the brand’s “Miracle Broth” plus lime-tea concentrate; $260. 4. CHANEL Say “oui” to perfecting your pout with this liner (pictured: Séduction); $31. 5. 111SKIN The “Cryo Energising Face Serum” (from a brand based on Harley Street in London, England) promises to refresh your complexion; $250. 6. CLÉ DE PEAU The pieces from “Les Années Folles”—a collaboration between artist Ashley Longshore and Clé de Peau’s Lucia Pieroni—are a combination of “art for art’s sake” and “beauty for beauty’s sake.” 7. MARIO BADESCU A fave of editors and other experts: Super Collagen Mask; $18. 8. CLARINS A series of boosters that enrichen your routine—add a dose of drops to your moisturizer or serum; $39. 9. ESTÉE LAUDER This bottle of ampoules are the answer to de-stressing your skin; $110. 1. THIS MODEL FROM THE SEVENTIES

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1 3 When the invitation is hand-calligraphed, the call is for formalwear. And there’s no better place to start shopping than here. 1. TONI FRISSELL photographed both fashion and wars, which might explain the beauty and drama in all of her images. We say to go for a heightened sense of drama, too. 2. SMYTHSON Brook bag in black. $1,395. 3. BETTERIDGE Estate Betteridge Collection ruby ring with pavés ($6,500) and Estate Betteridge Collection ruby and diamond dress ring ($21,500). 4. RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION Washed matte velvet evening dress. $4,790. 5. JIMMY CHOO Lucy 100 pump in Bordeaux velvet. $750.

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1 was an American photographer who worked for Vogue, the Daily Telegraph, and the Sunday Times, among others. He was born in Iowa, attended university there, and served as an Army combat cameraman during the Second World War. He is perhaps best remembered for a 1968 solarized print of Alberto Korda’s famous photograph of Che Guevara, Guerrillero Heroico, but we’ll always thank him for his contribution to fashion photography. 2. ROGER VIVIER The Sin Rose N Roll sandal adds an elegantly whimsical touch to stepping out for the evening. $1,200. 3. SACHIN & BABI Bold, black, and billowy, the Claramae gown by Sachin & Babi has just the right amount of pattern mixed with a touch of teal. $3,595. 4. CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION Sometimes nothing’s better than a tuxedo (for her) when the dress code calls for black tie. Here is Calvin Klein Collection’s satin jacket ($2,595) and trouser ($1,595) for fall. 1. DONALD HONEYMAN

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1 has never been one to shy away from the outer fringes of fashion. Throughout her career, she has been known to wear everything from Las Vegas–ready headdresses to the scantiest of stockings. She has also been known to rely on and collaborate with fashion designer Bob Mackie, known for his flamboyant styles that include lots of feathers and beads. Here, Cher and Mackie are pictured together in 1974 as they attend the Met Ball, or the Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. No matter what the attire, Cher always makes it clear that every occasion is a call to be original. We, too, endorse finding a unique sense of style—and owning it. 2. VHERNIER The Camuration ring in rose gold and jet. $7,700. 3. MANOLO BLAHNIK Fit for champagne-and-caviar nights is Manolo Blahnik’s Chaospearl heel in champagne satin. Other colors available at Neiman Marcus. $865. 4. DENNIS BASSO Embroidered organza gown. $8,500. 1. CHER

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1. IRVING PENN, who photographed this ruffly fashion look in 1964 for Vogue, was born in 1917 to a family with an art sense in the genes. His younger brother, Arthur, would go on to become a film director and producer, while Penn, who studied drawing, painting, and graphics under Alexey Brodovitch at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts), would go on to become one of the greatest fashion photographers of his timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and all time, for that matter. 2. EDIE PARKER The Jean Majestic clutch in purple is simply majestic for a night on the town. $1,295. 3. MARCHESA Tiered ball gown with voluminous skirt of paisley ruffled texture and draped bodice top of tonal tulles. $9,995 at Bergdorf Goodman. 4. HARRY WINSTON The recently released Harry Winston Sparkling Cluster diamond ring in platinum. Price upon request.

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SHOPPING INDEX

> Bergdorf Goodman: bergdorfgoodman.com. > Betteridge: betteridge.com. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Bodileys: bodileys.com. > Bottega Veneta: 212.371.5511 or bottegaveneta.com. > Brunello Cucinelli: brunellocucinelli.com/en. > Bulgari: bulgari.com. > Burberry: 877.217.4085 or burberry.com.

C > Calvin Klein: 866.513.0513 or calvinklein.com. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Cartier: 212.446.3400 or cartier.us. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Chopard: 800.CHOPARD or us.chopard.com. > Christian Dior: 212.249.5822 or dior.com. > Christian Louboutin: us.christianlouboutin.com. > Creme Cycles: At mikesbikes.com.

D > Dana Rebecca Designs: 800.931.9085 or danarebeccadesigns.com.

Shopping used to be a sport and pasttime that was relegated to the world of women, but we know dapper guys everywhere like to flex their muscles in this arena too. To help you shop for the looks seen in our pages, we’ve compiled a list here of the vendors featured in this issue, along with some of our go-to favorites. In between shopping, be sure to keep up with Quest and Q online for the latest fashion news: visit questmag.com and follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @questmag.

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> David Yurman: 877.908.1177 or davidyurman.com. > Dennis Basso: 825 Madison Ave., 212.794.4500. > Diane von Furstenberg: dvf.com. > Diesel Black Gold: dieselblackgold.com.

> Aerin: aerin.com.

> diptyque: 971 Madison Ave., 212.879.3330.

> Akris: 835 Madison Ave. or akris.ch.

> DKNY: dkny.com.

> Allied Metal Works: At Barton Perreira, 42 E. 66th

> Dolce & Gabbana: 212.249.4100 or

St., or alliedmetalworks.com.

dolceandgabbana.com.

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> Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com.

> Edie Parker: edie-parker.com.

> Barton Perreira: 42 E. 66th St. or bartonperreira.com.

> Eleuteri: 646.649.5769 or eleuteri.nyc.

> Belstaff: 814 Madison Ave. or belstaff.com.

> Elie Saab: eliesaab.com.


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> Emilio Pucci: emiliopucci.com.

> Lalique: 888.488.2580 or lalique.com.

> Robert Marc: 1225 Madison Ave. or robertmarc.com.

> Eric Buterbagh: ebflorals.com.

> Lanvin: 646.439.0380 or lanvin.com.

> Roberto Coin: At Neiman Marcus or Roberto Coin,

> Linda Horn: 1327 Madison Ave., 212.772.1122.

800.853.5958 and us.robertocoin.com.

> Loro Piana: At Bergdorf Goodman.

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or rogervivier.com.

> Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave., 646.559.8848.

> Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

> Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX or rolex.com.

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> GANT: 646.367.5416 or us.gant.com.

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or

> Sachin & Babi: 1200 Madison Ave., 212.966.5200, or

> Giorgio Armani: 877.361.1176 or armani.com.

manoloblahnik.com.

sachinandbabi.com.

> Graziela Gems: 800.961.1170 or grazielagems.com.

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue,

> Saint Laurent Paris: 212.832.7100 or ysl.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

and marchesa.com.

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> Marni: At Bergdorf Goodman or marni.com.

saksfifthavenue.com.

> Miansai: At Bergdorf Goodman or miansai.com.

> Salvatore Ferragamo: ferragamo.com.

> H. Stern: hstern.net.

> Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman, Barneys New

> Sammie Jo Coxon: sammiejocoxon.com.

> Harry Winston: harrywinston.com.

York, 212.228.3400, or michaelbastiannyc.com.

> Sevda London: sevdalondon.com.

> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

> Michael Kors: 800.908.1157 or michaelkors.com.

> Smythson: 212.265.4573 or smythson.com.

> Hueb: 717 Madison Ave. or hueb.com.

> Mikimoto: 800.223.4008 or

> Stella McCartney: stellamccartney.com.

> Hunter Boot: us.hunterboots.com.

mikimotoamerica.com.

> Stuart Weitzman: 212.823.9560 or

> Misha Nonoo: mishanonoo.com.

www.stuartweitzman.com.

> Ippolita: ippolita.com.

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> Irene Neuwirth: At Jeffrey New York,

> Nancy Gonzalez: At Neiman Marcus or

> Ted Muehling: At Bergdorf Goodman.

212.206.1272.

nancygonzalez.com.

> Tiffany & Co.: 561.659.6090 or tiffany.com.

> Ivanka Trump: ivankatrumpcollection.com.

> Neiman Marcus: 800.533.1312 or

> Tod’s: 650 Madison Ave. or tods.com.

neimanmarcus.com.

> Tom Ford: 212.359.0300 or tomford.com.

> Nirav Modi: 727 Madison Ave. or

> Tory Burch: toryburch.com.

us.niravmodi.com.

> Troubadour: troubadourgoods.com.

> J.Mendel: 212.832.5830 or jmendel.com.

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> Jennifer Meyer: At ylang23.com.

> Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or

> Valentino: 212.772.6969 or valentino.com.

> Jimmy Choo: 877.955.2466 or jimmychoo.com.

oscardelarenta.com.

> Van Cleef & Arpels: vancleefarpels.com.

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J > J.Crew: 800.562.0258 or jcrew.com. > J.McLaughlin: 844.532.5625 or jmclaughlin.com.

> John Varvatos: johnvarvatos.com.

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P

> Verdura: 745 Fifth Ave. or verdura.com. > Veronica Beard: 988 Madison Ave., 646.930.4746,

> Patek Philippe: patek.com.

or veronicabeard.com.

> Katie Ermilio: katieermilio.com.

> Prada: 724 Fifth Ave., 212.664.0010, or prada.com.

> Vogue Eyewear: At LensCrafters or

> Kim Seybert: kimseybert.com.

> Priya Himatsingka: himatsingkacollection.com.

LensCrafters.com.

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> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or ralphlauren.com.

> WANT Les Essentiels: wantlesessentiels.com.

> Rizzoli: 1133 Broadway or rizzoliusa.com.

> Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

> Kotur: koturltd.com.

L > La Perla: laperla.com.

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Capricorn Dec. 22 to Jan. 19 This is a season for love when it comes to the fortune of the Capricorn. The romance of autumn, when coupled with the influence of the stars, is sure to cause a spark. Be sure to be open with your options, as it could happen in the unlikeliest of places... > Elvis Presley: January 8, 1935

Cancer June 21 to July 22

Aquarius Jan. 20 to Feb. 18

Leo July 23 to Aug. 23

The extent of your frugalness has been admirable. This summer, you saved in the city. But one can’t be strict forever; it’s time for a reward that will serve to re-spur your momentum. Spend a week searching for a present for your’s truly and, then, click “purchase.” You desrve it. > Charlotte Rampling: February 5, 1946

Fame is the name of the game for you, dear Leo. But the sensation is known to wax and wane, like the pattern of the planets. Be cautious about overexposure in your quest for your attention. The trick is to moderate in order to stay au courant (and not passé). > Jackie Kennedy: July 28, 1929

Pisces Feb. 19 to Mar. 20 The air is colder and colder, and the water is becoming ice... But what does that mean for the pisces—a sign that is represented by the fish? Remember to adapt (and readapt) to your environment, because stillness isn’t the way to stay afloat. > George Harrison: February 25, 1943

Virgo Aug. 24 to Sept. 22 You are still the celestial favorite of 2016, so don’t let it go to waste. You’re reaping the rewards of all the hard work you’ve put in these past months—so, “don’t give up five minutes before the miracle.” Get rid of the deflectors, naysayers, and excess baggage during. > Sophia Loren: September 20, 1934

Aries Mar. 21 to Apr. 19 Aries are known as the pioneers of the zodiac and, this season, the stars have a recommendation: action. Whatever your new idea— whether its for an app, or whether its for a solution to world peace—it’s time to pitch, pitch, pitch. You’re a leader, so lead. > Marlon Brando: April 3, 1924

Libra Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 Libras aren’t the best when it comes to saying “no” to people. But it’s important to be a BFF to you before being a BFF to others. Whatever your reasons—business or pleasure—be sure to guard yourself/your time. It’s more than O.K., even if it’s to say “yes” to a nap... > Truman Capote: September 30, 1924

Taurus Apr. 20 to May 20 The stubborness that defines you, dear Taurus, has been a burden—but one that you’ve addressed. This season, the stars have placed their power in your hands. As you’ve challenged the inevitabilities of the zodiac, you’ve challenged the truths of your future. > Audrey Hepburn: May 4, 1929

Scorpio Oct. 23 to Nov. 21 Scorpios have, for months, been afflicted with an absense of change. And this is in part due to your hesitence. This season, be sure to take a risk and be uncomfortable. These sorts of challenges are necessary for excelling—and accelerating your excelling. > Ivanka Trump: October 30, 1981

Gemini May 21 to June 20

Sagittarius Nov. 22 to Dec. 21

The strength (and weakness) of Gemini is its vacillation between “the twins.” You are known for being of two minds, which is a conundrum if ever there was one. Embrace the chance to understand both selves—it will prepare you for the decisions this fall. > Judy Garland: June 10, 1922

You, as a Sagittarius, are known for your appreciation for roaming (and we aren’t talking about the Hamptons). Plan an escape to a new destination, like Japan or Morocco, this season. This is a chance to address your boredom—and quench your curiosity. > Jane Fonda: December 21, 1937

Per the stars, Cancers are prone to resentment—especially when their friends are being difficult. Unshackle your emotions and discuss your frustrations with that bestie who has been testing your patience. It would be productive to clear the air for a clean slate. > Anjelica Huston: July 8, 1951


S W I T C H T O N AT I O N A L

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Q Fall 2016  

Fall Classics

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