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FALL CLASSICS

FAYE DUNAWAY ON THE SET OF “THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR,” 1968


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46 LIVING LEGEND Faye Dunaway was a beauty out of another era, but someone who always managed to come out on top—a true survivor. Q’s own Liz Smith examines this brilliant star: her rise, reputation, and what could still be to come (and the classic movie Dunaway wishes she could forget!). 56 A LEGACY RESTORED With commanding brushstrokes, assured lines, and a hard and direct approach, Tony Viramontes’ fashion illustrations not only captured the ’80s—they helped define the decade. A new book by Dean Rhys Morgan puts Viramontes’ visual legacy on dazzling display. Daniel Cappello takes a look at the legacy of a brilliant career cut too short.

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62 FALL FASHIONS For all your fall fashion needs, Elizabeth Meigher and Alex R. Travers hit the runways and report back on the trends. Follow along as Meigher and Travers pick up on spectacularly streamlined dresses and some fresh takes on Christian Dior’s New Look, which gained popularity in the ’50s. 76 MAGNIFICENT OBESSESSIONS Exploring the world of Persol—and the passion behind the Italian brand—Elizabeth Quinn Brown ventures to the “Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship in Film” exhibition, which speaks to obsessive creation as it exists in a number of industries.

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80 WES GORDON: DESIGN LEADER Alex R. Travers sits downs with the talented young designer Wes Gordon to talk about his eponymous line and his first runway show. Gordon, who will present his ninth collection this season, is a marvel—a designer who continues to impress both fashion editors and clients alike. 86 BAILEY AND THE SHRIMP David Bailey started taking photographs early in his twenties, and hasn’t stopped since. Here, Elizabeth Meigher investigates the great photographer; his great muse, Jean Shrimpton; and the Manhattan photo shoot that kicked off their road to stardom.

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American actress Faye Dunaway on the set of the 1968 film The Thomas Crown Affair, which was directed by Norman Jewison and written by Alan Trustman.


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31 NOSTALGIA A montage of fashionable images and leafy scenes from our favorite—and most nostalgic—season: fall. 34 JEWELRY Maple brooches, pearl earrings, snake bracelets, and skull necklaces—oh, my! It’s a season of fabulous new introductions from some of the best jewelry brands and designers. 36 COOL AND CLASSIC COATS From camel hair to autumnal red, from oversize buttons to buttoned-up, there’s no better time to invest in the greatest staple of all, an overcoat.

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42 SHE SLEEPS IN BEAUTY Everything a lady needs to accessorize herself and her boudoir, from silk-and-glass pillows and sacred scents to long-sleeved leather gloves. 43 MANLY THINGS A Bentley for wheels, a Cartier Tank, retro-inspired stringback driving gloves... All the accessories that a guy’s guy might ever want and need. 44 IN THE NECK OF TIME As temperatures begin to drop, there’s no need to cover up your fashion sense—unless, of course, you’re talking this season’s trend: the turtleneck.

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94 Q FOCUS A look at the parties of summer, from the Fitch’s Corner Horse Trials in Millbrook to Shark Attack Sounds in Montauk, as PYTs everywhere rev up for fall... 104 BEAUTY Get gussied up with products from brands like Deborah Lippmann and Lush. Oh, and Chanel, darling. Don’t forget Chanel. 106 EVENING LOOKS When black tie calls, is it okay to show some leg and go a little short? This season, Q weighs in on definitive looks that are right for evening occasions.

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110 SHOPPING INDEX To help you on your fashion journey, a listing of where to buy the looks featured in our pages. 112 HOROSCOPES What do the stars have in store for you?


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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

ELIZABETH MEIGHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EDITOR

JAMES STOFFEL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LILY HOAGLAND EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN A SSOCIATE EDITOR

ALEX TRAVERS A SSI STANT EDITOR

DANIEL CAPPELLO FA SHION DIRECTOR

VALERIA FOX ART DIRECTOR

HILARY GEARY SOCIET Y EDITOR

JOANNA BAKER CO-FOUNDING EDITOR

Quest Media, LLC. S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER III CHAIRMAN AND C.E.O.

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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EDITOR’S LETTER

American journalist and author Jim Bishop (1907–1987) wrote, “Autumn carries more gold in its pocket than all the other seasons.” I especially love this image of autumn because it carries with it the bright yellow leaves of fall, freshly carved and smiling jack-o’-lanterns, caramel-colored cider doughnuts, and the golden glow from wood-burning fireplaces only found in the crisp months of fall. I have always considered fall a season of rejuvenation and new beginnings, as students head back to school and everyone prepares to dig into the richness of the season after the restful and relaxing days of summer. Truman Capote said it perfectly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s: “Aprils have never meant much to me, autumns seem that season of beginning, spring.”  This issue of Q doesn’t disappoint when it comes to all of the latest and greatest that fashion has to offer. As always, our goal at Q is to provide readers with current looks and accessories that are both fresh and effortless, timeless and attractive. We hope that within our pages you will find staples and investment pieces that will last a lifetime. Check out our fashion roundup for the newest looks this season in every color of the rainbow. For more fashion, don’t miss Alex R. Travers’ article on rising star Wes Gordon. The former Oscar de la Renta and Tom Ford intern, who turned to Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy and Gwyneth Paltrow (circa Great Expectations) as muses for his Resort 2014 collection, is definitely one to watch. With their rich colors and custom brocades, Gordon’s clothes have a luxe, elegant quality reminiscent of de la Renta’s and an understated elegance evocative of Tom Ford. For fashion in the raw, read Q and Quest fashion director Daniel Cappello’s piece “A Legacy Restored,” in which Daniel journeys back to the heyday of haute couture, the 1980s, and unearths a visual memory left by remarkable fashion illustrator Tony Viramontes, whose designs are the subject of a new book by Dean Rhys Morgan. “Sitting down with Dean to pore over Tony’s fast-paced, edgy, and exhilerating drawings was intoxicating—much like the 1980s themselves,” says Cappello. “Dean pays a great tribute to an artist we almost forgot. His book is a must-have for anyone who appreciates beauty.” This issue of Q also offers readers an array of accessories, including everything from bags and baubles to footwear and eyewear for both men and women. Q and Quest associate editor Elizabeth Quinn Brown writes about the renowned Italian eyewear company Persol. In the 1960s, Persol glasses came to the fore when they started being worn by top personalities of the period—not only pilots and sportsmen, but also film and television stars such as Greta Garbo, Steve McQueen, and Faye Dunaway, who chose Persol both on the set and in everyday life. Counterclockwise, from top right: Prada Twin Pockets Bag in Speaking of Faye Dunaway, Liz Smith writes a poignant piece marine; Jean Shrimpton photographed by David Montgomery, circa on the legendry actress who, according to Smith, “was too big 1965; Persol sunglasses with signature detailing; Chanel two-tone for her time.” As Smith describes her, “With her hooded gaze, leather pump; TOD’S leather-trimmed camel coat; Steve McQueen the lush mouth of her youth and those incredible cheekbones, and Faye Dunaway in The Thomas Crown Affair, 1968; TOD’S Dunaway was a true American exotic. And for a while, she was brown leather buckle boot; a look from Wes Gordon’s Resort 2014 one of the most fascinating actresses in the world.” Nevertheless, collection; Tiffany & Co. rings; David Hemmings and Veruschka it’s exciting to know that, according to Smith, Faye Dunaway’s in a scene from Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up, 1966. “golden moment…is still ahead of her.” u

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EDITOR


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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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CONTRIBUTORS

Liz Smith > Liz calls herself the 2,000-year-old gossip columnist. These days she’s been having fun with her website, which features twenty famous women: WowOWow.com (aimed at the largest demographic coming on the web—women who weren’t born yesterday!). In her latest “Living Legend” column for Q, Liz chronicled the career of Faye Dunaway, a star who would have shined brighter in the genre of film noir. Liz hopes the best is yet to come for the actress, and thereby includes a quote from Walt Whitman: “The untold want by life and ne’er granted/Now, voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.”

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Elizabeth Quinn Brown > Elizabeth serves as the associate editor of Quest and Q magazines, where she writes the “Young and the Guest List” column. For this issue, she ventured to the Museum of the Moving Image—in Queens—to experience the “Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship in Film” exhibition to write “Magnificent Obsessions.” And as Beauty Editor, she collected the best—and sometimes the brightest—products for fall (page 104). Elizabeth resides in the East Village, where she enjoys eating People’s Pops and wearing graphic T-shirts.

80 Patrick McMullan > The premiere nightlife photographer in New York City, longtime Quest and Q contributor Patrick McMullan’s work appears regularly in New York, Allure, Interview, Details, Tatler, Paper, Hamptons, Ocean Drive, and Gotham. A contributing editor at Vanity Fair, McMullan’s book, Kiss Kiss, is a compilation of over 1,000 blackand-white and color images from his vast body of work, capturing the famous, the infamous, the beautiful, the talented, and everyone in between puckering up. Said the late, great Andy Warhol, “If you don’t know Patrick McMullan, you ought to get out more!”

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46 < Daniel Cappello is the fashion director of Quest and Q. In “A Legacy Restored,” Daniel journeys back to the heyday of haute couture, the 1980s and unearths a visual memory left by the unforgettable fashion illustrator Tony Viramontes, whose work is the subject of a new book by Dean Rhys Morgan. “Sitting down with Dean to pore over Tony’s fast-paced, edgy, and exhilerating drawings was intoxicating—much like the 1980s themselves,” says Daniel. “Dean pays a great tribute to an artist we almost forgot. His book is a must-have for anyone who appreciates beauty.”

76 < Alex Travers As a born-and-raised New Yorker, fall is Alex’s favorite season. For this issue, he sat down with designer Wes Gordon to talk about his eponymous fashion line. “Wes crafts with a poet’s eye for detail,” tells Alex. In addition to the fashion story, he sifted through thousands of looks to put together this season’s Fall Fashion Roundup (page 56). “It’s one of my favorite things to do,” he says. “I consider myself very lucky.” Alex is the assistant editor of both Quest and Q.

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This page: 1. Prince Charles in a family tartan kilt and Princess Diana in a suit by Bill Pashley at Balmoral Castle, 1981; 2. An English Springer Spaniel leaps for the sharptail in the field; 3. Model Marisa Berenson photographed by Brian Duffy, 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; 4. Bianca Jagger and Nathalie Delon, 1974; 5. Wedding of Jacqueline Bouvier and John F. Kennedy at Hammersmith Farm, Newport, Rhode Island, September 12, 1953; > Opposite page: 1. Brigitte Bardot and Alain Delon in St. Tropez; 2. Brigitte Bardot in a classic fall trench; 3. The open road 4. Actress Natalie Wood in New York City, 1961. Photo by William Claxton. 5. Faye Dunaway in a scene from The Thomas Crown Affair.

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1. CINDY CHAO Maple Leaves brooch in diamonds, yellow diamonds, and brown diamonds; price upon request. 2. KARA ROSS Wide Section Cuff in chili lizard; $345. 3. IRENE NEUWIRTH Bracelet in rose gold, black onyx, mint chrysoprase, rubies, carnelian, pink tourmaline, diamonds, and Mexican fire opal; $26,260. 4. MIKIMOTO Lure earrings in pearls, water opal, and diamonds; price upon request. 5. MIRIAM HASKELL Reminiscence pearl necklace; $475. 6. TIFFANY & CO. Flower ring in diamonds, sapphires, aquamarines, and tsavorites; $42,000. 7. ELVA FIELDS Paired Parfaitement necklace; $308. 8. JUDITH RIPKA Reverse Oasis cuff: topaz, tourmaline, mother of pearl, diamonds; price upon request.


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4 Lauren Bacall is a New York native, born in the Bronx on September 16, 1924. She originally made a name for herself in the 1944 Humphrey Bogart film To Have And Have Not, and continued to distinguish herself as a leader in film noir. With her outbreak in noir, and her signature husky voice, Bacall became a legend in her own time. Thinking back to her 1944 breakout film, Q has got to thinking about what we must “have.” And we can’t think of better must-haves than snake bracelets, skull necklaces, briolette earrings, or sweeping rings of noble gold.

6 1. IVANKA TRUMP Black & White earrings with black diamond briolettes in oxidized white gold; $8,300. 2. HERMÈS Double-row bracelets in gold and diamonds: “Collier de Chien” in white gold ($40,600), “Kelly” in rose gold ($37,900), and “Kelly” in white gold ($39,800). 3. SHEER ADDICTION Courtney necklace; $225. 4. H. STERN Iris ring in rose gold and noble gold; $5,600. 5. CHANEL Bracelet in plexiglass, metal, and thread; $1,425. 6. JENNIFER MEYER Triple-drop earrings in gold, amethyst, and pink and blue sapphire; $35,000. 7. ROBERTO COIN Martellato snake bracelet in rose gold with cognac diamonds; $8,300. 8. GOLD & GRAY Pyrite, spinel, and diamond Skull necklace; $680.

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1. SANDRO Rev up your fall wardrobe with Sandro’s black leather moto jacket; $1,035. 2. TOD’S Turn heads with Tod’s red leather bomber; $3,645. 3. J. MENDEL The unique and unforgettable rust muskrat chevron degrade long-front zip vest with American and Finn raccoon; $8,850. 4. MARC JACOBS The coco baby llama mid-length wrap coat by Marc Jacobs effortlessly blends

Cool And Classic Coats Catherine Deneuve, the breathtaking beauty who gained fame for her roles in the films Repulsion and Belle de Jour, is always adept at style-related magic. Pictured here in 1965 with her husband at the time David Bailey, the actress personifies elegance in her white kneelength coat. So can you, with any one of these great finds for fall, which are sure to keep you looking your best with a Deneuve-like dazzle.

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style and comfort; $1,800. 5. MICHAEL KORS Be the cause of envy in Michael Kors’ olive and white camo mink stole; $19,995. 6. JENNI KAYNE Sleek and simple: Jenni Kayne’s overcoat; $895. 7. MASSIMO ALBA The Venezia coat in rust is perfect for a crisp fall day; $1,715. 8. NANETTE LEPORE Original, smart, and sexy: the gravity peacoat by Nanette Lepore; $598.

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1. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Pure French chic: Christian Louboutin’s Gruotta in black suede with black satin bow and 45-mm. heel; $995. 2. ALTUZARRA Kick off the fall season in high gear with the Gianvito Rossi for Altuzarra checkered-print patent leather pump; $830. 3. CHANEL With a heel evocative of a maritime cleat knot, Chanel’s two-toned leather pump in balletic pink and black is sure to impress; price upon request. 4. CARMEN MARC VALVO Strap on Carmen Marc Valvo’s burgundy point-toe Mara pump—in kidskin leather with adjustable ankle strap and padded insole—and make a statement; $520. 5. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO There’s no way to dim the luster of Ferragamo’s patent leather T-strap heel with ankle tie—a must-have for fall; $795 at select Salvatore Ferragamo boutiques nationwide. 6. JIL SANDER The immaculately designed black heel with ankle strap by Jil Sander; price upon request.

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Romy Schneider lit up the silver screen starting from an early age. The Austrian-born actress began her film career at 15 and went on to work with esteemed directors such as Luchino Visconti and Orson Wells. In the 1970s, she continued to work in France with director Claude Sautet on five films. Photographed here in Paris in 1962—looking less jeune fille than the 15-year-old character in the 1955 biopic Sissi that made her famous—Schneider brims with inimitable elegance. She was able to find a style all her own, especially when it came to footwear. And with the great shoe selections out this season, so will you.

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1. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Slip in to Ferragamo’s black leather boot with circle cut-out; $1,490 at select Salvatore Ferragamo boutiques nationwide. 2. RALPH LAUREN The black suede boot with chain tassel from Ralph Lauren Collection; $1,450 at select Ralph Lauren stores. 3. CHANEL An above-theknee boot with some true grit: Chanel’s black leather high boot with chains; price upon request. 4. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Red all over: Christian Louboutin’s Armurabotta in rouge imperial nappa leather with 120-mm. heel; $1,795. 5. ALTUZARRA The white nappa and patent leather thighhigh boot by Gianvito Rossi for Altuzarra; $3,090. 6. TOD’S The brown leather buckled boot; $1,325. 7. J.CREW A fall staple: J.Crew’s Rory leather ankle boot; $328.

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Long Legs To Boot Diane von Furstenberg may be considered New York style incarnate. Most celebrated for introducing the knitted jersey wrap dress in 1974, the designer has since gone on to create a global lifestyle brand known around the world as DvF. Each season, von Furstenberg brings an energy to Fashion Week that is pure and exhilarating. Pictured above in 1970 with her first husband, Prince Egon of Fürstenberg, Diane dons a pair of knee-high boots. This fall, channel your effortless von Furstenberg–like style with any of our latest finds. FA L L 2 0 1 3 /

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6 1. JIL SANDER Stun them all when you step out in these Jil Sander shades, featured in the fall runway show; price upon request. 2. PRADA Add some floral fun to your eyewear this season with Prada’s 26PS sunglasses; $495 at Sunglass Hut. 3. DKNY Simple and chic: DKNY’s 4107 sunglasses; $70 at LensCrafters. 4. TORY BURCH Tory Burch’s 9026 sunglasses are sure to make you shine; $175. 5. MIU MIU Miu Miu’s 08OS sunglasses have a feline and feminine edge; $315. 6. COACH Featuring consummate fall colors, Coach’s 8056 sunglasses are theis season’s must-have accessory; $158 at Sunglass Hut. 7. KUBORAUM The Kuboraum T0.01 collection is based on a revolutionary concept that combines a frame from the past with another from the present; price upon request.

Perfect Shades Françoise Hardy, the stunningly gorgeous French actress and singer, has always been an icon in film, music, and fashion. Her hit song “Mon amie la rose” blossomed into a successful career—one that inspired Balenciaga’s former designer, Nicolas Ghesquière who consistently had photographs of Hardy up on his inspiration boards. Pictured above, she looks dashing in white sunglasses; it’s no wonder we look to the star for style inspiration. You can’t go wrong with a solid pair of shades.

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1. JIMMY CHOO Solar Large handbag in black rabbit fur; $2,450. 2. LONGCHAMP Le Pliage Patch Exotic in wool and suede; $660. 3. KARA ROSS Circ in royal blue ostrich, black patent leather, and natural ring lizard with gold hardware and black onyx; $2,550. 4. PERRIN PARIS Attelage Frou Frou in goatskin, lambskin, and wood; $3,950. 5. LOVE, ALEX The Bay, an oversized hobo in grained calfskin with nickel hardware; $1,545. 6. NANCY GONZALEZ Black crocodile and calf hair soft Wallis bag; $3,360. 7. HERMÈS Constance Cartable in box calfskin; $11,400. 8. MARK CROSS Madison Mini Doctor in python color block of blush and plum; $3,495. 9. ASPREY Wiltshire shoulder bag in mushroomand fox ostrich; $8,450. 10. MAX MARA JBag in red ostrich; $5,950.

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The Makings Of A Lady Audrey Hepburn received the Academy Award for Best Actress for her lead role as Princess Ann in the 1953 William Wyler film Roman Holiday. She was again nominated for her 1964 performance as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady. Though she didn’t walk away with the Academy Award, Hepburn—who in real life carried a handbag like no other—remains in our hearts the fairest of ladies. Take her cue and carry any of these bags, and you’ll be among fall’s fairest, too.

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1. KARA BY KARA ROSS Narrow Skin Wrap Cuff with cabochon buttons in gold and oil spill lizard; $245. 2. HANRO OF SWITZERLAND Enjoy the sweetest of dreams in Hanro’s black tank cami ($118) and high-cut brief ($55). 3. LALIQUE Coutard cushions from Lalique Maison in ivory silk and black glass hand-beading; $1,400–3,300. 4. CIRE TRUDON Keep your boudoir smelling sacred with Cire Trudon’s Spiritus Sancti room spray, a holy perfume of altar candles and amber incense; $190. 5. PERRIN PARIS Baggala gloves in kid goat; $640. 6. HERMÈS E-Cover silk case for iPad 3 in Barenia calfskin and silk; $860. 7. ASPREY Cigarette clutch in sterling silver; $6,700. 8. MARK CROSS Grace box in saffiano calf color block of plum and luggage; $2,250.

She Sleeps In Beauty Audrey Hepburn has been ranked by the American Film Institute as the third greatest female screen legend in the history of American cinema. She’s also secured fashionable standing in the International Best-Dressed List Hall of Fame. Perhaps we’ll remember her most for her 1961 role as Holly Golightly in Blake Edwards’ film adaptation of the Truman Capote novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Delicate and demure even in her sleep, it’s easy to imagine Hepburn’s Holly dreaming about jewels from Tiffany. Here, we’ve gathered some dreamworthy finds for the modern woman, from the sleekest of nightwear to the softest and most sacred of scents.

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James Dean was the ultimate tough guy who came to define and embody the 1950s. As troubled Los Angeles teenager Jim Stark in 1955’s Rebel Without A Cause, Dean accelerated to the height of his fame as a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment. Today, there’s little room for disillusionment with the likes of these suave markers of male style. So go ahead and race away in the lap of luxury, from a Cartier Tank to the handcrafted Bentley GTC.

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1. AUTODROMO The beautifully crafted stringback driving gloves in drum-dyed leather and cotton crochet will take you back to a simpler era of leisure every time you slip them on for a drive; $110. 2. CARTIER Cartier’s Tank Solo Watch in steel and leather is as classic as they come; $3,500. 3. BENTLEY The GT Speed Convertible in dark cashmere is the fastest four-seat convertible in the world, at top speeds of 202 mph; bentleymotors.com. 4. ASPREY The alligator tumbler allows for a hefty pour; $295. 5. PUIFORCAT For the ultimate bachelor pad: the Jean E. Puiforcat cocktail shaker ($35,000) and shot glass ($640). 6. TIMOTHY OULTON Masculine chic: the Raleigh Spitfire Cases in mini ($495), small ($595), medium ($795), and large ($895). 7. TIFFANY & CO. Keep keys organized on the Tiffany 1837 valet key ring in stainless steel with sterling silver; $200.

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In The Neck Of Time Robert Redford might have been awarded French knighthood, but he will always be the prince of American cool on these shores. The prolific actor, director, and producer has always borne his own sense of chic, whether in aviators or a turtleneck. This fall, designers paid close attention to men’s necklines, featuring Aran rolls, sleek turtlenecks, and high, buttoned-up collars. Adopt some of the looks from these designers, and you’ll be rolling right on trend.

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1. HERMÈS Crewneck pullover in wool and cashmere ($1,350) and straight, narrow lambskin trousers ($6,000). 2. BELSTAFF Linden military blazer ($1,595), Berwick trouser ($495), and Harold shirt ($1,595). 3. RAG & BONE Bonded-cable merino sweater ($595) and slim suit pant in wool and mohair ($350). 4. RALPH LAUREN Gray turtleneck sweater ($695), charcoal wool sportcoat ($1,695), and green corduroy pants ($395), all from Ralph Lauren Black Label. 5. MICHAEL BASTIAN Hand-knit Aran oversized neck gaiter ($960), tiger-camo button-down ($345), and mini-stripe formal pant ($525). 6. BURBERRY PRORSUM Wool Aran sweater ($1,995), tapered-leg linen herringbone trousers ($795), and animal-print sunglasses ($200). 7. GANT Jaquard Roller ($240), Glencheck Smarty Pants ($295), and leather slip case ($395), all from GANT Rugger.

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Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie and Clyde (1967). > Opposite: Faye Dunaway in promotional material for the film Amanti (a.k.a. A Place for Lovers or Le Temps des Amants), directed by Vittoria De Sica for MGM (1968).

“Tell me the truth.” “She’s my sister.” (Slap!) “She’s my daughter.” (Slap!) “Sister.” (Slap!) “Daughter.” (Slap!) “She’s my sister and my daughter! Get it? Or is too tough for you?” Any film fan worth his salt knows that famous Faye Dunaway scene from Roman Polanski’s famed Chinatown (slaps, courtesy of a very frustrated Jack Nicholson.) Chinatown was, in many ways, the last true noir film (albeit, in color). And Miss Dunaway a true, mysterious, and tragic

Living Legend Faye Dunaway

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noir lady. Half-truths or deadly lies—and often a gun—were the weapons of this cinema staple. Although Faye would win her Oscar playing the ruthless exec in Network, it was Chinatown in which she gave her defining performance. The role she was born to play. Dunaway is a star who was born 30 years too late. She was made for mystery and evocative black and white. She could have given Bette and Joan and Barbara Stanwyck a run for their dramatic, neurotic money. She had her intrinsic propensity for brilliant, grand, unapologetic overacting. Nothing hesitant about Faye Dunaway. A straightforward throwback to a time when movie stars thrilled millions with the curl of a lip, an arched eyebrow, a whispered threat, or a


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Photo of Faye Dunaway taken by Jerry Schatzberg in 1970 that served as the 64th Festival de Cannes poster in 2011. > Opposite, clockwise from top left: Faye Dunaway photographed by Jerry Schatzberg in 1970; Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde (1967); Marcello Mastroianni and Faye Dunaway in A Place For Lovers (1968); Robert Redford and Faye Dunaway in Three Days of the Condor (1975); Faye Dunaway photographed by Jerry Schatzberg; Faye Dunaway on the set of Bonnie and Clyde (1967); Dunaway with her husband Terry O’Neill; on the set of The Thomas Crown Affair with Steve McQueen.

declaration of love—perhaps true? With her hooded gaze, the lush mouth of her youth, and those incredible cheekbones, Dunaway was a true American exotic. And for a while, she was one of the most fascinating actresses in the world. Born in Bascom, Florida, Faye attended the University of Florida and Boston University. She graduated having majored in theater. Then, the striking young woman joined the American National Theatre and Academy. She appeared on Broadway in A Man for All Seasons and Hogan’s Goat, both of which were well reviewed. Hollywood beckoned and she had smallish but showy roles in The Happening and Hurry Sundown, which was Otto Preminger’s tribute to Southern white trash. Dunaway objected to Preminger’s dictatorial attitude and this was the beginning of the actress being labeled “difficult.” (Why nobody ever considered Preminger difficult is hard to imagine.) Despite the tensions, Faye captured a Golden Globe

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nomination and was named “Star of the Year” for 1965. Still basically unknown, she immediately went into Warren Beatty’s Bonnie and Clyde. This catapulted her to the top echelon of stars. (Natalie Wood rejected the role.) Faye’s hard/soft performance, her unusual beauty, and the way she wore Theadora Van Runkle’s incredible 1930s fashions made her an instantly iconic and recognizable face of the late 1960s. Nobody looked quite like her, nobody looked like her at all! She received her first Oscar nomination for Bonnie and Clyde. She then had another big hit with The Thomas Crown Affair. Steve McQueen was cool. Faye Dunaway was icy. They looked beautiful together. The film was another hit. However, with the old studio system dying a ghastly death, Faye floundered for the next four years in films such as The Extraordinary Seaman, Little Big Man, The Woman I Love, Doc, The Arrangement, Oklahoma Crude, Puzzle of a Downfall Child (a brilliant but ignored performance) and A Place for Lovers (the place where at least she found romance with co-star Marcello Mastroianni, effectively breaking up her first, early marriage.) She also had a seductive turn in The Three Musketeers, as the infamous Milady de Winter. If she was not quite up to the lure of Lana Turner in the 1948 version, she was still mighty dangerous, in and out of bed. By that point, Faye’s public image had begun to spin into the realm of “diva”— though that phrase for a demanding movie or music star had yet to be coined. In fact, on the set of The Three Musketeers, it was rumored that in the scene where Faye is supposed to strangle Raquel Welch with a heavy wooden rosary, Faye did it a bit too realistically. Not that there was sympathy for Miss Welch. She was known as a difficult star herself. True or not, it made for lively gossip. And then, Faye received the second “role of a lifetime” when Roman Polanski cast her as Mrs. Mulwray in the beautifully chilly and tensely violent Chinatown. She starred opposite Jack Nicholson, a scene-stealer if there ever was one, but Dunaway held her own as the icy wife of a missing mogul who had a more than a few secrets of her own. Was she a deadly femme fatale or a hapless victim? Faye was top-to-toe a fabulous movie star, beginning to perfect a series of mannerisms that


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were fascinating to behold. She was once again nominated for an Oscar. But lost, perhaps because Polanski had been so vocal about how hard she was to work with. After that, she was a throwaway in the spy thriller Three Days of The Condor with Robert Redford (no chemistry at all between these two superstars) and looked gorgeous and distressed in the smash hit The Towering Inferno. She seemed to be drifting offtrack again when she took the role of the madly driven T.V. executive in Network. Working with Peter Finch, William Holden, and Robert Duval energized her. Her by-now familiar quirks and intensity fit the role perfectly. And finally, she took the Academy Award. (She was famously photographed relaxing the morning after at the Beverly Hills Hotel pool. The picture was taken by her second husband, Terry O’Neill.) But as is so often true after an Oscar win, things start to

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Faye Dunaway, 1967; Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway in The Thomas Crown Affair (1968). > Opposite: Faye Dunaway and Robert Redford in Three Days of the Condor (1975); Portrait of Faye Dunaway circa 1965.

go south. She was first billed in the aptly titled Voyage of the Dammed and saw visions in The Eyes of Laura Mars. (This made money, but critics were unimpressed.) She also appeared in The Champ in 1970, not looking her best and rather ignored in the praise heaped on Jon Voight and Ricky Schroder. She was sensational on T.V. as evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, but her co-star Bette Davis complained Dunaway was impossible to work with (pot and kettle, there!) She played Eva Perón in a T.V. movie based on the life of the Argentine legend, and was delightfully—for those who enjoy that sort of thing—over-the-top.


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Faye Dunaway on the set of The Thomas Crown Affair (1968); Dunaway and husband Peter Wolf. > Opposite, clockwise from top left: Faye Dunaway in Mommy Dearest, (1981); Faye Dunaway at Vanity Fair’s 2005 Oscar Party at Mortons in LA; Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie and Clyde (1967); Faye Dunaway by Terry O’Neill for Vanity Fair; Faye Dunaway stars with Dustin Hoffman in Little Big Man (1970); Dunaway in The Thomas Crown Affair; Faye Dunaway in Hurry Sundown (1967); Chinatown movie poster (1974); Dunaway and Jack Nicholson in Chinatown (1974); Bonnie and Clyde (1967); Dunaway and Johnny Depp in Don Juan DeMarco (1994).

And then came—drum roll!—Mommie Dearest, the screen version of Christina Crawford’s scathing tell-all on her famous mother. I can’t imagine what anybody expected from this, given the material. Frank Perry directed, with an eye toward excess. Faye, apparently, threw herself into being Joan Crawford with magnificent, unrestrained gusto. Faye hadn’t written the script, nor had she had a hand in editing, so who will ever know if she was encouraged to tone it down? (Or if there were subtler takes.) The performance is brilliant, daring, poignant—but so outrageous it explodes into camp instantly. Within a week of its release, there were “Mommie Dearest” parties being held all across the country. Faye’s every utterance had become legendary, and we needn’t even talk at length about the Kabuki makeup “no wire hangers” scene. In truth, Faye wasn’t doing anything she hadn’t in a number of other films; these were her mannerisms. But playing Crawford brought them out in vivid high relief. Faye would forever more blame “Mommie” for the downturn in her career. (Director Frank Perry simply omitted it from his biography.) The reality was that Faye had been a

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star since 1966. Her “big time” was coming to an end, anyway. She just happened to go out in a blaze of derision. (Though I happen to think of it as glorious.) Her next film would be an unfortunate potboiler, The Wicked Lady, which only enhanced her image as an eye-popping virago. Afterward, it was up and down—a fine, gritty turn in Barfly with Mickey Rourke, and superb with Peter Ustinov in a lush T.V. adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Dinner for Thirteen. But there were too many like Supergirl or Terror in the Aisles. She kept a hand in features and television, sometimes scoring (Albino Aligator, The Twilight of the Gold, a T.V. version of Rebecca where she was delicious as the pretentious Mrs. Van Hopper.) But mostly she just kept keeping on. Her résumé is vast, no matter the quality. She divorced Terry O’Neill, had a nasty bit of business over their child, Liam, married and eventually divorced musician Peter Wolf. In recent years, she has been almost manically committed to putting Terrence McNally’s tale of Maria Callas, Master Class, onscreen. It has proceeded in fits and starts, but is said


Opposite, clockwise from top left: Faye Dunaway in Chinatown (1974); Faye Dunaway and Steve McQueen on the set of The Thomas Crown Affair (1968); Dunaway and Steve McQueen on set of The Thomas Crown Affair; Still of Faye Dunaway in The Arrangement (1969); a scene from The Thomas Crown Affair. > This page: Steve McQueen as Thomas Crown and Faye Dunaway as Vicki Anderson in The Thomas Crown Affair.

now to be done and ready for release. It is surely a role for all aspects of her larger-than-life personality. Faye Dunaway was too big for her time. I end as I began— had she appeared in 1943, she would have wiped the studio floors with the great stars of that era. As it was, despite her bitterness over Mommie Dearest, Faye had a good run. And she has never stopped working, always looking for the next Bonnie and Clyde, Chinatown, or Network. She is an artist committed to her art. Her great, golden moment, I think, is still ahead of her. She puts in mind a quote from Walt Whitman: “The untold want by life and ne’er granted/Now, voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.” u

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The hard outlines, bold colors, and overt glamour of Pierre Cardinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haute couture lent themselves to Viramontesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pen and paintbrush, as this drawing, completed for Madame Figaroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide to the 1986 collections, makes clear.

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One of Viramontes’ most recognizable works—an illustrated sable-trimmed evening suit by Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel Haute Couture originally drawn in 1984 for Prosper Assouline’s La Mode en Peinture—was described by the artist in his diaries, in which he noted how the temperature of the room changed as the model made her entrance.

A Legacy Restored by

I llu s t r at i o n s

by

Daniel Cappello Tony Viramontes

This September, as bloggers flock to the front row at New York Fashion Week, “muploading” images of runway looks snapped by their handheld phones and iPads, and as sites like Style.com stream videos of the shows, the fashion world will have the chance to observe, remember—and honor—another time and era, when the beauty of ateliers’ creations and couture was captured by the pencil and the paintbrush—not the push of a “send” button. More specifically, the beau monde will have a chance to celebrate the bright, beautiful, and baroque work of the late fashion illustrator Tony Viramontes, whose dreamy, theatrical drawings of iconic couture by the likes of Valentino, Chanel, Jean Paul Gaultier, and Dior, among others, came to define the high-fashion ideal of the 1980s. Now, for the first time since his death in 1988, Viramontes’


visual genius will be on full display in a comprehensive monograph of his oeuvre—Bold, Beautiful, and Damned: The World of 1980s Fashion Illustrator Tony Viramontes (Laurence King Publishing), by the British print dealer Dean Rhys Morgan. The book will be available for sale in September exclusively at Bergdorf Goodman, which is also devoting its windows for the month to the artist’s work. And, for anyone wishing to own a piece of iconic fashion history, 1stdibs.com is offering an exclusive online sale of 25 original Viramontes fashion illustrations and portraits, as well as a dozen of his in-the-moment Polaroids, which offer a rare and intimate snapshot into the high-flying world of ’80s fashion. When Viramontes came onto the scene in the late 1970s, his hard and direct style was a marked contrast to the prevailing soft-pastel school of fashion illustration. Though different, his style was by no means a hindrance; in fact, it might have been just what the world was waiting for, and anticipating. He got his start in 1979 at The New York Times and was greeted with

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This page: A 1988 portrait of Rene Russo, whose allure and charisma spoke directly to the illustrator’s imagination, and who would come to define the epitome of Viramontes’ ideal female beauty. > Opposite page: A brigade of Halstonettes model Halston knitwear for Tony Viramontes in 1983. Halston’s clean, fluid style of dressing had become a trademark of the languid jet set and of the denizens of Studio 54.

immediate success. Soon, he was being commissioned by fashion bibles in both the United States and Europe, for the kinds of placements that were normally devoted to photographers. From Lei and Per Lui in Italy to Vogue in the United States, from The Face in Britain to Jill, Marie Claire, and Le Monde in France, editors descended. And so his brilliant—if too brief— career was off to a dazzling start, though it would often (if not always) be overshadowed by his friend and mentor, Antonio Lopez, with whom he shared “a certain street sensibility,” as Rhys Morgan describes it in his introduction to the book.


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This page: Illustration of an off-the-peg suit from the 1983 Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche collection. Saint Laurent’s innovative and rebellious color combinations frequently brought out the best in Viramontes. > Opposite page: An unusually conservative ensemble by Versace is laid down with Viramontes’ signature confidence and brushwork in this drawing for the April 1984 issue of Vanity.

Apart from editorial, Viramontes also worked on the ad campaigns for the reigning elite in fashion, including Yves Saint Laurent, Valentino, Versace, Chanel, Perry Ellis, Claude Montana, and Rochas cosmetics. Jean Paul Gaultier, who contributes the foreword to the book, describes Viramontes as “a shooting star who was able to unite in a single image several diverse elements: photos redrawn or highlighted in marker pen (a genre that he initiated and went on to pioneer), illustration, collage, design, graphics and finally FASHION.” Unlike many other artists and photographers, according to Gaultier, Viramontes “really loved, adored and worshipped fashion!” Perhaps this is why his influence and style have, for Gaultier, left their mark not just on the period, but on fashion more generally. Viramontes was also an exemplary portraitist; among the iconic women he drew were Paloma Picasso, Rene Russo, and Diana Ross. It’s almost as if he had been led to them from his early teens, when he began to cast for and create his own pantheon of female beauty—those whose allure and charisma spoke directly to his imagination. His striking images are of strong, dominant, aggressive, yet feminine women, and sensuous men, all smoldering and smokyeyed, vibrating with New Wave energy. Tony Viramontes was possessed of great artistic potential, but he died, during the height of the AIDS crisis, in 1988 at the age of only 33. And though we might wonder what could have been had he lived, we’re lucky to have Rhys Morgan, who enthusiastically and undauntedly unearthed and reconstructed the visual Viramontes legacy, which, shimmering brightly to this day, remains a powerful voice from an overpowering moment in fashion history. u

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Black It’s sleek. It’s sexy. And it never goes out of style. This season, black lured audiences in with its infectious appeal and suprising savvy.

Fall Fashions A l e x R . T ra v e r s

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Elizabeth Meigher Co u r te sy o f re sp e ct i ve d e si g ne r s

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Calvin Klein Collection

E l i e Ta h a r i

Blumarine

Balenciaga

Y i g a l A z ro u ĂŤ l

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Ti m o We i l a n d Nina Ricci

Red We just can’t take our eyes off of it. The color’s sanguine complexion—no matter the shade—worked wonders this season, for both day and

Acne Studios

P o u s t ov i t

P h o t0 Cre di t

evening looks.


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Balenciaga

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White Pure. Simple. Elegant. Still, with all its qualities,

allure can’t be beat. Here are some looks from

Balenciaga

white’s timeless

the Fall and Resort seasons that held

Te m p e r l e y Lo n d o n

Proenza Schouler

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Blue The best part about this invigorating color is its ability to pop. This season, we saw several shades of blue, and count ourselves as fans

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Pink This season,

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designers took the cutesy color and spun it into something magical. We dare you not to fall in love with the couture dress on Sasha Luss, pictured here.

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The New Look In the 1950s, Christian Dior cinched waists and flared skirts, giving them trumpet hemlines. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

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glad itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back.


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Bally

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Marc Jacobs

Cushnie et Ochs

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Hervé Léger by Max Azria

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Streamlined Whether cut into short slips or full-length columns, these body-hugging looks went flying down the runways, blowing our minds.

C a r o l i n a H e r re ra

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Magnificent Obsessions by

As an Italian—well, as a person who is one eighth Italian, but can gesticulate with the best of them—I identify with the Italian culture. (My yacht, which I have yet to purchase, will be docked at Porto Fino instead of Saint Tropez.) To me, Italy emphasizes the experience, whether that means relishing an hour at the Brunello Cucinelli store on Madison Avenue (or the factory in Solomeo) or a hearty meal with my 18 cousins (and lots and lots of bread). Perhaps, it’s the “experience” of

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Elizabeth Quinn Brown

Persol—the Italian brand of eyewear crafted, by hand, over the course of 30 steps—that resonates with my spirito. It’s about exquisiteness, not efficiency. And the product, a pair of vintage-inspired shades that won’t ever be passé, speaks to such a tradition. Persol was established in Turin, Italy, in 1917, when Giuseppe Ratti, a photographer and owner of Berry Opticians, crafted a pair of “protector” glasses, which were designed for


Co u r te sy o f Un i ve r sa l S tud i o s L i c en si n g, LLC .

Co u r te sy o f M GM Me di a L i c e n si n g, Un i te d A r ti s ts, Th e Ko ba l C o lle c ti o n at Ar t;

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This page: Johnny Depp captured Hunter S. Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (above); Persols, with signature detailing (below). > Opposite page: Faye Dunaway and Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair.


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P h ot of e s t; Co u r t es y o f Je a n n i n e O p pe w a ll; C o ur t e sy o f MG M M e di a Li c e n s i ng , Th e a do ra Van Runkle

oration, and this exhibition, with its emphasis on the brilliant work and fascinating process of a wide range of crafts, including acting, costume design, cinematography, editing, production, design, and sound design, as well as directing, reveals the essential link between meticulous and yes, obsessive, crafstmanship and artistic originality,” says David Schwartz, chief curator of the Museum of the Moving Image in New York. On display through November 10 are props created by production designer Jeannine Oppewall for Catch Me If You Can, including Leonardo DiCaprio’s character’s conterfeit Harvard University diploma; notebooks with scribbles from Jennifer Connelly as she prepared for her role in Requiem for a Dream; and original sketches by Theadora Van Runkle, costume designer for Bonnie and Clyde and The Thomas Crown Affair, both starring Faye Dunaway. Really, the exhibition is as rich— culturally and otherwise—as a vacation to Italy. Well, almost. u

Ca tc h Me i f Yo u C a n © DW Stu di o s, LLC . , All R i g h ts Re s e r ve d; Co ur te s y o f Para m o un t Pi c tu re s ,

pilots with rounded, rubber-lined lenses and an elastic instead of arms. By 1924, the eyewear was comprised of 41 parts requiring 43 operations for assembly. The brand was named in 1938—a derivation of “per il sole” which translates from Italian to “for the sun”—and, soon, the “Arrow” (the detail on the arms) and the “Maflecto” (the system of cylinders on the arms that give the glasses a flexibility) were introduced as signature. Years (and 35-plus patents) later, Persol opened a boutique on Rodeo Drive in 1991, choosing Los Angeles to host its brick-and-mortar debut. And the brand continues to show an appreciation for California—who wouldn’t, given a history of support from shiny, shiny stars like Greta Garbo and Steve McQueen?—with “Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship in Film.” The exhibition, which opened in 2011, shows examples of cinema that echo the passion that exists within the world of Persol. “In filmmaking, craftsmanship is expressed through collab-


A ca de m y o f M o ti o n P i ct ure A r t s a n d Sc i e n c e; Co ur te s y o f Ti c To c k Stu di o s

Co u r t e sy o f MG M Me di a L i c e ns i n g C o re co lle cti o n , Ma rgare t H e r r i ck L i bra r y,

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This page, clockwise from top left: Theadora Van Runkle designed the costumes for Faye Dunaway in The Thomas Crown Affair; Jennifer Connelly, who starred in Requiem for a Dream; pairs of Persols. > Opposite page, clockwise from top left: A sketch by Van Runkle; Jeannine Oppewall was the production designer for Catch Me If You Can; a sketch by Oppewall.


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This page: A sleeveless dress with peplum bodice from Wes Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Resort collection. > Opposite: An ivory compact fitted wool jacket with gold medallion and fitted wool flare pant from the Fall 2013 collec-

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tion shown at Gramercy Theater.


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A look from the Fall 2013 presentation at Gramercy Theatre; Wes Gordon in his Manhattan studio (inset). > Opposite: Five looks, including Gordon’s

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favorite camisole dress with trumpet hemline, from Resort 2014.

Wes Gordon always knew he wanted to be a designer. “I think at the same time I wanted to be a designer, I wanted to start my own collection,” he says. From the time he showed his first capsule collection in a hotel room during a blizzard, he managed to start working with some great stores. This September will mark his ninth collection—and first runway show—under the Wes Gordon name. Anyone who has followed Wes Gordon’s career could sensibly agree that now is the perfect time to take the step into runway. “When you start off you don’t know the right ways to do things, but you also don’t know the wrong ways to do things, so you kind of figure out your own voice a little bit,” he tells me. This could be one reason he threw himself into the challenge of creating his own collection at such a young age. I met Gordon for the first time in his Manhattan studio, a medium-sized space on Nassau Street, just south of City Hall Park. The neighborhood isn’t typically a legendary staging post for young designers. But it appeals to Gordon, who I sense does not want be like everybody else. As a student, Gordon went to London to study at Central Saint Martins. “I read biographies of designers who went to Central Saint Martins,” he says. “I didn’t know anything about it, but I knew I had to go there.” The school is one of the world’s FA L L 2 0 1 3 /

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leading centers for art and design education, and counts Alexander McQueen, Phoebe Philo, and Riccardo Tisci as graduates. In a place that breeds creativity, I ask him if it was hard to stand out. “If you want to do anything in London that stands out,” he says, “you have to be the craziest; you have to be the boldest; you have to be the wildest.” This youthful enthusiasm may have been the catalyst for his success in art school. “It’s so fun to have that opportunity to spend time in a place where there aren’t really rules,” he recounts. “You’re not thinking about restrictions, you’re just thinking about, ‘Let’s try this; let’s do this,’ and that’s very much—in a lot of ways—the spirit of London.” Many of the stories Gordon tells about London relate to the city’s ability to nurture young talent. But, as an American, he knew he wanted come to New York to start his company. All of Gordon’s garments are made in New York. “The resources are incredible here,” he beams. “The Garment District has skyscrapers full of buildings that are cutting button holes and making zippers.” Gordon seems very aware of what’s around him, and is well-known in fashion circles for using luxe, one-of-a-kind fabrics. I ask him about one of his dresses I saw the week before made from a material called scuba: Unlike neoprene, which is heavy and stiff—“They’re like armor,” he says, referring to jackets and dresses made out of the stuff—scuba is lightweight, a stretched polyester that is “more like Spanx.” Clearly he is quite drawn to the fabric. “We’ve been doing it [scuba] for three seasons now. We get it from one mill in Italy, then it goes to another mill in Italy to be printed.” An assistant named Remy brings over a yellow-and-white jacket from the Resort collection made out of the material. “This is scuba. It’s much lighter. It’s easier to wear, so we do a fitted dress with it—and ladies love it,” he grins. When I ask Gordon about the ladies he would most like to dress, there is no hesitation in his response. “It’s always Cate Blanchette.” Still, he can include the first lady as a fan. I look at him curiously when he tells me how he found out about Mrs. Obama wearing his jacket. “Michelle Obama wearing a metallic houndstooth jacket,” he pretends to read from a Twitter app on his phone. “I’m like, what?! We made a metallic houndstooth jacket. Sure enough I start looking at pictures, and it was so amazing. So cool. Very cool.” As a designer, Wes Gordon is true to himself. And for his most recent 2014 resort collection, he did one of his favorite things. He created a dress—a gorgeous navy-blue camisole number in a stretch silk-cotton blend with trumpet hemline—that was clean, simple, and timeless. “Really pretty,” he responds to my compliment. “That’s my favorite dress.” u


This page: A look, using ostrich feathers and embroidered tulle, from Wes Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Resort 2014 collection. > Opposite: A lace top from the Fall 2013 collection, which model Hilary Rhoda wore in May 2013 to the Costume Insti-

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tute Ball at the Met.

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This page, left to right: David Hemmings in a scene fom Blow-Up, 1966; Jean Shrimpton, circa 1965. Photo by David Montgomery; > Opposite: Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey for Vogue, 1962.

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Above, clockwise begining at upper left: Jean Shrimpton & Terence Stamp, London, 1963, by Terry O’Neill; David Hemmings and Veruschka in a scene from Blow-Up, 1966; Jean Shrimpton wearing pearls and knitwear for a David Bailey shoot in 1965; Jean Shrimpton and boyfriend Terence Stamp photographed by David Bailey at Heathrow Airport in 1965; Jean Shrimpton by Richard Avedon, 1969; Penelope Tree by Richard Avedon, 1967; Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up (1966); > Opposite: Veruschka in a scene from Blow-Up, 1966.


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It all began in 1960 when Jean Shrimpton was working with photographer Brian Duffy in a studio neighboring David Bailey’s. Bailey was working for British Vogue at the time, and quickly took a shine to Shrimpton (who could blame him, as she’s arguably one of fashion’s most beautiful models). Bailey booked the budding model for a slew of jobs, also marking the beginning of their four-year relationship that lasted through 1964. When describing Shrimpton, Bailey recounts, “she was magic and the camera loved her too. In a way she was the cheapest model in the world­—you only needed to shoot half a roll of film and then you had it. She had the knack of having her hand in the right place, she knew where the light was, she was just a natural.” When Bailey met Shrimpton he was still relatively new to the fashion world; and the 18-year-old Shrimpton, a recent graduate of the Lucie Clayton Modelling School, was, she remembers, “as green as a spring salad.” London was experiencing a period of optimism and hedonism, and a cultural revolution that brought upon the catch phrase: “Swinging London.” The ultra-cool couple’s first 14-page spread for British Vogue was such a hit with readers that the magazine decided to send the pair to Manhattan, a city also undergoing its own fashion, musical and cultural transition. This movement was later labeled the “Youthquake” by none other than American Vogue Editor-in-Chief Diana Vreeland. With no hair or makeup artist, Bailey and Shrimpton were instructed to shoot mid-priced British fashions against the New York cityscape. Instead, equipped with just a camera and an old teddy bear, the duo roamed Manhattan’s grittier side, combining raw street photography with fashion and art. The pair created “Young Idea Goes West,” a portfolio for British Vogue that includes endless iconic images of Jean Shrimpton, aka “The Shrimp.” Thin and misty-eyed, wandering the streets of Manhattan in the latest fashions, while carrying the sad teddy bear, Shrimpton leans against parking signs and peruses local haunts from the Harlem ghettos to the impoverished Lower East Side. “Young Idea Goes West,” was published in the April, 1962 issue of British Vogue. These revolutionary photos captured people’s attention, namely that of American Vogue Editor-in-Chief Diana Vreeland. In the spring of 1963, Vreeland summed the 25-year-old artist and his 20-year-old girlfriend to her office. “It was pissing bloody rain and we couldn’t get a taxi so we had to walk,” Bailey later recalled of their fateful meeting with fashion’s most powerful editor. “Jean was crying the whole way, saying, ‘We can’t meet Diana Vreeland like this. We look like a couple of drowned rats.’ ” When they finally made it to her office (which was, in Bailey’s words, a “magic cave—all dark, with leopard-print carpet, red-lacquer walls, and Rigaud candles”), Vreeland caught sight of the pair and cried, “Stop! They are adorable. The English have arrived!” In a matter of weeks he was shooting covers for the magazine, and within a year David Bailey—and The Shrimp—were an international sensation. FA L L 2 0 1 3 /

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This page, clockwise: Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey, 1963; Jean Shrimpton for Yardley advertisement, 1960’s; David Bailey proof sheets of The Beatles, 1965; Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey; Sue Murray by David Bailey; Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey, 1961; Shrimpton by Jeanloup Seiff for Harper’s Bazaar, 1964; Jane Birkin and John Barry by David Bailey, 1960’s.

Bailey’s ascent at Vogue was meteoric. At the height of his productivity, Bailey shot 800 pages of Vogue editorial in a single year. Penelope Tree, a former girlfriend, described him as “the king lion on the Savannah: incredibly attractive, with a dangerous vibe. He was the electricity, the brightest, most powerful, most talented, most energetic force at the magazine.” American Vogue’s creative director Grace Coddington, who was also a model at that time, remembers “It was the Sixties, it was a raving time, and Bailey was unbelievably good-looking. He was everything that you wanted him to be – like the Beatles but accessible – and when he went on the market everyone went in. We were all killing ourselves to be his model, although he hooked up with Jean Shrimpton pretty quickly.” Bailey was the first person behind the lens, at least in Britain, to become as desired and as distinguished as the rock stars, models and movie icons he photographed. Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni even made a film, Blow-Up, based on David Bailey’s life, although Bailey was never particularly happy with the choice of David Hemmings to play the role of the magnetic young photographer. “I don’t know why they didn’t use Terence Stamp. He was less of a sissy than Hemmings, and at least he was from the East End like me... I saw it in New York in one of those cinemas across the street from Bloomingdale’s with Catherine Deneuve,” Bailey told Vogue in 1999; “Actually, I thought it was a bit silly.” The mythological coolness of a David Bailey photograph is rooted in the “Swinging London” scene of the early 1960’s,-a youth-oriented phenomenon that emphasized the new and the modern—it was more than just mini skirts and music, it was

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This page, clockwise: Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey, 1961; Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey for Vogue UK, 1968; Sue Murray by David Bailey for Vogue, 1965; Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey 1960’s; Jean Shrimpton, box of pin-ups series, 1965, photo by David Bailey; Jean Shrimpton and Marie Lise Gres, photo by David Bailey, 1961; Jean Shrimpton in Dior by David Bailey, Vogue, 1963; Mick Jagger by David Bailey, 1964; Shrimpton and Bailey by Terry O’Neill, ‘60’s.


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a cultural revolution. The “Swinging London” vibe was best reflected in a project entitled David Bailey’s Box Of Pin-Ups, published in 1964: a box of poster-prints of 1960’s celebrities including Terence Stamp, The Beatles, Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, PJ Proby, Cecil Beaton, Rudolf Nureyev, Andy Warhol and the notorious East End gangsters the Kray twins. The box was a rare and unique commercial release, revealing the changing status of the photographer as one who could sell a collection of prints in this manner. (Opposition to the presence of the Kray twins from fellow photographer Lord Snowdon was the primary reason that an American edition of the “Box” never appeared, nor a British second edition issued.) The recent sale for a copy of David Bailey’s Box Of Pin-Ups is reported at “north of £20,000.” Along with Terence Donovan and Brian Duffy, David Bailey captured the 1960’s Youthquake that evolved from Swinging London-- a culture of fashion and celebrity chic. These three photographers mixed with actors, musicians and royalty, and ultimately found themselves elevated to iconic status, or as Norman Parkinson dubbed them: “the Black Trinity.” u


Above, left to right: Veruschka and David Hemmings in Blow-Up, 1966; Jean Shrimpton by David Bailey, 1964; > Opposite: Jean Shrimpton photographed in 1965.

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On July 23, L-Atitudeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the far-flung fashion e-commerce site featuring clothing, jewelry, and accessories sourced from 10 destinations and 150 designers, artisans, concept stores, and hotelsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; hosted a garden party at the High Line Hotel in New York. Guests gathered beneath a Rajasthani tent to toast the Resort 2014 collection, which showcases pieces like embroidered kaftans, embellished straw totes, antique jewelry, and Babouche slippers. Among the faces perched on Moroccan poufs or wearing bindis were Meredith Melling Burke, Jennifer Creel, Sabine Heller, Mara Hoffman, and Genevieve Jones.

1. Amanda Sheppard and Eugenia Miranda 2. Atmosphere 3. Vishna Subick 4. Eva Vai 5. Stephanie Nelson, Serena Merriman, and Chessy Slater 6. Tim Monaghan and Sarah Winters 7. Samantha Lopez-Edwards 8. Jessica Joffe 9. Anastaisa Rogers and Melanie Berliet

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Fitch’s Corner

On July 21, the Fitch’s Corner Horse Trials Spectator Luncheon celebrated its 20th anniversary in Millbrook, New York. The event was hosted by Fernanda Kellogg, Kirk Henckels, and Fernanda Gilligan and sponsored by Fresh Gourmet, Houlihan Lawrence, and J.McLaughlin. This year, Barbara and Donald Tober were presented with the Fitch’s Corner Award for philanthropic support as “their love of horses is manifested in their unwavering support of the Millbrook equestrian community and also at Yellow Frame Farm, home for many retired show horses.”

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1. A group of girls 2. Sam Allen, Meredith Travers, and Chris Spitzmiller 3. Atmosphere 4. Friends 5. Kirk Henckels and Fernanda Kellogg 6. Alexandra Kasmin 7. Chrissy Gaffney and Jennifer Oken 8. Libet Johnson and Cece Cord 9. Boyd Martin with Emily Hottensen and Fernanda Kellogg 10. Irina Erickson 11. Elizabeth Binder and Nilani Trent

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Beverly Hills On June 26, the West Coast Friends of the

Costume Institute honored Andrew Bolton at a dinner hosted by Susan Casden and Lizzie Tisch at the Beverly Hills Hotel. It’s one of my favorite events of the year, apart from the Party of the Year,” said Bolton to Women’s Wear Daily, referring to the annual Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. “We knew the [‘Punk: Chaos to Couture’] show would generate some controversy, though I wish there wasn’t quite so much. But punk provokes a lot of emotions. I myself think it was quite a romantic movement.”

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1. Michael Ostrow, Heather Mnuchin and Roger Stoker 2. Jacqui Getty and Crystal Lourd 3. Kate Mulleavy and Laura Mulleavy 4. Lizzie Tisch 5. Angelique Soave and Susan Casden 6. Aaron Fox 7. Harold Koda 8. Monique Lhuillier and Cameron Silver 9. Ina Treciokas

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Clinique hosted its “Dramatically Different” party to celebrate the brand’s iconic moisturizer—recently reformulated after 45 years. For decades, the product has been a favorite of leading ladies—East Coast and West Coast—craving a healthy glow. Emily VanCamp, the actress who embodies the fresh-faced aesthetic of Clinique, spoke about beauty saying that her icon was Audrey Hepburn and that her life could have been “dramatically different” had she continued to pursue a career in ballet. Also in attendance were Kelly Bensimon, Brendan Fallis, Stacy Keibler, Amy Sacco, and Stefano Tonchi.

1. Izak Zenou 2. Emily Weiss and Sofia Barrenechea 4. Annabelle Dexter-Jones 5. Amy Astley 6. Katie Schecter, Ava Rose, and Hannah Bronfman 7. Selita Ebanks 8. Rachel Roy 9. William Lauder, Anna Wintour, and Fabrizio Freda 10. Emily VanCamp

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Oh, Fourth of July weekend in the Hamptonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I wish I knew how to quit you... On July 5, Ben Watts hosted the 11th annual Shark Attack Sounds at the Montauk Yacht Club with co-hosts Jeffrey Jah and Mazdack Rassi. The young and the guest list departed New York, bypassing towns like East Hampton and Southampton for the tip of Long Island: Montauk. The MilkMade.com-sponsored event attracted thousands, including Annie Georgia Greenberg, Nur Khan, and Steven Rojas. Given the success of Shark Attack Sounds, I think we can agree that, at this point, #Shhh is sort of moot...

1. Jessica Hart 2. A reveler 3. Jenne Lombardo, Athena Calderone, and Chelsea Leyland 4. Alessandra Codinha 5. Jeffrey Jah, Theophilus London, and Ben Watts 6. Liz Prutting, Meaghan Burke, Chau Prutting and Alexandra Lanci 7. Samuel Deutsch and Natalie Obradovich

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1. JACQUELINE DE RIBES was a beauty, and a constant on best-dressed list after best-dressed list. 2. ERNO LASZLO The Phormula 3-9 Eye Repair firms and stimulates circulation; $175. 3. LUSH The Ocean Salt Facial Scrub mimics a day at the beach, plus a splash of lime and vodka; $35.95. 4. BLISS The Triple-Oxygen Ex-“glow”-sion Vitabead-Infused Moisture Cream provides a boost of radiance with ingredients like micro-algae; $64. 5. JURLIQUE A blend of extracts from a variety of roses, a bottle of Rosewater Balancing Mist Intense Deluxe Edition contains 10,000 petals; $60. 6. DAVINES The OI/Shampoo delivers shine and softness with roucou oil, which is richer than carrots in beta-carotene; $26. 7. EMINENCE The Hungarian company’s Clear Skin Probiotic Cleanser, with ingredients like yogurt, addresses acne-prone skin in a revolutionary way; available at Kimara Ahnert (212.452.4252). 8. ORIBE Soft Dry Conditioner Spray—the counterpart to the brand’s Dry Texturizing Spray—absorbs oil while softening your strands; $35.


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may not be as fresh-faced at 39 as she was when she started modeling at 14, but then there’s makeup... 2. FLOWER Drew Barrymore’s collection of cosmetics includes a rainbow-y range of lacquers; $4.98. 3. MAKE UP FOR EVER The brand debuts a collection of 76 brushes, for everything from make-up application to body painting. 4. CLARINS The Crayon Kohl is available in eight shades of long-lasting pencil; $25. 5. DEBORAH LIPPMANN The Fall 2013 collection, “Jewel Heist,” shines like a diamond with varnishes like Fake It ’Til You Make It; $19. 6. TOPSHOP The Lip Bullet guarantees color that’s as bold as its name, pictured in Rockabilly; $16. 7. FRESH Pucker up for fall with the Sugar lip treament in a festive, flirty color like Berry; $22.50. 8. CHANEL This season, Les 4 Ombres is available in Mystère with shadows of Golden Khaki, Golden Ivory, Silver Taupe, and Matte Khaki; $59. 9. CLÉ DE PEAU The Shiseido-owned company’s first foray into fragrance, the Rose Synactif Eau de Parfum; $300. 1. KATE MOSS

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1 Autumn evenings signal a return to the social circuit. When dressing up for the season’s black-tie events, look to the classically elegant for inspiration—then turn to trusted designers to achieve the perfect look. 1. AUDREY HEPBURN wore one of the most famous black dresses in history, by Givenchy, for the opening scene of Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The original dress was deemed too short by the studio’s standards, so Paramount had Edith Head redesign and lengthen the bottom. While floor-length is always safe, Q also believes in showing a little leg when the dress is right. 2. FABERGÉ Émotion ring in 18-kt. yellow gold, pink and white diamonds, sapphires, tourmalines, and spinels. Price upon request. 3. LELA ROSE Boatneck draped dress with full skirt in ivory and fuschia. $1,695. 4. ELIE SAAB Royal purple sleeveless round-neck satin-back crêpe and silk Georgette long dress with peplum waist. Price upon request. 5. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Crystal minaudière. Price upon request.

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1. BRIGITTE BARDOT was once crowned the “most beautiful woman in the world,” and her beauty and fashion sense were immitated across the globe. Though she shocked the establishment by wearing a mere mini skirt to the Élysée Palace, she could also be counted on to dress to the nines. 2. BOTTEGA VENETA Just one look, and you’ll know why the Watteau Intreccio Impero Ayers Stretch Knot is a masterpiece of design and artisanal craftsmanship. $1,750. 3. MANOLO BLAHNIK Keep it simple with ordered chaos: Manolo Blahnik’s rose Chaos heel is a perfect fit. $725. 4. VALENTINO Valentino’s embroidered stone gown from Fall/Winter 2013 conjures a sense of European romance. $33,000. 5. ASPREY With a nod to the brand’s floral heritage, Asprey’s jewelry designers have created the Daisy Heritage Earrings. Each daisy has a yellow brilliant-cut diamond at the center and is surrounded by individually set marquisecut diamonds in platinum to form the petals. Price upon request.

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1. AVA GARDNER was the ultimate sex symbol of the 1940s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s. She intrigued us from the start in film noir pictures like Whistle Stop and The Killers. She had a confident sense of style both in person and onscreen, favoring sexy gowns and luxe accessories. This season, when glamour calls, channel your inner Ava with a beautifully draped dress, leg-friendly heel, and luxurious accessories of your own. 2. JUDITH RIPKA The Allegria cuff in 18-kt. gold with guava chalcedony, pink tourmalines, and white diamonds. $23,000. 3. RALPH LAUREN Bordeaux suede cage sandal from Ralph Lauren Collection. $750. 4. MARCHESA Silver dropped-shoulder gown with tulle-draped sleeves and floral embroidery. $9,950. 5. IVANKA TRUMP The Patras earrings with aquamarine and diamonds in 18-kt. white gold are named after the Greek city and represent a reinvention of the artistic design of the Art Deco era, which was boldly influenced by Greek culture and history.

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has always embraced her exotic looks with an equally exotic sense of style. She never shies away from her confident curves or dramatic facial features; in fact, she tends to draw attention to them and enhance them. This fall, why not call attention to yourself in bold diamonds and sapphires, a gold-laced clutch, or a vibrant red dress of your own? 2. JIMMY CHOO The Cloud clutch in lemon lace and metallic mirror leather is infused with feminine elegance. $1,695. 3. TIFFANY & CO. The Tiffany fringe necklace of round and baguette diamonds in platinum, from the American luxury jewelry brand’s 2013 Blue Book Collection. Price upon request. 4. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG From the woman who gave us the little wrap dress comes the perfect red dress for evening: Diane von Furstenberg’s red silk Chopette dress ($645), paired with von Furstenberg’s Devon heels in beet ($398). 5. HARRY WINSTON Sunset by Harry Winston, a sapphire and diamond ring with 18.51-ct. cushion-cut sapphire and baguette diamonds totalling 1.25 carats, set in platinum. Price upon request. 1. SOPHIA LOREN

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SHOPPING INDEX

> Bentley: bentleymotors.com. > Bergdorf Goodman: 888.774.2424 or bergdorfgoodman.com. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Bottega Veneta: 212.371.5511 or bottegaveneta.com. > Bulgari: 800.BVLGARI or bulgari.com. > Burberry Prorsum: 877.217.4085 or burberry.com.

C > Calvin Klein: 866.513.0513 or calvinklein.com. > Carmen Marc Valvo: carmenmarcvalvo.com. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Cartier: 212.446.3400 or cartier.com. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Christian Dior: 212.249.5822 or dior.com. > Christian Louboutin: 212.396.1884 or christianlouboutin.com. > Cindy Chao: cindychao.com. > Cire Trudon: ciretrudon.com. > Coach: 800.444.3611 or coach.com. > Cynthia Vincent: 646.707.3830 or cynthiavincent.net.

D Romy Schneider, or “the ideal woman” as Coco Chanel once called her, had an unforgettable face and exquisite taste when it came to fashion. To help you on the journey toward a fashion sense of your own, we’ve compiled a listing of all the vendors featured in this issue, along with some of our go-to favorites. In between shopping, be sure to keep up with Quest and Q online for the latest fashion news: visit questmag.com and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/questmag.

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SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP! A

> David Webb: 942 Madison Ave., 212.421.3030. > David Yurman: 877.908.1177 or davidyurman.com. > de Grisogono: 212.439.4220 or degrisogono.com. > Diane von Furstenberg: dvf.com.

> Altuzarra: altuzarra.com.

> diptyque: 971 Madison Ave., 212.879.3330.

> Asprey: 212.688.1811 or asprey.com.

> DKNY: dkny.com.

> Assouline: 212.989.6769 or www.assouline.com.

> Dolce & Gabbana: 212.249.4100 or

> Autodromo: autodromo.com.

dolceandgabbana.com.

B

E

> Baccarat: us.baccarat.com.

> Elie Saab: eliesaab.com.

> Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com.

> Elie Tahari: elietahari.com.

> Belstaff: 814 Madison Ave., 212.897.1880.

> Elva Fields: 502.354.0415 shop.elvafields.com.


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

SHOPPING INDEX

> Emilio Pucci: emiliopucci.com.

L

R

> Etro: 212.317.9096 or www.etro.it.

> Lalique: 888.488.2580 or lalique.com.

> rag & bone: 866.509.3695 or rag-bone.com.

> Lanvin: 646.439.0381 or lanvin.com.

> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or ralphlauren.com.

> Lela Rose: 212.947.9204 or lelarose.com.

> Rebecca Taylor: 888.485.6738 or

> Longchamp: longchamp.com.

rebeccataylor.com.

> Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

> Reem Acra: 730 Fifth Ave., Suite 205, 212.308.8760.

> Love, Alex: lovealex.com.

> Roberto Coin: At Neiman Marcus or Roberto Coin,

F > Fabergé: 694 Madison Ave., 646.559.8848.

G > GANT: 646.367.5416 or us.gant.com.

800.853.5958 and us.robertocoin.com.

> Ghurka: ghurka.com.

M

> Giorgio Armani: 877.361.1176 or armani.com.

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or

> Gold & Gray: 818.621.8657 or goldandgray.com.

manoloblahnik.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue,

S

and marchesa.com.

> Saint Laurent Paris: 212.832.7100 or ysl.com.

> Mark Cross: markcross1845.com.

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> H. Stern: hstern.net.

> Marni: 212.343.3912 or marni.com.

saksfifthavenue.com.

> Hanro: hanrousa.com.

> Max Mara: 212.879.6100 or maxmara.com.

> Salvatore Ferragamo: ferragamo.com.

> Harry Winston: harrywinston.com.

> Michael Bastian: At Bergdorf Goodman, Barneys New

> Shoshanna: At Saks Fifth Avenue, saks.com.

> Havaianas: us.havaianas.com.

York, or michaelbastiannyc.com.

> Smythson: 212.265.4573 or smythson.com.

> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

> Michael Kors: 800.908.1157 or michaelkors.com.

> Stella McCartney: stellamccartney.com.

> Mikimoto: 800.223.4008 or mikimotoamerica.com.

> Stuart Weitzman: 212.823.9560 or

> Miriam Haskell: 212.764.3332 or

www.stuartweitzman.com.

H

I

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or rogervivier.com. > Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX or rolex.com.

> Indian Bazaar: shoplatitude.com.

miriamhaskell.com.

> Irene Neuwirth: At Jeffrey New York,

> Miu Miu: miumiu.com.

T

212.206.1272.

> Monique Lhuillier: moniquelhuillier.com.

> Tiffany & Co.: 561.659.6090 or tiffany.com.

> Ivanka Trump: ivankatrump.com.

J

N

> Timothy Oulton: timothyoulton.com. > Tod’s: 650 Madison Ave.,

> Nancy Gonzalez: At Neiman Marcus or

212.644.5945, or tods.com.

> J.Crew: 800.562.0258 or jcrew.com.

nancygonzalez.com.

> Tom Ford: 212.359.0300 or tomford.com.

> Jennifer Meyer: At Barneys New York.

> Neiman Marcus: 800.533.1312 or

> Tory Burch: toryburch.com.

> Jil Sander: jilsander.com.

neimanmarcus.com.

> Jimmy Choo: 866.JCHOO.US

V

or jimmychoo.com.

O

> John Galliano: johngalliano.com.

> Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or

> Judith Ripka: judithripka.com.

oscardelarenta.com.

K

P

> Kara Ross: kararossny.com.

> Perrin Paris: 987 Madison Ave., 212.585.1893.

> Kendall Conrad: kendallconraddesign.com.

> Porsche Design: porsche-design.com.

Y

> KOTUR: koturltd.com.

> Prada: 888.977.1900 or prada.com.

> Yigal Azrouël: 212.929.7525 or

> Kuboraum: kuboraum.com.

> Puiforcat: puiforcat.com.

yigal-azrouel.com.

> Valentino: 212.772.6969 or valentino.com. > Versace: 888.721.7219 or versace.com.

W > Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E

FA L L H O R O S C O P E S

Q112

Capricorn Dec. 22 to Jan. 19 To everything (turn, turn, turn), there is a season (turn, turn, turn)... This season, everything is love. Single? You won’t be, after an evening at Doubles. Not single? An afternoon of apple picking can add some spice—and some spiced cider—to your relationship. > Garnet ring by David Yurman

Cancer June 21 to July 22

Aquarius Jan. 20 to Feb. 18 You say that you’re drowning, but don’t be dramatic—drama is for sorority sisters and, well, Amanda Bynes. Whatever the hiccup, be it personal or professional, pick up a hobby like baking or pilates and just keep swimming, just keep swimming... > Amethyst brooch by Tiffany & Co.

Leo July 23 to Aug. 23 Recently, you’re more comfortable—nay, confident—in your skin, thanks to hours at Equinox or Pure Yoga or SoulCycle. You’ve felt the burn and now it’s time to drop it like it’s hot, which (according to the stars) means getting gussied up for a girls night out. Two words: vodka soda. > Peridot earrings by Asprey

Pisces Feb. 19 to Mar. 20 So, you’re hoping to make a splash at Fashion Week? Q says splurge on that vintage or vintage-inspired item you’ve been eyeing. (And no, we’re not talking about overalls à la Man Repeller.) Think boxy bag (Mark Cross, y’all) or statement coat. > Aquamarine earrings by Asprey

Virgo Aug. 24 to Sept. 22 “Grr, baby, very grr” equals the way you feel. Spice up your love life with a visit to Agent Provocateur, whether you’re shopping for yourself or for your partner. Nothing says romance like a pink box with a black ribbon. (Except, maybe, a blue box with a white ribbon.) > Sapphire necklace by Tiffany & Co.

Aries Mar. 21 to Apr. 19 Put some pep in your step with a visit to the salon. (Q suggests Marie Robinson or Valery Joseph.) A whole new ’do can mean a whole new you, so add some bangs with your buck or experiment with highlights. Diamonds aren’t a girl’s best friend—stylists are. > Diamond brooch by Tiffany & Co.

Libra Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 Libra, it’s that time of the month, and we all know what that means... Party like it’s your birthday! So surround yourself with your best friends, several nice bottles of champagne, and smile! Any and all troubles will seem less daunting when you remind yourself what’s really important. > Tourmaline ring by Asprey

Taurus Apr. 20 to May 20 Don’t think of fall as an end to your summer fun, but rather a chance to rejolt your professional life. Reconnect with old friends and start going to all the new non-sandy places you have been reading about. Fall in N.Y.C. is merely Montauk with jeans, so be prepared to get weird. > Emerald earrings by Tiffany & Co.

Scorpio Oct. 23 to Nov. 21 Fall favors the bold, and you, dear Scorpio, are the boldest. It’s time to harvest the seeds you’ve been planting (personal and professional) and reap the rewards. Oh, and you heart your autumn birthday. Cadbury’s and ruffles and whisky for you—and your friends—to celebrate! > Topaz ring by David Yurman

Gemini May 21 to June 20

Sagittarius Nov. 22 to Dec. 21

If you were a wine, you’d be a rosé—something in the middle of red and white. You do your own thing, which makes you so, well, you! Sometimes (and this is one of those sometimes), you are best off being single and ready to mingle—take advantage! > Pearl ring by Tiffany & Co.

Always honest and affectionate, Sagittarius men and women are goal-driven individuals who are great at getting what they want (wink, wink). So, this fall, take advantage on that infectious charm that comes so natural to you—you’ll be surprised at the wonders it works. > Tanzanite earrings by Tiffany & Co.

/ FA L L 2 0 1 3

We get it, Cancer. You’re trying to redefine yourself. (Midlife crisis, much?) You can buy as many Porsches as you want—depending on your budget—but you can’t reclaim your youth. Grow up, and appreciate the age you are. Really, it’s a wonderful one for a million reasons. > Ruby necklace from Tiffany & Co.


A nEW GrEEnWICh rESIDEnCE, DESIGnED by WADIA ASSOCIATES.

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN ~ INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION ~ CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (203) 966-0048 ~ WADIAASSOCIATES.COM

SCAn TO SEE MOrE phOTOS Of ThIS AnD OThEr CuSTOM DESIGnED hOMES


Q Fall 2013  

Fall Classics

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