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Queen’s mourns loss of student Robert Nason B y C lare C lancy News Editor Robert Nason, a 21 year-old geography major, was found dead in a car outside his Division St. home. At 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night, Kingston Police Staff Sergeant Alex Forsyth said that very little information could be released. “I can verify there is an autopsy to be performed,” Forsyth said. As the Journal went to print last night, Constable Joanne Geikie

said police are unable to release any always shocking and always so sad.” more details. Chowdhury, ArtSci ’11, “It’s currently under said providing support to investigation,” she said, adding students is a priority. that she can’t say when more “The AMS is just making sure information will become available. that people have the available “I don’t have a time frame.” resources [through Health, AMS President Safiah Counselling and Disability Services, Chowdhury said the death of the University chaplain and the a student is upsetting for the peer support centre],” she said. whole University. “When everyone else [in the AMS] “The loss of a student at any found out they were similarly time is unfortunate news and shocked and saddened by it. We obviously impacts the community were discussing how this news is in a significant way,” she said. “It’s always so jarring.”

University Chaplain Brian Yealland said he’s in the process of organizing a memorial service for after reading week with those who knew Nason. “To have something local means anyone can attend,” he said. “Because we plan it ourselves … [it’s] very student-oriented. It is a chance to pay tribute to his life.” He said there will also probably be a funeral in Toronto in the coming days, but that the University is mainly focused on supporting Nason’s family and friends.

“They’re devastated. I don’t think there’s any other word for it.” Flags on campus have been lowered in memory of Nason. Anyone needing support is encouraged to contact Health, Counselling and Disability Services at 613-533-6000 x 78264 and/or University Chaplain Brian Yealland at 613-533-2186. —With files from Katherine Fernandez-Blance

T h u r s d ay , F e b r u a r y 1 7 , 2 0 11 — I s s u e 3 4

the journal

Q u e e n ’ s U n i v e r s i t y — C a n a da ’ s O l d e s t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r — S i n c e 1 8 7 3

The century mark

environment

Counting climate change

Inside free reading The second annual Freedom to Read week in Stuaffer Library explores literary censorship. Page 2

B y L abiba H aque Assistant News Editor Queen’s is on track to reduce its carbon footprint. An inventory of emissions for the May 2009 to April 2010 fiscal year was released last Friday Feb. 11 week. It revealed that the University reduced its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by nine per cent compared to the year before. The University’s GHG emissions total 55,658 tonnes of CO2e for 2009-10. Reduction of emissions was established as a goal in the University and College Presidents’ Climate Change Statement of Action for Canada. The agreement, which was signed by Principal Daniel Woolf last year, commits university presidents across from Canada to collaborate with local communities to reduce GHG emissions, develop measureable targets by using research and science and measure and assess university procedures. Queen’s Sustainability Manager Aaron Ball said that this was the second time Queen’s has done the inventory report as an effort to make information more accessible to the public. “This is a good thing because the upcoming provincial regulations will now require institutions over a certain GHG threshold to report their GHG,” he said, adding that the regulation will come into effect in the summer and that Queen’s passes the required threshold. Ball said the inventory report itself was organized into two scopes, which followed reporting guidelines established by the World Resource Institute. Scope one categorizes all direct emissions owned by the University. These include the central heating system, stationary combustion from the boilers, cogeneration plant, See It’s like on page 2

sit-down with Stackhouse The Journal talks to Globe and Mail Editor in Chief John Stackhouse about the future of print journalism. Page 3

good sport Exploring the value of campus athletics. Page 7

bilingual from birth The latest Theatre Kingston production brings actors from Montreal. Page 11

Photo By Rob Campbell

Gaels forward Nikola Misljencevic powers past the Laurentian defence in the Gaels’ overtime win against the Voyagers. The Gaels recorded back-to-back 100-plus point games for the first time in Gaels history.

Ams

Welcoming the AMS council B y C lare C lancy News Editor On Sunday night, AMS incoming executive confirmed their council choices for 2010-11. With 25 applicants for eight positions, it was a difficult hiring process, president-elect Morgan Campbell said. “By the end we really understood how many strong student leaders there are at Queen’s,” Campbell, ArtSci ’11, said. “There are a lot of

people who probably deserve to work full time for the AMS next year. Making our council is about picking who is going to bring the most varied perspectives to council next year.” The interview process had two rounds, she said. “The first round went for four days. At the end of every night we would come together and assess how everything had gone for that day,” she said. “The second round interview is a group simulation …

where we asked them questions and would break them into small groups [to answer].” Hiring council is a hugely important task, Campbell said. “You could say that hiring’s the most important decision you make all year,” she said. “It’s not just your vision you’re going to be acting on the whole year. It’s a vision every commissioner and director brings towards their portfolio.” Mira Dineen said as next year’s See Varied on page 5

shouldering the weight The Journal looks into the impact of veteran line Lawrance-Kenway-Ouellet. Page 16

rolling into the playoffs The women’s hockey team extends their six game winning streak. Page 16

zumba! Check out the new dance work-out craze. Page 20


news

2 •QUEENSJOURNAL.CA

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

LiterAtUre

Censorship discussed B y J eSSiCa F iSHBein Assistant News Editor For the second year in a row, Queen’s is celebrating Freedom to Read Week in order to raise awareness about issues surrounding censorship and freedom of expression. Natalie Colaiacovo, ArtSci ’11, read Anne Bronte’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall to a crowd of nearly 30 people in Stauffer Library on Feb. 15. She said that she chose to read from the book because of how controversial its subject matter was at the time of publication. “While it wasn’t officially banned or censored, the book was criticized for its portrayal of a strong independent woman, which was a no-no in the 19th century, and its realistic depiction of the power dynamics of marriage at the time,” Colaiacovo told the Journal in an email. “[People] thought that the book would encourage increased female independence. One critic asserted that ‘it was utterly unfit to be put in the hands of girls’.” She said that as an aspiring librarian, it’s important to understand how censorship works in order to avoid it. “While librarians are often thought to be associated with anti-censorship, in that they provide public access to a wide variety of books, they can often be guilty of the very censorship they’re trying to fight against even simply by letting their personal decisions

interfere with how they select books for their collection,” she said. “That’s why it’s great that Stauffer holds Freedom to Read Week … it encourages students to think about the role of the library in their education, what [they’re] reading and how they access it.” Freedom to Read Week and is organized annually by Canada’s Book and Periodical Council. Freedom to Read is in its 27th year. Individuals working in libraries across Canada volunteer to host Freedom to Read events at different locations. School of Graduate Studies Director Jeanette Parsons read The Golden Compass on Wednesday, to an audience of students, staff and faculty members. The book was featured last year as well. “This book wasn’t deemed appropriate for Catholic children, and was actually banned in many Catholic schools because it discussed atheism,” she said. Parsons, who also participated in Freedom to Read week last year, said it’s important to raise awareness about controversial issues. “We don’t necessarily live in a society where everything is free and open and it’s important to challenge assumptions that we do,” she said. “It’s about how choices of what to read are limited. When books are banned, as a parent I have to ask what does that mean for what my kid can read in school?” Other works read this week included

Freedom to Read week is celebrating its 27th year educating people about censorship in literature.

Photo By ChRIStINe BlaIS

Lives of Girls and Women by Alice “It’s important for people to hear texts. Munro, Beyond Vietnam by Martin Luther You may not agree with them, but you King Jr., and lyrics from the recently should have the freedom to read it,” she said. banned-on-Canadian radio Dire Straits’ song “As a library we are very anti-censorship. We ‘Money for Nothing.’ believe in people having the freedom to read Readings of these and other controversial and have control over the content of what works were held in Speaker’s Corner in they are reading.” Stauffer Library from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. from Tuesday until Thursday. Freedom To Read will conclude today with a Nathalie Soini, Learning Commons panel discussion with professor of education coordinator and Freedom to Read Elizabeth Lee, professor of English Laura Murray committee member, said that works are and history professor Barrington Walker. They deemed controversial if there has been any will be discussing changes made to Mark Twain’s discussion in the news to remove them classic Huckleberry Finn from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in Speaker’s Corner of Stauffer Library. from bookshelves.

‘It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle’ Continued from page 1

generators furnaces and kitchen equipment. These factors make the largest impact in the university’s GHG emissions and contribute to 64 per cent of the University’s carbon footprint. On the other hand, scope two contributes 34 per cent to the carbon footprint and measures all indirect emissions from the University’s purchased energy. This includes the electricity, heating and cooling in all leased spaces. Ball said the inventory takes into account main campus, west campus, the Queen’s Biological Station electricity consumption as well as university labs across Ontario.

However the inventory doesn’t factor in the Queen’s International Study Centre and research labs outside of Ontario. When making calculations for the inventory report the Sustainability Office uses information collected by other financial and utility reports. Ball said theses are primarily from the monthly utility data invoices, in which the inventory takes into account the consumption of the University. After the data is all collected, Ball said the numbers are then put into a calculator and turned into a carbon dioxide equivalent using established emission factors. “From a higher level it’s positive because we are measuring quite accurately. The fact that in a year we were able to reduce is

also positive and we’d like to build on that,” he said. Ball said that although new buildings like the Queen’s Centre, the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies building use more energy for central heating, other steps are being taken to combat these emissions. “This year we’ve also changed the fuel choice in our central heating plan,” he said, adding that the switch from number six oil to natural gas was made for financial reasons but has led to a cleaner GHG gas profile for per unit burned. There are many things that contribute to GHG emissions that are out of the control of the University, Ball said. “We had a very mild winter and summer,

which means that we are using less energy because it’s not as hot or cold outside,” he said. “That translates to less fuel being used.” Ball said the next step is to find alternatives to the central heating system and for the University to conduct research in ways to ensure longevity in decreasing their carbon footprint. “It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle. These plans often are for several years. This could easily be turned into a 30 or 40 year plan. We want to make sure that we have a long-term plan for the university and plan [something] for the University with lasting benefits,” he said.

www.Cityof Kingston.ca

Apply now for one of 190 jobs Licensed by the LLBO • GLUTEN FREE MENU ITEMS

Friday & Saturday

Summer employment with the City of Kingston can be a great way to develop employability skills by providing on-the-job learning opportunities. You can apply to become a Camp Supervisor, Golf Course Attendant, Travel Counselor or a Lifeguard which are just a few of the 190 summer positions (in 42 different job categories) the City of Kingston is now looking to fill. e available positions pay between $10.25 and $15 an hour.

Servin

Brea gst, Brunchk, fa and D Lunch seven da inner ys a w eek!

Contact our full-service catering department for your next meeting, party or event.

To be eligible, students must be attending a secondary or post-secondary educational institution full time during the day and be returning to full-time attendance in the fall of 2011. A complete listing of summer student jobs, job descriptions and information on how to apply can be found at cityofkingston.ca/studentjobs. All applications must be submitted by Wednesday, March 16 at 4:30 p.m. Qualified applicants will be contacted for an interview before June 30. Positions are subject to budget, approval and enrolment.


NEWS

2 •QUEENSJOURNAL.CA

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

LITERATURE

Censorship discussed B Y J ESSICA F ISHBEIN Assistant News Editor For the second year in a row, Queen’s is celebrating Freedom to Read Week in order to raise awareness about issues surrounding censorship and freedom of expression. Natalie Colaiacovo, ArtSci ’11, read Anne Bronte’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall to a crowd of nearly 30 people in Stauffer Library on Feb. 15. She said that she chose to read from the book because of how controversial its subject matter was at the time of publication. “While it wasn’t officially banned or censored, the book was criticized for its portrayal of a strong independent woman, which was a no-no in the 19th century, and its realistic depiction of the power dynamics of marriage at the time,” Colaiacovo told the Journal in an email. “[People] thought that the book would encourage increased female independence. One critic asserted that ‘it was utterly unfit to be put in the hands of girls’.” She said that as an aspiring librarian, it’s important to understand how censorship works in order to avoid it. “While librarians are often thought to be associated with anti-censorship, in that they provide public access to a wide variety of books, they can often be guilty of the very censorship they’re trying to fight against even simply by letting their personal decisions

interfere with how they select books for their collection,” she said. “That’s why it’s great that Stauffer holds Freedom to Read Week … it encourages students to think about the role of the library in their education, what [they’re] reading and how they access it.” Freedom to Read Week and is organized annually by Canada’s Book and Periodical Council. Freedom to Read is in its 27th year. Individuals working in libraries across Canada volunteer to host Freedom to Read events at different locations. School of Graduate Studies Director Jeanette Parsons read The Golden Compass on Wednesday, to an audience of students, staff and faculty members. The book was featured last year as well. “This book wasn’t deemed appropriate for Catholic children, and was actually banned in many Catholic schools because it discussed atheism,” she said. Parsons, who also participated in Freedom to Read week last year, said it’s important to raise awareness about controversial issues. “We don’t necessarily live in a society where everything is free and open and it’s important to challenge assumptions that we do,” she said. “It’s about how choices of what to read are limited. When books are banned, as a parent I have to ask what does that mean for what my kid can read in school?” Other works read this week included

Freedom to Read week is celebrating its 27th year educating people about censorship in literature.

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE BLAIS

Lives of Girls and Women by Alice “It’s important for people to hear texts. Munro, Beyond Vietnam by Martin Luther You may not agree with them, but you King Jr., and lyrics from the recently should have the freedom to read it,” she said. banned-on-Canadian radio Dire Straits’ song “As a library we are very anti-censorship. We ‘Money for Nothing.’ believe in people having the freedom to read Readings of these and other controversial and have control over the content of what works were held in Speaker’s Corner in they are reading.” Stauffer Library from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. from Tuesday until Thursday. Freedom To Read will conclude today with a Nathalie Soini, Learning Commons panel discussion with professor of education coordinator and Freedom to Read Elizabeth Lee, professor of English Laura Murray committee member, said that works are and history professor Barrington Walker. They deemed controversial if there has been any will be discussing changes made to Mark Twain’s discussion in the news to remove them classic Huckleberry Finn from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. in Speaker’s Corner of Stauffer Library. from bookshelves.

‘It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle’ Continued from page 1

generators furnaces and kitchen equipment. These factors make the largest impact in the university’s GHG emissions and contribute to 64 per cent of the University’s carbon footprint. On the other hand, scope two contributes 34 per cent to the carbon footprint and measures all indirect emissions from the University’s purchased energy. This includes the electricity, heating and cooling in all leased spaces. Ball said the inventory takes into account main campus, west campus, the Queen’s Biological Station electricity consumption as well as university labs across Ontario.

However the inventory doesn’t factor in the Queen’s International Study Centre and research labs outside of Ontario. When making calculations for the inventory report the Sustainability Office uses information collected by other financial and utility reports. Ball said theses are primarily from the monthly utility data invoices, in which the inventory takes into account the consumption of the University. After the data is all collected, Ball said the numbers are then put into a calculator and turned into a carbon dioxide equivalent using established emission factors. “From a higher level it’s positive because we are measuring quite accurately. The fact that in a year we were able to reduce is

Licensed by the LLBO • GLUTEN FREE MENU ITEMS

Friday & Saturday

Servin

Breakfagst Brunch, L , and D unch seven da inner ys a w eek!

Contact our full-service catering department for your next meeting, party or event.

also positive and we’d like to build on that,” he said. Ball said that although new buildings like the Queen’s Centre, the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies building use more energy for central heating, other steps are being taken to combat these emissions. “This year we’ve also changed the fuel choice in our central heating plan,” he said, adding that the switch from number six oil to natural gas was made for financial reasons but has led to a cleaner GHG gas profile for per unit burned. There are many things that contribute to GHG emissions that are out of the control of the University, Ball said. “We had a very mild winter and summer,

which means that we are using less energy because it’s not as hot or cold outside,” he said. “That translates to less fuel being used.” Ball said the next step is to find alternatives to the central heating system and for the University to conduct research in ways to ensure longevity in decreasing their carbon footprint. “It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle. These plans often are for several years. This could easily be turned into a 30 or 40 year plan. We want to make sure that we have a long-term plan for the university and plan [something] for the University with lasting benefits,” he said.


Thursday, February 17, 2011

queensjournal.ca

•3

Features Sit-down Series Photo by Justin Tang

Interview

Stackhouse on the future of print media In the second installment of the series, the Globe and Mail’s Editor in Chief sat down with the Journal’s editorial board to talk about the state of the newspaper industry B y Tyler B all Editor in Chief Late last week, the Journal editorial board jammed into our offices to hear one of this newspaper’s most prominent alumni speak. John Stackhouse, Comm ’85, spent almost two hours of his morning answering our questions about the future of journalism, breaking into the industry and day-to-day struggles one encounters while running one of the largest newspapers in Canada. He also spoke about his connection to Queen’s and how it influences his journalism. A Journal staff member asked Stackhouse about the Globe’s interest in covering Queen’s University. In September, leading up to Fauxcoming, the Globe ran a story entitled “Crackdown on partying at Queen’s threatens university’s raucus reputation” where the writer attempted to tie together Queen’s party culture, the Aberdeen Street party and non-academic discipline. Many felt that the article’s mention of expensive cars on Aberdeen St. and the death of Cameron Bruce was a show of bias against Queen’s. “I’ve got three nieces here and they all tore a strip off me for it,” Stackhouse said. “I’m sure there was a BMW on the street, I’m sure he didn’t make that up. That piece dove into clichés and ran with them more than it should have.” However, he said the Globe’s coverage of issues like Homecoming reflect its readership. “Queen’s wears a certain reputation, justified or not. It’s seen as an elite and elitist place and it’s envied by many,” he said. “This place has a wonderful spirit that no place in the country has. That spirit has to be contained, but also nurtured. It’s one of the reasons why smart people come here.” Stackhouse said he attended Fauxcoming this year to

Photos by Justin Tang

celebrate the 25th anniversary of his graduation. “One of my colleagues [and] his daughter, they were together at the football game,” he said. “You can’t buy that.” Stackhouse was Editor in Chief of the Journal for its 113th volume, from 1983-1984, overseeing the redesign of the paper from a shorter, stout compact to its current tabloid format. During his time at Queen’s, Stackhouse also worked at the Kingston Whig-Standard as a copy editor. He said it doesn’t matter where a budding journalist is working, but what editor they’re working for. “My best experiences were at the Whig-Standard,” he said. “Every day I was counselled on the art of newspapering. I worked along side a crazy old editor named Norris McDonald. I was a copy editor and I effectively became his assistant.” From there he went on to a summer job at the Toronto Star and the London Free Press and even considered making his exit from journalism before he began writing for the Financial Times. “I had a few jobs where I wasn’t learning a lot and then I got lucky and got hired at the Financial Times,” he said. “Suddenly I was back with fantastic editors who were keen on teaching me ... They were merciless, but I learned more in 18 months than I could have in years.” In 1991, Stackhouse joined

the Globe and Mail and worked for eight years as a foreign correspondent in India. He also covered East Timor’s struggle for independence from Indonesia, for which he won an Amnesty International Award. He said he stayed with the locals, partnering with a local journalist and exploring the countryside. “You just sleep where there’s shelter. I’ve stayed in barns, in huts,

in fields,” he said. “You rely on the courtesy of strangers. And you actually get better stories that way, staying with locals. Stackhouse said the disparity between rhetoric from government officials and what he experienced in the countryside taught him a valuable lesson. “[I learned to] test assumptions. When you hear someone say something as fact, is it fact or is it an assumption?” Back in Canada Stackhouse rose to Editor in Chief and begun the process of re-thinking the Globe. He said that in many markets, especially the UK, there’s a “race to free” between the major papers who are minimizing their expenses and lowering their costs to achieve financial stability. “We decided to go against the grain and invest in a higher quality publication,” he said. “Our focus is primarily 35 to 50 year-olds. We think they want to keep reading in print.” Stackhouse redesigned and rethought the newspaper to

target a higher-class audience. The Globe signed a $1.7 billion, 18-year contract with their printer Transcontinental, so that they could buy the presses required to print the new Globe. Physically, the paper is slightly narrower and two inches shorter, but the most striking attribute is the cover, printed on bright white and glossy stock. Stackhouse envisions a “daily pause” when readers will turn away from their distractions and make sense of “everything that has blown by them through digital media.” “We need to really emphasise what print can do well,” he said. “Let’s move up the quality, rather than down and charge more for it. It appears to be working. The Globe has since seen an increase in subscribers and at a session later that day in the JDUC, an audience member said that the redesign had

“saved the Globe” for their family. But Stackhouse is also seeing readers flocking to the Globe’s digital sources. He said the Globe may see mobile readership reach 100 million pageviews by the end of 2011, up from only a few hundred thousand a few years ago—before smart-phones were a commodity. Today the Globe struggles with readers’ 24-hour thirst for new information as much as any paper. Stackhouse said that in designing their new website they published a less-polished iteration and solicited feedback on how to improve it.

“One of the big challenges of digital media is that it’s imperfect for journalists,” he said. “We live in an age now where you launch, then perfect. In digital media you need to take a more chaotic approach, we all need to be more willing to take risks.” In addition to the redesign, Stackhouse said he’s planning on adding a new Globe headquarters to these risks. “I’ve been thinking about the newsroom,” he said. “We’re making a bet that there will still be a demand for writers and editors sitting together.” Currently the Globe staff are spread across two floors of a squat set of buildings west of Toronto’s downtown core. Stackhouse said he wants to squeeze his staff into a smaller space to encourage more collaboration. “It’s a challenge in every newspaper and you get these silos of sections,” he said. “For the new building I hope we can have half the space and cram everyone in.” Engagement is a struggle for any newspaper. Stackhouse said that some of the newer mediums are providing ways to engage more readers. “I encourage our journalists to find the channels that work best for them and their readers,” he said. “Some reporters are great at

social media but they feel that they have to legitimize themselves in the newspaper. Maybe the newspaper isn’t the best place for them.”

He said he foresees the rise of the “super-freelancer” in journalism, where a reporter’s story is a product sold to multiple media outlets. But for Stackhouse, being a successful journalist stems from two skills that can’t be taught: curiosity and hunger. “I’m not convinced that journalism schools are great value,” he said. “I don’t have an hour of journalism training. I don’t say that boastfully.” Stackhouse said that the Globe hires 20 to 30 people into the newsroom each year, but they can’t find enough valuable candidates. “It’s unfortunate that J-school is still the go-to place for hiring,” he said. “My editors pick up the phone and call Ryerson. “There’s limited downside because there’s more pre-selection ... I look to know more about people’s upbringing, their parents than their schooling. “You can’t teach curiosity and you really can’t teach hunger.” That hunger is what makes the difference between someone who gets the story and someone who loses it in the news cycle, he said. “What we do in some ways is no different than selling insurance,” Stackhouse said. “You make 100 phone calls to get two people to talk. One of them is going to give you the gold.” He also encouraged writers to ask “dumb questions,” consider different perspectives and to develop people skills that will help get the dirt. “The person on the other side of the tape recorder, they don’t owe you anything,” he said. “They don’t have to tell you the truth. One of the arts of reporting is to get people to tell you what they don’t want to.”


4 •queensjournal.ca

“The morale and mental fitness of our soldiers are my primary concern. I joined to make a difference in their lives. But the thanks I get from them, well, that’s made a difference in my life.” Captain CARRA WATSON

News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

« Ma première préoccupation va au moral et à la santé de nos militaires. C’est pour faire une différence dans leur vie que je me suis enrôlée. Pourtant, ce sont souvent leurs remerciements qui font une différence dans la mienne. » Capitaine CARRA WATSON


Thursday, February 17, 2011

News

queensjournal.ca

•5

Varied perspectives valued in incoming council

Hiring decisions for the incoming AMS council were made Sunday night. From left to right: David Sinkinson, T.K. Pritchard, Jeff Heenan, Mira Dineen, Gracie Goad, Stephen Pariser, Daniel Szczepanek and Mark Preston.

Pariser, ArtSci ’11, said. “Being the director of the [JDUC] and academic affairs commissioner, the Queen’s Centre gives me the she wants to get students more most knowledge of resources on campus …. that can really be of use involved in provincial politics. “I am really excited about the to the commission.” Mark Preston, incoming upcoming provincial election … it represents a great opportunity to commissioner of internal affairs, get students more involved in the said he wants to maintain the political process and to make sure success of his predecessors. “The [commission of internal student interests are represented in politicians’ platforms,” Dineen, affairs] is a diverse portfolio with ArtSci ’11, said, adding that elections, clubs, non-academic although she’s external to the AMS, discipline and assembly matters … she feels prepared for the position. [I want to] make a few progressive Dineen has been actively involved changes … [but] keep with the in Queen’s Health Outreach for status quo … my predecessors the past three years and recently have left me with a great office co-authored a book on poverty to work with,” Preston, ArtSci ’11 said. “This year I worked on the in Ontario. “I have experience doing policy judicial committee. After talking to analysis and policy and advocacy a lot of people … I know what it work, albeit in social justice not means to be a commissioner … and academic affairs … but I think I think I’m pretty well rounded to that has definitely prepared me,” do this position.” David Sinkinson, currently the she said. Incoming campus affairs Journal’s business manager, said commissioner Stephen Pariser said he wants to focus on issues like his experience in the commission the Aberdeen street party when has prepared him for his new role. he takes his position as municipal “I was already in the [campus affairs commissioner. “I’m going to have a very affairs commission] as an intern, a committee member, a committee aggressive campaign to reduce the chair and an OC in orientation number of students on Aberdeen. week … all those are really useful,” I want to see if really effective Continued from page 1

and consistent marketing can reduce the turnout at the event,” Sinkinson, ArtSci ’11, said. “I want Homecoming to come back in a few years. If we take a few steps now, obviously it will set us up for a better situation.” Incoming Social Issues Commissioner T.K. Pritchard said one priority is to increase outreach in residences regarding anti-oppression and other social issues. “That I’m really excited about because I feel like they’re kind of lacking,” Pritchard, ArtSci ’12, said. “I’ve talked to [administration] … about bringing in more programs for floor talks and workshops.” Pritchard, current chair of EQuIP, said the commission’s future depends on growing from the past. “I’m most excited to continue with the work that’s being done,” Pritchard said. “I feel like seeing how the [social issues commission has] been run over three years has really helped, seeing that growth has really helped.” Gracie Goad, hospitality and safety services director, said meeting with head managers this

Editors in Chief elected Last Thursday, Clare Clancy and Jake Edmiston were elected as the incoming Editors in Chief for Volume 139 of the Journal. Clancy and Edmiston ran uncontested and won with 21 votes of confidence and none against. 21 votes out of the 45 eligible voters were cast. “Earlier in the year I spoke to Clare, who wasn’t planning on

year has helped prepare her for her future role. “The head managers were a huge asset,” Goad, ArtSci ’11, said, adding that she wants to implement new transition manuals. Currently, Goad is an assistant manager (marketing) at the P&CC. “[I want to emphasize] the importance of on-the-go transition manuals so that it’s not as stressful for outgoing managers in March. It’d be more of a task oriented process … to help alleviate [managers’] stress,” she said. “I’m excited to get to know my management teams and see what vision they have in store for the services.” Incoming media services director Dan Szczepanek said he’s especially excited about two initiatives he hopes to implement next year. “I want to put together a lot more training resources for the staff across the media services so I’m going to reaching out to professionals, alumni over the summer time so we have regular seminars throughout the year,” Szczepanek, ArtSci ’11, said. “The second [initiative] is institutional memory … to ensure we have

PHOTO BY JUSTIN TANG

strong transitions year after year … I want to put together manuals.” Szczepanek said operational manuals, updated as the year progresses, would be created for each media service. This would ensure that when hiring happens in March, there is already a transition manual available for incoming managers. Currently, manuals are mainly left until the end of the year, he said. Jeff Heenan, incoming retail services director, said he’s most excited to work with Tricolour Outlet in his new role. “I’ve worked at P&CC for two years now. It’s been a really positive experience … I don’t have very much experience with tricolour outlet and that’s a really important service that has a lot of potential at Queen’s,” Heenan, ArtSci ’10, said. “I think definitely my experience this year as head manager of the P&CC [has most prepared me.] Obviously there’s a lot more that I have to learn stepping from that role into director but I think it will be a really good groundwork to build on.”

NEWS IN BRIEF coming back,” Edmiston said. “I said that if you want to come back to the Journal next year, we could do this together.” He said the pair hopes to bring in professional editors to train members of the editorial board during the summer session. “We’re excited to motivate,” he said, adding that they hope to bring their previous experience from various facets of the Journal to their editorship. Clancy, who is the current news

editor, said that the pair’s past experience at the Journal is an asset. “Jake and I both worked for the Journal for two volumes now and so coming back to be Editor in Chief was a logical step,” she said. Building on online presence is a priority for both editors, she said, adding that they hope to implement section Twitter accounts. Clancy said that the pair also plans to build on the redesign implemented this year. “We want to ensure that we have a smooth transition into the next volume,” she said. —Labiba Haque


6 •queensjournal.ca About The Journal

Editorial Board

The Journal’s Perspective

Editor in Chief

Tyler Ball

Managing Editor

Rachel Kuper Production Manager Leslie Yun

News Editor

Clare Clancy

Assistant News Editors

Katerine Fernandez-Blance Jessica Fishbein Labiba Haque

Features Editor

Editorials Editor

Jake Edmiston

Elias Da Silva-Powell

Editorial Cartoonist Dialogue Editor

Adam Zunder

Craig Draeger

Arts Editor

Ally Hall

Assistant Arts Editor

Alyssa Ashton

Sports Editor

Editorials

Kate Bascom

Assistant Sports Editor

Lauri Kytömaa

Postscript Editor

Kelly Loeper

Supplements Editor

Holly Tousignant

““

At best, any site bearing Massen’s name would face considerable stigma and at worst, serious and recurring vandalism.

Surly about surnames A

Globe and Mail article published Feb. 14 discussed the first legal challenge to a 113 year-old Japanese civil law that forces married couples to choose one surname for both partners. A group of Japanese citizens has filed a lawsuit claiming that the law is a violation of equality—although couples may choose to use the woman’s surname, custom dictates that the wife adopts her husband’s. Use of the female surname is limited to rare cases and instances of financial benefit. The UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women has labelled the existing law “discriminatory.” The Democratic party elected to power in 2009 promised to design legislation allowing for

separate surnames, but failed to push it through in the face of great conservative opposition. Married individuals must use their chosen surname in all official capacities, reserving their birth name for private use. There’s no reason to deny individuals the right to determine how they label themselves, or to force partners to decide which one of them must give up his or her name. Forcing this choice upon married couples also denies them the right to choose a third name or hyphenated name for any children they might have. Knowing someone’s name is a crucial part of staying in touch with and being able to find them and this is ever more pertinent in the age of the Internet.

It’s unsettling to consider the life-long consequences this law may have had on married individuals. One woman interviewed in the Globe article has been waiting 50 years for a change. She stated that she wants to pass away under her birth name, not that of her husband. This law also has the potential to seriously weaken existing partnerships. One couple, plaintiffs in the case, became so exhausted with the inconveniences posed by giving up a surname that they filed for a divorce and remained together. The Globe article indicates that high-profile economic issues may be pushing this concern to the background. It’s regrettable that a problem with such a simple solution is being pushed out of the spotlight.

Christine Blais

Assistant Photo Editor

Justin Tang Andrew Stokes Catherine Owsik

Web and Blogs Editor

Terra-Ann Arnone

Web Manager

Dianne Lalonde

Business Staff

Business Manager David Sinkinson

Advertising Manager

Tina You

Advertising Representatives

Carlee Duchesne Lianne Lew Jesse Weening

Staff

Writers and Photographers Elamin Abdelmahmoud Paul Bishop Rob Campbell Justin Chin Jaaron Collins Devin McDonald Balpreet Kukreja Parker Mott Dan Osborne Katie Pearce James Simpson Anand Srivastava Ron Yan

Contributors

Gilbert Coyle Lindsay Kline Emily Lowe Chris Lund Thursday, February 17, 2011 • Issue 34 • Volume 138 The Queen’s Journal is an editorially autonomous newspaper published by the Alma Mater Society of Queen’s University, Kingston. Editorial opinions expressed in the Journal are the sole responsibility of the Queen’s Journal Editorial Board, and are not necessarily those of the University, the AMS or their officers. Contents © 2011 by the Queen’s Journal; all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the Journal. The Queen’s Journal is printed on a Goss Community press by Performance Group of Companies in Smiths Falls, Ontario. Contributions from all members of the Queen’s and Kingston community are welcome. The Journal reserves the right to edit all submissions. Subscriptions are available for $120.00 per year (plus applicable taxes). Please address complaints and grievances to the Editors in Chief. Please direct editorial, advertising and circulation enquiries to: 190 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3P4 Telephone : 613-533-2800 (editorial) 613-533-6711 (advertising) Fax: 613-533-6728 Email: journal_editors@ams.queensu.ca The Journal Online: www.queensjournal.ca Circulation 6,000 Issue 35 of Volume 138 will be published on Friday, March 4, 2011.

social issues

Photography Editor

Copy Editors

Thursday, February 17, 2011

NEWS

An unnecessary cost

T

he town of Amherstburg, Ontario recently celebrated the opening of a recreation and sports centre. The opening of the multi-million dollar facility marked the end of a process that began in 2008, when the municipal government purchased property owned by a local resident, Jimmy Massen, on which to build the site. Massen returned a portion of the money he was paid in order to have naming rights on a road leading to the site and the scoreboard at a baseball diamond for disabled children. The town has now hit a public-relations disaster concerning the new building, after reporters discovered that Massen is a convicted sex offender. The 80 year-old pled guilty to one count of sexual touching and two counts of gross indecency in 1990, and served a year in prison. As the news began to circulate,

the local population organized a protest and insisted that the donation be rejected. The town has since announced that it will be returning Massen’s donation and revoking his naming rights. Whether or not Massen has served his time and atoned for his crimes, the City has made the correct decision. It isn’t that Massen should continue to be punished for his crimes, but simply that the consequences of his past bar him from certain actions. Naming a space after an individual makes a strong statement about the value of the contribution that individual has made to a community—a contribution that isn’t always limited to a bank statement. Massen’s actions had a permanent and negative impact on his victims, and putting his name on a public space—especially one intended for children—is

entirely inappropriate. The City has made serious mistakes by entering into this arrangement with Massen. The terms of the agreement are still unclear and it’s important to note that reneging on such a deal might have unpleasant consequences in the long-term. Individuals upset by Massen’s past would likely be equally upset to see the City paying him to settle a lawsuit. The slew of media attention focusing on this issue also raises other issues if the city wanted to move forward on their arrangement with Massen. While many might have been previously unaware of his crimes, it’s unlikely that is still the case. At best, any site bearing Massen’s name would face considerable stigma and at worst, serious and recurring vandalism.

Katherine Fernandez-Blance

I

Age of Rage

am enraged. Woe is me. We’ve all heard it, whether it’s through our own self-indulgent grumblings about life’s horrible cruelties, or from our housemates’ fits of anger and general despair, the rage is there and it can’t be tamed. Verbal spewing somehow has a similar effect to vomiting after a night of drinking; it’s nice to get it out, it’s nice to complain. But why do we think anyone cares? Empathy can only go so far, and after listening to people I do in fact hold near and dear to my heart babble on about how much everything sucks, I get bored, unsupportive and I mentally move on. There’s obviously a lot to complain about in the world. Any form of ‘ism,’ the blatant divide between the global South and the North, our politicians, our economy, Metro’s utter uselessness—the list goes on. An excuse frequently used by enraged citizens, myself included, that we say justifies our anger, is that it’s a realistic way at looking at things. I’m not promoting ignorance, but mental longevity. Being angry takes time and mental energy. It’s annoying for everyone around you, and while it clearly serves some form of evolutionary function, it’s not always the most practical of emotions. Anger is great for the short term, and for issues deeper than a burned pizza, being late to class and a bad mark on a quiz, anger in the long-term en masse has potential to bring about change. Revolutions don’t occur with people fully content and happy with their situations, they thrive on anger, but anger with a goal and with an optimistic outlook to the future. Optimism is hard, but it isn’t without its benefits. While it may be more enjoyable to scream at the top of your lungs about how much you hate everything, how angry you are and how much the world sucks, your throat eventually dries up and you are forced to stop shouting, perhaps one of life’s cruel tricks. We have maybe 80 years to live. There’s plenty of time and reason for anger and complaining, and perhaps we are all destined to become bickering, grumpy and old men and women. While peppy over-done optimism is certainly as annoying as perpetual whining, there is a balance between the two, and in an inspired fit of happiness instead of my perpetual rage. Today, I’m looking at the glass half-full.


Friday, February 11, 2011

DIALOGUE

Perspectives from the Queen’s community

queensjournal.ca

““

If you truly believe that Queen’s has a special and unique spirit ... prove it.

athletics

We need to value our campus athletics

•7

Talking Heads ... around campus Photos By Craig Draeger

What are you doing over reading week?

Perhaps we should look to American universities as a model of athlete appreciation

of them all—the random team vs. Western game. It’s a contest that usually draws an unimpressive crowd, and those that do come are Boggle fans who flip letters around on t-shirts in an effort to be provocative. Wuck C hris L und , A rt S ci ’11 Festern? This is getting silly. There are a lot of sports being You know those moments, the ones overlooked here. Rugby, basketball, where there are so few people in a volleyball, hockey and many others room you stick out like a lightning play in front of brutal crowds made rod? I do, and I’ve got a great up mostly of parents, a fair portion of whom come to support the example of it. On a clear fall morning, myself visiting team. Why aren’t these and a few others headed to teams supported by students? Every third person on campus Richardson Stadium to watch our beloved Queen’s Gaels fight for an seems to own some sort of tricolour 8-7 win over the less-than-stellar rugby shirt, yet few people walk over to Kingston Field to watch McMaster Marauders. It was a game of defence, one of the best rugby programs in injuries and the infamous rouge—a the country go to work. We can watch hockey classics great way to spend an afternoon like Florida vs. Phoenix on TSN in Kingston. The thing is, there were maybe and think nothing of it, but we 150 of us to perform the Oil Thigh won’t take a five minute walk to at the end of the game. As I’m sure the Memorial Centre to check out you know, the Oil Thigh only starts a free game—one with talented sounding really cool once you hit players and real rivalries. How many of you watched the more than 200 people, and we World Cup? Now, how many of need to discuss this fact. We try to make football a big you took in a game featuring our part of orientation week, where the women’s soccer team, this year’s confused frosh pose questions to national champions? There are always theories their Gaels and Dons like, “are we on how Queen’s can be more yellow or red?” True story. Equally important is the effective at getting students in the Homecoming game, where stands—it even came as a topic up everybody attends the first half, in the recent AMS elections. But watches the engineering students up until now, most “grassroots” rush the field, complains about the efforts—initiated by the AMS or otherwise—simply miss the mark. weather and then leaves. If only there was somewhere Then there’s the crown jewel

we could look to see what works the Gaels are going to play in front and what doesn’t; perhaps then we of crowds for once, we need to change our expectations. could fix the problem. We have one of the oldest Turns out, there’s a athletics programs in the country. whole country. Like it or not, the US does It’s time to take some pride in university sports right. My heart it. 2010-11 was a big step in the “Shinny, school, beers.” swells with envy every time right direction. The Frosh Week I turn on the television to find pep rally gave all first-years a crash Nicholas Fulford, ArtSci ’12 a 100,000-seat football stadium course in Queen’s Athletics. The fact they knew we were packed to the rafters with “the team in yellow” is miles ahead student fans. Think I’m exaggerating? Look of the level of understanding up the ‘earthquake game’ to see displayed in years past. Similarly, this year’s newcomers how Louisiana State University fans registered on the Richter scale. attended more sporting events What compels students in than in years past. Ideally, these America to support their teams first-years who came to games— with such zeal while Queen’s and left thoroughly entertained— students spend their Saturdays will now tell their frosh in “Sleep and homework.” September, continuing the cycle doing anything else? It’s certainly not because and expanding the fanbase. Matt Mills, ArtSci ’11 Some argue that Queen’s they have better incentive programs—they need to pay is already better than most Canadian schools when it for tickets! Rather, in my view, they comes to attendance, and that’s appreciate their athletes because it’s absolutely true. However, when asked what the culture of their campus to do so. Why do over 100,000 Michigan they love most about Queen’s, fans pack The Big House every most students respond immediately Saturday, even when their team with “the spirit” and argue that is awful? They’ve been doing it it’s better than our rivals across the country. since 1927. “Going to Vegas for the first time.” If it’s true that the Queen’s Why do Duke fans camp overnight to get basketball tickets? student spirit is greater and more John Arlick, Comm ’11 vibrant than the one demonstrated They’ve been doing it since 1906. Why does Utah State superfan at other schools, we shouldn’t settle Wild Bill dress up like Mrs. Potts for being marginally better than from Beauty and the Beast (among Western or Toronto. We should set other outfits) and dance around the standard. If you truly believe that Queen’s at basketball games? I don’t know, has a special and unique spirit, do but I’m sure he has a reason. The fact of the matter is that if something for me. Prove it.

“Going home and seeing my little cousins.”

Talking Points Panel

The CRTC and usage-based billing

Andriana Hnatykiw, ArtSci ’13

The unfolding story of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), third-party internet providers and usage-based billing has yet to write its final chapter as our panelists weigh in on the dispute

Our nationality is based on freedom, so let’s preserve it

D an O sborne , A rt S ci ’12 They should really call the CRTC the un-Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, because the body erodes what Sir Wilfred Laurier claimed was the basis of our nationality—freedom. The government, through the CRTC, imposes upon the people of Canada a variety of measures to protect large, established producers at the expense of consumers and small businesses. Much has been made about

the cost of transmitting data and the large profits that established telecommunications providers would make off of the new mandate for usage-based billing; some estimates suggest that the cost of a gigabyte should be less than a cent, as opposed to the $2 or so charged. It’s truly a pity that the CRTC eliminated the possibility for Canadian consumers to pay less for better quality Internet access by suffocating freedom of commerce. It’s nearly impossible for a new telecommunications company to start up in modern Canada because of the dearth of regulation and approval required by the CRTC. As we all know from ECON 110, competition drives down costs and increases innovation. If you’re anyone other

than a big firm like Bell, you would probably support it. Real life supports the assertion—the countries that have the lowest costs for the best Internet service are consistently the countries with the most openness to competition in the telecommunications sector. South Korea has an uncounted number of Internet service providers providing the fastest Internet in the world for some of the lowest real prices. Unfortunately, some have suggested we worsen Canada’s lack of competition. They would have us consider the Internet as a human right (rather like my human right to have an espresso right now). Not only is such a right incompatible with the conception of liberty that characterises the

Anglo-sphere, but it propounds the belief that the government should provide Internet access to some segment of the population. Canadians who don’t have Internet access either don’t want it or can’t afford it precisely because of the government’s elimination of competition for established providers. If we truly want to provide high quality and low cost Internet access to all Canadians, we should emulate the South Koreans and the Swedes and eliminate barriers to competition and to foreign capital injections. We need to become Canadians again, remembering the words of Laurier, that Canada’s nationality is freedom—freedom for individuals to have a choice in Internet service providers, even if those firms don’t yet exist.

“Going to the Dominican Republic.” Mazen Shehada, Sci ’11

“Party on both ends, and homework in the middle.” Margaret Frith, ArtSci ’12

Have your say. Write a letter or visit

queensjournal.ca to comment.


8 •queensjournal.ca

Thursday, december 2, 2010

Mandate public ownership of the Internet Loosen the CRTC’s grip on controversial even to the most a crown corporation could ardent of neo-cons. the actions serve the public good, like the the broadband market of the CrtC would have done promotion of net neutrality, while d eVin M C d OnALd , A rt s Ci ’13 the good thing about the crises in public institutions, at least for me, is the allowance it gives me to ponder the existential worthiness of said institution. the CrtC’s seemingly wanton disregard for common sense in their recent internet billing ruling gives me appetite to dissect hits value. the current circumstance we find ourselves in is demonstrative of the failure of the CrtC to adequately serve the public good. i would like to remind the CrtC that corporations are not ends in themselves but rather tools through which we may produce public goods—specifically, the promotion of market competitiveness. this idea isn’t particularly

little or nothing to promote the public good. all they would have achieved is the stunting of market competitiveness in favour of corporative interest. the proposed bandwidth caps and subsequent overage rates would not serve to lower the price of the internet access for light users, it would only result in exorbitant rates for those of us who are heavy users—a percentage of the population which will only increase as services such as Netflix become more ubiquitous. if the government was to announce today that it was going to privatize electricity there would be much public outcry. a service such as electricity is a disaster to privatize, as that would require the multiplication of infrastructure to provide true “free market” competition. internet service is little different. Providing the internet by the same means we provide electricity is an option that ought to be considered.

running on a profit-driven model to sustain efficiency. there seems to be a tendency to require that, as a society, we either identify as fully capitalist or else communist. this mode of thinking provides little room for weighing the advantages of public ownership on a case-by-case basis. internet access is a service for which public ownership is a justified proposition.

Every week, Journal Dialogue brings together members of the Queen’s community to discuss events of the day and try to find solutions to some pressing issues. See our March 4 edition for the panel’s take on issues of criminal justice.

J AMes s iMPsOn , A rt s Ci ’11 Let’s say you build a fantastically expensive playground. you set up a schedule where people can pay to access it. Furthermore, you also set up agreements where other companies can also sell access to the playground if they give you a portion of the proceeds. Because the playground you built was so cool, it’s now become very crowded. to be fair, you decide to allow people to access the playground for a few hours a day at the basic rate, but if they want to play there for longer they have to pay more. Now imagine a government agency decides to prevent you from asking the other companies you’re working with to limit their

customers’ access to the playground. Naturally, the heaviest users of the playground will migrate to the other companies, where they can use the playground just as much and not have to pay for it. is this fair to everyone involved? that story is analogous to the telecommunications system in ontario. Bell has built and owns the broadband network and sells access to third-party service providers. Due to limited bandwidth, they charge their own users fees if they use more bandwidth than is fair, but they can’t ask this of their third-party service providers. in other words, Bell gets the same amount of money for a person on their network who uses 5gB a month as they do for a teksavvy user who uses 500gB a month. obviously, the latter customer costs Bell more. the CrtC’s original decision was the right one, but they really shouldn’t have been involved in the first place. their involvement raises prices for small-scale users. the industry should be free to set their own prices. the broadband internet market doesn’t need to be as tightly regulated as it currently is.

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Friday, February 11, 2011

queensjournal.ca

•9

The media controls the debate

L indsAY K Line , A rt s Ci ’11 the media’s coverage of the original decision made by the CrtC regarding by-the-byte internet charges has been explicit with undertones of anger and dissent. this unhappiness has trickled into the hearts and minds of Canadian citizens who managed to force the CrtC back to the drawing board until March of this year. For me, this issue is indicative of the power the media has in making an otherwise trivial issue into a newsworthy and talked-about subject. Furthermore, minor issues like bandwidth caps that get our nation in a knot should be attributed to the reliance we have on the media instead of the government or the industry itself. the idea to cap bandwidth use in Canada would have greatly impacted news agencies and their ability to gain information in a cheap and easy way. thus, the degree to which this story was discussed is more

reflective of the self-interests of media organizations than the general interests of all Canadians. however, what’s interesting is the relationship between Canadian news organizations and internet providers. For example, Bell Canada is a shareholder in the globe and Mail. thus, when a controversial article appeared in the globe regarding the issue, Bell was quick to defend their motives in a letter to the editor. it received far less attention, but quieted the globe’s more opinionated stance. it seems the CtrC decision affected news and internet companies the most. yet, these affected groups chose to involve Canadians in their conversation, an unnecessary but smart move to get what they wanted in the end. all in all, the CrtC issue has spawned two issues. First, the effects of framing and agenda-setting in the media, and second that these manipulations ultimately determine what issues Canadians should and shouldn’t be concerned with. our pride and integrity as a developed nation is embedded in our national media, so i find it questionable that their choice of issues remains focused on the smaller topical issues than those that could really define us. CRTC Chairman Konrad von Finckenstein testified before the Commons industry committee on February 3.

SUPPLIED

The CRTC makes dumb decisions, but it helps preserve our culture

e LAMin A bdeLMAhMOud , A rt s Ci ’11 examining the last four weeks in news, i can think of three instances where the CrtC has come under criticism for a poor decision it’s taken. i won’t go into detail regarding

the nature of all of these decisions, but the panel discussed the CrtC’s decision to accept Bell Canada’s proposal to bill customers based on metered usage. i’m less concerned with this decision, and more concerned with the role the CrtC plays in Canada. i personally don’t have any problems with the Canadian Content regulations the CrtC imposes on media bodies. the production of cultural output is well acknowledged to be lower in Canada, and as such Canadian artists and producers

require a safeguard against the massive media production machine of the United states.

The CRTC plays an important role in protecting Aboriginal programming ... multiculturalism in broadcast content and bilingual diversity. that’s why it’s fitting that the CrtC reports to Parliament through the Minister of

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Canadian heritage. however, the CrtC’s attempts to intervene in the telecommunications market, in addition to being incorrect and ineffective, are usually misguided. these attempts are usually well-meaning and aimed at protecting the consumer. But what these interventions usually mean is pandering and acquiescence to the demands of major telecommunication companies who already have a chokehold on the market. the CrtC plays an

important role in protecting aboriginal programming (even if superficial, it’s still much-needed), multiculturalism in broadcast content and bilingual diversity. it also ensures the creativity and talent of Canadian media producers has a home. But when it comes to market decisions—instead of doing what major companies want—the CrtC should stay out of the picture. see what happens to Bell Canada if it wants to institute usage-based billing, or any other dumb decision.

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Thursday, December 2, 2010


Arts

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film review

The Company Men tells the tale of three men grappling with life after the 2010 economic crash

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Plutocratic people

B y P arker M ott Staff Writer Starring: Ben Affleck, Tommy Lee Jones and Chris Cooper Director: John Wells Writer: John Wells Duration: 104 minutes

 If the world loved 100-minute infomercials that were watered down and predictable, The Company Men would be the most powerful film of this or any other year. Hold on. You sense my caustic humour. This is not a terrible movie, just an irritating one. It’s

It’s clear the film’s fresh and confident director John Wells formerly worked in television as he brings a primetime edge to The Company Men.

like being let go, going to the bar afterwards and finding out all they had was water. Not good enough. It has all the parts there for a good movie. Strong leads (Chris Cooper, Ben Affleck, Tommy Lee Jones to name a few), a sympathetic and very sensitive context and a director, John Wells, who’s just

come off television. He’s fresh, confident and not spoiled by Hollywood yet. I liked how The Company Men does illustrate facets of sitcom: it’s incredibly nuanced and well-thought of as for themes. Through Bobby Walker’s (Affleck) story in particular, the film discusses the erosion of material goods and our wants to remain valuable. Of course, as Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps told us, these are desperate times requiring desperate measures. But I also enjoyed how that film showed the changing lanes of economy; how the recession was accompanied by technological advancement. The Company Men does not delve into the American economical edifice, it lingers in its own niche of expired themes we can read in the papers. The Company Men doesn’t look at simple men or common citizens. These are plutocrats; men who had

it easy, worked and had riches but now are nobodies. Without their jobs, who else were they and where do they belong? It’s a frightening thought. Maybe that’s why some choose to give up and others to give in. I wouldn’t say this is a moving movie, I’d say there are moving moments. When a character tries to defend his golf membership, we could scoff at his callous complaint or nod in recognition that it hurts anyone who loses their pride. When one is having an affair with another, we can call it cliché or we can call it the way of the world: just another man trying to stay alive in the economy. It ends badly for him. None of these guys really make it. The company men accompany each other in failure, but the movie associates. I was not exactly bored just vexed by the tedious montages of Bobby helping his blue-collar brother-in-law (Kevin Costner) that

supplied

felt like a crass infomercial. The episodic flow is repetitive, unremarkable and disconcerting. And you know you are in trouble when the final shot is a nice-comfy pan away from the happiness and out into that crazy world out there. It only worked in Babel. The Company Men is just water. It explores some themes, does it adroitly, but fails to be important, just self-important. When Affleck reassures his son he will get it all back, you don’t get teary, you get that warm and underwhelming taste of ‘generic.’ Then it becomes all sitcom, American optimism through the ages and a final product that begs to be downsized. The Company Men plays at the Screening Room starting Feb. 25, see moviesinkingston.com for ticket times.


16 •queensjournal.ca

Thursday, February 17, 2011

sports Feature

The unsung heroes of hockey Veterans helped carry an injury-plagued Gaels to the postseason B y L auri Kytömaa Assistant Sports Editor At the start of the season the men’s hockey team looked like a group headlined by newcomers. Just a year before, first-year forwards Payton Liske, Jordan Mirwaldt and Joey Derochie exploded into the OUA with big offensive numbers. Liske and Mirwaldt were leading OUA rookies with 40 points in 28 games, while Derochie was sixth potting 28 points in 26 games. The 2010-2011 rookies showed promise as well. Leading this year’s incoming class were Alexi Pianosi, an offensive-defenceman coming off a 50-point season in the Ontario Junior Hockey League and Jordan Soquila, a forward with 45-points in the British Columbia Hockey League. Lost in this influx of flashy players were several key veterans. Three players in particular had fallen under the radar: Jonathon

Lawrance, Scott Kenway and Brock Ouellet. Fourth-year captain Lawrance was one of only two older players to break the 20-point mark the previous season, as he quietly continued averaging over twenty points a season. Third-year forward Kenway PhotoS by JustiN TANG was second in scoring for the Gaels Jonthathon Lawrance (22), Scott Kenway (11) and Brock Ouellet (27), teammates of three in his rookie year, but a sophomore years found chemistry instantly. slump in which he only scored three goals hurt his confidence and the net; or at least that was the plan. the season. Payton Liske missed his Kenway said the group saw this first game on Oct. 23 and Jordan his visibility. Mirwaldt was quick to follow him Finally there was Ouellet, a as a chance to prove themselves. “We took it as a challenge at the on Nov. 6. With the loss of their third-year role player, who had been cut by the University of start of the year seeing that we first line, the Gaels hit a six-game AthLetes of Ottawa program before coming to were put as the third line,” he said. losing skid in November and the the Week Queen’s and had never collected “We thought we could contribute high hopes from the beginning of the season began to dim. more than seven points in a season. more than just a checking role.” The Journal talks to As the Gaels lost their primary An opportunity for more The trio was penciled in as basketball players Brittany the Gaels’ third line as the season responsibility came in a hurry as threats, Lawrance, Ouellet and Moore and Dan Bannister. Kenway were finding the back of opened in October. They were to injuries on the team mounted. Less than a month into the the net. 10 games into the season be the shutdown line; their job page 19 wasn’t to score but to stop the season three key forwards were the line already had 14 goals to other team’s top line. It would be missing games. The team lost their name. The pucks were going the young-guns on the top two third-year David Chubb to a in, particularly for Ouellet and lines that would put the pucks in long-term injury three games into Kenway, who had six and five goals respectively over that span. The production kept coming and head coach Brett Gibson was forced to Men’s Hockey expand the role of his third line. Ouellet said the line’s chemistry The men’s hockey team peaked early. extended their winning “Playing with Jonny Lawrance streak to four games and Kenway has been great,” he to close out the regular said. “We just kind of gelled early season against Ryerson on the season. We work together and Toronto. well as line on the cycle. When you play with two skilled guys like that, offence is going to come eventually. We learned each

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women’s hockey

Wins keep coming Gaels extend six game winning streak The men’s volleyball team will be at the ARC Saturday in the quarter-finals against the Warriors.

Photo by Justin Chin

Men’s Volleyball

Season ends on high note

The men’s volleyball team rebounds with win over Guelph B y G ilbert C oyle Contributor The men’s volleyball team wrapped up the regular season in style on Sunday, easily overcoming the Guelph Gryphons 26-24, 25-17 and 25-21. Outside hitter Joren Zeeman led the team in kills with 17. The win sees the Gaels end their regular season with a 16-4 record heading into the playoffs. On Saturday against the McMaster Marauders, Zeeman put up 23 kills, but the Gaels still

fell 25-19, 22-25, 25-20, 22-25, 9-15 to their rivals in a five-set heartbreaker. The loss allowed the Marauders to move ahead of the Gaels into second place, by virtue of the head-to-head tiebreaker. Coming off that tough loss, the Gaels demonstrated an impressive ability to bounce back from adversity and earn an important victory. The Gaels went into Sunday’s game against Guelph with both teams holding 15-4 records. Their resounding victory means that

the Gaels will begin the playoffs in third place and will avoid facing first-placed Western in the quarter-finals. Head coach Brenda Willis said that she was particularly impressed by her team’s ability to learn from their mistakes on Saturday. “Although the opponent was better yesterday, I thought that we made it a little bit easy for them,” she said. “We didn’t mix up our shots, and we got predictable on offence. Today, we focused on See Warriors on page 19

B y E mily L owe Contributor

and Liz Kench scored for Queen’s in the shootout. Goaltender Mel Dodd-Moher made both saves to The women’s hockey team secure the Gaels’ first shootout win entered last weekend hoping to of the season. Although it was a far cry from extend their season-high four game winning streak against the the decisive 6-1 and 4-1 wins of Toronto Varsity Blues and the the previous weekend, it was still York Lions in Kingston. The Gaels an important victory for the Gaels. “I don’t think it was the best were successful and finished off their regular season with two close hockey we’ve played this season wins against the Blues and the but we managed to squeak Lions, picking up a much needed out [the win],” said forward Kelsey Thomson. four points. The Gaels finished the season The game remained scoreless through 40 minutes until the Blues on a high note Sunday. With broke the deadlock 7:45 into the their win over the Lions, Queen’s third period, scoring shorthanded. ends the regular season on a The Gaels tied it up on the power six-game winning streak and with a play with less than three minutes 10-2 record since Christmas. to play on a goal from defenceman Forward Brittany McHaffie Shelby Aitcheson, sending the opened the scoring six minutes game to extra time. into the game and the Gaels After overtime solved nothing, never looked back. Conroy added veteran forwards Becky Conroy to the Gaels’ lead in the second See Gaels on page 18


SPORTS

Thursday, February 17, 2011

woMen’s Volleyball

Stumbling to the finish

The Gaels go 1-1 in their final weekend at home B y a NaND S riVaStaVa Staff Writer

Gryphons prevailed 17-25, 25-17, 12-25, 20-25. Gray lead the team with 10 kills while libero Shannon Walsh recorded a team-high The women’s volleyball team split the 12 digs in the loss. final two games of their regular season last As a result, Queen’s will travel to the weekend to finish third in the OUA East. The University of Ottawa on Feb. 19 to take on Gaels downed the McMaster Marauders the Gee-Gees in the OUA quarter-final. on Saturday before falling to the Guelph While the Marauders and Gryphons Gryphons on Sunday, finishing their season finished the year as the two top teams with a 12-7 record. in the OUA West, head coach Joely After falling behind early to McMaster, Christian-Macfarlane said she was outside hitters Natalie Fisher and Natalie disappointed to see her team drop the final Gray took over, each recording 17 kills game of the season to Guelph. and combining for 32 digs in the match “We didn’t come out with the same to lead Queen’s to a 25-27, 25-17, 25-19, intensity that we had played [against 25-16 victory. McMaster] with,” she said. “We played well The Gaels were unable to complete a in spurts but we didn’t play well from start second comeback the following day as the to finish.”

Beating the Marauders was no consolation for Christian-Macfarlane. Had the Gaels beaten the Gryphons, they would have finished second in the OUA East and would have hosted their quarter-final match-up at the ARC against the Gee-Gees. “Winning [against Guelph] would have allowed us to host the next round of play, so the [McMaster] game was a feel-good game but it doesn’t mean anything in the long run,” she said, adding that the team would have to improve their ability to battle on the court if they want to succeed in the playoffs. “We need to improve our ability to fight for every point and make every point important,” Christian-Macfarlane said. “There’s almost a sense of ‘we’ll get the next one,’ which is a great attitude but there should be a feeling that, ‘I want this one more than the next one.’ ”

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Gray, who led the team with 191 kills and 192 digs over the regular season, agreed with Christian-Macfarlane and said that the team needs to make some adjustments in practice before the playoffs. “Our passing was a little off,” Gray said. “We weren’t able to run the middle as much. We couldn’t open any seams for our outside hitters to swing in.” During the season the Gaels beat the Gee-Gees in straight sets at home on Nov. 20, but lost their match-up earlier this month in Ottawa 3-1. “Ottawa is a tough team and one of our biggest rivals,” Gray said. “We’re going to have to really prepare well this week to go there, walk in to their gym and beat them at home. “All that really matters now is if you win in the playoffs, so that’s what we’ve got to do.”

Photo by KAtiE PEARCE

The Gaels will be in Ottawa on Saturday to take on the Gee-Gees. Their regular season record stands at 1-1 with Queen’s sweeping Ottawa in straight sets in November.

THE JOURNAL WAnT TO WORK FOR THe JOURnAl neXT YeAR? Visit queensjournal.ca or drop into the Journal House at 190 University Ave. for applications for the following positions: • News Editor

• Photography Editor

• Assistant News Editors (3)

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• Assistant Features Editor • Editorials Editor • Dialogue Editor • Arts Editor • Assistant Arts Editor • Sports Editor • Assistant Sports Editor • PostScript Editor

• 17

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Applications to multiple positions will be accepted. Return completed applications to the Journal house or email to new_editors@ams.queensu.ca by March 11, 2011 at 4 p.m.


SPORTS

18 •queensjournal.ca

From third to first Continued from page 16

other’s tendencies.” The line saw little decline in their production as each player finished with a career year in points. Lawrance matched career highs in goals and points finishing with 10 and 25 respectively. Kenway finished with 10 goals and 10 assists to break his career highs for goals and points. Ouellet handily broke his own career bests in every category finishing with eight goals and 11 assists good for 19 points. For each player the season’s success came for different reasons. Lawrance’s consistency helped cement the line together. “He’s been the same every year. He’s never going to be a huge, huge scorer but probably a point a game,” Gibson said. “He’s so good defensively. It’s a cliché but if you have good defence the offence will come. If I described him he’d be the poor man’s Ryan Kesler; he doesn’t skate as well but he plays well in every zone of the game.” Lawrance’s maturity and leadership earned him the captain’s ‘C’ by his second year at Queen’s. Gibson said that Lawrance’s

leadership is the backbone of the team. “The minute Jon stepped in the room I knew he was going to be a captain. He is quiet but when he speaks people listen,” he said. “[Lawrance] is the face of our program. It’s not Mirwaldt, it’s not Liske. Where Jon goes, our team goes.” Unlike Lawrance, Kenway needed to reestablish his game after a poor second year. The pressures of a strong rookie season caught up to him. “He thought the second year was going to come easy. But when you lead a team in scoring one year, people are going to know who you are and give you more attention. It wasn’t there, he was doing things uncharacteristic, he just hit the reset button,” Gibson said. “[This year] he came in a determined Scott Kenway.” The most improved player by far was Brock Ouellet. Gibson said that when he first started recruiting Ouellet it wasn’t clear that he would even earn a place on the roster, but his character impressed the coach. “Once I met him, I knew right away that he cared more than anyone I had ever

recruited,” he said. Gibson’s decision to hang on to Ouellet paid big dividends. His success came from a new found self-belief. “Off the ice he has charisma and confidence but on the ice it was different,” Gibson said. “When you get cut from a team like Ottawa University it gets you thinking ‘am I that good?’ He skates at a pro level, his shot is real heavy, Brock got off to a good start. It was big for him.” Brock also brought a physicality that was uncharacteristic of his line mates. “He’s our most physical player. I wish I could have three more Brock Ouellets on our team. We are not an overly physical team, but Brock is a prototypical power forward,” Gibson said. The line’s individual successes brought the team to a 14-11-3 record and a fifth seed

Thursday, February 17, 2011 playoff berth. The 31 points for the team is fourth most of all time for the Gaels. In spite of all of the team’s injuries, the crew of Lawrance, Kenway and Ouellet worked, and the team found a way. Unfortunately the story hasn’t ended on the happiest of notes. On Friday against Ryerson Rams, Kenway tore his MCL and will miss the entirety of the playoffs. Ouellet is still struggling with his injury and is currently day-to-day hoping to keep playing in the postseason. “These guys carried us a long way this season. They started the year as my third line but they ended up being my first line,” Gibson said. “I’ve always said this league is about veteran players. Players need time to figure things out and the performance from these guys confirmed that.”

The Gaels will be at home Saturday facing the Lancers in the playoffs.

Photo by bALPREEt KuKREJA

Gaels ready for Lancers With attention placed on the production from the Kench-Conroy-Thomson line, period with a goal on the power play. Kench Thomson said the contributions by all three extended the lead to 3-0 at the end of the lines have given the team an edge and makes period with her eighth goal of the season. them more unpredictable. “When we have all three lines rolling, Goaltender Karissa Savage made 18 saves, [the other team] can’t match lines because leading the Gaels to a 3-1 win. After going 9-8-4 in the first three months they don’t know who is going to be scoring,” of the season, Thomson said the Gaels she said. wanted to change their play heading into the new year. “We wanted to focus on getting a lot more For an extended game story, wins,” said the Gaels’ leading scorer. “The visit queensjournal.ca 10-2 record [since Christmas] is something we want to carry into the playoffs.” Continued from page 16


SPORTS

Thursday, February 17, 2011

queensjournal.ca

ATHleTes OF THe WeeK

Dan Bannister Men’s Basketball

ACROSS 1 Oohs and Ñ 4 Doctrine 7 Elliptical 8 Loosen 10 Plant life 11 Howard and Isaac 13 Show great anxiety 16 Scoundrel 17 Bar trayful, maybe 18 Midafternoon, in a way 19 Antelope’s playmate 20 Letters for letters? 21 “Surprise Symphony” composer 23 Dissolves 25 Ginormous 26 On deck 27 Actress Thurman 28 “Hancock” star 30 Overseer at JFK or LAX 33 Vent one’s anger 36 Lack 37 Montana city 38 Cubic meter 39 Eye part 40 Commotion 41 Roman X DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 12 14 15 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 31 32 34 35

Earthenware pot Leading man? Sign up TV watchdog org. Missteps Adolescent Bro’s counterpart Prepare Easter eggs Last (Abbr.) Sticky, weatherwise Playing marbles Apportion (out) Show “Wha’d ya say?” Recess Tear to bits Subway Belong Red army? Candle count “Bye” Tempt

lAsT IssUe’s AnsWeRs

Brittany Moore Women’s Basketball

It’s in times of need that the best players show their true potential. As the women’s basketball team won against the York Lions and the Laurentian Voyageurs to clinch a playoff spot last weekend, Brittany Moore came up with back-to-back clutch performances. Moore, a fourth-year guard, had two strong offensive games, scoring 45 points over the course of the weekend. “[T]hose were two games that our team needed to win to secure a playoff spot,” she said. “I was really happy that, under pressure, our team was able to pull off those key wins.” Moore said patience was one of the keys to her success. “I focused on letting the game come to me rather than forcing anything,” she said. “I was good at looking for openings.” Still, Moore was quick to point out that her teammates played a big part in her standout weekend. “I was able to attack the net really well because of how we moved the ball on offence,” she said. “When my shot wasn’t working, we got the ball to the net.” With a playoff spot now in the bag, the Hannon, Ontario native is keen to see how far the team can go. “Everybody believes that we can make it far in our division,” she said. Moore said that the high-pressure atmosphere of last weekend helped prepare the team for the postseason. “Those two games were just like the playoff games that we’re going to experience,” she said. “We can go into the playoffs with a good momentum, on a bit of a run. I think we’re peaking at the right moment.” —Paul Bishop —Paul Bishop

In a less than perfect year for the Gaels, the men’s basketball team was able to end the regular season on a high note. With the team cruising to back-to-back wins over the York Lions and the Laurentian Voyageurs, guard Dan Bannister had a stellar weekend. The fourth-year philosophy major notched a total of 46 points over the course of the weekend. “I was getting lots of open shots, and I finally started hitting some,” he said. Friday’s blowout win against York was of particular importance for Bannister; his 32 points were a career high. He said that a lot of the success had to do with being in the right place at the right time. “My shot was just falling,” said the Newmarket native. “It felt like the basket was huge.” Having only scored 100-plus points six times in its 108-year-old history, the team had two consecutive triple-digit wins. “But we really gave it all we had, even though we’re out of the playoffs,” said Bannister of the 5-18 Gaels. “They were some pretty big wins for us.” With their season drawing to a close, Bannister remained upbeat about his team’s progress. “We can be positive about the fact that we came out last weekend and pulled it together,” he said. “It shows a lot of character.” The Gaels look to finish off their season in style Friday, as they face off against the RMC Paladins, a team without a single win this season. Despite this, Bannister said he doesn’t want to take his opponents lightly. “We plan to take it like any other game,” he said. “We need the win, so we can’t overlook them at all.”

• 19

Warriors travel to Queen’s Continued from page 16

more variance in individual shots, and more creative distribution of the ball. We just tried to be more unpredictable.” While the team’s star players shone against Guelph, Willis said that Sunday’s victory exemplified the strength and depth of her roster, an attribute that has defined the Gaels all season. “This season has been a really deep team effort,” said Willis. “We had a lot of injuries to veteran players this season, but we have some great talent on the bench. Today, [outside] Will Sidgwick came in at a critical time, and did really well. ... The 16-4 record is not just a reflection of how good our top guys are, but also of how good our depth is.” Zeeman continued his hot streak all weekend, leading the Gaels in kills in both games. He said recent opponents have catered to his strengths. “The last four teams we’ve played aren’t very good at defending the right side, which is my position,” he said. “A big part of our game plan has been to abuse that, and I’ve benefitted from that.” Setter Dan Rosenbaum also had a big weekend, recording 45 assists on Saturday and earning player of the game honours on Sunday. Having spent much of the season out injured, Rosenbaum said he is happy to be contributing to the team’s success. “For me, I’m really happy to be back on the court, after having sat out the first half with injuries,” he said. “It’s fun to be a setter for this team because we have so many talented players. On any given play, I can set anyone and feel comfortable that they will put the ball away.” The Gaels wrapped up home court advantage for this week’s quarter-final, and they host the Waterloo Warriors on Saturday. The last time these teams met in Kingston, the Warriors pulled off a shock upset, taking down the Gaels in four sets. With that loss still fresh in their memories, Rosenbaum said that the Gaels will be seeking revenge against the Warriors. “We’re going to be ready for them,” he said. “A few weeks ago, Waterloo came into our barn and beat us, so I’m glad that we now have a chance to make things right.”

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postscript

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Enter Postscript’s Annual Short Fiction Contest! See queensjournal.ca/shortfictioncontest

Health & Fitness

Cardio gets crazy Tired of sweating it out on the treadmill? Many are trying out Zumba, aerobics inspired by Latin dance moves. Be prepared to shake it and get ridiculous! B y J essica F ishbein Assistant News Editor

sparked the growth of the dance-fitness program. There are now more than 10 million people Trying to keep fit is a challenge for taking weekly Zumba classes in everyone, and let’s be real: who over 90,000 locations in over actually enjoys the monotonous, 110 countries. Zumba borrows from a strenuous, asthma-inducing physical activity that society variety of dance styles, including and health practitioners deem merengue, foxtrot, salsa, cumbia, reggaeton, belly dance, waltz, so essential? photo by justin tang While critics might dare to call tango and samba. According to Shauna Fontaine (right), ArtSci ’13 and a certified Zumba instructor at the ARC, it’s In a typical class, 70 per possible to burn 500 to 1000 calories participating in an hour of Zumba. someone like me “out of shape,” that doesn’t change the startling cent of the music must be Latin fact that participating in many international rhythms, while the sport for shy people. In the class of enjoying this one big dance party, see results. It’s a social experience exercise-related activities honestly other 30 per cent can be popular I was in, inactive participants Fontaine said this is a non-issue. too,” she said, adding that she “It’s not about getting the became involved with Zumba were actively reprimanded for make me feel like I might pass music or top 40. Zumba has even expanded not wholeheartedly engaging in moves right, its all about moving,” very recently. out. And sadly, in our culture of ever-present laziness, I know I’m among many studios to include Zumba’s wide variety of dance she said. “You don’t have to be a “I personally was introduced different specialties: Zumba moves. While I was definitely not dancer to come try Zumba. It’s to it in [the] beginning of 2009, not alone. A regular exercise-sceptic, Toning, which incorporates 1.5 lb expecting to be sought out for for normal, average people and it’s in my senior year of high school. I I’ve always dreaded being toning sticks to sculpt and tone my apparent lack of enthusiasm in meant to be easy to follow.” just started taking classes and I was So Zumba might be easy enough hooked,” she said. dragged to the gym by my the body; Aqua Zumba, which is Zumba, I took it as a challenge to fitness-crazed friends. However, a in the water; Zumbatomic, which put away my sarcasm and actually for relatively coordinated people to If people aren’t used to Zumba, newworkoutregimehasgrabbedmy is Zumba for kids; and Zumba engage in the class, which turned follow, but how can a participant the experience can sometimes be a get in the mood to exercise to bit of a shock. Gold, which is geared towards out to be lots of fun. attention: Zumba. Shauna Fontaine, ArtSci ’13, is pulse-throbbing Latin beats? Created by Alberto “Beto” Perez older people. “I taught a Zumba class where Fontaine presented me with a people normally do Pilates … At I decided to try Zumba to see a certified Zumba instructor at the in 2001, Zumba’s combination of fast-paced dance and latin-inspired what all the hype was about, but ARC. She said classes started being feasible solution: it is the instructor’s first people were shy,” she said. job to ensure that participants are “When I’m crazy-energetic people tunes has inspired millions to get fit mostly because my athletic friend offered at the ARC in September. “I have definitely seen how active and the atmosphere remains can be thrown off.” dragged me. and have fun doing it. While participating in Zumba, I popular Zumba is at the ARC,” fun in the class. Apparently, Perez originally The experience of Zumba “If I see someone that isn’t sounded too good to be true. created Zumba by accident: got a sense of why this method to she said, adding that she has had to in Colombia, where he taught burn calories is so popular. To put it turn people away from her classes enjoying themselves, I amp up my Having this much fun while traditional aerobics classes, he simply, it’s empowering: I felt like I when it’s at full capacity of 30 energy and dance next to them,” working out? Preposterous! forgot his usual music one day and could be mistaken for an extra in a people. According to Fontaine, one she said. I strove to investigate further Problem solved. But does and spoke with Bailey Hope Eagan, of Zumba’s aims is to put the fun substituted in the Latin music he Shakira music video. this dancing actually accomplish ArtSci ’12 and a Zumba enthusiast. While Zumba is a nice change back in to fitness. had with him. “People don’t force themselves anything exercise-wise? From there, his new form of of pace from embarrassingly While Eagan hasn’t been a Consistent calorie burning and Zumba fan for a very long time, dance-fitness grew into what Zumba difficult forms of fitness (i.e. the to go. It’s something you want is today. In 2003, there were 200 treadmill, the elliptical, the bike, to do,” she said. “It’s like one big weight loss are realistic, attainable she advocates its uniqueness over results of a Zumba workout, other forms of exercise. Zumba teachers worldwide. The etc.), I figured it wouldn’t be dance party.” While one could wonder if Fontaine said. creation of the Zumba Academy in for everyone. “I tried it near the end of the “Zumba is proven to burn 500 year last year. It was different One might assume this is no awkward tendencies get in the way 2005 to teach Zumba instructors to 1000 [calories] in one hour, than any other workout … it was depending on your fitness level,” hilarious!” she said. she said. “If you want to have a So what differentiates Zumba lot of weight loss you also need to from other forms of exercise? follow a healthy diet, but you will “The ridiculousness of it,” be on the road to losing weight Eagan said. “You’re just shaking with Zumba. Some people put on your booty around. I have no idea a couple pounds, but that’s because what I’m doing, but it’s still fun.” you’re creating muscle.” As opposed to other more She said many participants have disciplined forms of fitness, Zumba observed differences in their weight does not emphasize the technical, after participating in Zumba. she said. “Especially in the summer when “It’s not like [the instructor] is at I taught in a gym back home, a the front saying ‘point your toes’… lot of middle-aged women with realistically you just participate to weight issues came up to me and your ability and as long as you’re told me they noticed a difference moving, it’s fun.” in results,” she said, adding that Eagan said she has also noticed Zumba is not a gender exclusive Zumba’s recent spike in popularity. sport either. “A lot more people have gotten “The person who created into it recently and are game to Zumba is a guy! I know several try it.” male instructors, but I haven’t had any guys come to my class in the Zumba classes are offered at the ARC every Monday from 7:35-8:20 ARC yet.” The longevity of Zumba’s p.m., Tuesday from 5:30-6:20 p.m. popularity is a testament to how and Thursday from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Bracelets for individual Zumba enjoyable it is, Fontaine said. photo by justin tang “It’s been around for 10 years, classes can be purchased at the ARC Zumba was originally created by accident: Alberto Perez, an aerobics instructor, substituted Latin for starters. It’s proved it has staying equipment counter for $9. music for his regular tunes when he forgot his music one day, and Zumba developed from there. power and that it’s effective—you

The Queen's Journal, Issue 34  

Volume 138, Issue 34 -- February 17, 2011

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