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Are we the right choice for you? Postgraduate study is an excellent way to enrich your academic experience and open up new career opportunities. Queen Mary, University of London is the right choice because:

• We are in the top 5 in the country in individual Department rankings (RAE 2008); including Linguistics (1st), Geography (1st), Drama (1st), Dentistry (1st), English Language and Literature (2nd), Epidemiology and Public Health (3rd), Pre-Clinical and Human Biological Sciences (4th), Health Sciences Research (4th), and Cancer Studies (5th) • We offer postgraduate students teaching and supervision by leading researchers in their academic fields – a thriving and stimulating research community

• Astronomy • Biological and Chemical Sciences • Business and Management • Computer Science • Drama • Economics and Finance • Editing Lives and Letters • Electronic Engineering • Engineering and Materials Science • English • Geography • Global Studies • History • Languages, Linguistics and Film

• We are one of the largest colleges of the University of London – graduate students have access to resources and facilities in the wider University as well as those at Queen Mary • We are the only multi-faculty University of London college to benefit from an integrated teaching, research and residential campus in central London • We offer a wide range of subjects in: Arts; Laws and Social Sciences; Engineering, Mathematical Sciences and Natural Sciences. Queen Mary also incorporates the Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry

• Law (including Commercial Law) • Mathematical Sciences • Medicine and Dentistry • Philosophy • Physics • Politics

QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON POSTGRADUATE PROSPECTUS ENTRY 2011

• We are a research-led institution with an international reputation. Our performance in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise confirmed this; we are ranked 11th overall in the UK (The Guardian)

We offer taught Masters courses and PhD research opportunities in the following areas:

Queen Mary, University of London Postgraduate Prospectus Entry 2011

• Statistics

• We offer an international environment, with students from over 125 countries Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS Freephone: 0800 376 1800

www.qmul.ac.uk

If calling from outside the UK: Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 5588 email: admissions@qmul.ac.uk

www.qmul.ac.uk


An application form for all subjects should be inserted at the end of this prospectus. Please complete the appropriate form, reading the accompanying ‘Notes for Guidance’ carefully, and return it to the address at the bottom of the form. If you have any admission enquiries the Admissions and Recruitment Office will be pleased to advise you. Freephone 0800 376 1800 If calling from outside the UK: Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions@qmul.ac.uk For an electronic version of the application form see www.qmul.ac.uk/postgrad/pgapplyq.shtml Medical and dental applicants should use the special form inserted at the end of this prospectus. Please complete carefully and return to the address at the top of the form. For medical and dental admissions enquiries, please contact: Freephone 0800 376 1800 If calling from outside the UK: Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk For an electronic version of the application form see www.qmul.ac.uk/postgrad/pgapplyq.shtml If you would like information on individual courses or research areas, please contact the relevant department. Visit us! Postgraduate Open Day dates for 2011 Entry are: 24 November 2010 and 20 April 2011 For full details and booking form, please visit www.qmul.ac.uk/visitus Contacts Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS www.qmul.ac.uk

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A list of all postgraduate degree programmes offered by the College can be found on page 414.

www.qmul.ac.uk

Notes for applicants


Contents Queen Mary, University of London

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Queen Mary, University of London Contents

Introduction Queen Mary, University of London Academic standards and research excellence Living in London International outlook Humanities and Social Sciences Medicine and Dentistry Science and Engineering Postgraduate degrees Some notable Queen Mary alumni

Essential information How to apply Financial costs of study Funding your study International students

Student resources A-Z

Next steps Visiting Queen Mary – Campus Tours Open evenings Contacts Postgraduate admissions How to find us Campus maps

Index Subjects

2 2 4 6 8 10 14 18 22 24

382 384 385 386 390

395

405 406 406 406 406 408 410

414

Humanities and Social Sciences Business and Management

29

Contemporary Global Studies

41

Drama

43

Economics and Finance

51

Editing Lives and Letters

65

English

71

Geography

83

History

103

Languages, Linguistics and Film

117

Law

137

Philosophy

169

Politics and International Relations

177

Medicine and Dentistry Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science

196

Institute of Cancer

214

Institute of Dentistry

228

Institute of Health Sciences Education

248

William Harvey Research Institute

256

Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine

270

Science and Engineering Biological and Chemical Sciences

281

Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

295

Engineering and Materials Science

329

Mathematical Sciences

351

Physics

367

Statistics

375


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Queen Mary, University of London

Queen Mary, University of London Postgraduate study at Queen Mary Our history

Queen Mary is one of the UK’s leading research-focused higher education institutions. You will join a thriving postgraduate community, where you can develop your skills, add to your qualifications, and build relationships with academics at the forefront of their field.

Queen Mary, University of London was formed from the merger of Queen Mary College and Westfield College, both member colleges of the University of London. The Mile End Campus is historically the home of Queen Mary College, which began life in 1887 as the People’s Palace, a philanthropic centre for the intellectual and cultural improvement of east Londoners. Westfield College was founded in 1882 in Hampstead as a pioneering college for the higher education of women.

Queen Mary did exceptionally well in the Government’s most recent Research Assessment Exercise. The College was ranked 11th in the UK (The Guardian); and the School of Medicine and Dentistry came top in London and 4th in the UK. For more details about how Queen Mary performed in the 2008 RAE see pages 4 – 5.

In 1995 the College merged again, this time with two leading medical colleges, to create Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry: the London Hospital Medical College, England’s first medical school, was established in 1785, and St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College was established in 1843.

What this means for you is that you will be studying with some of the best minds in your field; people who are actively contributing to the body of knowledge through public lectures and appearances at conferences, contributions to peer-reviewed journals, and other key publications. As you would expect, there is a lively student community, strengthened by regular cross-disciplinary seminars and other networking opportunities. You will be encouraged to take part in skills development courses run by the Learning Institute at Queen Mary. This will help you get the most out of your studies, as well as boost your future employability, for example by honing your research and presentation skills. Postgraduate students attend and take part conferences, linking you up to a network of experts that extends far beyond the College. For many students this is one of the highlights of postgraduate study, giving them a taste of what an academic career offers.

In recent years the School of Medicine and Dentistry has seen many exciting developments. Over £100 million has been invested in creating state of the art facilities in Whitechapel and West Smithfield to make east London a place which attracts world-class researchers.

However, not all our graduates go on to an academic career; for many postgraduate study is an excellent way to add to existing skills, enabling them to go on to rewarding professional positions that demand the kind of specialty knowledge that postgraduate study can provide. Our graduates work across a wide range of sectors, reflecting the impressive breadth of the programmes we offer. Illustrating this, you will find graduate profiles alongside relevant subject areas further on in this prospectus.


Queen Mary, University of London

• Outstanding results for the quality of our research in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), ranked overall 11th in the UK by The Guardian • Queen Mary scholarships, studentships, bursaries and prizes amounted to £17.5 million in 2009 • Queen Mary invests over £2 million into graduate studentships and bursaries each year • Queen Mary was ranked 7th in the UK for graduate starting salaries by The Sunday Times in 2010

Part of the University of London: the single largest critical mass of academic research in the UK Although the size and the range of subjects covered by Queen Mary give it all the characteristics and facilities of a university in its own right, it is also part of the federal University of London, a wide-ranging body comprising over 30 institutes. Together, these make it the largest and most diverse university in the country. It also means that, although Queen Mary is a selfgoverning institution, our graduate students are able to take advantage of the wide and varied academic research facilities of the University of London. The University of London is one of the leading universities in the world, with the largest postgraduate population of any university in the United Kingdom. It contains a large number of specialist graduate study and research centres, several of which are based at Queen Mary. For example Cancer Research UK recently awarded the School of Medicine and Dentistry £2 million to set up the Barts Cancer Centre. And in 2009-10 the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) celebrated its 30th anniversary. Since its establishment, the Centre has grown to become one of the leading institutions for the study of commercial law in the world. An exciting new development for the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, QMedia, brings together recent research in technology in the creative arts and media. QMedia builds on existing research activity in the following centres: MultiMedia & Vision; Interaction, Media and Communication; the Centre for Digital Music; and the Doctoral Training Centre in Media and Arts Technology. Students of Queen Mary are also automatically members of the University of London Union (ULU), which is among the most active and lively in the country. You will also have access to the Senate House Library, an outstanding research resource.

• 1st in London and 3rd in the UK for opportunities for students to teach (International Student Survey 2009) • 2,000 postgraduate students following taught programmes or registered for research • Students from 130 countries • Over £250 million invested in College buildings and facilities over the last five years • Integrated and secure living and studying environment on the Mile End campus

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Research excellence Queen Mary, University of London

Academic standards and research excellence

All our academic staff are engaged in leading research – adding to the body of knowledge in their field of expertise, and benefiting the students they teach and supervise. Queen Mary is home to a thriving academic research community. This is of particular relevance to our postgraduate students, many of whom will be embarking on their own research projects. The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise confirmed Queen Mary’s position as a leading, researchfocused institute. According to tables published in the Times Higher Education Supplement, Queen Mary was ranked 13th in the country out of 132 institutions. The Guardian placed the College even higher, 11th in the UK.

These excellent results place us ahead of several of the University of London multi-faculty colleges and many Russell Group institutions, including King’s College London, Bristol, Sheffield, Leeds, Nottingham, Birmingham, Southampton, Liverpool and Newcastle. The Times Higher Education commented “the biggest star among the research-intensive institutions was Queen Mary, University of London.” Many Departments and subjects did exceptionally well, with several being ranked 1st in the UK.

Queen Mary has also excelled in several subject groups, being in the top five in many, including: • Linguistics (ranked 1st ahead of UCL, Oxford and Cambridge) • Geography (ranked 1st equal with Bristol, Cambridge, Durham and Oxford) • Drama, dance and performing arts (ranked 1st for Drama, but 2nd equal in the unit of assessment with the department ahead of Queen Mary not being entered for Drama) • Dentistry (ranked 2nd ahead of KCL and UCL) • English Language and Literature (ranked 2nd ahead of UCL, Oxford and Cambridge) • Epidemiology and public health (ranked 3rd ahead of Oxford, UCL and Bristol) • Pre-clinical and human biological sciences (ranked 4th ahead of KCL, Bristol and Nottingham) • Health Services Research (ranked 4th ahead of Oxford, UCL and KCL) • Cancer studies (ranked 5th equal ahead of Oxford, Imperial, KCL and UCL). Queen Mary is also in the highest quartile in: • Law • Iberian Languages • History • Computer Science • Economics and Econometrics • Other hospital-based clinical subjects


Research excellence Queen Mary, University of London

The RAE results secured our medical school’s place as one of the UK’s top four medical schools, and top in London, for the quality of research. With staff engaged in outstanding research across the school’s six Institutes, we achieved impressive rankings across a wide range of subjects. Detailed RAE results for the School of Medicine and Dentistry can be found on page 179 of this prospectus. In addition, Queen Mary recorded substantial RAE achievements in a number of other extremely competitive subjects, including Russian, French, Materials, Politics, Pure Maths and Electronic Engineering. Business and Management, despite being a new department that was not entered in the 2001 RAE, has equalled the Cass Business School at City University in the Times Higher RAE ranking, coming within the top half of business schools. Top 20 universities in The Guardian Research Assessment League Table: Ranking

University

1

The University of Cambridge

2

The University of Oxford

3

London School of Economics

4

Imperial College

5

University College London

6

The University of Manchester

7

The University of Warwick

8

The University of York

9

The University of Essex

10

The University of Edinburgh

11

Queen Mary, University of London

12

The University of St Andrews

13

The University of Bristol

14

University of Durham

15

The University of Southampton

16

The University of Leeds

17

The University of Sheffield

18

The University of Bath

19

The University of Lancaster

20

King’s College London

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Living in London Queen Mary, University of London

Living in London

As one of the world’s most exciting and well-resourced cities, London is a great place to live and study. London is home to some of the best museums and art galleries in the world, talented performing arts companies, and outstanding cultural and science centres. The 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will bring one of the most inspiring sporting events and facilities to the city. Queen Mary’s Mile End campus is only one mile from the Olympic Park. Whichever campus you are based at, you are well connected to all that London has to offer. For example, it is only ten minutes by tube from Mile End station to Oxford Circus in the heart of the west end. You can find maps of our four campuses and surrounding areas on page 410 to page 413 of this prospectus. To find out more – from upcoming festivals to the location of your local pub, visit: www.lonelyplanet.com/england/london www.timeout.com/london

Museums, libraries and collections London’s museums and archives are of particular interest to postgraduate students, many of whom find exhibitions and collections to complement their studies and research. The major museums, such as The Science Museum, Natural History Museum, V&A Museum and galleries such as Tate Modern, Tate Britain and the National Gallery are all within easy reach of Queen Mary’s campuses. London has 250 museums and galleries and a diverse range of independent specialist collections. The city has 360 public libraries. London is home to nearly a third of all the UK’s archives and holds over 20,000 cubic metres of local authority records alone. Some of the museums and collections you may be able to use include: • The Corporation of London • Courtauld Institute Gallery • Dulwich Picture Gallery • Firepower, The Royal Artillery Museum • Horniman Museum and Gardens • Institute of Engineering and Technology • Museums of the Royal College of Surgeons of England • Jewish Museum • King’s College London – The Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives • Lambeth Palace Library • The Library and Museum of Freemasonry, Freemasons Hall • London Transport Museum


Living in London Queen Mary, University of London

• The Women’s Library

• Institute of Historical Research Library

• London School of Economics and Political Science – the British Library of Political and Economic Science

• Institute for the Study of the Americas Library

• Museum of London • Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art, University of London

• Institute of Psychiatry Library (part of King’s College London) • King’s College Library and King’s Libraries and Information Service Centres • London Business School Libraries

• Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, University College London

• London School of Economics Library (BLPES)

• Royal Academy of Music

• London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Library

• Royal Geographical Society • Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)

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• Royal Free and University College Medical School Library (part of University College Library System)

• The Royal Mail Archive

• Royal Holloway Library

• Sir John Soane’s Museum

• School of Oriental and African Studies Library

• Wellcome Trust

• School of Pharmacy Library

• Westminster Libraries and Archives

• School of Slavonic and East European Studies Library (part of University College Library System)

In addition, as a student of the federal University of London, you may use the libraries and collections of other University of London Colleges and Institutes. These include: • British Library of Political and Economic Science (London School of Economics Library) • Courtauld Institute of Art Library • Goldsmith’s College Library • Guy’s and St Thomas’s (UMDS) Libraries (part of King's College London) • Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library • Institute of Classical Studies Library • Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies Library

• Senate House Library • University College Library • Warburg Institute Library Please note: Individual Colleges and Institutes may have their own rules about access for outside students, for example you may need a letter of introduction from your supervisor, or may have access for limited hours. Please consult individual libraries and collections for further information.


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International outlook Queen Mary, University of London

International outlook

Queen Mary has a well-established precedent for welcoming students from all over the world, making for a lively international environment.

There are currently 5,000 international students (EU and non-EU) at Queen Mary (this figure includes 2,000 students following the Queen Mary and Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications joint degree programmes in China), representing 130 different nationalities overall.

Our international strategy is informed by the principles of close partnership and sustainable involvement in a number of countries around the world. It forms an important focus for our work. We recognise that we must continue to develop our international research partnerships to remain at the forefront of academic and scientific excellence.

The influence of so many different cultures creates a stimulating environment in which to study. It also feeds into the cultural life of the college. For example, there are many student-run clubs and societies representing the diversity of countries from which students come.

Lin Xiao, PhD student, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science “Independent research offers students a wonderful challenge, as well as the opportunity to develop some valuable skills. In particular, I like being able to learn more about those things I am interested in, along with the support and encouragement of my supervisor. I’ve been able to show my research results at major conferences and communicate with lots of international experts in my specialist area. So far, it has been a really amazing experience.”

Hrisith M Choksi, MSc Dental Public Health “After completing my BDS from the A.J.Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, India, I decided to continue my studies in the UK. Queen Mary’s Dental Public Health programme was an ideal choice. “The staff at Queen Mary have been amazing and the facilities are excellent. Overall, living in London has been a wonderful experience.”


International outlook Queen Mary, University of London

The international component of our staff adds to the College’s research strengths and world-class excellence. Queen Mary recruits globally, selecting academics on the basis of outstanding talent and achievement. Currently almost a third of our staff are from other EU countries or further afield. Our position in east London adds to our strong international presence. Students enjoy living in one of the most multicultural areas of the city. Support for International students We offer a range of support services to help our international students feel at home, including an airport collection service at the beginning of the academic year. Please see page 390 for more detailed information on our support services.

Onyinye Nwezi, LLM in Computer and Communications Law “I qualified as a barrister and solicitor of the supreme court of Nigeria. After my graduation, I worked for two years as an associate with a senior advocate. I decided to pursue an LLM programme in order to improve my career prospects, plus communication is a major economic and policy driver in Nigeria. “I chose Queen Mary because I wanted to be taught by the best in the field. I also loved the fact that it had a fully integrated student village on the campus. While studying, I took advantage of the insessional course to develop my presentation skills. Now I hope to start my PhD at Queen Mary and to work as a policy maker afterwards."

Scholarships Queen Mary constantly seeks to attract students of the highest quality, and, in recognition of the important investment that international students are making in their education, we are pleased to offer a range of scholarships to reward outstanding academic achievement. Please see page 391 for more information on the scholarships available to international students.

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Humanities and Social Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

Humanities and Social Sciences

Lock-keeper’s Cottage, Mile End

Welcome to the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate study is a demanding, exhilarating and, frequently, life-changing experience. For over a century Queen Mary has prepared men and women for rewarding careers in many traditional, innovative and evolving disciplines. We offer advanced degrees in a wide range of disciplines, from Film Studies to Business Management and from English literature to commercial law. Doctoral education emphasises original and independent scholarship, while Masters degree courses prepare students for careers in professional life or further study. These programmes share a number of distinctive features: a high level of engagement between distinguished academics and outstanding students, a campus environment that fosters a community of scholars, a commitment to financial support – more than £1 million annually – that allows concentration on research, and degree programmes with demonstrable success in educating graduates for careers in academia, government and the non-profit and corporate sectors, both in the UK and abroad.

Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences at Queen Mary has never been more dynamic. This is reflected in the £10 million of external funding received from bodies such as the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, the Natural Environment Research Council, and the Leverhulme Trust. Queen Mary provides outstanding research resources for postgraduate students, with an extensive buildings and refurbishment programme.

The Octagon, Queens’ Building


Humanities and Social Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

Facilities include: • The Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, a purpose-built research centre housed in a refurbished Victorian lock-keeper’s cottage on Regent’s Canal. • The Arts Research Centre, offering workspace, computing facilities and a common room. • The Humanities and Social Sciences Conference Suite provides a location for research activities as well Faculty offices and externally-funded research centres. • The new Humanities Building will house (from 2010) the Department of History, as well as new facilities including a studio for Film Studies and Drama, a 300-seat lecture theatre, seminar rooms and a graduate student study area.

New Humanities Building, artist’s impression

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The research ethos and environment at Queen Mary ensure that it is an excellent institution for postgraduate studies and research. Staff work through the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences to secure external funding for postgraduates from the research councils and other external organisations. Postgraduates also receive research training within the College and through its links with other institutions. They benefit from the presence of up to eight annual Distinguished Visiting Fellows from all over the world, who join the College temporarily to offer lectures and contribute to our expanding research culture.

Lock-keeper’s cottage, interior


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Humanities and Social Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

Humanities and Social Sciences

Outstanding and exciting research is taking place in the Humanities and Social Sciences. You will find detailed research information for each of the Faculty’s Schools: Business and Management; English and Drama; Economics; Geography; History; Languages, Linguistics and Film; Law; and Politics and International Relations, in the relevant sections later in this prospectus (from page 28 to 191). We particularly encourage inter-disciplinary research drawing on the strengths of different disciplines. Much of this collaborative work is organised around different Centres – some of these are listed below. • The Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies aims to consider how new scholarship and new interdisciplinary methods and approaches have refigured our understanding of several developments traditionally associated with the term and period ‘Renaissance’. • The Centre for Dissenting Studies is a collaboration between Queen Mary and Dr Williams’s Library in Gordon Square, Bloomsbury. The Library is the pre-eminent library for the study of Puritanism and English Protestant Dissent, and the Centre sponsors intensive research focused on the Library’s unrivalled print and manuscript collections.

• The Centre for EighteenthCentury Studies is an interdisciplinary research centre launched in 2008 with the intention of bringing together expertise on the society, culture, politics and literature of the long Eighteenth-Century from across the college and beyond. • The Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought, launched in 2008, brings together research expertise from across the college in the history of political ideas and ideologies, critical theory, contemporary continental philosophy, democratic theory, classical liberal theory and gender theory. • The Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) is a world-class facility for large and small-scale editing projects in historical biography, diaries and correspondence. The Centre hosts a range of seminars, events, skills-based postgraduate training seminars, and a thriving community of doctoral research students. • The Centre for the History of the Emotions, also launched in 2008, is the first research centre of its kind in the United Kingdom. It encourages interactions between social and cultural historians of the emotions on the one hand, and historians of science and medicine on the other.


Humanities and Social Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

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Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

• The Centre for the Study of Migration focuses on the movements of people, locally, nationally and internationally. The Centre offers an MSc in Migration and promotes doctoral research. • The Centre for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment, a collaboration between the Department of Geography and the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, is funded by the HEFCE Science Research Investment Fund and promotes doctoral research. • The University of London Institute in Paris (ULIP). In collaboration with Royal Holloway, University of London, Queen Mary has a link with ULIP. Located in the centre of Paris and acting as a focal point for academic collaboration and exchange, ULIP is an impressive resource for postgraduates at Queen Mary, including an MA in French Studies in Paris.

The Centre for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment

• People’s Palace Projects (PPP) puts theatre research into action. Based in the School of English and Drama, PPP manages a wide range of projects that find practical application for academic scholarship. PPP operates as an NGO that uses participatory arts practices to devise and implement development projects, with a particular focus on human rights, working in London and in Rio de Janeiro. • The City Centre is dedicated to collaborative research and related activities that are focused on the city, organised by the Department of Geography. It provides a space in which academic research can be developed and communicated with those within and beyond the academy. The Centre for the History of the Emotions


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Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Medicine and Dentistry

Blizard Building, Whitechapel

Welcome to Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry offers international excellence in research and teaching. We serve a population of unrivalled diversity in east London and the wider Thames Gateway, with a high prevalence of cancer, diabetes, adult and childhood obesity, heart disease, chronic lung diseases, HIV, and oral disease. Through partnership with our linked hospitals, notably Barts and The London NHS Trust, the School’s research and teaching is informed by a wide ranging and stimulating clinical environment.

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry continues to develop its range of provision at a postgraduate level, in both teaching and research, building on the School’s outstanding success in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. The School focuses its research activities around six research institutes. These are: • Institute of Cancer

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry has also shown the largest increase in the UK in research funding over the last five years. The School has the highest amount of bluechip charitable income in the UK, and our research spend in 2008-9 of £41.5 million represents a 20 per cent year-on-year increase, the highest in the UK. Our current portfolio of 1070 awards worth over £280 million includes £24 million from MRC since 2007, seven programme grants from the Wellcome Trust, and 12 programme grants from Cancer Research UK. Since 2006 we have appointed 26 new professors and 23 lecturers/senior lecturers.

• Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science • Institute of Dentistry • Institute of Health Sciences Education • William Harvey Research Institute • Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

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The Institutes contain a number of specialist research centres which are detailed in the Medicine and Dentistry section of this prospectus. New initiatives and groundbreaking research throughout the School of Medicine and Dentistry include the following:

Institute of Cancer The Institute of Cancer along with the Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics, and Statistics has been awarded Cancer Research UK Centre status with the aim to enhance cancer research in the UK and to train the clinical and non-clinical research workforce of the future. This new Barts Cancer Centre brings together our topranked scientists in the medical school with the expert clinical teams in the brand-new Cancer Hospital to push forward laboratory discoveries into benefits for patients. The Centre will particularly focus on pancreatic cancer, as well as breast, ovarian and prostate cancer, leukaemia and lymphoma. The laboratory programme explores the genes that drive cancer, aiming to identify markers for early diagnosis and targets for new therapies. The Barts Centre is at the forefront in cancer gene therapy and stem cell approaches, with a wide-ranging programme of clinical trials of experimental agents.


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Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Medicine and Dentistry

Blizard Building, Whitechapel

Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science The Institute facilitates research in genomic medicine, cell biology and tissue engineering, infection and immunology and neurosciences, with an annual research budget of £10 million. It hosts the Initiative in Stem Cell Biology, a crossdisciplinary consortium which involves many research institutes across the College. Following a successful bid by the School of Medicine and Dentistry, the Health Protection Agency’s Mycobacterium Reference Unit (MRU) has been established in the Institute and plays an integral role in the UK’s fight against TB.

Institute of Dentistry The Institute of Dentistry has a long and proud record in the delivery of internationally recognised research in oral and dental sciences. It combines a strong tradition of clinical, epidemiological and public health research in dentistry with a solid basic science research base which brings together a range of multi-disciplinary teams with complementary skills from clinical science, cell and molecular biology, microbiology, material science and biophysics. Our research is organised within the three main thematically linked research groups of Immune & Inflammatory Disease; Caries, Hard Tissue and Materials Research; and Oral Cancer. The Institute has access to an array of superb modern research and clinical facilities located within the Institute, the School of Medicine and Dentistry and Queen Mary College, of which any Dental School would be proud.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

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Institute of Health Sciences Education Wolfson Institute of The Institute houses both educationalists and Preventive Medicine researchers, with a unique research programme that is both clinical and community based, and integrated with local primary health care, local community-based groups and sports-focused organisations as appropriate. The Centre for Health Sciences has a reputation as a centre of excellence in research around complex interventions, particularly trials.

The Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine has a varied research programme including work on the legacy of the 2012 Olympic bid, a multi-disciplinary focus on tendinopathy and a Human Performance laboratory which was recently re-equipped. 62 papers were published from the centre in 2009. The Institute also houses the Centre for Medical Education.

William Harvey Research Institute The Institute is a fully integrated clinical and basic science research environment devoted to understanding the pathogenic mechanisms in cardiovascular, inflammatory and endocrine diseases, and to therapeutic innovation; using state of the art clinical, pharmacological, genomic, proteomic, imaging and other technologies. This research will be greatly enhanced by the opening of the unique ÂŁ14 million Heart Centre in Charterhouse Square in 2010, providing worldclass facilities for research and patient care.

This is an internationally renowned centre for excellence in epidemiology and preventive medicine. The Institute comprises the Centre for Environmental and Preventive Medicine (CEPM); the Cancer Research UK Centre for (CR-UK) Epidemiology, Mathematics, and Statistics (EMS), and the

Centre for Psychiatry (CfP) Groundbreaking work at the Institute includes pioneering work on passive smoking, cancer screening and prevention, screening for neural tube defects and Down's Syndrome and the substantial effects of periconceptual folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects.


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Science and Engineering Queen Mary, University of London

Science and Engineering

Welcome to the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Queen Mary. There are five schools in the Faculty: Engineering and Materials Science, Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Biological and Chemical Sciences, Mathematical Sciences including Astronomy, and Physics. There are over 300 full-time research degree students and just over 100 postdoctoral researchers. The College has invested billions of pounds in recent years in our research facilities and this has enabled us to build up the range of techniques we can use and to be competitive at an international level in many fields. As a Faculty, we are particularly keen to promote interdisciplinary research and interdisciplinary research consortia have recently been formed to facilitate research in the following areas: • Life Sciences, where there are opportunities for collaboration within the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences between Biology and Chemistry, and between the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences and the Medical and Dental School • Areas of overlap between Mathematics, Computer Science and Electronic Engineering • Areas linking Engineering, Materials and Physics • Areas linking Astronomy, String Theory and Particle Physics New areas of focus are emerging, such as sensors, networks, energy, and drug discovery.

The Faculty of Science and Engineering has a strong research culture with around 300 academic staff in the sector, and a further 300 research assistants and support staff, within its lively and supportive schools. Working in collaboration with staff in the College’s Learning Institute, the Faculty of Science and Engineering coordinates training in transferable skills. Research students and postdoctoral researchers have opportunities to participate in courses and competitions that develop skills in communicating science to a general audience and in developing and presenting business plans. Support for personal development is provided by a careers advisor specifically for postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the Science and Engineering sector and a coordinator for training in enterprise and entrepreneurship.


Science and Engineering Queen Mary, University of London

We also facilitate provision of training for students in research techniques. For example, there is an interdisciplinary course on “Research Techniques in Biomedical and Life Sciences”, which is taught by experts in research techniques from across the College. The Faculty is contributing to ImpactQM - a groundbreaking knowledge transfer project funded by EPSRC, which aims to create a new generation of science and engineering professional – one who is equally at home in both academia and in industry. We also support student-led initiatives such as Journal Clubs and interdisciplinary activities that encourage interaction between students and researchers across the Science and Engineering sector. For example, a recent student-led initiative is Women in Science & Engineering at QMUL (WISE@QMUL).

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The School of Engineering and Materials Science was awarded £1.5 million last year, including grants for a new facility for research on Energy Materials (Royal Society Wolfson Grant) and for research on Multi Functional Carbon Fibre Composites for the aircraft industry (EU FP7), Microchannel Condensation Heat Transfer (EPSRC) and the Chondrocyte Primary Cilium (Wellcome Trust). The School has internationally renowned academics working in fields ranging from aerodynamics and aerospace structures, to mechanical engineering, including thermodynamic principles, combustion and condensation heat transfer, electrospray technology and medical engineering. Materials research has been carried out at Queen Mary longer than any other institution in the UK and has an international reputation for excellence in metals, polymers, composites and ceramics. Biomaterials research, including tissue and cell engineering, orthopaedic implant design, biointerfical science, and bio/nano science takes place in the Interdisciplinary Research Centre (IRC) in Biomedical Materials.


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Science and Engineering Queen Mary, University of London

Faculty of Science and Engineering

In the The School of Mathematical Sciences pure mathematics research includes algebra, combinatorics, analysis, geometry, logic and probability. Interdisciplinarity is a strength, not just within pure mathematics (group theory from the perspective of model theory, or probabilistic methods in combinatorics), but also with other groups, notably dynamical systems, statistical mechanics and statistics. Computation is an object of study in its own right and is used as a tool for coping with large complex structures in algebra or combinatorics. The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences has been identified by the BBSRC as one of its top training environments for students. The School has secured over £6.5 million in CIF, SRIF and College funding for research and teaching facilities. The new Joseph Priestley Building houses 1000m2 of stateof-the-art research laboratories and includes new teaching laboratories. This has enabled the transfer of Life Sciences research and equipment into this environment to build on the synergy between the life sciences and chemistry. The School has state-of-the-art facilities for environmental and chemical analysis, cell and molecular genetic imaging, the study of protein structure and function, as well as new aquaria and temperature-controlled rooms. Centres within the SBCS include: The Centre for Life Sciences; The Centre for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment; The Imaging Centre; and The Centre for Psychology. Research in the School is funded by grants from UK research councils (BBSRC, NERC, EPSRC, MRC), charities (Wellcome, Leverhulme) and many other funding agencies.

Applied Mathematics at Queen Mary has been at the forefront of research in dynamical systems and general relativity for several decades. The group includes teams in statistical mechanics, mathematical physics and probability, with applied work in collaboration with other disciplines and with industry securing major EU funding for work on road traffic networks. The group holds over £1 million in research grants from UK funding agencies. The Astronomy Unit has active groups in the forefront of six areas: Theoretical Cosmology; Survey Astronomy (we lead the £36 million project to build VISTA in Chile); Solar & Stellar Physics; Planetary Formation; Solar System Dynamics, researching the dynamics of solar system objects, including members of the imaging team for the Cassini mission to Saturn; and Space and Astrophysical Plasmas.


Science and Engineering Queen Mary, University of London

Queen Mary has strong statistics groups in several different departments (School of Mathematical Sciences, School of Medicine and Dentistry and the Department of Economics) and has brought them together in the virtual Centre for Statistics. The Centre recognises the common statistical interests of the group by organising meetings of broad interest and hosting a web page to exchange information. The School of Physics has research groups in Condensed Matter Physics (CMP), Experimental Particle Physics, and String Theory. The CMP Group is part of the Centre for Materials Research, a consortium linking Physics, Engineering, Materials and Chemistry, created to support the burgeoning research collaborations in this area. The Particle Physics Research Centre (PPRC), the Centre for Research in String Theory (CRST), and the Astronomy Unit in the School of Mathematical Sciences comprise the EPSTAR Consortium (Experimental Particle, String Theory and Astronomy Research) which is at the heart of international experimental and theoretical research into the origin and structure of the universe and its fundamental constituents. The department is part of the South East Physics Network (SEPNET) which encourages collaboration between its members. These research groups are well funded with grants from various sources totalling £29 million for SEPNET, £1.1 million for PPRC, £1.4 million for CRST, and £1 million for CMP.

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The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science is one of the top 20 departments in the UK for Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, with outstanding resources, such as the state-of-the-art Listening Room and Media and Arts Studios (new for 2010) and laboratories in antennas and augmented human interaction. Since 2009, the School has housed the £5.9 million EPSRC Doctoral Training Centre in Media and Arts Technology where 12 fouryear PhD studentships are available per annum. The School currently holds a number of prestigious multi-million pound EPSRC grants, which are awarded to internationally leading research groups. These include three platform grants worth over £3 million and held in the areas of extreme reasoning, digital music and microwave and Terahertz applications to health care and imaging. In 2009, the School was awarded two EPSRC “Programme Grants” valued in excess of £5 million in the research areas of resource reasoning and computer human interaction in medical devices. The School was awarded the very first EPSRC “Large Grant”, valued at £2.5 million, for research into a distributed environment for music informatics and computational musicology. The School’s current research grant portfolio is valued at £33 million, of which about 20 per cent comes from EU grants.


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Postgraduate degrees Queen Mary, University of London

Postgraduate degrees

Taught programmes lead to a University of London Masters degree (MA, MSc or LLM), or College Postgraduate Diploma/ Certificate. Programmes of research lead to the University of London degrees of PhD or MPhil.

Taught programmes

Research degrees

MA, MSc and LLM A Masters degree will provide you with an excellent academic foundation in a relatively specialised subject area. Masters degrees are offered in a variety of subjects and usually take one year of intensive full-time study, or two years part-time. You may undertake a Masters degree for a variety of purposes, such as to improve your career prospects, or as a further step towards a research degree (MPhil/PhD). Alternatively you may simply wish to extend your knowledge and understanding of a subject beyond undergraduate level.

MPhil and PhD All of Queen Mary’s academic departments offer research degree programmes. Undertaking an MPhil or a PhD will enable you to make an original and significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge in your chosen subject area. The wide variety of research interests of individual academic staff, and a description of the College’s main research areas, can be found under the departmental entries. Many departments will allow you to study for a research degree either full or parttime. However, part-time study requires the specific approval of the academic department concerned.

Diploma/certificate programmes At Queen Mary we also offer several postgraduate diploma/certificate programmes that are either run in conjunction with Masters degrees or stand-alone. Generally entry requirements to diploma/certificate programmes are slightly more flexible than to Masters programmes. MRes A Master of Research degree combines a rigorous taught programme of research training with the opportunity to pursue a research project. Part-time study (This option is not available for non-EU students) You can study many of our postgraduate courses part-time, and you should indicate in the relevant section of the application form whether you wish to study by full or part-time mode.

Two distinct research degrees are offered: the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Both degrees are awarded following a supervised individual research programme presented as a thesis for examination. A PhD thesis is a more substantial academic undertaking than an MPhil and generally takes longer to complete. MPhil (Master of Philosophy) An MPhil thesis must be either a record of original work or an ordered and critical exposition of existing knowledge in any field.


Postgraduate degrees Queen Mary, University of London

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) You are registered for the PhD degree from the outset. During your first year of full-time study (or within an equivalent period for part-time study) your academic progress will be assessed and if it is satisfactory your progress to the next stage or year of the PhD will be confirmed MD(Res) (Doctor of Medicine) Minimum period of registration is two years full-time or three years part-time. Applicants must have full or limited registration with the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom. MA/MSc by Research Some departments also offer an MA/MSc by Research.

Attendance Full-time If you study full-time for a degree, you are expected to centre your academic activities at Queen Mary and to attend regularly and frequently, although you are entitled to a period of annual leave, which is usually six weeks per year. The normal time period taken to complete an MPhil is two years’ full-time study; for a PhD it is three years.

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Part-time Please note that non-EU students cannot study parttime on a student visa. Studying part-time enables you to follow a study pattern more suited to your personal circumstances and commitments. You should assume, however, that the equivalent of approximately one day per week attendance at Queen Mary will be required, whether on a weekly basis or in blocks. Parttime students will usually take three years to complete an MPhil or four years to complete a PhD degree. More details about the College and University regulations governing research may be obtained from the Admissions and Recruitment Office (see Notes for Applicants page 384).


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Notable Queen Mary Alumni Queen Mary, University of London

Some notable Queen Mary alumni Many Queen Mary graduates have gone on to establish inspiring and distinguished careers. These are just three of the best. Sarah Waters Lord Robert Winston The highly acclaimed novelist Sarah Waters graduated from Queen Mary with a PhD in English Literature in 1995. She had always enjoyed writing stories and poems as a child but it was while researching and writing her thesis that she found inspiration and material for her future novels. Following her PhD, she started work on her first novel and eighteen months later, in 1998, Tipping the Velvet was published. This was followed by Affinity (1999), Fingersmith (2002) and The Night Watch (2006). Her latest novel The Little Stranger, a ghost story, was published this summer and was shortlisted for the 2009 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. Tipping the Velvet, Affinity and Fingersmith have all been adapted for television; The Night Watch is currently in development with the BBC. Sarah has received numerous prestigious literary awards and nominations including three short listings for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction and the Orange Prize for Fiction. She was named as one of Granta’s 20 Best of Young British Writers in 2003 and in the same year, received the South Bank Award for Literature. Sarah has been named Author of the Year three times: by the British Book Awards, The Booksellers’ Association and Waterstone’s Booksellers.

The world-renowned fertility expert and member of the House of Lords, Professor Lord Robert Winston qualified in Medicine in 1964. Robert Winston was one of the pioneers of IVF (in-vitro fertilisation) as well as gynaecological microsurgery. His work on the preimplantation of genetic diagnosis has made a huge difference to families carrying hereditary gene defects; their children have been born without fatal illnesses. Robert has also carved out a successful TV career. He has presented several award-winning BBC television series, including The Human Body, The Superhuman and, most recently, A Child of our Time. The Human Body won a record three BAFTAs, an Emmy nomination and a Peabody Award. He is the author of no fewer than 14 books, many of which have won prestigious prizes. What Makes Me, Me won the Aventis Prize in 2005; in the same year The Human Mind was also shortlisted for the Aventis and won the BMA (British Medical Association) first prize for the Best Popular Medicine Book. It's Elementary also received a shortlisting for the Aventis prize in 2008. Robert has been a visiting professor at a number of American, Australian and European universities. He was Chairman of the British Fertility Society from 1984-87, Dean of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology for eight years, and President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 2005. He is currently a member of Council and Chairman of the Societal Issues Panel at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Throughout the course of his career Robert has received numerous awards and honours, including honorary doctorates from 16 universities. In June 2008, he was voted ‘Peer of the Year’ by his fellow parliamentarians for his expertise and work on the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill.


Notable Queen Mary Alumni Queen Mary, University of London

Sir George Cox The entrepreneur and senior corporate executive, Sir George Cox graduated from Queen Mary with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering in 1962. He chose to study at Queen Mary because it offered the best degree programme, plus the College had a good reputation for rowing which he had taken up at school. While he was at Queen Mary, George was elected President of the Engineering Society and, having rowed for Queen Mary in his second year, was invited to join the University of London Eight in his final year. George’s long and distinguished career spans engineering, management and management consultancy, most of which he has spent in information technology. For part of this he headed up the consulting and research company, Butler Cox which he led through its formation, development and eventual flotation on the London Stock Market. Following this, he was appointed Chief Executive, Chairman and Managing Director of the European arm of technology giant Unisys, a post he held for four years before becoming Director-General of the Institute of Directors. More recently, (2004-07), he was Chairman of the Design Council, the UK’s national strategic body for design. In 2005, he published The Cox Review of Creativity in Business: Building on the UK’s Strengths. Commissioned by the then Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, the review looks at how best to enhance UK business productivity by drawing upon the nation’s world-leading creative capabilities. A past international rowing coach, Sir George was Chairman of Selectors for the GB men’s rowing team for the 1979 World Championships and the 1980 Olympics.

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Humanities and Social Sciences


Business and Management

MSc International Financial Management p32 MSc International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations p33 MSc Management and Organisational Innovation p34 MSc Marketing p35 MSc Accounting and Finance p36 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p36


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

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School of Business and Management www.busman.qmul.ac.uk The School of Business and Management represents an exciting expansion in business and management education within the University of London. Our academics are engaged in high quality research with a particular focus on the relationship between business and society as a whole. Our range of innovative Masters programmes draw on the research strengths of our international staff and address a rapid growth of interest in business and management as an academic discipline.

Research strengths We are a distinctive School, proud of taking an approach to scholarship that emphasises the diverse range of humanities and social science backgrounds of our staff. Our distinctive, inter-disciplinary approach to the analysis of business and management builds on Queen Mary’s established reputation for innovative thinking in the humanities, law, and social sciences. Our emphasis on the interconnected nature of business management and society often leads us to ask questions that are not traditionally considered to be within the remit of a business school.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The School of Business and Management went into the Research Assessment Exercise for the first time in 2008. We currently rank alongside longer established Schools such as Cass Business School and the University of St Andrews. This outstanding achievement reflects the quality of our staff and their commitment to research and scholarship. Projects, funding, research grants and awards The School enjoys a growing international reputation for its initiatives in Responsible Management Education. It is a signatory to the United Nations Principles on Responsible Management Education and active in the PRME Network. Through academic partnerships with universities in Vietnam, China, and Indonesia, the School develops innovative curriculum and research incorporating these principles. These efforts are backed by a cluster of senior scholars in the School who enjoy a global reputation for scholarship in Corporate Social Responsibility and Good Governance. For example, our Knowledge Transfer Partnership between Queen Mary and Richmond Pharmaceutical Ltd which is worth ÂŁ459,986.


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Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

School of Business and Management www.busman.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Further information

The School has excellent resources for its graduate students, including two fully-equipped computer labs, its own computing support officer, and further backing from the extensive resources of the College’s computer services. Doctoral students have their own dedicated office and computing facilities and are given support to attend external workshops and conferences. Graduate students also have access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, an award-winning building designed especially for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room.

Postgraduate Admissions Geraldine Marks Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk

The College has a well-stocked library, with dedicated subject librarians, and subscriptions to the leading journals and discussion paper series. Students also have wider access to other libraries within London, including the University of London Library (Senate House). They may also take advantage of the College’s Language and Learning Unit (offering beginner, intermediate and advanced level courses in a wide range of languages), as well as an unrivalled array of specialist language centres provided by the University of London. All graduate students are eligible to attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year, on such topics as writing journal articles, preparing for an academic career, and knowledge transfer.

Scholarships / studentships The College has a number of bursaries available on a competitive basis, which offer financial support to those registering for one of its MSc programmes. Those applying for PhD research may apply for a College Studentship, which covers both UK fees and maintenance for up to three years. These are generally allocated in May/June of each year. Candidates do not need to make a separate application for bursaries and studentships, which are allocated as part of the usual application procedure. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section for more information about funding.

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teamd@qmul.ac.uk


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

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School of Business and Management Career opportunities Business and Management graduates are qualified to take up a wide range of careers; from advertising, banking, HR, accountancy and journalism, to teaching and public sector management. This by no means exhaustive list illustrates the diverse interests of our students, as well as the useful transferable skills that students acquire during their studies.

Graduate profile: Muhammad Usman Abid

Many international students have started their own businesses on returning home, or otherwise used their knowledge in family companies. Recent graduates are employed by: Standard Chartered • HSBC • Proctor and Gamble • Bank of Nigeria • Reuters • Unilever • Tesco • Marks & Spencer. Further examples follow each programme description.

Studied: MSc in International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations Currently: Assistant Manager (HR) Unilever, Karachi, Pakistan. My job involves looking after the unionised staff at Unilever’s factories throughout Pakistan. It is very challenging but I really enjoy it. Why did you choose Queen Mary? I had been working for a while, so I chose the School of Business and Management because I wanted an experience to remember. I was looking for a school which had a strong international context and which could offer me an advanced programme. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Studying here has proven to be very challenging; and importantly, huge emphasis is laid on critical thinking and practicality of issues. The academic staff are actively involved in various policyoriented projects and offer their full intellectual and research support to students.


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Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

MSc International Financial Management One year full-time Programme description This programme is designed to provide a critical and research driven study of aspects of financial management, and the changing international context in which they operate, developing your ability to apply knowledge and understanding of financial management to complex issues, both systematically and creatively. It will enable you to: • Develop your understanding of some of the key theories, approaches and issues in the field of financial management • Demonstrate transferable cognitive skills in relation to the analysis, synthesis and evaluation of the knowledge of financial management • Evaluate the appropriateness of the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods in particular contexts • Develop a range of personal skills including presentation, argumentation, evaluation, problem solving, interactive and group skills, self-appraisal, and autonomy in the planning and management of learning. Programme outline You will take the following core modules: The Firm and the Market • Research Methods for Business and Management • Financial Accounting • The Global Economy • Corporate Finance for Managers • International Macroeconomics and Finance Optional modules may include: Finance for Development • Innovation and Global Competition • Qualitative Research Methods • Quantitative Research Methods • Strategic Games for Managers • E-Marketing Assessment Assessment takes a number of different forms including coursework essays, assignments and presentations, and examinations that take place in May or early June. Students must achieve an overall pass in the taught element in order to progress to their dissertation which must also be passed for a degree to be awarded. Entry requirements You will need a good upper second class honours degree or equivalent in any subject. Some basic quantitative skills and an elementary knowledge of accounting will be an advantage. International students need IELTS 7.0 or equivalent.

Recent graduate destinations Bank of Nigeria • DeVere & Partners • J P Morgan • HB Consultants (Bangladesh) • S E Landon Estates • RSM Robson Rhodes Further information Postgraduate enquiries Geraldine Marks Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 3615 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

MSc International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations One year full-time Programme description This is a critical and research-driven programme that provides an intensive course of study and in-depth knowledge in the field of international human resource management and employment relations. You will: • Gain an insight into the key theories, policies and practices involved • Develop the skills to be able to appraise complex and contradictory areas of knowledge • Be able to evaluate the appropriateness of the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods in particular contexts • Develop a range of personal skills including presentation, argumentation, evaluation, problem solving, interactive and group skills, self-appraisal, and autonomy in the planning and management of learning.

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Recent graduate destinations HR Site Manager at Liptons (Pakistan) • Lecturer at University College, London • NHS • Superdrug Entry requirements You will need a good upper second class honours degree or equivalent in a social science or arts subject. International students need IELTS 7.0 or equivalent. Further information Postgraduate enquiries Geraldine Marks Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 3615 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk

Students will have the unique experience of studying alongside Human Resources students from Georgetown University, USA during an intensively taught module in the first semester reading week. In order to take advantage of this students will need to be available every day, for the entire week. Programme outline You will take the following core modules: The Firm and the Market • Research Methods for Business and Management • International Human Resource Management • Comparative Employment Relations • Managing Diversity • International Reward Management Optional modules may include: Finance for Development Innovation and Global Competition • Qualitative Research Methods • Quantitative Research Methods • Strategic Games for Managers • E-Marketing Assessment Assessment takes a number of different forms including coursework essays, assignments and presentations, and examinations that take place in May or early June. Students must achieve an overall pass in the taught element in order to progress to their dissertation which must also be passed for a degree to be awarded.

Judy Nwobi, MSc International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations “The programme has certainly given me a broader perspective on the international management of human resources. In particular, this has helped me critically analyse the methods and practices carried out within and across different cultures. I have also increased my practical knowledge of how to approach employment issues. “The College is in an accessible location for the rest of London, and I feel really at home on Campus. Students here know how to juggle study with leisure and still come out with good grades. The Drapers’ bar often has good nights organised, and Bar Med is a great place for lunch. “I work as a student ambassador sometimes, and I really enjoy showing prospective students around the Campus, pointing out the lecture halls and facilities. It makes me feel quite proud to be studying here!”


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Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc Management and Organisational Innovation One year full-time Programme description This programme is designed to deliver an advanced study of organisations, their management and the changing external context in which they operate. It will enable you to develop your understanding of: • Markets – the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services • The external context - economic, environmental, ethical, legal, political, sociological and technological, together with their effects at local, national and international levels upon the strategy, behaviour, management and sustainability of organisations • Customers – the role of marketing (customer expectations and orientation) • People – the management and development of people within organisations • Organisations – their internal aspects, functions and processes; their diverse nature, purposes, structures, and governance, together with the individual and corporate behaviours and cultures which exist within and between organisations and their influence on the external context • The role of business innovation, creativity, and knowledge management within organisations This programme is specifically designed for students who wish to develop their skills and knowledge to pursue a management career in a globalised environment. Programme outline You will take the following core modules: The Firm and the Market • Research Methods for Business and Management • International Marketing • International Human Resource Management • Organisation Theory • Knowledge and Innovation Management Optional modules may include: Finance for Development • Innovation and Global Competition • Qualitative Research Methods • Quantitative Research Methods • Strategic Games for Managers • E-marketing

Assessment Assessment takes a number of different forms including coursework essays, assignments and presentations, and examinations that take place in May or early June. Students must achieve an overall pass in the taught element in order to progress to their dissertation which must also be passed for a degree to be awarded. Entry requirements You will need a good upper second class honours degree or equivalent in a social science or arts subject. International students need IELTS 7.0 or equivalent. Recent graduate destinations Bio Healthcare • Barclays Bank • House of Fraser • J P Morgan Securities Further information Postgraduate enquiries Geraldine Marks Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 3615 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Marketing One year full-time Programme description This programme will provide you with a comprehensive knowledge of the working practices, theories and issues connected with the dynamic and increasingly important field of marketing in the global business arena. It will be attractive to both graduates and professionals who are interested in a career in marketing, or who wish to widen their knowledge and competencies in this field. The programme will identify processes of globalisation and their impact on multinational enterprises and national firms. It will compare strategies involved in marketing, examine the growing field of E-Marketing, discuss the contemporary debate over marketing ethics and contrast different approaches to the study of marketing and their implications. You will gain an understanding of the nature of global brands and their centrality for sustainable relationships with major stakeholders. You will also learn about the appropriateness of the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods for marketing, how to perform market research and how to design marketing programmes.

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Recent graduate destinations Reuters • Furgutmeflegas (Russia) • Museum of Vienna • HSBC • University of Dhaka Further information Postgraduate enquiries Geraldine Marks Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 3615 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline You will take the following core modules: The Firm and the Market • Research Methods for Business and Management • International Marketing • International Marketing Communications • Brand Management • Understanding Consumer and Market Behaviour Optional modules may include: Finance for Development • Innovation and Global Competition • Qualitative Research Methods • Quantitative Research Methods • Strategic Games for Managers • E-marketing Assessment Assessment takes a number of different forms including coursework essays, assignments and presentations, and examinations that take place in May or early June. Students must achieve an overall pass in the taught element in order to progress to their dissertation which must also be passed for a degree to be awarded. Entry requirements You will need a good upper second class honours degree or equivalent in a social science or arts subject. International students need IELTS 7.0 or equivalent.

Liliya Badayeva, MSc Marketing “I was recommended to apply to Queen Mary by a friend who knows a great deal about UK universities, mainly because of its immaculate reputation and high ranking. “I participated in insessional English courses and found it really helpful. I particularly loved the ‘effective presentations skills’ course. It was very creative and interesting.” “I feel like I have gained a great deal during my time at Queen Mary: knowledge, new friends, insight into culture of people from all over the world and the belief that nothing is impossible.”


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Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

(cont)

Research

MSc Accounting and Finance

Research degrees

One year full-time This programme is run in collaboration with the School of Economics and Finance

Our Doctoral Programme is one of the most vibrant and intensive research degrees in London. Students become members of an internationally recognised research community in which scholarly excellence and innovative training are highly valued. We attract students from around the world who benefit from the School’s expertise, energetic research culture and excellent work facilities.

Programme description You will develop an in-depth understanding of advanced topics in accounting and finance, as well as the opportunity to discuss many of the recent developments in both theoretical and empirical approaches to accounting and financial management. Upon completion of this programme you will: • Acquire a deep knowledge and understanding of key theories, approaches and issues in the fields of accounting and finance • Be able to demonstrate transferable cognitive skills such as analysis, synthesis and the evaluation of knowledge • Gain the ability to critically appraise complex areas of knowledge in relevant subjects • Be able to evaluate the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods in particular contexts • Have developed a good range of personal skills including presentation skills, argumentation, evaluation, problem solving, interactive and group skills, self-appraisal, and autonomy in planning and management of learning • Have enhanced your career prospects with an understanding of the complexity of policies and practices in accounting and finance and their similarities and differences in different jurisdictions. Programme outline All modules are core modules: Quantitative Techniques • Investment Management • Business Finance • Risk Management • International Accounting • Financial Reporting • Corporate Governance • Contemporary Issues in Accounting Assessment Assessment takes a number of different forms including coursework essays, assignments and presentations, and examinations that take place in May or early June. Students must achieve an overall pass in the taught element in order to progress to their dissertation, which must also be passed for a degree to be awarded. Entry requirements A good upper second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics, accounting, finance or a related subject. All International students need IELTS 6.5 or equivalent; see the ‘international students’ section on page 390 for more information. Further information Geraldine Marks, Postgraduate enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919, email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk or Sandra Adams, s.adams@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk

Research degrees normally consist of three years of full-time study in which an original contribution to an academic field is made. We have an excellent record for attracting College Studentships, and have placed PhDs in academic positions in top ranking UK and international universities. Former students have also been recruited to influential positions in the business, corporate and governmental sectors. Our taught programme covers all research methodological approaches and equips all first year PhD students with a wide range of knowledge and skills needed to complete their independent social scientific research. This programme is interdepartmental, involving departments from other Queen Mary and University of London faculties. You will be allocated a main and second supervisor. Over the three years you can expect to form a close working relationship with your supervisors, meeting regularly during your time with the School. They will also closely advise you for the upgrade examination that takes place after 12 months of research. Current PhD projects include: • Exporting, Foreign Direct Investment and Firm Performance • Gender, Sexuality and Class in Non-Traditionally Female Work • Culture Industries between Network and Metropolis: A Dynamic and Asymmetrical Definition of the New Immaterial Commons • Trends of the Global University Inside of Cognitive Capitalism • Optimising of R&D in Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries. Applications are accepted based on the candidate’s previous performance, the quality of their research proposal and the availability of a member of staff to supervise the chosen topic. The School also encourages applications from those whose topic might best be supervised jointly with another department within the College. Applicants are asked to submit a proposal of around 3,000 words, outlining the research that they hope to undertake, providing key references. A full academic transcript (a record of courses taken and grades achieved) and two academic references should also be included. Applications for PhD study beginning in


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

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Staff research interests www.busman.qmul.ac.uk/staff

September should be submitted no later than April of that year. All students whose applications are accepted by a supervision pair are automatically considered for the studentships; the decision is made in June. Further information MPhil/PhD enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8581 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 email: sbm-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk www.busman.qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Director of the Doctoral Programme Professor Sonja Gallhofer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8984 email: s.gallhofer@qmul.ac.uk

Research areas The School has a strong research focus and has quickly established itself as a centre of excellence for research, attracting a solid core of international scholars with world-class reputations and a diverse range of interests. Academic staff also undertake consultancy activities internationally. Research is currently focused in six areas: • Globalisation • Equality and Diversity • Innovation, Networks and Knowledge • Business History • Communications, Discourse and Narratives • Education The School has two Research Centres: The Centre for Globalisation Research (CGR) aims to be a leading academic centre for research on globalisation. Its research, dissemination and user engagement activities are structured around three Research Programmes, linked by the common theme of the analysis of globalisation: • Economic Systems and Development • Knowledge, Organisation and Social Networks • Multinationals It is a multidisciplinary project with its fellows and associates being drawn from the fields of economics, history, law, management, politics and sociology. The Centre for Research in Equality and Diversity (CRED) is at the leading edge of equality and diversity research nationally and internationally. The research is focused on employment relations policies and practices, global diversity management, labour force and sectoral studies, migration, professional and low paid work, career studies, marketing and organisational aspects of equality and diversity and draws on the intersecting nature of inequalities including gender, ethnicity, religion, age and class. The Centre has received in excess of £750,000 in grants from European and UK bodies and has built strong alliances with international universities and institutions.

Globalisation Dick Allard MSc(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Economics Industrial Economics, with particular reference to Rent-Seeking Behaviour, Environmental Economics, and Statistics Dr Alvaro Angeriz PhD(Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona) Lecturer in Economics Applied Macro-Econometrics, Structural Time Series, Efficiency Stochastic and Deterministic Assessments Santonu Basu PhD(New England, Australia) Senior Lecturer in Banking and Finance The Operation of Credit Market, Economic Growth, Poverty Professor Paul Duguid MA(St Louis, USA) Professorial Research Fellow in Knowledge Management Business, Management and Organisational History Professor Brigitte Granville PhD(EUI, Florence) Professor of International Economics and Economic Policy Monetary Theory, Macroeconomics, Economics of Essential Medicines, Fairtrade Giuliano Maielli PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Operations Management Business History, Business Organisation Sushanta Mallick PhD(Warwick) Senior Lecturer in International Finance International Finance, Development Finance Pedro Martins PhD(Warw) Reader in Applied Economics Labour Economics, International Economics, and Micro econometrics

Innovation, Networks and Knowledge Dorota Bourne PhD(Luton Business School) Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour Organisational Behaviour and Development, Change Management, International Knowledge Transfer Pietro Panzarasa PhD(Bocconi Italy) Senior Lecturer in Organisational Theory and Behaviour Social Networks, Social Dynamics, Social Influence, Knowledge Transfer and Sharing, Online Communication, Collective Cognition Martha Prevezer PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Strategy and Innovation Globalisation, International and Comparative Management, Business Management, Organisational History


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Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

Staff research interests

(cont)

www.busman.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Professor Maxine Robertson PhD(Warwick) Professor of Management Managing Innovation, Managing Knowledge Workers, Professional Identity, Knowledge Management

Critical Management Arianna Bove DPhil(Sussex) Lecturer in Marketing Social and Political Marketing Ishani Chandrasekara PhD(Leicester) Lecturer in Accounting Accountancy, Finance, Gender and Subaltern Studies Rowland Curtis MA(Lond) MRes(Lond) Lecturer in Organisation Studies Theory and Philosophy of Organisation; Politics of Knowledge and Critique; Discourse, Subjectivity and Meaning; Critical Action Perspectives Sadhvi Dar PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in Corporate Social Responsibility/Business Ethics Critical Management Studies, International Development and Non Governmental Organisations, Discourse Analysis, Ethnography Professor Peter Fleming PhD(Melbourne) Professor of Work, Organisation and Society Critical Studies of Organisations, Business Ethics, Sociological Analysis of Power in the Workplace, Industrial Semiology Professor Sonja Gallhofer MagPhil(Graz, Austria) Professor in Ethics, Governance and Accountability Critical Accounting History, Accounting and Universalism, Critical Accounting Theory and Accounting and Gender Professor Gerard Hanlon PhD(Trinity College, Dublin) Professor of Organisational Sociology and School Director Political Economy, Corporate Social Responsibility Matteo Mandarini PhD(Warwick) Lecturer in Strategy Transformations of Work, Culture and Conflict, Workerism and Post-Workerism, Marxism, Poststructuralism, Political Theory, Strategy Professor Cliff Oswick PhD(King’s College, Lond) Professor of Organisation Theory and Discourse Organisational Discourse, Critical Management Practices, Organisational Change

Communications, Discourse and Narratives Yasmin Ibrahim PhD(Lond) Reader in International Business and Communications Intercultural Communication, Political Communication, ICTs, Globalisation, Discourse Analysis, Creative and Culture Industries Bernadette Kamleitner PhD(Vienna, Austria) Lecturer in Marketing Consumer Behaviour, Consumer Psychology, Subjective Experiences of Financial Transactions Professor Sean McCartney MSc(Lond) Professor of Accounting and Business History Business History, Companies in the Industrial Revolution, UK Profitability 1855-1914, Railway Privatisation in the UK Professor Nicholas O’Shaughnessy PhD(Cantab) Professor of Communications Political Marketing, Political Communication, Propaganda, Advertising, Social Marketing Professor Michael Rowlinson PhD(Aston) Professor of Organisation Studies Organisation Theory, Critical Management Studies, Management and Organisational History, Organisation Theory, Critical Management Studies

Political Economy Liam Campling MA(Manchester), Lecturer in work and Organisation Political Economy of Development, Multinational Firms, International Trade and Industrial Policy, Food/Agri-Business, Global Commodity Chain Analysis Emma Dowling MSc(B’ham) MRes(Lond) Lecturer in Ethics, Governance and Accountability Global Governance and International Institutions, Social Movements and Social Change, Theories of Ethics and Political Economy, Gender and Affective Labour Professor Simon Mohun PhD(Lond) Professor of Political Economy Political Economy, Economics


Business and Management Queen Mary, University of London

HR, Equality and Diversity Hazel Conley PhD(Warwick) Senior Lecturer in International Human Resource Management Public Sector Employment, Non-Standard Employment, Equality and Discrimination Law, Trade Unions, Critical HRM Professor Geraldine Healy PhD(Herts) Professor of Employment Relations Employment Relations, Inequalities and Career, Gender, Ethnicity and Work Roger Johnston PhD(Edin) Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies Critical Accounting and Labour Process Gill Kirton PhD(Herts) Reader in Employment Relations Employment Relations, Trade Unions, Discrimination and Inequalities in Employment, Gender and Career, Diversity Management Professor Mike Noon PhD(Lond) Professor of Human Resource Management Equality and Diversity, Ethnic Minorities and Employment, Human Resource Management Ahu Tatli PhD(Lond) Lecturer in International Human Resource Management Discrimination and Inequality in Employment, Diversity and Careers, Agency and Change in Organisations, Practices and Discourses of Diversity Management

Education Professor Stefano Harney PhD (Cantab) Professor in Strategy and Director of Global Learning Governance, Strategy, Public Sector and Not-forProfit Management

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Staff profile: Dr Hazel Conley Senior Lecturer in International Human Resource Management “My research focuses on the use of new working practices, particularly numerical flexibility, in the public sector and its impact on equality and diversity. I am also interested in how numerical flexibility is developing in international public services, most notably in China. My most recent research, funded by the British Academy, examines the implementation of an innovative piece of legislation, the Gender Equality Duty, in local government. A list of my publications can be viewed on the Centre for Research in Equality and Diversity (CRED) web page: http://hosted.busman.qmul.ac.uk/ cred/Publications/index.html “As a student I noted an interesting anomaly in labour force statistics in relation to temporary workers in the UK public sector. I decided to research this further for my PhD, which I completed in 2000. I have retained an interest in public sector employment since. “Through my research I hope to advance our theoretical understanding of flexibility and ‘nonstandard’ working practices. Ideally this would lead to improvements in working practices for some of the lowest paid and most vulnerable workers. “I use my research in my teaching and I have inspired a number of international students to undertake similar research for their dissertations and theses in other countries. “Queen Mary is a good place for postgraduate study; the College is uniquely international in its focus and the research ethos has attracted leading academics.”


Contemporary Global Studies

MA Cities and Cultures p86 MRes Cities and Cultures p87 MA Global and Comparative Politics p180 MA Globalisation and Development p186 MA International Financial Management p32 MA International Relations p182 MSc Public Policy p184 MA in Migration and Law p144


Contemporary Global Studies Queen Mary, University of London

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Contemporary Global Studies www.qmul.ac.uk/courses Contemporary Global Studies at Queen Mary draws upon the expertise of four leading departments – Politics, Economics, Geography, and Business Management – to offer a range of exciting interdisciplinary courses in subjects ranging from Globalisation and Development to Migration and Public Policy.

Research strengths Staff members within these departments are internationally acknowledged as experts within their fields, who contribute not only to scholarship, but also to the work of enterprise, government and non-government organisations. This combination of academic excellence and practical knowledge is reflected in the teaching, which places equal emphasis on theory and practice, and which aims to equip students with skills that will enable them to pursue successful careers within their chosen field. Students can expect close supervisory contact throughout their period of study, and will also benefit from the vibrant, friendly, and intellectually stimulating atmosphere, which characterises the College as a whole.

Postgraduate resources All registered students will have access to both Queen Mary’s excellent research library and the University of London Library at Senate House. Information on access to other specialist research facilities is available from individual departments. Graduate students also have access to the Lockkeeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, an award-winning building designed especially for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room. Students also attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year by the Graduate School, on such topics as writing journal articles, research ethics, preparing for an academic career, enterprise skills, and knowledge transfer.

Degree programmes MA Cities and Cultures - see page 86 MRes Cities and Cultures - see page 87 MA Global and Comparative Politics - see page 180 MA Globalisation and Development - see page 186 MA International Financial Management - see page 32 MA International Relations - see page 182 MSc Public Policy - see page 184 MA in Migration and Law - see page 144

Pirah Palijoh, MSc in Globalisation and Development “I chose Queen Mary for its excellent reputation and the outstanding variety of courses on offer. I appreciate the quality of teaching, and the knowledge and exposure to my key subjects. My supervisor and other staff members are encouraging and appreciative. “I have so many memories of my time at Queen Mary, so I have to be selective. I have met students of different ages and nationalities through socialising, working and studying. It has been an experience for me, as I feel part of this multicultural, global institution. My vision has become far broader and I have experienced and sensed the concept of “globalisation” through close association with the international students and teaching faculty here at the College.”


Drama

MA in Theatre and Performance p46 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p48


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Department of Drama www.drama.qmul.ac.uk The Department of Drama is an exciting, dynamic and creative place for scholars and practitioners in drama, theatre and performance studies, and was rated the top drama department in the UK in the 2008 RAE. Our teaching and research embrace contemporary and emerging art forms as well as the rich history of theatre and the performing arts, especially those of the early modern period and the Nineteenth and Twentieth-Centuries. Our postgraduate students are at the forefront of new research in the field.

Research strengths The Department of Drama was created in 1997, as part of the School of English and Drama. It has a thriving undergraduate programme, and more than 70 postgraduate students, making it one of the largest and most rapidly growing departments for graduate study in the country. Our students come from a wide range of cultures and backgrounds and their work on theatre and performance has a strong international dimension. In a spirit of intellectual and creative adventure and ethical commitment, research in the Drama Department consistently explores the cultural politics of performance. Across all of our research, both practice- and text-based, we aim to enhance political understanding of the place of theatre and performance in social life.

Our research is embedded in a dual commitment, to exploring the interaction of experimental performance with the practices of activism and social engagement, and to practising historical and theoretical scholarship that is consistently attentive to the materialities of culture. Staff and research student work is focused through four main – but overlapping – strands of research: cultural histories of performance, transnational performance, live art, and applied performance.

Research quality indicators Research Assessment Exercise In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, the Drama Department was rated first among UK drama departments for the quality of its research. 90 per cent of the Department’s research was deemed to be of world-leading or internationally excellent quality. Projects, funding, research grants and awards The Department of Drama enjoys research partnerships with local, national and international partners, ranging from the Barbican to the Live Art Development Agency in London, to cultural activists in Brazil and theatre companies in Italy. People’s Palace Projects is an Arts Council funded organisation, based in the Department, responsible for the development of projects focusing on performance and human rights, climate change and mental health. The Department has also hosted artists such as Bobby Baker and Oreet Ashery as Creative Fellows funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.


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Drama Queen Mary, University of London

Department of Drama www.drama.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Further information

The Drama Department offers performance and rehearsal spaces, including the Pinter Studio Theatre and the Boiler Room. Students in the Department also have access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, which contains work stations, computing facilities and social space. Our postgraduates also draw on the extensive library and research resources of the University of London and the British Library. London is, of course, one of the world’s outstanding performance cities, and Queen Mary Drama students investigate – and contribute to – its vibrant cultural ecology.

Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: sedpgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk

Scholarships / studentships Scholarship information changes every year. In 2010, we awarded five internal scholarships to postgraduate students. We also have an excellent record in securing Arts and Humanities Research Council awards for both PhD and MA study. Applicants wishing to be considered for funding are strongly encouraged to contact us at the earliest possible date.

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk


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Department of Drama Career opportunities We offer students the possibility of attending a variety of workshops on professional career development, in addition to the opportunities offered by the College careers services. A very high percentage of our graduates attain academic jobs, and there are Queen Mary graduates working in universities across the globe. They also have the skills to enter many aspects of theatre work, arts management, research, publishing, and teaching at all levels of the education system. The Department of Drama has collaborative relationships with a wide range of arts organisations, including the Barbican, the Live Art Development Agency, Shakespeare’s Globe, Artangel, the Young Vic Theatre, the Liceu Theatre in Barcelona, ArtsAdmin, and BBC Radio Drama. Postgraduate students regularly work with these and other organisations, and collaborate with the many visiting artists who contribute to our programmes. Recent students on our postgraduate programmes have gone on to full-time academic careers at leading universities, as well as to a range of creative and managerial positions in arts organisations in the UK and the United States.

Graduate profile: Katja Hilevaara Studied: MA Performance and PhD in Drama – graduated 2009 Currently: Working on my PhD transfer, so writing, and shaping the whole project. I have also continued to work artistically, and teach Live Art and Theatre Making at Goldsmiths. Why did you choose Queen Mary? I had for a while been planning to get back into studying, and had begun to hear really good things about Queen Mary and its vibrant and extended research community. The MA in Theatre and Performance was structured in a way that provided an opportunity to critically develop my artistic practice, as well as engage in rigorous theoretical thinking around the discipline of performance. The courses ranged from theory to practice and the breadth and diversity of the staff and student interests and experience were made available within the course and beyond. The MA presented me with a renewed vocabulary and critical tools to launch into my PhD research for which I was able to apply for an AHRC-funded studentship. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Being part of a research community has invigorated both my practice and research. I have been able to identify the critical framework around which my artistic practice has operated for years, and this discovery has been made possible with the support and encouragement of the Department’s commitment to independent research. Dissemination of the research is very much part of the culture at Queen Mary, and contacts and opportunities to present at conferences and festivals as well as to write for publications are made readily available and promoted. What are your career plans in the next five years? Although early days still, at completion I aim to write a book on my PhD, and continue research into memory and performance both in theory and practice. I envisage continuing with my academic career, as well as working as a theatre and performance practitioner.


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Drama Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

MA in Theatre and Performance One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA in Theatre and Performance is an innovative programme that reflects the Department of Drama’s commitment to socially engaged and critically inventive inquiries into theatre and performance. The programme is interdisciplinary in its scope and you will have the opportunity to analyse and create theatre and performance in relation to a wide variety of contexts and critical, cultural and historical perspectives. A key benefit of the programme is its flexibility: within a framework of informed and structured experimentation, you can develop projects for individual modules to advance your own investigations. The programme aims to equip graduates for research degrees in theatre and performance and to enhance graduates’ career opportunities and professional development in teaching and a wide range of creative practices. Programme outline Students take four assessed modules, two nonassessed research training modules and write a dissertation. Compulsory modules: • Theatre and Performance Theory An examination of theoretical texts and ideas that have shaped contemporary understanding of performance, theatre and culture. • Performance Research A consideration of critical writings, theoretical frameworks and research methodologies. • Historiography and Archives An analysis of theoretical and practical issues surrounding historical research in theatre and performance studies. Optional modules Students choose three of the following: • Performance Lab Students co-devise and perform a group project as a means of addressing research questions through practice. • Independent Practical Project Students devise independent practical projects, with the support of a mentor, that focus on an area of performance practice such as playwriting, applied drama, directing, dramaturgy, acting, new technologies, site-specific performance and live art.

• Independent Written Project Students design and produce an independent written project under the supervision of a member of staff on a topic not provided within existing modules. • Contemporary Theatre and Performance An examination of trends in recent theatre and performance and its analysis, especially in relation to what they articulate about contemporary culture and aesthetic, political, social and emotional value. • Early Modern Drama in Performance An exploration of ways in which performance produces meanings in relation to early modern drama – in its early production, performance history and recent performance. Students may specialise in early modern drama by substituting Performance Lab with a suitable module from the MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (subject to the approval of the MA Convenor). Students may substitute a maximum of 30 credits from another of the School’s MA programmes (subject to the approval of the MA Convenor). Suitably qualified students take up to 30 credits of selected modules from the MSc by Research in Media and Arts Technology (subject to approval and availability). Dissertation Following the completion of the taught modules, students pursue an independent research project culminating in a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words.


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Assessment Theatre and Performance Theory, Contemporary Theatre and Performance; Applied Performance: Histories, Theories, Practices and Independent Written Project are each assessed by a 4,000-word essay. Performance Lab and Independent Practical Project are assessed by a combination of practical work process and documentation. Early Modern Drama in Performance is assessed by a practical presentation and a 3000-word essay. The dissertation is 12 – 15,000 words in length. The research training modules – Performance Research and Historiography and Archives are not assessed. Entry requirements Normally, an undergraduate degree with a first or upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in a relevant field. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should normally have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.3. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their potential to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. As part of the admissions process, we may call for examples or written and artistic work and/or interview candidates. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Live Art Development Agency • Candoco Dance Company A significant number of our graduates undertake PhDs in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies or related subjects and have been successful in attracting funding for these projects. Our graduates are employed at a number of universities including: William and Mary College, Central School of Speech and Drama and the University of Northampton. Many of our graduates use the degree to develop their performance practice and work as freelance practitioners, especially in the field of Live Art. Further information Ms Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries and academic advice, please contact: Director of Taught Postgraduate Programmes in Drama Dr Caoimhe McAvinchey Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2851 email: c.mcavinchey@qmul.ac.uk

Lewis Alexander Church, MA Theatre and Performance “Having completed my BA at Queen Mary, I was aware of the fantastic opportunities offered by the Department of Drama, in terms of working with staff and visiting artists, and excellent postgraduate student resources. “Overall Queen Mary has a fantastic attitude to research and performance practice. Department staff are willing to support and develop original ideas and interests, rather than limiting students to pre-set areas of investigation. They are always approachable and eager to offer help with any aspect of research. They are also brilliant when it comes to organising contact with artists and organisations, and I have been able to work closely with several artists in a way that I do not believe would have been possible at any other institution. “The facilities at Queen Mary are exceptionally well equipped. In the last few years the library has expanded to include a massive amount of resources, particularly in theatre and performance, and the University has strong connections with various arts organisations that compliment the materials available on campus. “East London is a great area to live in, with local pubs, restaurants and clubs, and easy transport links to central London. Culturally, there is a massive artistic community, which means that there are constantly opportunities arising to perform, see new work or meet artists and arts professionals. Queen Mary itself hosts many different events, and there is almost always something interesting going on somewhere!”


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Drama Queen Mary, University of London

Research

Research degrees Drama’s vibrant community of graduate scholars undertakes innovative performance research addressing a diversity of interests. We welcome graduate students and visiting research fellows who will contribute research in any of our areas of specialism (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Drama offers PhD studentships funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and a limited number of College awards may also be available. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22.

Research areas Research in Drama focuses on the cultural politics of performance. This encompasses a range of topics, themes and cultural contexts including: • Live art • Modern and contemporary European theatre • Theatre and cultural industries • Applied and socially engaged theatre • Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama in performance • Interculturalism and performance • South Asian, South African, and South American performance

• • • • •

Performance history and historiography Acting theory Dramaturgy, directing, and directors’ theatre Gender and sexuality in performance Performance and space

Our research builds on valuable international, national and local collaborations. These include AfroReggae in Brazil, companies like Artangel, the Barbican and Shakespeare’s Globe, events like East End Collaborations and the London Film Festival as well as ongoing arts projects in London and across Europe. Drama staff maintain links with cultural organisations around the world, from the British Council to the Mander and Mitchenson Theatre Collection, and from Performance Studies International to the American Society for Theatre Research. Members of staff are current or recent editors of and advisers to Contemporary Theatre Review, Modern Drama, TheatreForum, Western European Stages, Journal of American Drama and Theatre, Performance Research, Shakespeare Bulletin, Theatre Journal, and the Manchester University Press series Theatre: Theory-Practice-Performance. Drama research at Queen Mary is further enhanced by visits from leading international scholars and practitioners.


Drama Queen Mary, University of London

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Staff research interests www.drama.qmul.ac.uk/staff/

Ali Campbell MA(Edinburgh) Senior Lecturer Applied Performance with visual practice; large-scale community opera and social poetry; AIDS education through theatre; T.I.E/issue based performance in schools; London based work with marginal groups Nadia Davids BA(Cape Town) PhD(Cape Town) Lecturer South African Theatre; Staging Race in South Africa and the US; Physical Theatre; Cultural Memory; Oral Traditions in Performance Maria M Delgado BA(Wales) MA(Leeds) PhD(Newcastle) Professor Twentieth-Century Spanish theatre, performance and film; directors’ theatre and currents in contemporary European theatre; intercultural and transnational performance; performance and film analysis; editing and (film) curating; translation for the stage Bridget Escolme BA(Cantab) MA PhD(Leeds) Senior Lecturer Early modern performance practice; contemporary performance of Shakespeare and his contemporaries; the role of the audience; theatre for young people and Theatre in Education Jen Harvie BA(McGill) MA(Guelph) PhD(Glasgow) Reader Contemporary theatre, performance and art and cultural identities; contemporary theatre/ performance-making processes; relational and installation art/performance and social relations; space and theatre/performance; theatre/performance and the city Paul Heritage BA(Manchester) Professor The power of art to progress social justice and change (with particular reference to prisons, and probation; human rights; sites of urban conflict; people living in extremity and risk); contemporary Brazilian theatre and popular culture; cultural responses to climate change and environmental degradation Dominic Johnson BA(Warwick) MA PhD(Lond) Lecturer Performance art, live art, and body-based practices since 1960; performance and visual culture; histories of sex and sexuality; subcultural histories, including body-modification and performance in alternative spaces

Caoimhe McAvinchey BA(Manchester) MA(NYU) PhD(Queen Mary) Lecturer Applied theatre; prison and performance; cultural policy, particularly the politics and practices of evaluation; documentation and archives; contemporary Irish theatre Michael McKinnie BA(Guelph) MA(York, Canada) PhD(Northwestern) Senior Lecturer Theatre and space; theatre and the state; Irish, Canadian, postcolonial and transnational performance; interdisciplinary and materialist performance research; dramaturgy and new play development Jen Mitas MA PhD(Lond) Lecturer Practice-based research in performance; the politics and ethics of contemporary theatre and performance; technologies and epistemologies of self; Twentieth-Century theories of acting; hoaxes Nicholas Ridout BA(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Reader Contemporary theatre and performance; spectatorship and politics; performance and democracy; performance criticism as critical practice; tragedy, affect and ethics Richard Schoch BSc(Georgetown) PhD(Stanford) Professor Cultural history; theatre history and historiography; Shakespeare in performance Catherine Silverstone BA MA(Waikato) DPhil(Sussex) Lecturer Early modern drama in performance on stage and screen, especially in relation to gender, sexual and racial politics and Shakespeare cultural politics; trauma studies and its relation to performance practice and criticism; tragedy Lois Weaver BA(Radford) Professor Live art; solo performance; feminist and lesbian theatre; performance and human rights; performing democracy Martin Welton BA MPhil(Birmingham) PhD(Surrey) Lecturer The senses and performance; actor training; theories of phenomenology and embodiment with regard to acting; tourism and the city


Economics and Finance

MSc in Banking and Finance p54 MSc in Economics p55 MSc in Finance and Economics p56 MSc in Finance and Econometrics p57 MSc in Investment and Finance p58 MSc Law and Finance p59 MSc Accounting and Finance p60 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p61


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School of Economics and Finance www.econ.qmul.ac.uk The School of Economics and Finance is one of the top Economics Schools in the UK. We are committed to excellence in research and teaching, and combine an international reputation with a friendly and informal atmosphere for both staff and students.

Research strengths Queen Mary has been part of the University of London since 1907, with Economics taught since 1965. Over time, the School has developed a reputation for effective, serious study, and creative research. The aim of the School’s graduate programme is to produce fully trained professional economists. We are proud of our outcome: former students have carved out successful careers in academia, industry, finance, the civil service and other areas of the public sector, both in the UK and on the international stage, in organisations such as the International Monetary Fund and foreign Central Banks. The operation and achievements of the graduate programme are closely linked to the range and depth of research activities in the School. To date we have more than 500 undergraduate students, about 200 postgraduate students and 40 academic researchers in the staff. We have great expertise in three areas of economics: Economic Theory, Econometrics and Finance, and Applied Economics. We have been able to publish outcomes from our research in virtually all the top journals in the field. These include The American Economic Review, Annals of Statistics, Econometrica, Econometric Theory, The Review of Economic Studies, The Journal of Banking and Finance, The Economic Journal, The European Economic Review, The Journal of Finance, The Journal of Econometrics, The International Economic Review, The Journal of Economic Theory, The Journal of Public Economics, Economic Theory, Economics Letters, The Journal of Applied Econometrics, The Journal of the European Economic Association and the Rand Journal of Economics. Our research strengths have made it easy to develop close collaborations with a number of governmental and non-governmental agencies. This provides further opportunities for students wishing to carry out research within these organisations. We are also developing links with financial institutions such as Barclays, Bloomberg and KPMG so that interested students can take up internships and gain valuable experience.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise In the Research Assessment Exercise 2008, the School of Economics and Finance was ranked among the top six in the UK (Times Higher Education), an outstanding result that confirms the calibre of our academic staff and the high quality of our work. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Many of our staff have received academic grants (totalling over one million pounds per year) as well as provided consultancy and advisory services to financial institutions such as the UK and Italian Treasury and the Bank of England. There are also excellent funding opportunities for students, see the Scholarships and Studentships section on page 52.


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

School of Economics and Finance www.econ.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources In addition to the high quality of teaching and supervision available, and thanks to an extensive refurbishment programme (completed in 2008), our students have access to state-of-the-art computing and teaching facilities. The School has a subscription to Datastream as well as providing standard software packages for data analysis, simulation, and word processing including GAUSS, Eviews, PCgive, RATS, Microfit, and Stata. There are two computing labs in the School, each with 30 PCs and dedicated printers. These labs are on the undergraduate Ethernet network with links to College servers and the Internet. There is a dedicated postgraduate micro lab with more specialised econometric software. The faculty computer services officer is on call to help with queries and problems. Graduate students in Economics also have access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, an award-winning building designed especially for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room. Our graduate students also attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year, on such topics as writing journal articles, preparing or an academic career, enterprise skills, and knowledge transfer.

Scholarships / studentships We have a strong track record of attracting bursaries and scholarships for MSc study and PhD research. We offer unparalleled financial support to deserving graduate students. At the MSc level, we offer a number of bursaries, varying from £3,000 to £5,000 each, depending on the programme and on academic merit. In the academic year 2008-09 the School gave out more than £50,000 in scholarships. For the coming year we are planning the following scholarships: • Ten £3,000 scholarships for MSc Banking and Finance • Five £5,000 scholarships for the MSc Economics • Five £3,000 scholarships for the MSc Finance and Economics • Five £3,000 scholarships for the MSc Finance and Econometrics • Ten £3,000 scholarships for the MSc Investment and Finance. • Five £3,000 scholarships for the MSc Law and Finance.

Queen Mary’s Economics students obtaining an upper second class honours degree will also get 10 per cent off fees and those achieving a first will get a 20 per cent reduction. The School is unique in the strength of funding offered to PhD students. First and foremost, the School is recipient of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards that cover tuition fees and a maintenance grant (£17,300 in the year 2008-09). In addition, the School has College PhD Scholarships available, which cover tuition fees and include a maintenance grant which matches the ESRC ones. The School also makes available a financial package which covers fees and Teaching Fellowships (£12,000 for the year 2008-09) for three years in the first instance. The number of these awards changes from year to year; for the years 2009-10 and 2010-11 we already have a number of ESRC quota awards available. The awarding of scholarships, studentships and bursaries generally begins in April, so early applications are encouraged.

Further information Programme Manager (Postgraduate/Research) Sandra Adams Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7356 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teamd@qmul.ac.uk


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School of Economics and Finance Career opportunities Our graduates work with a very wide range of organisations. Many are in the City of London in institutions such as Barclays, HSBC, Ernst&Young and KPMG. Others work in financial institutions further afield, for example at the IMF Research Department, Central Bank of Colombia and Chief Economist at Hansabanka Latvia. As well as financial institutions, our graduates also work in academia, including the University of Manchester, Carlos III University (Madrid) and American University (Washington DC).

Graduate profile: Karim Boudjelal Studied: MSc in Finance and Investment – graduated 2007 Currently: Working for Deutsche Bank in the City of London Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? After having studied Economics in the University of Toulouse 1, I decided to come to London to obtain an MSc in Finance and Investment, primarily because the City of London is at the heart of the world’s financial markets. Therefore, I knew that obtaining an MSc in Finance and Investment in a leading UK University would grant me an added benefit in settling down in the professional world. I chose Queen Mary after researching widely on universities in the UK and establishing that Economics at Queen Mary was renowned for its excellent research work. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? The School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, University of London offers you a range of programmes taught by well-qualified professionals, who will help you to get the best experience from your time in London. Moreover the structure of the MSc, a mix of revision classes, tutorials, and guest speakers keeps the programme intense and helped me to achieve the best results. From a personal point of view, I enjoyed the warm welcome provided by the staff (workshop and events), which helped me to meet other students from all over the world. This has enriched my experience even more. As a foreigner I was also very pleased by the English modules offered for free which helped me become more confident. The College is also well equipped with excellent modern facilities, especially the gym. What are your career plans in the next five years? I now live in London and work for one of the leading investment banks in the world. I definitely think that studying for the MSc in Finance and Investment at Queen Mary prepared me more than adequately for my entry into the corporate world.


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

MSc in Banking and Finance One year full-time Programme description This programme aims to train you in areas of finance which have major practical and theoretical interest, especially investment analysis, corporate finance issues such as optimal capital structure and mergers and acquisitions, banking, derivatives, finance microstructure and taxation. The programme is intended to give professional postgraduate training to students wishing to pursue careers in the City, Government or elsewhere in the private sector. Those registering for the MSc in Banking and Finance take four core modules in the first semester and two core modules plus two options in the second semester. In order to reflect the practical and applied side of this programme the School organises a number of extra optional modules that aim to provide further practical training to students, whose subject matter changes from year to year. These modules are often taught by City practitioners, who provide an insider’s view on topics of interest to the financial community. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules Mathematics • Statistics Core modules Financial Statements • Investment Management • Asset Management • Commercial and Investment Banking • Risk Management for Banking • Quantitative Methods in Finance Module options include Financial Derivatives • Empirical Finance • Behavioural Finance • Applied Risk Management • Advanced Quantitative Techniques for Finance Assessment The grade for each module is assessed through coursework, which counts for 25 per cent of the final marks, along with a written exam in May. The 10,000 word dissertation written over the summer counts for four modules. Entry requirements You should have at least an upper second class honours degree, or equivalent. This doesn’t have to be in Economics, though it is preferable and some background in quantitative subjects is necessary. Students are expected to sit pre-sessional statistics and mathematics examinations following intensive pre-sessional modules in September. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Recent graduate destinations International Monetary Fund (IMF), CFA, NYSEEuronext, Mazars Pakistan, JS Bank, South Chine Securities (UK) Ltd, ING Wholesale, Barclays, HSBC, Ernst & Young Further information Postgraduate/Research Programme Manager Sandra Adams, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5096 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Leone Leonida Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8833 email: l.leonida@qmul.ac.uk


Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

MSc in Economics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This is a well-established intensive programme providing rigorous training in modern economic theory and applications. It is best suited for students who wish to train for careers as professional economists in the private sector or the government, or who wish subsequently to follow an academic career or to pursue research in economics. The programme has a research dissertation component and has recognition as a Research Training degree by the ESRC under their “1+3” scheme. Those registering for the MSc in Economics take four core modules in the first semester and four modules in the second semester, of which three are core modules and one is an option. MSc Economics students are also required to take pre-sessional modules in Mathematics and Statistics, designed as refresher courses so that their background knowledge is at the level required for postgraduate study in Economics. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules Mathematics • Statistics Core modules Macroeconomics A • Microeconomics A • Econometrics A • Mathematics for Economists • Macroeconomics B • Microeconomics B • Econometrics B

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Module options include: Labour Economics • International Finance • Financial Econometrics • Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling, Empirical Macroeconomics Assessment The grade for each module is assessed through coursework, which counts for 25 per cent of the final marks, along with a written exam in May. The 10,000 word dissertation written over the summer counts for four modules. Entry requirements You should have at least an upper second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics or a related subject. A good basic knowledge of relevant statistical theory and mathematics is also necessary, and students are required to sit pre-sessional statistics and mathematics examinations following an intensive two-week course in September. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Postgraduate/Research Programme Manager Sandra Adams Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7356 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Christopher Tyson Tel: +44 (0)2 7882 8851 email: c.j.tyson@qmul.ac.uk


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc in Finance and Economics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme provides advanced study in finance and related areas of economics. The programme gives training for those who wish to specialise as financial economists in the private sector or government, or who wish to follow an academic career. The programme has a research dissertation component and has recognition as a Research Training degree by the ESRC under their “1+3” scheme. Those registering for the MSc in Finance and Economics take three core modules in the first semester and two core modules in the second semester. Thereafter you may choose the mix of modules making up your degree according to the options below. MSc Finance and Economics students are also required to take pre-sessional modules in Mathematics and Statistics, designed as refresher courses so that their background knowledge is at the level required for postgraduate study in Financial Economics. Programme outline Pre-sessional programmes: Mathematics • Statistics Core modules: Quantitative Asset Pricing • Corporate Finance • Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling • Financial Derivatives • Econometrics A Module options include: Macroeconomics A • Microeconomics A • Macroeconomics B •

Microeconomics B • Public Economics Labour Economics • Econometrics B • International Finance • Financial Econometrics • Time Series Analysis, Mathematics for Economists, Empirical Macroeconomics Assessment The grade for each module is assessed through coursework, which counts for 25 per cent of the final marks, along with a written exam in May. The 10,000 word dissertation written over the summer counts for four modules. Entry requirements You should have at least an upper second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics or a related subject. A good basic knowledge of relevant statistical theory and mathematics is also necessary, and students are required to sit pre-sessional statistics and mathematics examinations following an intensive two-week course in September. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Postgraduate/Research Programme Manager Sandra Adams, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7356 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Andrea Carriero, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8050 email: a.carriero@qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Anna Szkalisnka Studied: MSc in Finance and Investment – graduated 2006 Currently: I am now working as Finance and Research Manager at UCL. I was offered this job within a couple of weeks of completing my MSc. The job itself has certainly been a positive reward after obtaining my MSc. Why did you choose Queen Mary? When I finished my studies in Poland I decided to pursue a second MSc degree to equip myself with the necessary analytical and research skills in the area of finance. I chose Queen Mary because of the unique programme structure

and excellent computing facilities for applied economics. On top of this the School of Economics and Finance was rated 5th in the UK in the Research Assessment Exercise 2008 and consists of both academics and City professionals. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? In the beginning, the programme appeared to be tough and challenging, but the experience, support and stimulating nature of the professors, along with excellent student services and on-the-spot guidance, made it simple but demanding. The library is excellent and is full of up-to-date knowledge, with books, journals, papers and the inter-library loans facility being the key players. The assessment

system was very effective, and included group assignments, presentations, research and final papers. I found it interesting to associate with other like-minded students from a range of backgrounds. After a year of postgraduate training in Finance and Investment I was ready for something that would not only build upon my theoretical knowledge but also provide me with practical, real world exposure. The opportunity of doing the programme at Queen Mary was an amazing and satisfying experience for me, and when I look back I know I could not have missed it. I am immensely proud to say that I graduated with something more than a certificate!


Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

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MSc in Finance and Econometrics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme provides advanced study in finance and econometrics. The programme gives training for those who wish to specialise as financial economists and econometricians in the private sector or government, or who wish to follow an academic career. The programme has a research dissertation component and has recognition as a Research Training degree by the ESRC under their “1+3” scheme. Those registering for the MSc in Finance and Econometrics take three core modules in the first semester and two core modules in the second semester. Thereafter you may choose the mix of modules making up your degree according to the options below. MSc Finance and Economics students are also required to take pre-sessional modules in Mathematics and Statistics, designed as refresher courses so that their background knowledge is at the level required for postgraduate study in Finance and Econometrics. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules Mathematics • Statistics. Core modules Quantitative Asset Pricing • Time Series Analysis • Financial Econometrics • Econometrics A • Econometrics B. Module options include: Macroeconomics A • Microeconomics A • Economic of Industry • Macroeconomics B • Microeconomics B • Labour Economics • Corporate Finance • Financial Derivatives • Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling • International Finance. Assessment The grade for each module is assessed through coursework, which counts for 25 per cent of the final marks, along with a written exam in May. The 10,000 word dissertation written over the summer counts for four modules. Entry requirements You should have at least an upper second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics or a related subject. A good basic knowledge of relevant statistical theory and mathematics is also necessary, and students are required to sit pre-sessional statistics and mathematics examinations following an intensive two-week course in September. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Mohaimen Mansur, PhD in Economics involving research in the field of econometrics. “I completed an MSc in Economics at Queen Mary last year, and decided to continue on to a PhD. With one of the top-ranked economics schools in the UK and a beautiful campus in the famous City of London, Queen Mary was an obvious choice for me. “The best thing about working as a PhD student is the opportunity to attend scholarly seminars and conferences every week and meet renowned and promising economists from around the world. This has helped me learn about recent developments in economic theory and has stimulated my own thoughts and ideas. “What I appreciate most about the college is its generous rewards for good academic achievements. I have won a handful of prizes and scholarships for my coursework and performance in examinations. This not only makes me feel rich and proud, but it has also helped to boost my confidence and brought out the best in my work. “As a postgraduate research student I have had the opportunity to work as a teaching assistant. I find it interesting, as well as challenging, to explain complex ideas of economics in a lucid and intuitive way to undergraduate students. I value this teaching experience very much as it has helped me to understand different topics in a deeper and better way too.”

Further information Postgraduate/Research Programme Manager Sandra Adams Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7356 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Andrea Carriero Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8050 email: a.carriero@qmul.ac.uk


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc Investment and Finance One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme aims to train you in areas of finance which have major practical and theoretical interest, especially investment analysis, corporate finance issues such as optimal capital structure and mergers and acquisitions, banking, derivatives, finance microstructure and taxation. The programme is intended to give professional postgraduate training to students wishing to pursue careers in the City, Government or elsewhere in the private sector. Those registering for the MSc in Investment and Finance take four core modules in the first semester and three core modules and one option in the second semester. In order to reflect the practical and applied side of this programme the School organises a number of extra optional modules, whose subject matter changes from year to year, that aim to provide further practical training to students. These modules are often taught by City practitioners, who provide an insider’s view on topics of interest to the financial community. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules Mathematics • Statistics Core modules: Quantitative Techniques • Business Finance • Investment Management • Behavioural Finance • Financial Derivatives • Commercial and Investment Banking Module options include: Empirical Finance • Asset Management • Risk Management for Banking • Applied Risk Management • International Finance • Advanced Quantitative Techniques for Finance Assessment A written examination is taken in May for each module. Some modules may also include assessed coursework. You will also produce a 10,000-word dissertation over the summer, which will normally include both theoretical economic content and applied results. Entry requirements You should have at least an upper second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics or a related subject. A good basic knowledge of relevant statistical theory and mathematics is also necessary, and students are required to sit presessional statistics and mathematics examinations following an intensive two-week course in September. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Graduate profile: Damien Regnier Studied: MSc Finance and Investment – graduated 2007. Currently: Working for JP Morgan Chase (London) on Convertible Bonds Trading desk as a permanent Analyst. During the first year I will focus on the Quantitative side of the Trading, as Convertible Bonds are pretty complex then I will go to the trading floor proper. Why did you choose Queen Mary? After my studies in Mathematics in France in a ‘Grande Ecole’ at Masters level, I was looking for a one-year postgraduate degree that would help me to find a job in a big US Investment Bank. Due to my background, an MSc in Finance was ideal. Choosing the MSc in Finance and Investment at Queen Mary was a no-brainer: It was located in London, ten minutes from the City, it was well balanced between economics subjects like Corporate Finance and technical ones like Financial Derivatives and last but not least it included some quite ambitious lectures on Behavioural Finance and Empirical Finance – not to mention that the School of Economics and Finance was very well ranked in the UK! What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Good facilities, including reasonably priced central London accommodation and the language school, which greatly helped me to enjoy my time in London. I also met some really interesting people, and I still meet up with some of them from time to time as many now work in the City. Lastly, I use the knowledge I gained during my MSc on a daily basis: I think that is the best proof that the programme is well structured! What are your career plans in the next five years? As I have just started I’m still learning… a lot! I will hopefully be able to start trading towards the end of this year… and then well I don’t know, but I’m pretty confident! Recent graduate destinations Barclays Capital, Bloomberg, KPMG, Ernst & Young Further information Postgraduate/Research Programme Manager Sandra Adams, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7356 email: econ-postgrad@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Ron Giles, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8049 email: r.giles@qmul.ac.uk


Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Law and Finance

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Law Options: Banking Law • Regulations of Financial Markets • Securities Regulations • Dissertation in Law

One year full-time; two years part-time Programme description This programme was created in September 2009, offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. It aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of the global economy and finance, and how it is regulated by law. It consists of a main programme and three additional specialist areas in Banking and Financial Services, Law and Financial Regulation and Law and Corporate Finance. The programme is currently fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Bankers of Scotland (CIBOS) with other professional accreditations being applied for. All programmes outlines Students must take a total of 180 credits, which will be a combination of law and economics modules listed below, including one dissertation. Main programme Economics Options: Corporate Finance • Financial Economics • Financial Management • Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling • Dissertation in Economics • Commercial and Investment Banking • Investment Management • Quantitative Techniques for Finance • Principles of Accounting and Financial Reporting • Financial Derivatives Law Options: Banking Law • Legal Aspects of International Finance • Regulation of Financial Markets • Securities Regulations • EU Financial Law • Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies • Dissertation in Law Specialisation A – Banking and Financial Services Economics Options: Financial Economics • Financial Management • Dissertation in Economics • Quantitative Techniques for Finance • Principles of Accounting and Financial Reporting • Financial Derivatives Law Options: Banking Law • Legal Aspects of International Finance • Securities Regulations • EU Financial Law • Dissertation in Law • Specialisation B – Law and Financial Regulation Economics Options: Financial Economics • Financial Management • Dissertation in Economics • Principles of Accounting and Financial Reporting • Investment Management • Commercial and Investment Banking

Specialisation C – Law and Corporate Finance Economics Options: Corporate Finance • Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling • Dissertation in Economics • Investment Management • Financial Derivatives • Principles of Accounting and Financial Reporting Law Options: Banking Law • Legal Aspects of International Finance • Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies • Dissertation in Law Assessment In addition to the dissertation which would be submitted in August of the year of examination, candidates will also take a written examination in each of the modules selected. Entry requirements Law focus: A minimum upper second class honours or equivalent degree in law / or a degree with substantial law content PLUS either substantial relevant work experience in banking / finance / regulation and compliance areas or some economics / finance content in academic studies Finance focus: A minimum upper second class honours or equivalent degree in economics/ finance or a degree with substantial economics/finance content PLUS either substantial relevant work experience in the field of law or some law content in academic studies For English language proficiency, please see: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/international/languagerequirem ents/index.html#PostgraduateLaw International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Academic Enquiries, please contact: Assistant Director, Dr Leone Leonida Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8833 email: l.leonida@qmul.ac.uk Application and Administrative Enquiries, please contact: Penny Stavrinou Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8093/8099 email: p.stavrinou@qmul.ac.uk


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc Accounting and Finance One year full-time Programme description This programme aims to provide a critical programme of study which provides a depth of knowledge in the fields of Accounting and Finance. This programme will provide a programme of contemporary relevance to students seeking to work in accounting, financial services and related areas and also provide a range of cognitive and transferable skills both generic and specific to the field of study of business. Those registering for the MSc Accounting and Finance take four core modules in the first semester and four core modules in the second semester. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules Mathematics • Statistics Modules include: Financial Reporting • Corporate Governance • Contemporary Issues in Accounting • International Accounting • Economics and Finance Modules • Quantitative Techniques • Investment Management • Business Finance • Applied Risk Management

Entry requirements A good upper-second class honours degree, or equivalent, in economics, accounting, finance or a related subject. Students are expected to sit presessional mathematics and statistics examinations following an intensive pre-sessional module. For nonnative English speakers, IELTS 6.5 or equivalent is required. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Academic Enquiries, please contact: Professor Sean McCartney Programme Director email: s.mccartney@qmul.ac.uk Deputy Director Dr Leone Leonida Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8833 l.leonida@qmul.ac.uk Application and Administrative Enquiries, please contact: Geraldine Marks (School of Business Management) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3919 g.a.marks@qmul.ac.uk


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Research Research degrees

Research areas

The breadth of the School’s research offers a wide range of opportunities for those wishing to embark on a programme of doctoral research. We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest. Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils. A number of College studentships are also available. All PhD students are currently funded.

The breadth and depth of the School’s research interests are reflected in the large and very different range of doctoral work completed over the years, examples of which are:

Research degrees normally require three to four years of full-time study. In their first year, students take taught modules offered in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, relevant to their area of interest, and begin their research topic. In subsequent years, students concentrate on writing their thesis. The School runs an occasional termtime MPhil/PhD workshop, attended by members of staff, at which research students present their work and which all MPhil/PhD students should attend for their own benefit. A research student can expect to give a seminar to the workshop at least once a year. In addition, some staff members run specialised workshops in areas in which they are researching. The MSc as the first year of a PhD Programme Students may register for one of our MSc programme as the first year of a PhD programme. Transition to the MPhil/PhD programme is subject to satisfactory performance in the MSc degree. The compulsory summer dissertation may form the first step toward the development of a PhD research topic.

• Job Creation, Job Destruction and Productivity • Option Pricing in the Presence of Regime Switching • Human Capital, Earnings and Early Childbearing • Wage Dispersion and Employment in the UK • Essays on Behavioural Economic Theory • Spectral Analysis of Economic Time Series • Tax Progressivity and Tax Elasticity in Sri Lanka • Capital Flows, Human Capital and Growth • Derivative Pricing and Risk Management • Temporal Aggregation in the Continuous Time Econometric Models.


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Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

Staff research interests www.econ.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Economic Theory Nizar Allouch MSc PhD(Paris 1, Sorbonne) Senior Lecturer Microeconomics Giulio Fella Laurea(Bocconi, Milan) MSc(Warw) PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer Macroeconomics and Labour economics Winfried Koeniger Diplom(University of Bonn) PhD(European University Institute) Lecturer Macroeconomics Rachel Male PhD Lecturer Applied Macroeconomics, Development Economics, Applied Econometrics Lord Peston BScEcon(Lond) Emeritus Professor Chairman of the House of Lords’ Select Committee on Economic Affairs Macroeconomics and Economics of education Christopher Tyson PhD(Stanford) Lecturer Microeconomics Roberto Veneziani BSc(Siena) PhD(LSE) Lecturer Microeconomics and History of economic thought Nick Vriend PhD(EUI, Florence) Professor Microeconomics and Behavioural economics

Econometrics and Finance Richard Baillie BSc(Middx) MSc(Kent) PhD(Lond) Professor Pasant Professor of Economics and Finance at the Michigan State University, USA. Time series analysis, Volatility and Risk. Listed in the Who’s Who of Economists. Co-Editor of the Journal of Empirical Finance Andrea Carriero PhD(Bocconi University, Milan) Lecturer Macroeconometrics and Forecasting Marcelo Fernandes BSc MSc(Rio de Janeiro) PhD(Solvay Business School, Brussels) Professor Econometric theory and Financial econometrics

Ana Beatriz Galvão PhD(Warwick) Lecturer Macroeconometrics and Forecasting Liudas Giraitis PhD(Vilnius) Professor Parametric and semi-parametric estimation for time series models, Long memory and ARCH type models Emmanuel Guerre PhD(Université Paris 6) Professor, Head of School Econometrics of auctions, Adaptive nonparametric specification testing and Time series methods George Kapetanios BSc MSc(Lond) PhD(Cantab) Professor, Head of School Nonlinear econometric models, Model selection and Econometric forecasting Marika Karanassou BSc(Asoee, Athens) MScEcon PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer Macroeconomics


Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London

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Stepana Lazarova Dipl Eng(Prague) MSc(Lond) PhD(Prague) Lecturer Time series econometrics Duo Qin MA DPhil(Oxon) Senior Lecturer History of econometrics and Applied Macroeconomics

Applied Economics José-Miguel Albala-Bertrand BSc Lic(Chile) MScEcon PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer Political economy of development Francesca Cornaglia Laurea PhD(University of Torino, Italy) Lecturer Labour economics, Microeconometrics and Health economics Ronald Giles BSc MA PhD(Kent) MSTA Lecturer Behavioural Finance and Noise Trading. Leone Leonida MSc(York) PhD(York and Naples) Lecturer Growth econometrics and Corporate finance Marco Manacorda Laurea(Naples) MScEcon PhD(Lond) Reader Empirical labour economics, CEPR and CEP Research Affiliate Anne Spencer BSc(St Andrews) MPhil(Oxon) MSc DPhil(York) Lecturer Health Economics

Staff profile: George Kapetanios Professor, Head of School “My main area of interest is econometrics, both theoretical and applied, especially for macroeconomic datasets. I have more than sixty publications in international journals on these topics. “I did my PhD in economics and econometrics and was interested in the ability of empirical analysis to provide answers to economic problems. “My current research involves gaining a greater understanding of the behaviour of the macroeconomy, especially in turbulent times such as those we are currently experiencing. “Economics is a fascinating subject for study, as it gives us the ability to understand the behaviour of very complex systems. For example, the analysis of data offers clues into the workings of the modern economy. Not only is this rewarding – both intellectually and practically, but it also provides students with tools that are extremely useful to potential employers.”


Editing Lives and Letters

MA/MRes in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies p68 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p69


Editing Lives and Letters Queen Mary, University of London

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Centre for Editing Lives and Letters www.livesandletters.ac.uk The Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) develops archive-based research projects of relevance to the period 1500-1800. We are especially interested in interdisciplinary projects that relate to letter collections, lives and works and marginalia. CELL's research agenda supports projects that pilot innovative methodologies and practices aimed at making archives matter, and that engage energetically with the wider community. We also offer seminars, events, a skills-based postgraduate training programme and have a thriving community of doctoral research students.

Research strengths The Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) is a unique facility for large and small-scale editing projects in historical biography, diaries, correspondence and other works, 1500-1800. CELL has three main functions: to be a home to cutting-edge, archivally-based research projects; to offer a postgraduate training programme in both traditional and innovative scholarly skills enabling access, organisation and interpretation of documentary materials for research in text studies and history; and to be a platform for discussion and debate. CELL offers major opportunities for other scholars to participate in the Centre’s activities – from one-off lectures and master-classes to year-long funded fellowships. It provides research opportunities for students, visiting scholars and those with a general interest in archives and is currently developing a schools outreach programme. CELL is housed in a comfortable, well-equipped building, which provides a welcoming environment for long-term and occasional visitors. There it hosts seminars, colloquia and conferences for professional and amateur scholars and students. CELL aims to draw young scholars into editing and people-based history and to empower those who study history as amateurs by providing them with the necessary skills to have confidence in their own judgment. CELL showcases historical research projects – both in book form and online providing a forum for the latest in research discussion. CELL offers hospitality to visitors – from tea and sympathy to expert advice. CELL is led by a team of internationally renowned scholars whose work reaches academic and popular audiences. Our focus is interdisciplinary, and is grounded in archival material. Scholars at CELL are involved in projects examining lives and letters, especially in the development of electronic resources around these subjects. Other research currently includes: Anglo-Dutch relations in the SeventeenthCentury; gentry culture; intelligence and political networks; letters in literature.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise CELL is a research centre within the Department of English, which was rated second in the UK in the recent 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). This outstanding result placed the department ahead of UCL, Oxford and Cambridge. The innovative research undertaken by CELL formed a significant strand in the College’s 2008 RAE submission. Individual researchers also submitted monographs and other high quality outputs to the department’s research profile. CELL’s exceptional number of funded doctoral students, together with its project-related funding both contributed to the 100 per cent rated ‘research environment’. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Set up in July 2002, CELL was funded by the AHRC until 2007. CELL is now independently established within the academic landscape of Queen Mary, University of London. Projects include: • Correspondence of Francis Bacon • The Diplomatic Correspondence of Thomas Bodley, 1585-97 • William Dugdale • Gabriel Harvey’s Livy Online • Hooke Folio Online, in collaboration with the Royal Society • Letters of William Herle • Letters of a Stuart Princess: the Complete Correspondence of Elizabeth of Bohemia, in collaboration with Dr Nadine Akkerman at the University of Leiden, Netherlands (OUP) • Work diaries of Robert Boyle As well as these projects, CELL has offered several named PhD studentships. In the last few years these have included the Hooke Folio Transcription with the Royal Society and the Dr John C Taylor Studentship working on the Fromanteel family and horological history. You can find out more about these studentships on our website: www.livesandletters.ac.uk/


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Editing Lives and Letters Queen Mary, University of London

Centre for Editing Lives and Letters www.livesandletters.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

Queen Mary is conveniently located for access to some of the world’s greatest archival collections: The British Library, the National Archives, Senate House Library, Warburg Institute, Institute of Historical Research, Victoria and Albert Museum, Royal Society, Wellcome Institute and many other smaller specialist collections.

Scholarship information changes every year. You can find the most up to date information on our website www.livesandletters.ac.uk Recent scholarships we have awarded include: • Dr John C Taylor PhD studentship • Hooke Folio Transcription Project

The CELL building is extremely well equipped with the latest resources for research in the humanities, from networked computers with broadband access to the Internet, to digital microfilm readers and printers, and flexible AV equipment for lectures and conferences. Graduate students have access to networked computers in the basement rooms. As well as the MRes students, there is a thriving small community of CELL doctoral students. CELL’s graduate students are encouraged to participate in the staff members’ ongoing research projects, and to undertake small amounts of relevant teaching and consultancy work on CELL-related topics. The Director runs a weekly research seminar at which all graduate students in the humanities are welcome. CELL’s graduate students also have access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, an awardwinning building designed especially for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room. Our graduate students are eligible to attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year, on such topics as writing journal articles, preparing for an academic career, and knowledge transfer.

Further information Robyn Adams Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8907 email: r.adams@qmul.ac.uk Additional information for the MA/MRes course and application process is available on our website: www.livesandletters.ac.uk/mres General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk


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Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Career opportunities The MRes at CELL, which is a designated pathway through the Masters programme in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, has been specially designed for students with an interest in archival research, critical editing, life-writing and intellectual histories. The central aim of the programme is to train students in the skills they require to pursue those interests. The course is aimed primarily at students wishing to pursue doctoral study and an academic career, although the broad range of research skills and methods equip graduates to follow careers in diverse sectors such as publishing, media research, and the business sector. Students are encouraged to discuss career and employment choices towards the end of the programme with their adviser. Students who have taken the MRes at CELL often move straight on to doctoral research, with the intention of pursuing an academic career. Alternative career paths for MRes and PhD students have recently included publishing, independent research, museum and archival work.

Graduate profile: Will Tosh

Studied: MRes Editing Lives and Letters 1500-1800 Currently: Studying for a PhD. Focusing on a Sixteenth-Century Englishman called Anthony Bacon. I’m researching the way spies and information-gatherers built up friendship networks to secure their access to vital political intelligence. Why did you choose Queen Mary? CELL is a leading institution in archival research, and its position within the crook of the English and History departments provides brilliant interdisciplinary opportunities. Because my research topic spans history, cultural studies, English and French, I needed to choose somewhere that could cope with the mix! The MRes at CELL taught me incredibly useful skills. I learnt palaeography, manuscript transcription and bibliographic analysis. I also brushed up on my Latin. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Without question, the best thing about Queen Mary is the staff. The quality of the teaching and research faculty is exceptional. Having hands-on guidance and support from world-class scholars makes an enormous difference. The staff at CELL are incredibly engaged in their students’ work, and the weekly seminar hosted by the director allows staff and students to share ideas and touch base with their colleagues. As well as a dedicated graduate centre in a beautiful new building on campus, there’s a huge workroom in the arts research annexe on Mile End Road. East London’s a great place to be based. Victoria Park is just around the corner. It’s the most beautiful park in east London – a nice place to run and there’s a great café to undo all the hard work with a huge breakfast.


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Editing Lives and Letters Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

MRes in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme provides a research qualification unique in the United Kingdom. It has been designed for students with an interest in archival research, critical editing, life-writing and document-based and intellectual histories. Training in the skills required to pursue these interests is central to the programme. It should be stressed that these skills are an essential and indispensable part of the distinctive CELL training, which is primarily envisaged as a preparatory training for those intending to progress on to a PhD programme. Programme outline Core module • Textual Scholarship (two modules) Module options include: Writing a Biography • Writing Lives from Letters: The Archive and Production of Historical Biography • Urban Culture and the Book • Public and Private Cultures in Renaissance England • Understanding Religions Historically • Renaissance Bodies • Performing Early Modern Drama • Reading Shakespeare Historically • Royal Authors and Royal Lives in Early Modern England Students will also take a compulsory but nonassessed module in Latin in Semester 1 and Semester 2. Assessment Coursework You will complete five practical and two written assessments for the core module, a 4,000 word essay for each module (67 per cent). Dissertation You will complete a dissertation of 15,000 words, for which you will be allocated a supervisor appropriate to your research topic (33 per cent). Entry requirements At least an upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in arts or humanities. Prospective students will be called for interview. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Thames & Hudson Publishers, British Council, Royal Institution Further information Patricia Hamilton, Tel: +44 (0)20 78524 email: sedpadmissions@qmul.ac.uk Dr Robyn Adams, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8907 email: r.adams@qmul.ac.uk

Kirsty Rolfe, PhD student working on a project to transcribe the letters of Elizabeth of Bohemia “After completing the Renaissance and Early Modern Studies MA, I was inspired to continue studying the Seventeenth-Century. The position of research student on the Bohemia project particularly appealed to me because of my interest in the culture of letter writing in the period. “Studying for a PhD as a research student gives me excellent training in the skills I need for my thesis, such as the use of archives and manuscript handling. I also enjoy working with the other members of the project team. “The teaching is excellent, and I’ve found my supervisors and other members of the department extremely supportive and helpful. Both CELL and the wider English department have a culture of innovation in research that is really inspiring. As students of the University of London we have access to some of the best resources in the world at the British Library and the National Archives. “I’ve lived in east London for three years and I think it’s great – there are plenty of nice pubs, parks, a cheap cinema... Plus you’re close to areas like Brick Lane and Shoreditch, and it’s really easy to get to central London. “There are a huge number of postgraduate events both at Queen Mary and in other parts of the University of London. I find that Queen Mary in particular strikes an excellent balance between academic events and more social ones.”


Editing Lives and Letters Queen Mary, University of London

Research

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Staff research interests www.livesandletters.ac.uk/people

Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils. A limited number of College studentships are also available. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22. Entry requirements Students with a distinction at MA level or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section from page 390.

Research areas History of science; biography and life-writing, intellectual and cultural history; epistolary networks. CELL is interested in projects that deal with the documents associated with early modern life writing, especially in electronic form. Members of staff at the Centre are involved both in managing their own projects and in developing the potential of existing projects in collaboration with other scholars. CELL is interested in the issues and problems presented by early modern documents associated with life writing, be they editorial, technical, methodological, pragmatic, or substantive. If you are interested in proposing a CELL project you should contact Dr Jan Broadway.

Professor Lisa Jardine CBE MA PhD(Cantab) CELL Director/Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies Renaissance intellectual and cultural history; the scientific revolution Professor Alan Stewart MA(Cantab) PhD(Lond) CELL International Director Renaissance lives; early modern networks and communities Jan Broadway PhD(Birmingham) CELL Technical Director Gentry culture; antiquaries; local history Robyn Adams MA PhD(Lond) Senior Research Officer, CELL/MRes convenor Early modern epistolary networks: intelligencers; manuscript culture Matthew Symonds MPhil(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Research Officer Eighteenth-Century political and cultural history; libels, sedition and miscommunication of ideas Eleanor Merchant BA(Oxon) MA(Lond) CELL Latin teacher Vernacular humanism; Anglo-Latin culture

Staff profile: Matthew Symonds Research Officer “I work on newspapers and the wider world of Grub Street in the late Seventeenth and early Eighteenth Centuries: writers, printers, booksellers, and slightly shop-soiled aristocrats. I examine the lives these people lived, often all rubbing up alongside each other in a small handful of London streets, and the newspapers, magazines, and books they produced. “I'm currently publishing a lot of research on a Jacobite newspaper-man called Nathaniel Mist. Mist was absolutely loathed by the governments of the day and he was eventually forced into exile in France after his paper published a scandalous libel on the king, the king's father, the king's mistress, and the prime minister. Naturally, the paper was a commercial triumph.

“I've also just started work on a new project, examining the strained family life of Henry St John, Viscount Bolingbroke, the tory statesman and philosopher, as his step-sister launches into an affair with a minor poet and his despised father so inconsiderately refuses to die. “I was drawn to these areas of research through an interest in hack journalism: it's such a strange and yet attractive way to earn a living. Grub Street is teeming with fascinating, obscure, but amazingly well-documented lives. These lives can be used to illustrate, contextualise, and test some of the larger claims we make about the past, whether in political, cultural, or economic history. “As someone new to the College, Queen Mary has always struck me as an amazingly productive and supportive place for postgraduates.”


English

MA in English Studies: English Literature p74 MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies p75 MRes in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies p76 MA in English Studies: Writing in the Modern Age p77 MA in English Studies: Writing and Society 1700-1820 p78 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p79


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Department of English www.english.qmul.ac.uk The Department of English at Queen Mary, University of London is widely recognised as one of the country’s leading centres for literary research and English studies. The research and teaching interests of our staff span a wide range of periods from the classical to the contemporary, and we have an international reputation for our pioneering interdisciplinary and collaborative work.

Research strengths We are one of the largest English departments in London, with 35 academic members of staff, and 900 students. The Department has a growing population (currently 130) of highly qualified postgraduate students working towards our taught MA and research degrees. We attract postgraduate students from all over the world, and greatly value the breadth of experience this diversity brings to our teaching and research. The Department’s research strengths are broadly based. We have specialists who can offer supervision in the following periods of study: Classical and Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern, Eighteenth-Century and Romanticism, NineteenthCentury Studies, Modern and Contemporary, Postcolonial. Many of the Department’s staff are known internationally for their work. They bring to their teaching and project supervision expertise in the most recent developments in research methodologies and an awareness of current directions in research. We are particularly prominent in histories of the book and histories of reading, archive-based research and manuscript studies, visual and material culture, intellectual history and its literary applications, cultural theory and politics, literature and religion, contemporary poetry and poetics, and colonial and postcolonial literature and theory. We develop and share these interests with students in our thriving research culture of seminars and reading groups, which are open to those following both MA and doctoral programmes. London is both the setting and the theme of much of our work, and collaborative research with great London institutions (including The Globe Theatre, The National Gallery, the Sound Archive at the British Library, Dr Williams’s Library, and The Victoria and Albert Museum) is a distinctive and growing strength.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise English at Queen Mary was positioned joint second in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) – the nationwide assessment of the quality of research across all Departments in all UK universities. The 2008 RAE confirmed the Department’s reputation as a centre of excellence in English studies. Based on a grade point average score, we were placed joint second of the 87 submissions from English departments in UK universities. 70 per cent of our research activity was judged to be of ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ quality by the RAE panel of experts. We were the highest ranked English department in London. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Research in the Department is organised in subject areas, and also fostered by research centres, including: • The Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (established with AHRC-funding) • The Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies (which hosts the Leverhulme funded ‘History of Dissenting Academies’ and AHRC/ESRC funded ‘Religion and Society’ projects) • Interdisciplinary centres in Renaissance Studies and Eighteenth-Century Studies. The Department also hosts the AHRC Strategic Programme ‘Beyond Text: Performances, Sounds, Images, Objects’. We have been notably successful in securing AHRC funded Collaborative Doctoral Awards.


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Department of English www.english.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Further information

Students in the Department have access to the Lockkeeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, which contains work stations, computing facilities and social space. Our postgraduates also draw on the extensive library and research resources of the University of London and the British Library. As students in the wider Humanities and Social Sciences sector of the College they are offered a rich and varied range of research training, lectures, seminars and reading groups. All of our postgraduate students are members by right of the University's Institute of English Studies, a leading centre for literary research which hosts around twenty seminar series and twenty conferences a year.

Research and External Communications Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7354 email: sedpgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk

Scholarships / studentships The Department has had an excellent track record in securing funding for our students. We participate in the AHRC Block Grant Partnership Scheme, which provides funding for both MA and PhD students in five-year cycles. In 2009-10 we were also granted a number of College awards, including four funded research studentships and three Masters bursaries. These studentships are allocated to the Department’s acknowledged areas of outstanding research strength.

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk


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Department of English Career opportunities In the Department of English we offer students the possibility of attending a variety of workshops on professional career development, in addition to the opportunities offered by the College careers services. The principal focus of professional graduate training in the Department is on an academic career, but not exclusively so. A significant number of our MA graduates undertake PhDs in English and related subjects, and many are successful in securing funding for their research

Graduate profile: Martin Eve

Studied: MA in English Studies: Writing in the Modern Age, graduated 2009

projects either at Queen Mary or at other universities. Increasing numbers of our graduates find that the skills they have developed as Masters students at Queen Mary attract offers from a diverse range of employers. An academic job is an important career objective for our doctoral students, and several of our recent PhD graduates are now employed in university departments in the UK and overseas. Doctoral students also acquire the skills they need to enter many areas of arts management. academic path as most studying this author, I would likely end up with the same conclusions; hardly innovative scholarship. Therefore, I opted for a background in Modernism at Queen Mary, an unusual path in my field, but one which has allowed me to work with a different perspective to others. The staff at Queen Mary were supportive of this idea and supremely capable at every stage of the course. Queen Mary is also a great place to work. You have a beautiful campus environment with all the benefits of Senate House and the British Library right on your doorstep. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Postgraduate study greatly enhanced my research methodology. The training in techniques for the systematic study of literature in context has contributed immensely to both my critical thinking and research practice. The staff were knowledgeable and dedicated. Without their support throughout, I would not have succeeded in my application for AHRC funding at doctoral level, with which they were more than willing to help. The MA environment is also highly stimulating in social terms. The people on the course are all there because they love the subject and the common ground prepared by this shared passion makes for an unparalleled learning, and social, experience. In the end, I look back on my time at Queen Mary as the ideal preparation for my ambitions to enter an academic career. Perhaps, if I'm lucky, I'll end up back there one day – on the teaching side!

Currently: PhD candidate at Sussex University Why did you choose Queen Mary? Having previously completed my undergraduate studies at Queen Mary, I was already assured of the administrative and academic structures of the department; they are excellent! I was also fortunate enough to know, before I began, that I wanted to continue in academia to write a PhD on Thomas Pynchon but that, if I took the same

What are your career plans in the next five years? I hope to complete my PhD in approximately three years time and, at that stage, apply for research and teaching posts in higher education. In the meantime, I have just had my first invitation to speak at an international conference and am involved in the establishment of an interdisciplinary online journal.


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Degree programmes

MA in English Studies: English Literature One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA in English Literature invites students to reflect on some crucial questions. How have ideas about literature and literary value changed over time? What effects do innovations in printing and publishing have on writing? To what extent do political and social factors condition and define authorial identities and practices? The programme considers the relationship between literatures from a variety of historical periods. It is ideal both for those who intend to pursue doctoral research – particularly if your interests span traditional literary periods – and for those who wish to achieve a broad overview of Anglophone literary culture. The MA in English Literature provides both structure and flexibility, combining a specially-designed core module with the opportunity to select further options from across the whole range of MA modules on offer in the Department of English. Programme outline Core module The Production of Texts in Context, considers how texts have been produced, disseminated, and received throughout history, as well as examining how this kind of historical enquiry might influence our own textual interpretations. Topics may include: the emergence of authorial identity in the Middle Ages; the reappearance of fictional narrative in Western Europe; the circulation and reception of information about news and current affairs in the medieval and early-modern periods; the relative longevity and popularity of different works and genres; manuscript circulation during the Restoration; the rise of the professional writer in the mid-Eighteenth Century; the influence of professional reviewers and criticism upon writing in the Romantic period; publication in the Victorian era; the emergence of ‘mass culture’ and its impact on literary production in the modern age; the influence of hypertext and the web on literary production. Students also take a non-assessed research methods module, Resources for Research. Module options You will also choose three modules – one in the first semester, and two in the second – from across the range of MA modules offered by the Department of English, and write a dissertation.

Module options may include: Aestheticism and Fin-de-Siècle Literature • Benjamin and Adorno • The Cultural Legacies of the Great War • Freud and Proust • Imagining the Modern Caribbean • Metro-Intellectuals: Women Writing in the City, 1780–1824 • Modernism, Aesthetics and Politics • Modernism and Ireland • Modernism, Secularism and Religion • Notions of Progress and Civilisation • Postcolonialism, Language and identity • Private and Public Cultures in Renaissance England • Psychoanalysis and Modern Culture • Reading Shakespeare Historically • Renaissance in Context • Polite and Popular Culture in the Eighteenth Century • Romantic Manifestos • Sociability: Literature and the City, 1660-1780 • Time and Historical Imagination • Urban Culture and the Book: London, Publishing and Readers in the Sixteenth Century • Writing the East End Assessment Coursework (67 per cent) Assessment for each module is a 4,000-word essay. Dissertation (33 per cent) A dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words. Entry requirements Most applicants will have an undergraduate degree with a first or good upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in English or such related fields as History, Cultural Studies and Media Studies. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their ability to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. Applicants may be invited to interview or asked to submit examples of written and/or creative work. We welcome applications from mature and non-traditional students. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations BBC – Copywriter • LB Sutton – Admin Assistant • UNESCO – Trainee Chartered Accountant • Bonhams Auctioneers – Sales Room Assistant • Freelance Writer • Institute of Education – PGCE • QMUL – PhD in English Further information Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk


English Queen Mary, University of London

MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies One year full-time; two years part-time Programme description The MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies gives you the opportunity to explore the vibrant culture that existed in Europe between 1450 and 1700. Our approach to this material is genuinely interdisciplinary: you will look at the history, religion, literature, and visual culture of the period, and be taught by experts working in the Departments of English, History, and Modern Languages. The specially designed modules examine some of the most influential figures of the Renaissance including Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Cervantes, and Michelangelo, and address the central issues that are informing current discussions about what constitutes the Renaissance and early modern periods. Among the topics that we investigate are: the emergence of new national identities, the nature of performance; the role played by religion, changes in ideas about the self and the body, and the impact of new technologies in printing and publishing. In all cases, the aim of the programme is to generate a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas which shaped the period. Students take this programme for different reasons. Many graduates of the MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies have gone on to win funding for doctoral study, and some are now established academics in their own right. Programme outline You take three compulsory modules: Textual Scholarship (semesters one and two) • The Renaissance in Context (semester one) • Renaissance and Early Modern Studies: Research Preparation (semester two). Training in Latin is also encouraged. You will also take two optional modules (one per semester), from a list which may include: Public and Private Cultures in Renaissance England • Reading Shakespeare Historically • Understanding Religions Historically • Urban Culture and the Book • Writing a Biography • Writing Lives from Letters: the Archive and Production of Historical Biography • Renaissance Bodies • Performing Early Modern Drama • Royal Authors and Royal Lives in Early Modern England

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Assessment Coursework (67 per cent) Assessment for each module is a 4,000 word essay. The Textual Scholarship and Latin modules are assessed by practical exercises and do not contribute to your overall mark. Dissertation (33 per cent) A dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words. Entry requirements Most applicants will have an undergraduate degree with a first or good upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in English or such related fields as History, Cultural Studies and Media Studies. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their ability to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. Applicants may be invited to interview or asked to submit examples of written and/or creative work. We welcome applications from mature and non-traditional students. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations BBC – Copywriter • LB Sutton – Admin Assistant • UNESCO – Trainee Chartered Accountant • Bonhams Auctioneers – Sales Room Assistant • Freelance Writer • Institute of Education – PGCE • QMUL – PhD in English Further information Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk


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Degree programmes

(cont)

MRes in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MRes in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies provides rigorous research training for students who already have a clear topic they want to pursue at graduate study. Focusing on the technical and linguistic skills that underpin research projects, it aims to provide high-level specialist research training for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, including direct experience of working with documents, images and artefacts, archival skills, Latin and other specialist training as appropriate. Programme outline You take a compulsory module in semester 1 and semester 2, Textual Scholarship, and a compulsory but non-assessed module in Latin in semester 1 and semester 2. You then also choose two optional modules from a list which may include: Urban Culture and the Book • Public and Private Cultures in Renaissance England • Reading Shakespeare Historically • Understanding Religions Historically • Renaissance Bodies • Performing Early Modern Drama • Writing a Biography • Writing Lives from Letters: the Archive and Production of Historical Biography • Royal Authors and Royal Lives in Early Modern England

Amrit Saggu, MA English Studies, Writing in the Modern Age “I chose Queen Mary mainly because I did my Bachelors degree here and found it to be a friendly place. I have a good rapport with all my lecturers, and know that the College seeks to uphold a tradition of strong pastoral care; this was definitely true in my own experience. Even when my advisers were not in a position to help, I felt that all my lecturers were approachable.

Assessment Coursework (67 per cent): Assessment for each optional module is a 4,000-word essay. Assessment of Textual Scholarship (the core module) is by five practical assignments and two 4,000-word essays. Dissertation (33 per cent): A dissertation of 15,000 words. Entry requirements Most applicants will have an undergraduate degree with a first or good upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in English or such related fields as History, Cultural Studies and Media Studies. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their ability to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. Applicants may be invited to interview or asked to submit examples of written and/or creative work. We welcome applications from mature and nontraditional students. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations BBC – Copywriter • LB Sutton – Admin Assistant • UNESCO – Trainee Chartered Accountant • Bonhams Auctioneers – Sales Room Assistant • Freelance Writer • Institute of Education – PGCE • QMUL – PhD in English Further information Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk

“The MA is really flexible so that people with different interests can pursue them without feeling like they're missing out a particular literary movement or historical period. I'm focused on 'modern' literature, but I don't have to focus totally on modernism, even though that is a very crucial part of modern literature.The teaching has been excellent, in my experience. I like the campus - everything's accessible and it's busy without being chaotic. “I'm a student ambassador find it really enjoyable. We do all kinds of things - helping out at graduation, general administrative work, campus tours, open days. It brings me into contact with a whole lot of very interesting people. I also like going to the postgraduate seminars in the Lock-keeper's Cottage. They are always thought-provoking, even if the subject isn't directly relevant, and everyone tends to go the pub afterwards!”


English Queen Mary, University of London

MA in English Studies: Writing in the Modern Age One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description Writing in the Modern Age examines how modernism and modern writing have encountered a range of intellectual debates in areas such as politics, art history, philosophy, psychoanalysis, theology, postcolonialism, and critical theory. Through reflecting on the dynamic relationships between these different discourses, the programme will provide you with a series of tools for thinking about the nature, status, and role of literature in the modern world. All students take Modernism and After; a core module which addresses the concepts of modernity and post-modernity, and provides a critical introduction to modernist theory and writing. You will also be given the chance to choose from a range of modules. These research-led modules have been specially designed to reflect the current scholarly interests of academics within the Department. Such an arrangement is mutually beneficial: it provides staff with the opportunity to discuss and debate their latest work, and students with the chance to come into contact with cutting-edge research by leading specialists. Students take this MA programme for different reasons. Many graduates of Writing in the Modern Age have gone on to win funding for doctoral study, and some are now established academics in their own right.

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Programme outline You will take the core module Modernism and After in semester one, and two research methods modules, Resources for Research (semester one) and Researching Modern Culture (semester two). You will also take three modules (one in semester one and two in semester two) from a list which may include: • Freud and Proust • Imagining the Modern Caribbean • Modernism and Ireland • Cultural Legacies of the First World War • Writing the East End • Aestheticism and the Fin-de-Siècle Literature • Modernism, Secularism and Religion • Postcolonialism, Language and Identity Assessment Coursework (67 per cent) Assessment for each module is a 4,000-word essay. Dissertation (33 per cent) A dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words Entry requirements Most applicants will have an undergraduate degree with a first or good upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in English or such related fields as History, Cultural Studies and Media Studies. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their ability to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. Applicants may be invited to interview or asked to submit examples of written and/or creative work. We welcome applications from mature and non-traditional students. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations BBC – Copywriter • LB Sutton – Admin Assistant • UNESCO – Trainee Chartered Accountant • Bonhams Auctioneers – Sales Room Assistant • Freelance Writer • Institute of Education – PGCE • QMUL – PhD in English Further information Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk


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Degree programmes

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MA in English Studies: Writing and Society 1700-1820 One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description Writing and Society looks closely at texts of the Eighteenth-Century and Romantic literature. The first semester of the programme focuses on the ways in which they address issues in literary history and the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history and visual culture. We consider these in relation to the preoccupations of the times: the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interests in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London. In the second semester, in focusing on Romantic poetics and manifestos, we examine the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment in the context of the world-shaking crisis of the French Revolution and its aftershocks, and with regard to the subjective entitlements demanded. This MA aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the MA will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography and IT. You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a course in research skills: Resources for Research. You take four modules, each of which culminates in the writing of a 4,000 word essay. A dissertation of 15,000 words provides

an opportunity to develop a sustained, coherent and fully documented argument on a research topic formulated in consultation with a specially-assigned supervisor. Programme outline You take two non-assessed modules: Resources for Research (semester one) and Panoramas of London (semesters one and two). In addition you also choose four modules from a list which may include: Romantic Manifestos • MetroIntellectuals: Women Writing and the City, 17801824 • Primitivism and Progress • Sociability: Literature and the City, 1660-1780 • Polite and Popular Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Assessment Coursework (67 per cent) Assessment for each module is a 4,000 word essay Dissertation (33 per cent) A dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words Entry requirements Most applicants will have an undergraduate degree with a first or good upper second class honours (or the equivalent) in English or such related fields as History, Cultural Studies and Media Studies. Where a North American marking scheme is used, applicants should have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Promising applicants who do not meet the formal academic criteria but who possess relevant credentials and who can demonstrate their ability to produce written work at Masters level will also be considered. Applicants may be invited to interview or asked to submit examples of written and/or creative work. We welcome applications from mature and non-traditional students. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations BBC – Copywriter • LB Sutton – Admin Assistant • UNESCO – Trainee Chartered Accountant • Bonhams Auctioneers – Sales Room Assistant • Freelance Writer • Institute of Education – PGCE • QMUL – PhD in English Further information Patricia Hamilton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8524 email: p.m.hamilton@qmul.ac.uk Applicants should be aware that English MA programmes are currently under review and that each MA and its core module may be subject to change in the future.


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Research

Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Home students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. A limited number of College studentships and Department of English research grants are also available. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22. Entry requirements Candidates will normally have a good first degree (upper second class honours or above) in the broad field of the humanities, and will be in possession of (or anticipate completing) a relevant Masters degree that demonstrates distinction-level achievement. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas Research areas in the Department include: Classical and Medieval Research in this area covers topics such as literacy and orality, cultural exchange between England and France, the writing of history, and the reception and transmission of medieval texts. Interests in the history of the book lead forward into the SixteenthCentury and work in the Renaissance area. Renaissance and Early Modern Studies Staff working in this research area have an international reputation in ‘applied intellectual history’, a term coined at Queen Mary for this distinctive field. A close link with the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters provides scholars in the Department with a backdrop for archival research and a resource for intellectual exchange across a range of humanities disciplines. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth- Century Studies and Romanticism Established research strengths lie in the literary analysis of polite and popular culture, in the poetry and politics of the Romantic and Victorian periods, and in intellectual history and the history of the book. The ‘long Eighteenth-Century’ is an area of particular interest and established research strength at Queen Mary, with colleagues working on rhetorics of race, philosophy, religion, gender and politics.

The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries are in close dialogue in the Department through research into poetry and poetic traditions of the period. Modern and Contemporary, and Theoretical and Interdisciplinary Studies The literature and culture of the modern period are a major focus of research activity among the staff. The Department has a successful tradition of combining high-level research into individual writers with an interdisciplinary focus on the relations between literature, theory, culture and politics. Postcolonial Studies A strong team of postcolonial researchers combines expertise on literatures in English from the Caribbean, Africa and South Asia. The Department contributes to the work of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters; the Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies; the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Seminars and Reading Groups are held in Medieval/Early Modern Texts and Contexts; Renaissance Studies; Dissenting Studies, Eighteenth Century; Enlightenment and Romanticism; Modernism; Psychoanalytic Thought; Irish Studies.


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Staff research interests www.english.qmul.ac.uk/staff/research/

Classical and Medieval Julia Boffey MA(Cambridge) DPhil(York) Professor of Medieval Studies The production and transmission of Middle English literature; medieval and early modern lyrics; codicology and early printing Michael Edwards BA PhD(London) ILTM Professor The Attic Orators; Greek and Roman Rhetoric; Classical Biography; later and post-classical Latin Katie Fleming BA MPhil PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer The classical tradition; the role of antiquity in modern intellectual thought; the afterlife of the ancient world Alfred Hiatt BA(Sydney) PhD(Cambridge) Reader Spatial representation in the Middle Ages and Renaissance; Old and Middle English Literature; forgery and the reception of forgeries

Renaissance Studies Warren Boutcher MA PhD(Cambridge) Reader Early modern European literature, translation, and philosophy (especially England, France, Italy); Shakespeare and early modern drama; interdisciplinary approaches (especially across English studies, History, modern languages)

Lisa Jardine CBE MA PhD(Cambridge) Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies. Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Renaissance and early modern intellectual history, European cultural history, archives and archivebased research, the history of science Kevin Sharpe BA MA DPhil(Oxford) Professor and Director, Centre for Renaissance Studies Early modern British cultural and political history; early modern British literature; the early modern visual culture and politics; history of the book and reading Evelyn Welch BA(Harvard) PhD(London) Professor of Renaissance Studies Renaissance visual and material culture and early modern dress in Europe

Eighteenth-Century Studies and Romanticism Markman Ellis MA(Auckland) PhD(Cambridge) Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies Eighteenth-Century English literature and culture; London and literature; sensibility and women's writing in the Eighteenth-Century; representations of slavery and empire Paul Hamilton MA(Glas) MA DPhil(Oxford) Professor of English Romanticism; relations between philosophy, political theory and literature

Andrea Brady BA(Columbia) PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer Early modern literature, especially ritual, the popular press and writing by women; Neoplatonism, dreams and fantasy in Seventeenth-Century England; and contemporary avant-garde poetry

Anne Janowitz BA(Reed) BA(Oxford) PhD(Stanford) Professor Late Eighteenth-Century and Romantic literary culture; the history and theory of poetry and poetics, poetics of the night sky, New York City and its literary networks

Jerry Brotton BA(Sussex) MA(Essex) PhD(London) Professor of Renaissance Studies Renaissance visual and material culture; east-west cultural exchange, particularly Anglo-Islamic; Shakespeare; early modern cartography and travel

Andrew Lincoln BA PhD(Wales) Reader Eighteenth-Century culture; Enlightenment social theory; the culture of Romanticism; comparative mythology and modern fiction

David Colclough MA(Cambridge) DPhil(Oxford) Senior Lecturer Literature and culture of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries; the history of English political thought; rhetoric; religious writing; Bacon; Donne; Milton

Chris Reid MA(Cambridge) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer Eighteenth-Century studies; political oratory and rhetorical theory; Eighteenth-Century popular culture Isabel Rivers MA(Cambridge) MA PhD(Columbia) Research Professor Co-Director of the Dr Williams’s Centre for Dissenting Studies Intellectual History 1660-1830; dissenting, Methodist and evangelical literary culture 1660-1830; history of the book 1660-1830


English Queen Mary, University of London

Nineteenth-Century Studies Sam Halliday BA(Sussex) MA(Nottingham) PhD(London) Lecturer Nineteenth- and early Twentieth-Century American literature; technology and the history of science; the body and the senses; literary/philosophical responses to sound and music Catherine Maxwell MA DPhil(Oxford) Professor in Victorian Literature Nineteenth-Century poetry and prose; Aestheticism; vision and visuality; gender and sexuality in Victorian literature Margaret Reynolds MA(Oxford) PhD(London) Reader in Contemporary Culture Eighteenth to Twenty-First-Century literature; poetry; transmission of Classics; imagination of adoption Matthew Rubery BA(Texas) MA(Colorado) PhD(Harvard) Lecturer Victorian literature; journalism; print culture and history of the book; technology; transatlanticism; sound studies Nadia Valman BA(Cambridge) MA(Leeds) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer Religion, politics and gender in Nineteenth-Century literary culture, with a particular interest in discourses surrounding Jews; London and literature in the Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Centuries, especially east London

Modern and Contemporary Michèle Barrett BA MA DPhil(Sussex) Professor of Modern Literary and Cultural Theory First World War writing and culture; representation of shell shock; politics of commemoration; gender and culture; Virginia Woolf; Michel Foucault Santanu Das BA(Calcutta) BA PhD(Cambridge) Senior Lecturer First World War literature and culture; modernism, colonialism and early Twentieth-Century literature; theories of gender and sexuality, the body and the senses Suzanne Hobson BA(Oxford) MA(Warwick) PhD(London) Lecturer British and American modernism; critical theory; religion and secularism in early Twentieth-Century culture; gender and sexuality; travel in modernist literature

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Peter Howarth BA(Oxford) PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer Modern and Modernist poetry. The interaction of aesthetic forms with culture, politics and religion Jacqueline Rose FBA BA(Oxford) MaĂŽtrise(Sorbonne) PhD(London) Professor Psychoanalysis; modern literature and culture; South African writing; Zionism and the history and writing of Israel-Palestine Morag Shiach MA(Glasgow) MA(McGill) PhD(Cambridge) Professor of Cultural History Cultural history of the late-Nineteenth and earlyTwentieth-Centuries Clair Wills MA DPhil(Oxford) Professor of Irish Literature Twentieth-Century Irish Culture; contemporary British, Irish and American Poetry; post-war British cultural history

Postcolonial Studies Rachael Gilmour BA MA PhD(Manchester) Lecturer Colonial and postcolonial literature and theory; African literary and cultural studies; cultural theory and the politics of language; colonialism and linguistic thought Javed Majeed MA DPhil(Oxford) Professor Nineteenth-Century British colonial literature; South Asian postcolonial literatures in English; colonialism, linguistic thought and translation studies; the intellectual history of colonialism and nationalism in South Asia; Islam and postcolonialism Bill Schwarz BA(York) Reader Twentieth-Century Caribbean writing; postcolonialism; Twentieth-Century British cultural and political history; some aspects of historiography, cultural studies and media studies Andrew van der Vlies BA MA(Rhodes) MPhil DPhil(Oxford) Lecturer South African literatures, culture and politics; contemporary global anglophone literatures; postcolonial print and text studies; aesthetics, queerness, and the obscene in postcolonial literary and material cultures; Twentieth-Century and contemporary History of the Book


Geography

MA Cities and Cultures p86 MRes Cities and Cultures p87 MA Community Organising p88 MA/MSc Geography p89 MRes Geography p90 MA Globalisation and Development p91 MRes Globalisation and Development p92 MSc Integrated Management of Freshwater Environments p93 MA London Studies p94 MSc Physical Geography by Research p95 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p96


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School of Geography www.geog.qmul.ac.uk The School of Geography is one of the world’s leading centres for geographical scholarship and postgraduate study.

Research strengths Geography has been taught at Queen Mary since 1894, making us one of the oldest Geography schools in the UK. The School is home to some 250 undergraduates, 50 graduate students, and 40 research staff and faculty. Research is organised around five main themes reaching across the breadth of the discipline. In human geography, graduate students and staff work within three research themes: Culture, Space and Power; Economy, Development and Social Justice; and Health, Place and Society. In physical geography, research coalesces around two themes: Environmental Change, and Hydrogeomorphological and Biogeochemical Processes. These themes are by no means mutually exclusive, and we are equally supportive of research that reaches across them. Further support for cross-disciplinary and multidisciplinary research is provided through the School’s four research centres: The Centre for Micromorphology, The Centre for Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments; The City Centre; and the Centre for Global Security and Development.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) the School was ranked joint first (with Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol and Durham) amongst the UK’s 49 Geography schools, with 75 per cent of research activities rated world leading or internationally excellent. Assessors singled out the ‘conceptual sophistication, methodological rigour and sustained empirical enquiry’ that is a hallmark of research in the School and were especially impressed by the strength of research across all five of our research themes. Assessors also praised the School’s ‘vibrant research culture’, and the ‘excellent integration of established staff, postdoctoral researchers and research students’. This success is underpinned by a clear and effective research structure, and a strong record in attracting high quality staff and students, as well as research income.

Projects, funding, research grants and awards Over the last few years the School has seen a significant increase in its research grant income, with an unusually high proportion of this income coming from the prestigious British Research Councils. Recent highlights include: • ESRC (£240,670) Professor Jane Wills – ‘Global cities at work’ • Leverhulme Trust (£143,608) Professor Alison Blunt – ‘Diasporic cities’ • Leverhulme Trust (£103,026) Professor Isabel Dyck – ‘Migrant’s Health Making Practices’ • NHS National Institute for Health Research (£800, 921) Dr Steve Cummins – ‘Healthy Towns’ • NERC (£650,000) Dr Kate Heppell – ‘Implications of groundwater-surface water connectivity for nitrogen transformations in the hyporheic zone’. • NERC (£283,203) Dr Lisa Belyea – ‘Geochemical control of organic mater turnover in peatlands’ • NERC (£224,216) Professor Angela Gurnell – ‘Physical Ecosystem Engineering The high esteem in which members of the School are held within the discipline is reflected in the number of staff who edit (Transactions of the IBG, Progress in Human Geography, Geography Compass, Cretaceous Research) or who are on the editorial boards of Geography’s most prestigious academic journals (Boreas, Journal of Quaternary Science, Cultural Geographies, London Journal, European Journal of Urban and Regional Studies, Social and Cultural Geography, Society and Space, Antipode). The School also prides itself on taking its research beyond academia, working with a wide range of national and international, governmental and non governmental agencies to shape policies and politics beyond the academy, for example: the US Cancer Institute, Department of Health, National History Museum, Environment Agency, United Nations, and The World Bank. The School was recently honoured with the award of ‘Best Academic Centre’ by London Citizens (a grassroots charity consisting of over 100 civil society organisations working for social, economic and environmental justice in London) in recognition of the calibre of its ‘research and analysis of the changes that have taken place to work, community and family life’ and for joining ‘hands with [your] neighbours [to] change and challenge the market forces that can destroy the bonds that keep civil society together’.


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School of Geography www.geog.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources Research students are an integral part of the School and we offer a thriving and supportive research milieu. This includes a weekly seminar series and regular reading groups in which staff and students explore the most recent developments in the discipline. In addition graduate students in human geography attend our bitermly Research Frameworks meetings – a discussion group convened around the work of distinguished academic visitors. Graduate students in physical geography can take advantage of the School’s Physical Geography Discussion Group, providing regular meetings where staff, postdoctoral research assistants and postgraduate students present and discuss new ideas and preliminary research findings in a friendly and informal atmosphere. Our graduate students enjoy desk and computing space in dedicated graduate offices with networked computer facilities, and access to the school research facilities – including specialist computers and computing software for statistical data analyses, geographical information systems, desktop publishing and the processing of video and electronic images. Those undertaking research in physical geography and environmental science have access to some of the best laboratory facilities of any geography school in the UK, both in the School itself and through access to the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, and facilities in the Centre for Micromorphology and Centre for Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments at Queen Mary. As a graduate student in Geography, you will also be part of Queen Mary’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, providing access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre and the further support and training offered by the Faculty.

Scholarships / studentships Each year, the School awards a number of College Masters Bursaries and College Research Studentships. Bursaries pay domestic fees and are available to applicants to any of our Masters programmes. To be eligible for a bursary you must first have been accepted on to a MA/MSc programme. The College Research Studentships pay domestic fees, and a maintenance allowance set to match the British Research Councils’ maintenance grant, for a period of three years. If awarded a College Studentship you may be required to undertake teacher training in year one of your studies, and a few hours of teaching each week throughout your degree. Studentships are open to all applicants to our PhD programmes in human and physical geography. For human geographers, the MA/MSc Geography, MA Cities and Cultures, and human geography PhD programme, are all currently recognised by the ESRC

as accredited training degrees. The School is also part of the College’s bid (jointly with Goldsmiths College) to host a Doctoral Training Centre which, if successful, will switch ESRC recognition from the School’s Masters degrees to a new suite of related MRes degrees. The School has a strong record of securing ESRC and AHRC collaborative studentships and has access to AHRC studentships (for both Masters and PhD students) through the College’s Block Grant. For physical geographers, the School has a strong record of securing fully funded National Environment Research Council (NERC) Algorithm Studentships, and a strong record in attracting NERC CASE Studentships. The precise number of studentships available for Masters and PhD work in the School, details of Research Council accreditation, and the deadlines for applications, varies each year. An up-to-date list of studentships, Research Council accreditation, and application procedures and deadlines, is available on our website: www.geog.qmul.ac.uk For further information on graduate programmes and funding opportunities in the School or to request a PhD or Masters brochure please contact: Jennifer Murray, Postgraduate Administrator, email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 See page 386 for more information on postgraduate funding.

Further information www.geog.qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/hss Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teamb@qmul.ac.uk


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School of Geography Career opportunities The School has a wide range of links with organisations in the working world, including international trade unions (for example ITWF), community organisations (for example London Citizens), and regional, national and international governmental and inter-governmental agencies (for example OECD, World Bank and the NHS). We also have links with Medical and Biomedical Science departments at leading London Universities, and with the ESRC-funded London Women and Planning Forum. Our links with conservation and resource management organisations include Centre for Hydrology and Ecology, Dorset and Wallingford, Countryside Council for Wales, Environment Agency, HR Wallingford Ltd, and Natural England.

What our students go on to do Taking advantage of these connections, our postgraduates have followed a range of careers in different sectors and a number of countries. Several former PhD students, from both our human geography and physical geography programmes, are following academic careers as lecturers or research fellows in the UK, Europe, the US, Mexico and New Zealand. Other former students have utilised their research skills outside academia in the UK, Europe and Africa. Positions include freelance work and employment with; business corporations, the UN, the Royal Geographical Society, and Dutch Geological Society. Students from our Masters programmes have continued on to pursue PhD studies, while others have taken their skills to private and public sector employment. Careers followed by recent graduate students include: Academia • Akile Ahmet – Researcher at Goldsmiths College • Michelle Collins – Lab Manager at University of Toronto, Canada • Andy Cook – Research Fellow, Lancaster University • Sarah Deedat – Research Associate at Kings College, London • Rob Higham – Research Councils UK Academic Fellow, Institute of Education University of London • Jane Holgate – Researcher, Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University • Aoibheann Kilfeather – Post-doctoral Research Assistant Durham University • Paul Morris – Post Doc Research Fellow at McMaster University,Hamilton, Ontario, Canada • Pete Walton – Climate Impacts Programme, University of Oxford • Ailsa Winton – Research Fellow, Department of Social Geography, Institute of Geography, The National University of Mexico (UNAM)

Government • Andrew Lincoln – Research/policy support in the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) • Ianto Jones – Programme Assistant, Iraq Inquiry Unit & Occupied Palestinian Territories Middle East North Africa Department, Department for International Development Non-Government Organisations • Jeremy Anderson – Head of Strategic Research International Transport Federation • Marcel Bakker – Geologist with NITG-TNO, Dutch Geological Survey • Lydia Bruce-Burgess – Technical Specialist Development Control, Environment Agency • Stewart Clarke – National Macrophyte Specialist, Natural England • Helen Dangerfield – Geomorphologist, Royal Haskoning • Carolyn Gaskell – Research Director, Kids Company • Lina Jamoul – Community Organiser with the Industrial Areas Foundation, Chicago, USA • Colm Jordan – Geologist with British Geological Survey • Edlam Aberra Yemeru – Human Settlements Officer, UN-HABITAT in Nairobi, Kenya

Graduate Profile – Ianto Jones Studied: MSc Globalisation and Development, graduated in 2008 Currently: Working in the Middle East North Africa Department in the Department for International Development Why did you choose Queen Mary? Queen Mary was offering an interesting programme that covered a good variety of modules that looked at the most contemporary issues in Globalisation and Development discourse, as well as offering a solid grounding in research methods. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? I found the atmosphere to be challenging, thought provoking, and very convivial. There is a healthy disregard for the status quo, engendering an environment that encourages students to think independently. I was also provided with the necessary tools to see these ideas through to fruition. What are your career plans in the next five years? I am hoping to build a portfolio of experience that will help me work towards becoming a social development advisor for one of the larger development agencies, focusing on gender issues.


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Degree programmes

MA Cities and Cultures One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA Cities and Cultures is an exciting programme that combines the study of cultural geography with a specific focus on urban cultures both past and present. The programme covers a wide range of urban settings, from imperial Delhi and Calcutta to Chicago during the height of modernity and contemporary cultural formations in London and Los Angeles. Taught by leading geographers in the field, the programme considers how cities are socially produced, imagined, represented and contested. It engages with original texts that have informed thinking about urban spaces and cultures as well as a range of other source materials – including the built environment, art practices, literature, music and film – through which the meanings and politics of urban spaces can be analysed. Optional modules introduce students to a wide range of intellectual approaches to urban living and social life: from literary analysis to pyschogeography and performativity. MA Cities and Cultures is recognised under the ESRC’s 1+3 funding scheme. (See also Scholarships/Studentships p84 for details of possible changes to ESRC recognition). The Arts and Humanities Research Council also offers studentships for this programme for those students intending to apply subsequently for a PhD. Programme outline Please note, module structures may be amended following the School’s accreditation as part of the QMUL/Goldsmith’s ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. Compulsory modules: Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • 15,000 word dissertation Module options include: Culture, Space and Power • Art, Performance and the City • Cities, Empire and Modernity • Option of taking one other approved module in another school in place of one of the specialised modules Assessment Assessment on each of the modules is through a variety of coursework assignments ranging from extended essays to book reviews and practical reports. You will also complete a 15,000 word dissertation (equivalent to 60 credits) on a topic of your choice relating to the programme.

Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Evelyn Owen – ESRC funded PhD, School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London Olivia Sheringham – ESRC funded PhD, School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: geography-ma-cc@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry Programme Convenor MA Cities and Cultures Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 8418 email: s.reid-henry@qmul.ac.uk


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MRes Cities and Cultures One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description You will gain an advanced training in wider social science research approaches and methodologies, combined with specialist study of cultural geography with a specific focus on urban cultures past and present. This programme is especially suitable for those wishing to proceed to a PhD in cultural geography. Based around the School’s highly successful MA Cities and Cultures (p86), you will consider how cities are socially produced, imagined, represented and contested. Specialist, substantive modules engage with original texts that have informed thinking about urban spaces and cultures as well as a range of other source materials. The programme combines this study with additional multi and interdisciplinary research training offered through the ESRC recognised QMUL-Goldsmith’s Doctoral Training Centre, and the opportunity to focus upon an extended piece of independent research in cultural geography in preparation for a PhD. MRes Cities and Cultures is recognised by the ESRC on both a +1 and 1+3 basis. Students will be eligible to apply for ESRC funding for both the MRes and subsequent PhD. Programme outline Core modules: Introduction to Social Research • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation (Mode A or B) Module options include: Culture, Space, and Power • Cities, Empire, and Modernity • Art, Performance, and the City Students studying on a Mode A basis complete the core modules, one module option, and a 15,000 word dissertation. Students studying on a Mode B basis complete the core modules and a 22,500 word dissertation. Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations.

Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIlwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk


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MA Community Organising One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme provides you with an advanced understanding of the theory, history and practice of community organising in the wider context of contemporary social, political and economic change. You benefit from the intellectual and practical training that is necessary for work as a community organiser, as well as a career in a related field. The programme aims to strengthen the cadre of community organisers being developed in the UK. This is the first postgraduate course in this field in the UK. In addition to your academic studies, you also complete five months hands-on experience as a community organiser with Citizens UK. All successful candidates will graduate with a higher degree from a world-class University as well as a reference from Citizens UK. Programme outline All students take the following compulsory modules: The theory and history of community organising • Community organising in practice (including a five month placement working part-time as a community organiser with Citizens UK) • Qualitative Research Methods and Research for Change • Dissertation

Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework. This includes essay writing, report writing, presentations and the production of a short video. You also complete a 15,000 word dissertation that counts towards a third of the total marks for the programme. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. Candidates are also expected to have the skills and/or aptitude to work as a community organiser on placement with Citizens UK. Candidates may be asked to provide examples of written work and will be interviewed. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Jane Wills Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5400 email: j.wills@qmul.ac.uk

Erica Pani, MSc Geography, leading to a PhD “I am on an ESRC 1+3 programme, which means that I am currently studying for an MSc in Geography (the 1), and that will be followed by a three year PhD. “I did my undergraduate degree in Cities Economy and Social Change (Human geography, basically) at Queen Mary and it was a fantastic experience. I couldn’t imagine a better school – and I know a few! “I can choose from a great variety of modules, which means I always study those subjects that I find interesting. I also like the fact that we get to discuss our subjects with some of the best academics in the country. And my classmates are fantastic. “The facilities are good. Postgraduate students have a dedicated computer room and the library is well-stocked. The teaching is great and the lecturers want to see us all do well, so they are very prepared to give us their time and thoughts. “I try to be involved with London Citizens as much as I can. It is a great organisation and Professor Jane Wills’ involvement is really inspiring. I also go to as many seminars as possible. We get fabulous speakers who deal with an incredible range of issues.”


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MA/MSc Geography One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA/MSc in Geography is designed to provide an advanced understanding of a variety of specialisms in human geography. A key feature of the programme is its flexibility. It can be taken in three different modes, enabling you to choose the length of dissertation and number of optional modules (whether in Geography or a cognate discipline) you take. The programme has proven especially popular not only to recent graduates but also to professionals who want to update their qualifications and widen their research and writing skills. The MA/MSc in Geography (Mode C) is recognised under the ESRC’s 1+3 funding scheme. (See also Scholarships/ Studentships on p84 for details of possible changes to ESRC recognition). Programme outline Please note, module structures may be amended following the School’s accreditation as part of the Queen Mary/Goldsmith’s ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (see p84). Core modules: All students take the core module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies. MA/MSc in Geography Modes of Study Mode A MA/MSc Geography (Research) Students complete the core module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 30,000 words • One specialist module from the list of options offered Mode B MA/MSc (Named Specialism for example Cultural Geography) Students complete the core module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 22,000 words • Two specialist modules from the list of options offered Mode C MA/MSc Geography (ESRC recognised) Students complete the core module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 15,000 words • Three specialist modules from the list of options offered Module options include: Culture, Space and Power • Art, Performance and the City • Cities, Empire and Modernity • Empire, Race and Immigration • Understanding Globalisation and Development I • Understanding Globalisation and Development II • Globalisation and Development in Practice

You may also substitute one module option from this list with another approved module offered in a cognate discipline at Queen Mary, University of London. Assessment The core module, Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies, is assessed by coursework; the dissertations are of an elective length; and the optional modules are assessed through a mix of coursework assignments ranging from extended essays to project summaries and practical reports. Entry requirements Applicants will normally be expected to have a relevant first degree with first or upper second class honours (or equivalent) in Geography or a related discipline in the social sciences or humanities. We actively encourage applications from students who have developed an interest in any aspect of human geography or related social sciences at undergraduate level, and/or who have relevant work experience. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Erica Pani – ESRC funded PhD, School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London Further information Jennifer Murray, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: geography-ma-cc@qmul.ac.uk


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MRes Geography One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description The MRes in Geography provides an advanced training in human geography and wider social science research approaches and methodologies for those wishing to proceed to a PhD in human geography. Based around the School’s highly successful MA/MSc Geography, this programme combines substantive modules in human geography with additional multi and inter-disciplinary research training offered through the ESRC recognised Queen Mary/Goldsmith’s Doctoral Training Centre, and the opportunity to focus upon an extended piece of independent research in human geography in preparation for a PhD. The MRes Geography is recognised by the ESRC on both a +1 and 1+3 basis. Students will be eligible to apply for ESRC funding for both the MRes and subsequent PhD. Programme outline Core modules: Introduction to Social Research • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation (Mode A or B) Module options include: Culture Space and Power • Cities Empire and Modernity • Understanding Globalisation and Development • Globalisation and the International Political Economy

Students studying on a Mode A basis complete the core modules, plus one module option, and a 15,000 word dissertation. Students studying on a Mode B basis complete the core modules and a 22,500 word dissertation. Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIIwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk


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Graduate profile – Lina Jamoul

One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description Taught jointly by staff from the Schools of Geography and Politics and Centre for Global Security, this programme examines the relationship between globalisation and processes of social and economic development at a variety of scales, considering issues of inequality, power and resistance in the Global North as well as South, and paying particular attention to the connections between North and South and the politics of an increasingly transnational world. You will benefit from a unique inter-disciplinary setting, working alongside internationally renowned scholars in geography, politics and international relations. A range of pedagogical methods (research seminars, presentations and workshops) offer an opportunity to engage with the latest theoretical and working practices in this field, providing a basis for those who may wish either to pursue work in this area or further research. Programme outline Core modules: Globalisation and Development • Globalisation and the International Political Economy • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIIwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk

Studied: Masters in Globalisation and Development and PhD in the School of Geography – graduated 2006. Currently: Community Organiser Why did you choose Queen Mary? The Masters course looked very interesting and interdisciplinary. I stayed on to do my PhD there because the teaching quality was so high, the School was full of interesting people doing interesting research, and it seemed very collegial. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? An exposure to a diverse set of research interests. I got to meet and discuss my work with internationally-renowned, visiting academics I had a huge admiration for Stuart Hall, David Harvey, Doreen Massey, Julie Graham. I also got an opportunity to put radical research into practice that had a real impact on the community and on the university campus itself. What are your career plans in the next five years? When I finished my PhD, I moved to Chicago to take up a job as a community organiser with the Industrial Areas Foundation. I plan to return to the UK and work with the Citizens’ Organising Foundation – an invaluable relationship that was forged through the School of Geography at Queen Mary.


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Degree programmes

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MRes Globalisation and Development One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description This programme provides an advanced training in wider social science research approaches and methodologies, combined with specialist study of the processes and politics of globalisation and development, for those wishing to proceed to a PhD in geography, politics, or international relations. Taught jointly by staff from the Schools of Geography and Politics and Centre for Global Security, the programme examines the relationship between globalisation and processes of social and economic development at a variety of scales, considering issues of inequality, power and resistance in the Global North as well as South, and paying particular attention to the connections between North and South and the politics of an increasingly transnational world. The programme combines this study with additional multi and inter-disciplinary research training offered through the ESRC recognised Queen Mary/Goldsmith’s Doctoral Training Centre, and the opportunity to focus upon an extended piece of independent research in preparation for a PhD. The MRes Globalisation and Development is recognised by the ESRC on both a +1 and 1+3 basis. Students will be eligible to apply for ESRC funding for both the MRes and subsequent PhD. Programme outline Core modules: Introduction to Social Research • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation (Mode A or B) Module options include: Culture Space and Power • Cities Empire and Modernity • Understanding Globalisation and Development • Globalisation and the International Political Economy Students studying on a Mode A basis complete the core modules, one module option, and a 15,000 word dissertation. Students studying on a Mode B basis complete the core modules and a 22,500 word dissertation.

Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIIwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk


Geography Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Integrated Management of Freshwater Environments One year full-time, two or three years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description This programme provides in-depth fundamental and applied training in the science and management of freshwater environments from uplands to estuaries. It is taught by water scientists from the School of Geography in collaboration with freshwater ecologists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. On graduating, you will be able to use the knowledge and skills acquired to work in the water industry or environmental consultancy or to undertake research for a PhD in the broad field of freshwater environments and their management. For employment in water environment management, the programme emphasises the information needed for policy and decision making and provides for a close interface with scientists active in this area through visiting lecturers, industrial visits and the pursuit of a research project in collaboration with the water industry. For those aspiring to a PhD, the programme offers fundamental science training that is placed in the context of current and emerging issues raised by internal and visiting expert contributors. You also have the opportunity to develop further research skills through an individual research project. Programme outline Compulsory modules: Field and Laboratory Methods for Freshwater Environmental Science • Data Analysis • Aquatic Systems: Hydrological, Hydrochemical and Geomorphological Processes • Aquatic Systems: Structure and Function • Biogeochemistry: Carbon, Nutrients and Pollutants in Aquatic Systems • Catchment Hydrology: Managing Water Resources and Hydrological Extremes • Hydrogeomorphology: River and Floodplain Appraisal and Management Module options include: Management-oriented Field Course based in Florida • plus a range of ecologically-oriented modules, for example, Lakes and Ponds • Fish • Macroinvertebrates • Macrophytes

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Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework (for example essay writing, report writing, laboratory work, oral presentations). You will also complete an individual research project of 15,000 words, usually in collaboration with industry, which comprises a third of the marks for the programme. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a relevant science (eg biology, earth science, environmental science, geography) from a UK University or equivalent international qualification together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Angela Gurnell Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5400 email: a.m.gurnell@qmul.ac.uk


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Degree programmes

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MA London Studies One year full-time, two years part-time (Taught in conjunction with the School of English and Drama and the School of Politics and International Relations) Programme description London has long been an international centre of cultural production and political power. This interdisciplinary Masters programme takes the city as its focus, using London as a central example, resource and inspiration. The MA is collaboratively taught, drawing upon expertise across the Schools of Geography, Politics and International Relations, and English and Drama. The programme brings together historical and contemporary perspectives on metropolitan culture, through approaches that span the humanities and social sciences. It also makes the most of Queen Mary’s position, being close to key cultural resources and institutions in London, while located in the city’s East End where many of the programme’s intellectual concerns find most vivid expression. Dramatic historical changes along with contemporary and future transformations of this area provide ample opportunities for scholarly reflection and debate as well as for engaging with practices and institutions within and beyond the academy. Programme outline A core module considers influential perspectives on metropolitan life by using London as an example, but setting it in the context of other cities across the world. You will also take three optional modules and complete a dissertation, following training in qualitative research methodologies and in the use of the unsurpassed resources for the study of London available in the city: libraries, archives, museums, galleries as well as sites and events. Core modules Cities, Empire and Modernity • Dissertation (15,000 words) • Resources for Research Module options may include: Art, Performance and the City • Empire, Race and Immigration • Health, Housing and Education of Immigrants in a Metropolitan Environment • Metrointellectuals, 1770-1820 British Women Writers in London and Paris • Sociability: Literature and the City 1660-1780 • Urban Culture and the Book: London, Publishing and Readers in the Sixteenth Century • Writing the East End Assessment Assessment is through a variety of assignments, ranging from extended essays to book reviews and oral presentations. You will also complete a 15,000 word dissertation, worth a third of total marks, on a topic of your choice relating to the programme.

Entry requirements You will normally be expected to have a first degree with first or upper second class honours in a humanities or social science subject (or equivalent international qualification). We actively encourage applications from students who have developed an interest in any aspect of metropolitan culture at undergraduate level and/or who have practical experience of working in related areas. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Peter Jones – PhD Student, School of English and Drama, Queen Mary Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: london-studies-ma@qmul.ac.uk www.qmul.ac.uk/london-studies For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Alastair Owens Programme Convenor MA London Studies Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5401 email: a.j.owens@qmul.ac.uk For information on the School of English and Drama, see pages 71 and 43. For information on the School of Politics and International Relations, see page 177.


Geography Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Physical Geography by Research One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme provides you with an opportunity to investigate in detail, and research, a topic of interest to you within physical geography. Unlike most taught MScs you design much of your programme of work with assistance from your supervisor and the programme convenor. You also receive training in key research methods and techniques used within physical geography and environmental science, and explore the main research approaches used by physical geographers and the debates on these approaches. Programme outline All modules are compulsory. However, the content of the modules is tailored to your needs and you play a key role in the design of your project. Physical Geography Research and Practice Worth 30 credits, this module introduces you to the different research approaches used in physical geography such as manipulative experimentation and hypothesis testing. Environmental Modelling Worth 15 credits, this module shows how environmental models can be used to improve our understanding of natural and human-modified environments. A background in maths is not needed. Project-Specific Research Training Worth 15 credits, the details of this module are finalised between you and your supervisor; the aim is to provide you with the research skills you need for the successful completion of your Independent Research Project.

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Independent Research Project Worth 120 credits, this project forms the core of the MSc and is on a topic decided between you and your supervisor; importantly, you are given the opportunity to explore an area in physical geography of most interest to you. The exact research questions that you seek to answer and the approach you use in addressing them are expected to be of research standard. Assessment All of your modules are examined via coursework; there are no exams. You are required to do a presentation as part of Physical Geography Research and Practice. An external academic will be the principal examiner of your Independent Research Project and may choose to conduct the examination as a viva voce. Entry requirements You will normally have a first degree with first or upper second class honours in physical geography or a related discipline. We actively encourage applications from those of you who have developed an interest in any aspect of physical geography or related environmental sciences at undergraduate level, and/or who have relevant work experience. International students please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Michelle Collins – Laboratory Manager/Lead Analyst for Brian Branfireuns Mercury Lab, University of Toronto, Canada. Further information Jennifer Murray, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk

Margaret Kadiri, PhD Student in Physical Geography “My PhD is investigating the physical and chemical factors which control the behaviour of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil and sediments through practical experience from detailed laboratory work. I chose to study at Queen Mary because of its good reputation and the conducive environment it provides for serious academic work. In addition to this, the quality of research of the Hydrogeomorphological and Biogeochemical Processes research theme in the School of Geography is highly rated and matches the best in the world because members of the theme are world class academics. The School also provides state-ofthe-art laboratories and regular supervision from my supervisors enables me to get feedback on my research.”


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Research

Research degrees

Research areas

The breadth of the School’s research expertise offers a wide range of opportunities for those wishing to embark on a programme of doctoral research in human or physical geography. Research students are registered for University of London degrees MPhil/PhD) and work under the close supervision of members of academic staff. We welcome applications from those wishing to study full or parttime. The School regularly holds NERC Algorithm Studentships and is part of Queen Mary’s Block Grant from the AHRC. At the time of going to press, the school is recognised by the ESRC for +3 and 1+3 Studentships and CASE Studentships, and is part of the College’s bid (jointly with Goldsmiths College) to host an ESRC Doctoral Training Centre.

Research in the School is organised around five interconnected research themes, offering a broad range of expertise. The School welcomes applications from those who may wish to work on issues within, or linking between, these themes, or in related areas of human or physical geography.

Entry requirements You will normally have a first degree with first or upper second class honours, or a Masters degree, in Geography or a related discipline. Please note, you are strongly encouraged to contact a member of staff with interests in your area – or the Director of Graduate Studies – to discuss your proposed research before making a formal application. For further information on entry requirements (including the PhD proposal) and how to apply please see: www.geog.qmul.ac.uk For advice on which member of academic staff you might best approach to discuss your ideas, contact: Professor Jon May Director of Graduate Studies Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 Email: j.may@qmul.ac.uk International students please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22.

Culture, Space and Power Research Theme Staff in this theme, including two Philip Leverhulme Prize holders, conduct theoretical and empirical research in to the spatial politics of cultural practice in a variety of historical and geographical settings. Our research has strong interdisciplinary links (especially with history and anthropology), shapes international debates, and has close synergies with research on the geographies of biosciences in the Health, Place and Society theme. Enquiry into global connections and diasporic identities enhances our understanding of the cultural practices that make new geographies from domestic to global scales. For example, research on relatedness in Irish diasporic genealogy, local and cross-border histories in Northern Ireland (Catherine Nash), new writing technologies in the English East India Company (Miles Ogborn), the politics of home and diaspora among Anglo-Indian women (Alison Blunt), the cultural construction of knowledge-producing industries and the relations between technology, the body and social-environmental relations (Bronwyn Parry and Simon Reid-Henry), shows how new geographies of power and identity are made through material practices, the making of places and the construction of connections. Working through The City Centre, research also enhances understanding of material culture and everyday life in Victorian cities (Alastair Owens) and of the politics of different visions of the city through studies of utopian urbanism and planning practices since the Eighteenth-Century (Miles Ogborn and David Pinder). By examining groups ranging from settlement workers to the situationists and surrealists, as well as artists and cultural practitioners, our research also advances debates about urban spatial politics and performance (Alison Blunt and David Pinder). Economy, Development and Social Justice Research Theme Members of the Economy, Development and Social Justice theme conduct theoretically-informed, politically-engaged research on the nature and consequences of inequality, uneven development and social justice in both the Global North and South. Staff in the this theme are currently engaged in research in five key areas: The Transformation of Cities and Regions – including work on household economies and poverty, learning and innovation, and


Geography Queen Mary, University of London

territorial competitiveness (Konstantinos Melachroinos, Adrian Smith); New Geographies of Work and Employment, with a particular focus on post socialist transformations, labour and community organising, and the gendering of work (Al James, Adrian Smith and Jane Wills); Transnational Migration and Global Uneven Development focusing on low paid labour migration, labour market change and social reproduction in European city regions, financial exclusion, remittances, gender and migration, and migrant identities (Kavita Datta, Cathy McIlwaine, Jon May and Jane Wills); Civil Society, Community Politics and Well-being, with a focus on street homelessness, welfare restructuring and post secularism, North-South linkages in civil society, and gender, household strategies and well-being in modern Europe (Cathy McIlwaine, Jon May and Alastair Owens); Spaces of Finance – financial crises and circuits, financial markets in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Britain, post socialist neoliberalisation, and FDI (Roger Lee, Alastair Owens, Adrian Smith, and Konstantinos Melachroinos); and Rethinking Economies, with work on ordinary economies, emerging markets, India’s off shore service economy, and the transformation of global value networks (Roger Lee, Adrian Smith and Al James). Health, Place and Society Research Theme This research theme conducts innovative and critical geographical research on health and the body, socioenvironmental determinants of health inequalities, and the cultural, political, and economic geographies of bio-medical science. The group produces cutting edge theoretical and empirical research of direct relevance to key academic and wider political and social debates on the future of health care provision in both the UK and Global South. Research is currently organised into three main areas: The Construction of Healthy and Ill Bodies, including work on the health and place making practices of migrants (Isabel Dyck, Beth Greenhough); the Healthy Environments Research Programme, with work on the socio-environmental determinants of health and health inequalities together with the bayesian spatial statistical modelling of health and health care in shaping health outcomes for local and national populations (Steven Cummins, Peter Congdon); and The Political Economy of Contemporary Biomedical Science, with research on the production of pharmaceuticals, the delivery of public health and health services, medical research, and understandings of the human body and identity (Bronwyn Parry, Catherine Nash, Beth Greenhough and Simon Reid-Henry).

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Hydrogeomorphological and Biogeochemical Processes Research Theme This research theme explores the interaction between hydrological, geomorphological and biogeochemical processes, encompassing terrestrial, freshwater and estuarine environments along the continuum from catchment to coast. Research is process-oriented, including field, laboratory and modelling studies at scales ranging from the mesocosm to the landscape. Research foci include: • The dynamics of fluvial, peatland and estuarine systems, including their response to, and recovery from, natural disturbance and human manipulation • Water, sediment, carbon, nutrient and contaminant mobilisation, transport and storage in fluvial, peatland and estuarine systems • Appraisal, characterisation and sustainable management of wetland, fluvial and estuarine systems. Research is of direct relevance to major issues in environmental management including flooding; diffuse pollution; and the maintenance of ecosystem services such as carbon storage. Environmental Change Research Theme The Environmental Change research theme investigates the processes and patterns of specific environmental systems at timescales ranging from the modern-day through to the Quaternary and older. Research focuses on: • Interaction of ice and water with sediments and landscapes • Rapid environmental change and feedbacks between biological (including early human) and physical systems. These issues are addressed through application of innovative methods in micromorphology, geochronology and palaeoenvironmental analysis. Recent research highlights include; • Advances in micromorphology and opticallystimulated luminescence dating methods to provide greater understanding of subglacial processes and glacier dynamics • New approaches to studying fluvial and glacial archives for understanding the timing and patterns of hominid occupations of the British Isles • Pioneering of an Ostracoda-based Mutual Temperature Range method for palaeoclimatic reconstruction.


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Staff research interests www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Culture, Space and Power Research Theme

David Pinder BA PhD(Cambridge) Reader in Geography Cities, culture, utopianism, art and spatial politics

Alison Blunt BA(Cambridge) MA PhD (University British Columbia) Professor of Geography Feminist and postcolonial geographies; imperial travel and domesticity; geographies of home, identity, migration and diaspora

Simon Reid-Henry MA PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer in Geography Geopolitics, ‘vital’ geographies, geographical biography

Catherine Nash BA(Nott) PhD(Nott) Professor of Geography Feminist cultural geography, geographies of identity and relatedness Miles Ogborn BA PhD(Cambridge) Professor of Geography Historical geography of the city; historical geography of early modern globalisation Bronwyn Parry BA Hons(Macquarie) PhD(Cambridge) Reader in Economic and Cultural Geography The rise and operation of the life sciences industry, informationalism, commodification of life forms, bioethics, intellectual property, indigenous knowledge systems

Economy Development and Social Justice Research Theme Kavita Datta BA Hons(Botswana) PhD(Cambridge) Senior Lecturer in Geography Geographies of development, gender and migration Al James BA PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer in Human Geography Economic geography: high tech regions, gender, work-life ‘balance’, labour market intermediaries, worker organising, India's new service economy Roger Lee BSc(Nottingham) AcASS Professor Emeritus Economic geographies of money, finance and alternative economies


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Jon May BA(Cambridge) PhD(London) Professor of Geography and Director of Graduate Studies Geographies of homelessness, urban marginality, social welfare, and post secularism; low paid labour migration Cathy McIlwaine BA MA(Liverpool) PhD(London) Reader in Human Geography Development geography; international migration to London; Latin America Konstantinos Melachroinos DTPl(University of Thessaly, Greece) PhD(Lond) Lecturer in Geography Regional economic development and policy Alastair Owens BA PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Human Geography Gender, wealth and material culture in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Britain Adrian Smith BA(Hons) MA PhD AcASS Professor of Human Geography and Head of School Economic geographies, globalisation and post-socialist transformations Jane Wills MA(Cambridge) PhD(OU) Professor of Geography The geo-political economy of labour; new forms of urban politics

Staff Profile: Jane Wills Professor of Geography “My recent research has focused on London’s labour market. I have been working on an ESRCfunded project with colleagues in the School (Datta, May, McIlwaine) to map the role and experiences of migrants in low paid employment. This work was published as a book in 2010 and we have written a number of articles and reports, all of which are listed on our project website: www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/globalcities/ “I have also been exploring the ways in which low paid workers can mobilise to secure the power they need to recalibrate their terms and conditions of work. As part of this work I have had ESRC-funding to explore the trajectory of the London living wage campaign. This campaign has been led by a broad-based coalition called London Citizens that has faith, labour and educational institutions (including our own School) in membership. To find out more see: www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/livingwage/ “My research features directly on the courses I teach and getting involved in London Citizens has facilitated a lot of the relationships that are key to doing good qualitative research. Research outcomes often feed directly into ongoing campaigns. For example, work on migrant workers has been critical in better understanding the nature of the labour market for low paid work in London. “I have long had an interest in politics and labour politics in particular. London is a fantastic place to do this research as there is so much to study.”


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Staff research interests

(cont)

www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Health, Place and Society Research Theme

Philip E Ogden BA(Durham) DPhil(Oxford) Professor of Geography Population geography, urban demography and migration in France and Europe

Peter Congdon BSc MSc PhD(London) Research Professor of Quantitative Geography and Health Statistics Quantitative analysis of geographic variations in health and mortality, quantitative health services research including needs, inequality and disease prevalence

Bronwyn Parry BA Hons(Macquarie) PhD(Cambridge) Reader in Economic and Cultural Geography The rise and operation of the life sciences industry, informationalism, commodification of life forms, bioethics, intellectual property, indigenous knowledge systems

Steven Cummins BSc(CGCHE) MSc(London) PhD(Glasgow) Senior Lecturer and NIHR Fellow Socio-environmental determinants of health, geography of public policy Beth Greenhough BSc(Reading) MSc(Bristol) PhD(OU) Lecturer in Human Geography Geographies of biotechnology and the biosciences, nature-society relations and environmental geography

Simon Reid-Henry MA PhD(Cambridge) Lecturer in Geography Geopolitics, ‘vital’ geographies, geographical biography


Geography Queen Mary, University of London

Hydrological, Hydrochemical and Fluvial Processes Research Theme Lisa Belyea BSc Hons(Carleton) MSc(Waterloo) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Development and dynamics of ecosystems, with an emphasis on peatlands Angela Gurnell BSc PhD DSc(Exeter) Professor of Physical Geography Ecohydrology and biogeomorphology Kate Heppell MSc DIC DPhil(Oxford) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Water quality and environmental chemistry Kate Spencer BSc MSc DIC PhD(Greenwich) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Estuarine geochemistry and contaminant behaviour in sediments and soils Geraldene Wharton BSc(Sheffield) PhD(Southampton) FRGS Chartered Geographer (Geomorphology) Reader in Physical Geography Fluvial geomorphology and hydrology

Environmental Change Research Theme Lisa Belyea BSc Hons(Carleton) MSc(Waterloo) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Development and dynamics of ecosystems, with an emphasis on peatlands Simon Carr BSc PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Climate, glaciers and landscape David J Horne BSc MSc(London) PhD(Bristol) FLS Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Quaternary climate and environmental change Simon Lewis BSc PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Quaternary environmental change and geomorphology Sven Lukas MSc(Bochum) PhD(St Andrews) Lecturer in Physical Geography Glaciers, climate and landscape Jaap JM van der Meer MSc PhD(Amsterdam) Professor of Physical Geography Quaternary science, glacial geo(morpho)logy

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Staff Profile: Angela Gurnell Professor of Geography “I undertake research in river geomorphology and riparian plant ecology, which has been funded over the last decade by the Natural Environment Research Council, the Leverhulme Trust, and the Environment Agency, and has resulted in the publication of 10 books and journal special issues, 30 book chapters and 130 scientific papers. I study the ways in which riparian and aquatic plants interact with sediments, organic matter and seeds transported by rivers to drive the character and dynamics of river landscapes. I have developed new concepts concerning the ‘engineering’ of rivers by plants and how these can be incorporated into sustainable approaches to river management. “I began my academic career as a hydrologist, but soon became interested in river geomorphology. My early work was based in the semi-natural landscape of the New Forest, Hampshire, where vegetation interacts freely with physical processes and its importance to the complexity and dynamics of river environments can be easily observed. “My research has contributed to more sensitive management of rivers. In 1985, I co-authored the first paper by European scientists on the importance of fallen trees and dead wood for physical habitat complexity in river systems. Now tree and wood clearance from rivers is no longer routine and managers are deliberately introducing wood to rehabilitate rivers. “I undertake fundamental scientific research but this has yielded results that are applicable to practical environmental problems. This balance between fundamental research and its application ensures that my students pursue interesting and challenging projects with the potential to translate their work into management applications.”


History

MA in History p106 MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History (University of London Intercollegiate Masters Programme) p107 MA in Islam and the West p108 MA in Twentieth-Century History p108 Leo Baeck MA in European Jewish History p109 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p110


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School of History www.history.qmul.ac.uk The School of History offers a wide range of postgraduate MA programmes and has a worldclass research base. We provide high-quality teaching inspired by cutting-edge research and a friendly atmosphere. Academic staff have outstanding research reputations and include three Fellows of the British Academy and the President of the Royal Historical Society. Two of our staff have been awarded the French distinction of the Ordre des Palmes académiques.

Research strengths The School has two main research clusters: Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern, (which includes four distinct groupings, British, European and Religious Cultures (c.1300-c.1640), Italian history (c.1350-c.1550), Crusader Studies and Cross-Cultural Encounters) and Modern and Contemporary, (with a significant sub-cluster in intellectual history and the history of political thought). Twentieth-Century British History offers a range of specialisms, with particular strengths in the military, social and cultural history of war. Our post-1945 history has a distinctive research agenda with the Mile End Group (MEG) seminar series attracting major speakers from national politics, the civil service, industry and the media. Recent speakers include Sir John Major, Dame Eliza ManninghamBuller, James Naughtie, Jeremy Paxman, Lord Melvyn Bragg and Lord Browne. The School offers internationally renowned expertise on US foreign affairs, Anglo-American relations and the history and philosophy of American social science. Our distinguished Europeanists offer expertise in modern French history and TwentiethCentury Russian, German and Italian history. Specialists in intellectual history and the history of political thought explore a range of political thinkers and ideologies. Members of the School co-convene seminars at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) in their fields and host regular international symposia in fields ranging from youth and violence in the middle ages to the history of philosophy and historiography.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The School entered all academic staff in the Research Assessment Exercise 2008 and performed exceptionally well with nearly a third of our research rated as 'world leading' and nearly two-thirds as 'internationally excellent' or better. Publications produced by School staff since 2000 total over 50 authored books and more than 30 scholarly editions and edited volumes. These include a number of award-winning and highly acclaimed books. Academic publications are detailed on staff webpages at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk Projects, funding, research grants and awards The School has an excellent record in attracting funding for research. Notable recent and current projects include the AHRC funded ‘British Film Institute, the Government and Film Culture, 19332000’ led by Professor Geoffrey Nowell-Smith; the Leverhulme Network funded ‘History of Physiognomy, 1500-1850’ and the AHRC funded ‘Saint-Aubin Project’ both led by Professor Colin Jones; the Borromei Bank Research project led by Professor Jim Bolton; the ‘Who were the Nuns?’ project led by Professor Michael Questier and the Wellcome Trust funded ‘Psychiatric Epidemiology’ led by Dr Rhodri Hayward. The School has also had great success in establishing collaborative relationships. We host the Queen Mary Centre for the History of Emotions, and our staff are actively engaged in the EighteenthCentury Studies Centre. In July 2009 Queen Mary, led by the School of History, entered into a strategic alliance with the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) in London. The School currently supervises two AHRC collaborative doctoral awards, one with the Royal Collection and one with Waddesdon Manor. PhDs students have obtained external studentships from the BBC, the Cabinet Office, Hewlett Packard, BAE Systems and the National Maritime Museum.


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School of History www.history.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

Our postgraduate students benefit from a wide range of services, from help with accommodation to excellent IT support and foreign language teaching as well as an individually designed research-training programme.

The availability of scholarships changes from year to year but for applicants commencing their studies in September 2010 we were able to offer:

As members of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, our MA and PhD students have full access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre. Purpose-built for postgraduate use, it houses a seminar room, a common room with kitchen facilities and three work rooms with computing resources. Its location enables postgraduates from schools throughout the Faculty to meet, encouraging interdisciplinary cooperation to enrich the research culture at Queen Mary. As well as access to Queen Mary’s own library you will benefit from the University of London (UoL) library and the riches of the British Library and the National Archives, as well as other UoL libraries and many of Britain’s major museums and galleries. Supervisors introduce students to specialist collections and libraries. Our research students make full use of these resources, which are unique to London, as are the wide range of seminars at the Institute of Historical Research.

• 4 Queen Mary PhD Studentships (fees and maintenance) • 3 AHRC PhD Studentships (fees and maintenance) • 2 AHRC MA Bursaries (fees and maintenance) • 3 Queen Mary MA Bursaries (fees only) • 2 Leo Baeck MA Bursaries (Leo Baeck MA in European Jewish History only) • 3 Mile End Group Bursaries (MA Twentieth Century British History) In addition the Centre for the History of the Emotions offered one PhD studentship (Wellcome Trust funded). We anticipate being able to offer similar numbers of awards in 2010-11. Further information can be obtained from our website at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/ postgraduate/funding Research and Communications Officer School of History Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road, London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8348 email: history@qmul.ac.uk

Further information Research and Communications Officer School of History Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road, London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8348 email: history@qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk


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School of History Career opportunities Postgraduate study at the School of History is excellent preparation for a career in research or academia, but also opens many other doors for graduates, through links with Whitehall, Government, former senior politicians and the private sector. The Mile End Group is very successful in attracting high- ranking officials to speak and the School has enjoyed successful collaborations with institutions and companies including the BBC, Cabinet Office, EDS and Experian. Our graduates find employment in the civil service and the media and in other commercial and public roles including town planning and gallery management. Graduates comment that they have found their time spent at Queen Mary undertaking postgraduate study to be very rewarding and fulfilling. As alumni, many continue to attend School events, networking and continuing their exposure to influential figures within their chosen fields of employment.

Graduate profile: Hywel Thomas Studied: MA in Contemporary British History since 1939 – graduated 2002. Currently: Civil Servant for past five years, mainly at the Ministry of Justice (formerly Department for Constitutional Affairs, Lord Chancellor’s Department). Posts have included Bill Manager taking a Bill through Parliament, Assistant Private Secretary to a Junior Minister, Rt Hon Baroness Ashton of Upholland. Currently Government Relations Manager in the Chief Executive’s Office at The National Archives. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? The excellent reputation of the School of History, especially for contemporary British History. My undergraduate degree mainly focused on the traditional areas of history (ancient, medieval, early European). I was keen to study for a postgraduate degree but wanted to focus on an area that allowed me to look in-depth at contemporary economic and political British history. The MA programme fitted the bill perfectly. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Meeting the-then Cabinet Secretary directly after he had a stressful meeting with the Prime Minister was an experience you don’t get on very many postgraduate programmes! The programme gave me an insight in the workings of government and sparked-off my interest in working for the Civil Service once I graduated. A lot of what I have learnt on my programme I have applied in work and it certainly gave me a good start when I first started. Queen Mary has also provided me with an excellent network of colleagues from my programme, through the Mile End Group, who I have kept in touch with. What are your career plans in the next five years? To continue in the Civil Service, working my way up the grades. To broaden my experience by working for at least another department hopefully gaining some public service delivery/operational experience along the way.


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Degree programmes

MA in History One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA in History allows you to draw on a broad range of options to design a programme that best reflects your needs and interests. You might, for example, focus on chronologically diverse modules which are united by cultural or political themes, or you may prefer to specialise by period or region. You will have the opportunity to create your own links between periods and approaches. You could combine the study of medieval religious popular cultures with the US Presidency, the crusades with May ’68 in Paris, Hollywood film or the history of political thought, or Nazism with Renaissance culture. You will receive intensive research-skills training at the Institute of Historical Research. Your work culminates in an individually-supervised research dissertation, which is an essential buildingblock for those considering a PhD. Programme outline The core module, an introduction to historical methods of and approaches, is team-taught by many members of the School. You also choose three optional modules (those currently available can be found on our website, www.history.qmul.ac.uk). Parttime students take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year. Assessment You will produce one essay of 5,000 words for the core module and one essay of 4,000 words for each of the three options in addition to completing a 15,000-word research dissertation. Entry requirements Normally an upper second class honours degree in History or another Humanities subject. A recognised equivalent from an accredited overseas institution or an equivalent professional qualification is also accepted. Applications from mature and nontraditional students are welcomed. International students please see the ‘international students’ section on p390. Further information Please contact: Assistant Administrator (Admissions) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8370 email: history@qmul.ac.uk

Marialana Wittman, PhD in French Medical History “I have been really impressed by the amazing encouragement and support I’ve received from academic staff. The professors at Queen Mary are not only eminent scholars in their fields, but also some of the kindest, most inspiring and supportive teachers I have come across in my years of studying history. The central location of the College also provides access to some of the world’s best libraries and archives. “East London has all sorts of vibrant activities going on. And Queen Mary is a constant a hub of academic and social events—so much so that I have had to really choose wisely in order to keep a balance with my research schedule. There are beautiful parks nearby and quaint pubs and restaurants to explore. As a southern Californian girl, I love being outdoors, and despite the rumoured weather in London, I have spent many weekends running in locals parks or cycling around north London. “I like to spend time in the Lock-keeper’s Cottage, it’s a great place to work when I’m on campus, as well as meet up with fellow graduate students in all schools. I participate in several history related groups of postgraduates across London and Europe, which provide both academic support/inspiration and socialising opportunities. “In the upcoming months I will be presenting papers at conferences around the world. I am looking forward to the travelling, as well as sharing my research with other scholars and hearing their ideas and suggestions relevant to my work. Studying history at Queen Mary has exceeded my dreams of a postgraduate programme and even within the first term I knew it was the best place for me to be.”


History Queen Mary, University of London

MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History (University of London Intercollegiate Masters Programme) One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MA is an intercollegiate programme, which draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student – once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States. Programme outline The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of modules that may be offered in a given year: • Democracy: Ancient and Modern, Richard Bourke (Queen Mary) • Ideology and Propaganda in the Roman Republic, Valentina Arena (UCL) • Political Thought in Renaissance Europe, Angus Gowland (UCL) • The Significance of Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan, Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary) • The Theory and Practice of Golden Age Kingship, Alexander Samson (UCL) • Political Thought in the British Atlantic World, c. 1660–1801, Ian McBride (KCL) • Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment (c. 1660-1800), Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) • Infamous Writings: Controversies and Receptions in the History of Political Thought in Early Modern Europe, Peter Schroeder (UCL) • Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, Nineteenth-Twentieth Centuries, Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary) • Republicanism and Liberalism: Historical and Analytical Perspectives, Cecile Laborde (UCL)

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• Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500, Serena Ferente (KCL) • Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought, Axel Korner (UCL) • Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Debates on Language, Avi Lifschitz (UCL) • Visions of Capitalism, Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) • Political Thought and Political Contexts: England 1640-1700, Blair Worden (Royal Holloway, University of London) Assessment Modules are assessed by coursework, examination and a dissertation. Entry requirements An upper second class first degree within the broad field of the Humanities (or overseas equivalent). We actively encourage applications from students who have developed an interest in any aspect of the history of political thought, intellectual history, or the history of philosophy. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Please contact: Assistant Administrator (Admissions) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8370


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Degree programmes

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MA in Islam and the West

MA in Twentieth-Century History

One year full-time, two years part-time

One year full-time, two years part-time

Programme description This groundbreaking, interdisciplinary MA explores one of the fundamental issues of our times – the relationship between Islam and the western world. Covering the period from the birth of the Muslim faith in the Seventh-Century to the present day, the programme examines a diverse array of contacts between these two overlapping worlds, from the spheres of politics, warfare and religion, to social, cultural, intellectual and economic interactions, and questions of law, migration and language. You will be taught by leading experts in fields such as the modern Middle East, the crusades, medieval Islam, Iberia, Sharia Law and Orientalist literature, gaining a fuller understanding of the nature and significance of relations between Islam and the West.

Programme description The MA in Twentieth-Century History is unique in offering students the opportunity to explore the key events and themes of the Twentieth-Century whilst specialising in a particular geographical region or cultural perspective. You will explore in-depth various aspects of British, American or European history, making use of an expert team of teaching staff which includes one of the most impressive collections of Twentieth-Century British and European Historians in the country. You will benefit from the great variety of approaches and areas of expertise the School offers, as well as intensive research skills training at the Institute of Historical Research. Your work culminates in an individually-supervised research dissertation, which is an essential building-block for those considering a PhD.

Programme outline You will take a one core module, Islam and the West; plus three module options and write a dissertation.

Programme outline The MA consists of the core module (see MA in History), three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Part-time students take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Module options may include: Saladin, Richard the Lionheart and the Third Crusade • The Mamluks • Medieval and Early Modern Iberia • Britain and the Middle East • Politics of the Middle East • Migrants, Diasporas and Law. Assessment You will be required to produce one essay for the core module, plus one essay of 4,000 words for each of the three module options. You will also complete a 15,000 word dissertation. Entry requirements Normally an upper-second class honours degree or equivalent in History or other relevant Humanities subject, together with two supportive academic references. A recognised equivalent from an accredited overseas institution or an equivalent professional qualification is also accepted. No foreign language skills are required. Applications from mature and ‘non-traditional’ students are welcomed and will be treated sympathetically. Applicants who are not currently undertaking a degree or who have not done so in the last five years would not be required to send in academic references but might be asked to provide examples of written work and/or be interviewed. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Please contact: Assistant Administrator (Admissions) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8370

Module options may include: Britain and the Middle East 1900-1960 • Comparative Welfare States • The US-UK Special Relationship • The Hidden Wiring: Government and the constitution since 1945 • Victors to Victims: Representing the First and Second World Wars in Britain, 1950-2000 • Hollywood and the Second World War • The American Presidency • Revolution in Paris, May 1968 • The Culture Industry in Europe • Overcoming Nazism • Constitutional Russia 1905-17 Assessment You will be required to produce one essay of 5,000 words for the core module and one essay of 4,000 words for each of the three options, in addition to completing a 15,000 word research dissertation. Entry requirements An upper second class honours undergraduate degree or higher in History (or overseas equivalent). Mature and non-traditional students are encouraged to apply. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Recent graduates have gone on to a variety of destinations, including the Home Office, GE Money and the Department of Constitutional Affairs. Further information Please contact: Assistant Administrator (Admissions) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8370


History Queen Mary, University of London

Leo Baeck MA in European Jewish History (Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the School of History) One year full-time, two years part-time (MA title is subject to approval) Programme description The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation as part of a programme which trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in pre-modern and modern society.

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Optional modules may include: • Modern Jewish History and Culture • Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600 • Jews, Power and Intellectual History • Antisemitism and the Holocaust • Modern European Jewish Literature • Hollywood and the Second World War • Understanding Religion Historically • Overcoming Nazism Assessment You will be required to produce one essay of 5,000 words for the core module and one essay of 4,000 words for each of the three options, in addition to completing a 15,000 word research dissertation. Entry requirements An upper second class honours undergraduate degree or higher in History (or overseas equivalent). Mature students are encouraged to apply. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Please contact: Assistant Administrator (Admissions) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8370

Programme outline The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

LEO BAECK INSTITUTE LONDON (LBI) The LBI is the leading research institute in the field of the history and culture of Germanspeaking Jewry in Europe from the Seventeenth-Century onwards. It was founded in 1955 and named after Leo Baeck, the last public representative of the Jewish Community in Nazi Germany. Among the Institute's publications are the Leo Baeck Institute Year Book and its own book series, the Schriftenreihe wissenschaftlicher Abhandlungen. The Institute organises a broad range of events including lecture series and

international conferences, and has recently established two research professorships to investigate the role of German-speaking Jews in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century academia. One of the Institute's aims is the dissemination of research results. The Leo Baeck Institute Year Book has appeared without a break for over fifty years. It has been published by Oxford University Press and is also available online. Its articles cover cultural, economic, political, social and religious history as well as the impact of antisemitism and Jewish responses to it. The Year Book’s classified bibliography is of unique value for researchers and students. The Schriftenreihe now comprises over seventy volumes. Further information on the Institute can be found at www.leobaeck.co.uk


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Research

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Research degrees The School of History is a vibrant, welcoming and stimulating environment in which to carry out your historical research at doctoral level. In recent years postgraduate research training has grown in size and scope. We pride ourselves on the high-quality of support and supervision delivered by our distinguished academics whose own excellence in research drives their teaching and inspires our postgraduate community. We also nurture an inclusive atmosphere engendered by a research community with a great diversity of interests and approaches. You can find examples of the breadth of current and recent theses supervised in the School on our website, www.history.qmul.ac.uk During your time at the School of History you will have the opportunity to take part in the numerous and lively research forums supported by the school. The Postgraduate Seminar Series is run entirely by and for our research students and combines a mix of papers by research students, staff, and external speakers; the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies runs a renowned series of seminars with an international cast of speakers; the Mile End Group (MEG) seminar series provides an unparalleled forum for the study of issues in contemporary British history. The new interdisciplinary Centre for the History of the Emotions, offers a rich array of seminars, colloquia and workshops, as well as Studentships. Most members of the School are involved in running research seminars at the Institute for Historical Research, an essential part of the postgraduate experience in London. An impressive group of postdoctoral researchers offers inspiration and support to those embarked on their postdoctoral work. Training Throughout your time at Queen Mary, you will benefit from the guidance of the supervisory team appointed to support you. You will also take part in the Graduate Training Forum run by the Director of Graduate Studies, which will provide you with the knowledge and skills to strengthen your historical research, manage your academic commitments, and prepare for your future career. You will be encouraged to draw on Queen Mary’s provision of generic training targeted at postgraduate researchers, as well as on subject-specific provision from external bodies such as the Institute of Historical Research or the Warburg Institute. Applications You are encouraged to contact a member of staff with interests in the relevant research area to discuss your proposed research prior to making a formal application. Details of staff and their research

expertise may be found at the School’s website: www.history.qmul.ac.uk Your application should be accompanied by a research proposal outlining the aims and academic context of the research. Further information Please contact: Research and Communications Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8348

Research areas Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern History The group is currently working on a wide range of research projects including: the nature of crusading violence; the origins of the ritual murder accusation against Jews; the late medieval English clergy; a history of the Bedouin and their role in the Islamisation of the medieval Near East; the history of Italian universities to 1500; black Africans in Renaissance Europe; the ‘secret’ political history of Britain c.1558-1688; the English clergy and the Hundred Years War; relations between the army and civilian society in England and Ireland under George I; the history of the smile in EighteenthCentury Paris; and the Terror in the French Revolution. Modern and Contemporary History The modern and contemporary group is currently engaged in a large number of projects in the fields of American, British and European history and political thought including a comparison of attitudes towards capitalism at the end of the NineteenthCentury and the beginning of the Twenty-First Century; a comparative transnational history of television and social change in 1960s and 1970s in England, Germany and the United States; consumerism in Nineteenth-Century America; the Russian civil war; the history of the Kremlin; John Kennedy; Hollywood and the Americanisation of Britain, analysing British responses to American films from the 1920s to the present; conceptions of scientific theory in America since 1900; Victorian moral thought; Edmund Burke; British political thought on the nation, nationalism, patriotism and cosmopolitanism, 1820-1930; Harold Macmillan, the Labour Party between the Wars and Britain in the Sixties. History of Intellectual and Political Thought The History of Intellectual and Political Thought group is engaged in a wide range of projects, including work on problems of empire and democracy, problems of conquest and ideas of equality, the Enlightenment, political philosophy in the Seventeenth-Century, Thomas Hobbes, Edmund Burke, and British political thought on nationalism, patriotism, cosmopolitanism and international relations.


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Staff research interests www.history.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Medieval and Renaissance History

Staff profile: Miri Rubin

European and British Religious Culture Professor Virginia Davis BA PhD(Dub) FRHistS Professor of Medieval History and Head of School Late medieval English history, in particular the medieval clergy, medieval education and medieval women Professor John Miller MA PhD(Cantab) FRHistS Professor of Early Modern History Seventeenth and early Eighteenth-Century British and Irish political, social and religious history Professor Michael Questier MA(Oxon) DPhil(Sussex) FRHistS Professor of Modern History Early modern British history; ecclesiastical politics of the period 1558-1688; the history of the English Catholic community and its relationship with the Tudor and Stuart regimes; aristocratic culture; the experience of conversion; the Jacobean exchequer; and anti-popery Professor Miri Rubin BA MA(Jerusalem) PhD(Cantab) FRHistS Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History Religious cultures and social relations in Europe 1100-1600; Jewish-Christian relations in medieval Europe; history of women and gender; historiography Italian and Renaissance History Professor Jim Bolton BA(Oxon) Professorial Research Fellow Borromei Bank Research Project Peter Denley MA DPhil(Oxon) FRHistS Reader in History Medieval history, history of universities, alterity in the middle ages Professor Kate Lowe BA PhD(Lond) FRHistS Professor of Renaissance History and Culture Renaissance and Early Modern Italian history, especially cultural, religious and social history, Fifteenth and Sixteenth-Century Portugal and the Portuguese empire, African diaspora in Europe 1400-1600

Professor of History and Leverhulme Major Research Fellow “I recently completed a long and challenging project, a cultural history of the Virgin Mary, which appeared in 2009 as Mother of God. I am now engaged in a number of projects. One is a study of the first known ritual murder accusation against Jews, which emerged in mid-Twelfth Century Norwich. Given the deadly influence this narrative had in later centuries, I aim to write a book which explores the context that gave rise to it. I shall also translate from the sole surviving Latin manuscript, the text which defined it. I am also preparing an article for History Today and a radio programme about this fascinating and troubling affair. An AHRC Network grant has been extremely helpful in allowing me to consult scholars from all over the world in the course of my work. “My research raises new questions, inspires me to new reading in history and beyond and all this enriches greatly what I can pass on. Lively research also means that one can offer an example to scholars in the making. “There can be no more inspiring environment for postgraduates than Queen Mary. Academic staff display enthusiasm for their work, expertise, and are usually real innovators in their fields. The Queen Mary ethos encourages staff and students to communicate their insights widely in the world.”


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Staff research interests

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www.history.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Crusader Studies and Cross-cultural Encounters Thomas Asbridge BA(Wales) PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Medieval History Medieval History, with particular focus upon Crusader Studies Dr Yossef Rapoport BA(Tel Aviv) PhD(Princeton) Lecturer in History Social history of the central Islamic lands in the medieval period (1000-1500); women and gender and Islam; history of Islamic law; medieval cartography

Modern and Contemporary History Britain Peter Catterall MA(Cantab) PhD(Lond) FRHistS Lecturer in History British social and political history, media history, religious history, contemporary British and EU politics, history of welfare policy

Jon Davis BA MA PhD(Lond) Executive Director, Mile End Institute Contemporary British political, governmental and constitutional history Thomas Dixon MSc(Lond) PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer in History History of theories of passions and emotions, history of debates about ‘altruism’, especially in Victorian Britain, and, more generally, the history of relationships between science and religion, religious, intellectual and cultural life of Nineteenth-Century Britain, political thought, Thomas Paine Professor Peter Hennessy BA PhD(Cantab) FBA FRHistS Attlee Professor of Contemporary British History Post-war British history Tristram Hunt BA PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in History Victorian civic pride and urban identity Helen McCarthy BA(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Lecturer in History Modern British history, political culture, gender, work and identity


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Staff profile: Colin Jones Professor of History Fellow of the British Academy and President of the Royal Historical Society

Dan Todman BA(LSE) MPhil PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer in Modern History Social, cultural and military history of total war in the Twentieth-Century Europe James Ellison BA PhD(Kent) Reader in Modern and Contemporary History History of Britain’s relationships with Europe and the United States after 1945; history of the Cold War and European integration Professor Raphael Gross DPhil(Essen) Reader in History, Director LBI London Director Jewish Museum Frankfurt and Fritz Bauer Institut Frankfurt, Honorary Professor at Frankfurt University Intellectual History, Modern German-Jewish History, History of the Third Reich Maurizio Isabella BA(Milan) MA PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in History Italian identity in the Risorgimento, Eighteenthand Nineteenth-Century Italian history and political culture, theories of international relations and cosmopolitanism in France and Italy in the long Nineteenth-Century Professor Julian Jackson BA PhD(Cantab) FBA FRHistS Professor of Modern French History Twentieth-Century French history

“I am a social and cultural historian of EighteenthCentury France, with particular interests in the French Revolution, the history of medicine and the history of Paris. One of my recent research projects relates to the history of smiling and laughing. I am just completing a booklength manuscript entitled ‘The French Smile Revolution: Identity and Dentistry in EighteenthCentury Paris’. “In addition, I am running two related projects, one on the history of physiognomy (‘the sciences of the face’) and the other on caricature in Eighteenth-Century Paris. This has made me think about what made people laugh in the past, how different emotions were expressed, and whether the human face has a history we can hope to recover. These are subjects which started off in the history of medicine but have widened to include a whole range of social, cultural and political issues. Find out more about the physiognomy project online: http://webspace.qmul.ac.uk/cdhjones/physiognomy/ “I also retain an intense interest in the French Revolution, and am planning a new project on why Robespierre fell, and how this relates to the history of terror. “I believe learning about the history of topics which are either manifestly significant (for example, the French revolution) or else highly problematic or unusual (for example, the history of the face) sharpens students’ imagination and encourages interdisciplinary thinking. As a School, we are working on an exciting range of historical topics and have excellent links with other disciplines, providing an exciting context for interdisciplinary work.”


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Staff research interests

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www.history.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Professor Colin Jones BA DPhil(Oxon) FBA FRHistS Professor of History History of France between the Seventeenth- and Nineteenth- Centuries, the French revolution, the history of Paris, history of medicine, the history of physiognomy, the history of the smile and the history of caricature Professor Catherine Merridale MA(Cantab) PhD(Birmingham) Professor of Contemporary History Twentieth-Century Russian history, the social and cultural history of Soviet Russia, with an emphasis on the 1930s and the war Professor Donald Sassoon BSc(Lond) MA(Penn State) PhD(Lond) Professor of Comparative European History West European left since 1900, Culture of the Europeans since 1800, Twentieth-Century Italy Jonathan Smele BA(Leeds) MPhil(Glas) PhD(Wales) FRHistS Senior Lecturer in Modern European History Late Imperial Russia, the revolutions of 1917 and the Russian Civil War, the history of Siberia and AngloRussian/Soviet relations in the revolutionary era Tom Sebrell, PhD in Union and Confederate propaganda and how it affected parliamentary and public opinion of the American Civil War. “No history school at any university takes better care of its postgraduate students than Queen Mary. I came here from the United States to research and get a PhD, but have been handed so much more already. In addition to granting me a studentship, the School has given me and some other postgraduates the opportunity to organise and operate our own seminar series. “My supervisor, Dr Peter Catterall, is a great friend and advocate who has done far more than just give me advice for researching and writing – he has ‘put my name out’ and arranged for me to make presentations at the Institute of Historical Research and at other universities in England. “The opportunity to conduct lectures and seminars for undergraduate courses has also been a most valuable experience that Queen Mary has given me, and this is great training for what I wish to do after finishing my degree – being a full-time lecturer. “I should also say that London is the best place for research in the United Kingdom. As home to the Institute of Historical Research, British Library, British National Archives, and the University of London’s Senate House Library, this is the ideal place for a research student.”

Christina von Hodenberg MA(Munich) DPhil(Bielefeld) Reader in Modern European History Social, political and cultural history of Nineteenthand Twentieth-Century Germany


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Daniel Wildmann Lic Phil(Z端rich) DPhil(Basel) Lecturer in History, Deputy Director LBI London Modern German-Jewish History and Culture, History of the Third Reich, Antisemitism, History of Masculinities, History of the Body, Film

Mark White BA MA PhD(Rutgers), FRHistS Professor in American History US Presidency and foreign policy; JFK; Cuban missile crisis; presidential advisers in post-war US politics

USA

History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Joanna Cohen BA(Cantab) MA(NWU) PhD(Penn State) Lecturer in History Consumption, economic policy and civic rights and obligations in Nineteenth-Century America

Richard Bourke BA(NUI) BA(Lond) PhD(Cantab) FRHistS Senior Lecturer in History History of political thought and intellectual history, particularly during the Enlightenment, modern Irish history, problems of empire and democracy, problems of conquest and ideas of equality

Mark Glancy BA(Lanc) MA PhD(East Anglia) Senior Lecturer in History Film history, Anglo-American relations, Alfred Hitchcock, cinema-going in Britain and in the United States, reception of American films in Britain, Second World War Joel Isaac BA MA(Lond) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in American History American cultural and intellectual history; the history of the human sciences Nico Pizzolato BA(Palermo) MA PhD(Lond) Lecturer in History Race relations in post-war United States, in particular in the urban north, Labour and working class history in Twentieth-Century Italy, early modern Mediterranean history, in particular concerning gender, sexuality, and slavery

Professor Quentin Skinner BA PhD(Cantab) Professor in the Humanities Intellectual history of early-modern Europe and political philosophy in the Seventeenth-Century, with a particular focus on the work of Thomas Hobbes Georgios Varouxakis BA(Athens) MA(Lond) PhD(Lond) FRHistS FRSA Reader in History of Political Thought British intellectual history and history of political thought, Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Centuries (with particular focus on British political thought on nationalism, patriotism, cosmopolitanism and international relations)


Languages, Linguistics and Film

MA in Anglo-German Cultural Relations p120 MA in Comparative Literature p121 MA in Film Studies p122 MA in Linguistics p121 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p123


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School of Languages, Linguistics and Film www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk The research and teaching strengths of the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies, Russian, Linguistics and Film Studies all converge in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film and have led to outstanding ratings in Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), league table and quality assurance assessments. Students are taught by internationally recognised experts in all fields covered by the School.

Research strengths We aim to provide a stimulating, intellectually challenging and nurturing research environment for our postgraduate student community which currently numbers over 80. Masters programmes in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film provide students with a grounding in research methods and skills, an introduction to the critical theories and approaches relevant to the area of study, and a choice of more specialised options. They offer excellent preparation for students who wish to continue on to doctoral work. Students come from a wide variety of backgrounds and age groups, from the UK, continental Europe and overseas. All programmes are available both full-time and part-time. Each student is allocated to a personal adviser, who offers guidance on personal development issues as well as academic matters such as choice of options and preparation for the dissertation. At MPhil or PhD level, supervision is available in a great variety of topics ranging from linguistics to European literatures, cinema, cultural studies, contemporary theory and the history of ideas. In all of these areas, students have the opportunity to carry out experimental and innovative research under the supervision of scholars who are among the UK’s leading experts in their fields. All departments hold research seminars to which distinguished scholars from Britain and abroad are regularly invited – visitors have included Mary Douglas, the late Jacques Derrida, Charles Barr and Laura Mulvey. We organise postgraduate lunch sessions where students meet to exchange ideas, and a postgraduate forum for the presentation of research papers. Professor Quentin Skinner is the Distinguished Visiting Professor for Humanities in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and Titular Head of the Arts Research Centre. Professor Skinner offers annual workshops for graduate students and succeeds Professor George Steiner and Professor Stuart Hall who held the position, respectively, from 2000 to 2003 and 2004 to 2006. First-year postgraduates all attend modules in research methods and skills, and IT training is available if needed.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The last national measurement of research quality, the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, graded research activity according to four quality levels. Departments were then assigned a quality profile, indicating how much of their activity was being conducted at each level. In terms of the top two categories, 4* (defined as ‘world-leading’) and 3* (‘internationally excellent’) the departments of the School performed as follows: • French 4* 10 per cent, 3* 45 per cent • German 4* 5 per cent, 3* 35 per cent • Iberian and Latin American 4* 25 per cent, 3* 35 per cent • Linguistics 4* 25 per cent, 3* 55 per cent • Russian 4* 20 per cent, 3* 20 per cent The Linguistics performance was the best in the country. You can find out more at: www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/research Projects, funding, research grants and awards The School’s recent major research activities include work in the following areas: in Film, screen representations of Paris, memory and fantasy, Hollywood, and British film; in French, interdisciplinary and comparative work covering the visual arts, linguistics, literature and the history of ideas; in German, the Stifterverband deutsche Wissenschaft-funded research into Anglo-German cultural relations; in Hispanic Studies, AHRC-funded work on Argentine documentaries; in Linguistics, ESRC-funded multicultural London English, and dialect development in a diasporic community; in Russian, on ruins and Russian cinema. Substantial recent research awards have been achieved by among others, Professor J L Cheshire (Multicultural London English, ESRC, £391,361); Dr Devyani Sharma (Dialect development and style in a diasporic community, ESRC £296,303); Professor FJ Rash (German Nationalism and AntiSemitism 1871-1924, Leverhulme Trust, £184,755). Dr KE Vaclavik, along with colleagues from the Department of Geography, has recently been awarded a grant of at least £172,620 from the AHRC for collaborative research in conjunction with the Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood (part of the Victoria & Albert Museum).


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School of Languages, Linguistics and Film www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

Our facilities include the excellent College Library with special collections on Anglo-German cultural relations and Swiss Literature, a Centre for Arts Computing, and the Arts Research Centre, unique among the University of London colleges, which contains dedicated social and work space for postgraduates and the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Students have free access to the superb collections of the University of London Library at Senate House, such as the Eliot Philips Collection of early printed Spanish books. The many other specialist libraries of the institution, such as the libraries of the British Film Institute, the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes or the social sciences library at the LSE, provide additional breadth. The incomparable resources of the British Library are close at hand, while London’s cultural resources facilitate research in our specialist fields.

The School offers Bursaries to cover tuition fees (at the home rate) for our Masters degrees and Studentships for our Research degrees that generally include payment of tuition fees at the home rate and living costs at the relevant research-council rate for three years. These are awarded to well-qualified MA applicants (home or overseas) and MPhil or PhD applicants (liable for tuition fees at the home rate) for full-time study. If you wish to be considered for a bursary or studentship, we recommend that you apply for an MA or Research Programme before mid-February 2011 for 2011/12 entry. Applications for research studentships in Film or Linguistics will also be considered for an AHRC award, if eligible. Full details and the deadline (normally mid-February) are announced in January each year, for entry the following September, and advertised on www.jobs.ac.uk and on our website www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate Late applications will still be considered for admission.

Graduate students attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year by the Faculty, on such topics as writing journal articles, research ethics, preparing for an academic career, enterprise skills, and knowledge transfer.

Further information Postgraduate admissions School of Languages, Linguistics and Film www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8332 email: sllf-pg@qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk


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School of Languages, Linguistics and Film Career opportunities On graduating, a huge range of career paths are open to you. The knowledge and skills you will acquire through postgraduate study can take you almost anywhere that values analytical thinking, independence, time management and research capabilities; from academia to fields such as the media, marketing, teaching or PR.

Graduate profile: Dr Ann Lewis

MA in Anglo-German Cultural Relations Graduates will benefit from the Centre’s link with the media and cultural institutions in Britain and Germany; this includes some of the major publishing houses and editorial offices of newspapers, TV and radio stations. The programme is designed to enable successful graduates to work and act as mediators/multipliers between our respective cultures and/or to engage in further research. MA in Film Studies This MA provides an ideal foundation for research at PhD level. As well as academia, the programme is also appropriate training for careers in fields including the cinema, television and media industries, teaching, journalism and public relations.

Studied: PhD on Sensibility, Reading and Illustration in the Eighteenth-Century French Novel – graduated 2006. Currently: I am a lecturer in French at Birkbeck, University of London. I started out as Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the School of Languages, Linguistics, and Film at Queen Mary, University of London, working on a book-length project on the representation of prostitutes in Eighteenth-Century France and teaching in the French Department. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? I did my undergraduate and Masters degrees at the University of Oxford. I chose to come to Queen Mary for various reasons: most importantly because my supervisor was here, and because of the Department’s expertise in the field of the Eighteenth-Century. London also has exceptional research facilities and libraries. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Doing a PhD is a challenging process, but there were plenty of opportunities to meet other postgraduate students through seminars and in the research annexe which is dedicated space for research students.


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Degree programmes

MA in Anglo-German Cultural Relations One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This is the only MA programme in the United Kingdom focusing exclusively upon the history, theory and practice of Anglo-German cultural relations from circa 1800 until the present. The programme deals mainly with the literary, theoretical and cultural dimensions of these relations, and also contains a unique practical component, in which students are taught by practitioners from British and German cultural institutions, as well as by experts from the fields of publishing, translating and the media. As such the programme provides a pathway either for future academic study or for a career outside of academia. Programme outline You will take the compulsory core module: Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers – which includes the study of inter- and intra-cultural relations between (national) cultures and will analyse the theory and history of Anglo-German cultural transfers from the late Eighteenth-Century to the present day. The second part will bring students in contact with practitioners in this field and introduce them to the reality of cultural transfers.

You will also take two out of the following four module options: Anglo German Aesthetics in the ‘Long’ Eighteenth-Century • Anglo-German Travel Writing • In pursuit of prejudice? Mutual perceptions of identity • Thinking Translation A student may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for the student’s intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. Assessment You will submit three essays for the core module, comprising one 2,000 word essay and two 3,000 word essays, submit one 4,000 word essay for each option in English and a 10,000 word dissertation in English or German. Entry requirements For entry to the MA you will need a BA in German or with German as a principal component (first class or upper second class honours degree) or Staatsexamen, or equivalent qualification. Applications by graduates from other countries are welcome. Where English is not your first language, you will need to be highly proficient in English, for academic purposes, as well as in German. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Students completing the MA in Anglo-German Cultural Relations have gone on to work in both Germany and Britain in the fields of secondary education, publishing, journalism, translation, as well as undertaking PhD research. Further information Postgraduate admissions Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8332 email: sllf-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Dr Angus Nicholls Programme Convenor Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2683 email: a.j.nicholls@qmul.ac.uk


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MA in Comparative Literature

MA in Linguistics

One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval)

One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval)

Programme description This is a new MA programme building on the thriving undergraduate programme in Comparative Literature. This field, sometimes also understood as comparative cultural studies, has since its beginnings recognised the realities of cultural movement, of exchange and dialogue. At its centre is the notion of ‘world literature’ along with attention to cultural, philosophical and theoretical questions. Research skills and training are an integral part of the MA. You will enjoy some flexibility in your choice of modules, while at the same time benefiting from the guidance of your tutor to ensure coherence in your studies. Whichever topics you study, you will have the opportunity to develop your academic writing skills.

Programme description This programme offers an intensive training designed to bring students to a level at which they can carry out their own original research. You will specialise in either sociolinguistics or formal linguistics, but can take options in the other subject, allowing you to tailor a unique programme combining these two disciplinary perspectives. You will be taught in small groups by an internationally recognised faculty. The Department of Linguistics was ranked first in its subject in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

Programme outline The curriculum consists of a core module, running over two terms, which deals with the history and nature of Comparative Literature as a discipline and which examines interdisciplinary, cross-national approaches to literature and critical theory. You will also choose two optional modules such as: Novels Behaving Badly • Thinking Translation • Orientalism in European Literature • Romantic Manifestos • History, Fiction, Memory in French Cinema • Reading Images: Painting, Photography, Film • European Jewish Literature • In Pursuit of Prejudice? Mutual Perceptions of Identity. Assessment Modules will normally each require a written essay of 4,000 words, along with a dissertation of 10,000 words, which counts for one-third of the overall mark. Entry requirements You will need a first class or good upper second class honours degree in an area such as comparative literature, languages, English, philosophy, classics, and history. Knowledge of one or more languages other than English is desirable, though presently not a pre-requisite. Applications from graduates from other countries are welcome. Where English is not your first language, you will need to be highly proficient in English for academic purposes. Please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390 for more information. Further information Professor Leonard Olschner School of Languages, Linguistics and Film Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8320 email: l.m.olschner@qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline Core modules: Sociolinguistics pathway: Qualitative methods in social science • Theory and methods in sociolinguistics • Quantitative methods in social science • Dissertation proseminar • Dissertation Formal linguistics pathway: Syntax • Semantics • Morphology • Dissertation proseminar • Dissertation Module options may include Language, nationalism and policy • Language change • Topics in psycholinguistics • Topics in syntax and semantics Assessment A wide range of assessment techniques will be used, tailored to the learning outcomes of the different modules. These will include poster presentations, technical exercises, critiques of methodological and theoretical proposals in the literature, and extended written analyses of data. Entry requirements Upper second class honours (or overseas equivalent) in an undergraduate degree with a significant linguistics component. International students need IELTS 7, plus 7 in writing (or the equivalent) if their first language is not English. International students, please see page 390 for more information. Further information Dr Paul Elbourne School of Languages, Linguistics and Film Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8298 email: p.d.elbourne@qmul.ac.uk


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MA in Film Studies One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. If you have already studied film at undergraduate level, you will be able to deepen your knowledge here. If this is your first in-depth engagement with film, you will be introduced to some of the liveliest and most important chapters in the history of cinema. You will be able to pursue your own particular interests in a dissertation on a topic of your choice. The MA also includes an element of practical work, both fiction and documentary, and the study of production practices. From the earliest days of British cinema, London was the location of most British studios and it remains the national focal point for studying film. Our provision at Queen Mary is enhanced by our proximity to major cultural centres such as the British Film Institute, which includes the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the CinéLumière at the French Institute. The MA attracts high numbers of well-qualified applicants from the UK and overseas each year. It is both a valuable qualification in its own right and particularly useful for applicants wishing to study subsequently for an MPhil or PhD in Film Studies. Programme outline The core module spans two semesters and provides an introduction to film analysis, theory and history and an overview of national and transnational cinemas cultures (incorporating discussion of films from the USA, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia and Latin America). You can also choose two single-semester module options from a range including: 9/11 and American Film • Auteur Direction • Comedies of Desire • Documentary Film: Theory and Practice (subject to approval) • Documentary: Specialist, Cross Platform and Current Affairs (subject to approval) • Films of Powell and Pressburger • Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War • Film Studies Research Project (subject to approval) • Frame, Space, Time: Approaches to the Experiences of Film • History, Fiction and Memory in French Cinema • Hollywood’s Vietnam • Introduction to Film Archives • Married to the Mob?: Mafia representations in Hollywood and Italian Cinema • Paris on the Screen • Sighting Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Film

You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. This arrangement is also extended to include an option offered as part of the MA in Global Cinema and the Transcultural at SOAS, the MA in Screen Studies at Goldsmiths, the MA in History of Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, the MA in Film Studies at UCL, or the MA in Film Studies at KCL. Assessment You will submit three essays for the core module, one of 2,000 words and two of 3,000 words, and one 4,000 word essay for each of the two options. At the end of August you will submit a dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words. Entry requirements We normally require an upper second class honours degree or equivalent in film or a relevant subject (such as English, History, Media or Modern Languages). International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Graduates of the MA in Film Studies have gone on to undertake PhD research and to work in the fields of film production, exhibition, curation, journalism and education. Further information Postgraduate admissions Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8332 email: sllf-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Dr Libby Saxton Programme Convenor Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8328 email: e.a.saxton@qmul.ac.uk


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Research Research degrees

Research areas

Academic staff in the School cover a very broad range of research interests. Among the many areas represented are: cinema, critical theory, dialectology, feminism, gay and lesbian studies, the history of ideas, Latin-American literacy and cultural studies, literature and linguistics in the main European languages, philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, theory of translation, descriptive and theoretical linguistics, especially syntax, phonology, sociolinguistics discourse and linguistic anthropology.

Film Studies Queen Mary has an active and flourishing interest in graduate work in Film Studies, leading to the degrees of MA, MPhil and PhD. The Department of Film Studies is one of the leading centres for graduate film study in London and benefits also from its close collaborative links with staff and graduate students at several other institutions of the University of London, such as the SOAS, Goldsmiths College, Birkbeck College, Royal Holloway, UCL and KCL.

One member of staff, who will be a specialist in his/her field of interest, will usually act as a supervisor to guide the student’s work and assess the student’s progress. However, the structure of the School lends itself to research topics that cross boundaries and co-supervision is now College policy. Research students are encouraged to attend conferences in their field and give papers as well as organise research-specific workshops; a limited amount of funding is available for this. At the time of writing, twenty-three PhDs have been awarded in the past five years, and a further sixteen are currently nearing completion.

From the earliest days of British cinematic history, most British studios were in London. The capital remains the part of Britain where film is most available for study – through the British Film Institute, including the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, which are all a short tube journey away from Queen Mary. The research ethos of the Department of Film Studies is further developed through a lively programme of graduate seminars and lectures by distinguished film specialist guest speakers, including our public Hitchcock Lecture series. Past speakers have included Richard Dyer, Douglas Pye, Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, Christine Gledhill, Richard Allen, Kevin Brownlow, Diane Negra, Laura Mulvey and Annette Kuhn. Talks have also been given by directors José Luis Borau, Karel Reisz, Claude Sautet and Jean-Paul Rappeneau, by Spanish actress Eulalia Ramón, and by Hollywood star Betsy Blair.

For information on studentships offered by the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, please refer to ‘Studentships’ on page 118. Entry requirements For entry at MPhil or PhD level, we would normally expect candidates to have an MA or equivalent. The School accepts students for the research degrees of MPhil and PhD of the University of London. Applicants for these degrees are accepted on the basis of previous academic performance and subject to the availability of a member of staff to supervise their work. We welcome applications from home and overseas students. As a prospective student you are advised to consult a potential supervisor before submitting a research proposal and formal application. You should also include a relevant piece of written work showing your potential for carrying out high level research in your subject area (preferably a final-year undergraduate or MA dissertation), with your application. Completed applications should be sent to the Admissions and Recruitment Office at Queen Mary. Please also refer to the ‘How to apply’ section on page 384. For international students, please refer to the ‘International students’ section from page 390.


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In addition to these activities, members of the Department have been responsible for organising major international conferences, including symposia celebrating the centenaries of the births of Luis Buñuel and David Lean, on the life and work of Lindsay Anderson, and on place and space in film. These events are regarded as an integral part of the research culture in film, and introduce MA and PhD students at the College to filmmakers and scholars working in the discipline. The School of Languages, Linguistics and Film is situated in a modern building on the College’s main campus at Mile End, with its own AV facilities, including a state-of-the-art cinema for screenings, lectures and research seminars, a studio space for practical production shooting, and two editing rooms and a sound studio for post-production work. The College library contains an extensive collection of English and foreign language films on DVD and video and offers private viewing facilities to support students’ research. Reflecting many years of teaching and research in this area, the library also has a large collection of books and journals on film, and corporate memberships which enable Queen Mary students to use the University of London Library and the British Film Institute Library.

European cinema There is a long tradition of research in European cinema at Queen Mary. The Department of Film Studies welcomes research proposals on contemporary European cinema and on specific historical case studies on national and transnational cinemas. We can offer supervision in most aspects of British, French, German, Spanish and Italian cinema and can draw on excellent film and book collections in the Queen Mary Library in these areas. With colleagues in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, we can also offer supervision in Russian cinema.

PhD topics researched by recent and current students in the Department of Film Studies include: • Female consciousness and film • Utopic space and globalisation in contemporary film • The influence of Japanese animation on the horror film genre • Popular Spanish comedy • Film adaptations of literary texts • Arthurian Romance and Film • Representations of Italianness in British cinema • Transnational stars in 1950s cinema: France and the USA • The relationship between the French and American film industries Prospective students are advised to consult the postgraduate selector, Dr Libby Saxton (e.a.saxton@qmul.ac.uk) about potential supervisors before submitting a research proposal. The Department of Film Studies is interested in receiving applications from prospective MPhil and PhD students across a wide range of areas. The Department has particular research strengths in the following fields:

Camilla Leathem, PhD in German Linguistics “I came to Queen Mary to be part of an existing project here on the discourse of German nationalism, and have ended up with two very helpful supervisors for my thesis: The Discourse of German Nationalism and Antisemitism, 1871-1924. For example, my supervisors have kept me up to date with which important conferences might be useful to me. I have been able to watch and learn from the professionals in action before presenting my own research. In general, the College in general takes great care of its Postgraduate students and ensures we are offered the right research training. “The Mile End Campus is just around the corner from my favourite part of the city; the vibrant Brick Lane, Shoreditch and Hoxton. These areas offer a wealth of more alternative leisure activities, including cuttingedge galleries, film and theatre. And, lest we forget, some of the most unique watering holes in London. “I play in the Queen Mary student orchestra and will be Orchestral Manager in the new academic year. The Music Society puts on some entertaining concerts and provides some friendly and relaxed evening activity after a long day in front of the computer. I also enjoy attending the numerous research events and guest lectures offered by the German Department and the Centre for Anglo-German Cultural Relations.”


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Hollywood and cinema of the Americas The Department of Film Studies, in collaboration with colleagues in the School of History and in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, encourages applications from prospective students with research interests in most areas of American cinema. Research on Hollywood is a significant focus of staff and student interest, and we also supervise research projects on Brazilian, Argentine, Cuban and other Latin American cinemas. Cultural history and memory Staff in the Department of Film Studies have wideranging expertise in the fields of cultural history and memory, and have published on topics including photography, oral history, popular memory, trauma and historical reception studies. Space and place in cinema There is a growing interest in the Department of Film Studies in questions of space and place in relation to the cinema. Queen Mary hosted a major conference on Designs for Living: Place and Space in the Cinema in 2005, and maintains a keen interest in questions of set design, film architecture, cinema and the city, representations of landscape and home, and in spatial film theory generally. Contemporary and classical film theory The Department of Film Studies, in collaboration with colleagues in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, has research strengths in a number of areas of film theory. Staff can offer supervision in research areas which engage with feminist film theory, queer theory, postcolonial theory, theories of performance and spectatorship, star studies, cinema and spatial theory, ethical theory and trauma theory, and theories of documentary.

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Genres and Directors Staff in the Department of Film Studies have considerable expertise in genre and directorial studies. Recent staff publications have included work on romantic comedies, war films, musicals and biblical epics, mafia films, heritage cinema and the Heimatfilm. Directorial studies on Carol Reed and Bertrand Blier have also been published recently by members of the Department. Further information Please contact: Dr Libby Saxton email: e.a.saxton@qmul.ac.uk French The French department is a vigorous research environment, which performed strongly in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. Staff are involved in vital research across a wide variety of areas and there are opportunities for research students and the staff of the Department to present their developing ideas and research findings in the framework of departmental workshop sessions. In addition to the research training provided by the Faculty in the Humanities and Social Sciences, there are subjectspecific sessions, tailored to the research training needs of individuals. Applicants can compete for College studentships. The Department of French is interested in receiving applications from prospective MPhil and PhD students across a wide range of areas. The Department has particular research strengths in the following areas:


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New Critical Approaches to the Novel Several members of the Department work on the novel, covering the Seventeenth to the Twenty-First Centuries, including francophone fiction for children. They engage with narrative theory, representations of social and cultural difference, and the relationships between literary and popular culture. Word and image Two key areas: intersections between Dada and Surrealist art, literature and thought; the work of contemporary women writers and artists. Modern French Theory and Cultural Studies Contemporary women’s writing and art, feminist theory, French colonial culture (in North Africa and the Caribbean), and representations of the exotic. Intellectual history Philosophical, religious, and political ideas from the late Sixteenth to the late Eighteenth Century; relationships between these and literary texts. French Cinema and Media Key periods in French cinema (1930s, New Wave, 1980s, 1990s); contemporary women’s filmmaking; theoretical approaches (psychoanalysis, ethics); central aspects of cinema (set design, genre, spectatorship). Linguistics Research in the department is centred on sociolinguistics, with a particular expertise in the following areas: Alex Lichtenfels, MPhil in film “I am studying for an MPhil in the Film Department – and hoping to upgrade to a PhD. The title of my thesis is Film Viewing and Political Efficacy. “I love the fact that my course gives me the space to conduct my own research without trying to mould it towards preconceived notions of what it ‘should’ be doing. Having said that, it is equally brilliant that when I need it, I can make use of the tremendously supportive learning environment provided by both the School and the Faculty. “The teaching I’ve encountered has been of an unusually high standard. I can’t speak well enough of the time my supervisors dedicate to giving me bespoke detailed feedback. “Last year I helped to organise a PhD colloquium, a mini-conference whereby a team had to organise the whole event from start to finish including everything from inviting speakers to organising catering. It was a great experience, and a real opportunity to get to know my peers at the university.”

• language and national identity in France, Quebec and Sweden • languages planning • language attitudes • variation in French • language in the European Union • languages and globalisation. Further information Please contact: Professor Edward Hughes Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8308 email: e.j.hughes@qmul.ac.uk German With its flourishing Centre for Anglo-German Cultural Relations; its connections with the Leo Baeck Institute and the University of London Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies (IGRS); and its partnerships with the Stiftung Weimar Klassik and with various German, Austrian, and Swiss universities, the German department offers an outstanding international research culture and is an exceptional place to pursue postgraduate study at MA, MPhil and PhD level.


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The Department, together with its Centre for AngloGerman Cultural Relations, has established an innovative MA in this field of research (see MA in Anglo-German Cultural Relations, page 120) and is also involved in teaching the IGRS MA on Cultural Memory. It is also actively engaged in planning for an MA in Comparative Literature at Queen Mary. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Departmental Research Seminar, and a range of events organised by the Centre for Anglo-German Cultural Relations, as well as lectures, readings and workshops given by Visiting Fellows and the Writer in Residence. All these events, together with the sheer number of Research students (some 12 in a given year) and a structured programme of ‘Oberseminare’ and Research Training Seminars also mean that the department is able to offer an unusually rich, supportive, stimulating and friendly framework for advanced research.

Some of the PhDs currently supervised include research on: • Urban ‘aurality’ as a literary motif in German modernism

The Department is interested in receiving applications from prospective MPhil and PhD students across a wide range of areas. The Department’s expertise covers virtually the whole field of Germanic studies, including Austrian and Swiss literature and linguistics. Particular research strengths include:

• German Exiles in London and Police records in Nineteenth- Century

• Anglo-German Cultural Relations, including comparative literature and cultural studies, the comparative history of ideas, the history of British ‘Germanistik’, cultural transfer, linguistic relations, translation theory and travel writing • Jewishness and German culture, including German-Jewish writing, exile and holocaust studies, and the rhetoric of anti-semitism • German, Austrian and Swiss literatures in their social contexts, including sociability, spas and salons; women’s writing; gay and lesbian studies • German thought from Lichtenberg to the Present, including Goethe and his age, Nietzsche, Freud and the history of psychoanalysis, hermeneutics , the Frankfurt School and queer theory • Poetry, and poetics, including Droste-Hülshoff, Rilke, and Celan • German Literature between 1945 and 1989, especially GDR literature before and after the ‘Wende’, Hubert Fichte and Uwe Johnson • German Linguistics, centred on dialectology and sociolinguistics, with a particular interest in contemporary German-speaking societies

• The psychoaesthetics of mourning in post-war West German prose • Winckelmann’s Aesthetics • Playing and playfulness in German thought and literature from Schiller to Hesse • Critique of the Purely Poetic Being in the poetry of Hölderlin, Rilke and Charents • The Poetics of H.C. Artmann and the Austrian Avant-garde • Heine's Poetic Images of Cities • Music and its narrative function in Wolfgang Hildesheimer and Gert Jonke

Research students in the Department have recently read papers at graduate colloquia and at research seminars in the UK, Germany and Austria. Where appropriate, they are encouraged to undertake archival research abroad, and grants have been awarded to work in Berlin, Wolfenbüttel, Marbach, Munich, Vienna and Zurich. Five theses from the Department have appeared in book form in recent years. Further information Please contact: Dr Angus Nicholls Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2683 email: a.j.nicholls@qmul.ac.uk


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Hispanic Studies Our research expertise is diverse and ranges over most areas of Spanish and Spanish-American Studies, Brazilian Studies, and Catalan Studies. We have an internationally-recognised research tradition and in the 2008 RAE, 60 per cent of our research was graded in the highest categories of 3* (internationally excellent) and 4* (world-leading). This placed us in the highest quartile in the 2008 research exercise. Among our researchers is a Fellow of the British Academy. Visiting Research Fellows, usually from Spain and the United States, who participate in research seminars and advise students on their areas of interest, are a regular feature of our research life. The Department benefits from the active ongoing involvement of a number of associated scholars: Emeritus professors Glendinning and Penny; Professor Dadson and Dr Whetnall. We publish a major scholarly journal, Hispanic Research Journal, and a monograph series, Papers of the Medieval Hispanic Research Seminar. See www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/hispstudies/pmhrs The College has a strong collection of books, periodicals, videos and DVDs in Hispanic and LatinAmerican Studies. It also houses a comprehensive collection of Brazilian fiction films, Argentinean and Brazilian documentaries (see www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/ hispstudies/ladocs) and the Bernat Metge collection (Catalan). In addition, postgraduate students at Queen Mary also have access to the extensive resources of the British Library, and the University of London Library, at Senate House, where the Eliot Phelips collection of early printed Spanish books, the Joan Gili collection of Catalan books and specialist Latin-American holdings are located. The Warburg Institute Library, a famous interdisciplinary centre which specialises in the classical tradition, is also available to students. The University of London is also home to the Institute for Germanic and Romance Studies and the Institute for the Study of the Americas, in which we actively participate. We provide supervision for MPhil and PhD theses in most areas of Spanish and Spanish-American linguistic, literary and cultural studies, film studies, Catalan and Brazilian literary and cultural studies, and comparative literature topics with a Hispanic element. In addition to more specialist seminars organised within the School, there is a Departmental Research Seminar, which is a focus for research in Hispanic Studies. We also hold a yearly full-day students’ symposium when students give papers and/or discuss research in progress. There is a

comprehensive programme of training in research methods, academic writing, dissemination of research and oral presentations. Research Students are often invited to undertake undergraduate teaching for the Department. The Department of Hispanic Studies is interested in receiving applications from prospective MPhil and PhD students across a wide range of areas. The Department has particular research strengths in the following areas: Medieval Hispanic Studies The Department hosts the Medieval Hispanic Research Seminar, an internationally recognised research centre directed by Dr Rosa Vidal. Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from Spain, America and elsewhere regularly spend extended periods working in association with the Seminar. Four or five meetings are held each term for discussion of work in progress and a two-day international colloquium is held each summer. The Department offers supervision in Medieval Spanish Studies in general and, in particular, in the Spanish Inquisition and inter-religious conflicts (Christian, Jews and Muslims). Film Studies Professor Vieira offers modules and supervision on the MA in Film Studies on Argentine, Brazilian and Chilean Cinemas, with a particular focus on political history and gender representations (see page 122). Dr GarcĂ­a offers supervision in Cuban and Spanish Cinema. Professor Parvati Nair offers supervision in Spanish cinema, with a particular focus on gender and migration. Modern Peninsular Research expertise in Modern Peninsular Studies covers all genres of literature, film and cultural studies. Current specific research interests include poetry and poetics, drama and theatre under Franco, censorship studies, poetics of exile, cultural resistance, film, photography, popular culture and the study of migration. Current major interdisciplinary research projects feature the history of emotions and early modern madness. Dr Carrera is a co-founder of the recently established interdepartmental Centre for the History of the Emotions. Professor Nair is the Director of the Centre for Migration Studies and teaches on the MA programmes in Migration Studies.


Languages, Linguistics and Film Queen Mary, University of London

Latin American Studies Latin Americanists in the Department (Dr D’Allemand, Dr García and Professor Vieira) can offer research supervision in cultural history; cultural studies; history of ideas; exile; social, resistance and revolutionary movements; gender studies; film and literature. Research in the Latin American field covers all genres and periods. There is particular expertise on Brazil, Cuba, Central America, Colombia, the Caribbean, the Andean countries, the Southern Cone countries, and Cuban-Americans. Brazilian Studies This area focuses on Brazilian Contemporary Culture in film, literature, music and photography. Our work with Brazilian artists includes, amongst others, Fernando Meirelles, Walter Salles, prominent women film directors, as well as major documentary filmmakers, such as Eduardo Coutinho, João Moreira Salles, Evaldo Mocarzel, José Padilha and Marcos Prado, and photographers such as Sebastião Salgado. Catalan Studies The Department hosts the Centre for Catalan Studies (CCS), funded by the Institut Ramon Llull (Barcelona). The CCS produces and disseminates first-class research in Catalan Studies and trains new researchers in the area. It contributes to the institutionalisation of Catalan Studies in UK universities and promotes links between researchers in the UK, the Catalan-speaking lands and the US. The CCS also offers scholarships to PhD students working specifically in this area. Hispanic and Romance Linguistics There is close collaboration with the Department of Linguistics, and linguists participate fully in the Linguistics Research Seminar. Professor Pountain convenes an annual Romance Linguistics Seminar attracting international participation in which Research Students regularly make presentations alongside established scholars. Further information Please contact: Dr Omar García Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8302 email: o.a.garcia@qmul.ac.uk Linguistics The Department’s research encompasses both the structure of language and its use within speech communities and different social contexts. The department came first in its subject in the country in the 2008 RAE, according to the rankings drawn up by theTimes Higher Education and Guardian; 80 per cent of research activity in the department was considered to be of 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent' quality by the RAE assessors.

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Our specific areas of interest are: syntax, semantics, morphology and prosody; phonology; tone and intonation; the structure of spoken language; dialect syntax; and sociolinguistics – including variationist, interactional, discourse-analytic, and field-based approaches, ethnography of communication, sociology of language, language and media, language and gender, language attitudes, language planning, multilingualism, endangered languages, dialect contact and historical linguistics. The Department works closely with other linguists in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, who have specific interests in French, German and Hispanic languages, and research students benefit from this range of expertise. We have a lively programme of seminars and reading groups and a series of invited guest lectures. Graduate students have access to the major academic libraries and resources in London, in addition to our own study facilities. The Department has a new linguistics laboratory and recording studio. The laboratory is fully stocked with state-of-the-art recording and transcribing equipment, a comprehensive range of public corpora and software for analysing language and workstations for graduate students and research fellows. Further information Please contact: Dr Paul Elbourne Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8298 email: p.d.elbourne@qmul.ac.uk Russian We have enjoyed a vigorous existence since the Department’s foundation in 1965 and continue to flourish, with 40 per cent of our research graded in the highest categories of 3* (internationally excellent) and 4* (world-leading) in the last Research Assessment Exercise (2008). The Departmental research culture is fostered through its research seminar series, its regular visits of lecturers from Russia, the work of the Garnett Press, and the organisation of conferences, such as that on the theme of Russia on Screen (2008). The College Library has material on Slavonic linguistics, Russian literature and film, in addition to all of the basic reference tools required by research workers. Students can supplement this collection by using other central London specialist sources. Within the broader area of the Faculty of Arts, the Department contributes to the MA in Film Studies (see page 122).


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Research

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Staff research interests www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/research

The Department is interested in receiving applications from prospective MPhil and PhD for research in Russian ranges over a wide number of topics and has particular research strengths in the following areas: • Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth- Century Russian literature (in particular Karamzin, Zhukovskii, Gogol, Tolstoi, Chekhov, Zoshchenko, travel literature, non-fiction literature) • Soviet cinema (especially documentary, Dziga Vertov and wartime cinema) • Landscape design in Russia • Modernity and its ruins • The Nineteenth- Century Russian press and its magnates • The relationship between totalitarianism and the Russian intelligentsia • Russian folklore • Polish literature Further information Please contact: Professor Andreas Schönle Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8329 email: a.schonle@qmul.ac.uk

Philippa Law, PhD Linguistics “I'm studying for a PhD in minority language broadcasting. In particular I'm researching how the media can support endangered languages. “When I was thinking about doing a PhD, someone recommended I approach a particular academic, who happened to work at Queen Mary. We talked about my research ideas and I put in an application. Now she's my supervisor. The fact that Queen Mary is the top-rated place for linguistics research in the UK is an added bonus! “The Linguistics Department is a great community – we have weekly reading groups and seminars that give us the chance to talk about our work and develop our ideas. The PhD students share an office too, so even though we're all working on different things, we don't need to feel isolated. The Lock-keeper's Cottage is a fabulous building that humanities students can use to get some peace and quiet or host seminars and events. The architecture is amazing. “Last year I met one of the few remaining speakers of Vilamovicean, an endangered language spoken by a handful of people in Poland. It was a moving experience – and it brought my subject to life.”

Comparative Literature Professor Elza Adamowicz MA(Edin) PhD(Lond) Professor of French Literature and Visual Culture Dada and Surrealist art, literature and film; word and image relations in Twentieth-Century French literature/art Elena Carrera LicFil(Zaragoza) MA(Nottingham) DPhil(Oxon) Lecturer in Hispanic Studies Comparative approaches to Sixteenth-Century European literature and history of ideas: madness, passions and emotions, mysticism, autobiography Robert Gillett MA(Oxon) PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer German, Austrian and Comparative Literature and Culture, especially poetry, theatre history, the cultural history of travel, gender and queer studies and film Professor Rüdiger Görner BA(Lond) MA(Tübingen) PhD(Surrey) Professor of German and Director of the Centre for Anglo-German Cultural Relations Aesthetics of Romanticism; Literary modernism in Germany and Austria, music and literature; AngloGerman literary relations since 1780 Shirley Jordan BA PhD(Hull) Reader Contemporary women’s writing (French and comparative); feminisms; self-narrative in literature, art and film; photography and photo-texts; poetry; art criticism.


Languages, Linguistics and Film Queen Mary, University of London

Will McMorran BA(Bris) DPhil(Oxon) Senior Lecturer in French and Comparative Literature Comparative approaches to early modern fiction, particularly the Eighteenth-Century novel in France and England; the afterlife of early modern fiction in contemporary popular culture; Sade and the ethics of fiction Angus Nicholls BA(Hons) PhD(Monash) Research Lecturer in German and Comparative Literature Literature and philosophy; literary and scientific discourses; comparative approaches to English and German Romanticisms; Goethe and the philosophy of his age; German critical and hermeneutic theory; the history of psychoanalytic theory; theories of myth

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Professor Peter Evans MA(St Andrews) PhD(Cantab) Professor of Film Studies Spanish cinema (especially Buñuel), Hollywood (especially the Musical, Romantic Comedy, Biblical Epics), British Cinema (especially Carol Reed) Mark Glancy BA(Lanc) MA PhD(East Anglia) Senior Lecturer (Department of History) American and British film history; transnational reception studies; Alfred Hitchcock; films and the Second World War; the Hollywood studio system

Professor Leonard Olschner BA(Virginia) Dr Phil(Freiburg) Professor of German and Comparative Literature German and comparative literature, Goethe, Lichtenberg, Twentieth-Century poetry, literature of the Shoah, Paul Celan, Adorno, translation studies Kiera Vaclavik BA(Sheffield) MA PhD(Manchester) Lecturer in French Studies and Comparative Literature Anglophone and Francophone children's literature and culture, comparative literature, NineteenthCentury fiction, theories of intertextuality Professor Else RP Vieira MA PhD(UFMG, Brazil) PhD(UFMG, Warwick) Professor of Brazilian and Comparative Latin American Studies Gender and sexuality in Latin American Cinema; African Cinema: racial and political liberation, postindependence reconstruction; Brazilian cinema and culture; Translation Studies

Staff profile: Dr Libby Saxton Senior Lecturer in French and Film Studies

Professor Elza Adamowicz MA(Edin) PhD(Lond) Professor of French Literature and Visual Culture Dada and Surrealist art, literature and film; word and image relations in Twentieth-Century French literature/art

“I have recently completed two books, Haunted Images: Film, Ethics, Testimony and the Holocaust (Wallflower, 2008), with the assistance of funding from the AHRC Research Leave Scheme, and Film and Ethics: Foreclosed Encounters, co-authored with Lisa Downing (Routledge, 2009). I also received a British Academy Small Research Grant for transcribing and digitally archiving the proceedings of Jacques Derrida’s seminars at Queen Mary.

Eugene Doyen BA MA(Westminster) Technical Director of Film The processes of creative writing, the skills and technique of fiction direction, the relationship between film theory and film practice

“My work on film and the Holocaust was driven by an interest in the ethics of representation, which led me, in my second book, to explore in detail the intersections between cinema and recent ethical thought in the continental tradition.

Charles Drazin BA MA(Oxon) PhD(Lond) Lecturer in Film Studies British cinema, especially Alexander Korda, Documentary Movement, Ealing Studios, Free Cinema and British 'New Wave', French cinema

“Much of my teaching is symbiotically linked to my research. My specialist undergraduate and MA modules have evolved out of, and informed, my books, which enables me to ensure that students are exposed to the latest scholarship and debates in the fields.”

Film


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Staff research interests www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/research

Sue Harris BA(Strathclyde) MèsL(Amiens) PhD(Bris) Reader in French Cinema Studies French cinema and popular theatre, books on European set design, cinema and national identity, Catherine Deneuve, Bertrand Blier Jeremy Hicks BA MA PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer Russian cinema, especially non-fiction, documentary and newsreel from 1920s-40s, as well as contemporary Russian documentary; Dziga Vertov and film representations of the Holocaust Alasdair King BA(Lond) MA(East Anglia) PhD(Southampton) Senior Lecturer in German and Film Studies German cinema (contemporary and historical case studies); film and philosophy, film and spatial theory, film aesthetics Professor Annette Kuhn BA(Econ) MA(Sheffield) PhD(Lond) FBA Senior Professorial Fellow in Film Studies Cinema, photography and cultural memory; childhood and cinema, transitional phenomena and cultural experience, history and ethnohistory of film reception Professor Parvati Nair BA MA PhD(Lond) Professor of Hispanic Cultural Studies Contemporary Spanish cultural studies, Migration Studies: representations of displacement in film, music and photography, community and minority identities Libby Saxton BA(Oxon) MA PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer in French and Film Studies Interactions between film and philosophies of ethics; post-war French cinema; representations of the Holocaust and the Franco-Algerian War; the relationship between film, memory and testimony Pauline Small MA(Glas) MLitt(Edin) Senior Lecturer in Film Contemporary Italian cinema, mafia films, star studies, comedy filmmaking of the 1950s Professor Else RP Vieira MA PhD(UFMG, Brazil) PhD(UFMG, Warwick) Professor of Brazilian and Comparative Latin American Studies Gender and sexuality in Latin American Cinema; African cinema: racial and political liberation, postindependence reconstruction; Brazilian cinema and culture; Translation Studies Guy Westwell BA(Keele) MA PhD(Glasgow) Lecturer in Film Studies Relationship between film, photography and cultural memory within an American context, representations of the Vietnam War and other traumatic events in American history, contemporary Hollywood and 9/11

Staff profile: Professor Michael Moriarty FBA Centenary Professor of French Literature and Thought; Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques “Many early modern (Sixteenth – Eighteenth Century) writers, philosophers, theologians, moralists are fascinated by the possibility of explaining apparently virtuous behaviour as false and deceptive, for instance, because it is practised for one’s advantage or to enhance one’s self-image. I am writing a book entitled Disguised Vices on this topic, mostly on French material. The research has been funded under the AHRC Research Leave scheme. It follows on from a prizewinning study Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves: Early Modern French Thought II (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006). “I was drawn to this area through a fascination with the arguments and strategies used to cast doubt on apparent virtue, and with the interface between religious and secular perspectives. “At its best, my research would affect readers’ sense of what is important or interesting. I aim to display the fascination and relevance of what may appear abstruse or remote in debates from the past. “Queen Mary benefits from distinguished researchers in many adjacent disciplines, and much scope to benefit from interdisciplinary connections. Our research students are highly valued, and the material and moral support is strong.”


Languages, Linguistics and Film Queen Mary, University of London

French Professor Elza Adamowicz MA(Edin) PhD(Lond) Professor of French Literature and Visual Culture Dada and Surrealist art, literature and film, word and image relations in Twentieth- Century French literature/art Sue Harris BA(Strathclyde) MèsL(Amiens) PhD(Bris) Reader in French Cinema Studies French cinema and popular theatre, books on European set design, cinema and national identity, Catherine Deneuve, Bertrand Blier Professor Edward Hughes BA PhD(Belfast) Professor of French The socio-political reading of literature; TwentiethCentury French Literature, particularly Proust, Camus, Genet; Francophone literature of North Africa; exoticism, marginality and cultural identity Shirley Jordan BA PhD(Hull) Reader Contemporary women’s writing (French and comparative); feminisms; self-narrative in literature, art and film; photography and photo-texts; poetry; art criticism Will McMorran BA(Bris) DPhil(Oxon) Senior Lecturer in French and Comparative Literature Comparative approaches to early modern fiction, particularly the Eighteenth-Century novel in France and England; the afterlife of early modern fiction in contemporary popular culture; Sade and the ethics of fiction Professor Michael Moriarty MA PhD(Cantab) FBA FRSA Centenary Professor of French Literature and Thought French literature from 1550-1800, history of ideas (philosophy, theology, political thought)

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Kiera Vaclavik BA(Sheffield) MA PhD(Manchester) Lecturer in French Studies and Comparative Literature Anglophone and Francophone children's literature and culture, comparative literature, NineteenthCentury fiction, theories of intertextuality

German Robert Gillett MA(Oxon) PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer German, Austrian and Comparative Literature and Culture, especially poetry, theatre history, the cultural history of travel, gender and queer studies and film Professor Rüdiger Görner BA(Lond) MA(Tübingen) PhD(Surrey) Professor of German and Director of the Centre for Anglo-German Cultural Relations Aesthetics of Romanticism, Literary modernism in Germany and Austria, music and literature, AngloGerman literary relations since 1780 Patricia Howe BA PhD(Lond) Research Fellow German literature, German and Austrian NineteenthCentury narrative fiction and travel writing Alasdair King BA(Lond) MA(East Anglia) PhD(Soton) Senior Lecturer in German and Film Studies German cinema (contemporary and historical case studies), film and philosophy, film and spatial theory, film aesthetics Astrid Köhler Dr Phil(Berlin) Reader in German German cultural history 1770-1830, including courtly and bourgeois sociability, public rituals and literary journals. Current writings by East German authors before and after German unification

Leigh Oakes BA PhD(Melbourne) Reader Language and national identity in France, Québec, and Sweden, language policy in the European Union, language attitudes, language and globalisation

Angus Nicholls BA(Hons) PhD(Monash) Research Lecturer in German and Comparative Literature English and German Romanticisms; Goethe and the philosophy of his age; German critical and hermeneutic theory; history of psychoanalysis; theories of myth

Libby Saxton BA(Oxon) MA(Cantab) PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer in French and Film Studies Interactions between film and philosophies of ethics; post-war French cinema; representations of the Holocaust and the Franco-Algerian War; the relationship between film, memory and testimony

Professor Leonard Olschner BA(Virginia) Dr Phil(Freiburg) Professor of German and Comparative Literature German and comparative literature, Goethe, Lichtenberg, Twentieth- Century poetry, literature of the Shoah, Paul Celan, Adorno, translation studies


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Staff research interests

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www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/research

Falco Pfalzgraf Staatsexamen(Kassel) PhD(Manchester) Lecturer in German Linguistics and Medieval German The influence of English upon German, Linguistic Purism (synchronic and diachronic focus), the relationships between politics, language, and culture Professor Felicity Rash BA PhD(Lond) MA(PCL) Professor of German Linguistics The sociolinguistics of Switzerland, politeness theory, cognitive metaphor theory, right-wing German discourse, German colonialism

Hispanic Studies Elena Carrera LicFil(Zaragoza) MA(Nottingham) DPhil(Oxon) Lecturer in Hispanic Studies Spanish Golden Age history and literature (passions and emotions, madness, mysticism, autobiography, Cervantes), contemporary Spanish narrative Professor Trevor J Dadson BA(Leeds) PhD(Cantab) FBA Professor of Hispanic Studies, Vice-Principal (Humanities and Social Sciences) Golden Age Spanish and Portuguese poetry, textual editing, Golden Age cultural history (literacy, history of the book, the Moriscos), contemporary Spanish poetry Patricia D’Allemand LicFil(National University of Colombia) PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies Latin American literature, cultural theory, cultural history and history of ideas, with particular emphasis upon Colombia, the Andean region and Southern Cone countries Professor Peter Evans MA(St Andrews) PhD(Cantab) Professor of Film Studies Spanish cinema (especially Buñuel) Omar García BA BS MA MSEd PhD(Mia) PhD(Lond) Reader in Poetics of Exile, Censorship and Cultural Resistance Cuban and Cuban-American literature and film, contemporary Spanish poetry and drama, poetry and poetics of exile, censorship and cultural resistance Jordi Larios BA MPhil PhD(Barcelona) Senior Lecturer in Catalan Studies Twentieth- Century Catalan literature, TwentiethCentury Spanish poetry, Spanish avant-garde narrative of the 1930s Professor Parvati Nair BA MA PhD(Lond) Professor of Hispanic Cultural Studies Contemporary Spanish cultural studies, Migration Studies: representations of displacement in film, music and photography, community and minority identities

Professor Christopher Pountain MA PhD(Cantab) Professor of Spanish Linguistics Spanish and the Romance languages, their structure and history, especially historical syntax Rosa Vidal Doval BA MA PhD(Manchester) Lecturer in Spanish Medieval Literature and Culture Late medieval Spanish history and literature, interreligious violence, Latin and vernacular preaching Professor Else RP Vieira MA PhD(UFMG, Brazil) PhD(UFMG, Warwick) Professor of Brazilian and Comparative Latin American Studies Gender and sexuality in Latin American Cinema; African Cinema: racial and political liberation, postindependence reconstruction; Brazilian cinema and culture; Translation Studies

Linguistics Professor David Adger MA MSc PhD(Edin) Professor of Linguistics Syntactic theory, interfaces in grammar, syntactic variation Professor Jenny Cheshire BA(Lond) PhD(R’dg) FRSA Professor of Linguistics Sociolinguistics, language variation and change, syntax of spoken language, Youth language in multicultural urban settings Colleen Cotter MA(Sussex, Berkeley) PhD(Berkeley) Senior Lecturer in Linguistics Sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, ethnography of communication, discourse analysis, language of news media, endangered languages Paul Elbourne MA MPhil(Oxon) PhD(MIT) Lecturer in Linguistics Semantics, philosophy of language, syntax-semantics interface Professor Carlos Gussenhoven MA(Amsterdam) PhD(Nijmegen) Professor of Linguistics Phonology, prosody, experimental phonology, intonation of west Germanic languages, typology of tonal systems, intonational transcription of spoken corpora Daniel Harbour MA(Oxon) MPhil (Oxon) PhD(MIT) Lecturer in Linguistics Features (linguistic atoms) in morphology, syntax, semantics, endangered language documentation/preservation Erez Levon BA(UCLA) MA PhD(NYU) Lecturer in Linguistics Sociolinguistics, language and gender/sexuality, language and ethnicity/nationalism, language style


Languages, Linguistics and Film Queen Mary, University of London

Leigh Oakes BA PhD(Melbourne) Reader Language and national identity in France, Québec, and Sweden, language policy in the European Union, language attitudes, language and globalisation Falco Pfalzgraf Staatsexamen(Kassel) PhD(Manchester) Lecturer in German Linguistics and Medieval German The influence of English upon German, Linguistic Purism (synchronic and diachronic focus), the relationships between politics, language, and culture Professor Christopher Pountain MA PhD(Cantab) Professor of Spanish Linguistics Spanish and the Romance languages, their structure and history, especially historical syntax Professor Felicity Rash BA PhD(Lond) MA(PCL) Professor of German Linguistics Research interests: the sociolinguistics of Switzerland, politeness theory; cognitive metaphor theory, rightwing German discourse, German colonialism

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Devyani Sharma BA(Dartmouth) MA PhD(Stanford) Lecturer in Linguistics Sociolinguistics, new Englishes, bilingualism, syntactic variation, syntax and typology

Russian Jeremy Hicks BA MA PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer Russian literature and cinema, especially non-fiction, documentary and journalism from 1920s-40s, satirical literature (Mikhail Zoshchenko), documentary film (Dziga Vertov), Russian representations of the Holocaust Anna Pilkington MA(Moscow) Lecturer Russian avant-garde, children’s literature and folk literature Professor Andreas Schonle MA PhD(Harvard) Professor of Russian Eighteenth and Nineteenth- Century Russian literature, cultural meaning of ruins, landscape design in Russia, conceptions of modernity in Russia, the emergence of an intellectual elite

“Recent projects include an AHRC study of Kiowa, an endangered native American language with radically free word order. It shows that the same principles underlie Kiowa grammar as that of more familiar languages. The results were published in ‘Mirrors and Microparameters: phrase structure beyond free word order’ (CUP, 2009).

Staff profile: Professor David Adger Professor of Linguistics “I’m interested in the underlying organising principles of language, especially in those that create grammar, so when I see phenomena that appear to challenge the existence of such principles, such as massively free word order, apparently random variation, or structures that look just the reverse of what one might expect, I feel I have to tackle them!

“I am also involved in a number of studies of dialectal English, examining the underlying logic to the apparently random use of phrases like ‘we was’/‘we were’, and developing a theory which links grammatical and sociolinguistic factors. This work has led to the publication of several papers in the Journal of Linguistics and Lingua. With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, I am also completing a book on the way that grammar connects with meaning, focusing on some odd looking grammatical structures in Scottish Gaelic. “My research feeds into everything I do, from my first year classes to my PhD students and postdocs. The process of doing research, and the understanding and knowledge that comes from it, find its way into my lectures, books, and discussions with students. Universities are all about developing knowledge and understanding of the world and passing it on.”


Law

LLM Programme p140 MA in Medical Law and Ethics p143 MSc in Management of Intellectual Property p145 Postgraduate Certificate in Intellectual Property Law p146 Postgraduate Certificate in Trade Mark Law and Practice p147 MSc in Law and Finance Programme p147 Postgraduate Diplomas in Law p148 Postgraduate Diploma in International Dispute Resolution (Arbitration) p149 Postgraduate Diploma in International Dispute Resolution (Mediation) p149 Diploma/LLM in Computer and Communications Law (Distance Learning) p150 Postgraduate Diploma in International Commercial Arbitration (Distance Learning) p151 Postgraduate Diploma in International Mediation (ADR) (Distance Learning) p152 MA by Research in Law p153 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p154


Law Queen Mary, University of London

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School of Law www.law.qmul.ac.uk The Queen Mary School of Law has consistently been ranked in the top 10 in the UK for research, thanks to our internationally recognised staff, many of whom act as advisers to governments, industry and NGOs both nationally and internationally. Along with contributions from distinguished visiting academics and practitioners, our postgraduate students are able to benefit from a supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, conveniently located in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, Holborn, near to numerous law firms, chambers and the Courts of European Justice. The Department of Law research strengths www.law.qmul.ac.uk The Department of Law conducts an extensive range of teaching and research activities. National and international institutions, governments, industry and the legal professions make use of the expertise of the Department of Law. The Department of Law has particular expertise in the areas of public international law; international human rights; public law; European Union law; criminology, class law, legal theory and legal history; equity, trusts and property law; healthcare law; comparative law; immigration, asylum and rights of ethnic minorities; company and commercial law; labour law, competition law; criminal law and environmental law. The Centre for Commercial Law Studies research strengths www.ccls.qmul.ac.uk The CCLS was created in 1980 by Professor Sir Roy Goode CBE QC to develop a body of knowledge and skills in the areas of commercial law, which is used by governments, public bodies, international financial institutions, NGOs, the legal professions and industry and commerce. CCLS has particular strengths in arbitration, banking and finance law, comparative and commercial law, intellectual property, economic regulation, international business law, law and development, mediation, computer and communications law, EU financial law and tax law. The School of Law at Queen Mary offers postgraduate research and teaching activities to over 700 students from all over the world. The School of Law, comprising the Department of Law and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS), has over 60 full-time members of academic staff, which makes us one of the largest Law Schools in the country, teaching both undergraduates and postgraduates. It also provides access to a wide range of specialist institutions, visiting fellows and practitioners who contribute their expertise to educational programmes that blend academic issues with practical skills. Government, public bodies, overseas institutions, the legal profession, industry and commerce all consult and utilise the experience, knowledge and skills of the School’s staff.

Continuous Professional Development (CPD) The School of Law is an authorised CPD provider of courses and seminars accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board For further details on events, guest lectures and how to register for them: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/events

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The results of the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008) confirm Queen Mary Law School's position as one of the country's leading legal research institutions. The Law School has consolidated its position as being ranked 7th in England, and 3rd in London, based on 60 per cent of its research activity classed as world-leading (4*) (highest score possible) or internationally excellent (3*). The independent assessment of research quality takes into account the quality of research outputs, research environment and esteem indicators.

Projects, funding, research grants and awards Current School of Law research projects include: • Global law firm White & Case LLP have appointed Penny Martin as Research Fellow at the School of International Arbitration to undertake research into ‘Corporate choice in arbitration in key regions of the world’, being overseen by Professor Loukas Mistelis • Professor Richard Ashcroft, along with Professor Paul Dolan (Imperial College) and Professor Theresa Marteau (KCL) have been awarded a £850K Wellcome Trust Strategic Award in Biomedical Ethics, to support an interdisciplinary research project on the use of personal incentives to promote public health • Professor Christopher Millard, together with Professors Chris Reed and Ian Walden, is undertaking research on legal and regulatory aspects of cloud computing. The project is funded by Microsoft • Dr Leonidas Cheliotis has been awarded two research grants to carry out evaluative research on the implementation and effectiveness of arts-based schemes for offenders in England and Wales • Professor Uma Suthersanen is working on a AHRC funded project entitled ‘Who Owns the Orphans? Traditional and Digital Property in Visual Art’, which investigates the regulation of non-attributable or abandoned visual art • Dr Prakash Shah is working on ‘Socio-Legal Status of British Immigrants in Turkey’ funded by The Nuffield Foundation


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Law Queen Mary, University of London

School of Law www.law.qmul.ac.uk • Professor Ian Walden and Dr Julia Hörnle are researching ‘International Frameworks and Powers for Enforcing Consumer Protection over the Internet’ for the Department for Business Innovation and Skills • Professor Chris Reed has been awarded a two year Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust for a project on ‘Effective lawmaking for ‘cyberspace’ • Professor Seán McConville is working with Dr Anna Bryson on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust: 'Archival Preparation of Irish Political Prisoners' Interviews, 1920 - 2000'

Postgraduate resources Postgraduate School of Law Centre In May 2007 we opened the new Postgraduate School of Law in a fully refurbished building in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, Holborn, which is near to numerous law firms, chambers and the Courts of Justice and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. The building has wireless and scan to email facilities, workstations for students, smart boards and digital data projectors for teaching and a students’ common room. Libraries As well as housing the Law Library and a European Documentation Centre, the Queen Mary Library at Mile End provides access to all the main British, European and international textbooks, law reports and periodicals and also boasts one of the best commercial law collections in the country. Through the University of London College network, students have access to an unrivalled range of electronic law journals and databases. In addition to the Queen Mary Library and the British Library, Postgraduate students are able to access the well-stocked law library at the University of London’s Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS). The Institute, located at Russell Square, a few minutes walk from Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is one of the major law libraries worldwide. Access to the University of London Library at Senate House, which is a general library with a very large collection, of particular interest to those studying legal theory, legal history, and commercial law, is available to MPhil and PhD researchers registered with the School. Postgraduate law students have access to the College’s extensive computing facilities, including full Internet access.

Graduate Centre Graduate students in the School of Law also have access to the Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre, an award-winning building on the Mile End campus designed especially for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room. Advice and support The School attaches great importance to the provision of support, both academic and pastoral, to its students. More detailed information is provided on our website, (www.law.qmul.ac.uk), see the page detailing the programme you are interested in.

Scholarships / studentships Scholarship information changes every year. In 2010, we awarded the following scholarships: LLM • Twelve scholarships covering full tuition fees spread across Home, EU and International Students • Six partial scholarships worth £2,000 to students from particular regions/countries • Six partial scholarships worth up to £1,000 for LLB graduates of Queen Mary, University of London. MSc in Management of Intellectual Property Herchel Smith scholarships Several tuition fee waivers are awarded at the home student rate and a small stipend towards additional costs to graduates of British universities only in mathematics, engineering and the natural, medical and computer sciences. John Kemp Scholarship (The Benescience Foundation) The John Kemp scholarship is awarded annually to a student of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property who intends to pursue a career as a Patent Agent. The scholarship is approximately £1,000 and is only open to graduates of UK universities. MA Research in Law Queen Mary provided one bursary, covering tuition fees at Home/EU rates, for the MA Research in Law. In addition, the Department of Law at Queen Mary provided up to two £5,000 bursaries for MA Research in Law, to outstanding candidates. These bursaries are paid once the student has enrolled and do not take the form of a fee waiver. MSc Law and Finance Programmes Five joint bursaries offered by the Economics Department and the School of Law worth £3,000 each.


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School of Law Career opportunities Research Scholarships • Queen Mary Studentship Awards available to full time students for payment of full MPhil/PhD fees and maintenance grant worth at least £15,250 (reviewed annually). All full time students with an agreed offer of study are eligible to apply • Herchel Smith Scholarships (The American Friends of Cambridge University) in Intellectual Property Law are awarded each year to new applicants and continuing PhD students and cover tuition fees (home/EU and overseas) and quarterly stipend which varies per year • Graduate Teaching Assistantships (four awards) to MPhil/PhD students of fee waiver of home/EU tuition fees plus maintenance grant (reviewed annually (worth £15,290 in 2009). Responsibilities includes teaching undergraduate law subjects and acting as LLB student advisers.

Our graduates are highly sought after by the legal and non-legal professions, both nationally and internationally. Senior practitioners and academics from leading law firms, chambers and other universities contribute on our programmes, providing excellent networking opportunities for our students. Many law firms, including Dechert LLP, Allen and Overy, Herbert Smith, Weightmans and Linklaters regularly ask to meet our students, whilst hosting interview events. In addition, some of these law firms offer work experience for students during their studies at Queen Mary. Further details on support offered by the Careers Service, please visit: www.careers.qmul.ac.uk

For further details on all our available funding and deadlines, please visit: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/ postgraduate/fees/

Further information Please contact the individual administrator for information on specific programmes. Postgraduate School of Law Queen Mary, University of London 67-69 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3JB Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8100 email: ccls-reception@qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teamc@qmul.ac.uk

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Law Queen Mary, University of London

LLM programme

The LLM programme One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The School of Law offers a rich and diverse range of modules which lead to either a General LLM which is designed to give students maximum flexibility in the choice of modules in any field of law or one of several specialist LLM degrees listed below: • Banking and Finance Law • Commercial and Corporate Law • Comparative and International Dispute Resolution • Competition Law • Computer and Communications Law • Economic Regulation • Environmental Law • European Law • Human Rights Law • Intellectual Property Law • International Business Law • Law and Development • Legal Theory and History • Media Law (New) • Medical Law • Public International Law • Public Law • Tax Law Programme outline You will complete three full taught modules or equivalent and a required dissertation. If necessary, we strongly recommend that students audit a fourth class for dissertation support to help with their research. Part-time students attend the same classes, but only take two modules per year over two years. Classes are held across sites in central London – Lincoln’s Inn Fields, Senate House, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Charterhouse Square or at the Mile End Campus. There are over 109 different modules available – these are outlined below. For detailed information on the individual modules and the specialisation groupings, please visit: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/ postgraduate/llm/programmes/ • Advanced Medical Negligence • Alternative Dispute Resolution • Banking Law • Business Taxation • Challenging Public Power: Advanced Administrative Law • Climate Change Law and Policy • Commercial Law Written and Oral Advocacy • Communications Law • Company Law • Comparative Commercial Law • Comparative Class Actions • Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law

• Competition and Regulation of Network Industries: The Legal Regime of Services of General Interest in the EU (half module) • Computer Law • Consent (in contemporary medicine) • Corporate Governance • Corporate Insolvency Law • Courts in Comparative Perspective • Crime and Punishment 1600 – 1900 (half module) • Cyberspace Law • E-commerce Law • Environmental and Planning Law • Environmental Law and Policy (with special reference to the UK) • Ethnic Minorities and the Law • EU Constitutional Law I (half module) • EU Constitutional Law II (half module) • EU Criminal Law (half module) • EU Immigration Law • EU Financial Law • EU Justice and Home Affairs • European and UK Protection of Equality Rights (half module) • European and UK Protection of Human Rights at Work (half module) • European Community Competition Law • European Community Tax Law • European Environmental Law • European Internal Market • External Relations Law of the European Union • Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues • Global Policy and Economics of Intellectual Property Law • History of Commercial Law (half module) • History of Contract Law (half module) • History of Tort Law (half module) • Insurance Contracts and Risk Management in Construction (half module) • Insurance Law and Construction Insurance and Risk Management • Intellectual Property • Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries • Intellectual Property Aspects of Medicine • Intellectual Property in the Digital Millennium • International and Comparative Commercial Arbitration • International and Comparative Competition Law • International and Comparative Law of Copyright and Related Rights • International and Comparative Law of Patents, Trade Secrets and Related Rights • International and Comparative Social Justice • International and Comparative Law of Trade Marks, Designs and Unfair Competition • International Commercial Law • International Commercial Litigation – Commercial Conflicts of Laws • International Construction – Contracts and Arbitration


Law Queen Mary, University of London

• International Criminal Law • International Economic Law • International Environmental Law • International Law and Development • International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force • International Law of the Sea • International Law on the Rights of the Child • International Merger Control • International Natural Resources Law • International Protection of Human Rights • International Tax Law I • International Tax Law II • International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement • International Trade and Intellectual Property law • IP Transactions • Judicial Protection in the EU • Jurisprudence A * (half module) • Jurisprudence B * (half module) • Law of Economic Crime • Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies • Law of Insurance Contracts (half module) • Law of Insurance Regulation (half module) • Law on Investment Entities • Law of Treaties • Legal Aspects of International Finance • Legal Problems of International Trade and Intellectual Property Law • Legal Theory in the Common Law Tradition • Media Law • Medical Jurisprudence • Mental Health Law • New Medical Technologies and the Law • Privacy and Information Law • Regulation of Financial Markets • Secured Financing in Commercial Transactions • Securities Regulation • Taxation Principles and Concepts • Traditional Knowledge and Genetic Resources • UK Competition Law Note: Not all of the modules listed above may be available in any one year. Therefore, individual specialisations can only be selected if sufficient modules are offered. All modules are full subjects unless otherwise stated. For General LLM students, you can select modules from any of those available in your study year. The LLM Programme Co-ordinator will advise on this at the start of term. For students choosing a specialist LLM, three of your four required modules need to be chosen from those available in any specific specialisation. The fourth module can be unrelated. Certain Queen Mary nonlaw subjects may be taken if these clearly

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complement the chosen law subjects. The required dissertation, which falls within the same area of law as any requested specialisation, may count as one module for this purpose. LLM module selections will need to be checked and agreed with the LLM Programme Co-ordinator after registration and by a given date. Full information on this process is available after Registration and detailed in the LLM Student Handbook, which is provided at induction. Assessment Taught modules are usually assessed by written exams, but in certain cases other methods may be used, such as combined exams, short essays or assessment entirely by essay. In all cases the required dissertation is worth 25 per cent of the final mark. Required dissertation This is a dissertation prepared as an original piece of work by the student. There is a maximum length of 15,000 words. It is sometimes possible to elect to do an additional half or full dissertation.

Graduate profile: Natthaphong Sirijirasuk, Thailand Studied: LLM Banking and Finance – graduated 2007 Currently: Working in the Financial Service Practice Group as a lawyer with Baker and McKenzie in Bangkok. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? I was an in-house lawyer practising corporate and financial law in a public company in Thailand before coming to Queen Mary for my LLM in Banking and Finance. I chose Queen Mary because of its outstanding reputation and good choice of modules. For example, I really enjoyed the Legal Aspects of International Finance. This is a very useful subject, and very helpful to my practical work as a lawyer. Overall it’s an excellent programme; there are great tutorial and revision classes for catching up on any points you don't understand. Guest lecturers come from various leading legal firms in London, and we were taught by some remarkable professors.


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Term 1: Taught classes and submission of dissertation proposal Term 2: Taught classes Term 3: Revision classes and exams in May and June – it is important that students remain on campus during this period as additional support is provided through the Critical Thinking and Writing in Law Programme. Dissertations are submitted mid-August: Students will be supported in their dissertation preparation by elements of the Critical Thinking and Writing in Law Programme and by specialised LLM Tutors. For more information, see: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/llm/ academicsupport/index.html Overseas recognition All LLM modules offered by the Queen Mary, University of London’s School of Law, have been accredited by the ABA (American Bar Association). Entry requirements Admission is based solely on academic merit. The usual qualification for entry to the LLM programme is a degree in law, or a degree with substantial law content, normally of at least upper second class honours (or equivalent). Non-law graduates with good honours, that have also obtained the equivalent of good honours in CPE and Bar Finals/Legal Practice examinations, or passed the solicitors’ qualifying examination, may qualify. Law graduates with lower second class honours degrees and at least five years professional legal experience may also qualify. Non-law graduates may be considered on the basis of exceptional professional experience that directly relates to specialist LLM taught programmes. For students with International qualifications, please visit: www.qmul.ac.uk/international Diana Goldau, Germany, General LLM 2008-9 “As a practising lawyer in Germany for one year after my traineeship I realised I needed a broader knowledge of my field of law to succeed in the international market. When considering my options for postgraduate study I was looking for a school that offered a wide range of modules and challenged my academic skills. I chose Queen Mary because of its worldwide academic reputation and teaching staff as well as the outstanding results achieved by the Centre of Commercial Law Studies.”

For English Language Proficiency, please see www.qmul.ac.uk/international/languagerequirements/i ndex.html#PostgraduateTaughtLaw Recent graduate destinations ABA Investment, Legal consultant – UAE Credit Suisse First Boston, Investment Banker – UK Baker & McKenzie, Associate, Lawyer –Thailand, Poland, Ukraine Central Bank of Malaysia, Manager City Bank, Legal Manager – Hong Kong Dewey & LeBoeuf, Legal Assistant – UK Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority, Legal Advisor Linklaters LLP, Trainee Lawyer, Lawyer – Italy, Belgium Herbert Smith, Trainee Lawyer – France Ernst & Young, Director of Financial Services Transfer Pricing – UK China Trust Financial Holding, Management Associate – Taiwan De Woodraew, Lawyer – Netherlands KPMG, Tax Advisor, Auditor – UK Advanced International Services, Legal Consultant – USA PriceWaterhouseCoopers – UK European Commission – Belgium Brazil Federal District, District Attorney Novatek, Senior Specialist – Russia Capital Markets, Director of Licensing – Oman Perchstone and Greays, Lawyer – Nigeria Bahas, Gramatidis & Partners, Trainee Associate – Greece CMS Cameron McKenna, Lawyer – Ukraine Fenech and Fenech, Lawyer – Malta Further information For the most up-to-date information about applying and deadlines, please visit: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/llm/faq Please note that students applying for Queen Mary Scholarships should apply in time to meet the separate deadlines. For general information on the LLM degree, please contact: Susan Sullivan, LLM Programme Coordinator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8092 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 8101 email: LLMadmin@qmul.ac.uk


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Degree programmes

MA in Medical Law and Ethics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description On this programme, you will be taught by the leading experts in the field, who act as advisers to government and as regulators of new medical technologies. Programme outline Teaching runs throughout the two semesters from September to Easter. Part-time students study the two compulsory modules in the first year and in the second year they take two optional modules and complete their dissertation, which should be based upon one of those modules. For part-time students, attendance is one half-day per week. For full-time students it is two half-days per week. Teaching is on Mondays (options) and Tuesdays (compulsory modules). Compulsory modules: • Medical Jurisprudence – a medical law survey module, covering the following subjects: Bioethics; Resource Allocation; Information, Capacity and Consent; Confidentiality; Mental Health Law; Medical Research; Reproductive Medicine and Abortion; End of Life Issues; Organ Transplantation; Medical Negligence; Product Liability • The Legal Regulation of New Medical Technologies – a module examining the ethical, legal and social issues arising in the regulation of new medical technologies. Optional modules Students choose two of the following options: • Consent in Contemporary Medicine – Considers in more depth the central role of consent, its philosophical origins, its place in the western legal tradition and its application to treatment, research and organ/tissue donation. • Mental Health Law – Considers law relating to the treatment of those who lack capacity, and of patients suffering from mental disorders. Includes examination of community care, discrimination and human rights. • Intellectual Property Aspects of Medicine – Examines the categories of intellectual property and the sources of intellectual property law (national, regional and international). Introduces the concept of patenting and examines it particularly in relation to human genetic material, medical research and public health. • Advanced Medical Negligence – Analyses issues of medical negligence in depth. Should the ‘good Samaritan’ be statutorily protected? Should a failure to warn of medical risks be treated as significantly as a failure to diagnose or treat? Assessment Medical Jurisprudence and Advanced Medical Negligence: written examination in May/June • The Legal Regulation of New Medical Technologies:

Noor Al-Humaidhi, MA Medical Law and Ethics “All the teaching staff took the time to explain the intricacies of the law that I did not understand (having done a Medicine degree) and were always interested in my thoughts and opinions. The programme was set up as a series of seminars, so we were not just lectured but encouraged to prepare background reading and engage in discussion. “The programme has been a wonderful opportunity for me to examine the day-to-day duties of a doctor in a completely different light. I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in the medical field as it forces you to question and re-examine issues that you may have thought were simple and straight forward.” 15,000 word dissertation submitted in June • Other options: submission of two 5,000-word research papers (June). For one of their two options students must submit a 10,000-word dissertation in August instead of the normal mode of assessment for that option. Entry requirements You will normally be expected to have been awarded (by the time of actually beginning the MA programme) a first or upper second class degree (or international equivalent) in a relevant field of study. Experience in a registered profession (medicine, nursing, law, the allied health professions) is also taken into account where an applicant is not offering the standard qualification. Students with a law background should normally apply for the LLM in Medical Law. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Many of our part-time students are already practicing medical and health care professionals in both the public and private sector. Other graduates have gone on work for pharmaceutical companies, including Quintiles Limited. Others are working for law firms including RCO Licensing Ltd, Neocleous & Co LLC or studying to practice law. Further information Sophia Oliver Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3932 email: s.c.oliver@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc in Management of Intellectual Property One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc programme is aimed at those who recognise the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and the MSc gives graduates the opportunity to study intellectual property to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates seeking to become patent and trade mark attorneys) and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of intellectual property. Programme outline All students in the Professional Stream are required to study the core modules: Patent Law I & II, Copyright and Designs Law I, Law of Trade Marks and Unfair Competition I, Basic Principles of English Law, and a compulsory Study Project where students develop skills in project management, commercial and litigation practice. Full year options may include Creativity Publics and Performance, Fashion Furniture and Design, Innovation and Technology, Information Technology Law, and IP Transactions.

Half options may include Licensing Practice, Media Law, Management of Innovation and Design, and Principles and Practice of Enterprise Management. Occasional additional options may be available. Assessment Three-hour, 15-minute papers for each full core option, for example Copyright and Designs Law I and II • Two-hour, 30-minute papers for each half option, for example Licensing Practice (if option is run) • Research Paper or Project for other modules (for example, Management of Innovation and Design) • Study Project (one year, various submitted materials relevant to management of an intellectual property portfolio, equivalent to 15 000 words). Closed book examinations operate for all programmes.


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Students are offered the chance to undertake additional special papers for those intending to be Patent Attorneys (Professional Stream only). Those who opt to undertake these exams gain exemption from the CIPA and ITMA Joint Examination Board foundation-level exams and also gain a pass in the additional Certificate of Intellectual Property Law. Entry requirements Minimum lower second class honours degree or equivalent - any discipline for Business Stream; natural or medical sciences or engineering for Professional Stream. Graduate degrees in mathematics, computer sciences or economics will be considered, but must show that a considerable amount of their previous study covered the areas of science and technology. Overseas applicants will be required to demonstrate a proficiency in the English language (IELTS). Students are required to attend pre-sessional studies in Basic Principles of English Law. For more information, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Graduate profile: Marie Jansson, Sweden Studied: MSc in Management of Intellectual Property Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? After completing a BEng in Biochemical Engineering in London, I knew that lab work was not for me. In my final year of the course, I had taken a law elective and for the first time in years found something I was enthusiastic about. I decided to convert to law but was reluctant give up on my scientific background. So after my law conversion course, I looked for a masters specialising in Intellectual Property and found that Queen Mary offered the most highly-rated and specialised course. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Management of Intellectual Property provides a brilliant introduction to Patents, Trademarks, Copyright and their interrelation with Competition Law. The structure and detailed nature of the course gives a great overall picture of IP. In large part due to the course, I am currently qualifying as a solicitor and patent attorney at a dynamic young firm called Ipulse. The course was incredibly useful for me as it demonstrated how I could couple my scientific background with law and provided confirmation that my future lay in Intellectual Property.

Recent graduate destinations Graduates are largely working either as Trainee or fully qualified Patent or Trademark Attorneys, Patent Lawyers, Patent Advisors, with the following companies: Hoffmann Eitle & Partner, EIP, GlaxoSmithkline, Kilburn & Strode, AA Thornton, Boult Wade Tennant, Carpmaels & Ransford, Page White and Farrer, Mathys & Squire, JA Kemp, Marks & Clark, D. Young & Co., Gill, Jennings & Every, Mewburn Ellis, WP Thompson, Ministry of Defence, European Patent Office Further information Sharon Watson MSc/Certificate Programme Administrator email: s.b.watson@qmul.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8098, Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 8101


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Postgraduate Certificate in Intellectual Property Law One semester full-time Programme description This is a full-time one-semester programme, which, at present, runs from mid-September to midDecember, with exams taking place in January. The Certificate programme is an intensive 13-week programme designed exclusively for trainee Patent agents. Trainees who successfully complete this programme will gain exemption from the Chartered Institute of Patent Agents (CIPA) foundation level examinations. The objective of this programme is to provide the student with a broad, overall perspective of intellectual property law, so that later, in practice, he or she has a more balanced appreciation of the wider range of matters which modern intellectual property practice involves. Programme outline There is intensive coverage of the law and practice of Patent Law, Law of Trade Marks and Unfair Competition, Copyright and Designs Law and Competition Law. There is also an introduction to aspects of Basic Principles of English Law, Practice and Evidence that are of special relevance to intellectual property practitioners. The emphasis is primarily, but not exclusively, upon United Kingdom Law; thus, considerable attention is paid to the European Patent Convention and to EC law, and to other regional arrangements and international conventions which affect the activities of the UK practitioner. Assessment Three-hour 15-minute papers for each subject, plus additional one-hour 45-minute Patent Law and Law of Trade Marks and Unfair Competition papers for exemption from the CIPA foundation level examinations. Closed book examinations operate for all modules. Entry requirements Minimum second class honours degree or equivalent in natural or medical sciences or engineering. Graduate degrees in mathematics, computer sciences or economics will be considered, but must show that a considerable amount of their previous study covered the areas of science and technology. The programme has been specifically designed in close cooperation with the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys, for the trainee agent who, preferably, has been in an office for six months to a year and has already had an opportunity of

becoming familiar with some of the language, documentation and procedure of Patent and/or Trade Marks. Overseas applicants will be required to demonstrate a proficiency in the English language (IELTS). For more information, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Graduates are largely working either as Trainee or Qualified Patent or Trademark Attorneys with the following companies: AA Thornton, Boult Wade Tennant, Carpmaels & Ransford, Page White and Farrer, Mathys & Squire, JA Kemp, Marks & Clark, D. Young & Co., Gill, Jennings & Every, Mewburn Ellis, WP Thompson Further information Sharon Watson MSc and Certificate Programme Coordinator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8098 email: s.b.watson@qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Andrew Clark, UK Studied: Certificate in IP Law Currently: Graduate-Trainee Patent Attorney at J A Kemp & Co. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? I attended the Queen Mary Certificate Course in Intellectual Property as the first stage in obtaining the necessary formal qualifications for becoming a UK patent attorney. I had already been working at a private practice firm for around one year by the time the course started. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? The lectures provided a challenging but accessible, well-rounded introduction not only to patent law, but perhaps more importantly to more general aspects of intellectual property law. Not only did the course help to place the career that I am now pursuing into its natural context, it also provided a useful opportunity to consider in more depth some of the issues relevant to my work, but not always easy to dwell on under the time pressures of the office. The well-informed and enthusiastic lecturers, the convenient, Central-London facilities and the friendly atmosphere all played their part in making my short stay at Queen Mary a most rewarding and enjoyable experience.


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Postgraduate Certificate in Trade Mark Law and Practice

MSc Law and Finance programme

Part-time (Nine months)

One year full-time, two years part-time

Programme description This new programme will start on 13 September 2010 and run as a two week intensive course, followed by ten two-day sessions between October and April, with exams taking place in the summer examination period 2011. Trainees who successfully complete this programme will gain exemption from the Chartered Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA) Joint Examination Board foundation level exams. The Certificate in Trade Mark Law will be a requirement for those wishing to qualify as Trade Mark Attorneys but it is also open to students who want to get a good understanding of national, European, and international trade mark law at an advanced level.

Programme description This programme was created in September 2009, offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the Department of Economics at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. It equips students with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of the global economy and finance, and how it is regulated by law. It consists of a main programme and three additional specialist areas in Banking and Financial Services, Law and Financial Regulation and Law and Corporate Finance. The programme is currently fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Bankers of Scotland (CIBOS) with other professional accreditations being applied for.

Programme outline The programme consists of four compulsory 15credit modules: Foundations of Law for Trade Mark Practice • Trade Mark Law & Practice A • Trade Mark Law & Practice B • Designs and Copyright Law

All programme outlines Students must take a total of 180 credits to include the Banking and Financial Dissertation (45 credits) and the remaining 135 credits to be selected from both Law and Economics modules listed below.

Students will begin their study of the programme with an intensive two-week induction period of fulltime teaching on Foundations of Law for Trade Mark Practice, introductory elements of the Designs and Copyright Law and Trade Mark Law & Practice A modules. These will be conducted in mid September. Students will then proceed to study the remainder of the Trade Mark Law & Practice A module, Designs and Copyright Law modules, and Trade Mark Law and Practice B between October and April.

Optional Mathematics and Statistics module: Students who want to review concepts such as statistical distributions and matrix algebra have the option to attend modules during induction week (week zero) and week one of the first term within the Department of Economics.

Assessment Three-hour 15-minute paper for each module. Closed book examinations operate for all modules. Entry requirements Minimum second class honours degree. The programme has been specifically designed in close co-operation with the Chartered Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys for the trainee agent who, preferably, has been in an office for six months to a year and has already had an opportunity of becoming familiar with some of the language, documentation and procedure of Trade Marks. Overseas applicants will be required to demonstrate a proficiency in the English language (IELTS). For more information see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Sharon Watson, Certificate Co-ordinator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8098 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 8101 email: s.b.watson@qmul.ac.uk

Main programme Students must select as follows: minimum 45 – 90 credits from Economics and minimum 45 – 90 credits from Law Dissertation Banking and Financial Essay Economic options: Principles of accounting; Advanced asset pricing and Modeling; Commercial and investment banking; Corporate finance; Financial derivatives; Financial economics; Financial management; Investment management; Quantitative methods in finance; Financial reporting Law options: Banking law; EU financial law; Law of finance and foreign investment in emerging economies; Legal aspects of international finance; Regulation of financial markets; Securities regulation Specialisation A – Banking and Financial Services Dissertation Banking and Financial Essay Economics options: Principles of accounting • Financial reporting • Financial derivatives • Financial economics • Financial management • Quantitative methods in finance


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Law options: Banking law • EU financial law • Legal aspects of international finance • Securities regulation

Postgraduate Diplomas in Law

Specialisation B – Law and Financial Regulation Dissertation Banking and Financial Essay

Programme description The School of Law has established a programme of postgraduate diplomas. These programmes are open to part time students who seek an alternative route to further qualifications other than the LLM. A wide range of subjects are available for study within the Diploma programme, facilitating specialisation in a particular field. The modules focus at high level learning on specific issues of current professional and commercial significance, and draw on the strengths of School of Law full time staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Economics options: Principles of accounting • Commercial and investment banking • Financial reporting • Financial economics • Financial management • Investment management Law options: Banking law • Regulation of financial markets • Securities regulation Specialisation C – Law and Corporate Finance Dissertation Banking and Financial Essay Economics options: Principles of accounting • Advanced asset pricing • Corporate finance • Financial reporting • Financial derivatives • Investment management Law options: Banking law • Legal aspects of international finance • Law of finance and foreign investment in emerging economics Assessment In addition to the dissertation which would be submitted in August of the year of examination, candidates will also take a written examination in each of their selected Law modules and for Economic modules students may be required to do coursework as well as an examination. Entry requirements Law focus: A minimum upper second class honours or equivalent degree in law / or a degree with substantial law content PLUS either substantial relevant work experience in banking / finance / regulation and compliance areas or some economics / finance content in academic studies Finance focus: A minimum upper second class honours or equivalent degree in economics / finance or a degree with substantial economics / finance content PLUS either substantial relevant work experience in the field of law or some law content in academic studies For English language proficiency, please see: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/languagerequirements/ index.html#PostgraduateLaw International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Application and academic enquiries, please contact: Penny Stavrinou Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8093/8099 email: p.stavrinou@qmul.ac.uk

Two years part-time

Programme outline In order to qualify for the award of a Diploma, students must complete two taught modules, plus one 10,000 word dissertation. Taught modules may be selected from any of the same extremely wide range offered to LLM students by Queen Mary listed on page 140. Diploma students will be taught alongside LLM students, with all aspects of the programme being to the same high standards. Students may opt either to read for a general Diploma or a specialised Diploma. Those who wish their Diploma award to carry a specialisation (ie PG Diploma in Tax or PG Diploma in Medical Law) are required to select both their taught modules from within the same subject grouping/study programme as those available on the LLM and to produce a dissertation within the same area of Law. See our LLM study programme on page 140 for module listings and 18 different available specialised groupings. (Students wishing to specialise in International Dispute Resolution must register for the specific Postgraduate Diploma in International Dispute Resolution, see p149). Assessment Taught modules are assessed by written exams and in certain cases, combined exams and short essays, plus one 10,000 word dissertation. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree in law (or with law as a major element) at a British University. Equivalent professional qualifications and experience will also be considered. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Most students are already qualified solicitors working in London/South East based law firms or as in house lawyers. Further information Diploma Administrator, Penny Stavrinou, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8093 email: p.stavrinou@qmul.ac.uk


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Postgraduate Diploma in International Dispute Resolution (Arbitration) Postgraduate Diploma in International Dispute Resolution (Mediation) One year programme Programme description These diplomas, which are available over one academic year period, will not only provide an understanding of the theoretical, practical and ethical problems relating to International Dispute Resolution, but will also provide a stepping stone to professionals becoming more involved in international ADR processes. Programme outline There are two distinct diploma routes (Arbitration or Mediation) to choose from, each with their own specialised focus. Students will need the following core elements; one taught module (45 credits) and a skills weekend/seminar (30 credits) AND either one further taught module (45 credits) from the free choice list OR produce a 15,000 research paper (45 credits) in order to qualify. All taught modules are taught as part of the LLM degree. Arbitration focus Core modules: International and Comparative Commercial Arbitration (45 credits) • A skills seminar and examination on arbitration award writing (30 credits) One further module from the following list (free choice, each worth 45 credits): International Commercial Law • International Commercial Litigation • International Construction: Contracts and Arbitration • International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement • 15,000-word research paper on a topic not covered by the taught elements and to be agreed with supervisor Mediation focus Core modules: Alternative Dispute Resolution (45 credits) • Advanced mediation skills residential weekend (30 credits) One further module from the following list (free choice): International trade and Investment Dispute Settlement (45 credits) • International Construction Contracts and Arbitration (45 credits) • 15,000-word research paper on a topic not covered by the taught elements and to be agreed with supervisor.

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Assessment Core taught modules are assessed by written exams an in certain cases combined exams and short essays. Core skills weekends/seminars are assessed by participation in weekend/seminar and a minimum 5,000 word written report. Free choice element is assessed by written exams and in certain cases combined exams and short essays (taught module option) OR 15,000 research paper. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree in law (or with law as a major element) at a British University. Equivalent professional qualifications and experience will also be considered. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Professional Exams' Exemptions Students who pass the diploma examinations are fully exempt fom the academic requirements for Fellowship of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators. Recent graduate destinations Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, McDermott, Will & Every, Allen & Overy LLP Further information Diploma Administrator Penny Stavrinou Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8093 email: p.stavrinou@qmul.ac.uk Nana Esi Atsem, UK, MSc Law and Finance “Prior to joining Queen Mary, I was an antimoney laundering compliance officer at Deutsche Bank, working on contract. I selected Queen Mary not only because of its stellar academic reputation but also because of the diversity of the student body. The programme has provided me with an opportunity to study the wide range of issues affecting financial markets today. The multidisciplinary nature of Law and Finance is developing my understanding of complex regulatory issues facing financial markets.”


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Diploma/LLM in Computer and Communications Law Distance Learning Programme description The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning modules that leads to the award of a Queen Mary, University of London, LLM or Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. The programme uses the online WebCT teaching platform to engage with tutors and fellow students in online tutorials and chat room discussions and to access professional legal databases and to submit assignments. Programme outline Students must obtain 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the LLM. Diploma • Pass eight taught modules, or • Students may wish to opt for a mixture of taught modules or a dissertation worth up to no more than 60 credits, or LLM • Pass eight taught modules as well as one 20,000word dissertation (or two 10,000 word dissertations, or • Pass six taught modules and three 10,000 word dissertations (or one 20,000 and one 10,000 word dissertation). The programme is based on the modules listed below: • Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management • Advanced IP Issues: Protecting Computer Software • Advanced IP Issues: Trade Marks and Domain Names • Computer Crime • Data Protection and Privacy • Electronic Banking and Financial Services • Electronic Commerce Law • European Telecommunications Law • Information Security Law • Information Technology Outsourcing • Intellectual Property: Foundation • International Telecommunications Law • Internet Content Regulation • Information Communications Technology and Competition Law • Introduction to Sales and Trading • Jurisdictional Issues in e-Commerce • Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector • Online Dispute Resolution in e-Commerce • Online Media Regulation • Taxation of e-Commerce • Online Banking Financial Services

Assessment Credits are obtained through a combination of taught online modules, dissertations (10,000 or 20,000 words) and seminar presentations. The seminar presentation option may be completed over the August and January terms and is worth 15 credits. Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term and is worth 15 credits. A 10,000-word dissertation is usually taken over two terms and is worth 30 credits. A 20,000word dissertation is usually taken over four terms and is worth 60 credits. The seminar presentation option may be completed over the August and January terms and is worth 15 credits. The year is divided into three four-month terms, with different modules being offered each term. Students will be assessed for each module on the submission of tasks, an essay and a final assessed exercise. The terms are as follows: • Autumn Session: End of August – December • Spring Session: Beginning of January – April • Summer Session: Beginning of May – August An optional residential weekend in London takes place each year. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree in law (or with law as a major element) at a British University or equivalent. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Michelle Dean, Distance Learning Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8099 email: m.dean@qmul.ac.uk www.law.qmul.ac.uk

Wenbin Wei, China, LLM Computer and Communications Law (Distance Learning) “I was based in Zurich running a consulting practice when I started the LLM programme with Queen Mary. The long-distance programme is perfect in terms of its flexibility which allowed me to study without really leaving the daily business. I am now looking forward to expanding my field of practice in IT-related business in China.”


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Postgraduate Diploma in International Commercial Arbitration Distance Learning Programme description The School of International Arbitration in cooperation with the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) offers a Postgraduate Distance Learning Diploma in International Commercial Arbitration with online support. The Diploma is taught by leading experts in the area and covers all aspects of International Arbitration. This postgraduate degree programme involves parttime study for a period of 18 months starting the beginning of January each year. A brochure and online application form is available at: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/llmdistance/diparb

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Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree in law (or with law as a major element) at a UK university or the equivalent in other universities. Equivalent professional qualifications and experience in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration in particular are accepted at the discretion of the Programme Director. The Programme Director will be happy to advise in cases of doubt. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Salini Costruttori S p A, SBM Offshore-Skarv Turret & Mooring, Brewer Consulting Ltd, Hewlett-Packard Further information Michelle Dean, Distance Learning Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8099 email: m.dean@qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline Students must obtain 120 credits in order to complete the diploma. Compulsory modules, semester 1: International and Comparative International Commercial Arbitration • Arbitration Award Writing Seminar (may include a weekend attendance) Semester 2, choice of one of the following modules: • International Construction Contracts and Arbitration • International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement • Alternative Dispute Resolution • International Commercial Law • International Commercial Litigation • 15,000 words dissertation (research paper) Assessment International and Comparative International Commercial Arbitration is examined by a take home exam and regular written assignments. Optional modules are mainly assessed by several written assignments and take home exams. Alternatively, a student may submit a supervised 15,000 words research paper (dissertation). Professional Exams’ Exemption Candidates passing the Diploma are exempt from the following modules: Introduction Module and Modules 1,2,3,4 of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators. Entry requirements which leads to Fellowship Membership is pending a successful interview with CIArb. Continuous Professional Development Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board CPD accreditation apply.

Graduate profile: Martin Goodman (FCIArb) Studied: Diploma in International Commercial Arbitration Currently: SBM Offshore Inc, Senior Project Manager "I found the Diploma in International Commercial Arbitration (Distance Learning) to be an excellent course and a good investment of my time. The course is run by a knowledgeable team that have the ability to transmit their enthusiasm of the complex and extensive subject matter to their students. It provided me with a meaningful insight into the world of commercial arbitration which will stand me in good stead for my eventual future as an arbitrator. "


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Postgraduate Diploma in International Mediation (ADR)

Continuing Professional Development Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board CPD accreditation apply.

Distance Learning

Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree in law (or with law as a major element) at a UK university or the equivalent from overseas universities. Equivalent professional qualifications and experience are accepted at the discretion of the programme director, who will be happy to advise in case of doubt. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Programme description The School of International Arbitration in cooperation with the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) offers the Postgraduate Diploma in International Mediation. The Diploma not only provides an understanding of the theoretical, practical and ethical problems relating to international mediation and conciliation, but also provides a stepping-stone to more professionals becoming involved in international ADR. The programme runs over a period of 12 months, maximum 18 months, starting in January. Programme outline Students must obtain 120 credits in order to complete the Diploma. Compulsory modules, semester 1: Alternative Dispute Resolution • Advanced Mediation Skills Residential Weekend. Semester 2, choice of one of the following modules: • Multi-party Negotiation and Mediation (half module) • Labour Disputes and Collective Bargaining (half module) • International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement (full module) • International Construction – Contracts and Arbitration (full module) • 15,000 word research paper on a topic not covered by the taught elements and to be agreed with Supervisor (full module) Assessment You will be regularly assessed by your tutorial performance and assignments submitted to your tutors. Interim assignments range from 1,000 to 1,500 words and are scheduled for submission monthly. Final assessment for the taught components will be either a mixture of a 3,000 word essay (30 per cent) and an unseen examination (70 per cent) or 100 per cent via in-course essays or unseen examination. Dissertations and exams are assessed by internal and external examiners. Professional Exams’ Exemption A 15,000 dissertation must be completed to receive exemption from the requirements for Fellowship, (CIArb Exemption). Students will be considered exempt from CIArb Modules 1 – 3 and able to apply for Member grade if the dissertation is not completed. CIArb Module 4 Mediation Theory would be would be required to satisfy the requirement for Fellow.

Further information Michelle Dean, Distance Learning Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8099 email: m.dean@qmul.ac.uk Silvia M Marchili, Argentina, MA by Research “For the last few years, I have been a lawyer with King & Spalding, which is an international law firm with many offices around the world. I have practised in Argentina, the UK and the US, and I am devoted to general international arbitration and investment arbitration. “In Queen Mary's MA by Research programme I found a great opportunity to develop my research project in an encouraging academic environment with great support from the faculty. The seminars on methodology were very useful and encouraged me to reflect on my ongoing research, which is focused on investment arbitration before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID). “At the same time, the programme's reasonable workload and less emphasis on taught modules, allowed me to study on a part-time basis, whilst working at King & Spalding's London office. In my opinion, one of the programme's greatest advantages is that it enables you to study the subject you prefer with the guidance of very qualified professors. In addition, taking a course with students with very diverse backgrounds and interests is also an enriching experience.”


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MA by Research in Law One year full-time, two-years part-time Programme description Queen Mary is the only university in London to offer a MA by Research in Law. This Masters offers students a structured one-year research programme within which they can explore individually supervised research on topics of their own choice, whilst following taught classes in Research Methods covering theory and methodology. The programme is ideal either for students wishing to proceed to doctoral study, or simply for students wishing to enhance their career prospects by developing expertise in a specific area of law and improving their research and writing skills. The ability to undertake a major piece of research is a transferable skill which is relevant to many different kinds of employment. Theoretical and inter-disciplinary, as well as more practical and traditional approaches, are all accommodated in this programme. For applicants interested in non-commercial law, the School of Law has well-known strengths in areas such as legal theory, legal history, international law, human rights, migration law, property law, European law, company law, environmental law, family law, medical law, criminal law and criminology, comparative law, constitutional law, competition law and any number of areas of traditional public and private law. For students interested in commercial areas of law, including arbitration, banking and finance, corporate and commercial, computer and communications, law and development, international business, intellectual property, economic regulation and tax, can draw on the expertise of CCLS. MA Research students are expected to attend staff seminars which are scheduled throughout the year. Programme outline All students enrolled in this programme will undertake supervised research with a view to submitting a 20,000 word dissertation by the end of the year. Students will also attend a Research Methods module, which will expose them to a broad range of theoretical and practical approaches to legal research. This module will be taught through one two-hour seminar each week. In the first semester, the programme covers theoretical topics: Ethics and Law • Law and Economics, Systems theory • Liberal theory, and Critical Theory

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In the second semester, the programme has a methods focus and covers areas such as: Research interviews, literature review and historical research methods. These second-term seminars will, so far as is possible, be tailored to the dissertations of enrolled students. Assessment The programme is assessed by two 2,500 word essays. The module entitled Theory and Method in Legal Scholarship accounts for 25 per cent of the final grade and the final dissertation accounts for 75 per cent of the final grade. Students who obtain a mark of more than 70 per cent for their thesis in the MA Research in Law programme are eligible to be considered for the PhD programme and develop their research into a PhD. Where students transfer into the PhD programme and continue researching in the same subject area, the work undertaken for the MA thesis will usually shorten the time needed to achieve the PhD. As such, students who undertake the MA Res prior to a PhD do not necessarily take longer to complete a PhD than students who go immediately in to the PhD programme.


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Programme and module contributors The MA Research Programme Leader and Contributor on the Research Methods and Theory Module, first semester Professor Richard Nobles Leader and Contributor on the Research Methods and Theory Module, second semester Professor Kate Malleson Contributor on the Research Methods and Theory Module, first semester Professor Eric Heinze Contributor on the Research Methods and Theory Module Professor David Schiff Entry requirements A good upper second class honours degree or a Masters degree from an UK university, a recognised equivalent from an accredited overseas institution or an equivalent professional qualification. English Language Qualifications Non-native English speakers will be required to have achieved minimum IELTS 7.0 with 7 in writing or equivalent. Further details: www.qmul.ac.uk/ international/languagerequirements/index.html #PostgraduateResearchLaw International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Several graduates progressed onto the PhD programme at Queen Mary, researching areas including: “Kurds in the UK: Legal Pluralism and Dispute Resolution in the Diaspora”, “Moving Towards an Asian Convention on the Rights of the Child”, “plea-bargaining in common law systems and criminal trials”, “alternative modes of governance in the reform of mental health legislation”. Other graduates are working in various UK law firms. Further information Sophia Oliver Departmental Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3932 email: s.c.oliver@qmul.ac.uk

Research

Research degrees MPhil and PhD Programme The School of Law research programme is one of the largest in the UK with 160 students from some 50 countries. You would be registered initially for the MPhil degree and can study full- or part-time (subject to residence status). A decision to transfer to PhD status is taken eighteen months after registration. Research training is offered through a series of research student seminars at which you would be required to present your work, and through a formal training module. Virtually all fields of law are represented in the School of Law and all supervisors are qualified members of staff with major research projects and publications of their own. A detailed description of the research specialisations of academic staff can be found on pages 159 – 167 or at the following website: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/people/academic/expert.html The minimum period of full-time research for an MPhil degree is two years. The PhD degree requires a minimum of three years research. Both are followed by a period of up to one year writing up before submission of a completed thesis. The School attaches great importance to completion of the thesis within a reasonable time, and full-time students will normally be expected to present theses within four years of original registration. Part-time study is permitted, and one extra year of research is allowed on this basis. Research is conducted and theses prepared under the supervision of two members of academic staff with whom you will be expected to have regular, scheduled discussions about your progress. Laíse Da Correggio, Brazil, PhD in ‘Competition law and policy in Brazil, particularly the creation of a policy for abuse of dominance cases.’ “The academics are very approachable, and I have regular and productive meetings with my supervisors. PhD students also have the support of the Department for the creation of seminars and conferences, where we can share our thoughts with other academics and peers. I believe that receiving methodological guidance from the outset will help me complete my PhD in the envisaged three-year period.


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The thesis is examined orally by two examiners appointed by the University. A successful MPhil thesis must be either a record of original work or an ordered and critical exposition of existing knowledge. A PhD thesis must form a distinct contribution to the knowledge of the subject and afford evidence of originality, shown either by the discovery of new facts or by the exercise of independent critical power. Entry requirements The normal entrance requirement is a Masters degree in Law that demonstrates an ability to produce research of the highest quality. For our detailed entry requirements see www.law.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/mphilphd/ English Language Qualifications Non-native English speakers will be required to have achieved minimum IELTS 7.0 with 7 in writing or equivalent. Further details: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/languagerequirements/ index.html#PostgraduateResearchLaw International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Full details of entrance procedure and requirements can be found at: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/ postgraduate/mphilphd/ Financial support Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils. There are also a number of School of Law studentships available. Details on page 138. All enquiries regarding Scholarships or Studentships should be directed to Brad Hillson (see contact details below). Further information For general information on research degrees, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8095 email: lawsresearch@qmul.ac.uk or or Gareth Skehan Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8094 email: g.skehan@qmul.ac.uk For detailed research inquiries, please contact: Professor Uma Suthersanen Co-Director of Graduate Studies email: u.suthersanen@qmul.ac.uk or Professor Alan Dignam Co-Director of Graduate Studies email: a.dignam@qmul.ac.uk

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Research areas Arbitration and Mediation The School of International Arbitration, led by Professor Mistelis and Professor Lew QC, offers world leading research including corporate attitudes towards dispute resolution, philosophical foundations of arbitration, extent of party autonomy, online arbitration, regional systems of international arbitration, business mediation and ADR in oil and energy disputes, focusing on the study of the particular problems arising in arbitration and contributions to the development of arbitration theory. With regards to teaching and training, the School takes a comparative and practice-orientated approach to the teaching of arbitration, so that students obtain a deep understanding of the special characteristics and needs of international arbitration. The School has close links with major arbitration institutions and international organisations and members of its academic staff and visiting scholars are active members in arbitrations. The School also frequently co-hosts and organises arbitration seminars, symposiums and events with leading law firms in London and around the world, where many of its visiting scholars work as partners. Banking and Finance The European Banking and Finance group comprises banking and finance law and European law. Staff have ongoing professional relationships with the EU institutions, the WTO, IMF, FSA, Bank of England, World Bank, ECB and other overseas institutions and universities. Dr Leal-Arcas serves as an expert on European Union Law for the American Society of International Law in Washington, D.C. and has acted as a legal consultant to the WTO. Dr LealArcas published his latest book International Trade and Investment Law: Multilateral, Regional and Bilateral Governance, Elgar, May 2010. In 2009 Professor Lastra was Specialist Adviser to the European Union Committee of the House of Lords regarding its Inquiry into EU Financial Regulation and the financial crisis and is currently advising the International Monetary Fund. Professor Tridimas has advised the ECB and the European Parliament concerning EU financial law and has advised on state aid and bank rescue packages. Dr Kern Alexander was invited to discuss the implementation of the Basel Capital Accord at an EU Parliament workshop. Professor Walker is a legal consultant with the International Monetary Fund. Dr Gari has advised the European Parliament in relation to the Equitable Life Affair. Company Law The School of Law has actively pursued academics with expertise in Company Law. Research areas include: company law, corporate law theory, jurisprudence and corporate accountability for


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human rights abuses, corporate finance and international investment law. Dr Shalini Perera’s recent research has focused on how the financing and ownership of companies affects the governance of companies in the context of developing economies. Professor Alan Dignam has published a co-authored book with Michael Galanis (Leeds University) entitled The Globalization of Corporate Governance, (Ashgate, 2009) on the role economic and legal aspects of globalisation have played in creating pressures on corporate governance systems. Competition Law The Interdisciplinary Centre for Competition Law and Policy (ICC) directed by Dr Maher Dabbah provides a key interface between leading academic research and the growing demands from practitioners and policymakers for comparative competition law analysis. This year marks the Ninth ICC Annual Summer School and the Fourth ICC-Crowell and Moring Annunal Conference, held in Brussels. In December 2009 Cambridge University Press published the major work, Anti-cartel Enforcement Worldwide of Maher M Dabbah and Barry E Hawk. The ICC Marion Simmons QC Annual International PhD conference was held at the Competition Appeal Tribunal in March 2009. The first issue of the annual ICC Global Antitrust Review (GAR) was published in June 2008. The Review aims to encourage outstanding scholarship among young competition law scholars by providing a unique platform for students to engage in research within the field of competition law and policy. On 1 January 2009, a Middle East Initiative was launched within the ICC. The Initiative represents a long-term commitment on the part of the ICC to promote competition law and policy throughout the Middle East. Computer and Communications Law The Institute of Computer and Communications Law, led by Professor Ian Walden, specialises in privacy and data protection, freedom of information law, media law, content regulation, cyberspace and electronic commerce law, online banking and financial services, and computer crime. In December 2009 Professor Ian Walden was appointed to the Board of the Press Complaints Commission, to provide his perspective and expertise on decisions made by the Commission. New appointments have strengthened our expertise in this area, including Christopher Millard who in September 2008 was appointed as Professor of Privacy and Information Law at Queen Mary. Previously a partner at Clifford Chance and Linklaters, he brings 25 years experience in the technology and communications law fields and is currently leading a three-year research project with Microsoft that is investigating legal and regulatory aspects of cloud computing. Professor Chris Reed, as part of his two year Leverhulme-funded research project Law 2.0 effective law-making for cyberspace, has given a

series of seminars including Information 'Ownership' in the Cloud, ‘Online and Offline Equivalence’, ‘Information Ownership’ and ‘Thinking Globally’. Criminal Law and Justice The Criminal Law and Justice Centre (CJC) formed in May 2008 and led by Professor David Ormerod and Deputy Director, Dr Leonidas Cheliotis, focuses on research that includes domestic issues of criminal justice in many forms, from substantive criminal law and theory, penology, evidence, procedure, appeals and legal systems, as well as in comparative criminology, IT and criminal law, EU criminal law and other trans-national criminal law. In October 2009 the CJC organised a Symposium on Neoliberal Penality, which included distinguished visiting academics from UK and overseas. In January 2010 ‘The Criminal Justice Centre conference - Hate speech bans: critical perspectives’ examined developments in new legislation in England and Wales on incitement to religious hatred and homophobic hatred. European Union Law Professor Takis Tridimas is a leading authority on the European Court of Justice and has recently published on its role in reviewing EU anti-terror measures. Kenneth Armstrong, Professor of European Union Law’s work focuses on constitutional and institutional issues but with a particular interest in EU governance. He has written on the governance of the Single European Market and in 2010 Oxford UP will publish his new book on the Governance of Social Inclusion in Europe. Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas’ expertise lies in the developing fields of EU criminal law and Justice and Home Affairs. He is the author of a major study of EU criminal law (Hart, 2009) and his expert advice has been sought by the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) as well as by the UK Parliament. Nick Bernard’s research and teaching covers EU substantive economic and social law. He has a particular interest in regulated industries in Europe and is undertaking research on air transport liberalization. Dr Rafael Leal-Arcas’ scholarship focuses on EU external relations and on international investment law. In 2008 he authored a major book on this subject Theory and Practice of EC External Trade Law and Policy (Cameron May). Dr Maher Dabbah is the School’s competition law expert and his scholarship includes research on the European dimension of competition law and policy. Environmental Law Professor Malgosia Fitzmaurice spoke on Settlement of Disputes in International Environmental Law at The Hague Academy of International Law in Beijing in October 2009. Professor Fitzmaurice also published a monograph on Contemporary Issues in International Environmental Law (Edward Elgar,


Law Queen Mary, University of London

2009). In October 2008, the Joint Energy Law and Policy Conference, jointly organised by Professor Loukas Mistelis and CECINT (Centre for International Commercial Law) at Universidad Gabriel Mistral (UGB), Chile was held in Santiago. The conference focused on two main areas: Economy, Environment and Energy and Business, Sustainable Development and Alternative Sources of Energy. Additionally, Dr Laurence Shore who is a visiting Professor at CCLS Queen Mary addressed the Energy Chartered Treaty. Human Rights In December 2009 the Secretary of State appointed Professor Geraldine Van Bueren as a Commissioner on the Equality and Human Rights Commission. Law's Duty to the Poor, edited by Van Bueren, has been published by UNESC0. Professor Eric Heinze researches theoretical problems in human rights. In addition to wider print media, he has published in Harvard Human Rights Journal, International Journal of Human Rights, Modern Law Review, and other journals. His books include The Logic of Constitutional Rights, The Logic of Equality, and The Logic of Liberal Rights, and recent translations of his earlier Sexual Orientation: A Human Right. Dr Jill Marshall published ‘Personal Freedom Through Human Rights Law? Autonomy, Identity and Integrity under the European Convention on Human Rights’ (November 2008) which investigates aspects of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Intellectual Property The Queen Mary Intellectual Property Research Institute (QMIPRI), part of the Queen Mary Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS), is one of the foremost dedicated intellectual property research centres in Europe, offering breadth and diversity in intellectual property research and teaching expertise. In 2007 QMIPRI was accredited as a permanent observer to the United Nations (UN) World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). QMIPRI was one of only three non-governmental organisations to be accredited in 2007 and is the only education institution in the UK and one of only two in the world to sit as observers to WIPO. Accreditation provides QMIPRI with unprecedented access to WIPO meetings and specialist committees. Members of QMIPRI, including student members and visiting fellows, may attend all meetings including the General Assembly of Member States. As future leaders in intellectual property research and practice, this is an invaluable experience for students and provides the opportunity to observe international policy-making and legal development first-hand. International Commercial Law The School hosts the Clive Schmitthoff Foundation which supports the study of harmonisation of international commercial law with particular focus on

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Graduate profile: Joseph Altendorff, UK Studied: LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law Currently: I am a trainee solicitor at Denton Wilde Sapte LLP. I am currently finishing a seat in the corporate department and will be going on secondment to our Istanbul offices for my next seat (six months). This will be to practise English law in the banking and corporate departments within the Energy and Technology sectors. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? I was attracted by the leading reputations of the Queen Mary Institute for IP Research and the Queen Mary School of International Arbitration. I was also keen to be involved in a mooting team. I saw from the CCLS website that they entered a team into the Willem Vis arbitration moot in Vienna. This looked as though it was taken pretty seriously, which I thought reflected well on the attitude of the faculty. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Winning the Willem Vis arbitration moot was a natural highlight. Through this I made my strongest friendships. I'm still in regular contact with my team-mates from around the world, all of whom are now lawyers in their respective jurisdictions. I'm really pleased that I took the LLM and got a good degree. I would certainly do it again. I enjoyed writing and researching in my specific areas of interest and taking a more jurisprudential look at the law. Through this I found that students built professional relationships with the faculty, rather than simply being teacher and pupil. CCLS also encouraged practitioners to come in and give seminars in their respective fields. What are your career plans in the next five years? Qualify as a solicitor at Denton Wilde Sapte.


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international sales contracts and secured transactions. Professor Mistelis is active in the Advisory Council of CISG and in law-making and advisory work of UNCITRAL and various governmental agencies. Ms Angie Raymond is working on issues of secured transactions and Dr Stavros Brekoulakis has advised on issues of European international commercial litigation. International Law In December 2009 Professor Malgosia Fitzmaurice and Professor Christian Tams, (University of Glasgow) received a conference grant from the Modern Law Review to organise a conference in November 2010 on The Permanent Court and Modern International Law Reflections on the PCIJ’s Lasting Legacy. Professor Mistelis is a member of the Advisory Board of the Investment Treaty Forum and member of the University of Texas Global Centre for Energy, Arbitration and Environment. Legal Theory and History Professor Michael Lobban is currently part of a team working on the Victorian volumes of the New Oxford History of the Laws of England. Professor Eric Heinze specialises in two areas. His recent writing on classical legal theory appears in International Journal of Law in Context, Ratio Juris and Canadian Journal of Law & Jurisprudence. His recent work on law and literature appears in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Legal Studies, Law & Literature, Law & Humanities, Journal of Social & Legal Studies and Law & Critique. Roger Cotterrell, Anniversary Professor of Legal Theory, is currently writing on the relationships between law and culture, and on theories of transnational law. He has recently edited for Ashgate a book on Emile Durkheim's sociology of justice, morality and politics. Catharine MacMillan has written on a number of different issues in the historical development of the law of obligations, including an intellectual history of the doctrine of contractual mistake in English law. Professors Nobles and Schiff have written extensively on Luhmann's Systems Theory, and are currently exploring the implications of this theory for jurisprudential issues such as civil disobedience, pluralism, retrospect law and judicial speech. Dr Prakash Shah is interested in theories of legal pluralism, transnational communities and the law, and law and religion, and he is involved in a major EU project on Religious Diversity and Secular models in Europe. Medical Law and Ethics Medical law and Ethics is a growing area of research and teaching at Queen Mary. Elaine Gadd, Deputy Director at the Department of Health has joined as Honorary Professor of Medical Law, working with Professor Ashcroft in developing graduate level modules on domestic and

international bioethics policy making. Staff in the School of Law are internationally recognised for their work in a wide range of aspects of medical and biotechnology law. The Council of the Society of Biology has awarded Professor Ashcroft a prestigious Fellowship in recognition of his work in bioethics and ethical issues in the life sciences. Current areas of interest include medical negligence and class actions (Professor Mulheron), medicine and the criminal law (Professor Wilson), intellectual property and medicine (Professor Gibson, Dr Matthews), public health and human rights (Professor Ashcroft). Public Law A number of Queen Mary academic staff are involved in debate and consultation in matters of Public Law. For example, in September 2008 a delegation of senior judges from the Republic of China (Taiwan) visited the School of Law to hold discussions with Professor Andrew Le Sueur and Mario Mendez on constitutional reforms in the UK. Professors Andrew Le Sueur and Kate Malleson held a series of invitation-only seminars on the new UK Supreme Court which were attended by senior lawyers, policy-makers and judges.The overarching aim of the seminar series was to stimulate debate about the operation of the new Supreme Court. In 2009 Professors Kate Malleson and Lizzie Barmes set up the Equal Justices Initiative (EJI), to promote the equal participation of men and women in the judiciary in England and Wales by 2015.The EJI serves as a forum for bringing together academics, practitioners, judges and policy-makers to work towards gender parity on the bench. Tax Law Staff hold annual conferences on the latest UK, EU and International Tax law issues; and are involved in research and projects concerned with international and European tax law involving the OECD and the Commission. Dr Christiana HJI Panayi is currently working on The Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base and the UK, report for the Tax Law Review Committee of the Institute for Fiscal Studies (sole author). In May 2009 Jonathan Schwarz (Visiting Professorial Fellow) published Schwarz on Tax Treaties which focuses on tax treaties from a UK perspective and provides in-depth analysis on the interpretation and interaction of the UK’s network of double tax treaties with EC and UK tax law. In June 2009 Dr Tom O'Shea spoke at the Annual Latin American International Tax Program on 'Tax treaty interpretation in the UK. Latest developments on UK international tax law: Potential Impact on tax treaty law' and 'Accessing EU Tax advantages'. In September 2008 Dr Ann Mumford spoke at New York University Law School about the possibility of replacing the US federal estate tax with a comprehensive inheritance tax, as proposed by the economist Professor Lily Batchelder.


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Staff research interests www.law.qmul.ac.uk/people

Arbitration Stavros Brekoulakis LLB(Athens) LLM(London) PhD(London) Lecturer in International Dispute Resolution International arbitration, construction arbitration, conflict of laws, multiparty and complex dispute resolution, jurisdiction of tribunals and national courts, enforcement of awards and national judgments, insurance law, oral and written advocacy Professor Julian D M Lew QC LLB Hons(Lond) Doctorat spécial en droit international privé (magna cum lauda) (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium) MCI Arb Barrister, England, Attorney-at-law (New York), Head of School of International Arbitration and Visiting Professor International Commercial and Investment Arbitration Professor Loukas Mistelis LLB(Athens) MLE(magna cum laude) Dr Iuris(summa cum laude)(Hanover) MCIArb Advocate(Athens Bar) Clive M Schmitthoff Professor of Transnational Commercial Law and Arbitration Director of the School of International Arbitration International commercial and investment arbitration, international commercial transactions, secured transactions, comparative law, unification and legal transplants, ADR, foreign investment law, international trade law

Banking and Finance Kern Alexander AB(Cornell) MSc(Oxon) MPhil(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Reader in Law and Finance UK and European banking and financial services law and regulation; corporate governance of financial institutions; economic/financial sanctions regulation and policy Professor Alastair Hudson LLB LLM PhD(London) Professor of Equity and Law, Barrister (Lincoln's Inn) Equity and trusts, housing law, banking and finance law, property law, restitution and the legal aspects of social exclusion Professor Rosa Lastra LLB MA(Valladolid) LLM(Harvard) PhD(Madrid) Professor of International Financial and Monetary Law Central banking, financial law and regulation, international banking, international monetary law, law reform in emerging economies, EU financial law

Shalini Perera LLB(Colombo) LLM(Columbia), DPhil(Oxon) Solicitor Lecturer in Corporate Law Corporate law, corporate finance and international investment law Professor Geraint Thomas BA(Wales) DPhil(Oxon) Barrister (Inner Temple) Professor of Equity and Property Law Domestic and overseas trusts (including estate planning, taxation of trusts, pension trusts and offshore trusts), legal problems affecting the elderly (Elder Law) Professor Takis Tridimas LLB(Athens) PhD(Cantab) Barrister(Middle Temple) Sir John Lubbock Professor of Banking Law European Union Law, judicial protection, competition law, internal market, external relations, company law, banking and financial services, constitutional law Leon Vinokur BA, LLB(Hebrew University) MSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer, Director of MSc Law and Finance programme Microeconomics, environmental economics, and policy analysis; efficiency of Kyoto Protocol flexible mechanisms Professor George Walker BA LLB(Hons) DIPLP(Glasgow) DAES(Bruges) LLM(London) PhD(London) DPhil(Oxford) Professor in International Financial Law UK banking and financial law, European and international law, UK financial regulatory reform and international capital standards

Commercial and Corporate Law Alan Dignam BA(Trinity College Dublin) PhD(DCU) Professor in Corporate Law Company law, corporate governance and the application of constitutional rights/human rights to corporations Professor Janet Dine LLB PhD(London) AKC Professor of International Economic Development Law Company law, interaction of human rights law and international trade law, international economic law Professor Alastair Hudson LLB LLM PhD(London) Barrister (Lincoln's Inn) Professor of Equity and Law Equity and trusts, housing law, banking and finance law, property law, restitution and the legal aspects of social exclusion


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www.law.qmul.ac.uk/people

Shalini Perera LLB(Colombo) LLM(Columbia), DPhil(Oxon) Solicitor Lecturer in Corporate Law Corporate law, corporate finance and international investment law

Competition Law Maher Dabbah LLB(Wales) LLM PhD(London) Barrister(Middle Temple) Reader in Competition Law Antitrust and national, regional and global competition law and policy

Anjanette H Raymond BA(St Ambrose University, Iowa) MS Ed(Western Illinois University) JD(Loyola University School of Law) LLM(London) PhD Candidate (CCLS) Attorney at Law(New York) Lecturer in International Commercial Law International commercial arbitration, international commercial comparative law, international secured transactions and electronic commerce, international and domestic contracts, international commercial finance

Anne Flanagan BA(New York) JD(New York) LLM(London) Senior Lecturer in Communications Law Communications law, copyright, privacy and data protection, competition law, freedom of information law and e-government

Professor Geraint Thomas BA(Wales) DPhil(Oxon) Barrister (Inner Temple) Professor of Equity and Property Law Domestic and overseas trusts (including estate planning, taxation of trusts, pension trusts and offshore trusts), legal problems affecting the elderly (Elder Law)

Laura Edgar LLB(Aberd) Lecturer (CCLS) Electronic commerce, particularly digital payments systems, taxation, jurisdiction, intellectual property and legal issues affecting virtual enterprises

Comparative and International Dispute Resolution Stavros Brekoulakis LLB(Athens) LLM(London) PhD(London) Lecturer in International Dispute Resolution International arbitration, construction arbitration, conflict of laws, multiparty and complex dispute resolution, jurisdiction of tribunals and national courts, enforcement of awards and national judgments, insurance law, oral and written advocacy Professor Loukas Mistelis LLB(Athens) MLE(magna cum laude) Dr Iuris(summa cum laude)(Hanover) MCIArb Advocate(Athens Bar) Clive M Schmitthoff Professor of Transnational Commercial Law and Arbitration Director of the School of International Arbitration International commercial and investment arbitration, international commercial transactions, secured transactions, comparative law, unification and legal transplants, ADR, foreign investment law, international trade law Anjanette H Raymond BA(St Ambrose University, Iowa) MS Ed(Western Illinois University) JD(Loyola University School of Law) LLM(London) PhD Candidate (CCLS), Attorney at Law (New York) Lecturer in International Commercial Law International commercial arbitration, international commercial comparative law, international secured transactions and electronic commerce, international and domestic contracts, international commercial finance

Computer and Communications Law

Anne Flanagan BA(New York) JD(New York) LLM(London) Senior Lecturer in Communications Law Communications law, copyright, privacy and data protection, competition law, freedom of information law and e-government Julia Hรถrnle LLB(Leeds) PhD(London) Solicitor Lecturer in Internet Law Internet Regulation and Governance, Jurisdiction and Conflicts of Law, Online Dispute Resolution, Regulation of Online Gambling, Privacy and Data Protection Professor Spyros Maniatis Law Degree(Athens) LLM(London) PhD(Lond) Professor of Intellectual Property Law, Director of CCLS Trade mark and unfair competition law, history of IPRs and innovation, innovation theories Professor Christopher Millard LLB(Sheffield) MA Criminology(Toronto) LLM(Toronto) Solicitor Professor of Privacy and Information Law Data protection law, international privacy regulation, cloud computing, information governance and the impact of the Internet on privacy Professor Chris Reed BA(Keele) LLM(London) Professor of Electronic Commerce Law Cross-border regulation of online activities, electronic signatures, online banking and financial services, and all aspects of electronic commerce


Law Queen Mary, University of London

Gavin Sutter LLB, LLM(Queens, Belfast) Lecturer in Media Law Content regulations issues both online and in the physical world, issues of defamation, obscenity, indecency, including a commercial media perspective Professor Ian Walden BA(Nott) MA(Virginia) PhD(Nott Trent) Professor of Information and Communications Law Cybercrime, telecommunications law, media law and information law

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Valsamis Mitsilegas LLB(Thes/niki) LLM(distinction)(Kent) PhD(Edinburgh) Professor of European Criminal Law EU law, EU Justice and Home Affairs (including immigration, asylum and border controls, criminal law, police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters) Professor Richard Nobles LLB(Hons)(Warwick) LLM(Yale) Solicitor Professor of Law Criminal appeals and miscarriages of justice, autopoietic systems theory

Guido Westkamp Dr jur(Münster) LLM Intellectual Property(London) First and Second German State Examination(Münster/Düsseldorf) Senior Lecturer Intellectual Property and Copyright, digital technology, unfair competition, media law, information access, IP conflict of laws, international and comparative IP law

Phoebe Okowa LLB(Nairobi) BCL(Oxon) DPhil(Oxon) Advocate(High Court of Kenya) Reader in Public International Law Public International Law, especially International Environmental Law, Use of Force, and State Responsibility

Corporate Law

Professor David Schiff LLB(Southampton) Professor of Law Criminal appeals and miscarriages of justice, autopoietic systems theory, emergencies and the law

Shalini Perera LLB(Colombo) LLM(Columbia) DPhil(Oxon) Solicitor Lecturer in Corporate Law Corporate law, corporate finance and international investment law

Criminal Justice Professor Peter Alldridge LLB(London) LLM(Wales) Drapers’ Professor of Law, Head of Department of Law Money laundering, criminal justice, evidence, commercial criminal law, financial aspects of crime, disability and law, information technology and law, legal education and legal theory Leonidas Cheliotis MPhil PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in Criminology and Deputy Director, Centre for Criminal Justice Sociology, psychoanalysis, philosophy of crime and punishment, the political economy of crime and crime control, crime, criminal justice and the mass media Professor Seán McConville BSc(Bath) PhD(Cantab) LLD(Cantab) JP Professor of Criminal Justice and Professorial Research Fellow Contemporary and comparative criminal and penal policy, penal policy and administration (historical, contemporary and comparative), litigation on prisonrelated issues

Professor David Ormerod LLB(Essex) Barrister(Middle Temple) Professor of Criminal Justice Director, Centre for Criminal Justice Criminal Law, Serious Fraud and the Law of Evidence Professor William Wilson LLM(Manc) MA(Middx) Barrister(Grays Inn) Professor of Criminal Law Criminal law, comparative criminal law, criminal theory

Economic Regulation Kern Alexander AB(Cornell) MSc(Oxon) MPhil(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Reader in Law and Finance UK and European banking and financial services law and regulation; corporate governance of financial institutions; economic/financial sanctions regulation and policy Maher Dabbah LLB(Wales) LLM PhD(London) Barrister(Middle Temple) Reader in Competition Law Antitrust and national, regional and global competition law and policy Alan Dignam BA(Trinity College Dublin) PhD(DCU) Professor in Corporate Law Company law, corporate governance and the application of Constitutional Rights/Human Rights to corporations


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www.law.qmul.ac.uk/people

Laura Edgar LLB(Aberd) Lecturer (CCLS) Electronic commerce, particularly digital payments systems, taxation, jurisdiction, intellectual property and legal issues affecting virtual enterprises Anne Flanagan BA(New York) JD(New York) LLM(London) Senior Lecturer in Communications Law Communications law, copyright, privacy and data protection, competition law, freedom of information law and e-government Professor Rosa Maria Lastra LLB MA(Valladolid) LLM(Harvard) PhD(Madrid) Professor of International Financial and Monetary Law Central banking, financial law and regulation, international banking, international monetary law, law reform in emerging economies, EU financial law Rafael Leal-Arcas PhD(EUI, Italy) MRes(EUI) JSM(Stanford) LLM(Columbia) MPhil(LSE) BA LLB(Granada) Barrister and Solicitor(Madrid) Senior Lecturer in International Economic Law and European Union Law International economic law, WTO law, international investment law, regionalism, and the external relations law of the EU Tom O'Shea MA(TCD) LLM(Tax)(London) PhD(London) Lecturer in Tax Law EC and International Tax law, policy reform, and tax research Professor Takis Tridimas LLB(Athens) PhD(Cantab) Barrister(Middle Temple) Sir John Lubbock Professor of Banking Law European Union Law, judicial protection, competition law, internal market, external relations, company law, banking and financial services, constitutional law

Environmental Law Professor Malgosia Fitzmaurice LLM PhD(Warsaw) Professor of Public International Law International environmental law, law of treaties, indigenous peoples and international water law Leon Vinokur BA LLB(Hebrew University) MSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer, Director of MSc Law and Finance programme Microeconomics, environmental economics, and policy analysis; efficiency of Kyoto Protocol flexible mechanisms

European Law Professor Kenneth Armstrong LLB(Glas) LLM(Toronto) Professor in European Union Law European Union law and policy, evolving governance structures of the EU, governance of the Single European Market, the EU’s Lisbon Strategy Nick Bernard BA DEA Maitrise(UniversitÊ Paris XI) Senior Lecturer Law of the EU, EU governance and regulation, internal market law, discrimination law Maher Dabbah LLB(Wales) LLM PhD(London) Barrister(Middle Temple) Reader in Competition Law Antitrust and national, regional and global competition law and policy Professor Rosa Maria Lastra LLB MA(Valladolid) LLM(Harvard) PhD(Madrid) Professor of International Financial and Monetary Law Central banking, financial law and regulation, international banking, international monetary law, law reform in emerging economies, EU financial law

Leon Vinokur BA LLB(Hebrew University) MSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer, Director of MSc Law and Finance programme Microeconomics, environmental economics, and policy analysis; Efficiency of Kyoto Protocol flexible mechanisms

Rafael Leal-Arcas PhD(EUI, Italy) MRes(EUI) JSM(Stanford) LLM(Columbia) MPhil(LSE) BA LLB(Granada) Barrister and Solicitor(Madrid) Senior Lecturer in International Economic Law and European Union Law International economic law, WTO law, international investment law, regionalism, and the external relations law of the EU

Professor George Walker BA LLB(Hons) DIPLP(Glasgow) DAES(Bruges) LLM(London) PhD(London) DPhil(Oxford) Professor in International Financial Law UK banking and financial law, European and international law, UK Financial Regulatory Reform and International Capital Standards

Valsamis Mitsilegas LLB(Thes/niki) LLM(distinction)(Kent) PhD(Edinburgh) Professor of European Criminal Law EU law, EU Justice and Home Affairs (including immigration, asylum and border controls, criminal law, police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters)


Law Queen Mary, University of London

Christiana HJI Panayi BA(Oxon) BCL PhD(London) Lecturer in Tax Law European Community tax law, international tax law and corporate finance, US and Cypriot tax law, state aid law, human rights and tax law Professor Takis Tridimas LLB(Athens) PhD(Cantab) Barrister(Middle Temple) Sir John Lubbock Professor of Banking Law European Union Law, judicial protection, competition law, internal market, external relations, company law, banking and financial services, constitutional law

Human Rights Law Merris Amos BEc(Sydney) LLB(Sydney) BCL(Oxon) Solicitor, Supreme Court of NSW and Supreme Court of England and Wales Senior Lecturer Human Rights Act 1998, the legal protection of human rights at the national level, European human rights law Professor Lizzie Barmes MA(Oxon) BCL(Oxon) Solicitor (England and Wales) Professor of Labour Law Employment, discrimination, labour and equality law Shazia Choudhry LLB(Liv) Dip LP(York) Solicitor of the Supreme Court Senior Lecturer Family law, the impact of the European Convention on Human Rights on various aspects of family law and the issue of 'rights' within family law in general Professor Janet Dine LLB PhD(London) AKC Professor of International Economic Development Law Company law, interaction of human rights law and international trade law, international economic law Professor Eric Heinze(Paris) Licence Maîtrise(Paris) JD(Harvard) PhD(Leiden) Member of the Bars of New York and Massachusetts Professor of Law and Humanities Jurisprudence and legal theory, philosophy of law, law and literature, international human rights Jill Marshall LLB(Queens, Belfast) MA PhD(London) Solicitor of the Supreme Court of England and Wales Senior Lecturer Feminist jurisprudence and human rights, research into freedom, choice and gender equality, investigating case law of the European Court of Human Rights

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Prakash A Shah LLB(LSE) LLM(LSE) PhD(SOAS) Senior Lecturer Ethnic minorities and diasporas in law, immigration, refugee and nationality law, legal pluralism, law and religion, and comparative law with special reference to South Asians Professor Geraldine Van Bueren BA(Wales) LLM(London) Barrister(Middle Temple) Associate Tenant Doughty Street Chambers Professor of International Human Rights Law Child law, human rights and civil liberties, social welfare and poverty law

Intellectual Property Law Professor Michael Blakeney BA LLM(Sydney) MA(NSW) Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property Law International trade law and regulation, digital technology law, cyberspace and law, genetic resources and biotechnological patenting/ geographical indications, traditional knowledge

Staff profile: Professor Kate Malleson Professor of Law, CoDirector of LLM Programme “My research interest lies in the field of constitutional law generally and the judiciary specifically. I have a particular interest in judicial selection processes and the challenge of increasing diversity in the composition of the judiciary. I am currently working on a three year AHRC funded project on the selection processes of the international judiciary to identify the processes that states use to nominate and elect international judges. Much of my research is engaged with current developments such as the creation of the Supreme Court in the UK or reforms to the international judicial selection process which helps me to engage students with topical issues and the most recent academic and policy work in the field. “Queen Mary is an excellent place to carry out postgraduate study. The high quality research being carried out by staff in the School of Law across a wide range of areas means that students are taught by leaders in their field. The ongoing engagement between academic staff and the legal profession, the judiciary and policy-makers gives students an opening into the legal world outside academia.”


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Professor Peter Drahos LLB BA(Adelaide) GDLP(SAIT) LLM(Sydney) PhD(ANU) Professor of Intellectual Property Law Regulation, legal philosophy, globalisation, intellectual property, trade and development Gail E Evans BA(Hons) DipEd LLB SJD(University of Sydney) Reader in International Trade and Intellectual Property Law TRIPS jurisprudence, TRIPS and Public International Law; patenting of living matter; online contracts and intellectual property Professor Johanna Gibson BA MA PGDipAppSci JD(Queensland) PhD(Edinburgh) Solicitor and Barrister to the Supreme Court of Victoria Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property Law Intellectual property law and policy, development and culture, traditional knowledge and cultural expressions, genetic resources and biodiversity, medicine and public health Jonathan Griffiths BA(Oxon) MA(York) Senior Lecturer, Solicitor Intellectual property law (particularly copyright law) and information law, international and comparative copyright law and the law of torts

Professor Spyros Maniatis BA(Athens) LLM(London) PhD(Lond) Professor of Intellectual Property Law, Director of CCLS Trade mark and unfair competition law, history of IPRs and innovation, innovation theories Duncan Matthews BSc MA(Warwick) LLM(Exeter) PhD(London) Reader in Intellectual Property Law TRIPS Agreement and access to medicines; patents for pharmaceuticals; technical assistance and TRIPS flexibilities; free trade agreements and intellectual property rights Professor Uma Suthersanen LLB(Singapore) LLM(London) PhD(London) Professor in International Intellectual Property Law Global intellectual property law, economics of intellectual property and innovation, comparative copyright and design law, human rights and intellectual property law, history and theory of creativity and the law Guido Westkamp Dr jur(M端nster) LLM Intellectual Property(London) First and Second German State Examination(M端nster/D端sseldorf) Senior Lecturer Intellectual Property and Copyright, digital technology, unfair competition, media law, information access, IP conflict of laws, international and comparative IP law

International Economic Law Kern Alexander AB(Cornell) MSc(Oxon) MPhil(Cantab) PhD(Lond) Reader in Law and Finance UK and European banking and financial services law and regulation; corporate governance of financial institutions; economic/financial sanctions regulation and policy Professor Janet Dine LLB PhD(London) AKC Professor of International Economic Development Law Company law, interaction of human rights law and international trade law, international economic law Rafael Leal-Arcas PhD(EUI, Italy) MRes(EUI) JSM(Stanford) LLM(Columbia) MPhil(LSE) BA LLB(Granada) Barrister and Solicitor(Madrid) Senior Lecturer in International Economic Law and European Union Law International economic law, WTO law, international investment law, regionalism, and the external relations law of the EU


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Gabriel Gari BA LLB(Universidad de la República) LLM(LSE) PhD cand(London) Lecturer in Corporate Finance Law EU regulation of life assurance undertakings and the liberalisation of trade in services in MERCOSUR, European internal market law, WTO law Leon Vinokur BA LLB(Hebrew University) MSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer, Director of MSc Law and Finance programme Microeconomics, environmental economics, and policy analysis; efficiency of Kyoto Protocol flexible mechanisms

International Business Law Professor Rosa Maria Lastra LLB MA(Valladolid) LLM(Harvard) PhD(Madrid) Professor of International Financial and Monetary Law Central banking, financial law and regulation, international banking, international monetary law, law reform in emerging economies, EU financial law Anjanette H Raymond BA(St Ambrose University, Iowa) MS Ed(Western Illinois University) JD(Loyola University School of Law) LLM(London) PhD Candidate(CCLS) Attorney at Law(New York) Lecturer in International Commercial Law International commercial arbitration, international commercial comparative law, international secured transactions and electronic commerce, international and domestic contracts, international commercial finance, electronic commerce Professor George Walker BA LLB(Hons) DIPLP(Glasgow) DAES(Bruges) LLM(London) PhD(London) DPhil(Oxford) Professor in International Financial Law UK banking and financial law, European and international law, UK financial regulatory reform and international capital standards

Law and Development Professor Janet Dine LLB PhD(London) AKC Professor of International Economic Development Law Company law, interaction of human rights law and international trade law, international economic law Gabriel Gari BA LLB(Universidad de la República) LLM(LSE) PhD cand(London) Lecturer in Corporate Finance Law EU regulation of life assurance undertakings and the liberalisation of trade in services in MERCOSUR, European internal market law, WTO law and latin american law

Staff profile: Anjanette Raymond Lecturer in International Commercial Law, Co-Director of LLM Programme “I am currently working in two main areas: international (or Transnational) secured transactions and international commercial (sales) law. I have recently published articles about intellectual property being used as collateral in secured transactions, and of course the current financial crisis has lead to an increased demand in the understanding of secured transactions. In addition, I have been advising several legislative bodies in the area of international sales law. “I have always been interested in international commercial law. Commercial law surrounds us everyday, and the inner working of law and the real world is incredibly fascinating. Although I came to the law a bit late in my career, business was always part of my daily life. So working in the commercial law world seemed a natural extension of my interests and my skills. “My research keeps me up to date on current issues and allows me to stay connected in the legal community. Students greatly benefit from timely information as well as realising benefit from contacts within the community. “Queen Mary is an excellent place for students to study for three main reasons: first, we have exciting, engaging and challenging programmes, second, a great faculty, and third, a great student body. Moreover, the postgraduate department is in Lincolns Inn Fields, the heart of the legal and financial world.”


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Professor Johanna Gibson BA MA PGDipAppSci JD(Queensland) PhD(Edinburgh) Solicitor and Barrister to the Supreme Court of Victoria Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property Law Intellectual property law and policy, development and culture, traditional knowledge and cultural expressions, genetic resources and biodiversity, medicine and public health Professor Rosa Maria Lastra LLB MA(Valladolid) LLM(Harvard) PhD(Madrid) Professor of International Financial and Monetary Law Central banking, financial law and regulation, international banking, international monetary law, law reform in emerging economies, EU financial law Professor George Walker BA LLB(Hons) DIPLP(Glasgow) DAES(Bruges) LLM(London) PhD(London) DPhil(Oxford) Professor in International Financial Law UK banking and financial law, European and international law, UK financial regulatory reform and international capital standards

Legal Theory and History Professor Roger Cotterrell FBA LLD MSc(Soc)(London) Anniversary Professor of Legal Theory Legal theory, relations of law, trust, community and culture, comparative law and sociology of law, concept of transnational law

Professor Michael Lobban MA PhD(Cantab) Professor of Legal History English legal history and the history of jurisprudence, private law, law reform in England in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Catharine MacMillan BA(Victoria) LLB(Queen's, Canada) LLM(Cantab) Barrister and Solicitor (British Columbia, nonpractising), Solicitor (England and Wales, nonpractising) Senior Lecturer Contract and commercial law, with an emphasis on the historical development of contract law, property law Professor Richard Nobles LLB(Hons)(Warwick) LLM(Yale) Solicitor Professor of Law Criminal appeals and miscarriages of justice, autopoietic systems theory Professor David Schiff LLB(Southampton) Professor of Law Criminal appeals and miscarriages of justice, autopoietic systems theory, emergencies and the Law


Law Queen Mary, University of London

Prakash A Shah LLB(LSE) LLM(LSE) PhD(SOAS) Senior Lecturer Ethnic minorities and diasporas in law, immigration, refugee and nationality law, legal pluralism, law and religion, and comparative law with special reference to South Asians

Migration and Law Valsamis Mitsilegas LLB(Thes/niki) LLM(distinction)(Kent) PhD(Edinburgh) Professor of European Criminal Law EU law, EU Justice and Home Affairs (including immigration, asylum and border controls, criminal law, police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters) Prakash A Shah LLB(LSE) LLM(LSE) PhD(SOAS) Senior Lecturer Immigration, refugee and nationality law, ethnic minorities and diasporas in law, and comparative law with special reference to South Asians

Medical Law Professor Richard Ashcroft MA(Cantab) PhD(Cantab) FHEA FIBiol Professor of Bioethics Ethical, legal and social aspects of medicine, public health and biomedical research, incentives in health promotion, relationship between human rights and bioethics Professor Rachael Mulheron BCom LLB(Hons) LLM (Adv)(UQ) DPhil(Oxon) Professor of Law Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and High Court of Australia Class actions jurisprudence, tort law, medical negligence Professor Johanna Gibson BA MA PGDipAppSci JD(Queensland) PhD(Edinburgh) Solicitor and Barrister to the Supreme Court of Victoria Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property Law Intellectual property and policy, development and cultural aspects, legal theory, traditional knowledge, intellectual property aspects of medicine and health

Public International Law Professor Malgosia Fitzmaurice LLM PhD(Warsaw) Professor of Public International Law International environmental law, law of treaties, indigenous peoples and international water law

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Phoebe Okowa LLB(Nairobi) BCL(Oxon) DPhil(Oxon) Advocate (High Court of Kenya) Reader in Public International Law Public international law, especially international environmental law, use of force, and state responsibility

Public Law Professor Kenneth Armstrong LLB(Glas) LLM(Toronto) Professor in European Union Law European Union law and policy, evolving governance structures of the EU, governance of the Single European Market, EU’s Lisbon Strategy Professor Andrew Le Sueur LLB(Hons) Barrister (Middle Temple) Professor of Public Law Top-level courts and the proposals to create a new supreme court for the UK, judicial review, law and government Professor Kate Malleson BA(London) MPhil(Cantab) PhD(London) Professor of Law The judiciary, the legal system and the constitution Mario Mendez BA(London) LLM(William & Mary) BCL(Oxon) PhD(EUI) Lecturer in Public Law Public law (including constitutional and institutional law of the EU)

Tax Law Ann Mumford BA(Columbia) JD(Connecticut) PhD(Wales) Senior Lecturer in Tax Socio-legal and critical approaches to tax law; study of tax law by both cultural studies and comparative legal perspectives Tom O'Shea MA(TCD) LLM(Tax)(London) PhD(London) Lecturer in Tax Law EC and International Tax law, policy reform, and tax research Christiana HJI Panayi BA(Oxon) BCL PhD(London) Lecturer in Tax Law European Community tax law, international tax law and corporate finance, US and Cypriot tax law, state aid law, human rights and tax law Further information, including details of visiting professors and practitioners, can be found at: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/people


Philosophy

Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p170


Philosophy Queen Mary, University of London

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Philosophy www.philosophy.qmul.ac.uk Queen Mary boasts world-class research and teaching in philosophy, with pioneering work in such topics as: logic, political philosophy, legal philosophy, moral philosophy, aesthetics, literary criticism, theory of history, philosophy of science, medical ethics, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, intellectual history, Medieval and Renaissance thought, early modernism, the Enlightenment, German idealism, phenomenology, existentialism, philosophy of the mind, sociology, psychoanalysis, human rights, feminism, race theory, post-colonial theory, post-structuralism, queer theory, deconstructionism and post-modernism.

Research strengths Philosophy at Queen Mary is pluralist, interdisciplinary and refuses to divorce philosophy from other disciplines. When appropriate, students receive supervision from staff in more than one school. The Philosophy programme is fast becoming one of the key forums for co-operation and exchange of ideas among staff from a variety of schools. That synthesis is crucial in encouraging students to interact with staff and fellow students within a broad range of disciplines. Although there are currently no taught programmes, individual PhD supervision, sometimes across participating schools, can be arranged.

Postgraduate resources There are extensive specialist postgraduate resources located throughout the College. Please see each School’s pages for more information on these. Graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences have access to the award-winning Lock-keeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre. It features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities, and a common room. The College has a well-stocked library, with dedicated subject librarians, and subscriptions to the leading journals and discussion paper series. Students also have wider access to other libraries within London, including the University of London Library (Senate House). They may also take advantage of the College Language Learning Unit (offering beginner, intermediate and advanced level courses in a wide range of languages) and of an unrivalled array of specialist language centres provided by the University of London. Queen Mary is conveniently located for access to some of the world’s greatest archival collections: The British Library, the National Archives, Senate House Library, Warburg Institute, Institute of Historical Research, Victoria and Albert Museum, Royal Society, Wellcome Institute and many other smaller specialist collections.

Studentships / scholarships Although no funding is currently available from the programme PhD applicants considering a degree in conjunction with some other school may want to investigate funding opportunities in that school. In addition, postgraduate applicants are encouraged to investigate funding opportunities through the Arts and Humanities Research Board, the British Academy, the European Union, or other organisations committed to funding advanced study.

Career opportunities Currently, Queen Mary philosophy postgraduate degrees are inter-disciplinary, and are awarded in conjunction with participating schools. For career opportunities, please see the description of the school in which you would be enrolled.

Further information For all enquiries Department of Corporate Affairs Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5314 email: corporate-affairs@qmul.ac.uk www.philosophy.qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk


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Research

Research degrees

Research areas

MPhil/PhD The PhD is ordinarily completed in four years. As it consists entirely of individually supervised research, there are no taught modules. In addition to degrees in Philosophy, the programme also encourages students to consider an interdisciplinary doctorate in collaboration with participating College Schools. As examples, a candidate may wish to receive a PhD in:

Philosophy at Queen Mary is pluralist and interdisciplinary. It draws upon experts from a range of schools and centres in the College, including: Astronomy, the Centre for Business Management, Computer Science, Electronic Engineering, English and Drama, French, Geography, German, Hispanic Studies, History, Law, Linguistics, Materials, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Politics.

• Physics, with special mention in Philosophy • Law, with special mention in Philosophy • English and Drama, with special mention in Philosophy • Politics, with special mention in Philosophy • Modern Languages, with special mention in Philosophy

Queen Mary welcomes potential philosophy research students who are interested in any of the following areas.

In some cases, the collaboration of more than one participating school may be possible, subject to special arrangements being made. Previous study in philosophy is not required, but all applicants will be assessed with a view towards their likelihood of success. Senior and Postdoctoral Fellowships Scholars are encouraged to spend a semester or a year at the College, in order to conduct independent research. As with academic degree programmes, a fee will be charged and no funding is currently available. Scholars will, however, receive access to Queen Mary and University of London libraries and facilities.

Aesthetics and Literary Theory • Aesthetics and Modernism • Ancient Greek Rhetoric • Film Theory • History and Theory of Aesthetics • Theory of Dramatics. Enlightenment and Early Modernism • British and American Enlightenment • Early Modern Intellectual History • French Enlightenment • Scottish Enlightenment. Epistemology, Logic and Language • History of Logic • History of Semantics • Philosophy of Language • Philosophy of Knowledge • Symbolic Logic. Medieval and Renaissance Thought • Medieval Philosophy • Renaissance Philosophy. Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy • Ancient Greek Law and Society • Feminism • Human Rights • Marxism and Post-Marxism • Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy • Philosophy of Education • Philosophy of History • Philosophy of Law • Post-Colonialism • Professional Ethics • Sexuality • Sociology and Social Policy • Space and Place.


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Nemonie Craven, PhD on ethical and political subjectivity “I was aware of Queen Mary’s School of Languages, Linguistics and Film’s good reputation. Once I began corresponding with my prospective supervisors about my PhD proposal, I found the level of support and commitment to be such that I was assured of a positive environment in which to work on my thesis. My experience has so far exceeded my expectations. “Queen Mary and the University of London have vibrant postgraduate communities – invaluable to anyone undertaking research towards a Masters or a PhD. Seminars are always stimulating and provide good opportunities to meet fellow students – especially as discussion often continues in the pub or over a meal. I have made many great friends. “As my work is interdisciplinary, I have been lucky enough to benefit from an unusually high sample of Queen Mary’s teaching excellence. I have found my supervisors to be supportive and incisive. The library facilities are good, and the staff in the Modern Languages section are particularly helpful and, indeed, passionate (thank you Anselm Nye). Postgraduate facilities and provisions are of a very high standard. “The support I receive from my supervisors has given me the confidence to develop a fairly ambitious thesis plan, as well as to present my work at conferences and seminars, and so to feel part of an academic community – again, key to an enjoyable postgraduate experience. I have found staff across the University of London as a whole to be wonderfully supportive of postgraduate students.

Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology • Phenomenology and Existentialism • Post-Structuralism and Deconstructionism. Psychology and Philosophy of Mind • Philosophy of Mind • Psychology and Psychoanalysis. Scientific Theory and Practice • Cosmology • History and Philosophy of Science • History and Theory of Medicine • Medical Ethics • Science and Society.

“In 2006 I was given the opportunity to present my work at an interdisciplinary conference on Levinas and Law in Montreal, Quebec, and therefore to meet an international community of people working, from different perspectives, on the main focus of my thesis. This conference expanded the scope of my own work. I also managed to fit in some whalewatching and black bear-fleeing! “In May 2006, I organised a seminar on Film and Philosophy, which was held in the Lock-keeper’s Cottage. The level of attendance and engagement demonstrated further the vibrancy of Queen Mary’s academic community. Our visiting speaker was quite thrilled to have such a turn-out, and to sample the delights of Tracey Emin’s local, The Golden Hart.”


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Staff research interests www.philosophy.qmul.ac.uk/staff

David Adger MA MSc PhD(Edin) Professor, Department of Linguistics Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Language; Symbolic Logic; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Mind Professor Michèle Barrett BA MA DPhil(Sus) Head of School and Professor of Modern Literary and Cultural Theory, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Aesthetics and Modernism; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy; PostEnlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism Gianluigi Bellin Laurea(Padua) PhD(Standford) Senior Lecturer, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Language; Symbolic Logic Richard Bourke BA(NUI) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer, School of History Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual History; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Ancient Greek Law and Society; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy Felicity Callard BA(Oxon) MA(Sus) PhD(Johns Hopkins) Honorary Visiting Lecturer, School of Geography Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Marxism and Post-Marxism; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy; Sexuality; PostEnlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis Vicky Cattell BSc MSc(Lond) PGCE PhD(Middx) Senior Research Fellow, Psychiatry, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine) Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Sociology and Social Policy Peter Catterall MA(Cantab) PhD(Lond) FRHistS Lecturer, School of History Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Philosophy of History Madeleine Davis BA MA PhD(Lond) Lecturer, School of Politics Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Marxism and Post-Marxism

Thomas Dixon MSc(Lond) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer, School of History History of theories of passions and emotions; history of debates about ‘altruism’, especially in Victorian Britain; and, more generally, the history of relationships between science and religion, religious, intellectual and cultural life of Nineteenth-Century Britain, political thought, Thomas Paine Professor Len Doyal BA MSc Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry (Institute of Health Sciences Education) Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science; History and Theory of Medicine; Medical Ethics Professor David Dunstan MA(Cantab) PhD(Hull) FInstP FRSA Professor of Experimental Physics, School of Physics Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science; Science and Society Michael Edwards BA PhD(Lond) ITLM Professor of Classics, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Ancient Greek Rhetoric; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Ancient Greek Law and Society Miriam Epstein MA PhD MD Lecturer in Medical Ethics and Law, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry (Institute of Health Sciences Education) Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Human Rights; Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science; History and Theory of Medicine; Medical Ethics Professor Julian RG Evans BSc PhD(Bath) CEng FIM Professor, School of Engineering and Materials Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Knowledge Robert Gillett MA(Oxon) PhD(Cantab) Senior Lecturer, German, School of Languages Linguistics and Film Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Sexuality James Gilson BSc MSc PhD(Lond) Emeritus Staff, School of Mathematical Sciences Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science


Philosophy Queen Mary, University of London

Professor Paul Hamilton MA(Glas) MA DPhil(Oxon) Professor of English, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual History; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy; PostEnlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Post-Structuralism and Deconstructionism Simon Harvey MA PhD(Cantab) School of Languages Linguistics and Film Enlightenment and Early Modernism; French Enlightenment Patrick Healey BSc(North) DipAppPsych(Notts) MSc PhD(Edin) Reader in Cognitive Science and Computer Science, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Language; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism Professor Eric Heinze MaĂŽtrise(Paris) JD(Harvard) PhD(Leiden) Coordinator (Laws), Professor of Law and Humanities School of Law Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Human Rights Professor Paul Heritage BA(Manc) Professor of Drama and Performance, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Theory of Dramatics; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Human Rights Suzanne Hobson BA(Oxford) MA(Warwick) PhD(London) Lecturer, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual; French Enlightenment; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism; Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Theory of Medicine Professor Wilfrid Hodges MA DPhil(Oxon) Professorial Fellow, School of Mathematical Sciences Epistemology, Logic and Language; History of Semantics; Philosophy of Language; Symbolic Logic Alastair Hudson LLB LLM PhD(Lond) Professor of Equity and Law, School of Law Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Philosophy of Law

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Mara Keire BA(Yale) MA PhD(Johns Hopkins) Lecturer, School of History Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Human Rights; Sexuality; Sociology and Social Policy Professor Charles Leedham-Green MA DPhil(Oxon) Professorial Fellow, School of Mathematical Sciences Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual History; Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science Andrew Lincoln BA PhD(Wales) Reader, School of English and Drama Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual History; Scottish Enlightenment Professor Malcolm MacCallum MA PhD(Cantab) Professor of Applied Mathematics, School of Mathematical Sciences Scientific Theory and Practice; Cosmology Javed Majeed BA DPhil(Oxon) Professor, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Post-Colonialism; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism Spyros M Maniatis LLB LLM PhD(Lond) Professor of Intellectual Property Law, School of Law (Centre for Commercial Law Studies) Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Philosophy of Law


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Staff research interests

(cont)

www.philosophy.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Julian Millar BA MA PhD Senior Lecturer Medical Studies, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry (Institute of Health Sciences Education) Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis Professor Michael Moriarty MA PhD(Cantab) Professor, French, School of Languages, Linguistics and Film Aesthetics and Literary Theory; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual; French Enlightenment Parvati Nair BA MA PhD(Lond) Professor, Hispanic Studies, School of Languages Linguistics and Film Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy Professor Leonard Olschner BA(Virginia) DPhil(Freiburg) Professor, German, School of Languages Linguistics and Film Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Aesthetics and Modernism; History and Theory of Aesthetics Pietro Panzarasa BA PhD(Bocconi) Lecturer, School of Business and Management Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Knowledge; Symbolic Logic; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Mind David Pinder BA PhD(Cantab) Reader, School of Geography Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Aesthetics and Modernism; History and Theory of Aesthetics; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Marxism and Post-Marxism; Space and Place Professor Stefan Priebe DipPsych MD(Hamburg) Habil(Berlin) Professor, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine) Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis; Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Theory of Medicine Professor Jacqueline Rose BA(Oxon) M창itrise(Sorbonne) PhD(Lond) Professor of English, School of English and Drama Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis

Professor Ian Roxburgh BSc(Nott) PhD(Cantab) FRAS Research Professor, Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science Nicholas Ridout MA(Cantab) Senior Lecturer and Head of Drama, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Aesthetics and Modernism; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Marxism and Post-Marxism; PostEnlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism Eric Scharf BScEng(Aberd) MSc(Wales) PhD(Surrey) AIMEE MIEEE Lecturer, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Scientific Theory and Practice; Science and Society Prakash A Shah LLB LLM PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer, School of Law Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Human Rights; Philosophy of Law; Post-Colonialism Professor Morag Shiach MA(Glas) MA(McGill) PhD(Cantab) Professor of Cultural History and Vice-Principal (Teaching and Learning), School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Aesthetics and Modernism; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy


Philosophy Queen Mary, University of London

Peter Skorupski BSc(St Andrews) PhD(Bris) Lecturer, School of Biological Sciences Epistemology, Logic and Language; Philosophy of Knowledge; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis Professor David Smith Emeritus Professor of Geography, School of Geography Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Professional Ethics; Space and Place William Spence BSc(ANU) PhD(Lond) Head of School and Professor of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics Scientific Theory and Practice; History and Philosophy of Science; Science and Society Uma Suthersanen LLB(S’pore) LLM PhD(Lond) Professor of Intellectual Property Law, School of Law (Centre for Commercial Law Studies) Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Philosophy of Law Professor Reza Tavakol BSc PhD(Lond) FRAS Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy, Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences Scientific Theory and Practice; Cosmology; History and Philosophy of Science Martin Welton BA MPhil(Birmingham) PhD(Surrey) Lecturer, School of English and Drama Aesthetics and Literary Theory; Theory of Dramatics; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology;

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Phenomenology and Existentialism; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis Graham White BA(Oxon) SM(MIT) DPhil(Oxon) Lecturer, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Epistemology, Logic and Language; History of Logic; Philosophy of Language; Symbolic Logic; Medieval and Renaissance Thought; Medieval Philosophy; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism Professor Margaret Whitford BA(Sus) PhD(Cantab) FRSA School of Languages Linguistics and Film Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Feminism; Post-Enlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; Phenomenology and Existentialism; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism; Psychology and Philosophy of Mind; Psychology and Psychoanalysis Caroline Williams BA(Manc) PhD(Wales) Lecturer, School of Politics Enlightenment and Early Modernism; Early Modern Intellectual History; Moral, Political, Legal and Social Philosophy; Marxism and Post-Marxism; Modernist and Postmodernist Political Philosophy; PostEnlightenment Metaphysics and Ontology; PostStructuralism and Deconstructionism

Staff profile: Quentin Skinner Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities “The seminar I currently teach for the MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History (I offer a close reading of Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan) is wholly based on my recent research, drawing on my most recent book, Hobbes and Republican Liberty (CUP, 2008).

“I am currently exploring questions about historical explanation and interpretation. I am also researching early-modern European intellectual history, with a special focus on the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.

“Queen Mary is a good place to undertake postgraduate study for a number of reasons. For one thing, the College attracts a very high standard of students, who together create a challenging and outstanding peer-group. The seminars are small, so that everyone receives a great deal of attention from staff. Lastly, students are eligible to use the British Library, which is the largest repository of relevant research materials to be found anywhere in Europe.”


Politics and International Relations

MA Global and Comparative Politics p180 MRes Global and Comparative Politics p181 MA Globalisation and Development p186 MRes Globalisation and Development p187 MA International Relations p182 MRes International Relations p183 MSc Public Policy p184 MRes Public Policy p185 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p188


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School of Politics and International Relations www.politics.qmul.ac.uk The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary is committed to excellence in teaching and research in both Political Studies and International Relations. We have scored highly in both teaching and research assessments, and are proud of our commitment to our postgraduates. We have particular strengths in the following areas: • International Politics • Political Theory • Government • Public Policy • European Politics • Western Balkans and former Yugoslavia • Comparative politics of developing countries (particularly in Latin America, the Middle East and South East Asia) and political conflict • Nationalism and Ethnicity • Parties, Elections and Communication

Research strengths The School is located in the Arts Faculty and maintains close relations with other arts-based disciplines, such as History and English, as well as with the Social Sciences. This is reflected in a broadbased approach to the study of politics, which combines theoretical and empirical considerations of the subject. It is also evident in a broad understanding of what politics entails, ranging from questions of the state, government and constitutional matters, to those concerning power relations in everyday life and international relations. Our location in London and proximity to the City afford many opportunities for active involvement in academic and practical aspects of politics, while the resources available in the University of London offer an excellent background for research and specialist study. The School has a strong commitment to research and we aim to integrate our research interests with our teaching, so that students become familiar with developments at the frontiers of knowledge and share in the excitement of scholarship at the cutting edge. Our graduates leave well-prepared for employment with oral and literary skills in self-presentation; familiarity with information technology, intellectual flexibility and a well-informed outlook on society. We are a broad-based group of scholars, who are all active in research and scholarly publication. Our principal research groups include political theory, ideas and thought, public policy, international relations, nationalism and ethnicity, conflict management and regime transition, globalisation, international security, international political economy, British politics, European politics, the politics of the Middle East, political communication and media policy, environmental politics, nationalism and nation-building.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The School is committed to research excellence as the underpinning of all our academic activities and aims to continue to enhance its position, both nationally and internationally. We aim to create and sustain a supportive and stimulating research environment while at the same time striving for continued – and enhanced – research excellence. The School’s submission in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise was very successful, placing us in the top 20 Politics departments in the UK. Projects, funding, research grants and awards • AHRC funded project on EU compliance in BosniaHerzegovina and Serbia with a grant of £203,000 (Reader Adam Fagan) • British Academy grant of £3,750 to fund research workshops (Dr Bryan Mabee) • Eleventh annual prize worth $10,000 for The Study of Spontaneous Orders issued by the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, Arlington, Virginia, USA (Reader Mark Pennington) • Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Académiques for “services rendered to French culture” (Professor Jeremy Jennings) • AHRC Sabbatical Leave Scheme worth £36,500 (Professor Jeremy Jennings) • Award of £18,000 for Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO) (Professor Wayne Parsons) • Journal of Contemporary Asia Prize 2009 awarded for the paper, ‘Poverty’s Fall’/ China's Rise: Global Convergence or New Forms of Uneven Development?’, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Professor Ray Kiely) • Diploma and 6000 Euros awarded by the Irla Foundation’s 2009 EINES Essay Prize for a book length manuscript on Catalan Studies (Professor Montserrat Guibernau) • £7000 awarded by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets to fund comparative research in the field of urban and rural migration in Tower Hamlets and Shropshire (Dr Anne Kershen and Dr Monika Nangia)


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School of Politics and International Relations www.politics.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources The Lock-keeper’s Cottage A former lock-keeper’s cottage by the Regent’s Canal is now an award-winning Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Centre. Open to all postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences, it features a seminar room, two workrooms with computing facilities and a common room. This complements the facilities currently available in the Arts Research Centre. Learning Resource Centre The Learning Resource Centre has 200 networked PCs and is open to students round the clock. Here our postgraduate students can make use of computing facilities at workstations allocated exclusively for their use. Postgraduate students also have access to the comprehensive libraries of the University of London as well as the library on the Queen Mary campus. In addition, the British Library in central London can be accessed as a research resource. Centre for the Study of Political Thought This Centre brings together academics from across the humanities who have a research interest in the history of political thought. In addition to the School of Politics, these colleagues are drawn from the Schools of History, English, French and Law. The fields of research covered range from the Renaissance to the present day, with a heavy emphasis on British, French, Italian, German and American political thought. The Centre organises visiting lectures and one day conferences, and actively encourages the participation of graduate students (who are represented on its standing committee). Members of the Centre presently organise the History of Political Thought Research Seminar at the University of London’s Institute for Historical Research. Centre for Global Security and Development (subject to approval) The Centre provides critical and politically engaged and policy relevant work, focused in particular on the discursive and political-economic aspects of: • Financial securitisation and possibilities for development • The security state • The privatisation of security services • Governance and legal aspects of security • Food and health security • Livelihood security and how it relates to challenges to human security, economic and social development • Biosecurity • The political-economy of security and development • Social movements and security • US hegemony and how this relates to security and development • Security and post-colonial states • Globalisation, security and development • International capital and/or labour flows • War and

conflict • The market as a source of insecurity. The Centre enables collaborative research to be undertaken and academic networks to be established. We are also planning new postgraduate taught programmes, specifically a new MA relating to global security and development. Centre for the Study of Migration This Centre acts as a focal point for the study of Migration within Queen Mary, University of London. It facilitates and develops interdisciplinary work within the College through teaching by experts from the Schools of Politics, Geography, Law, Linguistics and Medicine. In addition it runs conferences, research seminars and workshops which explore contemporary and historical cutting edge issues in the movement of people. Members of the Centre also liaise with local and national government and NGOs as consultants and, in addition, carry out specialised research projects. The Centre offers facilities for researchers from other parts of the UK and overseas working in the field of migration. The series, Studies in Migration and Diaspora, published by Ashgate, is hosted by the Centre and has a library of more than 16 publications, with another three due out in 2010. In addition, the Centre is currently producing the first in the Journal series that it is hosting under the title, Crossings: the Journal of Migration and Culture.

Scholarships / studentships Queen Mary Research Studentships The School offers Research Studentships to wellqualified MPhil or PhD applicants. If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, we recommend that you apply for a Research programme before January for entry to the next academic year starting at the end of September. The deadline (normally FebruaryMarch) will be announced in January each year and details are advertised on www.jobs.ac.uk and www.politics.qmul.ac.uk. In 2010 we offered two studentships in Politics, one in International Relations and a joint studentship with the School of Business and Management. All applications for full-time study, received by the deadline, will automatically be considered for a bursary or studentship, although late applications may still be considered for admission. There is no separate application form.


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Career opportunities

Further information Postgraduate Administrator School of Politics Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk General Postgraduate Information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teame@qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Hazel Cheeseman Studied: MSc Public Policy – 2006 Currently: Senior Policy and Campaigns Officer, Action on Smoking & Health – currently supporting the campaign to introduce new tobacco control measures in The Health Bill. Why did you choose Queen Mary? I wanted a broad Public Policy qualification which was based in London, was affordable and had a strong reputation. The course at Queen Mary also appealed because it actively recruited people who were already working in the field and I was keen to learn from other people’s practical experience. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? I found the course stretching and fascinating expanding not only my knowledge but the skills I had to interrogate ideas and the framework within which I understood public policy and Government. Without a doubt I got my first job after the course on the basis of my dissertation. What I learnt through the course has consistently been useful in the work I have done both in policy development and in advocacy and campaigning.

The Masters programmes are an excellent preparation for anyone wishing to undertake further research as a gateway to an academic career. It is also a very suitable qualification for any career in which research skills are required. Former students of our programmes have gone on to positions of responsibility in government and the voluntary sector. The MRes (Masters of Research) programmes are primarily designed as a precursor to PhD. They are mainly aimed at students who are interested in PhD level work, but require some training and some experience of a research degree before embarking on this. The MRes provides a solid training in research techniques, in developing and answering research questions, and in carrying out a substantial independent research project and serves as excellent training for any career which involves research skills. Some examples of graduate destinations: UK Border Agency, Brent Council, Refugee Council, Children Across Borders, UNESCO, UNO, Thailand Embassy in UK, University of Westminster, Swiss Government Department dealing with Immigration.


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Degree programmes

MA Global and Comparative Politics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA in Global and Comparative Politics will provide you with an intellectually stimulating analysis of the key issues in international and global politics, such as the changing dynamics of state power, the dimensions of regime change, and the challenge posed to states by ethno-nationalism and cosmopolitanism. The programme will provide you with advanced skills in comparative analysis, as well as a developed understanding of methodological approaches to the study of Political Science. Programme outline You will take the core module Global and Comparative Politics and three further modules from the options listed below. Core modules: Global and Comparative Politics (30 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: Issues in Democratisation • Nationalism, Democracy and Cosmopolitanism • Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • Globalisation and International Relations • The International Relations of the Middle East • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512-Now • Themes and Cases in US Foreign Relations • The Americas in Comparative Perspective I: Historical Roots • The Americas in Comparative Perspective II: Modern Politics and Society • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year.

Assessment The core module is assessed by written coursework and unseen examination. Some module options are assessed by written coursework only, while others have an exam. On satisfactory completion of your assessed work you will prepare an independent dissertation of between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. Each individual student will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Entry requirements A minimum of an upper second class honours degree in Politics or a related discipline. International students, please the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Bloomberg News, General Assignment Reporter in Jakarta, Indonesia; Italian Chamber of Commerce for the UK. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Reader Adam Fagan Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8602 email: a.fagan@qmul.ac.uk


Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

MRes Global and Comparative Politics One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MRes in Global and Comparative Politics will provide you with comprehensive training in the core research methods of social science. It provides an intellectually stimulating analysis of the key issues in international and global politics, such as the changing dynamics of state power, the dimensions of regime change, and the challenge posed to states by ethno-nationalism, migration and cosmopolitanism. The programme will provide students with advanced skills in comparative analysis, as well as a developed understanding of methodological approaches to the study of Political Science. Programme outline You will take the two core modules: Global and Comparative Politics and Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods and one further module from the options listed below. Core modules: Global and Comparative Politics (30 credits) • Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods (60 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: Issues in Democratisation • Nationalism, Democracy and Cosmopolitanism • Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • The International Relations of the Middle East • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512-Now • Themes and Cases in US Foreign Relations • The Americas in Comparative Perspective I: Historical Roots • The Americas in Comparative Perspective II: Modern Politics and Society • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year. Assessment Core modules are assessed by written coursework and unseen examination. Some module options are assessed by written coursework only, while others have an exam. On satisfactory completion of your assessed work you will prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to15,000 words on a topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme.

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Entry requirements A minimum of an upper second class honours degree in Politics or a related discipline. International students, please the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations In the Government and Social team at a market research company; British Civil Service. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Reader Adam Fagan Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8602 email: a.fagan@qmul.ac.uk


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Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes (cont)

MA International Relations One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MA in International Relations is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues and concepts in international relations. You will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations. You will also undertake a critical survey of the main theories associated with the study of international politics. It is primarily concerned with the varying theoretical explanations for why things happen in world politics. As well as addressing analytical questions the programme will also address the normative and political dimensions of theory. There is an extensive list of module options designed to allow students to develop their expertise and apply theories and concepts within particular issue areas. The programme provides students with a set of analytical skills and knowledge that will allow them to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as provide a firm foundation for further study. Programme outline The programme is built around a core module – Theories of International Relations – which provides a point of entry to the module options listed below. In addition to the core modules, students choose three other modules. You will also independently research and write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. Each individual student is assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Core modules: Theories of International Relations (30 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • International Public Management • Globalisation and International Relations • Issues in Democratisation • The International Relations of the Middle East • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512-Now • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Themes and Cases in US Foreign Relations • The Americas in Comparative Perspective I: Historical Roots • The Americas in Comparative Perspective II: Modern Politics and Society • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year.

Assessment The core module is assessed by unseen written test and coursework. Some module options are assessed by written coursework only, while others have an exam. You will also independently research and write a dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Entry requirements A minimum of an upper second class honours degree in Politics or a related discipline. International students, please the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the British Civil Service. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Dr Bryan Mabee Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8431 email: b.mabee@qmul.ac.uk


Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

MRes International Relations One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MRes in International Relations is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues and concepts in international relations. You will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations. You will also undertake a critical survey of the main theories associated with the study of international politics. It is primarily concerned with the varying theoretical explanations for why things happen in world politics. In addition, the programme will provide students with advanced skills in qualitative and quantitative research methods to support research leading to the degrees of MPhil/PhD. Programme outline The programme is built around the core modules – Theories of International Relations, and Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. The research methods module is designed to provide research students with essential politics research training skills to support research leading to the degrees of MPhil/PhD. In the first semester you will take Theories of International Relations and Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. In the second semester you will continue with the research methods module and take one further module from the options listed below. Core modules: Theories of International Relations (30 credits) • Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods (60 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • International Public Management • Issues in Democratisation • The International Relations of the Middle East • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512-Now • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Themes and Cases in US Foreign Relations • The Americas in Comparative Perspective I: Historical Roots • The Americas in Comparative Perspective II: Modern Politics and Society • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year.

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Assessment Core modules are assessed by unseen written test and written coursework. You will also independently research and write a dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Entry requirements A minimum of an upper second class honours degree in Politics or a related discipline. International students, please the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact: Dr Bryan Mabee Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8431 email: b.mabee@qmul.ac.uk


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Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes (cont)

MSc Public Policy One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of policy formation and implementation to Masters degree level. The programme is focused around current debates on policy-making, and public management in both developed and developing countries. • What is the appropriate relationship between the public and private sectors? • What is the significance of ‘partnership’ and the ‘new public management’ in the design and delivery of services? • How are policy decisions made and implemented? • How can public policy deal with issues of cultural diversity and value conflict? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore in both theoretical and practical terms. If you wish to work at the interface of service delivery and/or help shape the future policy agenda, either in a developed or developing country context, then this programme is designed with your interests in mind. This programme is for recent graduates looking for transferable skills relevant to the public, voluntary or private consultancy sectors as well as practitioners looking for enhanced skills and knowledge in public management Programme outline The programme draws on the wide expertise of staff members from across the School. You will take the core module in Theories of the Policy-Making Process. You will also take three further modules from the options listed below. You will also prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a public policy topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme.

Core modules: Theories of Policy-Making Process (30 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: International Public Management • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Implementation and Evaluation • Case Studies in British Policy Making • Issues in Democratisation • Globalisation and International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year. Assessment Core and optional modules are assessed by a combination of unseen written examination and coursework. You will also prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. Entry requirements Applicants will normally be expected to have a good honours degree, preferably in a relevant field of study. But we do consider applications from non-graduates with experience and ability if they are nominated by their employers. We are happy to advise informally on whether you are likely to be eligible for admission. If you are employed in the UK, expect to complete your programme over two years, attending one day a week in term time. You should ensure that you allocate sufficient time to cope with the out of class requirements. Overseas officials and students without employment responsibilities complete their programme in one year, attending for two days in term time. Recent graduate destinations Save Danube and Delta Association, a environmental NGO; Learning Facilitator at Christ the King Sixth Form College; Brazilian National Congress as a civil servant; Amnesty International; Senior Policy and Campaigns Officer at Action on Smoking & Health; Diplomat in Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Kazakhstan. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Reader Mark Pennington Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8594 email: m.pennington@qmul.ac.uk


Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

MRes Public Policy One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MRes degree is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of policy processes and to offer a grounding in research methods up to PhD level. The programme is focused around current debates on policy-making and public management in both developed and developing countries. • How are policy decisions made and implemented? • What are the implications of adopting an ‘evidencebased’ approach to policy evaluation? • How reliable is the data that comprises most public policy research • What research methods are appropriate for policy analysis in an environment of cultural diversity and value conflict? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore in both theoretical and practical terms. If you wish to develop skills in policy analysis and to further a research career in academia, in the civil service or the private and voluntary sectors then this programme is designed with your interests in mind. This programme is for recent graduates looking for transferable skills relevant to the public, voluntary or private consultancy sectors as well as practitioners looking for enhanced skills and knowledge in public management. Programme outline The programme draws on the wide expertise of staff members from across the school. You will take the core modules – Theories of Policy-Making Process, and Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods. You will also take one further module from the options listed below. You will prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a public policy topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Core modules: Theories of the Policy-Making Process (30 credits) • Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods (60 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Module options include: International Public Management • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Implementation and Evaluation • Case Studies in British Policy Making • Issues in Democratisation • Globalisation and International Political Economy of Development • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year.

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Assessment Core modules are assessed by a combination of unseen written examination and coursework. Optional modules are assessed by either written coursework only or by examination. You will also prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. Entry requirements Applicants will normally be expected to have a good honours degree, preferably in a relevant field of study. But we do consider applications from non-graduates with experience and ability if they are nominated by their employers. We are happy to advise informally on whether you are likely to be eligible for admission. If you are employed in the UK, expect to complete your programme over two years, attending one day a week in term time. You should ensure that you allocate sufficient time to cope with the out of class requirements. Overseas officials and students without employment responsibilities complete their programme in one year, attending for two days in term time. Further information Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8587 email: politics-pg@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Reader Mark Pennington Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8594 email: m.pennington@qmul.ac.uk Hani Garabyare, MSc in Public Policy “As an American student I wanted to expand my horizons and study in London. Queen Mary was an interesting choice. It was diverse in culture, the location was appealing and it had knowledgeable lecturers in my particular area of concentration. In addition to that it had an outstanding reputation for academic excellence. What I like about the programme is that it covers various issues regarding policy, not only in Western societies but also regarding the developing world. The optional modules offered are extremely valuable, allowing students to expand their interests in other fields while still being enthralled in their own subject. “So far, it has exceeded my expectations. My lecturers are engaged and knowledgeable, which motivates students to learn more and work harder. Overall, the facilities are well maintained, particularly the Lockkeeper’s Cottage Graduate Centre – it’s a quiet and relaxing environment which helps to get a lot of work done.”


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Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes (cont)

MA Globalisation and Development One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description Taught jointly by staff from the Schools of Geography and Politics and International Relations and Centre for Global Security, this programme examines the relationship between globalisation and processes of social and economic development at a variety of scales, considering issues of inequality, power and resistance in the Global North as well as South, and paying particular attention to the connections between North and South and the politics of an increasingly transnational world. You will benefit from a unique inter-disciplinary setting, working alongside internationally renowned scholars in geography, politics and international relations. A range of pedagogical methods (research seminars, presentations and workshops) offer an opportunity to engage with the latest theoretical and working practices in this field, providing a basis for those who may wish either to pursue work in this area or further research.

Programme outline Core modules: Globalisation and Development • Globalisation and the International Political Economy • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIIwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk


Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

MRes Globalisation and Development One year full-time, two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description This programme provides an advanced training in wider social science research approaches and methodologies, combined with specialist study of the processes and politics of globalisation and development, for those wishing to proceed to a PhD in geography, politics, or international relations. Taught jointly by staff from the Schools of Geography and Politics and International Relations and Centre for Global Security, the programme examines the relationship between globalisation and processes of social and economic development at a variety of scales, considering issues of inequality, power and resistance in the Global North as well as South, and paying particular attention to the connections between North and South and the politics of an increasingly transnational world. The programme combines this study with additional multi and inter-disciplinary research training offered through the ESRC recognised Queen Mary / Goldsmith’s Doctoral Training Centre, and the opportunity to focus upon an extended piece of independent research in preparation for a PhD. The MRes Globalisation and Development is recognised by the ESRC on both a +1 and 1+3 basis. Students will be eligible to apply for ESRC funding for both the MRes and subsequent PhD. Programme outline Core modules: Introduction to Social Research • Geographical Research and Practice • Dissertation (Mode A or B) Module options include: Culture Space and Power • Cities Empire and Modernity • Understanding Globalisation and Development • Globalisation and the International Political Economy Students studying on a Mode A basis complete the core modules, one module option, and a 15,000 word dissertation. Students studying on a Mode B basis complete the core modules and a 22,500 word dissertation.

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Assessment All modules are assessed through coursework, including essay writing, report writing, and presentations. Entry requirements An upper second class honours degree or higher in a humanities or social science subject from a UK University (or an equivalent international qualification) together with two supportive references. Candidates are expected to have good English language ability and to meet the standard of the IELTS – or equivalent – at a level of 6.5. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Jennifer Murray Postgraduate administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8165 email: j.c.murray@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Cathy McIIwaine Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5400 email: c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk


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Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Research

Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. A limited number of College studentships are also available. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22. Entry requirements Prospective research students are welcome to approach the School during the academic year and are advised to consult a potential supervisor before submitting a research proposal. For entry at MPhil or PhD level, we would normally expect you to have an MA or equivalent in a subject area connected to the field of study of your research proposal. You should include a research proposal (2,000 words), including hypothesis, methodology, key questions to be addressed by your intended research and bibliography. International students, please the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas • • • • • • • • • •

Conflict Management and Regime Transition Environmental Policy and Urban Planning International Relations Nationalism Political Communication and Media Policy Political Theory and Thought Politics of Democratisation Politics of the Middle East Public Policy and Political Economy UK Politics.

Conflict Management and Regime Transition The last thirty years has seen the transformation of the state across the world. The ‘third wave’ of transitions to democracy that began in the 1970s was followed by the neo-liberal policy prescriptions of the ‘Washington Consensus’ in the 1980s and the promotion of ‘Good Governance’ in the 1990s. This combined with the end of the Cold War, heralding a rise in the deployment of coercive diplomacy and intervention by the international community in the name of international liberalism and global governance. Several members of the School study the transformation of state-society relations and the changing nature of sovereignty in the international arena. Research ranges over critical examination of transitions to democracy, the domestic and inter-governmental mediation of conflict and nation and state-building in a range of developed and developing countries.

Environmental Policy and Urban Planning The School has a specialist interest in environmental policy and urban planning. Research interests also extend to the field of green political theory, the philosophical underpinnings of market-based approaches to environmental policy compared to those based on citizenship and deliberative democracy and the development of environmental movements in post-communist Europe. International Relations Research expertise within International Relations covers a number of areas. Several members of staff have an interest in historical sociological approaches to the study of international relations (including a concern with the changing nature of state power with a particular focus on the relationship between war and society, globalisation and resistance across the developed and developing worlds), as well as international political theory, and the history and theory of warfare. The international relations of the United States is another area of common concern with a particular interest in debates around contemporary American global power and imperialism and globalisation, including the question of how these issues relate to the international political economy of development. Nationalism Several members of staff specialise in the study of nations and nationalism, national identity, national and ethnic diversity and ethnic conflict regulation. Areas of study include Western European politics – with a specific emphasis on Catalonia, Northern Ireland and Spain – as well as Cyprus and Sri Lanka.


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Political Communication and Media Policy This research field covers all political aspects of the functioning of the media and the political communications process in Britain and Western Europe. More specifically, it includes questions related to issues such as media ownership and control, media regulation, media policy-making, news management by political actors and the media and elections. Recent research students in this area have examined the policy-making cycle in broadcasting during the Thatcher premiership and the Labour government’s policy on digital television.

globalisation and democratisation. Additionally, applications may be made on any aspect of the politics of Latin America, Eastern and Western Europe and the Middle East.

Political Theory, Ideas and Thought Research expertise in this area ranges over the history of political ideas and ideologies, critical theory, contemporary continental philosophy and political thought, democratic theory, classical liberal theory and gender theory. Members of the School are currently working on projects including an examination of the political philosophy of Spinoza, a broad-ranging study of the history of French political thought and an assessment of the thought and practice of the British New Left. Applications in any subfield of political theory and thought are welcome.

Public Policy and Political Economy Public policy is a broad field, and applications will be considered in respect of any aspect of the policy process in modern societies, at national or subnational levels. Research in public policy seeks to understand what government does. It may proceed by way of theoretical and conceptual analysis, or by historical and empirical analysis. It is, then, a broad and eclectic field and this characteristic is reflected in the diverse research interests of staff. Their research ranges over the sub-fields of public management, environmental policy and urban planning with a particular emphasis on the public sector, political economy and policy.

Politics of Democratisation The School has a strong research presence in the politics of democratic transition across a number of distinct regions, including Latin America, southern and east central Europe, and the Middle East. Applications are welcome in any of the following broad areas: transition processes from a comparative or single country study perspective; institutionbuilding, democratisation from above (including rule of law and judicial reform) and from below (including the role of the civil society, sectional and ethnic interests); theories of democratic transition,

Politics of the Middle East Applications are welcome with regard to any aspect of the politics of the Middle East. The School has a strong research presence in the comparative politics of Iraq, globalisation and the Middle East, democratisation in the region and the international relations of the Middle East.

UK Politics The School has a strong commitment to research in UK politics, incorporating a wide range of methods and approaches. Several members of staff are working on issues related to UK politics such as political parties and elections, local government, public service delivery, political marketing and communications, relationship marketing and policy transfer into the study of political communications.


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Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Staff research interests www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff

Judith Bara BSc Econ(London) MA(Essex) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Political Parties Changing orientations of political parties, with particular reference to ideology and policy Madeleine Davis BA MA PhD(London) Lecturer in Political Theory History of political ideas, Marxism, Hispanic and Latin American politics, Pinochet case and its implications for human rights Toby Dodge BA MSc PhD(London) Reader in International Politics Middle East, political sociology of Iraq, Iraq in post cold war international relations, regime change in Iraq for regional and international politics Professor James Dunkerley BA(York) MPhil DPhil(Oxford) Professor of Politics Latin American politics and modern history Adam Fagan BSc(Bradford) MA PhD(Manchester) Reader in Politics of Eastern Europe Europeanization of the post-conflict former Yugoslav states of the Western Balkans Professor Montserrat Guibernau BA(Barcelona) MPhil PhD(Cambridge) Professor of Politics Nations and nationalism, national and ethnic diversity, European politics and Spanish and Catalan politics Professor Jeremy Jennings MA(Wales) DPhil(Oxford) FRHistS Professor of Political Theory History of political thought, with special reference to France, Republicanism in Theory and Practice, French Nineteenth-Century political thought Lee Jones BA(Warwick) MPhil DPhil(Oxford) Lecturer in Politics Questions of state-society relations, governance, political economy, and sovereignty and intervention, particularly in postcolonial countries, particularly in the politics of the Asia-Pacific, with a particular focus on Southeast Asia Professor Ray Kiely BA(Leeds) MA(Leeds) PhD(Warwick) Professor of International Politics, Head of School International political economy of development, US hegemony, globalisation and theories of imperialism, cosmopolitanism and global justice Professor Raymond Kuhn BA(Glasgow) MA PhD(Warwick) Professor of Politics Contemporary French politics and the politics of the mass media in Western Europe

Bryan Mabee BA MA(Manitoba) PhD(Aberystwyth) Senior Lecturer in International Relations International relations and security studies, war and social theory, international historical sociology, security privatisation, US foreign policy Rainbow Murray BA(Manchester) MRes PhD(London) Lecturer in Politics French political parties, elections, election candidates and candidate selection, with a particular emphasis on gender and comparative politics and women in politics Catherine Needham BA(Leeds) MSc DPhil(Oxford) Lecturer in British Politics British politics, public service reform, consultation, political marketing and electronic government, consumerisation of the government-citizen relationship in Britain in the last 25 years Brendan O’Duffy BA(Boston) MA(McGill) PhD(London) Senior Lecturer in Politics Nationalism and ethnic conflict regulation, political violence in Northern Ireland, comparative ‘peace processes’ in Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and Sri Lanka; federalism in multi-ethnic states Patricia Owens BSc MPhil DPhil Senior Lecturer in International Relations Political and international theory, history and theory of warfare, war, politics and security


Politics and International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

Professor Wayne Parsons BSc(Econ) (Wales) MSc(Econ) PhD(London) FRSA AcSS Professor of Public Policy Politics of economic ideas and the study of public policy and management Mark Pennington BA PhD(London) Reader in Political Economy Political economy, environmental policy, role of market processes in improving environmental quality, public choice theory and the ‘Austrian’ school of economics Richard Saull BA(Portsmouth) MSc PhD(LSE) Senior Lecturer in International Politics International historical sociology, Marxist approaches in international relations, international politics of the Cold War, revolutionary change and international relations Lasse Thomassen BA MA PhD(Essex) Lecturer in Political Theory Deconstructive reading of the political philosophy of Jürgen Habermas, radical democratic theory, tolerance Caroline Williams BA(Manchester) PhD(Wales) Lecturer in Political Theory Modern European and contemporary continental theory, conceptions of selfhood and subjectivity, with a particular focus upon contemporary French philosophy - Althusser, Castoriadis, Lacan, Derrida and Foucault

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Staff Profile: Toby Dodge Reader in International Politics “At its broadest, my research sits at the juncture of International Relations and Comparative Politics, looking at the evolution of the post-colonial state in the international system after both decolonisation and the cold war. “More specifically, I have spent the last seventeen years studying Iraq, both its domestic politics and relations with the international community. This has involved looking at what thirteen years of sanctions did to the politics and society of the country as well as examining the violent and unstable aftermath of the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. “This work has involved numerous research trips to Iraq, both before the invasion under Baathist rule and then three trips to Iraq in the midst of a civil war, resulting in two single authored books: Inventing Iraq: the failure of nation building and a history denied and Iraq’s future; the aftermath of regime change. “I have also edited a collection of essays on the ramifications of the invasion, Iraq at the crossroads: state and society in the shadow of regime change and published numerous articles in academic journals and newspapers. “Practically-speaking, my work helps academics, students, policy makers and the wider general public to better understand the complexities of a country beyond the headlines and shocking news stories. With this in mind I continually strive to make everything I do both accessible and interesting to as many audiences as possible. This means I not only write books and papers for academic journals but articles for newspapers and take part in government briefings, and television and radio debates. “My teaching and wider academic interaction with students springs directly from my research. My lectures and seminar discussions are illustrated from my recent experiences in Baghdad and those who take my classes share in my on-going attempts to understand and explain Iraqi and Middle Eastern politics.”


Medicine and Dentistry


Medicine and Dentistry Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Pg Dip in Aesthetic Surgery p199 Pg Dip in Burn Care p199 Pg Dip in Clinical Dermatology p200 MSc/Pg Dip in Clinical Microbiology p201 MSc in Diabetes p202 MSc/Pg Dip in Gastroenterology p203 Pg Cert in Non-Invasive Aesthetic Techniques p204 MSc/Pg Dip/Pg Cert in Translational Neuroscience p205 Institute of Cancer MSc in Cancer Therapeutics p217 MSc in Molecular Pathology and Genomics p218 MSc/Pg Dip in Operative Gynaecology and Minimally Invasive Skills p219 MSc/Pg Dip in Operative Orthopaedics and Arthroscopy Skills p220 MSc in Surgical Skills and Sciences p221 Institute of Dentistry Pg Dip in Dental Clinical Sciences p231 MSc in Dental Public Health p232 Graduate Certificate in Dental Technology p234 MSc/Pg Dip in Dental Technology p233 Pg Dip in Endodontic Practice p237 MSc in Experimental Oral Pathology (Oral Sciences) p235 MSc in Implant Dentistry p236 MSc in Oral Biology p236 MClinDent in Oral Medicine p238 MClinDent in Oral Surgery p238 MClinDent in Orthodontics p239 MClinDent in Paediatric Dentistry p240 MClinDent in Periodontology p241 MClinDent in Prosthodontics p241 Institute of Health Sciences Education MRes in Medical Research p250 MSc/Pg Dip in Primary Care p251 MSc/Pg Dip in Public Health p252 MSc/Pg Dip in Sport and Exercise Medicine p253 William Harvey Research Institute MSc/ Pg Dip/Pg Cert in Analytical Toxicology p259 MSc/Pg Dip in Clinical Drug Development p260 MSc/Pg Dip in Endocrinology and Diabetes p261 MSc/Pg Dip in Healthcare Research Methods p260 MSc/Pg Dip/Pg Cert in Forensic Medical Sciences p262 MRes Inflammation: Cellular and Vascular Aspects p263 Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine MSc/Pg Dip/Pg Cert in Mental Health: Psychological Therapies p272 MSc/Pg Dip/Pg Cert in Mental Health: Transcultural Mental Healthcare p272 PG Cert Advanced Mental Health Assessment p272


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

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Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry www.smd.qmul.ac.uk Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry is a leading medical and dental school that offers international levels of excellence in research and teaching. This was confirmed by the outstanding results for Barts and The London in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. The RAE placed us in the top five research-active medical and dental schools in England, along with Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial College and University College London and top in London. According to rankings published in the Times Higher Education, Barts and The London scored consistently in the top five: • Dentistry was ranked 1st equal with Manchester based on 3* and 4* outputs, and 2nd overall out of 14 UK dental schools. • In Cancer, we were ranked 3rd out of 14 submissions in terms of 3* and 4* outputs and joint 5th in the UK overall, ahead of Oxford, Imperial, King’s College London and University College London

The School has almost 1,000 members of staff, consisting of over 650 academics and around 350 support staff. The School’s total annual turnover is approximately £86 million of which over £40 million is competitively awarded external research income additional to that received from HEFCE, placing Barts and The London in the top tier of research active medical and dental schools. Through partnership with our linked trusts, notably Barts and The London NHS Trust, and our associated University Hospital Trusts – Homerton, Newham, Whipps Cross and Queen’s (Romford) – the School’s research and teaching is informed by an exceptionally wide ranging and stimulating clinical environment. At the heart of the School’s mission lies world class research, the result of a focused programme of recruitment of leading research groups from the UK and abroad, and a £100 million investment in stateof-the-art facilities.

• Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, returned in Hospital Subjects, was ranked joint 1st with Cambridge and Edinburgh in terms of 3* and 4* outputs and was joint 7th overall out of 28, ahead of Manchester, Newcastle and Southampton

Research is focused on: cancer • cardiovascular • dentistry • inflammation • endocrinology/metabolism • immunology and infectious diseases • skin disease • genomics • neuroscience • gastroenterology • epidemiology • public health and primary care

• The Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, returned in Epidemiology and Public Health, was 2nd out of 21 in terms of 3* and 4* outputs, and 3rd overall, ahead of Oxford, University College London and Bristol

The School is nationally and internationally recognised for research in these areas. Its fundamental mission, with its partner NHS Trusts, and other linked organisations, such as CR-UK, is to ensure that the best possible clinical service is underpinned by the very latest developments in scientific and clinical teaching, training and research.

• In Health Services Research, we were ranked 4th overall out of 28, ahead of Oxford, University College London and King’s College London • The William Harvey Research Institute, returned in Preclinical and Human Biological Sciences, was ranked 3rd in terms of 3* and 4* outputs, and 4th overall out of 13, ahead of King’s College London, Bristol and Nottingham. Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry offers international levels of excellence in research and teaching. We serve a population of unrivalled diversity in east London and the wider Thames Gateway, with a high prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, tuberculosis and other chronic lung diseases, HIV, oral disease, and cancer.

The School is organised into six institutes, each containing a series of research centres. • • • • • •

Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Institute of Cancer Institute of Dentistry Institute of Health Sciences Education William Harvey Research Institute Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine

Find out more about each of these Institutes, and the postgraduate programmes associated with each on the following pages.


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Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science www.icms.qmul.ac.uk Research strengths The Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science is the largest Institute of the School of Medicine and Dentistry and is based in the award winning Blizard Building on the Whitechapel campus. The aims of the Institute are: • Creation of an environment for world class biomedical research • Development of innovative, interdisciplinary and cutting edge programmes of research • Provision of the intellectual environment and physical facilities for high quality training • Development of partnerships with neighbouring NHS Trusts and local communities in east London to build research collaborations which address the health needs of our local population. The Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science was established in 2003 and comprises approximately 400 staff and students based in research Centres, each with focused programmes of research which examine the cellular mechanisms of the maintenance of health, the response to injury and repair and the pathogenesis of disease. The Institute moved into the new Blizard Building in Whitechapel in 2005. This exciting environment contains world class facilities for biomedical research based on an innovative open plan design and includes core facilities for Imaging, Flow Cytometry, Global siRNA screening and Transgenic animal research. The BICMS is composed of six Centres and one Group: • Cutaneous Research • Diabetes • Digestive Diseases • Immunology and Infectious Disease • Neuroscience and Trauma • Paediatrics • Pathology Group The Centres are closely allied to the large clinical departments within Barts and The London NHS Trust and the priorities of the local Primary Care Trusts. The research of the BICMS has four major themes: • Cell Biology and Tissue Engineering • Infection and Immunology • Neurosciences • Genomic Medicine.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

We aim to build a pipeline of activity from basic science, clinical research and translational medicine to develop improved methods of diagnosis, management and therapy of disease with particular relevance to the clinical activity of Barts and The London NHS Trust and to the benefit of our local population in east London. The geographic location of the BICMS and its close liaison with primary care and NHS Trusts provides an excellent opportunity for the development of translational medical research. Clinical academics in BICMS are championing these links with the recently awarded NE London Diabetes Local Research Network (LRN), Medicines for Children LRN (joint with GOSH), a hub of the Thames Stroke LRN, a spoke of the North Thames Dementia and Neurodegenerative Diseases LRN, and the relocation of the HPA Mycobacterial Reference Unit from King’s College London.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise Staff of the Institute were returned under two Units of Assessment: UoA4 (Other Hospital based subjects) and UoA10 (Dentistry). Over 60 staff were returned in UoA4 and 80 per cent of our research activity in this return was judged to be 4*/3*. In terms of national rankings, this placed the Institute first equal (with Cambridge) out of a total of 28 submissions. In UoA10, 75 per cent of our research activity was rated 4*/3* which placed the School first equal (with Manchester) out of 14 returns from UK Dental Schools. Projects, funding, research grants and awards The annual research income of the Institute in 2008/9 was in excess of £13 million and major research funders include the Medical Research Council, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK and the Leukaemia Research Fund. We place great value on the appointment of clinical academics working closely with basic scientists and have greatly benefited from the establishment of the Walport clinical academic training programs, leading to the appointment of 10 academic fellows and three clinical lecturers. Over the last three years, the Institute has been awarded five prestigious HEFCE new-blood clinical senior lecturers. This has been complimented recently by the award of ten Career Scientists/Fellowships from the MRC, Wellcome Trust and other charities.

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Research findings from the Institute are frequently reported in the national media, including the discovery of the genetic causes of skin disease and diabetes.

Postgraduate resources All Centres belonging to the Institute are located in the Blizard Building, a £44 million purpose-built development in Whitechapel. This unique, award winning, research building provides state-of-the-art laboratory accommodation based on an innovative open plan design for 400 staff and postgraduate students. The laboratory facilities are co-located on a single laboratory floor of approximately 3,500m2, the design of which aims to encourage maximal interaction between different research groups and cost efficient usage of core equipment and facilities. The BICMS has also benefited from £4 million investment from Queen Mary for equipment which has enabled the establishment of core facilities in Genomics (jointly with the Genome Centre at Charterhouse Square), Flow Cytometry, Imaging, Transgenics and a global siRNA screening facility all of which are equipped to a high standard with the latest technology.

Scholarships / studentships Internal PhD studentships funded by the School are awarded on a competitive bidding basis. The annual MRC doctoral training award for PhD studentships is matched by an equivalent sum from the College and these are awarded internally to holders of MRC research grants and fellowships.


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Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Career opportunities Our taught Masters degrees and Diplomas are useful for the career development of general practitioners, hospital clinicians, nurses and life science graduates. Some successful students also complete a one-year clinical attachment with Barts and The Royal London NHS Trust, or go on to study for MD(Res) and PhD degrees. These doctors are then eligible for specialist training posts, consultant positions and senior clinical academic positions. Our PhD programmes are highly regarded due to our emphasis on excellent research standards and the teaching of transferable skills. Our students are therefore highly sought-after and employable. BICMS PhD postgraduates are found in research environments in the public and private sectors, as well as related career paths such as hi-technology product specialists, scientific publishing, international conferencing and exhibition companies. They are also commissioned to write scientific articles and act as advisors to the finance sector.


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Degree programmes Postgraduate Diploma in Aesthetic Surgery

Postgraduate Diploma in Burn Care

Two years part-time – distance learning

Two year part-time – distance learning

Programme description This programme is designed specifically to provide a core curriculum for established surgeons or surgical trainees, who wish to practice in the field of aesthetic surgery following completion of specialist training. The programme starts in October and runs for two academic years.

Programme description The programme is delivered online as eight, ten week modules over two years. This material is supplemented with DVD material and a limited number of clinical days.

Programme outline This programme is designed specifically to provide a core curriculum for established surgeons or surgical trainees, who wish to practice in the field of aesthetic surgery following completion of specialist training. The programme starts in October and runs for two academic years. The programme consists of a mixture of structured distance learning, DVD/theatre-based clinical teaching, and a dissertation. We cover the entire spectrum of aesthetic surgery with an emphasis on fundamental principles and instruction in a wide range of techniques. Clinical training days will be provided for up to four days, with video links to theatre and live discussions with the operating consultant.

Programme outline The programme is delivered online as eight, tenweek modules over two years. This material is supplemented with DVD material and limited clinical days (two per annum). The programme covers: • The structure and function of skin, pathophysiology of the burn wound, inhalation injury, the systemic response to burn injury, wound healing and scarring • Medicolegal and psychiatric aspects of burn practice • The principles of burn anaesthesia and burn critical care within a multidisciplinary team environment • The science and use of dressings and tissue engineered products • The prehospital, and acute care of burn patients

Assessment A weekly assignment, of which 80 per cent must be successfully completed. A dissertation must be submitted with an examination at the end of the programme. Entry requirements Qualification requirements for the course are MBBS; MRCS (Part 2) or equivalent. Assessments are made only of those areas relevant to each specialty based on their arena of practice, and these areas are listed on the successful student certificate under the universal title Postgraduate Diploma in Aesthetic Surgery. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. For further information, please see our website at: www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/courses Further information Sam Matthew Centre for Cutaneous Research Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7173 Fax: +44(0)20 7882 7172 email: s.matthew@qmul.ac.uk

• Burn reconstruction, scar management, and burn rehabilitation. Assessment Assessment is made by weekly essay or MCQ assignments, and a dissertation and exam within the final module. Entry requirements An MBBS or equivalent is required for entry to the diploma. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Sam Matthew Centre for Cutaneous Research Tel: +44(0)20 7882 7173 email: s.matthew@qmul.ac.uk


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Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Degree programmes (cont) Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Dermatology

Key features – International programme

Distance learning

• Regular small group tutorials, with live chat

Programme description There are two separate but linked programmes: one for UK-based General Practitioners and one for doctors outside the UK. Successful completion of either programme leads to award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Dermatology from the University of London.

• Live interactive lectures

The programme was extensively redesigned in 2009 and combines clinical expertise with innovative technology to facilitate first class training in dermatology. Programme outline This programme covers core aspects of dermatology over a one year period, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis and management of skin disease from a primary care perspective. The weekly teaching sessions are produced by experts in the field and comprise written and audiovisual material with a formative quiz. Key features – UK programme • Seven clinical days with clinical cases, throughout the course of one year • Small group consultant-led teaching • Weekly interactive web-based material • Weekly audiovisual material to demonstrate cases and good practice

• This programme can be studied anywhere. No travel to the UK is required

• A discussion forum allows for discussion of cases and topics at your convenience • Weekly audiovisual material to demonstrate cases and good practice Assessment Students are required to write a dissertation and to pass a written final examination. All students must complete at least 80 per cent of the weekly formative assessments during the year. Please see our webpage for more detailed programme information: www.londondermatology.org For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Sam Matthew Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7173 email: s.matthew@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Vicky Jolliffe Programme Director Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7169 email: v.jolliffe@qmul.ac.uk


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Microbiology One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme develops your skills and understanding in clinical microbiology, and provides a thorough knowledge of associated subjects (eg molecular biology). The formal teaching includes lectures, practicals and workshops. The lecturers are specialists in their fields and are invited from many institutions in the UK. The practicals are extensive and give you the maximum hands-on experience in all aspects of clinical microbiology. The practicals are taught in a large purpose-built teaching laboratory. Many students use the MSc as preparation for the FRCPath examinations and the MSc is accredited by the Association of Clinical Microbiologists as part of the training for clinical scientists. Programme outline Your studies are broad-based, with extensive coverage of the following topics: bacteriology • virology • mycology • parasitology • bacterial pathogenicity • immunology • molecular biology • microbial disease – diagnosis, treatment and prevention • antimicrobials and chemotherapy • epidemiology and public health • hospital infection. Assessment There are a series of in-course assessments throughout the programme. These assessments include practical and written examinations, posters, oral presentations, case reports, essays and comprehension of scientific papers. Each assessment is designed as a learning experience as well as a test of knowledge. There are four or five in-course assessments each year and they form approximately 25 per cent of the end of year marks. The final examinations at the end of year one include a practical exam and a written paper. The final examinations at the end of year two include two written papers, a research project or dissertation and a viva.

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Entry requirements If you are a medical practitioner, scientist or nurse currently working in the field of infectious disease the part-time programme is most likely to be the best way to study the MSc. Part-time applicants must hold an appointment or attachment in a microbiology department of a hospital, the HPA or other appropriate institution for the duration of the programme. If you are an overseas student or a recent graduate in biomedical science you are more likely to want to follow the full-time programme. Graduates in other related disciplines are considered for either programme provided they have suitable experience in clinical microbiology. Evidence of English proficiency is required of students for whom English is not their first language. A minimum overall score of 7.0 IELTS (or equivalent) is required. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Please contact Michele Branscombe Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7216 email: m.branscombe@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Armine Sefton (Programme Director) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8167 email: a.m.sefton@qmul.ac.uk


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Degree programmes (cont) MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Gastroenterology One year full-time (MSc) or eight months full-time (PgDip) Distance learning option available

Assessment 1 Diploma • Each module is examined separately by coursework and a written exam at the end of the module. 2 Project

Programme description Designed as both a thorough introduction and update in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition, this programme is aimed at clinicians wishing to gain strong knowledge of the sciences underpinning clinical diseases and their management. It offers a focus on the relevant basic sciences and research techniques. The Diploma (or ‘taught course’) runs from October until April. To gain the MSc you take research projects that run from April until August.

To be awarded the MSc requires passing both the Diploma and the project.

The Centre has two endoscopy training simulators, and training on these simulators is included for full time students. Full time students will also have opportunities to observe clinical meetings, audits, clinics or endoscopy sessions mainly in the latter half of the year.

Most students are interviewed by a senior member of the programme before being accepted to ensure they are suitable for the programme and the programme is suitable for them.

From 2010 the Diploma is available as a distance learning course. Teaching is recorded and uploaded and made available on the Internet. Regular live online tutorials and meetings will be run with senior members of the Faculty. For selected high-achieving students there are opportunities to stay in the Centre as clinical research fellows studying for higher degrees (MD(Res) or PhD). Programme outline Module 1: The Scientific Basis of GI Diseases Module 2: Liver and pancreatic diseases Module 3: Adult GI diseases: Luminal diseases Module 4: Neurogastroenterology: Advanced functional GI diseases Module 5: Paediatric and adolescent GI, liver and nutritional diseases, including GI infections Module 6: Introduction to endoscopy

• Written dissertation • Oral viva (September)

Entry requirements Minimum requirements for applications to the programme are MB BS or basic medical degree recognised by the University of London and an IELTS score of 6.5 (or equivalent).

International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Nici Kingston Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7191 email: n.j.kingston@qmul.ac.uk www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/courses


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Postgraduate Certificate in Non-invasive Aesthetic Techniques

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Two clinical training days will be provided to demonstrate the practical applications of the theory studied in the course material.

Eight months part-time

Assessment Each of the teaching packages includes bi-weekly multiple choice exams. A 3,000 word essay must be submitted at the end of each module.

Programme description This intensive programme is designed specifically to provide a core curriculum for established general practitioners, dentists and dermatologists who wish to practice in the field of aesthetic surgery.

Entry requirements Qualification requirements for the course are MB BS/ DDS or equivalent.

Programme outline The programme starts in January and October of each year and runs for eight months. The programme consists of a mixture of structured distance learning, online multimedia/ live clinical teaching, and four essays. We cover the entire spectrum of non invasive aesthetic surgery with an emphasis on fundamental principles and instruction in a wide range of techniques.

For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. For further information, please see our website at: www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/courses Further information Sam Matthew Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7173 email: s.matthew@qmul.ac.uk


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Degree programmes (cont) MSc/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate in Translational Neuroscience One year full-time Programme description The aim of the Translational Neuroscience programme, which is at present the first of its kind in the UK and Europe, is to provide a thorough training in the main concepts and methods of translational medicine, with a particular focus on unmet needs in diseases of the nervous system and the challenge of developing better therapies. At the end of their studies students will have a detailed knowledge of the drug discovery and development process, and of clinical trial design and methodology and the regulatory environment. The formal teaching takes place in the Neuroscience Centre at the Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and includes lectures, seminars, clinical workshops and a research project. The lecturers are specialists in their field and are preclinical scientists and clinicians. There are also invited speakers, who are leading researchers from other UK or international academic institutions and senior scientists from the pharmaceutical industry. Programme outline The programme provides coverage of the following topics: • Mechanisms of disease and drug targets in the nervous system • Unmet therapeutic needs in major disease areas in neurology • Biomarkers of disease and their role in drug development • Genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, systems biology and bioinformatics • Drug discovery • Drug development • Personalised medicine • Clinical trial design and regulatory requirements • Intellectual property The taught programme starts with a core module which covers fundamental concepts in drug discovery and development, and continues with five special modules which cover comprehensively specific disease areas. The taught programme is delivered on two half-days per week, throughout the

academic year. After the completion of the taught programme, students carry out a research project, which can be library-based, laboratory-based or clinically-based. Assessment The taught modules are assessed using a combination of final written examinations and a series of in-course assessments. The in-course assessments consist of literature reviews, oral presentations, case analyses and clinical trial protocols. They are designed as a learning experience as well as a test of knowledge. They represent 30 per cent of the module marks. The research project assessment is based on a written dissertation and an oral examination, which represent 85 per cent and 15 per cent of the mark, respectively.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Entry requirements If you are a recent graduate in medicine, pharmacy or biomedical science, you are more likely to want to follow the full-time MSc programme. If you are a medical graduate, dentistry graduate, pharmacist or nurse, or scientist in the public or private sector, and are currently employed, the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma may appeal more to you if you want a shorter programme of study, more compatible with full-time professional activity. Overseas students are encouraged to apply for the full-time MSc programme, the Postgraduate Certificate, or the Postgraduate Diploma. See the ‘International students’ section on page 390 for more information. Evidence of English proficiency is required of students for whom English is not their first language. A minimum overall score of 6.5 IELTS (or equivalent) is required. Further information Mr Surinder Pal Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8605 email: s.pal@qmul.ac.uk For informal academic enquiries, please contact Dr Adina Michael-Titus (Programme Director) Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2290 email: a.t.michael-titus@qmul.ac.uk

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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Research Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils (including CASE studentships in collaboration with an industrial sponsor). A limited number of College studentships are also available. Entry requirements Students with upper second class (or better) BSc(Hons) degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390.

Research areas Centre for Cutaneous Research The Centre for Cutaneous Research is one of the largest academic dermatology groups in Europe. Research within the Centre is currently organised into distinct programmes, which bring together a critical mass of clinical and non-clinical researchers under the current themes:

• Promotion of cell migration by hypoxia via metalloproteinase-9 and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase in keratinocyte migration on matrix • A signalling role for cadherins of the epidermal desomosome and the role of AKT signalling and its downstream pathway in skin barrier formation • The first description of a non gap-junction functional role for connexin 31. Centre for Diabetes The Centre has a major interest in genetic susceptibility to diabetes and related disorders. Barts and The London is at the forefront of the international gene discovery programs in these disorders (including genome-wide association scans, candidate genes, functional genomics and prevention strategies). In addition, the Centre has an ongoing programme of research into epigenetic influences on diabetes development. Clinical research is underpinned by: DOH funded NE London Diabetes Local Research Network; prevention initiatives in type 1 diabetes; LADA; type 2 diabetes (T2D) focusing on the local Bangladeshi population. Current research is focused in the following areas: • Genetics and diabetes • Insulin action and secretion in metabolic and cardiovascular disease

• Cancer Biology

• Inositide signalling

• Genetics

• Stem cells

• Stem cells

Major achievements within the Centre include: • Discovery of novel genes associated with T2D using a genome wide association scan and the first evidence of gene to gene interaction increasing susceptibility to disease.

• Epithelial differentiation and barrier formation • Burns and wound repair Major achievements within the Centre include: • Mechanistic evidence for the carcinogenicity of the immunosuppressive azathioprine in skin, revealing a therapy-related cancer risk • Evidence for human papillomavirus (HPV) modulation of AKT signalling, and a possible role for AKT2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) • The genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying basal cell carcinoma (BCC) • That Axl is a novel marker of squamous cell carcinoma • ABCA12 as the gene for the severe congenital skin disease Harlequin Ichthyosis resulting in the development of rapid pre-natal screening for affected families • RSPO4 as the gene for anonychia, therefore a key role for the Wnt pathway in nail development • Translational research into identification of novel new polymers to support tissue engineered skin and characterisation of survival characteristics of engineered skin on patients. Development of a Burns network

• A landmark study (CARDS) demonstrating the feasibility of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in T2D using a statin. • Establishing the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases in the control of the function in insulin-sensitive tissues and in pancreatic beta cells. • Identification of a novel signaling pathway important for insulin action in muscles and adipocytes • Identification of the critical role of the enzyme phospholipase C gamma1 in metastasis development.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Centre for Digestive Diseases The newly formed Centre for Digestive Diseases undertakes research and teaching into all aspects of the gastrointestinal tract, liver and nutrition. The Centre was established in 2009 and brings together the former Centres for Gastroenterology and Academic Surgery. In so doing the Centre is directly aligned to the Digestive Diseases Clinical Academic Unit (CAU) at Barts and The London NHS Trust. The Centre is one of the very few units that undertakes research in both paediatric and adult disease. It is organised as a research community with principal investigators grouped into major interdisciplinary research groups encompassing: epithelial cell biology; infection, immunity and inflammation; hepatology; neurogastroenterology; ano-rectal physiology; colorectal cancer and colorectal surgical development The Gastrointestinal Physiology Unit, an integral part of the Centre and national referral centre, develops new investigations of colorectal function. Reconstructive surgery is conducted in the Colorectal Development Unit, established in 1997 with NSCAG funding. There is a longstanding tradition of research in neurogastroenterology within the Centre, established by Professor David Wingate in the 1970s. This group is housed in a purpose built facility, the Wingate Institute and is closely linked with the neurogastroenterology interests of the Academic Centre of Surgery. Major achievements within the Centre include: • Establishing the field of nutrition and gene regulation in the intestine, particularly epigenetic regulation • Identification that the chromosomal region harbouring IL1 and IL21 underlies the susceptibility to coeliac disease using a genome wide association scan • Elucidating the mechanism by which Dengue and Hepatitis viruses inhibit interferon signalling • Discovering the central importance of interferongamma in the intestine resistance to infection with Cryptosporidium • Developing a new vaccine platform to immunise against viruses • Cerebral imaging of visceral pain; and elucidation of pain neuronal pathways from the upper GI tract in order to identify new therapeutic targets. The Centre also teaches gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition to undergraduates. Postgraduate teaching is undertaken in the MSc Programme in Gastroenterology.

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Centre for Immunology and Infectious Disease The Centre includes research groups investigating cutting-edge topics in microbiology, virology and immunology. Full details can be found on our website: www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/centres/ immunologyandinfectiousdisease/index.html Investigators in the centre receive blue-chip funding from MRC, Wellcome Trust, BBSRC and EUFP7, and publish in top journals. At mucosal surfaces such as the mouth and the gut there is intimate association between the immune system, food antigens, and the resident commensal bacteria. Several groups are investigating how this relationship is regulated in health, what goes wrong in inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s disease and periodontitis, and how the immune system distinguishes between pathogens and the normal microbiota. Studies include understanding mucosal T cell biology in health and disease, how dendritic cells modulate T-cell activity, the development of unconventional T-cells, and analysis of bacterial surface macromolecules. People who settle in east London come from many parts of the world, where TB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and AIDS (HIV) are endemic. We investigate pathogenic mechanisms, new drug targets, and strategies for improved disease prevention in both of these globally important infections. We host the Health Protection Agency National Mycobacterium Reference Unit which contributes to the Centre’s research strength on this topic. We also investigate epidemiology and pathogenic mechanisms of other organisms including varicella zoster virus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Resistance to antibiotics and antiviral agents presents a major challenge to modern medicine. We study the molecular and genetic mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobials, how resistance spreads, and novel strategies for combating resistance. Particular strengths are in drug resistant HIV and multiply antibiotic resistant gram negative bacteria. Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma The Centre has eighteen academic staff and research is focused on three interrelated topics: Trauma; Neuroinflammation and pain; Neurooncology and genomics. Trauma The focus is on spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury and coagulation. The group has identified several therapeutic strategies to prevent complications of injury, and to limit and repair its damage.


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Degree programmes (cont) Neuroinflammation and pain The main disease focus of the Neuroimmunology group is multiple sclerosis. £5 million of grants will be used to research immune tolerance strategies, develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies for progressive multiple sclerosis and manipulate cannabinoid biology as a therapeutic strategy to improve the symptoms of multiple sclerosis.

Neonatal Medicine A major initiative within Neonatal Medicine relates to investigation of the associations between low birth weight and airway function and the underlying mechanisms. Other areas of research include: • The use of Doppler ultrasound in the investigation of the neonatal circulation • The mechanisms and control of placental transport of nutrients from mother to foetus.

Neuro-oncology and genomics Research includes: • A molecular and developmental biology approach in mouse models which shows how cellular and molecular mechanisms control the development of the central nervous system and can contribute to brain tumorigenesis when deregulated. • A study of the function of human chromosomes and the genetic basis of cancer, with the discovery of distinct higher order chromatin configurations and loop domains that are dependent on gene density and transcriptional activity. Research also focuses on critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis, with an emphasis on brain tumours.

Respiratory and Environmental Medicine Main research interests are paediatric asthma, and the impact of environmental pollutants on the developing lung. An environmental research group is studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the increased vulnerability to pneumococcal pneumonia in children exposed to particulate air pollution.

There are also active research programmes in motor neurone disease, pain, muscle regeneration, biomarkers and clinical outcomes. Future objectives for the Centre include the establishment of research and clinical units in spinal injury and neuroinfectious diseases and further development of basic research in CNS tumour biology. Centre for Paediatrics The Centre for Paediatrics facilitates paediatrics research, as well as Child Health teaching on the MB BS programme. We work closely with the paediatric clinical services provided by Barts and The London (BLT), the second largest paediatric services in London (Barts and The London Children’s Hospital). The Centre regularly publishes scientific findings in journals including, Nature, Nature Genetics, New England Journal of Medicine and The Lancet. Research in Paediatrics is organised into the following themes: Haematology The principal research interest is bone marrow failure focusing on the pathophysiology of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, particularly dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Studies are also being undertaken on other haematological disorders including: the pathophysiology of myelodysplasia/ leukaemia and the establishment of a clinical network for sickle cell disease in east London.

Down’s syndrome Professor Nizetic utilises a functional genomics approach to the study of effects of gene dose in human aneuploidy with an emphasis on Down’s syndrome as a model. In particular, gene dose effects of trisomy of human chromosome 21 on embryonic stem cell differentiation and cell fate, and myeloid stem cell lineages in relation to childhood leukaemia in Down’s syndrome are under investigation. The work involves gene expression arrays, proteomics and potentially ZF transgenic modelling. Pathology Group This group focuses on, and explores cellular pathogenesis. Members are experts in the morphological aspects of disease, gene and protein expression in health and in disordered function eg cancer, inflammation and trauma. Members of the group play a large and important role in the ongoing teaching programmes across the medical and dental schools, and play an integral role in the research of groups in Pathology as well as other centres. Major links exist with groups working in gastroenterology, cancer, neurosciences, cutaneous and child health. The Academic Haematology Unit has developed from a broad clinical base and particular areas of clinical excellence including haematological malignancies and autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ATP). The ATP research has led to the development of particular expertise in flow cytometry under Professor Marion Macey and a cross Centre interest in autoimmune disorders. Other research interests lie in gene therapy for haemophilia, molecular pathology of von Willebrands disease, the link between cancer and thrombosis and the mechanisms of inhibitor development in haemophilia A.


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Staff research interests Centre for Cutaneous Research Professor David Beach PhD FRS Professor of Stem Cell Biology Mechanism of cell cycle control and its disregulation in cancer; In particular the problem of cellular life span control. Professor Carolyn Byrne PhD Professor in Skin Biology Skin barrier formation Virginia Hubbard MB BS MRCP Clinical Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Dermatologist Director of Overseas Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Dermatology E-learning, and in particular the different methods of online communication and support for students Victoria ML Jolliffe MA MRCP(UK) FRCS(Ed) MRCGP Clinical Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Dermatologist Programme Director, Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Dermatology (University of London) Trained Cambridge and London, special interest in teledermatology, E-learning and the primarysecondary care interface Professor David Kelsell PhD Professor of Human Molecular Genetics Genetic and functional studies in inherited syndromic and non-syndromic skin diseases including research of connexins, desmosomal proteins and ABCA12 Professor Kenneth Linton PhD Professor of Protein Biochemistry Membrane transport biology with current interest in ABC transporters Professor Ian Mackenzie BDS FDSRCS PhD Professor of Stem Cell Science Controls of epithelial growth, epithelial stem cells, and roles of malignant stem cells in tumour growth and therapeutic survival Simon Myers PhD FRCS(Plast) Clinical Senior Lecturer in Burns and Plastic Surgery Director of Postgraduate Diploma in Aesthetic Surgery, Postgraduate Diploma in Burn Care and Certificate in Non-invasive Aesthetic Techniques Keratinocyte biology, and wound healing, particularly in relation to burn care Professor Harshad Navsaria BSc MSc PhD Professor in Cell and Tissue Engineering The biology and clinical application of keratinocyte stem cell technologies including tissue engineering of skin for invitro toxicology

Professor Edel O’Toole MB PhD FRCPI DCH Professor of Molecular Dermatology Genetic skin diseases, signal transduction, extracellular matrix and keratinocyte migration in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) Professor Mike Philpott PhD Professor for Cutaneous Biology Lead, Centre for Cutaneous Research The biology of the human pilosebaceous unit and the role of Gli transcription factors in skin cancer

Centre for Diabetes Professor Malcolm R Alison BSc PhD DSc FRCPath Professor of Stem Cell Biology Lead, Centre for Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine Liver and pancreatic stem cell biology with particular reference to diabetes, end-stage fibrotic disease and cancer Professor Marco Falasco Professor in Signal Transduction The role of phosphoinositides and their regulatory enzymes in human diseases such as diabetes and cancer Professor Graham A Hitman MB BS MD FRCP Professor of Molecular Medicine and Diabetes Deputy Director (Research), Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Molecular genetics of diabetes and related disorders and diabetes/cardiovascular primary prevention programmes Professor David Leslie MB BS MRCS MD FRCP Professor of Diabetes and Autoimmunity Non-genetic factors including epigenetics causing autoimmune diabetes using unique national and international cohorts including twins Paolo Pozzilli MB BS MD Visiting Clinical Research Professor Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

Centre for Digestive Diseases Professor Qasim Aziz PhD FRCP Professor of Neurogastroenterology Director, Wingate Institute of Neurogastroenterology Modulation of gastrointestinal function by psychological stress


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Staff research interests (cont) Professor Stephen A Bustin BA PhD Professor of Molecular Science Role of hormones and dietary factors in the maintenance of normal bowel physiology. Novel approaches to detection of bowel disease-associated pathogens Nicholas M Croft MB BS PhD DCH FRCPCH Clinical Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Gastroenterology Clinical and translational research into diseases of the paediatric gastrointestinal tract. Co-director in the UK Medicines for Children Research Network Professor Sina Dorudi PhD FRCS FRCS(Gen) Professor for Surgical Oncology Improving the prognostic stratification of colorectal cancer patients following surgery and the immunology of differing colorectal cancer types Professor Graham R Foster PhD FRCP Professor of Hepatology Clinical studies on epidemiology and outcome of viral hepatitis. Laboratory research on hepatitis virology, interferon signalling and regulation of inflammation Professor Parveen Kumar CBE BSc MD DM(Hon) FRCP FRCP(E) FICG Professor of Clinical Medical Education Coeliac disease Professor Raymond J Playford PhD FRCPath FRCP FMedSci Professor of Medicine Deputy Warden (Vice Principal – NHS Liaison) Patho-physiological mechanisms behind injury to the gastrointestinal tract David Rampton DPhil FRCP Professor of Clinical Gastroenterology The inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis Crohn’s disease Ian Sanderson MSc MD FRCP FRCPCH Professor of Paediatric Gastroenterology Lead, Centre for Gastroenterology Nutrients and gene expression in the intestine; diets as primary treatment of Crohn’s disease Gareth Sanger BSc PhD DSc FBPharmacolS Professor of Neuropharmacology Gastrointestinal physiology and pharmacological control Daniel Sifrim MD PhD Professor of GI Physiology Motility disorders of the oesophagus; therapeutic trials on oesophageal dysfunction

Professor Andrew Silver BSc(Hons) PhD Professor for Cancer Genetics Understanding how intestinal/anal cancers develop. Creation of model systems for drug testing and extension of molecular technologies into clinical practice Professor David van Heel BM BCh MA DPhil MRCP Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics Genetics and immunology of coeliac disease and Crohn's disease Professor Ping Wang MD PhD Professor of Experimental Immunology Molecular mechanisms of MHC class 1 antigen presentation and antigen-mediated molecular signalling in T cells Professor Norman S Williams MS FRCS FMedSci Professor of Surgery Lead, Centre for Academic Surgery Large bowel function in health and disease and the application of such knowledge to improve the care of patients, particularly from the surgical perspective

Centre for Immunology and Infectious Disease Professor Michael A Curtis BSc PhD Professor of Microbiology, Director, Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of gram negative bacteria with particular reference to oral Infections Professor Francis Drobniewski MB BS MA MSc PhD DTM&H FRCPath Professor of Tuberculosis and Mycobacterial Diseases Director, Mycobacterium Reference Unit and Clinical TB and HIV Group Areas of interest are all aspects of tuberculosis, AIDS, and opportunistic infections and virulence determinants of pathogenic mycobacteria Lucinda Hall MSc PhD Reader in Molecular Microbiology Lead, Centre for Infectious Disease Molecular genetics of antibiotic resistance and microbial evolution Professor Thomas MacDonald PhD FRCPath FMedSci Professor of Immunology Dean for Research, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry Immunology and inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Professor Aine McKnight MiBiol MSc PhD Professor of Viral Pathology Interface between HIV and the immune system Professor John Oxford Professor of Virology Pathogenicity of influenza, in particular the 1918 Spanish Influenza strain Professor Tanya Parish BSc PhD Professor of Mycobacteriology Pathogenic mechanisms of the global pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis Professor Armine Sefton MB BS MSc ILTH MD FRCP(Edin) FRCPath Professor of Clinical Microbiology Programme organiser of MSc in Clinical Microbiology

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Professor Karim Brohi FRCS FRCA Professor of Trauma Sciences Traumatic coagulopathy and massive transfusion; damage response and activation of innate immunity; complex outcomes following trauma and posttraumatic disability; emergency preparedness and disaster management; trauma epidemiology and public health Professor Gavin Giovannoni MBBCh PhD FCP (Neurol.) FRCP FRCPath Professor of Neurology Lead, Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma Research interests are Epstein Barr virus as a possible cause of MS, MS-related neurodegeneration and MS biomarker discovery

Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma

Professor Silvia Marino MD FMH-Path Professor of Neuro-oncology Self-renewal and differentiation mechanisms of stem cells in the brain and skeletal muscle and their role in regeneration and tumourigenesis

Professor David Baker BSc PhD Professor of Neuroimmunology Professor Baker models: autoimmune, neurodegenerative and symptom-control aspects of multiple sclerosis. He also has an interest in cannabinoid biology

Adina Michael-Titus Lic Sci M es Sci Doct en Sci Reader in Neuroscience and Pharmacology Director of MSc in Translational Neuroscience Development of new neuroprotective treatments in neurotrauma and neurodegeneration with particular emphasis on strategies with translational potential

Cheen Peen Khoo, PhD in Adult Stem Cells “I am researching the use of adult stem cells to repair the damaged pancreas as future treatment for diabetes. My work primarily focuses on the use of stem cells from the bone marrow and blood cells. “I am undertaking my research in the Blizard Building, which houses the BICMS, which is made up of many different departments. This closely knit community allows the exchange of ideas and advice, which is important for the development of my research project. Additionally, the Blizard offers excellent core facilities. “My supervisors are very supportive of my research. They are very knowledgeable in my field and they have provided me with very useful advice which has helped me to develop the direction of my current research. Additionally, other staff members from different departments have been very helpful in giving me advice related to their own research fields. “During my time at Queen Mary, I have been accepted to do an oral presentation and two poster presentations. Besides having the opportunity to present my results to the scientific community, I have had the opportunity to travel to places that I had not been before, such as Germany and Holland.”


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Staff research interests (cont) Professor John Priestley MA(Cantab) DPhil(Oxon) Professor of Neuroscience Anatomy and neurochemistry of the spinal cord and of pain pathways, strategies to reduce cell death and promote regeneration after spinal cord injury and peripheral nerve injury Professor Denise Sheer BSc(Hons) DPhil Professor of Human Genetics Structural and functional organisation of the human genome and the nucleus; genetic and epigenetic aberrations in cancer, currently focused on brain tumours

Centre for Paediatrics Professor Kathleen Costeloe MB BCHir FRCP FRCPCH Professor of Paediatrics Population based health outcomes of extremely preterm infants. Prevention of hospital acquired infection in the newborn Inderjeet Dokal MBChB MD FRCP FRCPCH FRCPath Lead, Centre for Paediatrics Pathophysiology of aplastic anaemia (AA)/bone marrow failure including dyskeratosis congenita and related disorders Professor Jonathan Grigg BSc MB BS MD MRCP FRCPCH Professor of Paediatric Respiratory and Environmental Medicine Particulate air pollution and children's health, management of preschool wheeze, and management of difficult asthma Professor Dean Nizetic MD PhD Professor of Cellular and Molecular Biology Gene dose effects (aneuploidy and haploinsufficiency) on physiology of stem cell differentiation and pathogenesis of neuronal dysfunction and childhood leukaemia

Pathology Group Professor Rino Cerio BSc MRCS FRCP(Lond) FRCP(Edin) FRCPath DipRCpath ICDPath Professor of Dermatopathology Postgraduate training in dermatopathology with special interest in skin cancer, autoimmune dermatoses and management of severe psoriasis Professor Paola Domizio BSc MB BSc FRCPath Professor of Pathology Education Deputy Director (Education), Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Gastrointestinal pathology and medical (particularly pathology) education

Professor Stephen Greenwald BA PhD Professor of Cardiovascular Mechanics (Associate Director, Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomaterials) Mechanical factors in the genesis of arterial disease, non-invasive measurement of vascular function, fetal programming of essential hypertension, histomorphometry Professor Joanne Martin MA(Cantab) MB BS PhD FRCPath Professor of Pathology Lead, Pathology Group Neuromuscular pathology with a particular emphasis on gastrointestinal dysmotility Professor Adrian C Newland BA MB BCh MA FRCP(UK) FRCPath Professor of Haematology Lead, Academic Haematology Unit The cell biology and genetic basis of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and the study of apoptosis with an emphasis on leukaemia development Professor K John Pasi MB ChB PhD FRCP FRCPath FRCPCH Professor of Haemostasis and Thrombosis Gene therapy for haemophilia, molecular pathology of von Willebrands disease


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Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Further information Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science Postgraduate enquiries email: icms@qmul.ac.uk www.icms.qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

Staff profile: Professor Aine McKnight Professor of Viral Pathology “Throughout my academic career, I have had an interest in HIV/AIDS. In 1987, I joined a team at the Institute of Cancer Research, (London), to study the role of neutralising antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 in pathogenesis. I was awarded an MSc in Immunology, and a PhD both by the University of London. “In 2000, I won a fellowship (RCDF) from The Wellcome Trust to develop an independent research group to focus on noncoreceptor determinants of HIV replication in cells at The Wohl Virion Centre, University College London. I am currently a Medical Research Council (MRC) Senior Non-clinical Fellow (awarded in 2005). “The current focus of my research group is mainly on the interface between HIV and the immune system with regard to humoral immunity and a novel innate immune mechanism (Lv-2) that inhibits HIV replication after cellular entry resulting in abortive infection. The two viral genes involved in overcoming this antiviral effect have already been mapped, and we are currently mapping the host gene(s) involved. Other active research interests lie in HIV tropism and coreceptor use. “I am also among a number of scientists taking part in a $25.3 million international research consortium searching for an HIV vaccine. The grant is one of the largest awards in a $287 million, five-year programme of 16 grants provided by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to establish an international network of HIV vaccine discovery consortia, known as the Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery.”


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Institute of Cancer www.cancer.qmul.ac.uk Research strengths The Institute provides a supportive and multidisciplinary environment for research students, promoting academic exchange and personal development at all levels. The Institute currently consists of six research centres, driven by a strong translational theme, with emphasis on specialised research areas which focus on specific cancers. At the forefront of a number of scientific and medical discoveries, the Institute is one of the largest of its kind in the UK.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The Institute of Cancer submitted more than 33 researchers (over 95 per cent of its academic faculty) to the RAE 2008. 15 per cent of submissions were in the highest 4* category (world-leading) while 70 per cent were in the 3* category (internationally excellent). This places the Institute 3rd overall in the country for the proportion of activity at this level. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Grant funding for the Institute amounts to more than ÂŁ10 million per annum. The institute is now part of the Barts Cancer Research UK Centre with a multi million pound support programme, other significant funders include the Medical Research Council, the Welcome Trust and the Department of Health, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (USA) and the Leukaemia Research Fund. PhD studentships are advertised throughout the year on the Institute, College and postgraduate resources websites. For more information, see scholarships / studentships information on page 215.


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Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

At present nearly 30 per cent of the School’s research degrees are cancer-related, making the Institute a key constituent of the School’s research activity. There are five, fully equipped state-of-the-art research laboratories that include suites for proteomics and mass spectroscopy, cancer pharmacology, FACS, molecular pathology services with automated immunohistochemistry/in situ hybridisation systems, intravital microscopy and confocal microscopy. These are complemented by purpose-built School core facilities including the Genome Centre. There is a Molecular Imaging Facility for small animals that includes microPET, SPECT/CT and IVIS bioluminescence/fluorescence systems to complement the state-of-the-art clinical PET system with integrated 64-slice CT system recently commissioned in the Molecular Imaging Centre at Barts Hospital.

Graduate research students in the Institute are funded either by a grant award made to the project supervisor, or by personal awards to the student from national charities and overseas agencies. A number of scientific research studentships are available from the Institute each year, funded by Cancer Research UK (CR-UK). Most of the clinicians undertaking higher degrees are funded by awards such as MRC and CR-UK Clinical Research Training Fellowships. Several internally funded PhD studentships are available each year, funded through the Research Advisory Board of the Charitable Foundation and directly by the School. In addition, Queen Mary provides a number of College studentships, for which overseas students are also eligible. There is no separate application form and all applicants for an MPhil or PhD programme to commence in the 2011/12 session will automatically be considered for the research studentship. Studentships cover tuition fees and provide annual maintenance.

The Institute’s Teaching Centre is specifically for use by the Institute’s MSc students and includes teaching rooms, a fully-equipped laboratory, a surgical skills virtual reality suite and a computer lab.

Sarit Badiani, MSc in Surgical Skills and Sciences "With a background in surgical training, I was interested in undertaking a Masters programme where I could acquire both research and practical skills. Having looked extensively at the various MSc courses available I believe this was the only available programme to cover both these aspects. "This MSc is unique in the way it provides an opportunity to be part of, as well as undertake academic research, along with the practical skills training involving the use of endoscopic and laparoscopic surgical simulators. There has always been a high level of support from all members of the department which makes studying here a very positive experience. I would strongly recommended this MSc for anyone wishing to pursue any surgical career. "I was aware of Queen Mary's high reputation, and the work carried out at the Institute of Cancer in particular. I was excited to be part of such a highly recognised institution. Overall, I think the facilities associated with the University are of an extremely high standard. There is a real opportunity to be part of something special. "I am keen squash player so I try and keep on top of my game. Squash is great physical exercise, and I’ll always enjoy it.”


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Institute of Cancer Career opportunities Key relationships have been established with the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute at Lincoln's Inn Fields to foster translational research. Integration with the new Comprehensive Clinical Research Network covering a population of 2.7 million individuals in North East and North Central London, directed by the Director of the Institute of Cancer (Professor Lemoine) will build on the existing relationships with the North East London Cancer Research Network involving the other acute hospitals in North East London and the North East London Consortium for Research and Development. Through the introduction and development of new anti-cancer therapeutics, the Institute has links with many of the major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Some postgraduate student destinations include: • Graduate entry into medicine, PhD studentships (including within the Institute) in continuing education • Research positions within the Institute and other major research centres around the world in academia • Clinical trials (including those within the Institute), clinical scientists in the NHS, research assistants in industry.

Wellcome images: Breast cancer cells

Graduate profile: Linsey Madadi Studied: MSc Cancer Therapeutics – graduated 2007 Currently: Studying for a PhD in the Cancer Pharmacology lab within the Institute of Cancer, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry at Queen Mary. Why did you choose Queen Mary? The Cancer Therapeutics programme most closely matched what I was looking for, combined with the great facilities and location of Queen Mary. What are your career plans in the next five years? To finish my PhD and then either return to my previous role as a clinical oncology and haematology pharmacist, or continue my research in academia or the pharmaceutical industry.


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Institute of Cancer Degree programmes MSc in Cancer Therapeutics One year full-time, two years part-time Distance learning option available Programme description This programme aims to provide you with a clear understanding of the scientific basis underlying the principles and practice of cancer therapeutics and the development, evaluation and implementation of new treatments. This is underpinned by a thorough knowledge of cancer biology and pathology, research methodologies, drug development and regulatory issues. There is an emphasis on practical skills during the research skills module and the three month laboratory project undertaken during semester three. On completion of the programme you will: • Have a thorough knowledge of the principles underlying cancer treatment • Be able to demonstrate skills in gathering, recording, analysing and presenting information • Understand the regulatory framework underlying clinical research • Understand the principles of laboratory methodologies applied to clinical trials • Understand the steps involved in developing and implementing new treatments

• Be able to apply this knowledge in a professional role • Be able to contribute to the research activity and knowledge base in improving cancer care. Programme outline Core modules: Research Skills and Sciences • Cancer Biology • Cancer Pharmacology • Site Specific Tumour Treatment • Ablative Therapy • Biological Therapies • Drug Development • Lab Project. Optional modules: Imaging • Pathology of Cancer • Genomic Approaches to Human Diseases • Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology • Cancer Prevention and Screening Assessment Assessment will be based on written assignments, poster and oral presentations, written or MCQ examinations, and a full lab project write-up. Entry requirements The programme is open to graduate scientists, nurses, clinicians and other medical professionals working in healthcare, the pharmaceutical industry or contract research organisations. Entry to the programme will require a degree, or degree equivalent qualification, from a recognised academic institution or an appropriate professional qualification or experience. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Distance learning option This programme is also available as a distance learning option, and is delivered via our web based learning system known as “blackboard”. You will be able to follow each lecture online via audio recordings and slide/whiteboard content. All written assignments are submitted through the blackboard system and poster and oral presentations assessed through SKYPE/webcam system. You are encouraged to interact with teaching staff and other students in online discussion forums and join group activities and be part of the Institute’s student community. Further information General programme enquiries Tel: +44(0)20 7882 2081 email: cancercourses@qmul.ac.uk@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries please contact Dr Simon Joel Programme Director: email: s.p.joel@qmul.ac.uk


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Institute of Cancer Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc in Molecular Pathology and Genomics One year full-time, two years part-time Distance Learning option available Programme description This programme combines core teaching of disease mechanisms and molecular technologies, with an emphasis on development of critical and practical skills. It will provide you with the essential knowledge and skills to pursue a research career, either in a clinical or scientific setting, and contribute to the growing need for scientists and clinicians to promote the translation of molecular advances into the clinical situation. On completion of the programme you will: • Demonstrate a core understanding of human pathology and molecular biology • Have an in-depth knowledge of the principles and applications of molecular technologies as applied to human disease • Be proficient in experimental design, bioinformatics, data mining and interpretation • Demonstrate skills in oral and written presentation and in critical review of the literature • Contribute to the research process through experience of a laboratory project placement • Understand the ethical framework of the research process • An emphasis on development of practical skills is reflected in the Research Skills Module, and the three month laboratory-based project.

Programme outline Core modules: Basic Molecular Biology • Basic Pathology • Cancer Prevention and Screening • Genomic Approaches to Human Diseases • Molecular Diagnostics and Therapeutics • Molecular Pathology of Solid Tumours • Research Skills and Sciences • Lab project. Module options: Biological Therapies • Introduction to Bio-Informatics • Molecular Genetics of Haematologic Malignancies Assessment Assessment will be based on written assignments, poster and oral presentations, written or MCQ examinations, and a full dissertation write-up. Entry requirements The programme will be open to clinicians, graduate scientists, nurses, and other medical professionals working in a clinical, industrial or academic research environment. Entry to the programme will require a good degree, or degree equivalent, qualification from a recognised academic institution or an appropriate professional qualification or experience. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information General enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2081 email: cancercourses@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Louise Jones Programme Director email: l.j.jones@qmul.ac.uk


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Operative Gynaecology and Minimally Invasive Skills One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This unique programme offers students a highly advanced theoretical and practical understanding of Operative Gynaecology and Minimally Invasive Skills. Using innovative simulation technology, the aim is to provide surgeons in training with a year of instruction to develop operative surgical skills. You will receive ‘hands-on’ practical training that will help accelerate your surgical training and improve the surgical skills that are essential for building confidence and competence in trainees. It also maximises NHS training opportunities. On completion of the programme you will be able to: • perform basic laparoscopy tasks • perform laparoscopic suturing • perform laparoscopic procedures (salpingostomy, salpingectomy, tubal ligation and oophorectomy) • perform specific open surgical skills • understand the tools and methodologies for conducting research. For suitably able students, this programme will provide an excellent foundation for MS/MD or MPhil/PhD studies and obtaining grants, in open

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competition, from the work carried out in their dissertation. This unique programme offers the opportunity to develop or extend expertise in the established and rapidly developing areas of Laparoscopic Surgery and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Programme outline Laparoscopy Skills I • Laparoscopy Skills II • Open Surgery Skills • Laparoscopic Suturing Skills • Laparoscopy Procedure Skills I • Laparoscopy Procedure Skills II • Dissertation Assessment You will be assessed in a variety of ways: Practical Skills Assessments carried out through simulation and certification by the course tutor; a final written theory exam consisting of short and essay questions; continuous assessment through essay writing, critical appraisals and presentations; and a dissertation project write-up and presentation. Entry requirements This programme is aimed at trainees in Obstetrics in Gynaecology and specialist registrars, non-carrier grade Surgeons, associate specialists. A medical degree from a recognised institution is required and some postgraduate experience in surgery is desirable. This programme does not involve any direct contact with the patients, so GMC registration is not required for overseas doctors. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information General enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3847 email: info@surgicalsimulation.co.uk For informal enquiries please contact: Bijen Patel, Programme Director: email: b.patel@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Operative Orthopaedics and Arthroscopy Skills One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The aim of this programme is to provide surgeons in training with a year of instruction to develop operative surgical skills in orthopaedics using state-of-the-art simulation technology. The modernisation of medical education and decreased period of surgical training, combined with the new EU time directive, means that trainees must acquire technical skills within a shorter period of time. This programme will help accelerate your surgical training and improve the surgical skills that are essential for building confidence and competence in trainees. It also maximises NHS training opportunities. On completion of the programme you will be able to: • perform specific core skills in orthopaedics surgery • perform basic diagnostic arthroscopy for knee and shoulder • perform arthroscopic procedure • perform Practical specific open surgical skills techniques • understand the basic research methods and submit a dissertation. This programme will provide an excellent foundation for MS/MD or MPhil/PhD studies and is therefore suitable for doctors who wish to work as clinical scientists. The work completed for dissertations may help to attract further grants and funding. Programme outline Core modules: • Core Skills in Operative Orthopaedic Surgery • Open Surgery Skills • Arthroscopy Procedural Skills • Upper Limb Arthroscopy Skills • Lower Limb Arthroscopy Skills • Research Methods • Dissertation Assessment You will be assessed in a variety of ways: Practical Skills Assessments carried out through simulation and certification by the course tutor; A final written theory exam consisting of short and essay questions; Continuous assessment through essay writing, critical appraisals and presentations; And a dissertation project write-up and presentation.

Entry requirements This programme is aimed at surgeons in training, trainee and specialist registrars, non-carrier grade surgeons and associate specialists. A medical degree from a recognised institution is required and some postgraduate experience in surgery is desirable. The programme does not involve any direct contact with the patients so GMC registration is not required for overseas doctors. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information General enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3847 email: info@surgicalsimulation.co.uk For informal enquiries please contact: Bijen Patel Programme Director email: b.patel@qmul.ac.uk


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

MSc in Surgical Skills and Sciences One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This unique programme offers the opportunity to develop or extend expertise in the established and rapidly developing areas of Laparoscopic Surgery and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. The MSc accelerates surgical training and improves surgical skills that are essential for building confidence in clinical practice. The programme will provide you with a unique opportunity to gain postgraduate training and development in cognitive and motor skills using the surgical simulators. The state-of-the-art Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Centre removes the patient from the equation to allow novice learning and skill mastery to occur in a low-stress, high-feedback environment while protecting the patient from procedural inexperience. You will also be taught techniques of secure suturing, knot tying and bowel anastomosis using non-biological materials. You will gain a clear understanding of the concept and theories surrounding the issues of research and critical appraisal along with academic writing. This programme is designed to enhance your future career prospects in surgery. If you perform well and express an interest you may be given the opportunity to proceed to MD(Res) or PhD studies. Programme outline The programme comprises of the following surgical skills areas and a research/literature project. Core modules: Basic Laparoscopic Skills • Advanced Laparoscopic Skills • Laparoscopy Procedural Skills (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy) • Basic Endoscopy skills • Endoscopy Procedural skills (Flexible Sigmoidoscopy) • Endoscopy Procedural skills II (Upper GI Endoscopy) • Research Methods • Dissertation Assessment You will be assessed in a variety of ways: Practical Skills Assessments carried out through simulation and certification by the course tutor; a final written theory exam consisting of short and essay questions; continuous assessment through essay writing, critical appraisals and presentations; and a dissertation project write-up and presentation. Entry requirements This programme is aimed at surgeons in training, trainee and specialist registrars, non-carrier grade Surgeons, associate specialists. A medical degree from a recognised institution is required and some postgraduate experience in surgery is desirable. The programme does not involve any direct contact with

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the patients so GMC registration is not required for overseas doctors. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information General enquiries Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3847 email: info@surgicalsimulation.co.uk For informal enquiries please contact: Bijen Patel, Programme Director email: b.patel@qmul.ac.uk Dr Georgios Kallis MSc degree in Surgical Skills and Sciences "The continuous development of current surgical techniques as well as the constant stream of revolutionary advancements in the surgical field sparked my interest to further broaden my learning in and experience of surgical techniques. However, I did not wish to embark on either a general course or a very classroomorientated one. The MSc in Surgical Skills and Sciences offered by Queen Mary is unique in offering exclusive surgical skills through interactive learning and training at the state-ofthe-art Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Centre in a low-stress, high-feedback environment. "I very much enjoy learning and training at the state-of-the-art Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Centre which provides me with the opportunity to enhance and develop a broad range of skills including my laparoscopic and endoscopic skills in a risk-free and controlled environment. "I would rate the MSc course in Surgical Skills and Sciences very highly in terms of teaching excellence and academic facilities. In addition to the surgical skills training, the weekly journal club presentations have allowed me not only to develop a higher level of scientific appreciation but also to learn how to critically appraise research papers and perform literature reviews. The focused syllabus and scope of the course has enabled me to advance the competencies relevant to my chosen specialty of surgery, both from a surgical perspective and the development of other necessary skills such as academic writing, presentation techniques and organisational/time management abilities.”


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Institute of Cancer Research degrees Research degrees

Research areas

The Institute of Cancer has over 70 research students undertaking PhD or MD Res degrees. These students carry out an original research project in one of the Institute laboratories at Charterhouse Square at Barts and The London. The period of study is typically three years for full-time students. Projects are offered in a range of cancer-related research areas, as outlined in more detail on the following pages. There is a clear policy within the Institute on student supervision and monitoring.

The research strategy is built on an integrated molecular and cellular approach to the problem of cancer in individuals and in populations. A spectrum of research is underway and includes: therapeutic and diagnostic target identification and validation in both haematological and solid malignancies; clinical trials exploring new therapies; the development of novel molecular approaches for diagnosis, classification and treatment of human cancers; and investigations into the regulation of tumour spread and host anti-tumour responses.

In addition to carrying out their specific research project students receive training in a range of biomedical laboratory methods and in other transferable skills. Our aim is to equip our students for a career in science and to make them very attractive to potential employers. Entry requirements For entry to a PhD programme you should hold either: • A first or upper second class honours degree in a relevant biological subject from a UK university • A Masters degree • A recognised equivalent from an accredited overseas institution • An equivalent professional qualification. How to apply Each year the Institute has around 10-15 new PhD studentships. When available these are advertised on: • The Institute of Cancer website at www.cancer.qmul.ac.uk/vacancies • www.findaphd.com Prospective research degree students who have already obtained funding should contact Dr Simon Joel, Director of Graduate Studies, in the first instance. The application form for research students can be found at www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply You also need to include full details of your previous educational achievements and two academic references.

The specialist areas of interest for each of the six research centres within the Institute are outlined below: Centre for Cancer and Inflammation This Centre focuses on the links between cancer and inflammation. The overarching hypothesis that drives research in our Centre is that immune cells and mediators found in experimental and human cancers are more likely to promote cancer growth than be part of a host anti-tumour response. We believe that inhibition or re-alignment of this inflammatory process may be of therapeutic benefit. Our aim is to translate our laboratory research in chronic inflammation, cancer growth and spread into new treatments for cancer, especially ovarian cancer, and we are involved in several Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. We have excellent collaborations with the Departments of Gynaecological Oncology and Medical Oncology at Barts and The London NHS Hospitals. Research groups Cancer and Inflammation Group Professor Frances Balkwill Aims to understand links between cancer and inflammation and translate this into novel clinical trials. Tumour Microenvironment Dr Thorsten Hagemann Aims to understand the fundamental mechanisms by which TNF-signalling promotes cancer; with particular reference to the role of macrophages and their phenotype in carcinogenesis.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Centre for Cell Signalling The Centre for Cell Signalling aims to be a worldclass centre of expertise in both basic and applied PI3K signalling.

The aim of the centre is to increase:

Uncontrolled PI3K signalling is one of the most commonly deregulated pathways in cancer. PI3Ks also play principal roles in inflammation, diabetes and other disease contexts, making these enzymes attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. The development of drugs that block PI3K action is being actively pursued by the pharmaceutical industry.

• the diversity of clinical trials open at Barts and The London NHS Trust.

Research groups Cell Signalling Group Professor Bart Vanhaesebroeck Main interests of the group include signal transduction in cell migration, proliferation, survival, intracellular vesicular transport, in the context of cancer, inflammation and immunology, angiogenesis, metabolism and stem cell biology. Collaborative efforts with industry are under way in the preclinical development of isoform-selective small molecule inhibitors for PI3K. We aim to help to translate this preclinical work to early phase clinical trials through our links with the Centres for Medical Oncology and Experimental Cancer Medicine. Analytical Cell Signalling Group Dr Pedro Cutillas The aim is to understand the basic principles that govern cell signalling pathways, their molecular mechanisms and the contribution that different members of these pathways have to their signalling network. We are particularly interested in learning the properties by which these pathways control fundamental physiology and how they are deregulated in disease. Experimentally, our group integrates state-of-the-art mass spectrometry, advanced separation technology, cell biology and biochemistry to the study of cell signalling pathways in health and disease. The ultimate goal of this work is to contribute to the understanding of the fundamentals of cell signalling and to translate this knowledge to the design of personalised therapies to treat conditions with deregulated cell signalling pathways. Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine The centre provides design and management support for all trials including national, pharmaceutical and investigator led studies and centralises all staff involved in clinical trials to ensure compliance with the European Directive on Good Clinical Practice.

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• recruitment into existing clinical trials • the number of trials – NCRN, pharma-sponsored and investigator-initiated

Clinical Cancer Pharmacology Unit Dr Simon Joel This Unit conducts pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies of cytotoxic agents against a background of clinical trials. The aim is to develop and test new agents in the laboratory and in clinical trials and to optimise the way in which established chemotherapy drugs are used through a better understanding of their molecular and clinical pharmacology. Centre for Medical Oncology This Centre has a long and distinguished history in haemato-oncology, urological and paediatric malignancies, having led several pivotal trials in the treatment of these cancers. Research groups Clinical and Applied Medical Oncology Group Professor Andrew Lister, Dr Silvia Montoto, Dr Jude Fitzgibbon Aims to characterise the molecular signature of lymphomas to identify recurrent genomic and expression changes within these lymphomas to guide treatment selection. Cancer Genomics Group Professor Bryan Young, Dr Manoj Raghavan Aims to understand the key genetic events in malignant transformation especially in acute myeloid leukaemia. Genomic approaches are being used to uncover novel genetic lesions important in the occurrence and evolution of haematopoietic malignancies. Cancer Immunotherapy Group Professor John Gribben, Dr David Taussig, Dr Alan Ramsay Aims to develop immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer, including stem cell transplantation; to identify tumour antigens with particular emphasis on B cell malignancies; to characterise malignant stem cells and to understand the impact of the tumour microenvironment on outcome in haematological malignancies.


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Institute of Cancer Research degrees (cont) Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging This Centre is focused on the development of innovative therapeutic and diagnostic approaches to cancer. It is an internationally recognised centre of expertise in gene therapy for cancer, with a particular focus on oncolytic viruses.

Angiogenesis Group Dr Kairbaan Hodivala-Dilke Aims to understand the roles of cell adhesion in disease, particularly with respect to angiogenesis and tumour cell-endothelial cell interactions.

Linked to the clinic through a clinical fellowship programme and honorary consultants, the research is carried out within five laboratory groups.

Epithelial-Stromal Group Professor Louise Jones Aims to understand the pathobiology of breast cancer with a particular focus on cell adhesion and myoepithelial cells.

Research groups Molecular Pathology Group Professor Nick Lemoine, Dr Tatjana CrnogoracJurcevic, Dr Claude Chelala, Dr Rebecca Roylance, Dr Adam Rosenthal, Dr Peter Szlosarek Aims to identify molecular biomarkers of disease progression and treatment response.

Gene Transcription Group Professor Helen Hurst Aims to understanding the molecular mechanisms that control expression of key breast tumour genes, in order to identify novel targets for cancer therapy.

Gene Therapy Group Professor Nick Lemoine, Professor Iain McNeish, Dr Gunnel Hallden, Dr Yaohe Wang, Dr Michelle Lockley Aims to develop gene-targeted intervention strategies to treat cancer using oncolytic viruses and genetic triggers of apoptosis. Genito-Urinary Cancer Group Dr Yong-Jie Lu, Dr Dan Berney The Genito-Urinary Cancer Group focuses on molecular and translational research of testis, bladder, renal, penile and prostate cancer. Molecular Imaging Group Professor Steve Mather, Professor Rodney Rezneck, Dr Norbert Avril This Group is focused on the development of molecular targets for radionuclide-mediated diagnosis and therapy of cancer. It includes both laboratory teams and clinical consultants, working in the Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology at Barts and The London NHS Trust. Centre for Tumour Biology This Centre is concerned primarily with understanding the role that cytoadhesion plays in modulating cancer spread and has focused particularly on the involvement of members of the integrin family of adhesion receptors technology. Research groups Cellular Adhesion in Invasion and Metastasis Professor Ian Hart, Dr John Marshall Aims to understand how cell adhesion affects tumour spread and to develop strategies for blocking cancer metastasis.

Growth Factor Signalling Group FGF receptors – Dr Richard Grose Aims to understand and delineate the functions of FGFs and their receptors in tumourgenesis and wound repair. Spatial signalling – Dr Stephanie Kermorgant Aims to understand how endosomal signalling of the c-Met receptor affects tumour cell metastasis.


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Institute of Cancer Staff research interests Cancer and Inflammation Professor Fran Balkwill PhD OBE FMedSci Centre Lead Links between cancer and inflammation, role of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cancer growth and spread and translating this information into novel clinical trials Thorsten Hagemann MD PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer Interaction of the leukocyte infiltrate with the tumour microenvironment, with particular reference to the role TNF-alpha in innate immunity and the prospect of turning macrophages and NK cells back into tumour killers

Cancer Cell Signalling Professor Bart Vanhaesebroeck MSc PhD Centre Lead Signalling by PI 3-kinase and related pathways in cancer, metabolism and immunity; Translational cancer research; Mouse models of signalling in normal physiology and disease; Systems biology, developing small molecule therapies Pedro R Cutillas BSc PhD Lecturer Systems biology of cell signalling pathways

Experimental Cancer Medicine Professor John Gribben MD DSc FRCP FRCPath FMedSci Centre Lead Immunological responses to leukaemia and lymphoma, molecular basis for alterations in immune cells in the tumour microenvironment Simon Joel BSc PhD Reader Novel therapies and optimisation of the use of established agents, development of model systems for evaluating new therapeutic agents Thomas Powles MBBS MD MRCP Clinical Senior Lecturer The efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in urology cancers

Medical Oncology Rebecca Auer MRCP FRCPath PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer Lymphoid malignancies, in particular chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and mantle cell lymphoma: molecular pathogenesis and novel therapies Jude Fitzgibbon BA(Genetics) PhD Reader Molecular events leading to the development and progression of lymphoma and leukaemia

Li Jia MB PhD Senior Lecturer Regulation of apoptosis and autophagy in malignant B cells; Study of how to overcome resistance of lymphoma cells to apoptosis Silvia Montoto MB BS MD Clinical Senior Lecturer Follicular lymphoma (FL): natural history, prognostic factors, impact of diagnosis, risk factors and prognosis of histological transformation in FL patients Alan G Ramsay PhD Lecturer Investigating signalling interactions between tumour cells and T cells (cancer cell biology, immunology and immunotherapy) David Taussig MRCP MRCPath PhD Senior Clinical Lecturer The interaction between normal and malignant stem cells; Study of how leukaemia out competes normal haematopoietic stem cells to induce bone marrow failure Professor Bryan Young BSc PhD FMedSci Professor of Cancer Genomics Uniparental disomy and microdeletions in leukaemia; high density SNP arrays; integration of large genome-based data sets

Molecular Oncology and Imaging Norbert Avril MB BS MD Reader, Nuclear Medicine Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography for non-invasive monitoring of cancer therapy to define (early) markers of treatment response Subham Basu PhD Honorary Lecturer Signal transduction pathways, identification and characterisation of the protein substrates of the serine/threonine kinase Akt Claude Chelala PhD Lecturer The development and application of computational solutions to cancer research Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic MD PhD FHEA Senior Lecturer Development of a biomarker programme in pancreatic cancer; functional analyses of markers involved in the development and progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma Professor Finbarr Cotter MB BS FRCP(UK) FRCPath PhD Professor of Haematology The application of molecular understanding and therapy for malignancy using array technology, proteomics and functional modelling of malignancy in NOD/SCID xenographs and Zebrafish


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Institute of Cancer Staff research interests

(cont)

Gunnel Hallden PhD Senior Lecturer Novel treatment strategies to target late stage androgen-independent prostate cancers using replication-selective oncolytic adenoviral mutants Professor Nick Lemoine MD PhD FRCPath FMedSci Institute Director and Centre Lead Target identification and validation in studies on the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer, target exploitation through viral and genetic therapies Yong Jie Lu MB BS MD PhD Senior Lecturer The significance of genome changes in the development, progression and treatment of male urogenital tumours; genetic alterations as markers for patient outcome prediction and targets for novel therapies Michelle Lockley MRCP PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer Development of oncolytic adenoviruses as novel treatments for ovarian cancer; investigation and manipulation of the inflammatory response to intraperitoneal adenoviral vectors Professor Stephen Mather BPharm FRPharmS MSc(Biopharmacy) PhD Deputy Centre Lead Radiolabelled peptides and antibodies for diagnosis and therapy of cancer in clinical and pre-clinical research Professor Iain McNeish MA PhD MRCP FRCP Deputy Centre Lead (CECM), Professor of Gynaecological Oncology, Ovarian Cancer; abnormalities in apoptosis and cell cycle control in ovarian cancer as a target for gene and viral therapy, pre-clinical imaging; clinical trials Daniel Ă–berg BSc PhD Lecturer In vivo imaging and eradication of tumours using cancer-targeted viruses armed with genes for: visualisation of viral oncolytic activity, local conversion of pro-drugs into cytotoxic metabolites and induction of anticancer immune responses Adam Rosenthal BSc MB BS MRCOG PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer Gynaecological cancer screening, inherited gynaecological cancers, minimal access surgery, molecular diagnostics in tumour cells; new generation of oncolytic adenovirusgynaecological cancer Rebecca Roylance BSc MBBS MRCP PhD Clinical Senior lecturer Understanding the different genetic changes associated with different morphological subtypes of invasive breast cancer Peter Szlosarek BSc MBBS MRCP PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer, Clinician Scientist Arginine deprivation and argininosuccinate synthetase expression in the treatment of cancer

Yaohe Wang MD PhD Senior Lecturer Development of novel cancer therapeutic regimes using oncolytic adenovirus and vaccinia virus through further understanding the interaction of tumour cell, oncolytic virus and host immune response

Tumour Biology Richard Grose BSc PhD Lecturer Functions of FGFs and their receptors in the skin, wound repair and carcinogenesis; identification of targets downstream of FGF signalling that are pivotal to their role in cancer. Professor Ian Hart BVSc PhD FRCP FRCPath MRCVS FMedSci Deputy Director, Centre Lead Integrin expression and function in tumour invasion and progression; regulation of tumour spread specifically by cell adhesion receptors Professor Kairbaan Hodivala-Dilke PhD Professor of Angiogenesis Functions of integrins in pathological angiogenesis and wound healing, identification of differentially regulated angiogenesis related molecules Professor Helen Hurst MA PhD Professor of Transcription Biology Aberrant patterns of gene expression in breast cancer, AP-2 family of transcription factors. Gene expression profile of hormone resistant tumours Professor Louise J Jones BSc MB ChB PhD FRCPath Professor of Breast Pathology Mechanism of progression of in-situ to invasive breast cancer; role of microenvironment in control of breast cancer; identification of predictive and therapeutic markers Hemant Kocher MS MD FRCS Clinical Senior Lecturer/Clinician Scientist Pancreatic cancer progression; the development of in vitro models of pancreatic cancer, and investigation of tumour-stroma cross-talk with aim of therapeutic targeting. Surgery. Liver and Biliary cancers Stephanie Kermorgant PhD Lecturer Links between signalling and endocytic trafficking of the proto-oncogene c-Met. Consequences on tumour transformation in vitro and in vivo John Marshall PhD Reader Biology of the epithelial-specific integrin, avb6 in cancer; development of avb6 antagonists, developing novel targeting approaches to avb6-expressing carcinomas


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Institute of Cancer Further information Institute of Cancer Postgraduate enquiries email: Ioc-courses@qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate Teaching Lead Dr Simon Joel Tel: +44 (0)20 7601 8924 email: s.p.joel@qmul.ac.uk

Staff profile: Professor Bart Vanhaesebroeck Centre Lead, Cell Signalling

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

“I studied at the University of Ghent, Belgium, gaining a Masters degree (1985) in Biology (Physiology and Biochemistry) and a PhD (1990) in Molecular Biology. My PhD work focused on immunology and signal transduction by cytokines. “I joined the Institute of Cancer to set up the Centre for Cell Signalling, a group with a focus on understanding signalling through PI 3-kinases (PI3Ks), combining fundamental research with efforts to translate findings into diagnostic and therapeutic applications. “Our team proposed the now universally accepted classification and nomenclature of the PI3Ks Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 1996:351:217, TiBS 1997:22:267). “Other team activity includes pioneering the use of so-called 'kinase knockin' mice in which the active site carries a mutation in an ATP-binding amino acid residue, leading to inactivation of the kinase. These provide a more adequate physiological model for the effects of small molecule kinase inhibitors than classical gene knockout approaches (Cell 2004:118:274; TiBS 2005:30:194). “Partly through these research efforts, p110delta has become a drug target in cancer, inflammation and auto-immunity. These discoveries were successfully incorporated into the drug development programme of Piramed, and is now being further developed by Roche. “In addition to being a member of EMBO (European Molecular Biology Organisation), I have worked as a consultant for Serono (Geneva), PIramed, AstaZeneca and Intellikine.”


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Institute of Dentistry www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/dental Research strengths The Institute of Dentistry has consistently been rated highly against its peers in external assessments of its research and teaching performance. The Institute policy is that our dental research should always be in the main stream of Biomedical Research, contributing to it and at the same time benefiting from strong interdisciplinary links with our colleagues in the rest of the Medical School and the College. The Institute provides a friendly, intellectually stimulating, focused and first-class environment for postgraduate study. The Dental School of The London Hospital Medical College was formed in 1911 and moved into the current Institute of Dentistry building in 1965. Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry was formed in 1995 and merged with Queen Mary, University of London in the same year. The School shares the vision of Queen Mary that learning takes place in a research environment that enriches the teaching process. It also acknowledges its location in the east of London and embraces the potential this offers for teaching and learning. The Institute of Dentistry offers a friendly, focused and successful environment for postgraduate study. The Institute of Dentistry’s major strengths address many of the important research questions across the oral and dental sciences, and are particularly focused in research groups in Infection and Immunity, Dental Biophysics and Materials Science, Oral Cancer, and Oral Epidemiology. The Institute has particular expertise in Oral Microbiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, unique expertise in Biophysics of Dental Tissues, Dental Materials, Clinical and Population Epidemiological studies, Psychosocial and Behavioural factors in oral health. Extensive collaboration throughout Queen Mary, University of London brings great benefits from the excellent research facilities available within the College.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The results of the 2008 RAE have demonstrated that the Dental School at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry is one of the best in the country. Based on the quantity of 3* and 4* outputs, it was first equal with Manchester, and when this was converted to rankings, it was second out of 14 UK dental schools. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Researchers within the Institute compete successfully for major research grants for the UK Research Councils, (MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, CRUK) UK government, and major medical charities. We also have strong collaborations with industry.


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Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

The Institute of Dentistry is a very special place to undertake postgraduate studies. It brings together a number of world leading researchers in basic and clinical sciences that supervise research students in the fields of Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Microbiology, Oral Epidemiology, Oncology, Dental Biomaterials, Dental Biophysics, Dental Public Health, Dental Education, Periodontology, Orthodontics, Paediatric, Prosthetic and Conservative Dentistry. In addition, research students benefit from extensive interdisciplinary links with other areas of research within Queen Mary, University of London.

Graduate research students in the Institute are funded in one of three ways: either a grant award made to the project supervisor, a personal award to the student from national charities or overseas agencies, or student self-funding. Clinicians undertaking higher degrees are eligible for awards such as the MRC Clinical Research Training Fellowships. Several internally funded PhD studentships are available each year, funded through the Research Advisory Board of the Charitable Foundation and directly by the School. In addition, Queen Mary provides a number of College studentships, for which overseas students are also eligible. There is no separate application form and all applicants for an MPhil or PhD programme to commence in the 2011/12 session will automatically be considered for a research studentship.

The well established Centre for Oral Biometrics, comprising the fifth and sixth floors of the Institute of Dentistry, provides a focus for clinical postgraduate activity, offering seminar space, office, computing and clinical facilities. It includes a Dental Metrology Unit equipped with facial laser scan and facial image analysis. Microbiology and Cell and Molecular Biology resources are based in the award winning Blizard Building, which is one of the multidisciplinary research facility housing over 300 Biomedical Scientists. Core research facilities within the School of Medicine and Dentistry also include a new Genomics Centre development for high throughput DNA sequencing, genotyping and realtime PCR; a new Functional Genomics facility containing robotics and microarray readers; and a new Imaging Centre containing confocal and electron microscopy. Biophysics and Biomaterials are based in modern, well-equipped laboratories on the Mile End campus, adjacent to relevant collaborators in the Department of Chemistry and Department of Materials Science at Queen Mary. In addition, the Institute of Dentistry is located in east London and serves the largest multi-cultural population with high socio-economic diversity in the UK. This provides a unique opportunity to carry out population based studies and infer conclusions to nearly all environments.

Studentships cover tuition fees and provide maintenance at the basic Research Council level (ÂŁ15,100 for the 2009/10 academic year). Check for up to date information on the Institute of Dentistry website: www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/dental


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Institute of Dentistry Career opportunities Key relationships have been established with groups working in other Institutes of the School of Medicine and Dentistry such as Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine and the Tobacco Dependence Research Unit. There are active collaborations with the Engineering and Materials Science and Geography Departments at Queen Mary. National and international links have been made with industrial (including Glaxo SmithKline and GC Corp), academic (including Washington USA, North Carolina USA, Aarhus Denmark, Imperial College and Manchester) and non-governmental organisations (Cancer Research UK).

Graduate profile: Oluyori Adegun

There is increasing collaboration with the Primary Care Trusts serving the 2.7 million individuals in North East and North Central London in areas such as the epidemiology of adult oral health. Some postgraduate student destinations include: • Graduate entry into medicine, PhD studentships (including within the Institute), and postdoctoral studies in continuing education. • Research and teaching positions in universities and research centres around the world in academia. • Clinical trials, clinical scientists in the NHS, research assistants in industry.

Studied:MSc in Experimental Oral Pathology – graduated 2006 Currently: PhD in Dentistry Why did you choose Queen Mary? I chose Queen Mary, because of the diverse cultural environment but more importantly, its reputation as a University par excellence for high quality teaching and research in Dentistry. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? I researched the role of human papilloma-virus 16 (HPV16) in Oral cancer at the new, open plan Blizard Building, which provided access to excellent facilities and the opportunity to collaborate with a diverse range of research groups. I particularly enjoyed presenting my research via posters at international conferences, such as the British Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathologists day. I was privileged to get a publication in an international journal and the rare chance of meeting high profile clinicians, researchers and executives. Overall, my experience on the MSc was so enjoyable that I inevitably wanted to continue my research here. After graduating with a Distinction, I am delighted to now be a PhD student, researching diagnostic imaging for oral mucosal diseases. What are your career plans in the next five years? On completion of my PhD at Queen Mary, I intend to undergo a specialist training in Oral Pathology with a view to having an excellent background in the pathologic basis of Oral diseases.


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Institute of Dentistry Degree programmes Postgraduate Diploma in Dental Clinical Sciences One year full-time Programme description This programme offers dental graduates a comprehensive grounding in five key training areas: basic sciences and their application to modern day dental practice, principles of clinical issues in dentistry, principles of communication skills, principles of professionalism and principles of management and leadership. This programme aims to recognise previous professional experience and to augment and develop that experience. Two pathways are available. Both provide strong foundations for continuing postgraduate study. Students wishing to undertake the Membership of the Joint Dental Faculties professional examinations (MJDF) are recommended to apply for the core pathway. The enhanced pathway is recommended for those students seeking both Membership of the Joint Dental Faculties professional examinations (MJDF) and the overseas Registration Examination (ORE) or possible progression to a clinical MSc or MClinDent programme. Programme outline The syllabus is taught through lectures, seminars, tutorials and symposia. Communication and IT skills are developed through weekly journal club reports and presentations on dental and clinical governance topics. Students will be tutored in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) and Structured Clinical Reasoning (SCR) exams using the facilities in the newly equipped state-of-the-art Dental skills laboratory

All students will observe current UK dental practice via clinics in Oral Medicine, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontology, Paediatric dentistry, Orthodontics, Sedation and General Anaesthesia. They will practice taking radiographs using phantom heads. The enhanced pathway offers students greater emphasis on clinical skills development, using phantom head and teeth. Students will prepare and continuously update a Professional Development Portfolio for gathering evidence on lectures, tutorials, clinics, self study and self reflection sessions. Upon completion of the programme, students will attain certificates in core skills, required for continuing professional development (CPD). Assessment Students are continuously assessed through written multiple-choice papers in single-best answer (SBA) and extended matching questions (EMQ) format. The final examination will include two written papers, an OSCE and SCR exam. An audit project and clinical case presentation will also form part of the final programme assessment. Entry requirements Applicants should have a recognised degree in Dentistry from an approved University and 12 months post qualification experience. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli, Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7141 email: e.hagi-pavli@qmul.ac.uk or Ryan Salucideen email: r.salucideen@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc in Dental Public Health One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description For dentists and other graduates wishing to pursue a career in dental public health, oral epidemiology and health promotion in a service or university setting, this programme offers supervised experience in the theory and practice of dental public health and the opportunity to develop specialist knowledge and skills. It can contribute to a three year specialist training programme in Dental Public Health. Completion offers eligibility to enter the Diploma in Dental Public Health examination of the Royal College of Surgeons (England). Programme outline Your programme includes timetabled seminars, personal study and supervised research. All taught modules are considered core modules, although you have considerable choice when selecting a research topic. The taught modules’ content includes: • Oral health needs and demands assessment, including critically evaluating the dental literature, preparing scientific reports, familiarity with indices and determinants of oral disease, epidemiological principles and information sources. • Information technology, including computer skills in data analysis, analysing epidemiological data and competencies in common computer software packages • Service planning and evaluation, including resource allocation, measuring service quality and conducting audits

• Promoting oral health, including the principles, methods and limitations of prevention and oral health promotion, health determinants and preventive strategies • Research methodologies, both social science and clinical, and the application of scientific principles to research. Students are encouraged to develop appropriate key written, oral, group work and time management skills. Assessment You are assessed on a modular basis. The assessment procedures vary between each module and include written papers, in which three questions will be answered from a choice, long essays, drafting study protocols, proposing a solution to oral health needs and a critical review of a published paper using appropriate criteria. One third of your final grade is through your completion of a 20,000 word project report. You will also take part in an oral examination based on your project report. Entry requirements We acknowledge professional practice gained from a wide variety of relevant backgrounds, requiring a minimum of two year’s post qualification full-time experience in addition to having a recognised degree. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Professor Ray Croucher Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8662 email r.e.croucher@qmul.ac.uk


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Dental Technology One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme is designed for Dentists, Dental technicians or scientists who want to advance their knowledge in the field of Dental Technology and Dental Materials through research and training. During this course elements of Dental technology, CAD-CAM, implantology, occlusion and materials are taught together with clinical postgraduates. Teaching is carried out by clinical consultants/staff, chief technicians and Dental/Biomaterials experts in the Institute of Dentistry, which is ranked as one of the top UK Dental schools. Candidates will have the opportunity to carry out novel materials synthesis and projects are running on ceramics, polymer based dental materials, (eg temporary crown and bridge materials and glass ionomer cements) composites and bioactive glasses. Technical practice sessions run during the course underpin the core concepts of occlusion including; occlusal waxing, splints and setting up dentures. Candidates also produce an advanced technical patient case guided by senior multidisciplinary technical staff and clinical consultants. The module taken in Management, leadership and Communication skills will help students who are expected to take up future senior managerial roles. This programme equips candidates with a good scientific base, and transferable technical and research skills which will be attractive to a future employer. Candidates can expect to take up full time teaching, research or industry positions on completion of the programme. Programme outline This programme includes formal teaching, technical training, and a supervised research project. All the taught and technical modules in the programme are core teaching. You are able to choose the topic of your research project according to your area of interest. The programme comprises thirteen modules: • Module 1 – Statistics, Ethics and Research Methods • Module 2-3 – Properties of Dental Materials/Processing Methods • Module 4-5 – Occlusion • Module 6 – Introduction to Implantology • Module 7 – Aesthetics • Module 8 – Advanced Technical practice • Module 9-12 – Research Project and Report • Module 13 – Courses in Management, Leadership and Communication skills

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Assessment Candidates who are following the one-year full-time programme will be examined on their coursework in December (Modules 1), March (2, 4 and 5) and June (Modules 3, 6 and 7), which will qualify them for the Postgraduate Diploma. Marks accumulated from the Postgraduate Diploma (60 per cent) will go towards the final MSc marks. To complete the MSc project reports must be submitted by September of the year that the candidate completes the programme. The oral examination of the project and a practical case submission/oral will be held later the same month. Entry requirements Applicants require a degree (minimum second class honours) in Dentistry or a subject relevant to Dentistry, such as basic sciences or medical/bioengineering, or the equivalent in professional qualifications and experience. A Dental Technology Foundation degree, a minimum of two years post-initial qualification experience, and the ability to demonstrate advanced technical expertise in the field. Applicants may also be required to satisfy a practical trade test administered by the Medical School. A recognised qualification in Dental Technology through assessments, including a written examination of a standard comparable to a threeyear Foundation Degree in Dental Technology, or a Graduate Certificate in Dental Technology (see page 234) awarded at the level of merit. For language requirements, please refer to the international students section on page 390. Further information Dr Mike Cattell Tel: +44 (0)20 7377 7000 ext 2160 email: m.cattell@qmul.ac.uk


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Graduate Certificate in Dental Technology Four months full-time Programme description This programme is designed to help future leaders/technicians in the field of Dental Technology, without a degree, to build on their qualifications and to improve their skills and knowledge before considering entry to Masters level education. The on-campus Graduate Certificate programme is conducted over four months at level 6. Successful completion of the Certificate will allow students to progress to the Diploma/MSc in Dental Technology. This programme is also available to applicants with a dental/science qualification who may be responsible for teaching of related subjects. Programme outline This programme includes formal teaching, technical practice and a supervised project. All the taught modules in the programme are core modules. You will be able to select project topics according to your area of interest. The programme comprises four modules: • Basic Science I • Basic Science II

Bana Abdulmohsen, MSc Dental Technology, Syria “Queen Mary has a good reputation amongst Syrian students. A friend of mine highly recommended studying here at postgraduate level. It has been a great opportunity to meet colleagues in the same field and exchange knowledge. The College itself is a really friendly environment, with great facilities such as the Library, computers and modern accommodation. “Ideally I would like to teach as well as practise dentistry, and hope to apply for a PhD at Queen Mary. I enjoy attending conferences and learning about up to date research. I would also like to work on some research and publish articles.”

• Technical practice • Project. Assessment Students will be expected to complete 12 essays as coursework assessments which will constitute 40 per cent of the total marks for the Graduate Certificate. At the end of module four, students will be examined by two written papers on the subjects covered. A project report and oral examination will also be expected. A reflective practice log book will be kept for the technical work. Entry requirements Applicants should possess the appropriate broadbased training, experience and knowledge for entry. This might be measured by possession of a recognised Dental Technology qualification (see below), a minimum of two years post-initial qualification experience, and the ability to demonstrate advanced technical expertise in the field. Applicants may be required to satisfy a practical trade test.

A recognised qualification in Dental Technology through assessments, including a written examination of a standard comparable to the Higher National Certificate in Dental Technology or the Dental Technicians Advanced Certificate of City and Guilds of London Institute. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 (or an equivalent alternative qualification) is also required for overseas students where English is not the first language. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Students will be required to complete the Graduate Certificate to progress to the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc. Further information Dr M Cattell Tel: +44 (0)20 7377 7000 ext 2160 email: m.cattell@qmul.ac.uk


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

MSc in Experimental Oral Pathology (Oral Sciences) One year full-time Programme description This one year full-time programme is designed as an introduction to the principles of experimental pathology applied to oral disease. It is principally intended to provide a grounding in experimental method for dental graduates who plan to follow either a career in academic dentistry or one of the clinical specialities. It also provides an opportunity for science graduates to learn about oral disease, in preparation for a career in dental research. The programme offers fundamental training in the principles of laboratory research methods and the range of techniques used to study the behaviour of oral tissues in health and disease. Programme outline Your programme will be modular, focused on acquiring laboratory skills and knowledge. The taught modules provide the basic understanding to help with the research component. There is a structured course of seminars with associated practical work, dealing with the structure and behaviour of cells and tissues in health and disease. This core begins with fundamental and general concepts of cell biology and continues with the application of these concepts to a consideration of oral and dental disease. Related disciplines such as oral microbiology and immunology are also covered. Throughout the programme, emphasis is placed on the evidence upon which the concepts are based and the way in which such evidence is obtained by observation and experiment. You are actively encouraged to take part in the seminars. Running in parallel with the core programme are several related series of seminars dealing with research methods, statistics and techniques of fundamental importance to experimental pathology such as tissue culture, molecular biological techniques, immunocytochemistry, light and electron microscopy. Students undertake a laboratory-based research project in the final module of the programme, exploring any aspect of oral disease.

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Assessment The programme is assessed by two written papers, the submission of a project report and an oral examination. Entry requirements A degree in dentistry or medicine or a good BSc honours in a biological science subject. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Alan Cruchley Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7134 email: a.t.cruchley@qmul.ac.uk or Dr L Bergmeier Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8654 email: l.a.bergmeier@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc in Implant Dentistry

MSc in Oral Biology

One year part-time

One year full-time

Programme description For dentists wishing to upgrade their core knowledge and skills of evidence-based dentistry in identifying and understanding the scientific basis of implant treatment.

Programme description You will join a one year full-time programme, the only UK MSc in Oral Biology. It is designed to be appropriate for both dental and basic or applied science graduates who may in future be responsible for the teaching of related subjects, or who need a greater understanding of the subject in order to develop their future academic or research careers.

Programme outline The programme includes timetabled seminars, personal study and supervised research. All programme taught modules are core options, although your have considerable choice when selecting a research topic. The taught modules’ content includes: • Searching, critically reading and analysing the literature • Formulating appropriate hypotheses for investigation • Demonstrating knowledge of clinical techniques and how to evaluate them • Interpreting the results of these techniques • Planning, conducting and reporting original research. Students are encouraged to develop appropriate key written, oral, group work and time management skills. Assessment The assessment procedures are: • a research report on an individual project • an oral examination on your research report. Candidates will be examined in the year in which they complete their research report. Entry requirements You should have successfully completed the two-year part-time Diploma programme in Implant Dentistry, accredited by the Faculty of General Dental Practitioners of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr G Martuscelli Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8663 email: g.martuscelli@qmul.ac.uk

Oral Biology encompasses a range of basic sciences fundamental to the understanding of the underlying scientific principles relevant to developing modern dentistry. You will study dental anatomy, oral physiology, and dental biophysics, as well as basic biochemistry in relation to dentistry, chemistry of bone and tooth biominerals and components, aetiology of dental caries and erosion, saliva biochemistry, oral microbiology, dental materials science, modern 2D and 3D x-ray imaging. Programme outline You will follow a group of modules, including Statistics, Ethics and Research Methods, an Introduction to Oral Biology, Dental Hard Tissues and the Microenvironment, Oral Microbiology, Minimally Invasive Dentistry and Properties of Dental Materials. In addition to these basic science lectures, there will also be lectures from practising clinicians on current issues in modern clinical dentistry. You will also complete a laboratory based project, which will be partly assessed by an oral examination. Entry requirements A medical or dental degree, a non-clinical degree in basic sciences, biological sciences, or bioengineering, or the equivalent in professional qualifications and experience. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 (or an equivalent alternative qualification) is also required for overseas students where English is not the first language. Further information Dr Paul Anderson Tel: +44 (0)20 7883 7933 email: p.anderson@qmul.ac.uk


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Postgraduate Diploma in Endodontic Practice Two years part-time Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to develop their clinical skills in and understanding of endodontics. The aim is to enable the practitioner to develop and apply the current evidence base to their clinical practice. Programme outline By entering this programme you will embark on: clinical training (30 per cent), laboratory practical sessions (25 per cent) formal seminar teaching (45 per cent). All modules in this programme are core. Assessment Your progress will be monitored throughout the programme by formative in-course assessments. These may include essays, critical paper reviews and practical tests of laboratory based skills. On completion of the programme, you will be assessed by two clinical case reports of not more than 2,000 words each and an oral examination. Your in-course assessments will contribute up to 40 per cent, the two clinical case reports up to 40 per cent and the oral examination up to 20 per cent of your final mark. Entry requirements You will have a UK dental degree or equivalent (such as IQE), hold full registration with the General Dental Council and have a minimum of two years post-initial qualification experience. Offers to join the programme follow competitive interview. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Chathura Malalasena Tel +44 (0)20 7377 7057 email: chathura.malalasena@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk or Dr Sharan Siddhu Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8617 email: s.k.sidhu@qmul.ac.uk

Jonathan Collier, PhD in Dentistry “I researched the role of chemokine receptors in oral cancer metastasis. Oral cancer is a devastating disease and this study focused on a possible mechanism by which these tumours spread around the body. “There is an enormous amount offered by the College with regards to facilities and further development. As a clinician it was important to be close to a major teaching hospital. The facilities are first class and there is a huge diversity of departments within the College that really facilitates collaborative research. If you are stuck and don’t know how to tackle something then there is a wealth of resources (academic and practical) available to help you. “I was proud to be able to present my work in competitions at the national and then the international conferences for dental research. The latter was in Brisbane, Australia – and the bonus was I won!”


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Institute of Dentistry Degree programmes

(cont)

MClinDent in Oral Medicine

MClinDent in Oral Surgery

Two years full-time

Two years full-time

Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue a career in oral medicine, either in primary or secondary care services or in a university setting. The programme aims to develop your knowledge, understanding and clinical skills in oral medicine and related topics.

Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue a career in oral surgery, either in primary or secondary care services or in a university setting. It can contribute to the first two years of clinical training leading to the Membership examination of The Royal College of Surgeons.

Programme outline By entering this programme you will embark on: clinical training (60 per cent), formal teaching (25 per cent) and research activity (15 per cent). The programme aims to enable you to understand basic sciences related to oral medicine and apply this to north and east London’s unique clinical case mix. All the taught and clinical modules in the programme are core teaching. The research element of this programme involves a report or a literature review on a topic chosen with the advice of your tutor and a clinical audit report.

Programme outline By entering this programme you will embark on: extensive clinical training (60 per cent) formal teaching (25 per cent) and a supervised research project (15 per cent). All the taught and clinical modules in the programme are core modules. You will however have considerable choice when selecting a topic for your research project.

Assessment Your clinical activity will be assessed through case presentations and a clinical logbook whilst the taught element will be assessed through one written paper and oral assessment. Your research activity will be assessed by a report of a literature review on a topic chosen with the advice of your tutor and a clinical audit report. Weightings of each of the major components will reflect their contribution to the programme: clinical training (60 per cent), formal teaching (25 per cent), and research activity (15 per cent). Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242.

The full programme includes patient diagnosis and treatment planning, teeth and root extraction, surgical endodontics, management of dental trauma, implantology and pain management, and anxiety control. Assessment You will be assessed at the end of the first year through a written paper and a clinical viva voce examination. At the end of the second year there are two written papers, four case presentations (two seen and two unseen) and a treatment planning exercise. You will also take part in an oral assessment of your research report. At the moment all three major components of the second year exams (written, clinical, research) are equally weighted.

For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

During an optional additional third year, you will undertake, if eligible, the Royal College of Surgeons Membership examination. This entails case presentations, clinical diagnostic and treatment planning exercises.

Further information Dr Anwar Tappuni Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8655 email: a.r.tappuni@qmul.ac.uk

Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242.

or Ryan Salucideen email: r.salucideen@qmul.ac.uk

For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Judith Jones Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7154 email: judith.jones@qmul.ac.uk


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MClinDent in Orthodontics Two years full-time Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue a career in orthodontics either in primary or secondary care services, or in a university setting. The two-year full time Masters programme is integrated into a three-year clinical programme, with a strong emphasis on close chairside support. Students will undertake the MSc examination (University of London) at the completion of their second year and the Royal College of Surgeons Membership examination during the third year. The programme aims to enable you to: • Understand the biomechanical principles of tooth movement • Understand the development, growth and influence of the skeletal and soft tissues on the dentition • Understand the importance of materials science in orthodontics • Formulate a diagnosis of malocclusion and appropriate treatment plan • Apply the theory and practice of clinical orthodontics to treat a variety of malocclusions. Programme outline By entering this programme you will embark on a course which includes extensive clinical training (60 per cent), formal teaching (25 per cent) and a supervised research project (15 per cent). All the taught and clinical modules in the programme are core teaching. You will however have considerable choice when selecting a topic for your research project. The threeyear programme includes the following areas: • Growth and development of the head, face and dentition • Anatomical and physiological considerations of the face and jaws, including the temporomandibular joint • The aetiology of malocclusion • Clinical assessment, diagnosis and treatment of malocclusion • State-of-the-art treatment mechanics • Concepts and practice of retention and stability • Inter-disciplinary care, including surgical and restorative interfaces. Assessment You are currently assessed at the end of the second year (MSc examination) by two written papers, case presentations, a clinical diagnostic and treatment planning exercise. You will also take part in an oral assessment of your research report. During the third year, you will undertake, if eligible, the Royal College

of Surgeons Membership examination (M.Orth). This entails case presentations, clinical diagnostic and treatment planning exercises. Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Lorraine Low Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8744 email: l.low@qmul.ac.uk or Dr Ama Johal Tel: +44 (0)20 8662 8651 email: a.s.johal@qmul.ac.uk


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Institute of Dentistry Degree programmes

(cont)

MClinDent in Paediatric Dentistry Two years full-time, three years part-time Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue a career in paediatric dentistry either in primary or secondary care services, or in a university setting. The programme can contribute the first two years of clinical training leading to Membership in Paediatric Dentistry of The Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh and full active membership of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. Both of these options are possible following successful completion of an optional third year of training which is available through competitive entry. Programme outline By entering this programme you will undertake extensive clinical, formal teaching and a supervised research project. All the taught and clinical modules in the programme are core modules but you will have considerable choice in selecting a topic for your research project. The programme comprises 9 modules: Module 1 Foundation Course Module 2 Statistics, Ethics and Research Methods Module 3 Basic Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry including the following: • Behaviour science/patient management, sedation and general anaesthesia • Dental Traumatology • Prevention of Caries and

Periodontal Disease • Diagnosis and Treatment Planning • Basic Orthodontics Module 4 Advance Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry I, including: • Consolidation of the Basic Knowledge • Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology • Children with special needs Module 5 Advance Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry II, including: • Paediatric medicine and surgery • Dental Anomalies • Multi-disciplinary treatment planning Module 6 Basic Clinical Skills and case-mix Module 7 Specific Clinical Skill Module 8 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Plan Module 9 Research Project You will undertake the care of child and adolescent patients to gain experience and prepare for your case presentations in the final examination. An important feature of the programme is that you will also participate in medical clinics held in the main hospital. You will also attend specialist clinics such as cleft lip and palate, and developmental disorders. Assessment Each module is assessed separately, including essays, written, clinical and viva voce examinations. Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Lorraine Low Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8744 email: l.low@qmul.ac.uk or Professor Mark Hector Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8676 email: m.p.hector@qmul.ac.uk or Dr Ferranti Wong Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8745 email: f.s.l.wong@qmul.ac.uk


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MClinDent in Periodontology

MClinDent in Prosthodontics

Two years full-time

Two years full-time

Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue postgraduate level education or a career in Periodontology. The programme is recognised by the UK Specialist Advisory Committee in Restorative Dentistry as suitable for the first two years of specialist training in Periodontology. An optional third year of training is available through competitive entry for UK/EU applicants wishing to be entered on the GDC specialist list. This option must be agreed by The London Deanery prior to entry. Programme outline The programme consists of clinical training, formal taught elements and the completion of a research project and dissertation. The clinical training (60 per cent) in diagnosis and management of periodontal disease emphasises the practice of advanced techniques in periodontology and includes the relationship between periodontology and other dental disciplines. The formal teaching element (25 per cent) is designed to provide a wide scientific background in the practice of periodontology. The supervised research project consists of 15 per cent of total programme activity. All the taught and clinical modules in the programme are core modules. However, you have a wide range of opportunities and topic choices for the research project in our exemplary modern research laboratory and clinical facilities. The full programme includes attendance at weekly new patient diagnostic clinics, clinical practice in periodontology including surgical, antimicrobial, regenerative and mucogingival procedures, management of periodontal disease in patients with other restorative problems, and principles and practice of implant dentistry. Assessment You are currently assessed at the end of Year One by a single written examination paper and a clinical oral examination on the scientific basis of Periodontology. At the end of the second year there are two written papers, four case presentations, and a clinical diagnosis and treatment planning test. You will also produce a written report of your research project. You will also take part in an oral assessment of your research report. At the moment all three major components of the second year exams (written, clinical, research) are equally weighted. Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Kevin Seymour, Tel: + 44 (0)20 7882 8663 email: k.g.seymour@qmul.ac.uk

Programme description This programme is designed for dental graduates who wish to pursue a career in Prosthodontics. It can contribute to the first two years of the three year clinical training leading to Membership in Restorative Dentistry (MRD) of The Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh. Membership is granted following successful completion of an optional third year of training without additional examination. This option is only available through competitive entry. For UK/EU applicants wishing to be entered on the GDC specialist list this option must be agreed by The London Deanery prior to first year entry. Programme outline The programme comprises extensive clinical training (60 per cent), formal teaching (25 per cent), and a supervised research project (15 per cent). All the taught and clinical modules on the programme are core options. You will have considerable choice when selecting a topic for your research project. The programme includes modules covering all aspects of fixed prosthodontics, removable prosthodontics, implantology and related subjects. You will value the opportunity of attending new patient diagnostic clinics, providing you with the opportunity of formulating complex treatment plans. Assessment You will currently be assessed at the end of year one by a single written examination paper and a clinical oral examination. At the end of the second year there are two written papers, two case presentations (four for the MRD candidates), a treatment planning exercise, and a clinical test in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. You will also take part in an oral examination of your research report. At the moment all three major components of the second year exams (written, clinical, research) are equally weighted. Entry requirements Please refer to the person specification table for all clinical masters programmes in Dentistry on page 242. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr P D Taylor Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8619 email: p.d.taylor@qmul.ac.uk


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Person specification for entry to postgraduate clinical dentistry programmes Criterion

Essential

Desirable

Education

Primary qualification in Dentistry - BDS or equivalent.

Primary dental qualification registerable with the General Dental Council in the UK; MFDS, MJDF or FDS or equivalent; Other postgraduate diplomas, degrees; Other evidence of high academic achievement (eg Course grades, award of degree with honours or equivalent. Previous first degree BSc).

Experience

Two years full time (or equivalent) post qualification clinical practice of dentistry.

English Language

English as first language

Evidence of experience of practice of a broad range of general dentistry; Completion of formal Vocational Training course, General Professional Training program, or equivalent such as hospital internship. Specific clinical experience in discipline/specialty to which they are applying.

OR Minimum IELTS score of 7.0 (no less than 6.5 in any part), TOEFL scores as follows: internet based 106, computer based 263, paper based 627 and must have been completed within the last two years. Career intentions

Clear commitment to pursuing postgraduate studies in the one specialty/discipline applied for.

Generic skills

Ability to use a computer and familiar with common programs such as MS Office.

1 You may not apply for more than one speciality in the hope of acceptance on one. We do though recommend applicants consider application for the Diploma in Dental Clinical Sciences course here prior to applying for any of the clinical programmes as it will show commitment and allow us to assess the candidates’ work ethic and knowledge before any decisions are made.

Other equivalent tests will be considered on merit.

2 The personal statement should show genuine enthusiasm for the speciality, such as attendance at relevant conferences, membership of appropriate professional bodies and postgraduate course attendance and not be generic in nature.


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Institute of Dentistry Research Research degrees The Institute of Dentistry welcomes postgraduate students MPhil, PhD, RD (RES) and visiting research fellows to undertake research in the areas of interest listed below. Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD/RD) or post-doctorate training, and work under the supervision of senior researchers. They are trained in transferable skills in accordance with the British Research Councils requirements for research students. For further information on research opportunities please contact the Director of the Institute of Dentistry Graduate School Professor Wagner Marcenes. Entry requirements Students with upper second class (or better) BSc honours degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. For language requirements, please refer to the international students section on page 390.

Research areas Research in the Institute of Dentistry is organised within multidisciplinary research groups which provide critical mass of expertise, common interests and a fulfilling academic environment. Major interests within these groups include the following: Infection and immunity • Microbial pathogenesis and virulence • Microbial-host interactions and immune defences • Naturally occurring antibacterial peptides and other molecules • Mucosal immune responses • Clinical studies and genetic factors in oral ulceration • Host bacterial reactions in periodontal diseases. • Cell biology of bone formation and tissue regeneration • Risk and prognostic factors in Periodontitis. Oral cancer • Oral epithelial ageing and role of telomerase in oral cancer • Epithelial stem cells in cancer • Keratinocyte biology • Biology of tumour invasion and role of integrins. • Clinical studies of treatments in oral cancer • Behavioural factors and smoking cessation. • Physical Sciences in Dentistry

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Institute of Dentistry Research

Institute of Dentistry Staff research interests

• Physical chemistry of dental caries

Physical Sciences in Dentistry

• X-ray microtomography of dental hard tissues

Maisoon Al-Jawad BSc PhD Lecturer in Dental Physical Sciences Biomineralisation – enamel formation, protein absorption at interfaces for biomedical applications, enamel structure-function relationship, using neutron and synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques novel to dentistry

• Crystallographic studies of enamel and biomaterials • Changes in bone structure associated with ageing and tooth loss • Salivary proteins in enamel homeostasis and dental caries • Biomechanical properties of bone and dental hard tissues • Polymer chemistry and dental materials • Development of polymers for drug delivery devices. Clinical and Population Research • Clinical and Population studies on sociopsychological, economic, and behavioural determinants of oral health inequalities • Clinical and Population studies on tobacco cessation in the oral health environment • Clinical and Population studies on oral health impact on quality of life • Population studies on the burden of oral diseases • Clinical studies on determinants of treatment outcomes of oral and dental conditions, including oral cancer, Behcet’s Syndrome, Dry mouth, Periodontal diseases, and malloclusion, Clinical studies on Minimum Intervention • Development of primary care networks for practice based research • Systematic reviews (collaborative work with the Cochrane Oral Heath Group).

Paul Anderson BSc PhD Reader in Biophysics in relation to Dentistry Chemistry of enamel, X-ray microscopic methods, salivary proteins and enamel mineralization Professor Alan Boyde PhD BDS LDSRCS MDHonCaus Professor of Mineralised Tissue Biology Bone and cartilage structure, imaging, development Mike Cattell MSc PhD Lecturer in Dental Technology Synthesis and characterisation of glass-ceramic materials, mechanical testing of ceramic materials Graham R Davis BSc(Eng) PhD Senior Lecturer in Biophysics X-ray microtomography, 3D imaging techniques Stephanie Dowker BSc BDS PhD CSci CChem MRSC Clinical Senior Lecturer in Adult Oral Health Physicochemical mechanisms of de- and remineralisation in dental tissues Professor Mark P Hector BSc BDS PhD Professor of Oral Health of Children Physiology of saliva, salivary proteins and enamel mineral homeostasis Professor Robert Hill BSc MsC PhDDIC Professor of Physical Sciences in Relation to Dentistry Degradable glasses, bioactive glasses, restorative dental fillings, glass (Ionomer) cements, glassceramics, demineralisation, remineralisation phenomena and caries, tooth pastes, mode of action of strontium and fluoride on hard tissues Tomasz Janicki BDS PhD Clinical Lecturer in Adult Oral Health Biomaterials, laser dentistry, soft tissue and hard tissue lasers, air abrasion and air polishing, SEM images, implant dentistry


Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary, University of London

Natalia Karpukhina PhD Lecturer in Dental Physical Sciences Setting mechanism in glass ionomer cements, characterisation of various dental cements, structural characterisation of bioactive glasses and bioceramics, structural study of substitutions in apatites, structural study of bioapatites, establishing utility of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance technique to monitor amorphous or nanoscrystalline structure and its evolution in dental materials Ginny Kingsmill BDS PhD Clinical Senior Lecturer Osteoporosis, osteonecrosis of the jaws, post extraction bone resorption Jelena Kosoric BDS PhD Clinical Lecturer in Paediatric Dentistry Interaction of salivary proteins with hard dental tissues: enamel and dentine Sahar Mohsin MBBS MMedSci PhD Lecturer in Anatomy Bone histology, bone biomechanics, tissue response to orthodontic tooth movement, fabrication of synthetic bone scaffold, dental implants, other prosthesis like hip implants, study osseointegeration and other mechanical and biological aspects, use of growth factors and BMP in dental implants, detection of microdamage in vivo using advanced imaging techniques, osteoporosis: drug release antibiotics, anti resorptive, anabolic drugs, strontium and zinc Sandra Parker BSc Hons MPhil PhD Lecturer in Dental Materials Polymeric dental materials, elastomeric materials for biomedical applications Mangala P Patel PhD MSc BSc(Hons) Senior Lecturer in Dental Materials, Centre for Oral Growth and Development Synthetic polymeric materials in clinical dentistry and orthopaedics, drug delivery systems Simon Rawlinson BSc PhD Lecturer in Oral Biology (Physiology) Skeletal development, regulation of bone growth by mechanical loading, regional variation in bone tissue, influence of biomaterials on bone cell growth, osseointegration

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Kevin Seymour BDS MSc PhD MRD DRD MFGDP FHEA Senior Lecturer/Honorary Consultant Dental metrology, measurement of preparations, periodontal graft materials Ferranti Wong BDS MSc PhD FDSRCSEd FDSRCS(Eng) Senior Lecturer/Honorary Consultant in Child Dental Health X-ray microtomography, dental traumatology, clinical paediatric dentistry

Oral Cancer Alan Cruchley PhD Senior Lecturer in Oral Pathology Epithelial permeability barrier, the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis and oral cancer Professor Eric K Parkinson BSc PhD Professor of Head and Neck Cancer Immortalisation of human keratinocytes, telomerase in oral cancer Muy-Teck Teh BSc PhD Lecturer in Head and Neck Cancer Early molecular events in oral carcinogenesis cancer initiation Hong Wan BSc MSc PhD Non Clinical Senior Lecturer in Molecular Immunobiology The role of desmosomal proteins, including Dsg3, in junction assembly, cell polarisation, differentiation and tissue morphogenesis Ahmad Waseem BSc MSc (Biochemistry) MPhil PhD (Biochemistry) Reader in Oral Biology Centre for Clinical and Diagnostic Oral Sciences Molecular markers of oral cancer, cytokeratins

Infection and Immunity Robert P Allaker BSc PhD ILTM Reader in Mucocutaneous Microbiology Host-microbial interactions, antibacterial molecules Lesley A Bergmeier CBiol MIBiol PhD Senior Lecturer in Applied Mucosal Immunology (non clinical) Mucosal immunlogy, heat shock proteins, immune responses


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Institute of Dentistry Staff research interests Professor Farida Fortune CBE BDS MBBS MRCP FRCP FDS RCSeng FGDP PhD Dip Ed Teachers Med/Dent Professor of Medicine in relation to Oral Health Dean of Institute of Dentistry Clinical epidemiology, oral oncology, genetic, inflammatory and immune determinants of oral mucosal diseases

Ana Gamboa BDS MSc DDPH PhD Clinical Lecturer in Dental Public Health Socio-economic and psycho-social factors related to periodontal health, access and utilization of oral health care, clinical trials

Eleni Hagi-Pavli BSc PhD Non Clinical Lecturer in Oral Sciences Basic biology and clinical oral research in investigating mucosal inflammation, Behcet’s, Crohns Disease, Lichen planus and Erytheme Multiforme

Ama Johal MSc PhD FDSMOrth FDS(Orth) RCS Senior Lecturer/ Hon Consultant Orthodontist Orthodontics: quality of life and psycho-social factors related to orthodontic need and treatment, treatment mechanics, sleep-related breathing disorders: role of mandibular advancement splint therapy in management: design factors; modes of action and outcomes of treatment, clinical trials

Ian McKay BA DPhil Lecturer Basic bone biology, periodontal disease, control of osteogenesis, development of osteogenic biomaterials, infection control, wound healing, alveolar bone biology

Helen Liversidge B Ch D MSc PhD Senior Clinical Lecturer Worldwide variation in the timing of permanent tooth formation, application of dental maturity standards to estimate age, third molar development and estimating age of majority

Anwar Tappuni LDS RCS PhD MRACDS(OM) FHEA Clinical Lecturer in Oral Medicine Dry mouth/Sjogren's syndrome, oral manifestations of HIV, Behcet's Disease

Professor Wagner Marcenes BDS MSc PhD Professor of Oral Epidemiology Director of Institute of Dentistry Graduate School Epidemiology of oral diseases, socioeconomic and psychosocial determinants of oral health inequalities, behaviour and biological pathways, quality of life, oral health needs assessments, epidemiological surveys, and clinical trials

Robert Whiley BSc PhD Senior Lecturer Oral microbiology, oral streptococci, streptococcus pneumonia, candida albicans, and microbiological aspects of biomaterials

Patient and Population based Research Group Aylin Baysan BDS MSc PhD MFDS RCS(Edin) FHEA Clinical Lecturer in Restorative Dentistry Cariology, minimal intervention, dental caries and root caries, detection of dental caries, domiciliary dental care, quality of Life, clinical trials George Cherukara BDS MFDS RCP PhD Specialist Registrar (Clinical Lectureship) Dental metrology, translational research, educational research Professor Elizabeth Davenport BDS PhD MSc FDSRCSEd FHE Professor of Dental Education Education research, learning styles, professionalism, assessment, inter professional learning children health care, systemic disease and periodontal disease

Valeria Marinho MSc PhD Non Clinical Senior Lecturer Evidence synthesis, systematic reviews methodology, and evidence based health care Sharan Sidhu BDS MSc PhD MFDS RCS FADM, FICD Clinical Senior Lecturer/Honorary Consultant in Restorative Dentistry Cariology, dental materials; glass Ionomer materials; adhesion to tooth structure, dentine perfusion, laser preparation of teeth, dental materials and the biological interface, clinical trials Alison Williams BDS MSc PhD DDPH FDS Clinical Senior Lecturer/Honorary Consultant in Orthodontics Orthodontics, quality of life, cleft palate, clinical trial Lifong Zou BSc PhD Clinical Scientist in Dental Metrology Clinic orientated freeform surface measurements


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Institute of Dentistry Further information Director of Graduate Studies Professor Wagner Marcenes Institute Graduate Tutor Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8650 email: w.marcenes@qmul.ac.uk www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/dental

Staff profile: Dr Muy-Teck Teh Lecturer in Head and Neck Cancer

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

“My research interests are focused on finding new biomarker genes for predicting early oral cancer formation. Currently studies are based around a known cancer gene called FOXM1B using human oral keratinocytes cells as the research model. Early results have showed that FOXM1B may be an early cancer marker which is expressed at a higher level in pre-cancer and cancer cells compared to normal cells. The future aim is to develop a diagnostic test using the Gene Chip technology that can guide treatment strategy.”


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Institute of Health Sciences Education www.ihse.qmul.ac.uk Research strengths Our Institute comprises the Centre for Health Sciences with multidisciplinary research groups addressing programmes in health services research particularly related to primary health care, hosting the Translational Research Unit for the MRC Asthma UK Centre in Allergic mechanisms of Asthma, and offering modular programmes in primary care and public health; the Centre for Medical Education, focusing primarily on curriculum delivery, design and assessment and the Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine which offers a modular programme in sports and exercise medicine for both doctors and physiotherapists as well as a research programme including work on the legacy of the 2012 Olympic bid. The Institute is unique within Barts and The London in its emphasis on clinical and communitybased research, its inclusion of researchers from a wide range of disciplines, and its integration with local primary health care, local community-based groups and sports-focused organisations. The Institute of Health Sciences Education, comprising three Centres and approximately 160 staff, was established in 2005. The Centres were formed from the amalgamation of existing diverse units within Barts and The London medical school. Staff employed in the Institute come from a wide range of disciplines and benefit from transfer of ideas between disciplines, and between teachers, researchers and developers. Within the Institute we conduct a programme of research focused largely on chronic disease management, infection and methodological issues related to health services research. In particular we house multidisciplinary research groups addressing programmes on respiratory and cardiovascular health, tuberculosis and HIV, and lay-led self management. We also have a programme of research in sports and exercise medicine. We have expertise in a wide range of methodologies notably randomised trials, use of complex interventions, translational, qualitative and developmental research. Our research has direct relevance to patients locally, nationally and internationally.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise In the 2008 RAE we submitted a strong application to the Health Services Research panel and came fourth out of 24 units submitted to this panel, ahead of Oxford, University College London and King’s College London. A substantial proportion of our outputs were rated as internationally leading or of internationally excellent quality.


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Institute of Health Sciences Education Projects, funding, research grants and awards Current major research projects include large clinical trials: • evaluating methods for improving the treatment and management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OEDIPUS, MEDEA, BELLA projects) • investigating vitamin D supplementation for tuberculosis (ADJUVIT project) • exploring methods for improving the identification and management of intimate partner abuse in primary care (IRIS project) • evaluating the impact of the introduction of the London Low Emission Zone on children’s respiratory health (LEZ) • testing the impact of HIV screening in primary care (RHIVA2) • comparing tuberculin versus IGRA tests for TB screening (PREDICT) • evaluating a method of decreasing depression in nursing homes (OPERA). The last two projects are collaborations with the Universities of Warwick and Bristol respectively. In addition we lead two large programme grants considering the effect of vitamin D on respiratory conditions (OVID) and self-management programmes for people suffering from chronic pain (COPERS). We also have a major grant to equip a new Human Performance laboratory within the Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine. All projects are externally funded and the Institute has an income from such grants of over £1 million a year. Together with the Centre for Psychiatry in the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, the Institute houses the UK Clinical Research Collaboration registered Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit which was recently awarded three years infrastructure funding from the National Institute for Health Research. We collaborate with a number of universities in the UK (St George’s, King’s College, Imperial and UCL, University of London; Warwick; Southampton; Bristol; Glasgow and Aberdeen) and abroad (McGill, Canada; New York; Melbourne, Australia; Stanford).

Postgraduate resources The Institute provides a very supportive environment for those wanting to undertake a PhD in the broad area of health services research, particularly primary care and public health, as well as opportunities in applied statistics and sociology in this area. All students have their own workspace; postgraduate students within the Institute run a postgraduate qualitative research support group and the Institute’s weekly research seminars provide an excellent opportunity for learning about aspects of other research and for receiving feedback on students’ own research.

Scholarships / studentships Scholarship information changes every year. The majority of studentships/ scholarships in the Institute are funded from external sources and in recent years studentships have been won from the NHS Research and Development executive, the Health Care Consortium, and from Barts and The London Joint Research Board. For current information, please contact our Director of Graduate Studies: Professor Clive Seale email: c.seale@qmul.ac.uk


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Institute of Health Sciences Education Career opportunities Degree programmes The research conducted within the Institute is predominantly health services, translational and community based. Thus the vast majority of research projects undertaken are in collaboration with NHS primary care or acute trusts. We also have links with local community organisations, sports associations and clubs, national governing bodies for sport, the Olympic Medical Institute, and various medical charities. We have a relatively small postgraduate community. Students come from a wide range of disciplines including medicine, osteopathy, physiotherapy, nursing and statistics. Many are mature students who continue working in their own profession. Others have continued post-doctoral research at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry or elsewhere.

Graduate profile: Dan Lewindon Studied: MSc in Sports Medicine, graduated 2007 Currently: I work full-time as Senior Physiotherapist for Northampton Saints RFC and as a locum physiotherapist for England RFU. Why did you choose Queen Mary? As a physiotherapist working in professional rugby, it was always my intention to complete an MSc in Sports Medicine both to improve my understanding and expertise in this rapidly evolving field. After much research I found Queen Mary to be the best programme for my needs. It offered the best mix of ‘foundation’ modules in assessment and injury management, and modules of interest and innovation, including team medicine, podiatry/ biomechanics and injection therapy. The flexibility of the programme also allowed me to limit time lost from work and spread the workload, which was essential in placating my employers. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? Although by no means easy and often requiring significant personal sacrifice, the MSc has been an extremely worthwhile experience for me, both with regard to my work within sport and also in general practice. It has improved the quality of my assessment skills and my ability to generate rehabilitation plans, which are criteria driven and evidence-based. I also gained an insight into the latest innovations in injury management and had the opportunity to network with leaders in the field of sports medicine, both lecturers on the programme and through organised shadowing sessions. I would whole-heartedly recommend this programme to any physiotherapist with an interest in sports medicine or an intention to work in the field.

MRes in Medical Research One year full-time; two years part-time (Subject to approval) Programme description This programme offers an opportunity to gain an excellent training in generic research skills. This is achieved through taught modules as well as conducting a novel research project. On completion, you will be well-equipped to undertake a doctoral programme of study. Programme outline Module options include: Governance framework and research management • Critical evaluation • Engagement with a wider audience • Presentation skills • Dissertation literature review Assessment You will be assessed through a series of written and oral presentations including: Critical evaluation of a research method • Application to an ethics committee • Referees report of a paper and a grant proposal • Literature review • Proposal for a pilot study • Report of the pilot study (written, poster and oral presentations) • Fellowship proposal/grant application • Press release, topical article and oral presentation • Critical presentation of research papers Entry requirements For entry on to the programme students will need either MB BS, BDS or a BSc with an upper second class honours in an appropriate subject For language requirements, please refer to the international students section on page 390. Further information Professor Joy Hinson Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2090 email: j.p.hinson@qmul.ac.uk


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Institute of Health Sciences Education Degree programmes MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Primary Care One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This is a flexible, modular, multidisciplinary programme that aims to facilitate learning in topics that are meaningful to all primary care staff including GPs. It captures the rapid developments that are taking place in Primary Care, and is designed to provide new and exciting learning opportunities which will enhance your work experience. This programme is run jointly with City University and offers you a diverse range of routes. The one you choose to follow will depend on your career aspirations. You can either complete eight modules to attain the Postgraduate Diploma or continue to Masters level by submitting a 15,000 word dissertation. Modules can also be taken as ‘stand alone’ modules as part of your personal development plan, as required by the NHS knowledge and skills framework. Programme outline The programme offers four routes: • Primary Care Route: a flexible route which allows students to choose from a wide range of options to meet their individual learning needs • District Nursing Route • Long Term Conditions Route: particularly designed to meet the needs of those in community matron/case manager roles • Advanced Nurse Practitioner Route: RCN accredited route for those who wish to develop their skills as advanced practitioners For the full list of modules and route structures, please see the programme website: www.ihse.qmul.ac.uk/chs/education/primarycare Each module includes 30 hours of group teaching. Students are also expected to spend 120 hours for each module on private study (reading, preparation for sessions, project work and assignments). Assessment The programme consists of both formative and summative assessments. Students are required to complete an assessment at the end of each module. These include essays, presentations, reflective essays and an unseen written exam. In order to obtain the Masters award a 15,000 word dissertation must also be completed.

Students who have obtained the Postgraduate Diploma in Primary Care may convert this to a Masters degree by submission of the preparatory work and then the final dissertation, any time up to five years after starting the programme. Entry requirements This programme requires a suitable level of prior academic achievement and/or practical experience of delivering healthcare, either personally or in a managerial capacity. This can be shown by a medical, nursing or dental qualification of an appropriate standard, plus relevant professional experience. This can also be demonstrated by a good honours degree in another subject plus relevant professional experience. Applicants for a Masters degree are usually required to have achieved an upper second class honours degree or equivalent standard in other qualifications. Applicants with other qualifications plus relevant experience, or without professional qualifications but with extensive relevant experience, will also be considered. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Programme Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2541 email: g.borrie@qmul.ac.uk www.ihse.qmul.ac.uk/chs/courses/primarycare


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Institute of Health Sciences Education Degree programmes (cont) MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This programme is run jointly by Queen Mary, University of London and City University. This highly practical programme aims to enable you to develop the skills and knowledge to become a leader in public health, health economics or food policy and practice. By the end of the programme, you will also have the opportunity to cover the majority of the skills and knowledge required for the MFPHM part 1 examination. It offers students from a wide range of disciplines the opportunity to study practical aspects of public health with a strong emphasis on current public health issues, food policy or health economics. Programme outline The programme offers four routes: • Public Health • Health Economics • Food Policy • Community Public Health Specialist Practice Nursing: Health Visiting; School Nursing; District Nursing

For the full module list and route structures, please see the programme website: www.ihse.qmul.ac.uk/chs/education/publichealth or http://www.city.ac.uk/study/courses/communityhealth /public-health-msc-pgdip.html Each module includes 30 hours of group teaching and 120 hours private study for each module. Assessment The MSc requires the completion of six core modules, two option modules and a dissertation. Module options are taken from programmes at both City University and Queen Mary University. Diploma students will be required to complete eight modules only. Assessment varies per module and may include: essay writing, a policy paper or article suitable for submission for peer review publication, an oral or poster presentation of work, completing a reflective learning diary and completing a grant proposal form. Many or all the projects undertaken by students on this MSc will be closely related to your daily work. Entry requirements We recognise professional experience from a wide range of relevant backgrounds in the public sector, with a minimum of two years’ professional experience for applicants together with at least a second class honours degree. International students need to have a degree-level qualification in an area related to public health, and equivalent professional experience. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Students in local PCTs may undertake this programme through the NHS London Commissioning Contract with City University with supporting documentation. Further information Caroline Humphrey Academic Administrator MSc Public Health, School of Community and Health Sciences City University, 20 Bartholomew Close, London EC1A 7QN Tel: +44 (0)20 7040 5470 email: mscphad@city.ac.uk www.ihse.qmul.ac.uk/chs/courses/publichealth


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MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Sport and Exercise Medicine One year full-time, two to four years part-time

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Assessment Taught modules are assessed by a variety of written exams, coursework and clinical exams. All are weighted in varying degrees, the dissertation accounts for one third of the total marks.

Programme description This internationally renowned programme is open to doctors and physiotherapists. The programme is based on the philosophy of total care for the athlete and the promotion of physical activity in the general population. It is unique in the UK for the delivery of integrated academic and practical tuition. Based on the main Mile End Campus, the maximum intake is 30 students.

Entry requirements Doctors and physiotherapists with at least one year’s postgraduate relevant clinical experience. Current involvement with sport would be an advantage. Physiotherapists with overseas qualifications must be registered with the Health Professions Council.

Working in sport is a largely practical discipline and the emphasis on the programme is for regular clinical experience. Programme participants benefit from regular contact with members of the Centre as well as visiting clinicians and lecturers who are experienced sport medicine specialists. The Centre is ideally situated on the same campus as the sports injury, physiotherapy, podiatry and the interdisciplinary combined sports clinics. Additionally you will have the opportunity to attend recognised external clinics around London, as well as the chance to attend sporting events and visits to national centres of excellence where possible.

Further information Dr Peter Malliaras Tel: +44 (0)20 8223 8255 email: p.malliaras@qmul.ac.uk www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/sportsmed

Many of our alumni now work in both professional and amateur sport, 14 worked at Athens 2004 Olympic Games, and the Centre was involved in the bid for the London 2012 Olympic Games. Programme outline MSc Eight taught modules plus a research project (equivalent to four modules) Postgraduate Diploma Eight taught modules • Semester 1: September – December (12 weeks) five modules available • Semester 2: January – March (12 weeks) five modules available • MSc Research project: December – September Clinics: compulsory attendance of 32 clinics Modules Sports Injury Assessment I • Sports Injury Assessment II • Sports Injury Treatment • Sports Injury Rehabilitation • Exercise as a Health Tool • Podiatry and Biomechanics • Medical Problems in Sport • Exercise Physiology and Team Medicine • Injection of the Spine and Appendicular Skeleton • Research Methods

For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.


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Institute of Health Sciences Education Research Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD/MD Res) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils. A limited number of College studentships are also available. Entry requirements Students with upper second class (or better) BSc honours degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas Our research programme is community and health services based. Research groups work on respiratory health (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, TB), cardiovascular health (angina management, diabetes prevention), chronic pain and musculoskeletal (pain services, ethnic differences in pain, self-management, prevention and treatment of injury, reporting of back pain trials); exercise and the delivery of the London 2012 Olympic legacy. Much of our work in different groups is similar, and involves evaluating complex interventions in trials, developing and evaluating lay-led self management programmes, exploring ethnicity and healthcare variation, systematic reviewing, and qualitative research. The Institute therefore has strong methodological expertise in all of these areas, and separate themes of research developing methods.

Carol Rivas, PhD in Social and Cultural Contexts and Domestic Violence “I’m looking at the effect that culture has on women’s responses to psychological abuse from a male partner. I am particularly interested in how women deal with their situation and how they manage their social identities when they stay within the relationship. I have interviewed Caribbean, African and white British women for the study. “I think all three campuses are great for different reasons and it is nice that you can make use of the facilities at all three. The libraries are well resourced and there are libraries at each campus which is useful – you can return or renew at all of them interchangeably. I have found the staff to be nurturing and keen for me to get a good quality PhD. I work with some leading experts in my field who are very accessible and who also present great networking and other opportunities. “There are great opportunities to mix at Queen Mary, from the personal development courses to curry nights, barbecues, special talks and so on. There is also a performance arts group, who sometimes provide free ‘theatre’ workshops and shows. The gym has a women only room. There are several good eateries both within and outside the college (some of them are of very high quality but still reasonably priced), and the canal and park at Mile End. The market at Whitechapel is vibrant and useful for bargains. “I also help out with teaching, which I love, and taking children round the Centre of the Cell, which is the amazing new interactive exhibition at Whitechapel. I am also a science ambassador for schools, which means I go to special events for schools to promote science as a career. This might involve conducting mock job interviews, helping children do experiments or talking about my work. Last year I took children around the Big Bang, which also gave me the chance to enjoy it and have a go at everything.”


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Staff research interests

Further information

Sandra Eldridge BA(Oxon) MSc PhD Professor of Biostatistics Clinical trials, especially cluster randomised trials, modelling complex interventions, statistical methods in primary health care

IHSE Graduate Tutors Director of Graduate Studies Professor Clive Seale email: c.seale@qmul.ac.uk

Chris Griffiths MA DPhil(Oxon) MBBS FRCP FRCGP Professor of Primary Care Asthma, COPD, TB, allergy, diabetes, vitamin D, primary care, clinical trials and qualitative research Adrian Martineau B Med Sci DTM&H MRCP Clinical Lecturer Immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D in tuberculosis infection John Robson MBBS DRCOG DCH MSc MD FRCGP Clinical Senior Lecturer Cardiovascular disease Clive Seale BEd MSc PhD Perrin Professor of Medical Sociology Communication in health care consultations, mass media and health; internet and health, end-of-life decisions, palliative care, sociology of cancer, social research methods Stephanie Taylor MBBS DCH DRCOG MRCGP MSc MD FFPHM Professor of Primary Care and Public Health, Health Services Research and Development Complex interventions, self management of chronic disease (respiratory, heart failure), adolescent obesity, clinical trials, observational epidemiology, systematic reviewing Robert Walton BSc MD FRCP FRCGP Professor of Primary Medical Care Smoking cessation, hepatitis, liver cancer, TB, KIR, HLA, genetics, pharmacogenetics Nicola Maffulli MD MS PhD FRCS(Orth) Professor of Sports and Exercise Medicine Randomised trials and evidence based musculoskeletal medicine Soft tissue injuries Tissue engineering Dylan Morrissey PhD MSc MMAC MCSP Clinical Senior Lecturer Movement and pathology (shoulder, knee, lumbar spine and achilles tendon), evidence-based pathways for musculoskeletal conditions, legacy of London 2012 Olympic games

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0) 207 882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0) 20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

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William Harvey Research Institute www.whri.qmul.ac.uk Research strengths The William Harvey Research Institute has just celebrated its twenty-fifth year with real success and growth in the depth and quality of our programmes in cardiovascular, inflammation and endocrine research. Our major strength is in bringing scientists with different skills together. Our goal is to combine disciplines, such as genetics, cell biology, pharmacology, epidemiology, advanced imaging and clinical trials, with therapeutic innovation. Recently we have strategically invested over £4.1 million in excellent researchers to support our mission and increased staff by 24 per cent. The William Harvey Research Institute (WHRI) was established by the Nobel Laureate John Vane with the goal of becoming an international powerhouse for pharmacological research operating at the academic/industry interface. The Institute has now grown to accommodate 240 researchers and is independently rated amongst the top 20 pharmacological research centres worldwide. WHRI benefits from strong clinical links to cardiology, renal medicine, critical care, anaesthesia, rheumatology and clinical endocrinology in our allied Barts and The London NHS Trust. WHRI is the largest pharmacological research institute in the United Kingdom University Sector and our success in this respect can be measured by publications in high-impact journals, accompanied by renewal and new funding of one MRC and five Wellcome Programmes which we lead or support as co-investigators. Our real advantage is the model of therapeutic innovation in that it allows a two-way flow of hypothesis generation from the scientist at the bench through the clinician to our patients and back again in the form of clinical data, samples and experience. WHRI believes in capitalising on the diversity of our community that we serve and this provides a major opportunity to investigate new therapies which may have implications for emerging countries in South Asia and Africa.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise According to the last RAE 2008, 20 per cent of WHRI staff were considered to be ‘World leading’, and 45 per cent were considered ‘Internationally excellent.’ This excellent result places the WHRI third in the UK in this unit of assessment (Human Biology and Preclinical sciences), coming just after Cambridge University and UCL. 28.6 members of staff were returned who jointly had achieved a research spend of over £37.5 million over the six year period.


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Projects, funding, research grants and awards WHRI research scientists have invested more than £38.5 million in research since 2001. During this time there have been major grant awards from the MRC, five from the Wellcome, and two BHF Programme Grants. We now have in excess of 240 clinicians and scientists from over 44 countries who work collaboratively and have produced multiple papers in Nature, Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine, Nature Biotechnology, the New England Journal, The Lancet and other high impact specialist journals. Currently the WHRI has a £14 million Heart Centre which is near completion which will incorporate four new Cardiovascular Chairs, and this group will open in 2010 offering a unique approach of applying a systems biology approach to therapeutics innovation.

Postgraduate resources

Sir John Vane, Nobel Prize winner and founder of the William Harvey Research Institute

As part of our overall development we have worked to underpin our scientific environment with purpose built space for core facilities including the Genome Centre, FACS, proteomics/mass spectroscopy, intravital microscopy and confocal microscopy suites. Currently we are installing small animal Positron Emission Tomography in our Biological Services Unit and have a GCP compliant Clinical Trials Unit. This unit has generated a research network of 120 general practices serving an east London population of 500,000. These facilities, combined with our state of the art laboratories, funded by an extensive Science Research Infrastructure investment programme of £7 million, provide an excellent environment for postgraduate studies.

Scholarships / studentships There are internal PhD studentships available, which are funded by the School and awarded on a competitive basis. Holders of MRC research grants and fellowships are eligible for PhD studentships, and this funding is matched with an equivalent sum from the College. We also run a successful four year MRes/PhD programme, currently funded by the MRC and the Medical School. The Centre for Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology leads an Oliver Bird Studentship Scheme, in conjunction with King’s College London. The WHRI regularly has awarded a number of studentships from such bodies as the ARC, BHF and Wellcome Trust.


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William Harvey Research Institute Career opportunities WHRI offers a mentoring system whereby we encourage our research students to recognise when their research training would benefit from a period in another research institution so they may accrue new strengths. At postdoctoral level they are offered career advice and support from senior members of the institute and they are strongly supported during fellowship applications. As evidence of this we have just secured a promising researcher fellowship for the MRC PhD student who discovered the association of WNK I with hypertension in BRIGHT and Graphic students to take this into functional studies jointly with Cambridge. Several other young scientists have been nurtured into fellowship awards. We encourage our students to develop their careers either internally or by assisting with international collaborators to further their opportunities both academically and commercially at national and international levels.

Neil Dufton, PhD in Inflammation and Immunology “My tutor at Bath was a former friend and colleague of Professor Flower and both undertook their PhD research with John Vane who set up the William Harvey Institute. I came for an interview and was immediately struck by the enthusiasm for both my project and the progression of science in the department. “I am currently getting to grips with a huge number of new techniques ranging from molecular biology, in vitro immunology and in vivo pharmacology so there is plenty to keep me out of trouble. “I have two very dynamic Professors, Perretti and Flower, as my supervisors who are always open for discussion, often leading to a raft of new ideas for both current and future work. The group is always willing to help by either providing technical expertise or just bouncing ideas that may relate to their field of investigation. “Charterhouse Square green is a great place to spend your lunch break when the sun is shining, and with three barbecues available for general use you will often see people gathering on a summer evening. The William Harvey has a good social scene with curry nights, barbecues and a marquee ball in the summer. There is also an annual five-a-side football tournament that often leads to some amusing rivalries between labs. “I enjoyed convincing fifteen colleagues predominantly from my department to take part in a four-mile charity space hop around London City for Red Nose Day. It was a great day all round, especially seeing the professors on hoppers before we embarked round London, and we managed to raise more than £2,500.”


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William Harvey Research Institute Degree programmes MSc/Postgraduate Diploma/ Postgraduate Certificate in Analytical Toxicology Two to five years part-time Programme description This programme is aimed primarily at those practising in the clinical field, but will be relevant and useful to students who wish to follow a career in forensic, pharmaceutical, or environmental toxicology as the skills and knowledge base needed for those disciplines are complementary and overlapping. The programme aims to provide a theoretical basis for gaining competence in the practical aspects of analytical toxicology; to develop competence in research and development activities; and to enable the participants to review analytical data critically. The modular nature of the programmes is designed to fit in with the needs of those students who are in full-time employment. The taught elements of the modules are delivered in three-day blocks every six weeks. Programme outline Year 1 Module 1: Essential Clinical Toxicology • Module 2: Analytical Techniques I • Module 3: Analytical Techniques II • Module 4: Essential Therapeutics • Module 5: Trace Elements and Toxic Metals • Module 6: Drug Abuse and Forensics Year 2 Module 7: Essential Clinical Biochemistry • Module 8: Laboratory Operation • Modules 9 – 12: Practical Project and Dissertation (or Critical Dissertation)

Assessment For a Postgraduate Certificate, students must complete and pass Modules 1-4. Successful completion of all eight taught modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Completion of a practical project and submission of a dissertation based on the project of approximately 20,000 words and successful completion of all eight taught modules is required for the MSc award. The assessment of the taught modules is 100 per cent by continuous assessment with submission by the student of essay-style answers, a series of shorter answers or a mixture of both. Entry requirements For entry onto the programme students will need either an appropriate life sciences degree or equivalent from a recognised academic institution, or an appropriate professional qualification or experience acceptable to the Programme Director and Director of Graduate Studies. Students for whom English is a second language will also require a minimum IELTS 7 or TOEFL 610 score. Further information Professor Atholl Johnston Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3404 email: a.johnston@qmul.ac.uk


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William Harvey Research Institute Degree programmes (cont) MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Drug Development MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Healthcare Research Methods One year full-time, two to five years part-time Programme description Over the last 30 years healthcare research and drug development have been transformed from peripheral activities carried out on an ad hoc basis to become core activities that require trained, professional, staff. However, the education and training of staff involved in healthcare research and drug development has not kept pace with the scientific and regulatory changes that have occurred over this period. For this reason the Clinical Pharmacology Centre of the William Harvey Research Institute, in association with the Barts and The London NHS Trust and Hammersmith Medicines Research, has developed modular postgraduate programmes in healthcare research and in clinical drug development. The programmes are designed to give individuals the necessary academic background and specialist skills needed to carry out clinical drug development or healthcare research in a contract research organisation, pharmaceutical industry or Health Service environment. Our target audience is graduates, nurses, medical doctors and other health professionals working in contract research organisations, the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare. Programme outline These two postgraduate programmes share a common spine, which cover the key areas of expertise needed for a successful clinical research programme. For students choosing the Clinical Drug Development programme the initial modules will concentrate on early drug development whereas for those students taking the Healthcare Research Methods programme the emphasis will be related to health management. The modular nature of the programmes is designed to fit in with the needs of those students who are in full-time employment. The taught elements of the modules are delivered in three-day blocks every six weeks.

Core modules Clinical Study Design • Practical Aspects of Clinical Research and Early Drug Development • Ethics and Regulation • Data Management and Statistics • Specific Topics in Clinical Trial Design • Elective Dissertation • Health Outcomes and Pharmacoeconomics • Marketing Healthcare • Research Project/Dissertation Module options include: Health and the Human Body • Healthcare Organisation and Decision Making • Drug Discovery and Preclinical Research and Development • Toxicology Assessment For a Postgraduate Diploma, students must complete and pass eight modules. Successful completion of a further four modules, two of which will comprise a critical dissertation of approximately 20,000 words, is required for the MSc award. The assessment of the taught modules is 100 per cent by continuous assessment with submission by the student of essay-style answers, a series of shorter answers or a mixture of both. These are marked and returned to the students according to the timetable specified in the Programme Handbook. There is no final written examination. Entry requirements For entry onto the programme students will need either an appropriate degree or equivalent from a recognised academic institution, or an appropriate professional qualification (for example nursing) or experience acceptable to the Programme Director and Director of Graduate Studies. Students for whom English is a second language will also require a minimum IELTS 7 or TOEFL 610 score. Further information Professor Atholl Johnston Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3404 email: a.johnston@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Endocrinology and Diabetes Two years part-time – distance learning Programme description The Postgraduate Diploma is designed as a complete curriculum in endocrinology and diabetes, both for new entrants to these fields, as well as an update and extension for those already familiar with them. The programme provides clinicians with theoretical and clinically applied aspects of their discipline, and incorporates elements of the UK specialty training curriculum for endocrinology and diabetes mellitus. It also includes aspects of the knowledge-based examination required for Royal College Certification. There is a focus on up to date developments in the field with expert opinions and presentations. In addition, students taking the MSc complete a project on a topic to be approved by the programme organiser which is conducted at the candidate’s home institution. The project is examined in the form of written dissertation of approximately 10,000 words and a viva. Programme outline You will take the following modules: Hypothalamus and pituitary • Thyroid, parathyroids and bone • Reproduction, pregnancy and paediatric endocrinology • Appetite, weight, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism • Adrenals (medulla and cortex) • Genetics, endocrine oncology, neuroendocrinology • Diabetes mellitus • MSc Project

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Assessment The end-of-module assessment format varies with each module (for example, EMQ and 'best of 5' multiple choice questions or short answer format or longer essays). There is an end-of-course summative assessment after completion of all of the taught modules. Entry requirements Qualification requirements for the course are MB BS or basic medical degree from universities recognised by the University of London. Candidates should generally have worked for one year after registration (two – three years post qualification). Applicants will be interviewed prior to acceptance and entry may be competitive. Students must have access to a suitable computer (minimum system specifications for using Blackboard CE8) and broadband access to the internet is required. Students must be able to sit examinations at a British Council Centre under invigilation or be able to attend examinations in the UK. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Maralyn Druce Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8284 email: m.r.druce@qmul.ac.uk


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William Harvey Research Institute Degree programmes (cont) MSc/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate in Forensic Medical Sciences One year full-time, two to five years part-time

practical project by candidates awarded the Diploma and submission of a dissertation of approximately 20,000 words is required for the MSc award. The full programme comprises twelve modules, with each contributing equally to the final mark (one twelfth of the total). The result of one module contributes a maximum of 8.33 per cent and the project a maximum of 33.33 per cent to the final mark.

Programme description This programme aims to respond to the national and international need for professionals who can apply a critical and scientific approach to their forensic practice, and who wish to have a broad understanding of the various interrelated disciplines of forensic medicine and science. The programme will provide theoretical and practical knowledge of the forensic medical sciences, and will train students to be able to critically evaluate and interpret forensic medical and scientific evidence.

Core and other modules will be assessed through tutorial work (including paper presentations), submitted assignments, practical reports and short examinations (Short Answer Questions or Multiple Choice Question format). There will be variation in the relative contribution of each assessment method within modules.

The programme will cover several aspects of forensic medical science and there is no other programme which offers such a wide range of specialist topics under the umbrella of the forensic medical sciences, coupled with the opportunity to carry out research in a specialist area.

Further information Professor Peter Vanezis Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3401 email: p.vanezis@qmul.ac.uk

The programme offers the opportunity for graduates to further their career prospects within their own professional specialty. The programme should be regarded as intermediate level for pathologists and forensic medical examiners who will be expected to progress to specialist exit level exams, through their respective Academic Colleges. Programme outline Core modules Clinical Aspects of Forensic Medicine (two modules) • Forensic Pathology (two modules) Module options Legal and Ethical Issues Relevant to Forensic Medicine and Science • Forensic Toxicology I and II • Forensic Identification I and II Research project Laboratory based or a critical dissertation (four modules) Assessment Full attendance is expected throughout the programme and is a pre-requisite for successful completion of the programme. For a Postgraduate Certificate, students must complete and pass four modules. Successful completion of a further four modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma, completion of a

Entry requirements For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.


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MRes Inflammation: Cellular and Vascular Aspects One year full-time Programme description The MRes in Vascular and Cellular Inflammation provides a practical training in modern molecular and proteomic research techniques and their application to traditional methods of pharmacological investigation of inflammatory and vascular disease mechanisms. The programme is specifically designed to develop the skills necessary to conduct biomedical inflammatory research, for example in rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, nephrology, or cancer, and draws upon the unique combination of expertise in inflammatory disease, vascular disease and pharmacology found in the William Harvey Research Institute. It is therefore an invaluable foundation if you wish to pursue a career in industry or academic research. Many students have continued on to carry out a PhD within the School. Programme outline In the first term students follow an initial three-month course of tutorials and practicals to obtain a broad grounding in inflammation mechanisms, and to develop the necessary laboratory skills for conducting the project element of the programme. This is split up into generic skills (ie writing, presentation skills, statistics, laboratory safety and critical analysis), proteomics, molecular methods, immunological and pharmacological methods. In the following two terms, students are expected to apply a variety of techniques as part of an integrated research project under the guidance of an experienced academic supervisor. Coursework continues throughout the year. Students are able to develop their scientific understanding through the use of problem based learning (students write-up one PBL as a dissertation) and critical analysis and appraisal of key research papers. Assessment Coursework (36 per cent), Critical analysis of the literature (24 per cent) and dissertation (12 per cent). Research project (64 per cent) This forms the major part of the assessment and is divided into three elements, project write-up (50 per cent), project presentation (6 per cent) and project viva (8 per cent).

Entry requirements The programme is suitable for life science graduates, with a minimum second class honours degree (or the equivalent from an overseas university), MB BS with or without an intercalated degree. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Martin Carrier Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2104/2218 email: m.j.carrier@qmul.ac.uk


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William Harvey Research Institute Research Research degrees Currently the WHRI have in excess of 80 PhD students throughout the seven centres. Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work with internationally recognised members of academic staff. Studentships are offered from a variety of sources externally from major funders and grant awarding bodies and also internal College studentships. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22. Entry requirements Students with upper-second class (or better) BSc honours degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas The William Harvey Research Institute has three central research themes of inflammation science, cardiovascular medicine and endocrine research. Bone and Joint, Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology and Biochemical Pharmacology are clustered under inflammation science while Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Clinical Pharmacology and Microvascular Research combine under Cardiovascular Medicine. Inflammation Science The Inflammation Science Strategy Group Meetings chaired by Professor Rod Flower FRS ensure delivery of a co-ordinated and interactive research agenda. Researchers in this group have held numerous fellowships and grants, from Wellcome, ARC and the Multiple Sclerosis Society, among others. Specific research themes are: Annexin Biology In particular: research into the role of annexins in glucocorticoid action; Research on identification and characterisation of the annexin receptor and its ability to modulate cell activation in various models of experimental inflammation; The role of annexin 1 in T cell activation, and in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Endogenous anti-inflammatory effectors (resolution of inflammation) Work on annexin and glucocorticoid biology has extended into analyses of other endogenous antiinflammatory pathways. There is investigation into the biology of galectins in vascular inflammation. Research into the molecular and cellular mechanisms activated by melanocortin peptides as another exciting area for innovative anti-inflammatory drug discovery. And finally, studying anti-inflammatory actions of nuclear receptor agonists in vascular inflammation.

Latent cytokines Bone and Joint’s primary research focus is the development and targeting of latent cytokines and other therapeutic compounds. This includes a study on the application of latent cytokines to treat unstable plaques in atherosclerosis, and an investigation into signalling pathways in T cells with particular regard to the contribution of lipid rafts. Translational research and stem cells in inflammatory disease research into developing a translational immunological research focusing upon analysis of the signalling defects in both T and B cells of patients with SLE. We have recently made a strategic investment of £1.45 million to create a new Centre of Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology with a major research programme in joint and tissue repair and stem cell therapy. Specific areas of collaborative research interest include the regulation of cell adhesion by glucocorticoids, engineering of fusion proteins consisting of a human synovium-specific homing peptide and an anti-inflammatory cytokine for the targeted therapy of rheumatoid arthritis and the use of mesenchymal progenitor cells for joint tissue repair. Inflammation in the Vasculature Success in characterising the roles of vascular smooth muscle cells in inflammatory responses of the blood vessel wall has led to further research into the role of PPAR, farnesoid X receptor and retinoid X receptors and their potential for therapeutic modulation. We are involved in the EU (6th Framework) integrated project “Eicosanox” (£12.4m, 2004-2009) to develop European prostanoid and nitric oxide research. In addition there is a collaborative project to target cytokines and on platelet nuclear receptors in arthritis and with cardiologists at the Barts and The London Heart Attack Centre on platelet reactivity in acute myocardial infarction. Microvascular Research A major investment of £1.2 million has recently been made to establish a Centre for Microvascular Pharmacology which aims to investigate molecular and cellular events within the microcirculation in the context of inflammatory responses. Specifically the group addresses the mechanisms that mediate and regulate leukocyte migration through venular walls by applying advanced imaging methodologies to the vasculature). Cardiovascular Research Research in this area extends from vascular biology, which shares considerable overlap with Inflammation Sciences, to cardiovascular genetics, clinical trials and stem cell research. Specific research topics are: Endothelial cell biology Having established the effects of dietary polyphenols in regulating endothelial function, we are now developing novel approaches in biomarkers of


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cardiovascular disease. Work is also being carried out on the endothelium and its capacity to release vasodilators, and the putative identity of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), showing the important role of EDHF in blood pressure regulation. There is continued investigation into the role of kinin B1 and the kinin B1 receptor in stimulating CXCR5 and the role of sheer stress. Genetics of cardiovascular disease The WHRI co-ordinates the MRC British Genetics of Hypertension (BRIGHT) study and has conducted the largest linkage-based genome screen in human hypertension, identifying four regions for essential hypertension and have refined this to a principal locus on chromosome 5. Researchers have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in a serine threonine kinase (WNK1) are associated with essential hypertension which could present a novel therapeutic target for hypertension. WHRI scientists have published a novel strategy for identifying linked co-variate phenotypes and contributed to the first 2D scan in hypertension and published the first genome wide association scan for hypertension in Nature. Cardiovascular Clinical Trials WHRI has been represented on international steering groups for several major clinical trials that have significant implications for clinical practice in cardiovascular disease. In particular, the AngloScandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) (Pfizer, £2.02 million) tested the influence of combinations of newer anti-hypertensives and lipid lowering agents upon cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study changed UK and international guidance on lipid lowering and NICE/ British Hypertension Society guidance on hypertension management. Cardiac stem cells WHRI has developed innovative strategies for cardiac stem cell research and therapy, defining various aspects of behaviour of grafted cells in a cardiac environment including survival, proliferation, paracrine effects, differentiation and integration within the host myocardium. This complements our clinical programme evaluating adult stem cells for treating heart disease. Endocrinology Developing on the internationally renowned expertise in clinical endocrinology established at St Bartholomew’s Hospital over the last forty years, basic endocrine research has been greatly stimulated by incorporation into WHRI and the provision of state-of-the-art laboratory space and facilities including confocal imaging. Close links with clinical research persist with a strong tradition of clinical academic training and major support from industry (eg Pfizer £1.5 million unrestricted plus

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£1.2 million NESTEGG study) and the Wellcome Trust and Research Councils. Specific research topics are: Melanocortin receptors ACTH action and resistance has been a major focus of research in the group and they have defined the basis of ACTH receptor/ melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) desensitisation and internalisation and have described the impairment of this phenomenon as a potential factor in adrenal tumour formation. Work discovering genes causing inherited forms of ACTH insensitivity has led to the successful identification of a new gene, MRAP, that encodes an accessory protein for the MC2R. Existence of MRAP was predicted from earlier work, and has broader implications for G proteincoupled receptor function in general. WHRI scientists have defined the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the melanocortin 2 receptor in the differentiating adipocyte, identifying a novel role for PPAR_ and C/EBP and alternative splice site selection. This area has significant synergy with the inflammation research group. Lipidology Working at the interface between endocrinology and cardiovascular. Key areas include elucidating the genetics and the underlying biology of FCHL-lipid abnormalities; establishing roles of Sar1 Isoforms in lipid homeostastis; and homing in on the biochemical properties of a highly conserved, ancient, DUF (Domain of Unknown Function) protein which contributes to the synthesis of cholesterol and triglycerides and may play a role in metabolic syndrome. Metabolism and endocrine disease Work has been extended on describing the role of ghrelin in appetite regulation and obesity and has investigated the role of ghrelin and the cannabinoids in modulating AMP regulated protein kinase (AMPK) in the cell. Also researching on the farnesoid X receptor and on tumour suppressor activity in human pituitary tumours. The latter exemplifies the major research benefits derived from the extensive clinical endocrine activity conducted jointly between the WHRI and the Barts and The London NHS Trust. Growth genetics Work in paediatric endocrinology is being carried out to define novel mechanisms of foetal and childhood growth failure including identification of pseudoexon activation as a new mechanism of disease and the role of IGF-I in foetal growth failure. The NESTEGG aims to identify the major genetic influences on foetal and childhood growth failure. This study, co-ordinated from the WHRI, has completed collection in four European centres of 1,500 intensively phenotyped children with foetal and/or childhood growth failure and their parents and is now in the genotyping phase of the project. This study has benefited from the Genome Centre and the expertise and teamwork developed in the MRC BRIGHT study.


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William Harvey Research Institute Staff research interests Inflammation Research Yuti Chernajovsky BSc MSc PhD ARC Professor of Rheumatology and Centre Lead Bone and Joint Research Unit Development of Gene Transfer Strategies for rheumatoid arthritis via cell engineering, molecular design and genetic engineering Rod Flower FRS BSc PhD DSc Professor of Biochemical Pharmacology and joint Centre Lead, Biochemical Pharmacology Main research field is the mechanisms of antiinflammatory drugs, particularly NSAIDs and glucocorticoids Fulvio D’Acquisto BSc PhD Reader in Immunopharmacology Main interest focuses on the multiple functions and properties of Annexin-A1 in the adaptive immune system; in particular the biological role of AnnexinA1 in T cell activation and differentiation Rizgar Mageed BPharm PhD Professor of Experimental Immunology Interests are focused on defining the cellular and genetic factors that underlie the development of immune-mediated diseases Mauro Perretti BSc MSc PhD FBPharmaco1S Professor of Immunopharmachology, Senior Research Fellow of the Arthritis Research Campaign, joint Centre Lead Biochemical Pharmacology Interests include the host inflammatory response, with particular attention to ‘anti-inflammation and the phase of resolution’, specifically targeting the leukocyte-endothelium interaction Constantino Pitzalis MD PhD MRCP Professor of Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology, Centre Lead Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology Focuses on the development of innovative therapeutic and diagnostic approaches to inflammatory and degenerative arthropathies

Mark Caulfield MB BS MD FRCP Professor of Clinical Pharmacology, Head of Clinical Pharmacology and Institute Director National Co-ordinator of MRC British Genetics of Hypertension (BRIGHT) Study Genetics of Pre-eclamsia Consortium, metabolic syndrome translation from models to man Roger Corder BSc MSc PhD MRPharmS Professor of Experimental Therapeutics Links between diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking for new therapeutic approaches and identifying biomarkers of the disease Charles Hinds FRCP FRCA Professor of Experimental Medicine Research interests include pathophysiology and treatment of sepsis, ‘goal directed’ therapy, endocrine aspects of critical illness, genomics of sepsis and intensive care for patients with malignancy Atholl Johnston BSc MSc PhD FBPharmacolS CPath Professor of Clinical Pharmacology Interested in drug concentrations as a guide to therapy and in relation to toxicity. Also works in clinical trial design, statistical data analysis, modelling pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics Richard Langford MB BS MRCS LRCP FRCA Professor of Inflammation Science Current research interests include acute and chronic pain studies Anthony Mathur MA MB Chir FRCP PhD Professor of Cardiology and Lead for Clinical Cardiology Key research interests are investigating the role of cell therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, in particular the role of stem cells in cardiac repair for patients with heart failure.

Cardiovascular Medicine

Sussan Nourshargh PhD FPharmacolS Professor of Microvascular Pharmacology Main research interests include leukocyte transmigration and regulation of leukocyte responsiveness

Amrita Ahluwalia BSc PhD Professor of Vascular Pharmacology Identification of model mediators protecting against vascular dysfunction, new pathways in endothelial biology

David Perrett BSc PhD FRSC CChem Professor of Bioanalytical Science Interested in many aspects of biomedical separation science and decontamination of surgical instruments in relation to vCJD

David Bishop-Bailey Basic Science Lecturer Research interests include investigating the roles of nuclear receptors within the cardiovascular system


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Rupert Pearce MBBS MD Clinical Senior Lecturer in Intensive Care Medicine Key research interests include improving survival following major surgery, development of cardiac output monitoring technology, effects of exogenous adrenergic agents in critical illness Steffen Petersen MD DPhil Reader in Cardiovascular Imaging A key research goal is to integrate cardiovascular MR, echo, PET-CT and cardiac CT and to drive the technical development of imaging to encompass large scale population-based imaging (eg UK Biobank); to provide support for clinical trials and other activities within the Institute; and deeper myocardial phenotyping. Romana Scotland PhD Lecturer in Vascular Pharmacology Research interests include sex-differences in cardiovascular disease focusing on mechanisms of vascular homeostastis and inflammation

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Ken Suzuki MD PhD Professor of Translational Cardiovascular Therapeutics Research interests include cardiovascular stem cell and gene therapy research Adam D Timmis MA MB BChir MRCP MD FRCP FESC Professor of Clinical Cardiology Research interests include outcomes of stable and unstable ischaemic syndromes Peter Vanezis OBE MBChB MD PhD FRCPath FRCP(Glas) DMJ(path) Professor of Forensic Medical Sciences Has an international reputation in forensic medical sciences Tim Warner BSc PhD Professor of Vascular Inflammation Main research interests include the regulation of vascular smooth muscle function and formation and action of mediators derived from vascular endothelial cells


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William Harvey Research Institute Staff research interests (cont) Magdi Yaqoob MB BS MD FRCP Professor of Nephrology; Lead Clinician, Director of the Department of Renal Medicine and Transplantation at BLT Research interests include experimental and clinical aspects of cardiovascular diseases in uraemia, diabetic nephropathy, pleitropic effects of erythropoietin, chemical nephrotoxicity and mediators of ischaemia reperfusion injury Shu Ye MB MD PhD MRCP FRCP Profesor of molecular Medicine and Genetics Research interests in positional and functional candidate genes for coronary artery disease

Endocrine Research Paul Chapple BSc MSc PhD Senior Lecturer in Endocrine Cell Biology Research interests include the mechanism by which molecular chaperones modulate the folding of proteins within cells and the cell biology of diseaselinked proteins that have homology to molecular chaperones Shern L Chew BSc MB BChir MD FRCP Professor of Endocrine Medicine Research interests include the mechanisms of regulation of pre-mRNA splicing with clinical research in clinical endocrinology

Adrian Clark DSc FRCP FMedSci Professor of Medicine, Centre Lead Endocrinology Molecular basis of the pituitary hormone ACTH and its role in the pituitary-adrenal axis in health and disease Ashley Grossman BA BSc MD FRCP FMedSci Professor of Neuroendocrinology Major interest is in translational research and working on optimising diagnostic techniques and therapeutic modalities in pituitary and neuroendocrine tumours Marta Korbonitis MD PhD Professor of Endocrinology and Metabolism Mainly interested in ghrelin, the stomach-derived brain-gut peptide and its receptor GHS-R Carol Shoulders BA DPhil Professor of Lipidology Research interest is focused on identifying the diverse range of cellular processes that contribute to premature cardiovascular disease through promoting the assembly and secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons (Cm).


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William Harvey Research Institute Further information Further information on postgraduate programmes and the area of expertise of members of staff can be found on our website: www.whri.qmul.ac.uk

International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk

Enquiries about postgraduate programmes Dr Martin Carrier Director of Graduate Studies Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2104/2218 email: m.j.carrier@qmul.ac.uk

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk

Staff profile: Sussan Nourshagh Professor of Microvascular Pharmacology Centre for Microvascular Research “I was appointed Professor of Microvascular Pharmacology at the William Harvey Research Institute to head a new Centre focusing on Microvascular Research. My research group focuses on the mechanisms of leukocyte trafficking into sites of inflammation and the consequence of this response on regulating the phenotype of emigrated cells. “The group’s principal experimental approach is the use of advanced imaging techniques (eg intravital and confocal microscopy) for analysis of leukocyte/vessel wall interaction in vivo. Our work is supported by The Wellcome Trust, The British Heart Foundation and funds from the EU and has been published in high ranking journals such as Journal of Immunology, Blood, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Nature Reviews and Science. “My PhD project addressed mechanisms of neutrophil activation in vitro, and I extended my interests in this area to the in vivo inflammatory scenario through postdoctoral work at the MRC Clinical Research Centre based in Harrow, and then at the National Heart & Lung Institute (NHLI) in London where I was appointed to Lecturer position in 1988. “In 2001, I was awarded the Quintiles Prize for outstanding contribution to Immunopharmacology and became Fellow of the British Pharmacological Society in 2005. I have acted as a committee member on the British Heart Foundation Project Grant panel (20022006), was a co-founder and committee member of the London Vascular Biology Forum (2001-2008) and am currently the Treasurer of the UK Adhesion Society and Programme & Fellowship Committee member for the American Society of Investigative Pathology (ASIP).”


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine www.whri.qmul.ac.uk Research strengths Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research The Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine is distinctive. It captures scientific opportunities arising from laboratory-based epidemiological and screening research into common diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and congenital malformations through integrating epidemiology and statistics with pathology and clinical medicine. The inclusion of the Centre for Psychiatry in this internationally renowned Institute reflects the importance of the public health implications of psychiatric disease. The Wolfson Institute opened in 1991, comprising the existing Centre for Environmental and Preventive Medicine (CEPM – the Epidemiology Department of the Medical School) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology and Medical Care Unit. In 2002 the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics and Statistics joined the Institute following the closure of the MRC Unit (after its Director’s retirement). In 2005 the Tobacco Dependence Research Unit joined CEPM and the Centre for Psychiatry joined the Institute as a third Centre. The Institute has about 140 staff whose research continues to make a significant impact on public health practice and advance the science of preventive medicine. Much research is carried out in-house, but collaborative research also takes place with groups within the Medical School, other Departments at Queen Mary, and more widely within and beyond the UK. There is benefit from east London’s unique position with its local population. Important public health initiatives have arisen from our research including: • Limiting salt intake through proven links with blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes • Fortification of flour – lack of folic acid shown to be a major cause of the serious birth defects spina bifida and anencephaly • Antenatal screening for Down’s syndrome, now used worldwide • Prohibition of smoking in public places – environmental tobacco smokes being a cause of lung cancer and heart disease • Development of cervical screening policy and development of a vaccine for HPV • Prevention and treatment of breast cancer showing the benefits first of tamoxifen and later anastrozole


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Career opportunities • Prevention of cardiovascular disease by pharmacoprevention and development of the Polypill • A greater understanding of pathways to mental health care across ethnic groups • Greater protection for schools against the effects of aircraft noise on reading comprehension in children.

Research quality indicators The Research Assessment Exercise The internationally renowned Wolfson Institute maintained its long-held position in RAE 2008 with a grade-point average (GPA) of 3.05 in Epidemiology, placing it third out of 21 submissions. Psychiatry, separately returned, had a GPA of 2.3, with noted strengths in environmental and cultural psychiatry. Projects, funding, research grants and awards Most research income is from medical research charities, Research Councils or government health bodies, with little from industry. Research spend was £4.8m last year. Key funding bodies include Cancer Research UK, MRC and NHS National Institute for Health Research.

Postgraduate resources With the largest group of medical statisticians in the Medical School and a number of research groups within each Centre, the Institute is able to offer a wide variety of subjects for postgraduate study. Students have access to the Institute’s full and powerful computing facilities, which support extensive databases (managed by Oracle and Sequel-Server) and SAS and STATA, IT support, excellent laboratory facilities and the Institute’s specialist reference library. Students can be involved in local, national and international research networks and increasingly national and international consortia. Regular seminar series are organised at Centre, Institute and School level.

Scholarships / studentships Scholarship information changes every year. Recent awards have been from Cancer Research UK, MRC, Research Advisory Board (Barts and The London Charity). For home and eligible EU students with a good first degree (first or upper second) these will all cover tuition fees and maintenance. There are also some College studentships for which international students are eligible. There are now a number of studentships available from the East London NHS Foundation Trust for their staff for programmes run by the Centre for Psychiatry.

Many students pursuing further study do so to seek professional development and/or improve clinical practice. Of the students taking the MSc/Diploma in Psychological Therapies or Transcultural and Mental Healthcare many will have come from Mental Health Agencies or the NHS and find the qualification assists in promotion to Case- Ward- or Team Managers. Others find it useful in going on to apply for a PhD.


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Degree programmes MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Mental Health: Psychological Therapies MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Mental Health: Transcultural Mental Healthcare PG Cert Advanced Mental Health Assessment

Programme outline The MSc programme consists of three 12-week modules.

One year full-time, two years part-time Distance learning option available

Module 3 is compulsory to all students and includes research methods and evidence based practice. Students aiming for the MSc award are required to undertake a dissertation on an original topic that includes original research or an original and comprehensive literature review using systematic methods wherever possible. Completion of modules 1, 2 and 3 is accredited for exit with an MSc in either Psychological Therapies or Transcultural Mental Healthcare.

Students on this programme aim to: • Develop more advanced understanding of the basis of assessment, diagnosis, formulation and care management of mental health disorders in general and then in diverse racial, ethnic and cultural groups drawing on cultural psychiatry, social sciences and allied disciplines. • Have access to an academic programme that prepares competent practitioners to deliver effective mental health treatments for people with mental health problems. • Develop knowledge of research methods and systematic and critical review. • Develop and have access to a network of mental health professionals and established academics. Students on the Transcultural Mental Healthcare programme will learn how to improve their assessment of mental health problems. The specific strength of the MSc is that students will develop a knowledge base derived from social anthropological, medical, sociological, epidemiological and pharmacological understanding of the presentation, expression and management of mental disorders and psychological distress amongst Black and Ethnic minorities. Students on the Psychological Therapies programme will also learn and utilise an advanced level of knowledge derived from different psychological interventions including: • Therapeutic paradigms • Cognitive Behavioural Therapies • Cognitive analytic therapies • Group Therapies • Family Therapy • Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Therapies • Bio-psycho-social model

Module 1 (Advanced Mental Health Assessment) is compulsory and completion of this alone is accredited for exit with a certificate in mental health assessment. This is a compulsory module for all students. Module 2 We offer the option of two pathways. Psychological Therapies or Transcultural Mental Healthcare. Completion of this module and module one permits exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in either Psychological Therapies or Transcultural Mental Healthcare.

MSc Full-time: all three modules are completed in one year. Part-time: we advise students that it is best to complete the first two modules in the first year, and the third (research module) in year two. However, we permit flexibility if individual circumstances require this and if this still provides the student with the best chances of progressing. The MSc programme includes three modules, each lasting 12 weeks, and each with 12 core teaching and learning days. These are complemented by a half-day work placement (Transcultural Mental Healthcare students) for module 2 or half a day a week of supervised treatment of two short cases of 12 to 20 sessions (for students following the Psychological therapy pathway) to develop better practices in real clinical settings. Students prepare a report on this as part of the programme assessment for Modules 1 and 2. There are also PBL sessions (one a week), and time is required to read two key references each week and provide a précis each week. Postgraduate Diploma Full-time: both modules are completed in year 1. Part-time: one module is completed in each year. Postgraduate Certificate Full-time: completion in one term Part-time: N/A Assessment Module 1: Practice placement plan, clinical therapy (one brief therapy), research or literature review


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plan, tutor's assessment report on PBL write ups, oral and written examination. Module 2: Practice placement report or clinical practice (two brief cases), pilot study report for the main study, student presentation, tutor's assessment report on PBL write ups and oral and written examination. Module 3: Tutor's assessment report on PBL write ups and attendance, grant writing report, dissertation (10-15,000 words), supporting publications and written examination. Both programmes are also available as distance learning options. All students will have access to our established E-learning facilities for each module, including: Online Programme Syllabus (student handbook); Tools for e-lecture Materials; Tools for online PBL materials; Tools for submitting online assignments/homework WebCT email; Virtual discussion board; Virtual classrooms (synchronous); E-calendar Tools for online student feedback; Tools

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for students to track online results/progress; E-notice board and Skype tutorials as well as Skype add-ons (ie whiteboard) to facilitate virtual classroom interactions. In addition, lectures are recorded using screen capture technology and then uploaded onto WebCT. Entry requirements Applicants should have a basic degree in a related subject and/or a professional qualification and have worked in the relevant subject area for at least one year. We wish to include people from diverse backgrounds and career pathways especially people working in the independent and voluntary sector and NHS. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Dr Nasir Warfa Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2035 email: n.warfa@qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Rhian Gabe Studied: An epidemiological / statistical based PhD on the evaluation of breast cancer screening using mammography – graduated 2007 Currently: I’m a senior statistician at the Medical Research Council’s Clinical Trials Unit (MRC CTU). I’m project lead for a number of innovative studies (randomised trials) that aim to find the best therapies and care for patients with cancer. Why did you choose Queen Mary? My background in mathematics and epidemiology, and an interest in cancer research led me to the Cancer Research UK centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics and Statistics at the Wolfson Institute. This department and the Medical School as a whole at Queen Mary have good international reputations for cancer research. I was very interested in cancer epidemiology and in particular breast cancer screening. I knew the Centre had some of the top researchers in this field (Professors Duffy, Cuzick, Sasieni) and I was familiar with their work. I visited the Centre and came away thinking that not only did they have a range of exciting projects but these Professors and their colleagues were friendly, easy to talk to and learn from. I was not wrong and

enjoyed my time there immensely. This research environment kept me motivated throughout my studies and I finished my PhD in three years. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? A greater in-depth knowledge of cancer screening and prevention. Less obvious, is the greater confidence acquired as a researcher, which comes from developing the right skill set, such as initiating and writing papers, presenting work at international conferences, formulating research ideas and applying for funding, and communication and contacts for successful collaborations. I also enjoyed meeting a variety of people and made some good friends along the way! What are your career plans in the next five years? While I’m lucky enough to have found a permanent position with the MRC, it’s still hard to know where your work will be in five years, as it depends on the projects we manage to get funded. I think studies in prostate and lung cancer, especially in the areas of prevention, screening or treatment of early disease should be high priority for cancer research. I’m trying to use my experience from my PhD and from clinical trials to take things in that direction with my current portfolio of work. The next step up in terms of a career at the MRC CTU would be “programme leader” (which is equivalent to a group lead in a university setting) and hopefully my current experience and efforts to get studies off the ground will help towards this.


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Research Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD/MD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils or medical charities. A limited number of College studentships are also available. Entry requirements Students with upper-second class (or better) BSc honours degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. For language requirements, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas The Centre for Environmental and Preventive Medicine (CEPM) focuses on preventive medicine (with special attention to cancer and cardiovascular diseases) and on developing novel methods for screening and solving the statistical problems using many tests in combination. It runs large-scale randomised prevention trials and epidemiological studies into the causation of disease. For example there are major trials in screening for Helicobacter pylori infection in the prevention of stomach cancer, and screening and treatment for hypothyroidism in pregnancy (assessing childhood intellectual development) and in the elderly. Trials to evaluate the Polypill in reducing cardiovascular disease are planned. The Tobacco Dependence Research Unit within CEPM, one of the leading Centres in its field, operates a large smokers’ clinic providing an ample clinical base to support its extensive research programme. Here there are opportunities for postgraduate projects concerning both behavioural and pharmacological approaches to understanding and treating nicotine dependence and also to health behaviours and weight management. The CRUK Centre for Epidemiology Mathematics and Statistics focuses mainly on clinical trials and epidemiology in the treatment and prevention of cancer. It has particular strengths in the chemoprevention and treatment of breast cancer with its IBIS-II trial, cervical screening and development of HPV vaccines, colorectal cancer (once in a lifetime sigmoidoscopy) and prostate cancer (managed by watchful waiting). It is involved in the development of new mathematical and statistical methods in the study of risk factors for cancer and projecting their future incidence and mortality. Its new Clinical Trials Prevention Unit will

enable it to expand its research portfolio. Much of the research here is collaborative both nationally and internationally. There are opportunities for postgraduate projects in many of these areas. The Centre for Psychiatry has three distinct research groupings: • Environmental and Cultural Psychiatry focuses on the association of physical and social environmental factors and ethnicity with common mental disorders and affective disorders. (eg RANCH trial of aircraft noise and childhood learning). It also has an international reputation for cultural psychiatry and health services research. (geographical mobility as a risk factor for mental distress). This group runs the popular MSc in Transcultural and Mental Healthcare. • The Forensic Psychiatry Unit has been studying violence in individuals who pose a risk to the public and is using multilevel modelling to assess the accuracy of screening methods to identify those who carry exceptional risks. • The Unit for Social and Cultural Psychiatry is involved in developing concepts and methods for assessing treatment processes and outcomes, evaluation of mental health care and developing and testing innovative complex interventions. It has been successful in gaining European funding with many projects addressing more than one area of study. All three Centres are involved in statistical research, covering a wide range of methodologies and applications. These will include epidemiology, demography, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, health screening, infection control, birth weight and gestation, systematic reviews, cluster randomisation, meta-analysis, logistic regression, survival analysis, multi-level modelling, and models of disease progression.


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Staff research interests Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Jonathan Bestwick MSc Academic Fellow in Medical Statistics Medical screening Professor Jack Cuzick PhD John Snow Professor of Epidemiology Cancer prevention and screening with focus on endocrine treatments and breast cancer, HPV and cervix cancer, and natural history of prostate cancer Professor Stephen Duffy BSc MSc CStat Professor of Cancer Screening Evaluation of cancer screening programmes; cancer epidemiology; treatment of early or screen-detected cancers Beth De Souza MSc PhD Lecturer in Epidemiology and Medical Statistics Epidemiology of Down’s syndrome, maternal and infant health

Professor Peter Hajek MA PhD Professor of Clinical Psychology Psychological treatments in medicine, weight management Enid Hennessy BA MSc Senior Lecturer in Medical Statistics Statistical analyses primarily related to outcomes of extreme prematurity and carriage of bacteria in pregnant women and the newborn Professor Attila Lorincz PhD Professor of Molecular Epidemiology Human diagnostics, HPV and cervical cancer Professor Malcolm Law FRCP FFPH FMedSci Professor of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Causes and prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, salt, blood pressure, cholesterol, folic acid and passive smoking

James Cook, PhD in medical statistics “I am currently looking at the prevalence of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in England and Wales as part of my PhD in medical statistics. I'd heard good things about the quality of research at Queen Mary, it was part of the reason I chose to study here. I’m now surrounded by excellent researchers, all of whom are happy to help and support me however they can. Working in central London has its perks too! “The facilities are amazing. Charterhouse Square and Whitechapel both have superb departments for medical research, and the Educational and Staff Development (ESD) department at Mile End is great for learning more general skills. Sitting outside in Charterhouse Square is a great place to work in the summer. “I also work as a Problem Based Learning (PBL) facilitator on the undergraduate medical degree programme. It's a really interesting way to teach, which I think works much better than constant lectures.”


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Staff research interests (cont) Peter MacCallum MD FRCP FRCPath Clinical Senior Lecturer in Haematology Epidemiology and management of venous and arterial thrombosis Professor Joan Morris MSc PhD Professor of Medical Statistics Epidemiology of Down’s syndrome and other chromosomal and non-chromosomal anomalies, mathematical modelling Mark Simmonds PhD Lecturer in Epidemiology and Medical Statistics Preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, meta-analyses Professor Peter Sasieni MA PhD Professor of Biostatistics and Cancer Epidemiology Evaluation of service screening, chemoprevention of cancer, cervical screening and HPV, survival analysis

Rose McCabe BA PhD Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry Mental health service evaluation, clinician-patient communication, therapeutic relationships, psychotic disorder Professor Stefan Priebe Dipl Psych Dr med habil Professor of Social and Community Psychiatry Therapeutic processes and treatment evaluation in mental health care Professor Stephen Stansfeld MB BS PhD MRCP FRCPsych Professor of Psychiatry Environment and mental health, work and mental health, cohort studies, depression and coronary heart disease Ruth Taylor BSc MSc MBChB MRCPsych Clinical Senior Lecturer Attachment, somatic symptoms and somatisation

David Wald MA MBBS MRCP MD Clinical Senior Lecturer in Preventive Cardiology Interventional cardiology, screening for prevention of cardiovascular disease

Simone Ullrich Dipl Psych PhD Senior Lecturer in Forensic Mental Health Personality disorders, empirical research methods, epidemiology, risk assessment

Professor Sir Nicholas Wald FRS FRCP Professor of Environmental and Preventive Medicine Epidemiology and preventive medicine, namely antenatal screening and neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease

Nasir Warfa PhD Senior lecturer in Transcultural and Mental Health Cross-cultural studies of refugee and marginalised populations, khat use and quality of life

Psychiatry Professor Kamaldeep Bhui MD MBBS FRCPsych Professor of Cultural Psychiatry and Epidemiology Methodological innovations for researching health and social care of black and minority ethnic communities Charlotte Clark BSc(Hons) PhD Senior lecturer in Environmental Mental Health Epidemiology Psychiatric and environmental epidemiology, lifecourse predictors of mental health Professor Jeremy Coid MB ChB MD FRCPsych MPhil DipCriminol Professor of Forensic Psychiatry Epidemiology of violent and criminal behaviour Professor Ania Korszun PhD MD MRCPsych Professor of Psychiatry and Education Neuroendocrinology and genetics of depression, women’s mood disorders, interface of depression and stress with other medical conditions

Professor Peter White OBE MD FRCP FRCPsych Professor of Psychological Medicine Causes and treatments of chronic fatigue syndrome/ME, graded exercise therapy for ME Robert White MSc Tutor in Transcultural and Mental Health Sociocultural learning theory, violence and depression in school-aged children


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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Further information Director of Graduate Studies Professor Stephen Duffy Email: s.w.duffy@qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)207 882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk

Staff profile: Dr David Wald Senior Lecturer and Consultant Cardiologist

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry The Admissions and Recruitment Office Room CB02 Queens’ Building Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: pgsmd@qmul.ac.uk

“As an Interventional Cardiologist, my main interest lies in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, in particular bridging the interventional and preventive approaches to cardiovascular disease which are often viewed as distinct. I am currently co-ordinating a proposed randomised trial to assess the value of coronary angioplasty in preventing future coronary heart disease among patients receiving angioplasty to treat an acute myocardial infarction. “This follows a randomised trial which showed the minimum fully effective dose of folic acid for serum homocysteine reduction, for which I was awarded the BMA Brackenbury Research Prize. “I have acted as an adviser to the Food Safety Authority of Ireland in helping them reach a decision on dietary fortication with folic acid. In collaboration with other members of the Institute, this led to research into the expected effect of folic acid intake on cardiovascular disease prevention. This in turn showed how even the largest randomised trials of folic acid supplementation were underpowered to show the expected effect. “Another recent joint initiative involved showing that screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia, by serum cholesterol measurement, is effective if done in early childhood after the first year of life. This finding underpins a novel “child-parent” population screening strategy that screens children and their parents within the same programme. This involved assessing imaging techniques like carotid ultrasound and CT scanning in screening for coronary heart disease to determine their value in medical practice. “Additionally, I coordinate the Polypill Prevention Programme, a novel service that adopts the Polypill approach in coronary heart disease and stroke prevention.”


Science and Engineering


Biological and Chemical Sciences

MSc in Aquatic Ecology by Research p284 MSc in Chemical Research p285 MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences p286 MSc in Marine Ecology and Environmental Management p287 Research degrees (MPhil/PhD) p288


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School of Biological and Chemical Sciences www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences is one of the largest departments at Queen Mary, University of London's Mile End campus, with over 70 members of academic staff and 1,300 undergraduate and postgraduate students. The School is committed to excellence in research and teaching, and offers an exciting and stimulating environment for staff and students.

Research strengths The School provides a friendly, interactive and lively environment for research students taking PhD or MPhil degrees, and post-doctoral research. We benefit from strong collaboration, both within and beyond the School, which provides additional insight and expertise. We also benefit from London’s position as a major international centre for scientific meetings and conferences. Research in the School spans sub-atomic to global levels of analysis, and includes research on materials and interfacial chemistry, protein structure and function, photosynthesis, cell biology, evolutionary and functional genomics, neurobiology, cognitive biology and psychology, behavioural ecology, aquatic and terrestrial ecology.

Research quality indicators Research Assessment Exercise Our School is distinguished by high calibre academic staff who generate a vibrant research culture and produce work that appears in high-impact multidisciplinary journals (for example Nature, Science and other top-rank specialist journals). The results of the 2008 RAE confirmed the School's position among the UK's leading centres for Biological Sciences, with 85 per cent of our outputs assessed as being of international quality. In recent years we have focused on recruiting young and enthusiastic research-oriented staff. This will ensure the continued development of the School's exciting research environment. Projects, funding, research grants and awards The School attracts funding from UK research councils (BBSRC, NERC, MRC, EPSRC) and charities (Royal Society, Wellcome Trust, Leverhulme Trust), the EU, industrial collaborators and other funding agencies. The School has also benefited from substantial infrastructure funding (SRIF and CIF) having recently been awarded more than £1m for new facilities for protein structure determination, and imaging for cell biology and aquatic biology. To get an up-to-date impression of the International recognition of the School’s research, please see the News section on our website: www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/


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School of Biological and Chemical Sciences www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk Postgraduate resources

Scholarships / studentships

Research resources include: an efficient and wellequipped chemical store; various workshops; excellent library and information services; a high-speed computer network that provides fast access to a wide range of databases and other electronic sources of information; facilities for purification and analysis of macromolecules incorporating FPLC and other chromatographies, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), electrospray mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies, X-ray crystallography; recombinant DNA technology; stateof-the-art light and EM microscopy; glasshouses; controlled environment rooms; cold rooms; marine and freshwater aquaria. In 2009 the School benefited from over £1 million CIF investment in state-of-the-art equipment for cell biology, structural biology and aquatic biology. The School has a Bioinformatics Hub (shared with Computer Sciences) and the College Genome Centre provides further specialist resources for genomics and bioinformatics. Some of our academic staff are based at The River Laboratory (Wareham, Dorset) and its research facilities are available for use by our students.

PhD Studentships The School offers around 15 research studentships annually, which we advertise on our website at the beginning of the year, together with information on how to apply. Approximately 50 per cent of these are funded by research councils – BBSRC (www.bbsrc.ac.uk/), EPSRC (www.epsrc.ac.uk/) and NERC (www.nerc.ac.uk/) – UK and some EU students are eligible to apply for these. Other studentships are funded by the College, for which International students are also eligible. In addition, the School awards Graduate Teaching Studentships, which enable students to do a PhD over a four-year period whilst contributing to our undergraduate teaching programmes. MSc Studentships and Bursaries A limited number of College-funded bursaries to the value of £2,000 are available for award to students on our Masters programmes.There are also scholarships specifically for international students worth £2,000 a year. Applicants to our MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences are also considered for full and part-funded NERC Studentships (UK/EU) and a bursary to the value of Home Fees only, funded by the Freshwater Biological Association. All applicants are automatically considered for awards and there is no separate application form. Enquiries about studentships/bursaries should be directed to Postgraduate Admissions Officer (sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk).

Further information Postgraduate Admissions Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3012 email: sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teamb@qmul.ac.uk


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School of Biological and Chemical Sciences Career opportunities Students graduating with a PhD from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences have excellent career prospects. Many of our students continue to pursue a career in research, taking up positions as postdoctoral research fellows in laboratories based in the UK and abroad. Some progress to become independent research scientists, heading up their own research groups in universities or research institutes and going on to train the next generation of research scientists. Others take up research positions in industry (such as agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals) or move on to a teaching career in schools and other educational institutions. For some, a PhD is a qualification that provides a strong academic foundation for careers in business, the civil service, health care, journalism and more. Students who have recently graduated with one of our Masters degrees have gone on to do further research in the UK and abroad, including PhD positions at Queen Mary, Oxford University, University College London and in the USA. Other students have secured employment in industry and academia, including environmental consultancies, UK and overseas government agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, a global oil field services provider and as the Head of a Department at a university in Guyana.

Graduate profile: Tânia Nobre

Studied: PhD in Biological Sciences – graduated 2007 Currently: Marie Curie post-doc fellow at Wageningen University (Laboratory of Genetics), The Netherlands Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? When I was looking for a University to undertake my PhD studies I had a clear line of research that I wanted to pursue. Furthermore, I wanted to acquire new skills and broadening the spectrum of my expertise, and those were the driving forces behind my wish to undertake my PhD studies in a country other than the one in which I had studied and worked. Queen Mary offered the right expertise and the right environment. I was looking for a team with a solid and broad scientific basis but also one willing to explore new areas and develop new methods within my area of research. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? During my time at Queen Mary I have grown as a researcher. I have learned how to adapt to a different research community with different ways of working and in a different country. Besides the scientific enrichment, my PhD study at Queen Mary taught me mainly how to cope with complicated situations, improved my social skills with respect to building up professional relations and showed me that there is a balance between working in a team and individually solving problems. What are your career plans in the next five years? After my Marie Curie post-doc (two years) my ambition is to start establishing my own research team in the field I am working in.


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Degree programmes

MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research offers students a comprehensive practical training with a good proportion of time spent in the laboratory and field. The content covered is closely aligned to the MSc Freshwater and Coastal Sciences (see page 286), however this programme places more of an emphasis on practical work, rather than formal tuition such as lectures. You will develop all the skills necessary to undertake further academic or applied research through completion of an extended project. This will be aligned to cutting edge research taking place in the Centre for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment in the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. Students will be encouraged to share their work through publication in relevant journals. Programme outline You will take three core modules and an associated one-week residential field training course taught by experts in aquatic ecology from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences and the Geography Department. Core modules: Aquatic Ecosystems: structure and function • Aquatic Systems: hydrological, hydrochemical and geomorphological processes • Statistics for the biosciences Field training course: an introduction to key field skills held at the Freshwater Biological Association’s River Lab on the River Frome, Dorset. Individual research project: Comprises a literature review, written thesis, seminar presentation, and oral examination. Assessment The taught element of the programme comprises 20 per cent of your final mark determined by continuous assessment. The field course is not formally assessed, but provides further training in field techniques introduced during the two aquatic systems modules. Your extended project makes up the remaining 80 per cent of your mark. You will be assessed on the following: literature review and project plan (20 per cent), student contribution and work ethic (10 per cent), oral presentation (10 per cent) and thesis (60 per cent).

Entry requirements Undergraduate degree (minimum upper second class honours) in a relevant subject such as Environmental Science, Biology, Chemistry or Geography. Individuals with relevant professional qualifications or other experience and qualifications will also be considered. Candidates will be interviewed as part of the admission procedure. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Further information Postgraduate Admissions Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3012 email: sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Jonathan Grey Tel: +44(0)20 7882 7819 email: j.grey@qmul.ac.uk


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MSc in Chemical Research

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International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description The MSc in Chemical Research at Queen Mary offers you the opportunity to make a contribution to the fascinating world of modern chemistry, by spending a year working on a major individual research project. This research work is supplemented by lecture modules and seminars, and successful completion of the programme leads to the award of an internationally recognised Masters qualification. This programme provides a comprehensive preparation for students wishing to progress onto a research career (bridging the gap between the lecture-dominated programme of a typical undergraduate BSc degree and the research intensive PhD degree), but the qualification can also be a real asset for those wishing to pursue other careers in industry, or in education. Training is given in a wide range of techniques to enable candidates to build up a substantial portfolio of experimental skills and thereby tackle more extended research and development projects with increased confidence. The practical work is also reinforced by lecture modules explaining the underlying theoretical basis of various research methods and techniques, and other aspects of advanced chemistry.

Recent graduate destinations Many graduates from this programme have gone on to do further research in the UK and abroad, including PhD positions at Oxford University, University College London, Birmingham and in the USA. Other students have secured employment in industry and academia, including: • Schlumberger, a leading global oil field services provider • Manager of a cosmetics company in China • Pharmaceutical industry in the USA • National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens • Head of Chemistry, University of Georgetown, Guyana. Further information Postgraduate Admissions Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3012 email: sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk For informal enquiries, please contact Geoff Hawkes, Programme Director Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3261 email address: g.e.hawkes@qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline The major part of the programme is a research project on a topic agreed in consultation with the MSc programme coordinator. This practical work will generally provide training in a variety of specialised techniques appropriate to your chosen area of research and is carried out in the main research laboratories, under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The taught component of the degree programme consists of two lecture modules, usually selected from the range of advanced undergraduate chemistry modules offered by the School. Assessment The taught modules include assessed coursework components, but the main assessment is by examination in May/June. For the research project you are assessed on the basis of a dissertation, which you submit towards the end of the programme, a presentation of your research work at a seminar and an oral examination of your dissertation and the associated project topic. Entry requirements The normal minimum requirement is a second class honours degree in chemistry, or with chemistry as a major element (or equivalent international qualification).

Bema Khanam, MSc in Chemical Research “The MSc programme is very well structured, offering a balance of exam assessed and coursework assessed components. The lecturers at Queen Mary are great! They are all very supportive, enthusiastic and approachable. There’s also a wide mix of students providing an opportunity to learn about other cultures and interests. “My current project on drug delivery is the most interesting part of my course so far. I am at a stage where I’m analysing data I’ve gathered from using various techniques available such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultra violet spectroscopy. With the help of my supervisor, I’m hoping to make some interesting discoveries to write about in my project.”


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Degree programmes

(cont)

MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences (Jointly taught with the Department of Geography) One year full-time, two to five years part-time Programme description Aquatic ecosystems are vital global resources. However, issues such as habitat degradation, pollution, species introductions and climate change, severely threaten their ecological integrity and sustainability. The MSc in Freshwater and coastal sciences (FACS) aims to provide students with the necessary skills to understand and tackle these issues, by integrating ecology with hydrology and geomorphology. Emphasis is placed on practical skills and field experience. The Centre for Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment (CATE) is an interdisciplinary collaboration between the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences and the Department of Geography. The staff within CATE have considerable multi-disciplinary expertise in aquatic ecosystem sciences which is further complemented by staff from organisations such as the UK Environment Agency, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, The Freshwater Biological Association and the conservation agencies. Programme outline (subject to modification) Semester 1: Four core two-week modules and a oneweek field module: Aquatic Ecosystems: Structure and Functioning • Statistics for the Biosciences • Hydrological, Hydrochemical and Geomorphological Processes • Science, Policy and Management Semester 2: Four module options from those listed below. Habitat module options include: Streams and Rivers • Lakes and Ponds • Estuaries and Coastal Systems • Coastal and Aquatic Management. Specialist organism options include: Macrophytes • Plankton • Chironomids • Marine Invertebrates • Fishes Assessment The taught element of the programme comprises 60 per cent of your final mark determined by continuous assessment. The research project (40 per cent) is assessed via a 12,000-15,000-word dissertation. Entry requirements A second-class honours degree (or the equivalent from an overseas university) in a relevant Natural Sciences subject. Applicants with relevant professional experience in science or environmental management will also be considered. International students, please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390.

Scholarships and Bursaries The programme is supported by NERC studentships (www.nerc.ac.uk/) and by a limited number of bursaries, including one from The Freshwater Biological Association (www.fba.org.uk/). Recent graduate destinations These include: • Environment Agency • ENSIS Ltd • Portsmouth Water • Bureau Veritas • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds • Nunatsiavut Government – Fisheries Research and Management • Open University Further information Postgraduate Admissions Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3012 email: sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Chris Mellor Studied: MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences (FACS) – graduated in 2007 with distinction Currently: Studying for a PhD in Arctic Stream Hydroecology. Why did you choose Queen Mary for your postgraduate study? I chose the FACS MSc course at Queen Mary because of its interdisciplinary nature. It covers all aspects of aquatic systems rather than just Marine Biology or Freshwater Biology like other Universities. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? The FACS MSc incorporates a wealth of fieldwork and I went on at least one trip per module. The staff are approachable and most importantly passionate about what they teach, which given the relatively high staff to student ratio provides a very healthy learning environment. There was also the opportunity to attend lectures and seminars across London that I really enjoyed.


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MSc in Marine Ecology and Environmental Management One year full-time or part-time over a maximum of five years This programme is taught jointly by the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary, University of London and the University of London Marine Biological Station at Millport, Isle Of Cumbrae, Scotland (www.gla.ac.uk/centres/ marinestation/). Programme description The aims of this programme are to: • Develop a strong interdisciplinary understanding in marine ecology and marine environmental management. • Provide structured training in research techniques and practical skills, including in systematics (biodiversity), statistics, experimental design, project planning, monitoring, modelling and scientific writing that will engage with user needs. • Provide a foundation for further PhD research, or for prospective employment with marine environmental protection and conservation agencies, overseas development agencies, national and local government, the water industry, the fisheries sector, environmental consultancies, elements of the tourist industry and national and international non-government organisations. This programme covers ecological issues and environmental management in marine science. It is taught in two institutions with roughly six months in London and six months in Millport. The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary has a long tradition of working in aquatic biology. It is a large and diverse institution with expertise in whole organism biology and molecular sciences. The University Marine Biological station at Millport is a smaller specialist marine institution with a range of laboratory and research vessel facilities and associated specialist staff. Programme outline Core modules At Queen Mary: Benthic and Planktonic Processes • Marine Invertebrate Zoology • Marine Pollution • Statistics for the Biosciences • Project 1 At Millport: Coastal Zone Management • Fisheries Biology • Project 2 Optional modules At Queen Mary: Estuaries and Coastal Systems At Millport: Coral Reef Monitoring and Management (taught at Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt) • Marine Microbiology • Turtles, Seals, Whales and Dolphins Assessment All taught and field modules will be equally weighted at one-twelfth (8.33 per cent) of the total mark. Each of the two projects will be weighted at two-twelfths

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(16.67 per cent) of the total mark. Each taught module will be assessed by one or more of: openessays, practical reports, laboratory or fieldwork note books, presentations and traditional exams. Entry requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (or the equivalent from an overseas university) in a relevant subject such as Environmental Science, Biology, Chemistry or Geography will be required. Preference will be given to candidates with an upper second class or first class degree. Applicants with relevant professional experience in marine science or environmental management will also be considered. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Graduates from this programme have taken up a range of exciting positions, for example with environmental consultancies, UK and overseas government agencies, marine and other environmentally related industries and water authorities. Others have continued on to further research in the UK and worldwide, including PhD positions. Further information Postgraduate Admissions Officer Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3012 email: sbcs-pgadmissions@qmul.ac.uk


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Research

Research degrees We welcome postgraduate students and visiting research fellows who wish to undertake research in our areas of interest (see below). Research students are registered for University of London degrees (MPhil/PhD) and work under the supervision of members of academic staff. Students may receive financial support (research studentships) offered by the research councils (including CASE studentships in collaboration with an industrial sponsor). A limited number of College studentships are also available. For further information on MPhil/PhD degrees, see page 22. Entry requirements Students with upper-second class (or better) BSc honours degrees or equivalent are eligible to apply for admission to research degrees. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390.

Research areas • Biological and experimental psychology • Ecology and behavioural biology • Evolutionary and organismal biology • Materials chemistry and interfaces • Mechanistic and structural biology • Synthetic chemistry Biological and experimental psychology http://psychology.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/index.html Research in this area focuses on the ultimate (evolutionary) and proximate (genetic, developmental and neurobiological) mechanisms responsible for cognition and behaviour. A central consideration for this group concerns cognitive evolution and the biological basis of human social behaviour. We also place a strong emphasis on the experimental approach to research problems in these fields of psychology. Recent topics in which world-class work has been conducted includes physical reasoning and social cognition in Corvids, colour perception in bumblebees, the transmission of cultural information in humans using evolutionary models, the biological origins of human sexual orientation, sex differences in cognition, the use of zebra fish as a model behavioural assay of addiction, visual attention and search in humans and non-human animals, the role of Cannabinoid signalling in several neural processes, social evolution in mole rats, gene-brain interaction in mammalian reproductive behaviour, the utility of Drosophila models of circadian rhythms, face processing and imitation, and the philosophy of mind.

Ecology and behavioural biology www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchgroups/ ecologybiology/index.html Within this group are two major research themes of international significance: aquatic ecosystems and behavioural/evolutionary ecology, particularly of social animals. Together, these themes give a distinctive and strong coverage of modern ecosystems and organismal ecology. Included within the aquatic ecosystems theme is one of the strongest freshwater ecology research groups in any British University. Research by the group includes population and community ecology, empirical and theoretical aspects of food web structure and function, the application of stable isotopes to aquatic ecology, biogeochemical processes, including the production of greenhouse gases from rivers and wetlands, and studies of acidification and eutrophication. We also have leading experts in the biogeochemistry and ecology of estuaries, coastal margins and salt marshes. Included in the behavioural ecology of social animals theme, we have world-leading research on the foraging biology of bees, the social organisation and mating systems of communally roosting bats, and the (eu)sociality of the mole rats. We also have excellence in the behaviour, ecology, management and conservation of wild mammals, on the role of termites in the productivity and sustainability of tropical agriculture, and on the role of pathogens and parasites in sexual selection and behaviour in insects. Evolutionary and organismal biology www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchgroups/ evolutionaryandorganismalbiology/index.html The Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Group is internationally recognised for using post-genomic approaches to investigate the evolution and functions of genes and proteins at an organismal level using a range of model organisms, including plants, invertebrates, fish and mammals. An underlying theme is a recognition of the importance of

A ‘Buckyball’: A sphere of carbon atoms known as ‘Buckminsterfullerene’.


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comparative and functional genomics in modern systems biology. It encompasses research on chromosome evolution in plants, transposable elements in insects, functional genomics and developmental biology (using Danio rerio and Fugu rubripes as vertebrate model systems), molecular neurobiology (eg endocannabinoid signalling), behavioural genetics (eg circadian biology of Drosophila) and population genetics of humans and other animals. This research utilises a range of methods including bioinformatics, analysis of cell and tissue structure, analysis of gene and protein expression and the impact of gene-knockout on phenotypes, in vitro physiology and pharmacology and analysis of whole-organism behaviour. Materials chemistry and interfaces www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchgroups/ materialsandinterfaces/index.html Research in the materials and interfaces area combines expertise in synthetic methodology along with a wide range of sophisticated analytical techniques in order to design and develop new materials, to investigate and predict their properties, and to characterise interfacial structure and chemical reactions at surfaces. See also the Centre for Materials Research website: www.cmr.qmul.ac.uk/ Mechanistic and structural biology www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchgroups/ mechanisticandstructuralbiology/index.html Mechanistic and Structural Biology has traditionally been strong at Queen Mary, and activity in this area has accelerated over the past five years. We have particular research excellence in: (i) photosynthesis and bioenergetics at the molecular and cellular levels; (ii) protein structure and structure/activity relationships in peptides, proteins and enzymes; and (iii) in the synthesis of biologically relevant molecular systems, small molecule catalysts and their biologically inspired analogues. We use a variety of approaches including cloning and over-expression, mechanistic enzymology and structure determination utilising X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We have modern and well-equipped facilities for these techniques and also for a variety of other spectroscopic approaches, including circular dichroism, both continuous wave and pulsed EPR and ENDOR, confocal microscopy, Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Synthetic chemistry www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchgroups/ mechanisticandstructuralbiology/index.html Synthetic chemistry at Queen Mary has seen resurgence in recent years with the appointment of a number of new staff. Our main interests lie in: (i) the

Doris E Pichler, PhD Freshwater Ecology “I did the MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences at Queen Mary in 2007-8. The programme incorporated everything I wanted, and I was impressed by the College’s good reputation, especially in the field of Freshwater Ecology. There are a number of very successful and renowned scientists working in the Department. “I also really enjoyed the large amount of practical fieldwork on the MSc. I had the opportunity to go to Iceland for two weeks and do sampling on a unique stream system in the geothermal area, Hengill, SW Iceland. In fact, it was my experiences on the MSc that led to my doing a PhD here. I’m doing my PhD project on this stream system, investigating the effects of warming on structure and functioning of stream food webs. It’s a great training for an ecologist.” development of new synthetic and catalytic methodology; (ii) the total synthesis of natural products and their analogues as drug candidates; (iii) molecularly imprinted polymers for application as artificial receptors and catalysts; (iv) ultrafast electron transfer and (v) molecular machines for application to the synthesis of complex molecules and materials. We have excellent laboratories to undertake this research in the state-of-the-art Joseph Priestley Building. We are also supported by outstanding research facilities, including an array of NMR, EPR and ENDOR and mass spectrometers, single crystal X-ray crystallography and a range of analytical facilities commensurate with contemporary synthetic chemistry.


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Staff research interests www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/people/academicstaff/index.html

Isaac Abrahams BSc(CNAA) PhD(City) CChem MRSC Senior Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry Solid-state chemistry; crystallography, materials chemistry, solid electrolytes, glasses, biomedical materials

Brendan Curran BA PhD(Dublin) Senior Lecturer in Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology Yeast biotechnology

John Allen BSc PhD(Lond) Professor of Biochemistry Regulation of photosynthesis by protein phosphorylation; redox signalling in cell evolution

Ronald Cutler MSc PhD(Lond) CIBiol CSc FIBMS FIBiol Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science Infectious diseases and pathology with particular emphasis on novel treatments against multiple drug resistant microbial pathogens

Rachel Ashworth BSc(Birmingham) PhD(Reading) Lecturer in Oral Biology (Physiology) The role of calcium signalling in nerve and muscle development

Adrian Dobbs BSc PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Organic and Biological Chemistry Synthetic organic chemistry: methodology and total synthesis

Christopher Bray MChem DPhil(Oxon) Lecturer in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Organic chemistry, total synthesis and new synthetic methodology

Maurice Elphick BSc PhD(Lond) Professor of Animal Physiology and Neuroscience Neurobiology and evolution of signalling molecules

Caroline Brennan BSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer in Molecular genetics Neurobiology of drug addiction and cell signalling during development Lars Chittka PhD(Berlin) Professor of Sensory and Behavioural Ecology Sensory physiology, learning and evolutionary ecology

Nathan Emery BSc Hons(Central Lancs) PhD(St And) Royal Society University Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Cognitive Biology Comparative cognition and the evolution of intelligence Genoveva Esteban BSc MSc PhD(Madrid) Lecturer in Eukaryotic Microbiology Microbial ecology, taxonomy and functional groups of free-living protozoa in fresh waters, soils and marine habitats Chris Faulkes CBiol MIBiol PhD(Lond) Reader in Evolutionary Ecology Molecular Ecology; Social evolution in cooperativelybreeding mammals Bland Finlay BSc PhD(Stirling) FRS FRDSSL Professor of Microbial Ecology Ecology and physiology of free-living Protozoa; dimensions and dynamics of biodiversity at the microbial level Stephen Goldup MChem(Oxon) PhD(London) Royal Society Research Fellow Organic synthesis and methodology; molecular nanotechnology; physical organic chemistry Jonathan Grey BSc PhD(Lanc) Senior Lecturer in Freshwater Biology Ecology of lakes and aquatic-terrestrial links John Gurnell BSc PhD(Exon) Professor of Ecology Behaviour and ecology; conservation biology; wildlife management


Biological and Chemical Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

Geoff Hawkes BSc PhD(Lond) CChem FRSC Professor of Physical Organic Chemistry Solution and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); spectroscopy to study structure and dynamics at the molecular level Peter Heathcote BSc PhD(Lond) Professor of Biochemistry and Head of School Protein cofactor interactions in photosynthetic reaction centres, respiratory chain complexes and enzymes involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis Alan Hildrew BSc PhD(Wales) Professor of Ecology Community ecology of rivers and streams Andrew Hirst BSc PhD(Soton) Senior Lecturer in Marine Biology Biological oceanography, marine zooplankton ecology Rob Hughes BSc(Wales) PhD(R’dg) Senior Lecturer in Marine/Estuarine Ecology Marine and estuarine benthic ecology and conservation Paul Hurd BSc PhD(Sheff) Lecturer in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Epigenetics, epigenomics, DNA methylation, histone modifications, post-translational modifications Bob Janes BSc MSc PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry Structure-function studies of voltage-gated ion channel toxins Keith Jensen MSc(Dalhousie) PhD(Humboldt) Lecturer in Developmental and Comparative Psychology Biological and experimental psychology group Development and evolution of cooperation John Iwan Jones BSc PhD(Liverpool) Research Leader in Freshwater Ecology Pure and applied freshwater ecology; ecosystem structure and functioning; biological assessment of human impacts on freshwater ecosystems Rob Knell BSc PhD(Liv) Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology Transmission dynamics of parasites Norbert Krauss Diploma in Chemistry PhD(Cologne) Senior Lecturer in Structural Biology Three-dimensional structures of photosystems I and II of organisms which perform water-oxidising photosynthesis; phytochromes

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Igor Larrosa BSc PhD(Barcelona) Lecturer in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Gold and palladium homogeneous catalysis Steve Le Comber BSc PhD(Lond) Lecturer in Anatomy Evolutionary modelling; mathematical approaches to animal foraging Andrew Leitch BSc PhD(Bris) Professor of Plant Genetics Evolutionary consequences of polyploidy in plants Ewan Main BSc Hons(Edinburgh) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in Biochemistry Molecular Biophysics – the design, folding and molecular interactions of proteins Colin Malcolm BSc(Aberd) PhD(Manc) Lecturer in Molecular Genetics Insect genomics; molecular genetics of mosquitoes Rob Martin MA(Oxon) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in Chemistry Environmental and atmospheric chemistry of volcanic emissions Alan McElligott BSc(Cork) PhD(Dublin) Lecturer in Organismal and Environmental Biology Behavioural ecology, sexual selection, vocal communication and wildlife management Alex Mesoudi BSc(Lond) MSc(L’pool) PhD(St Andrews) Lecturer in Social, Evolutionary and Cultural Psychology Human cultural transmission and human cultural evolution Fanis Missirlis BSc(Patras) PhD(Guelph) Lecturer in Cell biology Genetics, cell biology and physiology of iron metabolism Conrad Mullineaux BA PhD(Leeds) Professor of Microbiology Photosynthesis and membrane dynamics in bacteria Richard Nichols BSc(Lond) PhD(UEA) Professor of Evolutionary Genetics Using genetic evidence to understand the biology and history of living organisms Jonathan Nield BSc PhD(Lond) DIC ARCS Royal Society Research Fellow, Structural Biology Transmission electron microscopy; image-processing technique of single particle analysis Roger Nix MA PhD(Cantab) CChem MRSC Senior Lecturer in Physical Chemistry Surface chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, nanotechnology


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Staff research interests

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www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/people/index_academic.shtml

Magda Osman BSc(Sussex) PhD(Lon) Lecturer in Experimental Cognitive Psychology Mechanisms involved in learning, decision making, and problem solving in complex dynamic environments.

Alexander Ruban BSc MSc(Kiev) PhD(Minsk) Reader in Biophysics Molecular mechanisms of light energy utilisation and management in the photosynthetic membrane

Ian Phillips BSc(Rand) PhD(Lond) Professor of Molecular Biology Molecular biology and genetics of foreign compound metabolism

Jenny Schmid-Araya BSc MSc PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Freshwater Ecology Invertebrate body size spectra and food web dynamics, scaling relationships in aquatic systems, surface-subsurface patterns

Richard Pickersgill BSc(Lond) DPhil(Oxon) Professor of Structural Biology X-ray crystallography studies of enzyme structure and function

Peter Skorupski BSc(St Andrews) PhD(Bris) Lecturer in Neurobiology Neurobiology of colour vision

Michael Proulx BSc(Arizona State) MA PhD(Johns Hopkins) Lecturer in Cognitive Psychology Cognitive psychology with a focus on attention and perception

Ralf Stanewsky PhD(Cologne) Privat Dozent(Regensburg) Professor of Neurobiology Genetic and neuronal control of circadian rhythms in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster

Qazi Rahman BSc(Staffs) PhD(Lond) Lecturer in Cognitive Biology Cognitive Biology; Psychobiology of human sexual orientation

Angelika Stollewerk PhD(Cologne) Reader in Evolutionary Developmental Biology Evolution and development of the arthropod nervous system

Marina Resmini Laurea PhD(Milan) Senior Lecturer in Organic Chemistry Molecular recognition and enzyme mimics

Alice Sullivan BA PhD(Trinity Dub) CChem MRSC Professor of Inorganic Chemistry Functional solid reagents and catalysts, porous organosilicon materials, phosphonate coordination chemistry

Steve Rossiter BSc(Sus) PhD(Bris) Royal Society University Research Fellow Molecular ecology and evolution of mammals; main focus – bats


Biological and Chemical Sciences Queen Mary, University of London

James Sullivan BSc(Leic) PhD(Cantab) Lecturer in Biochemistry Protein sorting and degradation Mark Trimmer BSc(Lond) PhD(Essex) Senior Lecturer in Aquatic Biology Nitrogen transformations in estuarine and coastal sediments

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Staff profile: Professor Maurice Elphick Professor of Animal Physiology and Neuroscience

John Viles BSc MSc(Bris) PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry Role of metals in prion protein structure and function Tony Vlcek RNDr(Prague) CSc(Czech Academy of Sciences) CChem FRSC Professor of Inorganic Chemistry Physical-inorganic chemistry; special emphasis on characterisation of excited states and their ultrafast dynamics Mike Watkinson BSc(St Andrews) PhD(UMIST) CChem MRSC Reader in Synthetic Chemistry Custom design and synthesis of novel functional ligand systems Shane Wilkinson BSc PhD(Wales) Lecturer in Microbiology/Parasitology Molecular parasitology; anti-parasitic chemotherapy Guy Woodward BSc(Cardiff) PhD(Lond) Senior Lecturer in Fish Biology and Freshwater Ecology Freshwater food webs; Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning; Evolutionary and organismal biology Peter Wyatt MA DPhil(Oxon) CSci CChem MRSC Senior Lecturer in Organic Chemistry Organic synthesis; chemical synthesis of natural product analogues and of optoelectronic materials Ali Zarbakhsh BSc(Leeds) MSc PhD(Sheff) MIOP Lecturer in Physical Chemistry Structural studies of biological and polymeric systems at buried fluid-fluid interfaces

“I am interested in the evolution and functions of molecules that mediate communication between nerve cells in the brain. A particular focus is the endocannabinoid system, a signalling system in the brain that is affected by the drug cannabis. Our research, funded by grants from BBSRC, MRC, Wellcome Trust and Leverhulme Trust, has helped to establish how this system works, when it first evolved, and how it can be targeted to treat medical disorders such as chronic pain. “I decided to work in this field for a few reasons: A desire to learn more about how nervous systems orchestrate the astonishingly complex behaviour of humans and other animals; A conviction that research on all forms of life is absolutely essential for understanding human biology and for maintaining life on earth. “I hope my research work helps me transmit the joy of learning and discovering new things about the natural world to the students I teach. Discovering things yourself really helps you appreciate how valuable knowledge and understanding are. “London is one of best cities in the world to do scientific research because there are so many opportunities to collaborate and learn from other scientists. Queen Mary provides a friendly, supportive and interactive environment that enables scientists to do world-leading research.”


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science MSc Computing and Information Systems (Conversion) p300 MSc Advanced Methods in Computer Science p301 MSc Digital Music Processing p302 MSc Digital Signal Processing p303 MSc Information Management p304 MSc Intelligent Web Technologies p305 MSc Security and Surveillance p306 MSc Software Engineering p307 MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Network Pathway) p308 MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Internet Computing Pathway) p309 MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Applications Pathway) p310 MSc Telecommunications with Law (Network Pathway) p311 MSc Telecommunications with Law (Internet Computing Pathway) p312 MSc Telecommunications with Law (Applications Pathway) p313 MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) p314 MSc Telecommunications (Internet Computing Pathway) p315 MSc Telecommunications (Applications Pathway) p316 MSc Wireless Networks (Network Pathway) p317 MSc Wireless Networks (Physical Pathway) p318 MSc in Computer Science by Research p319 MSc by Research in Electronic Engineering p319 Research degrees p320


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School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk We are one of the top 20 universities in the UK for Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, with outstanding resources, such as our state-of-the-art listening room and laboratories in antennas and augmented human interaction.

Students often base their projects around the cutting-edge research taking place in the School. Many of our researchers are connected to more than one research group and we pride ourselves on our success in interdisciplinary research. We work with:

The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science was created from the Departments of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering when we formalised our existing synergy in 2008. We are well-known for our pioneering and ground-breaking research, award-winning teaching, and innovative public engagement programme.

• psychologists – developing mathematical models of human vision and errors in software • biologists – decoding genome data and understanding cell deformation • musicians and actors – producing better music and performance • medical researchers – designing new monitoring techniques and decision-making strategies • lawyers – finding ways to simplify risk and probability to juries • linguists – developing, testing and decoding the dynamics of conversational dialogue.

The 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise rated our research as internationally leading: 75 per cent of our Computer Science staff and 50 per cent of our Electronic Engineering staff received the highest possible rankings of 3 and 4 stars. Research in the School is divided into research themes and you will be taught by leading researchers or research groups within these themes: • Antennas & Electromagnetics (Antennas) • Computer Science Theory (Theory) • Computer Vision (Vision) • Networks • Centre for Digital Music (C4DM) • Interaction Media and Communication (IMC) • MultiMedia & Vision (MMV) • Risk Information Management (RIM) • Media & Arts Technology EPSRC Doctorial Training Centre (MAT)

The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science has more than 130 members of academic and research staff and a community of more than 2,500 students. With over 170 research students and a current research portfolio of £34 million, we clearly have a strong research culture. We currently hold three prestigious EPSRC platform grants worth over £3 million. These grants are awarded to internationally leading research groups and we hold them in the areas of extreme reasoning, digital music and microwave and Terahertz applications to health care and imaging. We have two EPSRC “Programme Grants” and an EPSRC “Large Grant”, all with multimillion pound funding recognising research excellence. In addition, we run an EPSRC Doctoral Training Centre for Media and Arts Technology with almost £6 million in funding. Our School has more of this strategic funding than six of the 19 Russell Group universities have within their entire institution. For more information on the research strengths, research quality indicators, projects, funding, research grants and awards, please see the following pages: www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/research/


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Electronic Engineering and Computer Science www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science is a relatively new formalisation of our shared interests and focus, but in both areas we are noted for linking innovative teaching to pioneering research. Electronic Engineering was established at Queen Mary more than a century ago, and throughout this time we have maintained a reputation for research excellence, working on significant topics such as core electronic engineering and telecommunications. Additionally, we have been leaders in Computer Science since the 1960s, contributing to many major developments in the field, including setting up the first UK internet node to developing tools that are revolutionising the detection of bugs in operating systems. As well as offering a wide range of taught and research postgraduate programmes, we offer unique Distance Learning MSc programmes, which are available to students in the UK, Europe, and through partner institutions around the world.

Research strengths Research in EECS is at the cutting-edge; we work on core developments as well as novel technologies. Our research is focused in key areas led by internationally leading researchers, and has a strong interdisciplinary component. To produce world-class research, we engage with industry partners and academic colleagues in the UK and internationally, in a variety of sectors and disciplines. This approach has led to meaningful contributions in research that apply to real world problems. Our research has left indelible marks in areas as diverse as: the foundations of programming languages, digital signal processing, parallel computing, augmented human interaction, and intelligent systems. The benefit of studying for an MSc in a research active School is that you are taught by the people who are leaders in their research fields.

Research quality indicators Research Assessment Exercise Significant investment in research expertise led to excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008), confirming that the School offers internationally leading research in the areas of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering. Significant increases in research output and funding helped us to achieve results that place us firmly in the top 20 per cent of UK universities for Computer Science and Electronic Engineering. We submitted 80 per cent of academic staff in Computer Science to the recent RAE 2008 and 75 per cent of these academic staff and their research output was deemed to be three or four star (four being the highest possible number of stars). Our research income also increased dramatically to ÂŁ5.4 million in new grant awards in 2007.


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

We submitted 90 per cent of our Electronic Engineering academic staff, of which 50 per cent were rated at either three or four star, confirming the standard of our internationally leading research. During the assessment period, we awarded an impressive 77 PhDs, and attracted 126 new research grants valued at £15.2 million. We have formed two new research groups in the last six years and both, Multimedia and Vision and C4DM, have moved rapidly to world leading status. Post RAE this performance has continued with a current active grant portfolio of £34 million, with five of our academics being funded by prestigious external five-year fellowships, and the opening of a new doctoral training centre in Media and Arts Technology. Projects, funding, research grants and awards We continue to attract significant funding from both UK and EU academic funding bodies and industry. We have been awarded three EPSRC Platform Grants and two EPSRC Programme Grants. These prestigious grants are only awarded to groups with an internationally leading reputation and a high international profile.

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Professor O’Hearn and members of the Computer Science Theory group have been awarded both EPSRC Platform and Programme Grants valued at £3.2 million. Dr Curzon and members of the Interaction, Media and Communication group, along with colleagues at University College London, have been awarded an EPSRC Programme Grant valued at £5.8 million to study human error and medical devices. Professor Parini and the Antennas and Electromagnetics research group has been awarded more than £1 million to research the use of microwave systems for healthcare and imaging. Our Computer Vision group, led by Professor Gong, has been awarded more than £2 million on research topics including smart camera networks. Professor Sandler and members of the Centre for Digital Music and the Interaction, Media and Communication group have been awarded more than £5 million of funding to establish a doctoral training centre in Media and Arts Technology. The programme provides ten four-year PhD scholarships per year for five years and is part of a £250 million strategic initiative.

Postgraduate resources The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science offers taught postgraduate students their own computing laboratory. MSc students have exclusive use of the top floor in our purpose-built, award winning Informatics Teaching Laboratory (ITL) outside of scheduled laboratory sessions. The ITL boasts state-of-the-art computer systems providing over 250 fully networked multimedia workstations, a robotics research lab, and workshops. The ITL also has an extensive wireless LAN network so that students can use their own laptops. For postgraduate students on taught and research degrees there are specialist laboratories to use for carrying out research. Our Augmented Human Interaction (AHI) Laboratory combines pioneering technologies including full-body and multi-person motion capture, virtual and augmented reality systems and advanced aural and visual display technologies. We also have specialist laboratories in multimedia, digital signal processing – including a sound laboratory, and microwave antennas. PhD students have generous study space in our research laboratories. In addition, we have been awarded £1.8 million for the development of experimental facilities in Antennas and Digital Music that will be completed in 2010. We formed the Interdisciplinary Informatics Hub in Collaboration with the Schools of Biological and Chemical Science and Mathematical Science. These laboratories and associated office spaces house around 40 researchers, providing a meeting place for postgraduates from all departments to interact and exchange ideas.


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Computer Science and Electronic Engineering

www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk Scholarships / studentships

Further information

MSc Scholarships The College provides Computer Science and Electronic Engineering studentships worth £2,000 to a limited number of high-quality applicants. These awards can be held in conjunction with other funding and are awarded on the basis of exceptional academic merit, on a first come first served basis at the time of application to one of our programmes.

Postgraduate Administrator Rupal Vaja Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@dcs.qmul.ac.uk

For further information, please see www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/studentships/ for further information. A Westfield Trust Bursary (to the value of £2,000) is available for award to students on our MSc programmes. All applicants will be automatically considered for these awards and there is no separate application form. Successful candidates will be informed before the end of May. UK Government Scholarships The British Council administers the UK Government’s Chevening Scholarship programme. This is a special worldwide scheme to fund Master’s level study by international students and Queen Mary attracts about 20 Chevening scholarship winners every year. For further information please contact either www.chevening.com or your local British Council office www.britishcouncil.org who will also be able to inform you of any other scholarship opportunities open to you. For further information regarding these scholarships please visit www.qmul.ac.uk/international/ scholarships/ or contact our Postgraduate Administrator. PhD Scholarships The School has a number of EPSRC, College, industrial and internationally funded research studentships available for PhD students beginning in the autumn of each year. These are available to UK, EU and international students and pay for tuition fees and/or a tax-free maintenance grant. There is always strong competition for these and interested students should apply as early as possible, preferably between January and March. There is no separate scholarship application form; however, please ensure you indicate on the postgraduate application form that you wish to be considered for a scholarship. For further information regarding our scholarships please visit www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/phd/ or contact our Research Students Coordinator.

Research Students Coordinator Melissa Yeo Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5357 email: phd-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Director of Postgraduate Studies (teaching) Dr Tony Stockman Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5202 email: tonys@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Directors of Postgraduate Studies (research) For the research areas of: Computer Vision; Risk Information Management; Interaction, Media and Communication; Analysis; and Computer Science Theory: Professor Norman Fenton Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7860 email: norman.fenton@eecs.qmul.ac.uk For the research areas of: Antennas and Electromagnetics; Centre for Digital Music, Multimedia and Vision; and Networks and Communications: Professor Xiaodong Chen Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7983 email: xiaodong.chen@eecs.qmul.ac.uk General postgraduate information Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7952/7840 email: askthegradteam@qmul.ac.uk International students Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3066 email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk Graduate Admissions Office Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5533 email: admissions-teama@qmul.ac.uk


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Computer Science and Electronic Engineering Career opportunities We are committed to being leaders in research, and in training future leaders. The world of electronics, communications, media technologies and computing offers challenging, creative, and well-paid careers in a variety of economic sectors. There is currently a shortage of highly qualified graduates in both computer science and electronic engineering related fields, making exciting career opportunities and excellent salaries the norm.

PhD graduates have even more career opportunities. Vodafone, Microsoft Research, and Philips are just a few of the major companies employing our graduates in research capacities. Recent PhD graduates who are pursuing careers in higher education have found postdoctoral positions at New York University, Stanford University, University of Amsterdam, and University of Sussex.

Your future plans may involve working on the research and development of new technologies and applications – either in the laboratories of a large manufacturer or in a smaller contract research and development company where there would be opportunities to work with a variety of clients. For this type of work, career progression is through project leadership into positions of increasing technical challenge and responsibility. Alternatively, you may prefer to work on large projects which require organisational skills and leadership. Initially this might involve working at a junior level in support of major projects, but with increased experience the career path opens into senior project and company management.

Graduate profile: Andrew Graves

Studied: MSc Advanced Methods in Computer Science, PhD Computer Science Currently: Working for a large US investment bank, in London. I'm involved with the development of software that derivatives traders use to book trades and manage risk. Why did you choose Queen Mary? I was working in the industry as a software engineer and I wanted to do a research-based postgraduate course. I found that the Department of Computer Science had a healthy research reputation and offered an advanced MSc that allowed me to work closely with the research groups. After enjoying my Masters, I decided to stay and study for a Doctorate. This decision was easy because the department is full of talented researchers and, owing to its relatively small size, offers a good, friendly environment in which to live and study. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? I managed to learn a lot about Computer Science: how to design and perform research experiments, how to write scientifically and get published, how to mentor and teach. What are your career plans for the next five years? I am currently working in the financial sector where I get to work on complex software systems for demanding users. I enjoy software development and architecture and I expect that I will continue doing this.


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Degree programmes

MSc Computing and Information Systems (conversion) One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc is an intensive one-year generalist programme for highly motivated graduates with a good honours degree, but with little prior experience of computer science. You will develop theoretical and practical skills in computing and information systems development. The programme includes modules which introduce core aspects of computing, including a double module in object-oriented programming (using Java), plus modules covering Systems Analysis and Software Engineering – essential for anyone seeking a career in Information Systems development. The core modules are supplemented by optional specialist modules covering a broad range of subjects relevant to the software industry, such as Network Programming, Business Information Systems and Graphical User Interface design. Your project work will typically involve the design and implementation of a significant piece of software within your chosen specialism. Projects undertaken for external organisations are encouraged.

and we normally look for a Grade Point Average (GPA) of greater than 3.2. We also need evidence of mathematical ability equivalent to UK GCSE grade B, and that you have completed an individual project as proof of your ability to study independently. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Graduates have gone on to be employed by the following: Accenture (EC4M), British Telecommunications Plc, Camelspace, Datang Microelectronics Technology Co Ltd, Hellagro Ltd, Kaplan Financial, KPMG, Lancaster University, Melli Bank Place, Pacific World Ltd (Thailand), Queen Mary, University of London Further information Please contact: Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline Core modules Database Systems • Java Programming (double module) • Software Engineering (double module) • Systems Analysis • MSc Project Module options include: Network Programming • Business Information Systems • Computational Genomics • Entrepreneurship in Information Technology • Graphical User Interface Design • Interaction Design • Software Risk Assessment Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements A first degree in a subject not related to computer science, or a degree with less than 50 per cent of the modules in computer science subjects. We require a minimum of an upper second class honours degree,

Giuseppe Passino, PhD Computer Science “I am studying computer vision, that is, how computers can analyse and extract information from images and videos, to interact with the surrounding environment. The course allows me to pursue my interests, maximising my learning and research on topics that I find fascinating. The College is helpful in many ways, offering plenty of opportunities to share ideas, to listen to interesting talks, and to apply for workshops, projects and other initiatives. “My experience within the Multimedia and Vision research group in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science has always been rewarding. For a PhD student it is very helpful to count on an internationally regarded group with a good reputation in the field. I got in touch with great experts in the field, and attended many interesting conferences as well as two fruitful summer schools.”


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MSc Advanced Methods in Computer Science One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc programme offers a broad range of advanced study options, with modules taken from a variety of application areas. It is multi-disciplinary and, in addition to computer science, you may choose options involving aspects of cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, and sociology. The programme prepares you for a wide range of careers depending on your selection of modules studied. Typical jobs after graduation include advanced programmer, software development and support, software engineer, product designer/developer, systems analyst, interface/interaction designer, database developer, and other specialist employment based on your selected study areas. Programme outline Core modules: Research Methods (double module) • MSc Project Module options include: Advanced Database Systems and Technologies • Advanced Program Design (in Java) • Algorithms and Complexity • C++ for Image Processing • Computability • Computational Genomics • Computer Vision and Neural Networks • Design for Human Interaction • Distributed Systems and Security • Entrepreneurship in Information Technology • Foundations for Information Retrieval • High Performance Computing • Interactive Systems Design • Multimedia Systems • Software Risk Assessment • Special Topics in Information Retrieval • Specification and Verification • Techniques in Computer Vision • The Semantic Web • XML and Structured Information Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment The Research Methods modules are assessed through coursework alone. All other modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May.

Entry requirements You should possess a good honours degree (minimum upper second class) with a substantial computer science component (at least half) or equivalent industrial experience. You should also have good programming skills for undertaking the practical elements of the programme. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Support Engineer, Computer Assets; Analyst, Credit Suisse First Boston; Business Analyst, Norton Rose; Queen Mary, University of London; Tesco Plc; Thames Valley University; The Open University Further information Please contact: Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Digital Music Processing One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description Based on our Digital Signal Processing (DSP) programmes, but incorporating specialist modules and a specialised project, this Masters will help to you to understand not only how today’s audio and music technology works, but also to become a leader in developing the next generations of these technologies. You can choose from modules to follow one or two pathways of study: Digital Music Processing with DSP or with Multimedia. The DSP option delves further into the techniques that can be used for processing, analysis and synthesis. It will provide you with a strong background for further DSP work or research. The Multimedia option incorporates a more general understanding of how music processing is performed in broadcasting systems and in relation to other media. This option also emphasises many of the technical issues currently of concern to industry, such as watermarking, copyright protection, and Internet streaming.

degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. Applicants should also have completed an undergraduate programme in at least one of the following areas: Signal Processing, Control, or Analogue Filters. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Creative labs, FXpansion, Sonnox, Sonalksis, Intrasonics, EMI, Calrec Audio, Rockstar Games Further information Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Programme outline Core modules: Fundamentals of DSP (1) • Advanced Transform Methods • Music Analysis and Synthesis • Music and Speech Processing • Digital Audio Effects (1) Module options: Real Time Digital Signal Processing • Digital Broadcasting • Design for Human Interaction • Multimedia Systems • Machine Learning (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline. You should have Java programming experience from your undergraduate degree. Applicants with unrelated

Christopher Sutton, MSc in Digital Music Processing “I chose Queen Mary mainly because the Digital Music Processing course so closely matched what I wanted to do and the Department is very highly regarded in the Digital Music field. “I’m studying Digital Music Processing which combines the more traditional Digital Signal Processing with music-specific elements. It’s a combination only tackled by a few Masters programmes in the UK and the Queen Mary programme is particularly well designed. “The programme is great because the lecturers are experienced and enthusiastic about their subjects and the Department is particularly friendly to students. “I have been consistently impressed by the teaching standards and the attitudes of staff towards Masters students. The Department is certainly innovative, with the Centre for Digital Music rapidly expanding and making its mark on the research field.”


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MSc Digital Signal Processing One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description This programme is specifically intended to respond to a growing skills shortage in industry for engineers with a high level of training in signal processing, and to support Internet, multimedia, broadcast, communications, and consumer industries. You will develop core knowledge of basic DSP theory and its implementation in hardware. In addition you will be able to specialise in areas including multimedia and intelligent signal processing. The taught modules are fully supported, with computing and laboratory work. The MSc is intended for graduates in a related discipline, who wish to enhance and specialise their skills in the area, and also for industrialists with some experience of working with signal processing in the IT sector, who wish to obtain a formal qualification. Programme outline Core modules: Fundamentals of DSP (1) • Advanced Transform Methods • Multimedia Systems • Music And Speech Processing • Image And Video Processing • Machine Learning Module options: Real Time Digital Signal Processing • Digital Broadcasting • C++ For Image Processing (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline. You should have Java programming experience from your undergraduate degree. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. Applicants should also have completed an undergraduate programme in at least one of the

following areas: Signal Processing, Control, or Analogue Filters. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Sound Engineering, Digital Sound Engineering Company; Signal Design Engineer, Metronet Rail Ltd; Engineer, Sony Ericsson; Engineer, Streaming Networks Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Information Management One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc focuses on the specialist skills required to develop and manage search tools for large-scale, complex information repositories, such as the Web, digital libraries, and interactive digital TV. This programme provides advanced study in a range of modelling, evaluation and design methods used in information management research and development. You will learn about effective and efficient techniques for representing, managing, retrieving, and presenting electronic information, and gain experience of their application in practice. Strong emphasis is given to the design of information management systems in increasingly intricate and diverse information environments. You will also gain experience in the development of search engines using the latest technologies and standards (for example XML and MPEG-7). The programme prepares you both for research study and for specialist employment in the information industry. Typical jobs after graduation include web search engine architect, digital library research, database manager/administrator, content manager, knowledge engineer, and data visualisation engineer. Programme outline Core modules Foundations for Information Retrieval • Special Topics in Information Retrieval • Research Methods (double module) • XML and Structured Information • Advanced Database Systems and Technologies • MSc Project Module options include: Advanced Program Design (in Java) • Algorithms and Complexity • Computability • Computational Genomics • Computer Vision and Neural Networks • Design for Human Interaction • Distributed Systems and Security • Entrepreneurship in Information Technology • Interactive Systems Design • Multimedia Systems • Software Risk Assessment • Specification and Verification • Techniques in Computer Vision • The Semantic Web Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment The Research Methods modules are assessed through coursework alone. All other modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an

MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should possess a good honours degree (minimum upper second class) with a substantial computer science component (at least half) or equivalent industrial experience. You should also have good programming skills for undertaking the practical elements of the programme. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Lancaster University Further information Please contact: Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Intelligent Web Technologies One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc focuses on advanced study in the development of intelligent technologies on the web, covering web services, software agents, and technologies associated with the semantic web. This programme provides you with an understanding of the relevant standards and technologies such as XML, XSLT, RDF, RDFS, DAML+OIL, OWL, and the database technologies appropriate for the storage and retrieval of both XML and RDF. You will learn about the tools needed for working with web ontology languages, such as OWL, for analysing intelligent web technologies and supporting the semantic web. You will also gain practical experience with the relevant programming frameworks and APIs (XSLT, DOM, SAX, and Jena). You will be able to apply this knowledge in your project work, developing your own intelligent web system. The programme is aimed at preparing you both for research study and for specialist employment in a wide range of public and private sectors in web technologies. Typical jobs after graduation include web developer, web master, web architect, e-commerce programmer, portal developer, or mobile services developer. Programme outline Core modules Foundations of Information Retrieval • The Semantic Web • XML and Structured Information • Research Methods (double module) • MSc Project Module options include: Advanced Database Systems and Technologies • Advanced Program Design (in Java) • Algorithms and Complexity • Computability • Computational Genomics • Computer Vision and Neural Networks • C++ for Image Processing • Design for Human Interaction • Distributed Systems and Security • Entrepreneurship in Information Technology • Multimedia Systems • Software Risk Assessment • Special Topics in Information Retrieval • Specification and Verification • Techniques in Computer Vision Please note that module availability is subject to change.

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Assessment The Research Methods modules are assessed through coursework alone. All other modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should possess a good honours degree (minimum upper second class) with a substantial computer science component (at least half) or equivalent industrial experience. You should also have good programming skills for undertaking the practical elements of the programme. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Adtech, a subsidiary of America Online (AOL) Further information Please contact: Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@dcs.qmul.ac.uk


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(cont)

MSc Security and Surveillance One year full-time Programme description This programme enables you to design and implement security and surveillance systems. You will graduate with an understanding of the techniques used to protect computer systems against attack and how individuals can be identified from images and video. In addition, you will be able to implement a system that uses image and sounds from surveillance systems to identify events. At the end of the programme you will be able to apply your thorough understanding of security and surveillance issues to act as a technical consultant for any organisation intending to develop or enhance these systems. Programme outline Core modules Advanced Transform Methods • C++ for Image Processing • Computer Vision and Neural Networks • Security and Authentication • Research Methods (over two semesters) • Techniques in Computer Vision • MSc Project Module options include two of the following: Multimedia Systems • Image and Video Processing • Software Risk Assessment Please note that module availability is subject to change

Assessment The Research Methods modules are assessed through coursework alone. All other modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should possess a good honours degree (minimum upper second class) with a substantial computer science component (at least half) or equivalent industrial experience. You should also have good programming skills for undertaking the practical elements of the programme. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Further information Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Software Engineering One year full-time, two years part-time Programme description This MSc programme focuses on advanced theoretical and practical techniques in program design, and the management of software project risk. It includes training in vital areas such as security, specification, risk management, usability, and design integrity. You will learn advanced techniques in program design (including software patterns and component technologies) and information handling (structured information, databases). You can study key issues of interactive system design, leading to the ability to identify issues and trade-offs in the design of human-computer interaction, and to invent and evaluate alternative solutions to design problems. You will gain knowledge in the mathematical foundations of software and the practical application of these techniques. You will develop skills to manage software project risks and learn about the development of tools to support decision-making. The programme will enable you to become competitive in the most technically oriented branches of software engineering. Typical jobs after graduation include software risk analyst, system designer, software quality assurance, software engineer, programmer, usability consultant, systems analyst, and software architect.

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Programme outline Core modules Advanced Program Design (in Java) • Research Methods (double module) • MSc Project and at least one of: Software Risk Assessment • Specification and Verification Module options include: Advanced Database Systems and Technologies • Algorithms and Complexity • Distributed Systems and Security • Entrepreneurship in Information Technology • Interactive Systems Design • Foundations for Information Retrieval • The Semantic Web • XML and Structured Information Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment The Research Methods modules are assessed through coursework alone. All other modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should possess a good honours degree (minimum upper second class) with a substantial computer science component (at least half) or equivalent industrial experience. You should also have good programming skills for undertaking the practical elements of the programme. For international students we require English language qualifications IELTS 6.5, TOEFL (CBT) 237 or TOEFL (written test) 575. Please see the ‘International students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Oracle, Thale, University of York Further information Please contact: Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Network Pathway)

Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice.

One year full-time

Semester 1 Either Java Programming or Advanced Software Technologies (1) As determined by the School to suit the applicants’ academic and professional profile • Digital Broadcasting • Internet Infrastructure • Total Quality Management

Programme description This programme prepares you for a career in telecommunications and its applications, for example the integration of voice and data applications, within a business context. The programme combines indepth coverage of the main technical aspects of telecommunications with advanced business modules. At the end of the programme you will be equipped with the skills needed for a wide range of jobs in the expanding telecommunications industry, with emphasis on those that are relevant to business/financial needs, particularly in the small business and start-up sector.

Semester 2 Entrepreneurship • Satellite Communications • Business Technology Strategy • Wireless Networks • Network Planning, Finance and Management May-September Project Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Recent graduate destinations Executive RF Planning and Optimisation, Wateen Telecom Further information Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Internet Computing Pathway) One year full-time Programme description This programme is aimed at graduates planning to work at providing underlying Internet software and infrastructure in a business context. You will develop knowledge of Internet protocols and applications, an understanding of the Internet can benefit business and how the underlying infrastructure can enhance or limit possibilities. The programme combines indepth coverage of the software technologies for the Internet, as well as advanced business modules. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies • Network Computing and Internet Technologies • Internet Infrastructure • Total Quality Management

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Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Recent graduate destinations Analyst, BDA Ltd Further information Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Semester 2 Business Technology Strategy • Multimedia Systems • Entrepreneurship • Internet Databases • Network Planning, Finance and Management May-September Project

David Turner, MSc in Telecommunications “I chose Queen Mary because of its excellent reputation academically and because the course I was interested in targeted the key skills currently demanded of specialists in the software engineering sector. Moreover, I found the delivery of the course through virtual lectures and tutorials, together with electronic message boards well suited to my needs as a distance-learning student. “The academic staff are very strong in their field and excited by the technology. This is evident in their delivery of the course, which is well-researched and clearly communicated. The support staff are also first class and are always quick to respond to any queries distance-learning students may have. “I would rate Queen Mary very highly in terms of teaching. It is internationally recognised as a leading teaching and research institute and this is certainly reflected in the standard of teaching I have experienced during my time at Queen Mary. One of the coursework assignments focused on wireless security. This is an area that I am particularly interested in and is particularly topical in the e-Commerce sector at the moment. Those distance learning students that I have spoken to either during exam week or through the electronic message boards strike me as being very focused and professional individuals who are clearly dedicated to their studies.”


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MSc Telecommunications in the Business Environment (Applications Pathway) One year full-time Programme description This programme is aimed at graduates with an entrepreneurial approach, who see themselves working in e-Commerce applications in small businesses or start-up companies, where a knowledge of both the applications software, infrastructure and business issues is necessary. The programme combines in-depth coverage of the applications and software technologies for e-Commerce as well as advanced business modules relevant to the sector. By the end of the programme, you should be able to demonstrate that you can construct e-Commerce applications that are relevant to business needs, particularly those in the small business and start-up sector. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies • Network Computing and Internet Technologies • Internet Infrastructure • Total Quality Management Semester 2 Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems • Entrepreneurship Protocols for the Electronic Marketplace • Business Technology Strategy • Network Planning, Finance and Management May-September Project Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May.

Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Recent graduate destinations Engineer, NDS Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Graduate profile: Ali Naiz Studied: MSc Telecommunications – graduated September 2006 Currently: I am in Telecoms R&D department with IBM, developing HSS for Nortel as a contractor which is a part of their IMS NGN solution. Why did you choose Queen Mary? I wanted to study Electronic Engineering in London. Queen Mary enjoys a good reputation amongst UK universities. It is a respected College of the University of London with the whole campus located in one place, which means one doesn’t have to run around all over London to attend classes. What did you gain from your time at Queen Mary? My time at Queen Mary was very conducive to learning. The library, the labs and other students were very helpful. And last but not least I have made friends there from all over the world. What are your career plans in the next five years? I have always been fascinated by technology and would like to learn more and more about new as well as established technologies. I aim to build myself a good base for the future where I eventually want to become a solutions/ applications architect.


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Telecommunications with Law (Network Pathway) Fifteen months full-time Programme description The Telecommunications with Law programme is a joint collaboration between The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS). The programme consists of eight taught modules; five of these are technical and three are focused on legal issues. In addition, students also undertake a compulsory law orientation weekend and a preparatory law module before starting the three legal modules. This programme is aimed at graduates planning to work in telecoms and telecommunications applications, for example integration of voice and data applications. This programme combines indepth coverage of the main technical aspects of telecoms plus advanced law modules. At the end of the programme you will be equipped with the skills needed for a wide range of jobs in the expanding telecoms industry, with particular emphasis on those that also require knowledge of the legal sector. Programme outline Our Telecommunications with Law programmes are taken over 15 months. The first two semesters run from September to April where you would study the five technical modules of the programme and start your project. The written examination for the technical modules takes place in May and June of each year. The three optional law modules begin the following September and conclude in December, with the examinations in January. Semester 1 Either: Java Programming or Advanced Software Technologies as determined by the Department to suit the applicant’s academic and professional profile • Digital Broadcasting • Internet Infrastructure • Law Orientation Weekend – compulsory but not assessed as part of the degree Semester 2 Satellite Communications • Wireless Networks In addition to the above modules, students will be expected to undertake a short Law Preparatory module. This will be compulsory but not assessed as part of the degree

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Semester 3 A choice of three Law modules taught by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies from the following list of options: • Computer Crime • IT Outsourcing • Internet Content Regulation • Intellectual Property Foundation • European Telecoms Law • International Telecoms Law • Privacy and Data Protection • Trade Marks and Domain Names • e-Commerce Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Telecommunications with Law (Internet Computing Pathway) Fifteen months full-time Programme description The Telecommunications with Law programme is a joint collaboration between Electronic Engineering and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS). The programme consists of eight taught modules; five of these are technical and three concentrate on legal issues. In addition students also undertake a compulsory law orientation weekend and a preparatory law module, before starting the three legal modules. This programme is aimed at graduates planning to work at providing underlying Internet software and infrastructure. To do this requires knowledge of Internet protocols and applications, an understanding of how the Internet fits into, and benefits, business and how the underlying infrastructure can enhance or limit possibilities. The programme combines in depth coverage of the software technologies for the Internet plus advanced law modules relevant to the commercial and IT sector. Programme outline Our Telecommunications with Law programmes are taken over 15 months. The first two semesters run from September to April where you would study the five technical modules of the programme and start your project. The written examination for the technical modules takes place in May and June of each year. The three optional law modules begin the following September and conclude in December, with the examinations in January.

Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies • Network Computing and Internet Technologies • Internet Infrastructure • Law Orientation Weekend – compulsory but not assessed as part of the degree Semester 2 Multimedia Systems • Internet Databases Semester 3 A choice of three Law modules taught by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies from the following list of options: Computer Crime • IT Outsourcing • Internet Content Regulation • Intellectual Property Foundation • European Telecoms Law • International Telecoms Law • Privacy and Data Protection • Trade Marks and Domain Names • e-Commerce Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Telecommunications with Law (Applications Pathway) Fifteen months full-time Programme description The Telecommunications with Law programme is a joint collaboration between Electronic Engineering and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS). The programme consists of eight taught modules; five of these are technical and three concentrate on legal issues. In addition, you will also attend a compulsory law orientation weekend and a preparatory law module, before starting the three legal modules. This programme is aimed towards graduates with an entrepreneurial approach who see themselves working in e-Commerce applications in small businesses or start-up companies where a knowledge of the applications software, infrastructure and legal issues is necessary. The programme combines in-depth coverage of the applications and software technologies for e-Commerce plus advanced law modules relevant to the sector. Programme outline Our Telecommunications with Law programmes are taken over 15 months. The first two semesters run from September to April where you will study the five technical modules of the programme and start your project. The written examination for the technical modules takes place in May and June of each year. The three optional law modules begin the following September and conclude in December, with the examinations in January.

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Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies • Network Computing and Internet Technologies • Internet Infrastructure • Law Orientation Weekend (compulsory but not assessed as part of the degree) Semester 2 Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems • Protocols for the Electronic Marketplace Semester 3 A choice of three Law modules taught by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies from the following list of options: Computer Crime • IT Outsourcing • Internet Content Regulation • Intellectual Property Foundation • European Telecoms Law • International Telecoms Law • Privacy and Data Protection • Trade Marks and Domain Names • e-Commerce Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements See MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) on page 314. Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Telecommunications (Network Pathway) One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description This programme provides postgraduate training in the principles and applications of telecommunications, particularly in the way the subject is moving towards integrating voice and data applications with the Internet. It builds on the internationally acknowledged research expertise of our staff, as well the substantial amount of teaching that was provided by staff on the University of London BT MSc in Telecommunications Engineering. This pathway puts emphasis on telecommunications technologies, especially mobile technologies. At the end of the programme, you will be equipped with the skills needed for a wide range of jobs in the expanding telecommunications industry, from designing infrastructure and services for the new 3G mobile networks to working on the expansion of the Internet with new technologies and protocols. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Either: Java Programming or Advanced Software Technologies as determined by the Department to suit the applicant’s academic and professional profile (1) • Digital Broadcasting (1) • Internet Infrastructure • Security and Authentication Semester 2 Network Modelling and Performance • Satellite Communications • Multimedia Systems (1) • Wireless Networks (1) May-September Project (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent.

In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline; some programming experience (preferably an object orientated language) such as C or C++, and a basic knowledge of telecommunications networks. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Senior Projects Officer, Islamic Development Bank; Engineer, Nokia Siemens Network Pvt. Ltd; Engineer, Nortel Networks; Network Engineer, Wateen Telecom; Network Administrator, Action Images Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Telecommunications (Internet Computing Pathway) One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description The growth of the Internet has led to the emergence of new industries, services, and products that were unimaginable only a few years ago. With this growth has come the need for employees with the special skills required to build and deploy industrial-strength Internet computing systems. The Internet Computing pathway is designed to equip you with the skills needed to succeed in the Internet computing industry. This programme is intended both for graduates in a related discipline, who wish to enhance and specialise their skills in the area, and also for industrialists with some experience of working in the information technology or telecommunications sectors, who wish to obtain a formal qualification. Upon completing, you will have advanced skills in the application and underlying theory of Internet Computing technologies. Taught modules include the basic principles of digital networks, through modules that describe the software technologies that drive the Internet, and modules that describe research-level technologies, techniques, and services. This will give you a thorough understanding of the subject, with a specialised knowledge of a chosen sub-field based on your project. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies (1) • Network Computing and Internet Technologies (1) • Internet Infrastructure • Security and Authentication Semester 2 Network Modelling and Performance • Multimedia Systems (1) • Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems • Internet Databases (1) May-September Project (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note that module availability is subject to change.

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Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline. You should have Java programming experience from your undergraduate degree. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree is specialised in relevant subjects. Recent graduate destinations Managing Director/CEO, DanTech; Officer, Greek Army; Engineer, Huawei Technologies S.A.; Emergency Link Officer, Kelly Services UK; IT Software Engineer, Siemens Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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MSc Telecommunications (Applications Pathway) One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description This programme provides postgraduate training in the principles and applications of software and telecommunications as applied to e-Commerce. The integrated curriculum responds to rapid developments in the discipline and attempts to satisfy the needs of good graduates with degrees in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science or related subjects. The structure is similar to the Internet Computing pathway and aims to help fill the skills gap for e-Commerce specialists as demand continues to grow in all sectors of industry and commerce. It emphasises both e-Commerce applications and the underlying information and communication technologies. At the end of the programme, you will be able to construct software to deliver e-Commerce applications over the Internet and understand how the different types of infrastructure affect design and commercial decisions. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Advanced Software Technologies (1) • Network Computing and Internet Technologies (1) • Internet Infrastructure • Security and Authentication Semester 2 Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems • Mobile Services (1) • Protocols for the Electronic Marketplace • Internet Databases(1) May-September Project (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note that module availability is subject to change. Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an

overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline. You should have Java programming experience from your undergraduate degree. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. Recent graduate destinations Chief Technical Officer, Business Object Solutions Ltd; Analyst, Global Insight; Vice President, Habib Bank Ltd; Manager, Lucent Technologies Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Wireless Networks (Network Pathway) One year full-time, two years part-time by distance learning Programme description In the MSc in Wireless Networks (Network Pathway) you will study the architectures, applications, and protocols for modern wireless networks, including mobile networks, wireless LANS, WiMax, and ad hoc networks. You will also become specialised in network security and how to make these networks secure for both users and operators, and the latest concepts in mobile services, including personalised location-based services. At the end of the programme you will be equipped with the skills needed for a wide range of jobs in the expanding telecommunications industry, especially those for network operators, service providers, and content providers. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Either: Java Programming(1) or Advanced Software Technologies(1) As determined by the Department to suit the applicant’s academic and professional profile. Digital Broadcasting(1) • Internet Infrastructure • Security and Authentication Semester 2 Satellite Communications • Wireless Networks (1) • Mobile Services (1) • Ad-hoc Broadband Wireless May-September Project (1) = This module is taken in the first year of parttime by distance learning study. Please note that module availability is subject to change.

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Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May. Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline; some programming experience (preferably an object orientated language) such as C or C++, and a basic knowledge of telecommunications networks. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. International students, please see the ‘international students’ section on page 390. Recent graduate destinations Airwide Solutions, Manukau Institute of Technology, Warid Telecom Further information Rupal Vaja, Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

Degree programmes

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MSc Wireless Networks (Physical Pathway) One year full-time Programme description This pathway is aimed at graduates who wish to develop careers in the wireless telecommunications sector, especially those concerned with the radio aspects. The programme covers topics ranging across all layers in the wireless and mobile networking fields, but with particular emphasis on the physical layer of wireless cellular telephony, adhoc networks and wireless LANs. You will also study antenna design for mobile networks and electromagnetics aspects. At the end of the programme you will be equipped with the skills needed for a wide range of jobs in the expanding telecommunications industry, with particular emphasis on those that are relevant to the needs of wireless equipment manufacturers and operators. Programme outline There are no optional modules. Enrolment onto this degree programme constitutes the specialisation and module choice. Semester 1 Fundamentals of DSP • Advanced Transform Methods • Internet Infrastructure • CAD Techniques for RF Electromagnetics Semester 2 Satellite Communications • Wireless Networks • Antennas for Mobile Applications • Radio Wave Propagation for Wireless Communications May-September Project Please note that module availability is subject to change Assessment All modules are examined through a combination of coursework and written examinations taken in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in six of the eight modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent. In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory individual project be completed. MSc students who do not pass the written examinations are only allowed to attempt the project after passing resit examinations the following May.

Entry requirements You should have a first or upper second class degree in Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, or a related discipline. Applicants with unrelated degrees will be considered if there is evidence of significant industrial experience. Applicants with lower second class degrees may be considered if the undergraduate degree specialised in relevant subjects. Applicants should have a first degree that included Electromagnetics and be familiar with such topics as Maxwell’s Equations and basic antenna theory. Recent graduate destinations Airwide Solutions, King's College London, Motorola (China) Technologies Ltd, Schlumberger, Wateen Telecom Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

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MSc in Computer Science by Research

MSc by Research in Electronic Engineering

Our MSc in Computer Science by Research involves an extended (one-year) individual research project carried out as part of one of our established research groups, combined with selected taught modules.

One year full-time

This programme offers you the chance to undertake an advanced Masters programme through an extended research project. The programme is suitable for outstanding students who have an interest in advanced research-based study in one of our research specialisms: Computer Vision; Information Retrieval; Interaction, Media and Communication; Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis; Computer Science Theory. You will join one of our research groups, taking four selected taught modules and completing an extended research project. You will have the opportunity to develop further research and technical skills and to be able to demonstrate a level of independence that is greater than developed on a purely taught programme.

Programme description An MSc by Research will provide you with the necessary skills to undertake research, either in an academic or industrial environment. You will join one of our research groups, taking four selected taught modules and completing an extended research project. The expectation is that every graduate from the degree publishes at least one conference paper as part of the research. You will have the opportunity to develop further research and technical skills and to be able to demonstrate a level of independence that is greater than developed on a purely taught programme. The programme is suitable for outstanding students who have an interest in advanced research-based study in one of our research specialisms: Antenna and Electromagnetics; Centre for Digital Music (C4DM); Multimedia and Vision (MMV); Networks and Communications

The MSc by Research programme will give you solid theoretical and practical research competences in your chosen field of study and will enhance your employability. Successful completion of the programme may also provide a route to further study at doctoral level or for a research and development position in industry.

Module options Any three modules, chosen with the approval of your supervisor, from within the Advanced MSc programme to fit your research area to provide background skills and knowledge.

Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Assessment All students are required to take written examinations in May/June. To obtain an MSc, students must gain passes in two of the four modules taken with an overall average of 50 per cent.

Programme outline Core taught module Research Methods

In addition to the above, the MSc requires that a satisfactory research project should be completed and mark of 50 per cent or more attained. Further information Rupal Vaja Postgraduate Administrator Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7335 email: msc-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


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Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

Research Research degrees We are well-known for our pioneering research and pride ourselves on our world-class cutting-edge research projects. Joining us as a PhD student gives you the chance to experience this buzz and be part of our efforts to shape the future of electronic engineering and computer science. We have a dynamic community of approximately 150 PhD students and 80 research assistants in our labs working on leading edge research. We offer well-integrated doctoral study programmes in our various areas of specialisation, each of our research groups is involved in internationally leading research, funded by UK Research Councils, the European Union, and industry around the world. As one of the UK’s leading Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Schools, we offer our postgraduate students a comprehensive and supportive training environment. You will work as part of a friendly and vibrant research community under the supervision of experts in the field. As a member of one of our research groups you will be accommodated in a research laboratory alongside other PhD students and full-time post-doctoral researchers. Students often participate in the funded research projects of the group. We provide a generous travel budget to enable research students to present papers at international conferences. Budgets for expenditure on experiments, equipment, and software are also available. Mary Lavelle, PhD in social interaction in schizophrenia “I am part of the Interaction, Media and Communication group in the Department of Computer Science. As a research group we are very diverse, integrating people from a variety of disciplines. The group meet regularly and discuss our work or relevant readings. It’s really helpful to be part of a multidisciplinary team because everyone brings different kinds of knowledge and skills. One of the best things I’ve done so far is train to use the motion capture equipment in the Augmented Human Interaction Lab. The postgraduate development and study skills courses provided by the Learning Institute at Queen Mary, University of London are also very helpful. They’ve allowed me to broaden my skills in a variety of areas while completing my PhD.”

For more detailed information and funding opportunities for PhD students, please visit our website: www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/phd/ Media and Arts Technology (MAT) The PhD in Media and Arts Technology is an innovative inter-disciplinary training programme in the science and technologies that are transforming the creative sector. Our mission is to produce postgraduates who combine world-class technical and creative skills and who have a unique vision of how digital technology transforms creative possibilities and social economies. This is a unique four year PhD programme built around core courses in advanced research methods, interaction design and digital media processing, production and recording techniques and optional specialist modules ranging from Digital Audio Effects through Digital Rights Management to Contemporary Performance. You will work under the supervision of internationally recognised experts in: • Digital Music • Digital Video • Human Interaction • Performance and Live Art You will also develop a working partnership with one of our strategic collaborators including: BBC, The British Film Institute, last.fm, SONY Computer Entertainment Europe, BT. Our programme is part of a £250 million strategic initiative, funded by Research Councils UK, and is exceptionally well resourced. You will have access to our state-of-the art research and performance facilities including the Augmented Human Interaction Laboratory and the Pinter Studio Theatre as well as the extensive resources offered by our industrial and public sector partners. New for 2010 are the Media and Arts Studios including the Listening Room, Control Room and performance Laboratory as well as the full range of computing resources offered by the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, including several clusters. For more detailed information and funding opportunities please see: www.mat.qmul.ac.uk/


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

Research areas Our main areas of research are defined as follows. For more detailed information please visit each research group’s web pages: www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/research/ Antennas and Electromagnetics Antenna research at Queen Mary was established in 1968 and since then has built an international reputation for its research in the areas of microwave antennas and electromagnetic analysis. Comprehensive experimental facilities are housed in the Antenna Measurement Laboratory, which has recently received £1.4 million in infrastructure investment. The group has strong links with industry ranging from providing MSc summer project placements, through providing PhD studentships, to collaborative research contracts. The group has been awarded a prestigious EPSRC platform grant valued at £1.2 million to fund post-doctoral researchers as well as inreach and outreach activities with other world-leading antenna laboratories. Our research on antennas for mobile communications includes multiband handset antennas, multiple antennas for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) applications, semi-smart base station antennas and antennas and radio propagation for wireless wearable computers. In the area of theory and application of metamaterials we study computational electromagnetic models for lefthanded materials, the design and applications of EBG structures and left-handed materials in microwave engineering. Our research on quasi-optics and millimetrewave antennas focuses on tri-reflector compact antenna test range (CATR), 90GHz imaging for security applications and THz spectroscopy. In the area of antennas and healthcare we study the interaction of electromagnetic waves with biological tissue, dosimetry, wireless implants and RF controlled drug delivery. We also apply CEM to Microwave Electron Tube Devices to understand CEM design of magnetrons and low power phase locking of high power magnetrons. In the area of antenna metrology we work on near-field measurement and compact antenna test ranges. Computer Science Theory Our Computer Science Theory group specialises in the logical, mathematical and statistical foundations of computer science, with a breadth and depth of expertise almost unmatched in the UK. The group’s expertise is broad in range – from complexity, through automated reasoning, concurrent and distributed systems, formal methods in humancomputer interaction to verification of systems software and logic. We tackle the hard problems inherent in discovering the power and limitations of computer systems, and how principled design,

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based on the right mathematical models might make them more robust and secure. We collaborate with NASA, Intel, Microsoft, and other companies and government agencies on using novel mathematical modelling techniques. Our group is known as a world-leading centre for research on logical methods for reasoning about computer systems. We have spearheaded several developments separation logic, logic for continuous systems, information theory for security, process types for web services in which novel theoretical developments by us have been brought to bear in new application areas. We have also made fundamental contributions in pure logic (model theory, proof theory, categorical semantics), and in complexity theory. At the moment we have about £4m in research funding, supporting a thriving intellectual community. This includes a prestigious EPSRC Platform Grant, awarded to leading research groups in the UK to underpin their strategic development. Computer Vision Our Computer Vision group is internationally renowned for its work on modelling object behaviour, human facial and body action, facial synthesis and super-resolution, multi-modal biometrics, 3D deformable shape, and structure from motion. The work has been widely applied to vehicle and people detection and tracking; behaviour screening and anomaly detection in public space CCTV. Our core expertise includes statistical machine learning, time series analysis, dynamic Bayesian graph models, multi-view geometry, multi-modal data fusion, neurobiologically inspired vision, and image compression. The group’s research attracts significant interest from industry and the government and has attracted a large amount of international funding from a variety of sources. Since 1998, the group has had direct industrial funding from the US and Australia for an R&D project developing computer vision-based advanced incident monitoring systems. Since 2007, the group has received venture capital investment; UK and US government seed funding for video analytics commercialisation. This work has also been the primary IPR for two start-up companies in the US, Australia and UK. Some recent projects include SAMURAI, global behaviour inference over distributed multi-camera networks; LIREC, emotion and body language recognition; BEWARE, multi-camera object tracking and abnormal event recognition in CCTV; HUMANIS, 3D models of deformable and articulated objects; ICONS, incident recognition for surveillance and security; and VIGOUR, an Integrated Vision System


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Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

Research

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integrating face detection, head tracking, human body modelling, feature extraction, and behaviour interpretation. These collaborative projects link the group with UK, EU and US government and industrial partners as well as end users. Networks The Networks group was founded in 1987, and has since expanded greatly. We now have an international reputation for excellence in bringing intelligence and performance assessment techniques to both fixed and mobile communication networks. We work on intelligent resource management for configuration, accounting, and security; advanced models to safeguard resources, based on trust, security, privacy, and anomaly modelling; ubiquitous computing systems and applications including home-networks, mobile data and communication systems, location aware systems, and services; semantic and agent based services; resource management, capacity planning, measurement, and performance evaluation; mapping complex network topologies; complexity in social networking; simulation and accelerated simulation; and protocols, including IP, MPLS, and optical burst switching. Our group are key players in several international collaborative projects and recent projects include: CRUMPET where we research ubiquitous computing; EDEN IW, the uses of semantic Web for water data; ADAMANT where we study distributed optimal control of wireless LAN resources; TORRENT is focused on intelligent access networks; and SAFEGUARD explores the security and survivability of large scale critical infrastructures. We have achieved notable success in PhD student supervision and have had 34 PhDs awarded since the last RAE period in 2001. Many research students in the group received support from both industry and EPSRC. Companies that sponsored our students include: BT, Lucent, Motorola, and Nokia. The Group has a long-standing interdisciplinary collaboration with the School of Mathematical Sciences, supported by a succession of EPSRC (and recently EU) funded projects. This encompasses areas such as non-linear dynamics and experimental design. Centre for Digital Music The Centre for Digital Music (C4DM) is a worldleading multidisciplinary research group in the field of music and audio technology. In less than a decade, the Centre has grown to become the UK’s leading Digital Music research group. We hold several substantial EPSRC Grants, including a platform grant, and a Doctoral Training Centre. Resources include our state-of-the-art Listening Room, and from 2010, the Space for Performance and Interaction, including 3D sound and video systems.

Our research into technologies for audio and music has a long and successful history, starting in 1978 with pioneering work on digital power amplification. Today, our work on music ontology (www.musiconology.com) and using the Semantic web for music is blazing the trail. Our research covers music and audio technology from record/replay equipment in the home or studio, to the simulation and synthesis of instruments and voices, acoustic spaces, music and audio understanding, delivery and retrieval. Our main areas are: music informatics, machine listening, audio engineering and interactional audio. We have developed systems for automatic play-listing from personal collections (www.isophonics.net/SoundBite/), for looking inside the audio (www.sonicvisualiser.org) for automatically synchronising to a drummer for collaborative composition (DaisyPhone for iPhone), and many others. We regularly release algorithms under open source licenses. See our interactive art installations at www.c4dmpresents.org Interaction, Media and Communication Interaction Media and Communication (IMC) is an internationally recognised interdisciplinary group with a current grant portfolio of over £12 million. We explore new forms of human action and interaction using a combination of ideas and methods from the arts, computer science, philosophy, and social science. Our primary research areas are: human interaction, public engagement, creativity, and performance and advanced multi-modal interaction. Our Augmented Human Interaction (AHI) Laboratory is a unique research facility that combines state-ofthe-art multi-person motion capture equipment with novel 3D auditory and visual displays. This enables us to capture and transform a wide variety of human-human and human-machine interactions. We will shortly be extending this facility through a new Space for Performance and Interaction (SPI). IMC’s current research projects include a large ESRC project on human dialogue, a large EU project on human-robot interaction and an internationally lauded science outreach activity: cs4fn (www.cs4fn.org). We also have new strategic links with the Centre for Digital Music (C4DM) with whom we share an EPSRC platform grant and jointly lead an innovative new PhD programme in Media and Arts Technology (www.mat.qmul.ac.uk).


Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary, University of London

We publish our research in high quality international journals and have a strong presence at international conferences in our area (eg, Cognitive Science and Human-Computer Interaction). We also chair important international conferences in our area (eg SIGDial and Creativity and Cognition). Our innovative arts-science collaborations have been shown at the National Portrait Galley, the ICA, SHUNT, and arts and science festivals around the UK. Multimedia and Vision (MMV) Our Multimedia and Vision group’s expertise is broad, ranging from multimedia coding to visual information retrieval. Our work includes scalable source and channel video coding, surveillance centric coding, object segmentation, and tracking for surveillance, multimodal signal processing, mobile multimedia systems, interactive media computing, semantic inference for visual information retrieval, multi-view based 3D modelling, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. Members of the group have published numerous technical papers, several of them in the highest ranked journals of the field, including the IEEE Transactions. We are currently cooperating with top academic institutions and industrial players world-wide, including research centres in France, the Netherlands, USA, and Spain. We have developed practical applications for relevant multimedia systems including a complete framework for Scalable Video Coding and are contributing to other standardisation activities as JPSearch and MPEG4/7/21. We are a member of the European Networked Electronic Media Platform and participate in a selected group of international experts making up the Future Media and 3D Internet Task Force of the European Commission. The current research portfolio consists of a healthy mixture of academic and industrial oriented research. We hold three EPSRC research projects and two substantial industry funded grants. Members of the group are currently coordinating the IST Network of Excellence K-Space and the European COST292 action. Our international projects include the FP6 IP projects aceMedia and MESH, the FP7 NoE PetaMedia and the STREPs Papyrus and Apidis.

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Risk Information Management The core research themes of the Risk Information Management Group are: Decision Analysis and Risk, Databases/Information Retrieval (including usercentred approaches), Learning, Uncertainty, and Bayesian methods. The Group’s research is heavily interdisciplinary and involves numerous commercial partners. There are two companies Agena (www.agenarisk.com) and Apriore (www.apriorie.co.uk) which grew directly out of research by key members of the Group. Agena delivers Bayesian Network solutions, while Apriore delivers integrated database and information retrieval technology. The Group is made up of two internatio