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OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE CELEBRATING HEALTHY, HAPPY DOGS

INSIDE: SHOW MAPS 208-219  YOUR DAILY PLANNER  WHAT’S ON  BREED GUIDE  TRADE EXHIBITORS’ DIRECTORY

£7.50


Contents

celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO MAKE YOUR DAY MORE ENJOYABLE There is no better place than Crufts to experience and learn about the wonderful world of dogs

Introduction 5 Chairman of the Kennel Club welcomes you to Crufts 2012 while thanking its show supporters

Crufts Essentials 11 All you need to know to get the best from the show

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Where to eat and drink From light bites to fine dining, there is something for everyone at The NEC

What’s on? Do not miss the show’s attractions and highlights for 2012

DAILY PLANNER Timetables, Entries and Judging

20 Thursday Toy & Utility 24 Friday Gundog 28 Saturday Working & Pastoral 32 Sunday Terrier & Hound

KENNEL CLUB NEWS

First stop – the Main Kennel Club Stand, 56 in Hall 3 The Kennel Club at Crufts 2012 36 Bring all the family, join in the fun! Breeding for the Future Zone 38 Celebrate healthy, happy dogs with the team in the area dedicated to Breeding for the future

Kennel Club 40 The Assured Breeder Scheme Kennel Club Assured Breeders and prospective members of the Kennel Club Assured Breeder Scheme (KCABS) should visit this section of the stand Breeder Services Come and visit this stand to obtain your computerised Kennel Club reports and certificates

Kennel Club Registrations 41 An ideal place for all breeders and owners to find out more about Registration Services, Kennel Names and the Friend of the Kennel Club packages

Pet Insurance 43 The Kennel Club urge every dog owner to take out the right insurance for their pet – it is the responsible thing to do

Kennel Club Library 44 The and Collections Section

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Introducing the Judges Meet the Crufts judges for this year’s event

56 Judging The Kennel Club explains to Best in Show 58 Path How do you get there? Best in Show Interview 2011 60 Crufts Best in Show winner 2011 shares all…

of Crufts 62 History How it all started Roll of Honour 64 Crufts Best in Show winners since 1928 All details correct at time of going to print.

Featuring the new Bark & Read campaign, Dog Photographer of the Year Competition and your chance to win a portrait of your dog

Activities Stand and 45 Dog Display Ring Time to unleash your dog’s potential – a window of opportunity for all dog owners

47 Reuniting lost pets

Petlog Premium is a lifetime service membership for microchipped pets with no hidden extras and is being offered at a special show price of just £5.00 Official Crufts Merchandise The popular new range of Official Crufts Merchandise for all the family is available to purchase here at Crufts 2012

48 The Kennel Club Charitable

Trust and Breed Rescue Stand

Meet breed rescue organisations and their dogs The YKC Stand and Ring Come and find out more about the Young Kennel Club, a fantastic organisation for dog lovers aged 6-24 years KC Publications Offering you a wide range of high quality products and publications relating to canine matters

50 Good Citizen Dog Scheme (GCDS) Stand and Ring

Find out why Gromit thinks “It’s Champion!” to get involved with the largest dog training programme in the UK

DISCOVER DOGS BREED GUIDE 66 Discover Dogs

Sponsored by Eukanuba

A chance to meet over 200 breeds

Directory 89 ABreed complete A-Z quickfinder of the Kennel Club recognised breeds which can be found in the Discover Dogs Area

Show

YOUR GUIDE TO THE

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At the Show

celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Crufts 2012 ~ TAILWAGGING FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!

ith the eyes of the world falling firmly on the UK in 2012, another truly great international spectacle returns to The NEC, Birmingham for four days to showcase the wonderful world of dogs. Whilst around 10,500 athletes prepare for the London Olympics this summer, twice that number of canine competitors are making their way to England’s second city for Crufts 2012. With dreams of gold medals and world records swapped for

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rosettes and trophies, just one dog will claim the ultimate prize: Crufts Best in Show. But where will he or she hail from? Well, who knows? There are nearly 2,000 overseas dogs taking part this year and over 50 different countries will be represented in a wide variety of competitions and events. This year’s show promises to be a truly cosmopolitan affair, with dogs and visitors from all across the globe coming to what is widely regarded

as the world’s greatest dog show. What can they – and indeed you – expect to see whilst at Crufts 2012? Pretty much anything which involves dogs and the wonderful companionship, support and entertainment that they bring to our lives really. The show is a celebration of all dogs and the many varied roles which they play. Several events throughout the show will have a distinctly international flavour.

Top: Last year’s Friends for Life winners were Joanne Day and her Canine Partners’ assistance dog, Kaiser Above: Crufts 2011 Left: Sunday’s schedule features an Arena debut for the East Anglian Staffordshire Bull Terrier Display Team

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Daily Planner: THURSDAY (Day 1)

Daily Planner

TOY & UTILITY GROUP

YOUR DAILY GUIDE TO WHAT IS ON AND WHEN

THE ARENA

The Arena

The Arena seats 7,000 dog fans and showcases a wealth of displays and competition finals including Friends for Life, the Agility Championships and Best in Show.

Time

Event

08.40 09.10 09.40 10.25 11.10 12.30 13.00 13.45 14.15 14.45 15.15 15.45 16.15 16.20 17.15

Agility – British Open – Jumping Agility – Novice – Agility Agility – Team – Large Semi Finals Agility – Mini/Mixi Pairs Freestyle Heelwork to Music Competition Rescue Dog Agility Flyball – Team Quarter Finals West Midlands Police Display Dog Activities Display Agility – Novice – Jumping Agility – Large – Finals Agility – British Open – Agility Freestyle Heelwork to Music Competition – 2nd place Interval YKC Agility Competition Heelwork to Music – Freestyle (winner) Kennel Gazette Junior Warrant Final Group Judging (Utility) and Presentation Group Judging (Toy) and Presentation

19.55

Programme Ends Programme subject to alteration

ESCALATORS TO AIRPORT AND RAIL STATION HALL 3

HALL 3A

HALL 2

HALL 4 PIAZZA

HALL 1

HALL 5

PAVILION ARENA

MAIN SHOW ENTRANCE

SHUTTLE BUS PICK-UP POINT

Show Maps: Find your way around on pages 208-219

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Heelwork to Music Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library


Daily planner: Toy & Utility Group

Hall 3

GCDS RING YKC RING

Hall 3

Make sure that you don't miss out on all of the fun in the YKC Ring. Packed full of competitions, training tricks and displays, there is something for everyone.

Through the Kennel Club Good Citizen Dog Training Scheme, little steps lead to a lifetime of harmony. You can visit the stand and watch fantastic displays in the ring which we hope will help you to learn more about the joys of responsible dog ownership. See pages 102-103 for more information on the Good Citizen Dog Scheme (GCDS).

Time

Event

08.30

Handling (6-11 years)

09.15

Starters Obedience

Time

Event

10.15

Agility Dog of the Year Semi Final

09.45

Star Citizens Heelwork to Music

11.50

Senior Jumping (+18 years)

10.00

Puppy Foundation Display

12.20

Handling (12-16 years)

10.15

Hearing Dogs For Deaf People

13.20

Elementary Obedience

10.30

Bronze Factor Challenge

14.30

Handling (17-24 years)

10.45

Safe And Sound

15.30

Obedience Presentations and Rebecca Pointer Award

11.00

Silver Award Display

15.50

John McDougall Award

11.20

Defence Animal Centre

16.00

Stakes (Toy & Utility)

11.35

GCDS Multi Level

17.15

Agility Dog of the Year Final (Arena)

11.50

Pets As Therapy

12.00

Gold Award Display

12.20

Tunnel of Temptation

12.35

Puppy Foundation Display

12.50

Dogs for the Disabled

13.10

Bronze Factor Challenge

13.25

Safe And Sound

DOG ACTIVITIES RING

13.40

Silver Award Display

14.00

Star Citizens Heelwork to Music

Do you want to train and or compete with your dog? The staff and helpers on the Dog Activities Stand (16), in Hall 3 will be able to offer help and advice to choose the best activity for both of you.

14.15

Gold Award Display

14.35

Pets As Therapy

14.45

GCDS Multi Level

15.00

Defence Animal Centre

15.15

Bronze Factor Challenge Test

15.45

Silver Award Display

16.05

Star Citizens Heelwork to Music

16.20

Puppy Foundation Display

16.35

Gold Award Display

16.55

All Teams – Down Stay

17.00

Programme Ends

Programme Ends All times subject to alteration

Hall 3, Stand 16

Time

Event

09.00

Agility

09.30

Heelwork to Music

10.15

Working Trials

10.45

Bloodhounds

11.00

Showing and Ringcraft

11.30

Gundog

12.30

Obedience

13.00

Heelwork to Music

13.30

Bloodhounds

13.45

Agility

14.15

KCAI: Inspirational Instruction

14.45

Showing and Ringcraft

15.15

Working Trials

15.45

Obedience

16.15

Gundogs

17.15

Programme Ends

All times subject to alteration

Hall 5

OBEDIENCE RING The Obedience Ring is used exclusively for obedience competitions.

All times subject to alteration

Time

Event

08.30 – 16.00

Inter-Regional Obedience Competition All times subject to alteration

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Hall 3 Stand 56

BREEDER SERVICES Come and visit us to obtain your computerised Kennel Club reports and certificates ome and visit us to obtain your computerised Kennel Club reports and certificates. If you register your puppies with the Kennel Club why not order an official Kennel Club record of what puppies you have bred, a report which also shows their parentage, colour and current owner? Alternatively, you can obtain a list of all those dogs which are connected to your Kennel Name. Similar to the previous report, this information is essential for those breeders and owners wishing to find out how many Stud Book entries they have achieved. Sure to be of interest to all are health reports on hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia and eye diseases relevant to your breed, some going back pre-1980.

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Don’t forget! You can also order copies of award certificates (Stud Book, Junior Warrant, CC and Champion certificates) from us too.

Hall 3 Stand 56

ASSURED BREEDER SCHEME Kennel Club Accredited Breeders and prospective members of the Kennel Club Accredited Breeder Scheme (KCABS) should visit this section of the stand he Kennel Club Assured Breeder Scheme was launched at Crufts in 2004 as a platform on which the Kennel Club could promote responsible breeding practices. Breeders who already belong to the Scheme are invited to come to the stand and pick up their special Crufts gift. Breeders wishing to join the KCABS can discuss any aspect of the Scheme with knowledgeable staff at Crufts and even fill out their application form on the stand. Existing members of the KCABS will also have the opportunity to ask questions and pay their annual membership fee. They can also update their accolade details, if applicable, in relation to breeding experience, breed club membership and the

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number of dogs bred by them which are listed in the Kennel Club Stud Book. The KCABS has a nationwide network of Regional Breeder Advisors who travel throughout the UK visiting Kennel Club Assured Breeders, ensuring they meet the requirements of the Scheme and offering advice. There will be Breeder Advisors on the stand each day, so do please come along if you have any questions about what a visit entails. The KCABS offers members a badge carrying the Scheme’s distinctive purple brand colour. If you are a member of the KCABS and have previously not received your membership badge, please come to the stand and collect yours.


The Kennel Club at Crufts

Page 40 [large image]: Basenji Photo> Dreamstime.com

Page 40 [small image]: Bedlington Terrier Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library

Below: Border Collie Photo> Courtesy of Kim Lock

Bottom:You can register your litter online Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library

Hall 3 Stand 56

KENNEL CLUB REGISTRATIONS There are a great many benefits to visiting the Kennel Club Registrations stand he Registration and Health & Breeder Services teams will be available to provide advice on all registration enquiries – or you may simply want to visit us and pick up some of our application forms or information guides. There is also a Breeder Lounge available on the main stand where Kennel Club Assured Breeders will be able to chat to staff and relax with a coffee.

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What’s Included? The range of services include:

With the development of many online services the team will be available to demonstrate these to customers. These include: Online services  Online Litters – be able to register litters in the comfort of your own home  Mate Select – developed in conjunction with scientists at the Animal Health Trust (AHT) it enables breeders to begin to assess the impact that a proposed mating between Kennel Club registered dogs will have on the genetic diversity of a breed  Breed Information Centre – provides up-todate information about your chosen breed with recommended health schemes, breed standards, breed clubs etc  Health Test Finder – displays health tests registered with the Kennel Club for dogs on the breed register

 Online Transfer – enables new owners to register the change of ownership of their dog simply and quickly Drop off and go service As the success of Online Registration services increases, paper based applications will not be processed at the show, however staff will be able to check the application, take payment and process the application after the show. Registrations documents will be forwarded to your home address. Find A Puppy If you are thinking about buying a puppy, the team will be able to provide information on choosing the right dog for you and finding a responsible breeder by locating a Kennel Club Assured Breeder. The team will also be demonstrating the Find A Puppy service and the Kennel Club Puppy Buying Guide, which is available to download on smartphone handsets.

Become a friend of the Kennel Club For only £20, friends of the Kennel Club receive the following exclusive benefits:  12 issues of the Kennel Gazette worth £27  10 per cent discount on all of the Kennel Club publications and events such as Crufts and Discover Dogs  Tours of the Kennel Club’s office in London’s Mayfair  A Kennel Club pin badge Whatever your Kennel Club Registration query the dedicated team will be delighted to help you throughout the show so please visit the Kennel Club Breeding for the Future Zone, Stand 56, in Hall 3.

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

dog FINDING A RESCUE

Hall 3 Stand 52

Giving a home to a rescue dog can be an immensely rewarding experience and the Kennel Club “Find a Rescue Dog� service will help point you in the right direction of the many rescue organisations that give dogs the potential to find a better life

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Breed Rescue

he Kennel Club’s Breed Rescue Stand again features prominently at Crufts 2012. This stand showcases the work of the rescue organisations and on each day of the show there will be a selection of dogs with their owners/handlers, to spread the word about dog rescue and how to go about rehoming pedigree dogs. A recent survey showed that the breed rescue organisations re-home more dogs every year than Battersea and Dogs Trust put together, with an annual total of approximately 25,000. Therefore the importance of breed rescue is not to be underestimated. For over twenty-five years the Kennel Club has published a rescue directory to list the many general and breed rescue organisations that exist around the country. This has proved to be a useful tool for anyone looking to adopt a dog or wanting to re-home a pet in a home that is appropriate. The rescue directory is a valuable source of information for the general public, veterinary surgeries, dog wardens, police, dog clubs and other welfare organisations. In this way all those involved in re-homing dogs can quickly find the contacts they need. There is now also an online service to give contacts for breed rescues, the address for which is www.findarescuedog.org.uk The Kennel Club’s commitment to rescue continues to grow as we work ever more closely with breed rescue organisations to support the work that is done to find the right homes for pedigree dogs in the UK. Breed rescue organisations have specialist knowledge about their particular breeds and can advise on the type of environment and care that the dogs require.

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A recent survey showed that the breed rescue organisations re-home more dogs every year than Battersea and Dogs Trust put together…”“ Rescue and re-homing is also supported by the Kennel Club Charitable Trust, which offers financial assistance to many dog welfare programmes throughout the UK. Further details can be obtained from the Kennel Club website. It is the principle objective of the Kennel Club to ‘promote in every way the general improvement of dogs’; this is achieved through ensuring that the Kennel Club is the first port of call on all canine matters and recognising the importance of canine health and welfare. The Kennel Club is firmly committed to safeguarding the welfare of all dogs and thus supporting wholeheartedly the interests of rescue dogs.

Visit the Breed Rescue and Kennel Club Charitable Trust Stand (52) in Hall 3, or visit www.findarescuedog.org.uk to find out more about finding a rescue dog. Did you know: The Kennel Club has a dedicated rescue website www.findarescuedog.org.uk and its ‘Find a Rescue Dog’ service will point you in the right direction.

DON’T MISS… THE BREED RESCUE DOGS

As the breed competition element of Crufts features the different dog ‘groups’ each day, the rescue dogs represented will reflect this. Therefore, the breeds present at the show will be as follows:

THURSDAY

Toy Group Northern & Midland Bichon Frisé Club Rescue Midland Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Rescue Utility Group Miniature Poodle Club Rescue & Rehoming Scheme Lhasa Apso Club Rescue

FRIDAY

Gundog Group German Shorthaired Pointer Rescue Midland Golden Retriever Club Rescue Labrador Retriever Rescue Scotland Cocker and English Springer Spaniel Rescue

SATURDAY

Working Group Thames Valley Boxer Rescue Great Dane Care Pastoral Group GSD 2000 Rescue & Re-home Samoyed Rescue Society

SUNDAY

Terrier Group Leicestershire Staffordshire Bull Terrier Rescue Bull Terrier Club (UK) Welfare Trust Hound Group Birmingham Afghan Hound Club Rescue Rhodesian Ridgeback Welfare Trust

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Hall 2 Stand 9

LIBRARY AND COLLECTIONS Featuring the new Bark & Read campaign, Dog Photographer of the Year Competition and your chance to win a portrait of your dog Bark & Read corner ome along and meet Danny the READ dog, star of the CBBC show Animals at Work, and lots of other doggy reading companions at the Bark & Read corner part of the Kennel Club Library Stand (Hall 2, Stand 9). There are lots of books for children to share with the dogs, and grown-ups can find out more about how Bark & Read could help their local school or library. See you there. P.S. To find out more about the Bark & Read Foundation – turn to pages 118-119.

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Time to get snapping! The search for the Dog Photographer Of The Year 2012 begins at Crufts. Make it snappy and come along to the Kennel Club Library Stand (Hall 2, Stand 9) to find out how you can take part. The competition is now free to enter and there are six great categories:  Dogs at Work  Dogs at Play  Dog Portrait  Man’s Best Friend  Puppies  I Love Dogs Because… (For entrants aged 16 years and under) For more information, visit us at www.dogimages.org.uk

The lucky winner will receive the unique prize of having talented watercolour artist Christine Varley paint a personal picture of their dog. Christine is celebrating her 25th year of painting portraits of dogs, horses, cats and other animals at Crufts. On display at the stand is a portrait by Christine of last year’s Reserve Best in Show winner, the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen, Ch Soletrader Peek A Boo. If you would like to see more work by Christine she will be exhibiting at Crufts in Hall 3, Stand 47where she will also be giving demonstrations of her painting skills throughout the show.  Visitors to the Kennel Club Library Stand will be able to enter the raffle for the donation of just £1 and the ticket will be drawn on Sunday 11th March at 16.00.

Europe’s biggest and best dog library The Library & Collections staff will be on hand to answer any questions you have about the Kennel Club’s Library, Art and Photographic Collections. You can book your visit to the Kennel Club to view the outstanding art collection and learn more about current and upcoming exhibitions. Staff can also advise on how to carry out your own canine research at Europe’s biggest and best dog library.

Something new Win a portrait of your dog The Library and Collections Stand will also be hosting a raffle to win a personal portrait of your dog by Christine Varley, whilst money raised from the raffle will go to the Bark & Read Foundation.

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For more information on any of the above after the show, please visit

www.thekennelclub.org.uk/library or www.thekennelclub.org.uk/gallery or www.dogimages.org.uk

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The Kennel Club at Crufts

Hall 3 Stand 16

DOG ACTIVITIES STAND AND DISPLAY RING Time to unleash you dog’s potential s your dog a couch potato? However much fun it is just sharing your home with your dog, going for ‘walkies’ and visiting the park, the time may come when you decide that you would like to try something different – something to help you and your dog to enjoy each other’s company, bond more closely and get more exercise. At the Dog Activities Stand (16), in Hall 3, our experts can help you decide on just the right activity for you and your dog. Agility, obedience, heelwork to music, gundog work and field trials, breed showing and ringcraft, working trials, bloodhound trials and flyball – enough to suit every size and type of owner and dog; and

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through our KCAI scheme we can help you to find expert instructors in your area to help you train your dog. We have a busy display ring right through the day where expert trainers and handlers demonstrate how we train our dogs in each activity; when they are not in the ring, our experts will be available to chat to you about their activity, introduce you to their dogs, and answer any questions you may have. We also have a wide range of leaflets, booklets and information packs for you to take away, staff to help you, and our new online ‘Find a Dog Club’ service will be available (with human assistance!) to enable you to find local training clubs for your chosen activity.

 For more information visit the Dog Activities Stand (16), in Hall 3, and don’t miss the Dog Activities feature on pages 116-117 for a top up.

Above: Flyball is one of the many activities you can do with your dog Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library

Left: Whippet – the winning entry from Dog Photographer of the Year 2011 Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Libraryy/Tina Williams

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

THE KENNEL CLUB EXPLAINS:

JUDGING Left: Judge, Liz Cartledge assesses the Best of Breed winning Whippet at Crufts 2010

Right: Anne Macdonald assesses the smooth and springy movement of the Afghan Hound

WORDS BY ANNETTE OLIVER Many people are not familiar with the system of judging at Championship Dog Shows and might be somewhat perplexed at the different classes and awards at Crufts. This is the system and how it operates rganised dog shows began over 150 years ago when exhibitions for cattle, birds and other livestock were already enjoyed by many. The comparison of stock was important to the landowners of the day and their workers, and this regular competition ensured the survival of many breeds. It is only by breeders seeing the animals bred by others that they can ensure the standard of their own dogs is maintained and this is still recognised today. It is also a pleasurable pastime for dogs and humans, as you can see by all those wagging tails at the show. When the Kennel Club was formed in 1873 to regulate the exhibition of pedigree dogs, there were only ten rules in place as its main purpose was to record their registration. The needs of exhibitors were rather secondary but a century and a half later, there are regulations in force to ensure that every facet of the sport is covered, including the needs of the exhibitor, the judge, and more importantly, the dogs. Everyone visiting Crufts will have their favourites when standing around the various breed rings throughout the show.

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Those not used to dog shows will probably wonder what makes one dog better than the next and entitle it to a first prize whereas another will not receive an award at all. The person making the decisions of course is the judge and each judge has to conform to the Kennel Club’s Code of Conduct for Judges. The main criteria above all else is integrity; enabling the judge to be able to place dogs solely on their merit. It is their personal opinion as they see the dog on the day. They should not be influenced by any past achievements. The judges will all be experienced in their particular field; some will specialise in their own breed, i.e. the one they have owned, bred and exhibited and referred to as breed specialists; others known as ‘all rounders’ will have acquired knowledge about a number of breeds, sometimes just in their own Group [Gundog, Utility etc] and sometimes across all the Group categories. Crufts judges will have bred and owned good dogs themselves and will have judged many, many times; it is a long and dedicated road to becoming a judge. Many hours are spent travelling the

country gaining the experience needed; examinations are taken not only on the breed but also on all aspects of conformation, movement and structure of the dog, as well as the proper handling of dogs and Kennel Club rules and regulations. It is the judge’s responsibility to assess each exhibit against its own breed standard. This document is a full description of the dog from nose to tail. It describes the shape of the dog’s head, the way it holds its ears, the length of neck, how the back, [topline] should look. Some breeds require a level back, others require curves. The way the tail is carried, some are held upwards and some are down. The overall shape of the body, coat, colour and size are all relevant. Even the feet are detailed in the standard. Movement in different breeds varies too. You only have to look at a class of mixed breeds, perhaps in the Young Kennel Club Stakes or Handling Classes to see how some move smoothly, others lift their front legs, some dogs appear to move at walking pace. A Collie for instance will move in a totally different way to a Whippet, and the handler will adjust their pace accordingly.


Judging Explained

The Collie is a herding breed originally and therefore needs to run low over the ground with a requirement for quiet stealthy movement. The Whippet’s function as a running hound requires a far different pace and style. Although many of the dogs at the show are pets and do not fulfil their original function, it is necessary that they are constructed sufficiently well, and keep their inherent features so they may be fit enough to do so, if required. When the dogs first come into the ring, after the judge’s initial look at them, each exhibit is examined individually. Smaller dogs are placed onto a judging table to make it easier for the judge to go over them. You will notice how the judge’s hands run all over the body, feeling for placement of shoulders, muscle tone, construction. He or she will examine the mouth checking dentition and for healthy clean teeth. It does not matter whether the breed is the smallest Chihuahua or the largest St Bernard, it is the responsibility of the owner initially to present, and then for the judge to look for, not only a true representative of the

Above: Last year’s Best in Show winner thanks judge, Paolo Dondina, for his epic win! All Photos> The Kennel Club Picture Library

Annette Oliver began with Labrador Retrievers but is more widely known for her Champion Italian Greyhounds. She has also owned and bred Chihuahuas. Annette is a Toy Group judge and is judging the Toy Group at Crufts 2012. Annette is author of books on the Italian Greyhound and a number of articles for the canine press. Annette is a member of KC General Committee and Judges Sub-Committee and holds a number of administrative roles within the canine world. Annette is also part of the commentary team at Crufts.

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breed standard, but to ensure the dog is of a happy disposition, has no signs of aggression, is not over or under weight, has no signs of unhealthy eyes or ears. The coat should be glossy and clean, [a dog that is scratching or showing signs of a dirty coat would be penalised]. All dogs should move soundly and without obvious exertion or signs of distress. It is important that there should be no exaggerations in breed type whatsoever. Judges are required to place dogs from left to right and from ‘first to very highly commended’ [or first to fifth]. If there are more than five dogs in the class then obviously some dogs will not receive an award. In some instances the judge will be disappointed not to be able to hand out more awards when the quality of competition is high. The dog considered by the judge on the day to be the Best of its Breed and therefore represent them in the Group ring at Crufts, should not only be the one that epitomises everything that the standard asks for but will also be a healthy, happy dog that is fit for function.

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Show

THE PATH TO BEST IN

HOW DO YOU GET THERE?

o enter at Crufts all dogs must have qualified at Championship Shows throughout the preceding year or have other qualifications as outlined in the schedule. Having qualified, each dog may be entered in an appropriate class either on an age basis or in a class designed to reflect the dog’s past show successes. Dogs and bitches have the same classification but are judged separately. When the judge has completed all the dog classes, each unbeaten class winner will then compete for best dog. The same procedure then takes place for the bitches, after which the judge chooses ‘Best of

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Breed’ from the best dog and best bitch. There are seven Groups at all General Championship Shows – Working, Pastoral, Utility, Hound, Toy, Terrier and Gundog. Each day after the completion of the breed judging, all Best of Breed winners in their relevant Group compete in the Arena. Here, a different judge chooses the best exhibit, who is known as the ‘Group Winner’. In each Group the dogs are placed 1, 2, 3 and 4. On the final evening all seven Group winners compete in the Arena under yet another judge, who after a final assessment, chooses the ‘Best in Show’ winner and the ‘runner-up’.

All dogs are judged against the KC appoved breed standard particular to each breed. This breed standard is the property of the sport’s governing body, the Kennel Club. Kennel Club approved judges take many factors into consideration when assessing the merits of each dog, such as overall health and condition, coat, character, temperament and sound movement. They also look for any health concerns that are particular to the individual breed they are judging. Judges are aware that their decisions ultimately affect the future development of a breed and that they must reward health and welfare first.

Flat Coated Retriever, Show Champion Vbos The Kentuckian, also known as ‘Jet’ going Best in Show at dfs Crufts 2011 Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library

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Best in Show

Breed Classes

Best of Breed

Group Classes (Competing with other Best of Breed Winners of the Gundog Group)

Group 1 (Gundog Group)

Best in Show Competition (Competing with other Group Winners)

Best in Show Winner

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

2011

RETRIEVER (FLAT-COATED)

2010

Sh Ch Vbos The Kentuckian Mr JM Irvine

2005

NORFOLK TERRIER

2004

CH & AM CH CRACKNOR CAUSE CÉLÈBRE Ms S Ingram, Mrs P Beale and Miss E Matell

1999

IRISH SETTER SH CH CASPIANS INTREPID Mrs J Lorrimer

1993

IRISH SETTER

AFGHAN HOUND

1998

IRISH SETTER

1992

FOX TERRIER (WIRE)

1986

G.S.D (ALSATIAN)

1980

LAKELAND TERRIER

1974

KEESHOND CH VOLKRIJK OF VORDEN Mrs IM Tucker

1950

SPANIEL (COCKER)

1968

POINTER

1962

SPANIEL (COCKER) LUCKYSTAR OF WARE HS Lloyd

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1991

RETRIEVER (FLAT-COATED)

ST BERNARD

DALMATIAN

FOX TERRIER (WIRE)

1956

GREYHOUND

1985

SPANIEL (COCKER)

1979

GREYHOUND

1973

SPANIEL (COCKER) LUCKYSTAR OF WARE HS Lloyd

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL ALANSMERE AQUARIUS Messrs Hall and Evans

1967

LAKELAND TERRIER CH STINGRAY OF DERRYABAH Mr and Mrs Postlewaite

1961

AIREDALE TERRIER CH RIVERINA TWEEDS-BAIRN Miss P McCaughey and Mrs D Schuth

1955

POODLE (STANDARD) CH TZIGANE AGGRI OF NASHEND Mrs A Proctor

1939

SPANIEL (COCKER) EXQUISITE MODEL OF WARE HS Lloyd

1933

SOUTHBALL MOONSTONE B Hartland Worden

1930

KERRY BLUE TERRIER CH & AM CH CALLAGHAN OF LEANDER Mrs W Streatfield

TRACEY WITCH OF WARE HS Lloyd

1934

POODLE (STANDARD) CH MONTRAVIA TOMMY-GUN Miss M Gibbs

TREETOPS GOLDEN FALCON Mrs W De Casembroot and Miss H Greenish

1948

SPANIEL (CLUMBER) SH CH RAYCROFT SOCIALITE Mr R Dunne

CH CRACKWYN COCKSPUR Mr HL Gill

PENNINE PRIMA DONNA A Eggleston

1931

AIREDALE TERRIER

YORKSHIRE TERRIER CH OZMILION MYSTIFICATION Mr OA Sameja

CH FANHILL FAUNE Mrs EJ Woodyatt

TRACEY WITCH OF WARE HS Lloyd

1935

1997

CH BURTONSWOOD BOSSY BOOTS Miss M Hindes

ROGERHOLM RECRUIT Mr W Rogers

1957

WHIPPET

PEKINGESE

CH YAKEE A DANGEROUS LIAISON Mr A Easdon and Mr P Martin

CH SHARGLEAM BLACKCAP Miss P Chapman

CH HENDRAWEN’S NIBELUNG OF CHARAVIGNE Mr and Mrs EJ White

1963

2003

CH GINGER XMAS CAROL Miss A Livraghi

CH BROOKEWIRE BRANDY OF LAYVEN Messrs Benelli and Dondina

1969

WELSH TERRIER

SEALYHAM TERRIER Am, Can & Swed Ch Efbe’s Hidalgo at Goodspice Mesdames M Good and S Middlebrook

CH PENCLOE DUTCH GOLD Miss M Bolton

CH ASTLEY’S PORTIA OF RUA Mrs and Miss Tuite

1975

2009

CH SAREDON FOREVER YOUNG Mr D Scawthorn and Mrs J Averis

CH VISCOUNT GRANT Mr and Mrs C Amoo

1981

WHIPPET CH COBYCO CALL THE TUNE Mrs L Yacoby-Wright

SH CH DANAWAY DEBONAIR Mrs J Lorrimer

1987

HUNGARIAN VIZSLA Sh Ch & Aust Ch Hungargunn Bear It’n Mind (IMP) Mesdames N Cragg and K Armstrong

RETRIEVER (LABRADOR) BRAMSHAW BOB Lorna, Countess Howe

1929

SCOTTISH TERRIER HEATHER NECESSITY E Chapman


Roll of Honour

2008

GIANT SCHNAUZER

2007

Ch Jafrak Philippe Olivier Mr K and Mrs S Cullen

2002

POODLE (STANDARD)

2001

CH & NORD CH TOPSCORE CONTRADICTION Mr and Mrs Glenna

1996

SPANIEL (COCKER)

WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER

1995

LHASA APSO

1989

FOX TERRIER (WIRE)

1983

BULL TERRIER

1977

POODLE (TOY)

1971

IRISH WOLFHOUND SULHAMSTEAD MERMAN Mrs Nagle and Miss Clark

1953

GREAT DANE

1965

SPANIEL (COCKER) EXQUISITE MODEL OF WARE HS Lloyd

1932

RETRIEVER (LABRADOR) BRAMSHAW BOB Lorna, Countess Howe

1928

GREYHOUND PRIMLEY SCEPTRE H Whitley

AFGHAN HOUND

ENGLISH SETTER

G.S.D (ALSATIAN)

G.S.D (ALSATIAN)

1959

WELSH TERRIER

1988

BULLDOG

1982

RETRIEVER (LABRADOR) CH CHEVERELLS BEN OF BANCHORY Lorna, Countess Howe

POODLE (TOY) CH GRAYCO HAZLENUT Mrs LA Howard

1976

WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER CH DIANTHUS BUTTONS Mrs K Newstead

1970

PYRENEAN MOUNTAIN DOG BERGERIE KNUR Mr and Mrs FS Prince

1964

ENGLISH SETTER SH CH SILBURY SOAMES OF MADAVALE Mrs A Williams

1958

POINTER CH CHIMING BELLS Mrs W Parkinson

1951

CH NOWAYS CHUCKLES JT Barnard

1937

ENGLISH SETTER SH CH STARLITE EXPRESS OF VALSETT Mr and Mrs JW Watkin

CH SANDSTORM SARACEN Mesdames Leach and Thomas

1952

WELSH TERRIER

CH PURSTON HIT AND MISS FROM BROCOLITIA Mrs AJ Maughan

CH FENTON OF KENTWOOD Miss SH Godden

CH ELCH EDLER OF OUBOROUGH WG Siggers

1938

1994

CH RAMACON SWASHBUCKLER Prince Ahmed Husain

OAKINGTON PUCKSHILL AMBER SUNBLUSH Mrs CE Perry

1960

BEARDED COLLIE

KERRY BLUE TERRIER CH TORUM’S SCARF MICHAEL Mr R Ramsay

SH CH BOURNEHOUSE DANCING MASTER Mr GF Williams

CH ABRAXAS AUDACITY Miss V Drummond-Dick

1966

2000

CH MONTRAVIA KASKARAK HITARI Mrs P Gibbs

CH HARROWHILL HUNTSMAN Miss E Howles

1972

IRISH SETTER

AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD AM CH CAITLAND ISLE TAKE A CHANCE Ms N Reseter

CH POTTERDALE CLASSIC OF MOONHILL Mrs B White

CH SAXONSPRINGS HACKENSACK Mrs J Blyth

1978

BASENJI

SH CH STARCHELLE CHICAGO BEAR Miss HR Shaw

CH OLAC MOON PILOT Mr D Tattersall

1984

2006

CH JETHARD CIDEVANT Mr PS Singleton

SH CH CANIGOU CAMBRAI Mrs PL Bentley

1990

TIBETAN TERRIER

CH & AM CH ARAKI FABULOUS WILLY Mr N Smith, Mrs J Shaw, Mr K Sinclair and Mrs M Francis

WELSH TERRIER TWYNSTAR DYMA-FI Capt and Mrs IM Thomas

1936

CHOW CHOW CH CHOONAM HUNG KWONG Mrs VAM Mannooch

Winners BEST IN SHOW

Before 1928 there was no award of Best in Show at Crufts, since that time the following dogs have gained this prestigious title…

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Discover Hall 3/3A

OVER 200 BREEDS OF PEDIGREE DOG…

Come and find us Interact with us using any of the social media websites below:

If you love dogs, but can’t decide between a Labrador Retriever or a Lhaso Apso then the Discover Dogs area is the place to be ithin the Discover Dogs section sponsored by Eukanuba, you will have the chance to meet over 200 different breeds of pedigree dog, together with real experts on the breed – the people who own and live with them. Each day experts will be on hand to give guidance on the temperament and characteristics, grooming, feeding and exercise needs of the vast range of dogs of all shapes and sizes. The dogs appearing at the show are all listed below with their relevant breed

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booth number. Use the colour coded map to help you find your favourite breed in Halls 3/3a, see pages 214-215.

Did you know? Discover Dogs first appeared at Crufts in 1994 to promote the message of responsible pet ownership through choice, care and training. This year it will be located in the heart of Halls 3/3a where everyone can easily enjoy this unique experience.

Become a fan of: www.facebook.com/kclovesdogs www.facebook.com/crufts www.facebook.com/dogshowing www.facebook.com/dogagility www.facebook.com/discoverdogs

www.flickr.com Have a look at our photo gallery – search for the Kennel Club TM

www.twitter.com We tweet! Follow @kclovesdogs

GUNDOG ogs that were originally trained to D find live game and/or to retrieve game that had been shot and wounded. This group is divided into four categories – Retrievers, Spaniels, Hunt/Point/Retrieve,

Brittany

Bracco Italiano Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G1

German Longhaired Pointer Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G4

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Pointers and Setters – although many of the breeds are capable of doing the same work as the other sub-groups. They make good companions, their temperament making them ideal all-round family dogs.

www.youtube.com/crufts Watch live on YouTube! Free to view live coverage on the action from the Arena and subscribe in advance for updates, archive footage and the ability to rate and share videos.

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English Setter Size: Medium Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G2

German Shorthaired Pointer Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G5

Key: > symbolises “more than” ; Breed illustrations by Jo Van Kampen ©The Kennel Club

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G3

German Wirehaired Pointer Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G6


Discover Dogs

Gordon Setter

Hungarian Vizsla Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G7

Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G8

Irish Red & White Setter Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G10

Irish Setter

Kooikerhondje

Korthals Griffon (Imp)

Large Munsterlander

Size: Medium Grooming: > once a week Exercise: Up to 1 hr/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G13

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G16

Hungarian Wire Haired Vizsla

Pointer

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G11

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G9

Italian Spinone

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G12

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G14

Lagotto Romagnolo (Imp) Size: Medium Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G15

Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G17

Retriever (Chesapeake Bay) Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G18

Retriever (Curly Coated) Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G19

Retriever (Flat Coated)

Retriever (Labrador)

Retriever (Nova Scotia Duck Tolling) Size: Medium Grooming: > once a week Exercise: Up to 1 hr/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G25

Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer (Imp) Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: Up to 1 hr/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 Years Breed Booth: G26

Spaniel (American Cocker)

Spaniel (American Water) (Imp) Size: Medium Grooming: Once a week Exercise: Up to 30 mins/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 Years This breed does not appear at Discover Dogs 2012

Size: Large Grooming: Once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 Years Breed Booth: G23/24

Small Munsterlander (Imp) Size: Medium Grooming: Once a week Exercise: Up to 1 hr/day Locality: Country Lifespan: Over 10 Years This breed does not appear at Discover Dogs 2012

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 Years Breed Booth: G22

Size: Medium Grooming: Every day Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G27

Retriever (Golden)

Size: Large Grooming: > once a week Exercise: > 2 hrs/day Locality: Town or Country Lifespan: Over 10 years Breed Booth: G20/21

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Puppy? Hall 3 Stand 56

THINKING ABOUT BUYING A

uppies are one of life’s joys, and buying your puppy armed with expert advice will help to ensure they are a joy for life. It is important to get things right from the very beginning and know what you are getting yourself into, so what better time or place to help you get that decision spot-on than here at Crufts – the world’s greatest dog show. There are nearly 200 different breeds on show at Crufts, many that you may have never seen or even heard about before. Each breed of dog has a unique set of characteristics, and meeting them first hand will help you to understand more about them and help you realise which breed is best for you. Here at Crufts you have the unique opportunity to talk to as many experts as possible, and the advice they give can be invaluable. Understanding the lifestyle requirements for your chosen dog is vital for a happy relationship. Misunderstanding the cost, exercise, grooming requirements and

P

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temperament can result in your puppy having to be re-homed – unfortunately this is the main reason our nation’s rescue centres remain so necessary. After Crufts there will still be a wealth of tools available to you to find out all about buying a puppy responsibly. The Kennel Club has launched a new Puppy Buying Guide app for Android users, with an iPhone version due this spring. This clever step-by-step guide helps the potential owner decide if they are ready for a puppy, what breed is best, what questions to ask the breeder, tips on taking a new dog home, and training and health tips for those important first few weeks of owning a dog.

Making the right decision Before anything else you need to ask yourself, are you ready for dog ownership?  Will I have the time to love and care for him and to keep him company?  Am I prepared to accept the mess that

a puppy or dog will create and to clear up after him?  Will I spend time training him?  Can I afford to care for him, insure him and pay for veterinary care?  Will I give him the exercise that he needs, every day? If you can answer yes to all of these questions then read on…

Advantages of a pedigree puppy There are 210 pedigree dog breeds registered by the Kennel Club and these are split into seven groups – working, pastoral, gundog, toy, hound, utility and terrier – each of which were bred for different functions and so those within each group often share similar characteristics. Remember the original purpose for which a particular breed was developed won’t just disappear when these animals change environment.


Buying a Puppy

All the information that you need about the different pedigree breeds, their characteristics, needs and health requirements can be found in the Breed Information Centre at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/ onlineservices

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Left: Whippet Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library/Louise Tope

Opposite: Akitas Photo> Dreamstime.com

Most breeds have their own inbuilt characteristics and temperament, being bred for their working abilities as well as looks. Within the seven groups, each breed has its own breed standard which outlines the breed’s individual characteristics and which enables you to predict how it is likely to turn out.

So how do I know what breed is best for me? This depends on your circumstances. Visit the Discover Dogs area in Hall 3 and you can meet every breed and ask questions directly to individual breed experts. There is a bigger version of this event every November at Earls Court, London too. You need to ask whether your chosen breed will fit into your daily routine? Are you out all day, or perhaps you keep irregular hours? If you are a city dweller looking for a dog with moderate exercise needs, perhaps

a Miniature Pinscher is for you. If you are looking for a family dog then the Staffordshire Bull Terrier or Labrador Retriever could be good choices. If you want a lively, energetic dog and have time to give it advanced training and lots of exercise then a Border Collie could be a good fit. The important questions you need to ask centre on your preferred breed’s temperament and characteristics, the size it will grow to be (so that you can ensure that you have the space in your home and the ability to control it) and its training, exercise and grooming needs. You can do some research at home and get an idea about the breeds that might suit you by visiting the Kennel Club’s dedicated website www.findabreed.org.uk or download the Kennel Club’s free Puppy Buying Guide app from www.thekennelclub.org.uk/puppybuyingguide Small breeds can live much longer than giant breeds, so take into account the average lifespan of your chosen breed, and the estimated costs of lifetime care

(both financially and in terms of your own time) before buying. Why not contact a pet insurance company, such as www.kcinsurance.co.uk, and ask how much it would normally cost to insure the breed you are considering taking on? It is also vital to remember that some breeds are more prone to certain health issues than others. There are health screening and DNA tests for many of these conditions, which the parents of your puppy should have undergone in order to give you an idea about its future health status. Make sure you ask the breeder about these tests or check for yourself with the Kennel Club’s Health Test Results Finder, by just typing the name of the sire and dam of your puppy you can find the results of the health test, if they have been done www.the-kennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect/Default.aspx Whichever breed you choose, all puppies need patience, commitment, constant supervision, socialisation and training; so don’t jump in at the deep end.

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celebrating healthy, happy dogs www.crufts.org.uk

Hall 3 Stand 56

Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library/Alice Van Kampen

FIND THE RIGHT BREEDER… The Assured Breeder Scheme Many people do not realise how important it is to find the right breeder, but it is just as important as finding the right breed. A good breeder will dedicate their time and money to ensure that your puppy has the best possible start in life, and will be less likely to suffer from health and behavioural problems. Kennel Club Assured Breeders are the only breeders to have officially agreed to follow responsible breeding practice and so go above and beyond that which is required of those who simply register their dogs with the Kennel Club (or who don’t register their dogs at all). They will make sure their dogs have undergone the required health tests for their breed, socialisation, worm their dogs and provide information about inoculations that they require, keep them in clean and comfortable whelping conditions, offer a full after-sales service and give their customers all the information that they need in a puppy pack. They also agree to allow a Kennel Club Advisor to access their premises, to ensure that they uphold the standards of the scheme. Not all breeders choose to be Assured

Your checklist: Take this with you when you visit the Breeder: Do  Go to a Kennel Club Assured Breeder. Assured Breeders will be found with a purple scheme logo next to their name at www.findapuppy.org.uk or you can visit www.thekennelclub.org.uk/onlineservices  Expect to see the puppy with its mother.  See the puppy in its breeding environment and ask to look at the kenneling conditions if they are not kept in the family home.  Be prepared to be put on a waiting list – a healthy puppy is worth waiting for.  Be wary of a breeder selling more than one or two breeds unless you are sure of their credentials.  Expect to receive a contract of sale outlining any relevant terms and conditions including details on after-sales care and a receipt.  Ask to see the puppy's records of worming and vaccinations [if any], as well as any other veterinary treatment.  Check the puppy’s parents have been given appropriate health screening tests,

94

and not all puppies are given a good start in life. Sadly, more and more puppies are being bred purely for profit by people who do not care about the health and welfare of their puppies and breeding bitches. These breeders will not rear their puppies properly or socialise them and often keep both the pups and the breeding bitches in cramped and filthy

and that any recognised registration papers and parents’ health certificates relevant to the breed are in order and available at the time you buy the puppy; for you, or your vet, to take a look at. Go to the Kennel Club Breed Information Centre to find out more about the health screens that the parents of your puppy should have undergone, which will give you a good indication of how healthy it is likely to be. www.thekennelclub.org.uk/onlineservices  Be prepared and arm yourself with lots of questions to ask; the Puppy Buying Guide app can help with this. A good breeder will be glad that you are asking questions and be happy to answer any concerns you have.

Don’t  Buy a puppy from a pet shop – these have often come from puppy farms.  Order your puppy from the internet or over the phone without being sure of the breeder’s crudentials, or pick up from a ‘neutral location’ such as a car park or motorway service station. This is a common tactic used by puppy farmers.  Buy a puppy because you feel like you

conditions. These careless breeders are often referred to as puppy farmers. Puppy farmers will often operate through dealers and sell their puppies through free newspaper ads, on the internet or in pet shops. Some key dos and don’ts will ensure that you are not helping these breeders to stay in business and that the puppy you buy is a healthy, happy one.

are rescuing it. So long as the breeder’s pockets are being lined you will only be making space for another poorly puppy to fill.  Be fooled by a fake Kennel Club pedigree certificate. These are often faked by puppy farmers who are already operating illegally and have no qualms about forging paperwork. If in doubt, check with the Kennel Club.

Final note... Of course, buying a puppy is not your only option. For some people an adult rescue dog is a better fit for their lifestyle and helps to give disadvantaged dogs a fresh start in life. If you are considering buying a rescue dog, why not contact a Kennel Club Breed Rescue organisation for advice. There are many thousands of beautiful stray and abandoned dogs in need of loving families. For further information visit the Kennel Club Breed Rescue Stand in Hall 3 and read Finding a Rescue Dog feature on pages 96-97. Good luck with buying your pedigree puppy, and we hope you both enjoy a healthy, happy life together.


Buying a Puppy

Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library/Janetta Fairbairn

KC Tips!

As a puppy buyer you should prioritise health, welfare and temperament, and avoid exaggerated physical features likely to affect the puppy’s quality of life. All puppies have the cuteness factor, but please don’t let your heart rule your head by basing your decision on appearance alone.

Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library/Emer Howard

Left to right and bottom: Bull Terrier, Pointer, Weimaraners, Bearded Collies

Always ask to see the puppy’s health records and ensure that these are available by the time you buy the puppy. Good breeders will supply you with a detailed feeding regime and diet plan for the next few months and a sample of the puppy’s normal food to take away with you.

EXCLUSIVE… Puppy Buying Guide app App key features include:

The Puppy Buying Guide app delivers essential information to help prospective puppy owners decide if they are ready to own a puppy, providing guidance on choosing the right pedigree, crossbreed or rescue dog that is right for them. Once this decision has been made it progresses to how to go about buying a puppy, including a helpful checklist to ask the breeder and then takes the prospective new owner through two more stages, which provide tips on taking a new dog home, and training and health tips for those important first few weeks of owning a dog. The app is available to download from the Android Market and will be available on iPhones this spring.

Discover the breeds! Use the Discover Dogs Breed Guide listings on pages 66-89

www.thekennelclub.org.uk

i Photo> The Kennel Club Picture Library/Kenneth Handley

 Advice on how to choose and care for your puppy  A checklist of what to ask the breeder  Helpful links to search for breeds, local clubs and training advice  The ability to browse through the journey of purchasing a puppy  Simple design with easy navigation and efficient browsing  Tips and hints throughout

To help you in find a puppy visit the Discover Dogs Area in Hall 3. Alternatively contact the Kennel Club on +44 (0)844 463 3980 or visit the website

New! Kennel Club Puppy Buying Guide app free: www.thekennelclub.org.uk/puppybuyingguide

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Crufts 2012  

The Biggest Dog Show Event on the planet !

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