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Reza’s

INDIAN

SPICE

EASTERN RECIPES FOR WESTERN COOKS REZA MAHAMMAD


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FOR THE SALAD

400g white radish (mooli/daikon), peeled and julienned 1-2 carrots, peeled and julienned seeds of 2 pomegranates 120g toasted flaked almonds few sprigs of mint and coriander leaves

This is colourful, jewel-like and ravishing both to look at and eat. I think of it as a Silk Route salad, in which sharp Middle Eastern pomegranate meets vibrant Indian mint and hot radish. Quite crunchy and peppery, its freshness works really well with grilled meats – such as chicken tikka or any tandoori dish – and is also fabulous with fish. Very versatile and refreshing, this salad is a welcome addition to almost any Indian-inspired meal.

Soak the julienned mooli in iced water for 15 minutes, then rinse, drain and pat dry. Place the daikon, carrots, pomegranate seeds and almonds in a serving bowl. For the dressing, thoroughly mix all the ingredients and adjust the seasoning to taste. Pour over the salad, toss well, cover and chill for 30 minutes. Finally fold in the herb leaves just before serving.

FOR THE DRESSING

2 tbsp lime juice 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1 tsp salt ½ tsp chilli powder 2 tsp sugar or honey

SERVES 4–6

Quick & Chic

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Mooli and Pomegranate Salad


FOR THE SALAD

400g white radish (mooli/daikon), peeled and julienned 1-2 carrots, peeled and julienned seeds of 2 pomegranates 120g toasted flaked almonds few sprigs of mint and coriander leaves

This is colourful, jewel-like and ravishing both to look at and eat. I think of it as a Silk Route salad, in which sharp Middle Eastern pomegranate meets vibrant Indian mint and hot radish. Quite crunchy and peppery, its freshness works really well with grilled meats – such as chicken tikka or any tandoori dish – and is also fabulous with fish. Very versatile and refreshing, this salad is a welcome addition to almost any Indian-inspired meal.

Soak the julienned mooli in iced water for 15 minutes, then rinse, drain and pat dry. Place the daikon, carrots, pomegranate seeds and almonds in a serving bowl. For the dressing, thoroughly mix all the ingredients and adjust the seasoning to taste. Pour over the salad, toss well, cover and chill for 30 minutes. Finally fold in the herb leaves just before serving.

FOR THE DRESSING

2 tbsp lime juice 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1 tsp salt ½ tsp chilli powder 2 tsp sugar or honey

SERVES 4–6

Quick & Chic

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Mooli and Pomegranate Salad


400g sweet potato, cubed salt and pepper 200g log soft goat’s cheese or feta cheese, cut into cubes 3 spring onions, chopped 2 tbsp finely chopped coriander 1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped ½ tsp dried chilli flakes 1 tsp toasted cumin seeds, crushed 1 tsp ground cinnamon 3 garlic cloves, crushed 125g unsalted butter 270g filo pastry 1-2 tbsp cumin seeds rock salt, to sprinkle

Unlike most samosas, these aren’t fried. This not only makes them healthier, but somehow intensifies the flavour of the filling… also there is no oil making the pastry greasy. Cinnamon works brilliantly with sweet potato, while the lush goat’s cheese makes these fabulous. I serve them with a peppery watercress dip – a kind of Indo-Italian pesto – with coriander and lemon (once, by accident, I used orange instead and it was great, so try it). If you grow nasturtiums, use their leaves instead of watercress; it is unbelievable. These are smart enough to serve with drinks.

Place the potatoes into a saucepan, cover with water and add some salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for six to eight minutes until tender. Drain and allow to cool. Now add the goat’s cheese, spring onions, coriander, fresh and dried chilli, crushed cumin, cinnamon and garlic. Lightly season with some salt and mix well. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6. Melt the butter. Lay a sheet of filo pastry on a work surface and brush with melted butter. Place a second sheet on top to fit exactly over the first, then cut the filo pastry into strips about 5cm wide. Spoon a little filling into one corner of the strip. Fold the right corner of the strip over to the left side to create a triangle. Continue to fold this triangle along the strip until you reach the end, cutting off any surplus pastry. Brush the samosas liberally with butter and sprinkle with cumin seeds and rock salt. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until the pastry is cooked and golden. MAKES ABOUT 24

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Quick & Chic

Serve with Indo-Italian Watercress Pesto (see page 129)

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Sweet Potato and Goat’s Cheese Samosas


400g sweet potato, cubed salt and pepper 200g log soft goat’s cheese or feta cheese, cut into cubes 3 spring onions, chopped 2 tbsp finely chopped coriander 1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped ½ tsp dried chilli flakes 1 tsp toasted cumin seeds, crushed 1 tsp ground cinnamon 3 garlic cloves, crushed 125g unsalted butter 270g filo pastry 1-2 tbsp cumin seeds rock salt, to sprinkle

Unlike most samosas, these aren’t fried. This not only makes them healthier, but somehow intensifies the flavour of the filling… also there is no oil making the pastry greasy. Cinnamon works brilliantly with sweet potato, while the lush goat’s cheese makes these fabulous. I serve them with a peppery watercress dip – a kind of Indo-Italian pesto – with coriander and lemon (once, by accident, I used orange instead and it was great, so try it). If you grow nasturtiums, use their leaves instead of watercress; it is unbelievable. These are smart enough to serve with drinks.

Place the potatoes into a saucepan, cover with water and add some salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for six to eight minutes until tender. Drain and allow to cool. Now add the goat’s cheese, spring onions, coriander, fresh and dried chilli, crushed cumin, cinnamon and garlic. Lightly season with some salt and mix well. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6. Melt the butter. Lay a sheet of filo pastry on a work surface and brush with melted butter. Place a second sheet on top to fit exactly over the first, then cut the filo pastry into strips about 5cm wide. Spoon a little filling into one corner of the strip. Fold the right corner of the strip over to the left side to create a triangle. Continue to fold this triangle along the strip until you reach the end, cutting off any surplus pastry. Brush the samosas liberally with butter and sprinkle with cumin seeds and rock salt. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until the pastry is cooked and golden. MAKES ABOUT 24

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Quick & Chic

Serve with Indo-Italian Watercress Pesto (see page 129)

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Sweet Potato and Goat’s Cheese Samosas


FOR THE SPICE MIX

½ tsp coriander seeds ½ tsp fennel seeds ½ tsp black peppercorns 1 tsp red chilli flakes FOR THE MULLET

4 red mullet fillets, each weighing 160g, scaled and pin-boned salt 4-6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 100ml vegetable or olive oil FOR THE SALSA

250g ripe tomatoes, deseeded and sliced 100g red onions, thinly sliced 3 unwaxed lemons, zest finely grated and fruit segmented 80ml olive oil 1 tsp chaat masala 1-2 thin green chillies, deseeded or not, according to taste and finely chopped 4-6 sprigs of coriander, leaves picked and chopped sugar, to taste

When I was in France I ate an amazing fish à la grenobloise, with lemon segments and capers. I thought it would be so nice to spice the recipe up, but not too much because red mullet is a delicate fish. You could also use grapefruit segments instead of lemon here, if you prefer. The freshness and a lovely sweet-sharp-sour quality from the chaat masala in the salsa is delicious with the red mullet, giving it an amazing lift. Serve with rice noodles if you want something else. Fabulous.

Mix together the coriander and fennel seeds and the peppercorns and toast them in a dry frying pan. Crush them coarsely in a mortar and pestle and add the chilli flakes. Rub this mixture on to the fillets and set aside for 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 160°C/325°F/gas mark 3. Place the fillets on to a baking tray and season with salt, add the garlic and drizzle over the oil. Cook for about 10 minutes. Combine all the ingredients for the salsa in a mixing bowl and set aside, adding salt and sugar to taste. Remove the fish from the oven and place on warmed plates. Pour any of the juices from the fish into the salsa. Spoon the salsa over the fish and serve with rice noodles and Mooli and Pomegranate Salad. (see page 011) SERVES 4

Quick & Chic

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Roasted Red Mullet with a Spicy Tomato Salsa


FOR THE SPICE MIX

½ tsp coriander seeds ½ tsp fennel seeds ½ tsp black peppercorns 1 tsp red chilli flakes FOR THE MULLET

4 red mullet fillets, each weighing 160g, scaled and pin-boned salt 4-6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 100ml vegetable or olive oil FOR THE SALSA

250g ripe tomatoes, deseeded and sliced 100g red onions, thinly sliced 3 unwaxed lemons, zest finely grated and fruit segmented 80ml olive oil 1 tsp chaat masala 1-2 thin green chillies, deseeded or not, according to taste and finely chopped 4-6 sprigs of coriander, leaves picked and chopped sugar, to taste

When I was in France I ate an amazing fish à la grenobloise, with lemon segments and capers. I thought it would be so nice to spice the recipe up, but not too much because red mullet is a delicate fish. You could also use grapefruit segments instead of lemon here, if you prefer. The freshness and a lovely sweet-sharp-sour quality from the chaat masala in the salsa is delicious with the red mullet, giving it an amazing lift. Serve with rice noodles if you want something else. Fabulous.

Mix together the coriander and fennel seeds and the peppercorns and toast them in a dry frying pan. Crush them coarsely in a mortar and pestle and add the chilli flakes. Rub this mixture on to the fillets and set aside for 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 160°C/325°F/gas mark 3. Place the fillets on to a baking tray and season with salt, add the garlic and drizzle over the oil. Cook for about 10 minutes. Combine all the ingredients for the salsa in a mixing bowl and set aside, adding salt and sugar to taste. Remove the fish from the oven and place on warmed plates. Pour any of the juices from the fish into the salsa. Spoon the salsa over the fish and serve with rice noodles and Mooli and Pomegranate Salad. (see page 011) SERVES 4

Quick & Chic

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Roasted Red Mullet with a Spicy Tomato Salsa


1 x 1.5kg chicken salt freshly ground black pepper 100g ghee or vegetable oil FOR THE MARINADE

finely grated zest and juice of 2 oranges finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1½ tsp chilli flakes 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground allspice 2 garlic cloves, grated

This shows the influence of Middle Eastern food, which I love. In fact, it started out as a Middle Eastern recipe, before I Indianised it. The stuffing is just fabulous, with the sweetness of dried apricots and raisins playing against the hot ginger and chilli; it also keeps the chicken good and moist. This recipe makes a fantastic alternative roast dinner, with French Beans with Sesame Seeds (see page 118).

Rinse the chicken in cold water and pat dry with kichen paper. Rub the chicken with salt and pepper and place in a baking dish large enough to hold it. Combine all the ingredients for the marinade in a mixing bowl and pour over the chicken, also pushing it under the skin. Allow to marinate for at least three hours, preferably overnight, spooning the marinade over the chicken occasionally. In a skillet, heat 2 tbsp of ghee or oil over a medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and fry until the onions turn a golden brown. Now add the ginger and stir for a further minute. Add all the remaining ingredients except for the coriander and gently sauté for another five minutes. Finally add the coriander and allow the mixture to cool. Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5.

FOR THE STUFFING

1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2.5cm fresh root ginger, peeled and grated 175g pitted prunes, soaked and finely chopped 175g dried apricots, soaked and finely chopped 1 apple, peeled, cored and chopped 40g raisins 50g toasted pine nuts 1 tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground allspice 1 tsp chilli flakes 2 tbsp chopped coriander

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Slow Burners

Remove the chicken from the baking tray, retaining all the excess liquid in the tray. Stuff the chicken with the fruit mixture and truss. Return the chicken to the baking tray, spoon over the marinade and brush with the remaining ghee or oil. Cover loosely with foil. Place in the oven and roast for 1½ hours, basting occasionally. Remove the foil after 40 minutes to allow the skin to brown and crisp. SERVES 6

Serve with Roast Potatoes with Chilli and Chaat Masala (see page 125)

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Sweet and Sour Chicken


1 x 1.5kg chicken salt freshly ground black pepper 100g ghee or vegetable oil FOR THE MARINADE

finely grated zest and juice of 2 oranges finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1½ tsp chilli flakes 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground allspice 2 garlic cloves, grated

This shows the influence of Middle Eastern food, which I love. In fact, it started out as a Middle Eastern recipe, before I Indianised it. The stuffing is just fabulous, with the sweetness of dried apricots and raisins playing against the hot ginger and chilli; it also keeps the chicken good and moist. This recipe makes a fantastic alternative roast dinner, with French Beans with Sesame Seeds (see page 118).

Rinse the chicken in cold water and pat dry with kichen paper. Rub the chicken with salt and pepper and place in a baking dish large enough to hold it. Combine all the ingredients for the marinade in a mixing bowl and pour over the chicken, also pushing it under the skin. Allow to marinate for at least three hours, preferably overnight, spooning the marinade over the chicken occasionally. In a skillet, heat 2 tbsp of ghee or oil over a medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and fry until the onions turn a golden brown. Now add the ginger and stir for a further minute. Add all the remaining ingredients except for the coriander and gently sauté for another five minutes. Finally add the coriander and allow the mixture to cool. Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5.

FOR THE STUFFING

1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2.5cm fresh root ginger, peeled and grated 175g pitted prunes, soaked and finely chopped 175g dried apricots, soaked and finely chopped 1 apple, peeled, cored and chopped 40g raisins 50g toasted pine nuts 1 tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground allspice 1 tsp chilli flakes 2 tbsp chopped coriander

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Slow Burners

Remove the chicken from the baking tray, retaining all the excess liquid in the tray. Stuff the chicken with the fruit mixture and truss. Return the chicken to the baking tray, spoon over the marinade and brush with the remaining ghee or oil. Cover loosely with foil. Place in the oven and roast for 1½ hours, basting occasionally. Remove the foil after 40 minutes to allow the skin to brown and crisp. SERVES 6

Serve with Roast Potatoes with Chilli and Chaat Masala (see page 125)

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Sweet and Sour Chicken


FOR THE STUFFING

120g minced chicken breast 1 tbsp garlic and ginger paste 2 green chillies, finely chopped 1 tbsp raisins 1 tbsp chopped dried cherries 1 tbsp chopped roasted cashew nuts 1 tbsp chopped roasted pistachios 1 tbsp finely chopped coriander stalks ½ tsp each cardamom and cinnamon 1 star anise, ground 1 tsp garam masala salt and pepper, to taste 4 quail’s eggs, cooked and shelled FOR THE QUAIL

4 boned quails (keep the bones) 4 tbsp melted butter ¼ tsp each chilli and garam masala FOR THE SAUCE

4 tbsp vegetable oil 3-4 green cardamom pods 2x3cm pieces of cassia bark 4 cloves and 1 star anise 1 tsp cumin seeds and 2 bay leaves 2 shallots, finely sliced 1-2 green chillies, finely chopped ½ tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground cardamom 1-2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tbsp chopped coriander stalks 4-6 tbsp double cream ½ tsp garam masala

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Serve with Jewelled Rice (see page 110)

Game used to be eaten a lot in Rajasthan, and this is a very rich, royal recipe. This is a bit time-consuming, but it’s worth the trouble when the result is this opulent dish. All the prep can be done in advance, leaving you with just the jobs of roasting the birds on the day. The quail makes a lovely combination with Jewelled Rice (see page 110). If you want to impress guests at dinner, this is the recipe to do. Get the butcher to bone the quail and give you the bones for the sauce.

Put all the ingredients for the stuffing, except the quail’s eggs, into a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly and divide into four balls. Wrap the chicken mixture around each quail’s egg as if making scotch eggs. Set aside. Season the quails with salt and pepper and place a stuffing ball in the middle of the each. Wrap the legs over the filling, turn over, tuck everything in and shape it nice and tight. Cover the birds with foil and leave to refrigerate for an hour or so to firm up. In the meantime, make the sauce. Heat the oil in a pan over a medium-high heat and add all the whole spices. Once they begin to sizzle and splutter and their aroma is released, add the shallots and lightly sprinkle with salt. Sauté until they turn golden brown, then add the chilli. Continue to stir-fry for a few seconds, then add the quail bones and ground spices and continue to stir-fry for a further two to three minutes. Now add the tomato puree and the coriander stalks. Contine to stir-fry for a further minute, then add enough water to cover the bones. Bring to the boil, then simmer until reduced by half. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve into a separate pan, then add the cream and garam masala and adjust the seasoning. Reheat gently when ready to serve. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6. Bring the birds out of the refrigerator. Mix the melted butter with the chilli powder and garam masala and baste the quails with the seasoned butter. Put in the oven to bake for 15-20 minutes, or until cooked through. Baste the birds once more halfway through the cooking process. Once the birds are cooked, allow to rest for a few minutes. To serve, spoon the sauce on to a platter and place the quails on top. Garnish with gold or silver leaf, if you like, and crispy fried onions. SERVES 4

Showing Off

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Stuffed Quails with a Creamy Sauce


FOR THE STUFFING

120g minced chicken breast 1 tbsp garlic and ginger paste 2 green chillies, finely chopped 1 tbsp raisins 1 tbsp chopped dried cherries 1 tbsp chopped roasted cashew nuts 1 tbsp chopped roasted pistachios 1 tbsp finely chopped coriander stalks ½ tsp each cardamom and cinnamon 1 star anise, ground 1 tsp garam masala salt and pepper, to taste 4 quail’s eggs, cooked and shelled FOR THE QUAIL

4 boned quails (keep the bones) 4 tbsp melted butter ¼ tsp each chilli and garam masala FOR THE SAUCE

4 tbsp vegetable oil 3-4 green cardamom pods 2x3cm pieces of cassia bark 4 cloves and 1 star anise 1 tsp cumin seeds and 2 bay leaves 2 shallots, finely sliced 1-2 green chillies, finely chopped ½ tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground cardamom 1-2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tbsp chopped coriander stalks 4-6 tbsp double cream ½ tsp garam masala

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Serve with Jewelled Rice (see page 110)

Game used to be eaten a lot in Rajasthan, and this is a very rich, royal recipe. This is a bit time-consuming, but it’s worth the trouble when the result is this opulent dish. All the prep can be done in advance, leaving you with just the jobs of roasting the birds on the day. The quail makes a lovely combination with Jewelled Rice (see page 110). If you want to impress guests at dinner, this is the recipe to do. Get the butcher to bone the quail and give you the bones for the sauce.

Put all the ingredients for the stuffing, except the quail’s eggs, into a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly and divide into four balls. Wrap the chicken mixture around each quail’s egg as if making scotch eggs. Set aside. Season the quails with salt and pepper and place a stuffing ball in the middle of the each. Wrap the legs over the filling, turn over, tuck everything in and shape it nice and tight. Cover the birds with foil and leave to refrigerate for an hour or so to firm up. In the meantime, make the sauce. Heat the oil in a pan over a medium-high heat and add all the whole spices. Once they begin to sizzle and splutter and their aroma is released, add the shallots and lightly sprinkle with salt. Sauté until they turn golden brown, then add the chilli. Continue to stir-fry for a few seconds, then add the quail bones and ground spices and continue to stir-fry for a further two to three minutes. Now add the tomato puree and the coriander stalks. Contine to stir-fry for a further minute, then add enough water to cover the bones. Bring to the boil, then simmer until reduced by half. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve into a separate pan, then add the cream and garam masala and adjust the seasoning. Reheat gently when ready to serve. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6. Bring the birds out of the refrigerator. Mix the melted butter with the chilli powder and garam masala and baste the quails with the seasoned butter. Put in the oven to bake for 15-20 minutes, or until cooked through. Baste the birds once more halfway through the cooking process. Once the birds are cooked, allow to rest for a few minutes. To serve, spoon the sauce on to a platter and place the quails on top. Garnish with gold or silver leaf, if you like, and crispy fried onions. SERVES 4

Showing Off

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Stuffed Quails with a Creamy Sauce


‘Bunny chow’ is traditional to Durban; it was created by Indian immigrants. In South Africa under the apartheid regime, excluded people were not allowed to be served food. To get around this, enterprising restaurant owners used to hollow out a loaf of bread, fill it with bunny chow, and pass it through a hatch. When I was in Durban, I was asked to make my version of bunny chow, and this is it. I decided to use a brioche bun, which is wonderfully sweet against the slightly bitter taste of the fenugreek and mustard seeds in the lamb.

500g lean lamb cut into 5cm cubes salt, to taste 1 tsp turmeric 25ml mustard oil 100g ghee 4 onions, thinly sliced 4 -6 dried red chillies 6 cloves 3 black cardamom pods 4 green cardamom pods 1 tsp black mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds ½ tsp fennel seeds ½ tsp nigella seeds ¼ tsp fenugreek seeds pinch of asafoetida 4-6 garlic cloves, crushed 5cm piece fresh root ginger, grated 1 tsp chilli powder 1-2 tbsp gur (sugar molasses) juice of 1 lime 4 brioche buns

Put the meat into a saucepan with a tight-fitting lid. Pour in just enough water to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, skim any scum from the surface, then add salt and the turmeric. Cover, reduce the heat, then simmer until most of the liquid has been absorbed and the meat is tender, about 45 minute to 1 hour. Remove the meat wit a slotted spoon, reserving any remaining liquid. In a separate pan, heat the mustard oil along with the clarified butter. Once the oil begins to smoke, add the onions. Fry the onions until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Add the whole dried chillies to the remaining oil in the pan and fry until they blacken. Remove the pan from the heat and discard the chillies. Return the oil to the heat once again, then add the cloves and both the cardamom pods, allowing them to sizzle for a few seconds. Now add the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, fennel, nigella, fenugreek and asafoetida. Once they begin to crackle and pop, add the garlic and ginger. Stir-fry for a minute, then add the cooked meat along with the chilli powder and sugar molasses if using. Stir-fry for a further few minutes, adding the leftover meat stock, if there is any. Add the lime juice with 2 tbsp water and simmer over a low heat until all the moisture has evaporated and only the ghee remains on top. Spoon into the hollowed out brioche buns, garnished with the fried onions. Alternatively, serve with chapatis. SERVES 4

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Classic Curries

Serve with French Beans with Sesame Seeds (see page 118)

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Achari Gosht


‘Bunny chow’ is traditional to Durban; it was created by Indian immigrants. In South Africa under the apartheid regime, excluded people were not allowed to be served food. To get around this, enterprising restaurant owners used to hollow out a loaf of bread, fill it with bunny chow, and pass it through a hatch. When I was in Durban, I was asked to make my version of bunny chow, and this is it. I decided to use a brioche bun, which is wonderfully sweet against the slightly bitter taste of the fenugreek and mustard seeds in the lamb.

500g lean lamb cut into 5cm cubes salt, to taste 1 tsp turmeric 25ml mustard oil 100g ghee 4 onions, thinly sliced 4 -6 dried red chillies 6 cloves 3 black cardamom pods 4 green cardamom pods 1 tsp black mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds ½ tsp fennel seeds ½ tsp nigella seeds ¼ tsp fenugreek seeds pinch of asafoetida 4-6 garlic cloves, crushed 5cm piece fresh root ginger, grated 1 tsp chilli powder 1-2 tbsp gur (sugar molasses) juice of 1 lime 4 brioche buns

Put the meat into a saucepan with a tight-fitting lid. Pour in just enough water to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, skim any scum from the surface, then add salt and the turmeric. Cover, reduce the heat, then simmer until most of the liquid has been absorbed and the meat is tender, about 45 minute to 1 hour. Remove the meat wit a slotted spoon, reserving any remaining liquid. In a separate pan, heat the mustard oil along with the clarified butter. Once the oil begins to smoke, add the onions. Fry the onions until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Add the whole dried chillies to the remaining oil in the pan and fry until they blacken. Remove the pan from the heat and discard the chillies. Return the oil to the heat once again, then add the cloves and both the cardamom pods, allowing them to sizzle for a few seconds. Now add the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, fennel, nigella, fenugreek and asafoetida. Once they begin to crackle and pop, add the garlic and ginger. Stir-fry for a minute, then add the cooked meat along with the chilli powder and sugar molasses if using. Stir-fry for a further few minutes, adding the leftover meat stock, if there is any. Add the lime juice with 2 tbsp water and simmer over a low heat until all the moisture has evaporated and only the ghee remains on top. Spoon into the hollowed out brioche buns, garnished with the fried onions. Alternatively, serve with chapatis. SERVES 4

96

Classic Curries

Serve with French Beans with Sesame Seeds (see page 118)

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Achari Gosht


FOR THE PANNACOTTA

200g good white chocolate, such as Valrhona 400ml whipping cream 200ml whole milk 75g caster sugar 1 tsp ground cardamom seeds 3 gelatine leaves FOR THE ROSE SYRUP COULIS

6 tbsp rose syrup ½ tsp ground cardamom seeds finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime TO SERVE

24 strawberries 24 raspberries 6 sprigs of redcurrants 1-2 tbsp slivered pistachios nuts

This is such a lovely dish. If you can melt chocolate, you can make this impressive and delicious pudding, as the gelatine does all the hard work. Any sort of chocolate works fabulously with cardamom. Rose syrup is very sweet but, cut with lime juice, it makes the perfect, fragrant accompaniment. If you can’t find rose syrup, make a simple sugar syrup and flavour to taste with rose water. Together, the pannacotta and syrup form a wonderful balance of sweet, sharp and aromatic. Use any berries in season; all should work well.

Melt the chocolate with the cream, milk and sugar in a bowl over a hot water bath. Whisk until the chocolate and sugar have dissolved completely, then stir in the cardamom. In the meantime, soak the gelatine leaves in cold water for five minutes until soft and pliable. Squeeze out the excess liquid and add to the chocolate mixture. Stir until all the gelatine has dissolved. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve and pour into six moulds. Allow to cool, then place in the refrigerator for three to four hours until set. Put all the ingredients for the coulis into a pan with 2 tbsp water. Bring to the boil, then remove from the heat and set aside for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve. To serve, turn out the pannacottas and place in the centre of six plates. Spoon around the rose coulis. Arrange the berries and currants around and sprinkle with the pistachios. SERVES 6

Sweet Like Candy

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White Chocolate & Cardamon Pannacotta


FOR THE PANNACOTTA

200g good white chocolate, such as Valrhona 400ml whipping cream 200ml whole milk 75g caster sugar 1 tsp ground cardamom seeds 3 gelatine leaves FOR THE ROSE SYRUP COULIS

6 tbsp rose syrup ½ tsp ground cardamom seeds finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime TO SERVE

24 strawberries 24 raspberries 6 sprigs of redcurrants 1-2 tbsp slivered pistachios nuts

This is such a lovely dish. If you can melt chocolate, you can make this impressive and delicious pudding, as the gelatine does all the hard work. Any sort of chocolate works fabulously with cardamom. Rose syrup is very sweet but, cut with lime juice, it makes the perfect, fragrant accompaniment. If you can’t find rose syrup, make a simple sugar syrup and flavour to taste with rose water. Together, the pannacotta and syrup form a wonderful balance of sweet, sharp and aromatic. Use any berries in season; all should work well.

Melt the chocolate with the cream, milk and sugar in a bowl over a hot water bath. Whisk until the chocolate and sugar have dissolved completely, then stir in the cardamom. In the meantime, soak the gelatine leaves in cold water for five minutes until soft and pliable. Squeeze out the excess liquid and add to the chocolate mixture. Stir until all the gelatine has dissolved. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve and pour into six moulds. Allow to cool, then place in the refrigerator for three to four hours until set. Put all the ingredients for the coulis into a pan with 2 tbsp water. Bring to the boil, then remove from the heat and set aside for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve. To serve, turn out the pannacottas and place in the centre of six plates. Spoon around the rose coulis. Arrange the berries and currants around and sprinkle with the pistachios. SERVES 6

Sweet Like Candy

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White Chocolate & Cardamon Pannacotta


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Reza’s

INDIAN

SPICE

EASTERN RECIPES FOR WESTERN COOKS REZA MAHAMMAD

Reza's Indian Spice  

Reza Mahammad’s passion and unstoppable enthusiasm for Indian flavours are irresistible. The charming, flamboyant TV chef and owner of the S...

Reza's Indian Spice  

Reza Mahammad’s passion and unstoppable enthusiasm for Indian flavours are irresistible. The charming, flamboyant TV chef and owner of the S...

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