Page 1

ab ou t th e bo ok

Felt Sew Good is a truly wonderful collection of unique ideas for one of the most versatile fabrics in a crafter’s kit. Including 20 inspiring yet deceptively simple projects for crafters of all abilities to sew and enjoy, Felt Sew Good features fun items to suit children and babies, as well as more sophisticated projects that are perfect for the home. Many of the projects are shown with a possible variation, whether it be a different colour way or an alternative method for making them, for example the different effect hand-stitching and machinestitching will have on the end product. Felt Sew Good is the ultimate guide to felt – a must-have book that will delight crafters and provide ideas for every person and occasion. This book is part of the Simple Makes series, a creative and affordable set of illustrated step-by-step books that are suitable for all crafters, no matter what their level of skill.

simple makes

feltsew good

20 simple & stylish felt projects

ce of ni lot s boo k... e r a e his T h e rn g s i n t t hi

, li k e Wh atou m ea n? y s u

Christine Leech


about the autho

12.99 aps £ with fl k c a rb Pape 74 4 jects mm 4949 2 978 18 s 210 x 210 luding 20 pro e c g in a , p s 8 rd 2 1 wo graphs 0,000 Over 2 colour photo ons ati 0 5 tr s r Ove ur illu 5 colo 3 Over 2 on May 201 ati Public Ltd shing e Publi ll ri d a Qu use bra Ho Cross Road Alham ng ri a h C 27–31 WC2H 0LS n Londo adrille.co.uk u www.q

Christine Leech has been an avid crafter since childhood, sewing menageries of felt animals, wardrobes of dolls’ dresses and has always refused to buy a greetings card when a handmade one could be sent instead. She has over fifteen years’ experience designing and art directing magazines, and has worked on titles including New Woman, Marie Claire, Look and Fabulous. In 2009 Christine helped launch the Hobbycraft magazine and has most recently been presenting a series of craft tutorials for Hobbycraft online. When she is not busy crafting you can find Christine blogging at www.sewyeah.co.uk. Christine co-created the bestselling book Everything Alice: The Wonderland Book of Makes and Bakes and Everything Oz: The Wizard Book of Makes and Bakes which introduced a truly groundbreaking approach to craft.

Contents

r

n

Introduction 4 Felt Top Tips 6 0

gifts

0

Pear Doorstop 12 Apple Rattle 18 Winged Slippers 22 Darling Dollies 28 The Clown Collective 32 Pretty Face Mirror Case 38 Forest Friend Finger Puppets 44 0

n

0

decorations

Flower Wreath 50 Heart Baskets 54 A Bunch of Baubles 58

Autumn Leaf Garland 62 Bluebird Wall Hanging 66

for the home

Feathered Napkin Rings 76 Geometric Mat 80 Circus Egg Cosies 86 Classic Coasters 90 Dancing Elephant Mobile 92 Windmill Cushion 98 Scallop Cushion 104 Ipad Case 108 0

n

0

Templates 114 Inspirations & Resources 122 Index 126 Acknowledgements 128


about the autho

12.99 aps £ with fl k c a rb Pape 74 4 jects mm 4949 2 978 18 s 210 x 210 luding 20 pro e c g in a , p s 8 rd 2 1 wo graphs 0,000 Over 2 colour photo ons ati 0 5 tr s r Ove ur illu 5 colo 3 Over 2 on May 201 ati Public Ltd shing e Publi ll ri d a Qu use bra Ho Cross Road Alham ng ri a h C 27–31 WC2H 0LS n Londo adrille.co.uk u www.q

Christine Leech has been an avid crafter since childhood, sewing menageries of felt animals, wardrobes of dolls’ dresses and has always refused to buy a greetings card when a handmade one could be sent instead. She has over fifteen years’ experience designing and art directing magazines, and has worked on titles including New Woman, Marie Claire, Look and Fabulous. In 2009 Christine helped launch the Hobbycraft magazine and has most recently been presenting a series of craft tutorials for Hobbycraft online. When she is not busy crafting you can find Christine blogging at www.sewyeah.co.uk. Christine co-created the bestselling book Everything Alice: The Wonderland Book of Makes and Bakes and Everything Oz: The Wizard Book of Makes and Bakes which introduced a truly groundbreaking approach to craft.

Contents

r

n

Introduction 4 Felt Top Tips 6 0

gifts

0

Pear Doorstop 12 Apple Rattle 18 Winged Slippers 22 Darling Dollies 28 The Clown Collective 32 Pretty Face Mirror Case 38 Forest Friend Finger Puppets 44 0

n

0

decorations

Flower Wreath 50 Heart Baskets 54 A Bunch of Baubles 58

Autumn Leaf Garland 62 Bluebird Wall Hanging 66

for the home

Feathered Napkin Rings 76 Geometric Mat 80 Circus Egg Cosies 86 Classic Coasters 90 Dancing Elephant Mobile 92 Windmill Cushion 98 Scallop Cushion 104 Ipad Case 108 0

n

0

Templates 114 Inspirations & Resources 122 Index 126 Acknowledgements 128


Windmill Cushion The windmills on this cushion have a simple geometric feel and are a nice change to flowers. Choose any colour felt to suit your room, you could even make multi-coloured windmills for an impressive nautical-style cushion.

to make the cushion cover

s u p p l ie s Fabric scissors Fabric pins Iron

1

For the front panel, cut one 31cm x 31cm square from the felt. For the back panel, cut one 31cm x 24cm rectangle and one 31cm x 14cm rectangle.

2

Place the front panel on your worksurface. Lay the larger rectangle over one side of the square and lay the smaller rectangle over the opposite side, aligning the outside edges. The two rectangles should overlap in the centre to make a square the same size as the front.

3

Pin and tack together the layers of felt. Using matching sewing thread, stitch around all four sides. At each corner, trim the seam allowance to within 3mm of the stitch line by cutting diagonally across. This will give neat, sharp corners when the cushion is turned right side out.

For the cushion 1m length of felt in your chosen colour Sewing thread in the same colour as your felt

Sewing thread in a contrasting colour to your felt 30cm x 30cm cushion pad

cut here

a

c

98

4 5

b

Turn the cushion cover right side out. Using the rounded end of a pencil, gently push the corners out into neat points. Press. Insert the cushion pad into the cover (if you are using a felt that is a nylon and wool blend be careful not to stretch the felt too much).

to make the windmills

1

Cut nine 8cm diameter circles and four 6cm diameter circles from the felt.

2

Make four equally spaced 3cm cuts into each circle, as shown in diagram A. Taking one circle at a time and working clockwise, fold one side of each quarter into the centre, making sure they overlap in the middle and hold in place. When all four corners are folded over, secure with cross stitches in a contasting thread as shown in diagram D.

3

Hand sew the windmills to the front of the cushion cover. Place one large windmill in each corner, four large ones along the sides and the final large one in the middle. Fill the gaps inbetween with the small windmills.

d


Windmill Cushion The windmills on this cushion have a simple geometric feel and are a nice change to flowers. Choose any colour felt to suit your room, you could even make multi-coloured windmills for an impressive nautical-style cushion.

to make the cushion cover

s u p p l ie s Fabric scissors Fabric pins Iron

1

For the front panel, cut one 31cm x 31cm square from the felt. For the back panel, cut one 31cm x 24cm rectangle and one 31cm x 14cm rectangle.

2

Place the front panel on your worksurface. Lay the larger rectangle over one side of the square and lay the smaller rectangle over the opposite side, aligning the outside edges. The two rectangles should overlap in the centre to make a square the same size as the front.

3

Pin and tack together the layers of felt. Using matching sewing thread, stitch around all four sides. At each corner, trim the seam allowance to within 3mm of the stitch line by cutting diagonally across. This will give neat, sharp corners when the cushion is turned right side out.

For the cushion 1m length of felt in your chosen colour Sewing thread in the same colour as your felt

Sewing thread in a contrasting colour to your felt 30cm x 30cm cushion pad

cut here

a

c

98

4 5

b

Turn the cushion cover right side out. Using the rounded end of a pencil, gently push the corners out into neat points. Press. Insert the cushion pad into the cover (if you are using a felt that is a nylon and wool blend be careful not to stretch the felt too much).

to make the windmills

1

Cut nine 8cm diameter circles and four 6cm diameter circles from the felt.

2

Make four equally spaced 3cm cuts into each circle, as shown in diagram A. Taking one circle at a time and working clockwise, fold one side of each quarter into the centre, making sure they overlap in the middle and hold in place. When all four corners are folded over, secure with cross stitches in a contasting thread as shown in diagram D.

3

Hand sew the windmills to the front of the cushion cover. Place one large windmill in each corner, four large ones along the sides and the final large one in the middle. Fill the gaps inbetween with the small windmills.

d


circus egg cosies

elsbeth elephant

Cut out and sew around her body. Very neatly embroider an eye on each side of her head. Bondaweb together the fabric for her ears, cut out and stitch in place.

Breakfast always seems to be a frantic circus act, so here are some egg cosies that will keep your eggs warm and entertain your little monkeys.

s u p p l ie s Tailor's chalk or water-soluble pen Fabric scissors Bondaweb or fabric glue For Elsbeth Elephant 1 x A4 sheet pink felt Grey embroidery floss 10cm x 20cm spotty fabric For Bongo Bear 1 x A4 sheet brown marl felt 10cm x 10cm lighter brown felt Dark brown embroidery floss 10cm x 10cm patterned fabric For Stanley Seal 1 x A4 sheet grey felt Grey embroidery floss

to make the basic shape These egg cosies are all made in a similar way but each has its own slight variation. To sew the main body shape, either hand sew in blanket or running stitch or use a sewing machine. If sewing by machine, cut the felt in two (making sure that the body template fits comfortably) and pin together both pieces. Draw around the chosen template on page 88 using tailor's chalk or a water-soluble pen. Stitch around the outline. Neatly cut out the shape about 2mm outside the stitch line. If sewing by hand, trace and cut out two body shapes from the felt. Pin together and stitch 2mm from the edge using four strands of embroidery thread. The ears, flippers, tummy and mane are made by attaching the patterned fabric to felt using Bondaweb or a thin layer of fabric glue. Trace around the chosen template and cut out.

bongo bear

Cut out and sew his body and head, then embroider his eyes. Cut out his tummy and ears from the Bondawebbed fabric. Stitch in place. Use large stitches to sew his head in place. Stitch through the front layer of his body and the rear of his head. This is fiddly but the stitches won't be seen so don't panic!

stanley seal

Embroider the eyes using four strands of embroidery floss and small straight stitches. Work outwards from the centre.

Cut out and sew his body. Embroider his eyes. Cut out his flippers from the Bondawebbed fabric and stitch in place. Sew the felt ball to the tip of his nose.

10cm x 20cm patterned fabric 2cm-diameter pink felt ball For Linus Lion 1 x A4 sheet orange felt Dark brown embroidery floss 15cm x 15cm patterned fabric 10cm x 10cm yellow felt

86

linus lion

Cut out and sew his body and head, then embroider his eyes. Cut his mane from the Bondawebbed fabric and cut a smaller mane from the yellow felt. Layer the two pieces on top of his body and use a few large stitches to secure in place. Sew on his head.


circus egg cosies

elsbeth elephant

Cut out and sew around her body. Very neatly embroider an eye on each side of her head. Bondaweb together the fabric for her ears, cut out and stitch in place.

Breakfast always seems to be a frantic circus act, so here are some egg cosies that will keep your eggs warm and entertain your little monkeys.

s u p p l ie s Tailor's chalk or water-soluble pen Fabric scissors Bondaweb or fabric glue For Elsbeth Elephant 1 x A4 sheet pink felt Grey embroidery floss 10cm x 20cm spotty fabric For Bongo Bear 1 x A4 sheet brown marl felt 10cm x 10cm lighter brown felt Dark brown embroidery floss 10cm x 10cm patterned fabric For Stanley Seal 1 x A4 sheet grey felt Grey embroidery floss

to make the basic shape These egg cosies are all made in a similar way but each has its own slight variation. To sew the main body shape, either hand sew in blanket or running stitch or use a sewing machine. If sewing by machine, cut the felt in two (making sure that the body template fits comfortably) and pin together both pieces. Draw around the chosen template on page 88 using tailor's chalk or a water-soluble pen. Stitch around the outline. Neatly cut out the shape about 2mm outside the stitch line. If sewing by hand, trace and cut out two body shapes from the felt. Pin together and stitch 2mm from the edge using four strands of embroidery thread. The ears, flippers, tummy and mane are made by attaching the patterned fabric to felt using Bondaweb or a thin layer of fabric glue. Trace around the chosen template and cut out.

bongo bear

Cut out and sew his body and head, then embroider his eyes. Cut out his tummy and ears from the Bondawebbed fabric. Stitch in place. Use large stitches to sew his head in place. Stitch through the front layer of his body and the rear of his head. This is fiddly but the stitches won't be seen so don't panic!

stanley seal

Embroider the eyes using four strands of embroidery floss and small straight stitches. Work outwards from the centre.

Cut out and sew his body. Embroider his eyes. Cut out his flippers from the Bondawebbed fabric and stitch in place. Sew the felt ball to the tip of his nose.

10cm x 20cm patterned fabric 2cm-diameter pink felt ball For Linus Lion 1 x A4 sheet orange felt Dark brown embroidery floss 15cm x 15cm patterned fabric 10cm x 10cm yellow felt

86

linus lion

Cut out and sew his body and head, then embroider his eyes. Cut his mane from the Bondawebbed fabric and cut a smaller mane from the yellow felt. Layer the two pieces on top of his body and use a few large stitches to secure in place. Sew on his head.


darling dollies I spend a lot of time watching old films while making my projects and these dolls are an homage to their stars: the feisty Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face and the graceful Grace Kelly in High Society.

s u p p l ie s Tailor's chalk or water-soluble pen Fabric scissors

to make audrey

1

Using the templates on page 32, draw around and cut out all the pieces of the body from the beige felt. Fold an arm in half lengthways and, using blanket stitch in a matching beige thread, sew along the length of the arm leaving the wider end open. Turn the arm right side out. Using the rounded end of a pencil, gently push the felt all the way through. Fill with toy stuffing until quite firm. Repeat with the other arm and the legs.

2

Using short straight stitches, embroider on her eyes using black embroidery floss. Alternate the length of the stitches at the top to give her eyelashes. Use the pink floss to make her mouth – make two close horizontal stitches with one vertical stitch in the middle so that she appears to be smiling. For a dainty stitch use only four strands of embroidery floss.

3

Following the template on page 33, cut her hair out of the yellow felt. Sandwich her face between the front and back hair pieces. Stitch around her head, from one side of her neck around the top of her head and over to the other side of her neck. Fill her head with some toy stuffing using the small hole left at the nape of her neck.

4

Position an arm between the front and the rear of the body angled slightly downwards so that the arms are at the side of the body (make sure the arm seam is at the back and can't be seen from the front). From the nape of the neck towards the bottom of the body (but leaving space to insert the legs later) stitch through the front and back fabric as well as the arm to hold in place. Repeat with the other arm and side of the body. Fill the body with toy stuffing before you add the legs.

For Audrey 2 x A4 sheets of beige felt Beige sewing thread Polyester toy stuffing Black embroidery floss or thread Pink embroidery floss or thread 8cm x 8cm yellow felt

28

n

Continued overleaf...

Er, nice birdy...


darling dollies I spend a lot of time watching old films while making my projects and these dolls are an homage to their stars: the feisty Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face and the graceful Grace Kelly in High Society.

s u p p l ie s Tailor's chalk or water-soluble pen Fabric scissors

to make audrey

1

Using the templates on page 32, draw around and cut out all the pieces of the body from the beige felt. Fold an arm in half lengthways and, using blanket stitch in a matching beige thread, sew along the length of the arm leaving the wider end open. Turn the arm right side out. Using the rounded end of a pencil, gently push the felt all the way through. Fill with toy stuffing until quite firm. Repeat with the other arm and the legs.

2

Using short straight stitches, embroider on her eyes using black embroidery floss. Alternate the length of the stitches at the top to give her eyelashes. Use the pink floss to make her mouth – make two close horizontal stitches with one vertical stitch in the middle so that she appears to be smiling. For a dainty stitch use only four strands of embroidery floss.

3

Following the template on page 33, cut her hair out of the yellow felt. Sandwich her face between the front and back hair pieces. Stitch around her head, from one side of her neck around the top of her head and over to the other side of her neck. Fill her head with some toy stuffing using the small hole left at the nape of her neck.

4

Position an arm between the front and the rear of the body angled slightly downwards so that the arms are at the side of the body (make sure the arm seam is at the back and can't be seen from the front). From the nape of the neck towards the bottom of the body (but leaving space to insert the legs later) stitch through the front and back fabric as well as the arm to hold in place. Repeat with the other arm and side of the body. Fill the body with toy stuffing before you add the legs.

For Audrey 2 x A4 sheets of beige felt Beige sewing thread Polyester toy stuffing Black embroidery floss or thread Pink embroidery floss or thread 8cm x 8cm yellow felt

28

n

Continued overleaf...

Er, nice birdy...


ab ou t th e bo ok

Felt Sew Good is a truly wonderful collection of unique ideas for one of the most versatile fabrics in a crafter’s kit. Including 20 inspiring yet deceptively simple projects for crafters of all abilities to sew and enjoy, Felt Sew Good features fun items to suit children and babies, as well as more sophisticated projects that are perfect for the home. Many of the projects are shown with a possible variation, whether it be a different colour way or an alternative method for making them, for example the different effect hand-stitching and machinestitching will have on the end product. Felt Sew Good is the ultimate guide to felt – a must-have book that will delight crafters and provide ideas for every person and occasion. This book is part of the Simple Makes series, a creative and affordable set of illustrated step-by-step books that are suitable for all crafters, no matter what their level of skill.

simple makes

feltsew good

20 simple & stylish felt projects

ce of ni lot s boo k... e r a e his T h e rn g s i n t t hi

, li k e Wh atou m ea n? y s u

Christine Leech

Felt Sew Good  

Felt Sew Good is a wonderful collection of ideas for one of the most versatile fabrics in a crafter's kit. Including 30 inspiring yet decept...

Felt Sew Good  

Felt Sew Good is a wonderful collection of ideas for one of the most versatile fabrics in a crafter's kit. Including 30 inspiring yet decept...

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