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June 24 – July 7 Volume 1 ■ Issue 5

Anderson: Gays and Lesbians Key to Main Street Revival Warns LDS Church against “homogeneous downtown”

The Meaning of Freedom Activist youth speak out at Pride Day

Lesbians Honored sWerve receives “Organization of the Year”

2004 Walk for Life Rapier: Increased participation “a good sign” DC Ripe for “Outing” War Blowing the door off the congressional closet Mecham She’s a real lesbian, dammit!

Metro Guide to the Utah Arts Festival

Why are gay men exluded from tissue donor programs?


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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

Saliva Sisters


News

New Outing War Predicted in D.C. Closeted Members of Congress to be “Outed to the Rafters,” Aravosis Warns

WORLD AND NATIONAL

U.S. Senate Adds Sexual Orientation to Hate Crimes Legislation

The Southern Baptist Convention voted June 15 to withdraw from the Baptist World Alliance, and to lobby the federal government to amend the U.S. Constitution to prohibit same-sex marriage. The anti-gay marriage resolution, which passed without debate, defined marriage between a man and a woman as the only form of Biblically acceptable marriage and stated that the traditional family served as the cornerstone of social order. It also praised President Bush for his previous promises to sponsor a Constitutional amendment prohibiting same-

sex marriage. Bush addressed the convention via satellite on the day of the vote. Along with the marriage resolution, the SBC also voted to leave the larger Baptist World Alliance, citing as reasons their concerns with the Alliance’s “liberal” theology, questioning of Biblical inerrancy and the existence of some “gay-friendly congregations,” particularly among Alliance member denomination American Baptist Churches. At 16.3 million members, the SBC is America’s largest Protestant group and the world’s largest Protestant denomination. — JV

Gay Couples Challenge 1913 Massachusetts Law A dozen cities and towns along with several out-of-state gay and lesbian couples have filed two lawsuits challenging a 1913 law that they say is being used to discriminate against nonresident couples wishing to marry. The law in question was initially created to forbid the Commonwealth from issuing marriage licenses to interracial couples whose marriages remained illegal in their home states. According to Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, a legal defense group representing the couples and towns, the law was not enforced until Massachusetts legalized same-sex marriage last May. Since that time, Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney has invoked the law to deny gay and lesbian couples marriage licenses if their home states have anti-gay marriage laws.

In a related suit filed by the firm of Palmer & Dodge, a handful of clerks from twelve Massachusetts towns and cities — including Provincetown, Cambridge, Acton and Plymouth — ordered by Attorney General Thomas Reilly to stop Mass. Attorney General Thomas Reilly issuing marriage licenses have also stated that the 1913 law is discriminatory against gays and lesbians. Anticipating this law’s reappearance, GLAD lawyers began finding plaintiffs for this suit as soon as Massachusetts allowed same-sex marriage. — JV

New Zealand to Vote on Civil Union Bills In late June, New Zealand’s parliamentary justice and electoral select committee is expected to hear hundreds of public testimonies regarding its Civil Unions Bill — including some which favor gay marriage to civil unions — and testimonies regarding the Relationships (Statutory References) Bill, which would amend several existing laws to recognize existing same-sex unions and de facto relationships. If given Parliamentary approval, the Civil Unions Bill would amend existing laws to allow both gay and heterosexual couples to enter civil unions, appoint civil union celebrants to register unions of couples who do not wish to marry, and would lower the age of parental consent for civil unions from 20 to 18. The second bill would allow social security payments to same-sex partners to be assessed at rates now granted to heterosexual couples. It would also grant civil union partners of either sex parental or maternal leave from work. Neither bill addresses citizenship, adoption or guardianship rights for gay and lesbian people. — JV

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Members of India’s hard-line Shiv Sena group and gay and lesbian groups alike have recently protested Indian filmmaker Kaaren Razdan’s controversial lesbian-themed film Girlfriend, in which a woman’s jealous girlfriend goes on a homicidal rampage. Leaders of Shiv Sena, an organizaActress Isha Koppiker tion which wants India to become a Hindu nation, have protested the film — sometimes by breaking cinema windows and tearing down movie posters — on the grounds that it portrays Indian society in a bad light. Additionally, Vijay Tiwari, a Shiv Sena leader from the northern town of Varanasi, said that members of his group would lobby censor board officials in New Delhi to revoke the film’s certificate of approval. In India, all films must have the board’s approval before being shown. Meanwhile, gay and lesbian activists such as film analyst Shubra Gupta have spoken against the film on the grounds that it “does a … disservice to lesbians by depicting them as man-hating psychopaths,” according to a June 17 Guardian article. “It’s a tacky, badly done film which would have flopped but for the protests,” Gupta added. — JV

Southern Baptists Exit Alliance, Affirm Federal Marriage Amendment

tional Stonewall Democrats, concurred: “Today we applaud Senate Democrats and those Republicans who rejected the divisive politics of the Republican Leadership. The Bush White House and Senate Republican leadership continues to use cultural issues in an attempt divide the electorate. However, it is time for the Republican Party to join Democrats in demonstrating a commitment to law enforcement by supporting the equitable prosecution of hate crimes.” The bill will move to the House for voting later in June. — JV

SALT LAKE METRO

Lesbian Film Enrages India

Bill sponsor Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.)

out of the final bill on both occasions. While neoconservative groups such as Concerned Women for America have argued that this measure will encourage persecution of religious groups opposed to homosexuality, Smith says the bill prohibits only acts of violence, not thought or speech. “I believe there are real family values and there are counterfeit family values,” he said, according to a June 16 SF Gate article. “Opposing hate crimes measures as a family value is truly misguided.” In statements released the day of the Senate vote, gay politicos on both sides of the aisle praised the measure. “Today, thanks to the courageous leadership of Senator Gordon Smith, the United States Senate has sent a strong message that gays and lesbians are a valued part of our great country,” said Patrick Guerriero, executive director of Log Cabin Republicans. “They should be free to live their lives without fear of violence.” Dave Noble, executive director of Na-

JUNE 24, 2004

A measure to expand the federal government’s definition of hate crimes to include sexual orientation cleared the U.S. Senate June 15 on a 65-33 vote, in a move applauded by gay and lesbian civil rights groups. Sponsored by Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and Gordon Smith, R-Ore., the measure would amend the Local Law Enforcement Enhancement Act to allow local officials to seek federal assistance when prosecuting crimes targeted against an individual’s gender, sexual orientation or disability, possibly resulting in harsher federal prosecution. The federal hate crimes law, enacted in the 1960s to force Southern states to prosecute assaults against African-Americans, currently covers crimes motivated by hatred towards an individual’s actual or perceived skin color, race, national origin or religion. Although sponsors attempted to pass hate crimes measures covering sexual orientation in 1999 and 2000, such measures were written

Senate majority leader Bill Frist’s announcement to Christian leaders June 17 that the Senate will vote on the Federal Marriage Amendment in July has prompted several gay rights leaders, including Washington D.C. activist John Aravosis, to call for staffers and aids to out closeted congressional members. “If you’re gay and you support making sexual orientation a political weapon, then your sexual orientation is fair game, and you will be outed to the rafters,” a June 18 Washington Blade article quoted Aravosis as saying. Avarosis’s call comes two weeks after former National Gay and Lesbian Task Force member Mike Rogers began telephoning the closeted gay aids of congress members who support the FMA. He did so to urge them to come out and thus persuade their employers to rethink their position. “I asked them how their congressman could justify supporting the FMA knowing that his long-term aide was gay,” said Rogers. “Those in public positions who support homophobia or work for someone who supports homophobia can no longer secretly enjoy the protections the gay community has afforded them.” Steve Gunderson, a former Republican Congressman who came out in the 1990s amid outing threats, predicted this campaign over a month ago, and told Newsweek magazine in March that the current gayhostile political climate and the anger of gay rights advocates will lead to trouble. “I think it will get uglier than anything we saw on AIDS,” he said. — JV


News

PRIDE 2004

LOCAL AND REGIONAL

by Mandy Q. Racer The late afternoon heat was especially harsh at the Utah Pride political stage — people came and left just as quickly to escape the unremitting sun. When Theron McGriff of Idaho Falls stepped up to speak, it was to a small audience. Soon, however, the people who paused stayed to listen. McGriff was outed “instantly” by USA Today in a story about his ongoing custody battle. He is currently awaiting a decision on an appeal to the Idaho Supreme Court. “Traumatic as [coming out has] been for my family and trauGay Idaho father Theron McGriff matic as it’s been for my community, it’s been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life,” he said. Borne of McGriff’s struggle are his convictions: “Everyone knows and loves someone gay or lesbian.” Those people must, therefore, come out. “Put a face on the GLBT community,” he urged. Visibility is more important now than ever before, McGriff said, especially in light of a proposed amendment to the Utah Constitution banning recognition of both gay marriage and of civil unions. He warned gay parents that they may lose their children: “They will use anything they can against us … If [the amendment] passes, gay families are gone.” During a short intermission, Michael

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

Colorado: “Promoting Heterosexual Families” Despite the skepticism of some board members, Colorado Springs school board member Willie Breazell placed a resolution to promote “stable, heterosexual two-parent families” on the board’s June 16 agenda, according to Denver’s Channel 7 News. Additionally, the proposed resolution asks Colorado Springs’ delegation to the state legislature to recommend a statewide policy “which defines, defends maintains and nourishes stable, heterosexual two-parent families.” Board member Karen Teja said that the resolution exceeded school board authority, which can only take responsibility for students’ educational environment, as opposed to their family situations. “My guess is that the majority of our students do not live in what this resolution is calling a ‘traditional’ family,” she said. Teja also questioned whether the resolution would encroach upon state and federal anti-discrimination laws. According to Breazell, “The single-parent household is at a tremendous disadvantage in our society. You need someone available for PTA meetings and all.” — JV

Mitchell, co-host of the political stage along with Maryann Martindale, said, “This is the most important election in your lifetime. If you need permission to get involved, to give money, I’m giving you permission.” He stressed the importance of joining such organizations as Equality Utah and supporting the Don’t Amend Alliance, a statewide, nonpartisan campaign to combat and defeat the Definition of Marriage Amendment. Bruce Bastian, 2004 Utah Pride Grand Marshal and member of the Human Rights Campaign’s board of directors, spoke briefly about his induction into activism. “This whole thing has really changed my whole life.” Bastian explained that activism takes many forms: “Whatever area your passion fits, everybody needs your support, your efforts.” Next on the roster was Scott McCoy, campaign manager for the Don’t Amend Alliance. McCoy discussed the Alliance’s “house party” program. Their goal is to hold at least 300 house parties all across the state of Utah. McCoy, who took a leave of absence from his law firm in order to work on the campaign, implored hosts “to invite friends and neighbors, not just in your circle of friends, but reach out and invite the Mormon couple from across the street.” After making sure that his family was present, Tony Butterfield took up the microphone and warned the audience that he was a terrible public speaker. Though quiet, Tony’s speech was infused with raw emotion, which he displayed candidly when he spoke of his partner of twelve years, Paul, and their twin boys, Liam and Luke. The boys’ grandparents were also present; each cradled an almost two-year-old boy. “I know the mere existence of gay and lesbian parents upsets many folks,” Tony said. If, however, one were to overlook only the fact that Tony and Paul are gay, “how unremarkable and Puritan it would all seem,” Tony said. “I’m pretty sure [the opposition’s] imaginations would be let down.” He and his partner chose to raise their children in Utah, he said, because they love the state and wanted to remain near their extended family. Their choice to live here has resulted, at times, in “undue praise.” When dining at a restaurant, Tony and Paul are often told, “How nice we are to take on two toddlers and let our wives have the night off.” Tony, voice cracking with emotion, asked, “What is it like to be a parent? It’s amazing … it changes you in ways you couldn’t possibly explain. Being gay changes none of that.” Luke ran up to his father and grabbed his knee. “I’m almost done,” Tony said quietly to Luke, lifting the toddler onto his hip. “We’re talking about very, very real families,” he said, a superfluous statement considering the picture he was presenting of an everyday father and much-loved son. Theron McGriff ’s site is IdahoDad.org. The Don’t Amend Alliance’s “house party” kits are available at DontAmendAlliance.com.

WILLIAM H. MUNK

McGriff: Gay Parents May Lose Children

KSL Reports Small Pride Attendance Figure Litvack: Other Media Coverage Was “Excellent” by Brandon Burt This year, what many felt to be a singularly large turnout at the Utah Pride Day Festival and Pride Parade prompted the media to report on the number of attendees. Most numbers reported were in line with Pride event organizers’ estimate of 50,000. The Salt Lake Tribune and KUTV News both reported that number, whereas the Deseret News reported up to 60,000. However, numbers reported by KSL News disagreed substantially with more widely reported figures. During the station’s 10:00 p.m. news programming June 13, anchor Kim Johnson announced, “Hundreds of people turned out today in downtown Salt Lake City for the annual Gay Pride Day.” Later in the segment, reporter Sam Penrod placed the figure at 5,000 — a tenfold discrepancy against the Center’s estimate. According to Kim Thomas, executive producer of KSL News, the station did not purposefully underreport the number of attendees. “We have the stigma that we’re the Mormon station,” Thomas said, but KSL had no “ulterior motive” to make the crowd appear smaller than it was. “No one cares” about the numbers, he said. “Look at the spirit of the coverage.” “It’s like counting jelly beans in a bottle,” said Thomas. Anyway, the discrepancy in KSL’s reported numbers is not very important: “Life’s too short to worry about things like this,” he said. Getting an accurate count of the number of people who turn out for a large event may be very difficult when tickets are not sold. “There is no official number. They’re

all estimates,” said Erin Litvack, director of fund development at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Utah. “We don’t count; we don’t charge. Maybe we should — then at least we’d have an accurate count.” Still, according to Litvack, nobody from KSL asked Pride Day organizers how many people showed up to the parade or festival. “I don’t know where KSL got their numbers. They definitely didn’t talk to any of us,” she said. “I think we’ve always been underreported in the media,” said Ben Williams, director of the Utah Stonewall Historical Society. “They always underreport.” Still, among gay people, “The opposite happens: We try to over-inflate our numbers,” Williams said. Thomas agrees: “People who want a big crowd want to inflate the numbers,” he said. Williams has his doubts about the Center’s 50,000 figure. “How are they coming up with these numbers?” he asked. “Are they just making them up? Even 10,000 is a hell of a lot of people. In the old days, if we got 3,000 [attendees], we were ecstatic!” According to Livack, the Center consults security officers and the Salt Lake City police who work at the Pride event in order to come up with their estimate. “Some of the news stations pick and choose what they are going to say” about the event. “They’re looking for a juicy, meaty story,” she said. “The press is an interesting beast to tame.” Minus an official headcount, attendance at Utah Pride events remains anybody’s guess. Still, with few exceptions, the local media did its best to cover “the humanity and diversity of the community,” said Litvack. “We had a lot of really excellent coverage.”


Malin, Julander, Larsen Honored sWerve Named Organization of the Year

Alicia Suazo and Sen Paula Julander in the Pride Parade

gay and lesbian organizations. Further, the number and type of awards can also change depending on how the Utah queer community grows and “where we feel recognition could be given to strengthen

Publisher Michael Aaron Editor Brandon Burt Events Editor Greg Harrison Sports Editor David Nelson Contributing Writers Scott Abbott, Brandie Balken, Lee Beckstead, Xenia Cherkaev, Janice Eberhardt, Jace Garfield, Ann Hess, Beau Jarvis, Lynette Malmstrom, Laurie Mecham, LaDonna Moore, Sally Neilson, William T. Park, Scott Perry, Nicholas Rupp, Mandy Q. Racer, Ruby Ridge, Joel Shoemaker, Jim Struve, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams Photographers Tony Fantis, Lucy Juarez, William H. Munk, Shauna Sanchez Proofreader Nicholas Rupp Art Director Michael Aaron Graphic Designer Kris Kramer Marketing and Public Relations Director Chad Keller

LUCY JUAREZ

Sales Director and Office Manager Steven Peterson

Dyke March Draws Hundreds by Mandy Q. Racer

Distribution Chad Keller, Director Courtney Moser, Northern Utah Copyright © 2004 Salt Lake Metro.

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Over two hundred lesbians, along with a few men and children, took over State Street and swarmed the Capitol steps June 12 at the 2004 Dyke March. At the Capitol, marchers surrounded Rep. Jackie Biskupski, who addressed attendees of the event. “You people are my troops,” Biskupski said, raising cheers and the waving of signs, one of which read, “Lesbians Against Bush. Oh! The Irony.” Biskupski cautioned against being lulled into a sense of security by the community’s recent successes: “GLBT people in our country are not free.” Although the opposition the community faces is ugly, Biskupski called for openness and inclusiveness. “This is not a time for hatred,” she said. “Do not distrust those around you, but bring them into your circles.” She called the marchers to action, both in their private and political lives, equating their actions to heroism: “You are all heroes. You are all heroines.” This year’s Dyke March went much more smoothly than last year’s — for marchers if not for motorists — thanks to organizer Brandie Balken of sWerve. In 2003, marchers were required to wait through a succession of red lights before proceeding. The participants had been cautioned not to block traffic, and those who did risked being ticketed or arrested. This caused

logistical problems as the women were forced into clusters, with wide gaps stretching across the spaces between. Due to the permit garnered with a great deal of perseverance by Balken, a Trax train was this year’s only impediment. The gap it created was quickly filled in. The 2004 Dyke March streamed through red lights on June 12, forcing Saturday evening traffic to a halt. Some marched with girlfriends, some with their wives. Many brought their children, as did Amy and Carrie White — their 3 month-old, Aiyana, snoozed through the march. Susan and Stephanie each rode with their kids, Josh and Britnee, on the back of their motorcycles, making up part of the Dykes on Bikes motorcade. Also in residence were the Lesbian Avengers, who sported their trademark superhero capes and duct tape across their nipples. Shellby Nathan, 13, marched with a sizeable contingent of junior high and high school-aged kids, who made up a large portion of the participants. The ranks swelled as the women surged along the route, which ended at the City and County Building, site of the 2004 Pride Festival. The march’s final count reached 270, 50 more than the number of last year’s participants. The evening was capped off with a dance opened by the Los Angeles queer band, Iamloved. By the night’s end, the attendance had doubled to over 500 people.

Sales Executives 801-323-9500 877-870-0727 Jill Brooks Sebastian Cruz Jeff McElhiney Bob Tubbs

JUNE 24, 2004

The Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Utah and Utah Pride have given out a number of awards following Pride 2004 including the eighteen-year-old Kristen Ries Community Service Award and the newly created Volunteer of the Year Award. Named after a prominent Utah physician renowned for her work with AIDS patients in the 1980s, the Dr. Kristen Ries Award was first given in 1987 when, according to Ben Williams, director of the Utah Stonewall Historical Society, Utah Pride Day used to be “a community activist function.” That same year it was given to the newly created Gay and Lesbian Community Council to administer. According to Williams, Emperor XII Donny Eastepp also played a large part in creating this award, due in part to the fact his lover Bobby spent time in Dr. Ries’ care. “The chair at that time was also the Royal Court emperor, and they were very used to giving out awards for things, so they created an award for community service,” Williams said. “It was the first time the award was ever given out at a [Utah] gay pride event.” This year’s Kristen Ries Community Service Award went to Lucy Malin, former president of the Utah chapter of the National Organization for Women. Malin was also a member of the 20 Rue Jacob Book Store and Coffeehouse Collective. According to Craig Miller, 1992 Kristen Ries recipient, this award has a unique selection committee. “The committee that decides the Kristen Ries award is made up of past recipients,” he said, “so everyone who’s received that award gets one vote. There are about more than 20 at this point who vote on that award.” According to Miller, the Center’s board votes on the Organization of the Year Award, which he describes as “only three or four years old.” This year’s organization of the year award went to sWerve, a four-yearold group which has raised over $20,000 for organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resources Center, Salt Lake Valley Women’s cancer screening program and the Human Rights Coalition. The three year-old Pete and Alicia Suazo Political Action Award, established after Pete Suazo’s untimely death, honors “either an elected or appointed official who has been working to support the community.” State Senator Paula Julander — who according to Miller supported state hate crimes legislation referencing sexual orientation — received this award for 2004. “She has supported the community in many ways over the years, including supporting many women’s issues and really standing up to the state legislature for our rights,” Miller said. Unlike other Pride awards, members of various Utah political groups select Pete and Alicia Suazo Award recipients: “We try to invite a republican group, a democratic group, a libertarian group, representatives from any of the organizations within the gay community who really focus on political issues.” According to Miller, as the organizers of Pride decide which awards to give each year, the number and types of awards can sometimes change in order not to conflict with the types of awards given out by other

WILLIAM H. MUNK

by JoSelle Vanderhooft

growth in new directions.” For example, the Center created the Volunteer of the Year Award this year to honor an outstanding volunteer. Although arguably similar to the Kristen Ries Award, Miller said the volunteer award honors something different from its communityservice cousin. “I think the Kristen Ries Award is really given to people who have committed a lifetime of service to the community that wasn’t necessarily volunteer,” he said. “There are a lot of people who work and get paid as a part of their service to the community. Certainly Dr. Reese was paid for the services she did as the doctor who really initiated and brought community recognition to the AIDS cause. But the volunteer should really get the merits based on dedication of free hours. And it’s not based on a lifetime of service like the Kristen Ries is.” Missy Larsen received the Volunteer of the Year Award for 2004. The Center’s board also selects this award.


Activist Youth Speak Out at Pride

LOCAL AND REGIONAL NEWS

JOEL SHOEMAKER

by Mandy Q. Racer

Walk for Life participants rehydrate at one of the several water points.

2004 AIDS Walk Organizers Encouraged by Attendance Rise

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

JOEL SHOEMAKER

by Joel Shoemaker

After calling this year’s Walk for Life “crucial” for determining its future, organizers are encouraged by a doubling in attendance at the June 19 event over the previous year. “The future is looking positive,” said Jerry Rapier of the Utah AIDS Foundation (UAF). “It’s a good sign that we have about 500 people walking.” Jerry Rapier Rapier said the Walk had been struggling with declining attendance over recent years. He says at its height in 1998 the event drew as many as 2,500 participants. But last year, the walk saw just a tenth of that. In its 16th year, Rapier says the event is well past the 10-year cycle for most nonprofit fundraising events. Even though the walk continues to be UAF’s biggest fundraiser, Rapier stressed that in order for the Walk to be viable, they needed to see an increase in participation this year. Although a total wasn’t immediately available, Rapier said contributions had increased along with participation. Rapier says he knows there’s interest, even passion, for the event. In April this year, UAF polled past participants and found that, overwhelmingly, people still wanted the walk to continue. Rapier says the trick has been finding what shape the event needs to take in the future to make it a success. Different tactics have been tried to attract more walkers.

In recent years, the walk was moved to the evenings. Organizers are now working to tie the event to the Folk & Bluegrass Festival so the walk becomes a day-long event, rather than just a couple hours. This year, a ceremony for the AIDS Walk was worked into the festival line-up. Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson welcomed the crowd and read the names of people who had died from AIDS as sections of the AIDS Quilt were opened. Aside from the event being a fundraiser, Rapier says the future of the walk is positive because so many people connect with it emotionally, which was echoed by many of Saturday’s walkers. “This is my fight against apathy,” said first-time walker Chris Johnson. Johnson, who walked with his ex-wife, partner, and two daughters, said the walk was important for him because it raises awareness. “It’s important to keep the issue on the forefront. People feel the medications have fixed it all, but they haven’t.” Mike Wallentine said even though this was his first time walking, he’d been involved with the event in some way for many years. He said the walk is a reminder of those who’ve been lost to AIDS. “It’s sad. I used to think about AIDS constantly,” said Wallentine. “But I haven’t been to an AIDS funeral in a long time. Then, to hear tonight Rocky Anderson say the names of people who have died — people I knew — it’s a sudden shock of reality.” Kim Thompson, also a first-time walker, echoed that the walk is an important tool for raising awareness. “AIDS isn’t a shock like it used to be.” said Thompson. “But we need to be reminded. We need to make sure that we don’t become numb.”

Dramatic in red and black, Chloe Cosman stepped up to the Utah Pride Political Stage and commanded immediate attention with her powerful voice: “Freedom. What does this word mean to you?” Our struggle for freedom, Cosman said, is not something that we think of on a daily basis, but it exists nonetheless. “The Constitution of these United States still stands as one of the most divinely inspired articles of freedom this world has ever known. Yet are we free?” Cosman asks. The answer, she asserts, is no: “For some of us [there] hangs a price tag that reads … sold out.” “We have come here to this world,” Cosman said, “To bridge the gap between fear and love, between ignorance and acceptance, between the traumatic experience of being publicly and privately stripped of our dignity and our conscious choice to reclaim the freedom that is rightfully ours.” Cosman endorsed acceptance and understanding of one’s self without fear: “We have suffered in the shadows of fear too long.” She looked into the eyes of the many who covered the cement steps and said, “Today, let the war be over. Let today be a day of peace and celebration, for we have made peace within ourselves.” After Cosman’s striking speech, Samantha Harman, Cody McCook and Ryan Cheek took to the stage. All three are Hillcrest High School students. Harman and McCook were each suspended May 6 for wearing T-shirts bearing the anti-tobacco slogan, “Queers Kick Ash.” Harman spoke of their struggle to start a gay straight alliance at Hillcrest: “We did our part and turned in our forms and [permission] slips … and waited.” A month beyond the deadline, they had yet to be notified. They visited the school week after week during their summer vacation “only to be told some excuse like ‘We haven’t had time to check into it yet,’ and every week we didn’t forget like we feel they expected us to.” Approval was finally granted, but only if the words “gay” and “lesbian” were not used. The students agreed, “only to find shortly after when we checked our school policy that we were lied to.” Harman cautioned, “You should always

question authority and never simply give in and take what’s handed to you.” McCook stepped up to talk about the hotly debated word queer. In light of the Hillcrest High School suspensions, the Utah Department of Health rejected the renewal of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Community Center of Utah’s grant that funded the “Queers Kick Ash” program. “Administrators, the health department, city officials and queer people all are taking part in silencing the Queer community,” McCook said. “The queer movement to reclaim the word queer started in the 1980s, and look how far we have come, only to be silenced by people we thought were there to help us.” McCook recited the losses effected by people who are against the use of the moniker, some of whom belong to the Queer community. “Students have been suspended, funding has been taken away, people are not supporting their own communities when they are queer themselves,” said McCook. “There is nothing derogatory about the word queer.” Cheek described the “Queers Kick Ash” program, which was established to combat tobacco companies’ marketing projects that specifically target gay youth. When the grant was yanked, the program was forced to an immediate halt. The sudden dismantlement of the … program is one more step in taking away more rights from the GLBT community, Cheek warned. He thanked the Center “for bringing us into an active scene” — one that queer youth continue to inhabit even in the anti-tobacco program’s absence. In answer to “the homophobia of the Hillcrest administration,” Cheek said, “We’re here to say that that word is okay. … The word queer is a beautiful, lovely term that we should all celebrate.” Harman implored everyone to act, and to do so immediately: “Please don’t think you’re ahead of the time or that five years from now this will all be easier. It will only be easier if you stand up now and end the silence.” McCook said, “I would like to thank two important people: [Hillcrest principal] Linda Sandstrom and [assistant principal] David Breen. Thank you for showing us how cruel people can be and for making us stronger.”

Montana Pride Draws Hundreds Held in a different city each year for the past decade, this year’s Montana Pride (held in Missoula the weekend of June 12) drew over 200 people from Montana and other states, many of whom rallied in support for gay and lesbian marriage. The Rainbow Parade marshals, a 20-woman “bucket band” corps from Spokane, opened the parade which began and ended at Caras Park. They were followed by a group carrying a large rainbow flag, a Great Falls couple in wedding clothes waving a banner that read “Just Illegally Married,” and even a few straight couples including Ms. Gay Butte and her husband wearing drag, according to an article in the Missoulan. After the parade, attendees listened to speakers who urged them to work for gay civil rights and to oppose constitutional Initiative 96, Montana’s own “defense of marriage act.” These speakers included PRIDE board member Casey Charles and Rep. Christine Kaufman, D-Helena, who compared the struggle to legalize samesex marriage to efforts to have interracial marriage legally recognized. Other Western states and cities, such as Boise, Idaho, also held their part of their gay pride celebrations on the weekend of June 12. — JV


WILLIAM H. MUNK

Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson waves to the crowd at the 2004 Pride Day parade.

Anderson to LDS Church: Diversity Necessary for Economic Vitality by William Todd Park

JUNE 24, 2004

Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson upheld diversity as “necessary for a healthy, sustainable community” in his June 16 speech to the Downtown Merchants Association. Anderson pointed at a city’s diversity as an economic barometer, citing communities that “enjoy the greatest economic sustainability are those that are welcoming and hospitable to all people — people of all faiths, all races, different sexual orientations and all economic situations.” Anderson lauded Salt Lake City’s progress in promoting diversity, but noted the shortcoming in “equal treatment under the law, as members of our gay and lesbian community struggle for basic equal rights and, at the same time, equal respect and dignity as members of the community at large.” He went on to emphasize how critically important diversity is in the downtown area. While praising the commitment of the LDS Church to the city’s revitalization, the mayor encouraged the church to consider plans to include distinct uses of the downtown area such as “lively retail, mixed-income housing and many entertainment options — including restaurants and nightclubs.” He cautioned against a homogeneous downtown, noting it to be less welcoming to prospective new businesses and residents as well as diverse residents of the city and surrounding communities. Mayor Anderson pointed out several projects designed to energize the downtown core. Among these were the renovating of the Utah

Theater, giving a face-lift to Pioneer Park and completing the intermodal hub, which would extend light rail service to the airport. He also proposed more aesthetic features such as street artists and performers. Businesses have always located their centers of operation where their resources were. With companies shifting their emphasis from manufacturing to information, the new resources are talent-centered. Quoting from Richard Florida’s book, The Rise of the Creative Class, the mayor emphasized the link between diversity and economic growth: “Every aspect and every manifestation of creativity — technological, cultural and economic — is interlinked and inseparable.” Mr. Florida, Heinz Professor of Regional Economic Development at Carnegie Mellon University published a study with the Brookings Institution linking diversity and high tech growth. His “most striking finding [was] that a leading indicator of a metropolitan area’s high-technology success is a large gay population. Frequently cited as a harbinger of redevelopment and gentrification in distressed urban neighborhoods, the presence of gays in a metro area signals a diverse and progressive environment.” City Councilman Eric Jergensen expressed concern that the mayor cited ideas from Florida’s book asserting that it was criticized in academic circles. Some academic studies state that rather than a specific gay population concentration, the common point is a community atmosphere that is open to differences.

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Opinion

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JUNE 24, 2004

Playing the Numbers The news cycle following Pride week was a bit slow from the perspective of our writers covering local events — which is not surprising considering all the time and energy organizations and individuals put into the parade and festival. For just a few days, our busy community seemed to be taking a much-deserved break. This year’s Pride Day was probably the largest and best-attended in the history of Utah. Not only have issues such as the state constitutional amendment focused our attention and re-energized our political will, but more and more folks from outside the community are catching on to the fact that the Pride Festival is a lot of fun. Every Pride Day there is a certain amount of number crunching — how many people showed up? Was it bigger than last year? Increased attendance is a sign that our community is thriving and that our political clout is growing. Many of us pay special attention to the way the mainstream media reports on the event, and on our numbers. Did television cameramen purposefully point their lenses toward a sparsely-populated corner of the festival? Did they tend to focus on the more outrageous costumes and behavior in an attempt to paint our community as a small group of bizarre malcontents deserving to be marginalized? Or was the coverage balanced, giving an accurate view of who we are and what we accomplished? These are valid questions — the media in this market has sometimes been unkind to our community. Things are changing, however, and this year media coverage of Pride was almost all positive.

In this issue, there is a story about the way KSL News reported Pride attendance numbers, which brings up another question: Is the exact number really that important? Are we so sensitive about media coverage that we’re ready to jump all over the first news outlet that doesn’t go by the Center’s unofficial estimate? The fact is, for most people — even reporters and festival organizers — it’s very difficult to judge the size of a large crowd. Quantifying large numbers of people or things is the subject of a lot of complicated statistical studies, and it’s harder than it looks — unless you’re an idiot savant like Dustin Hoffman’s character in Rainman. Sam Penrod, the reporter in question, did a thorough job of reporting on an issue of interest to KSL’s viewers: the constitutional battle over gay marriage. He made a special effort to interview Scott McCoy of the “Don’t Amend” campaign. Sure, the coverage didn’t focus much on the festival as a festival, portraying it more as a purely political event. There’s a big difference between 5,000 and 50,000 — and who knows? The real number may lie somewhere in the middle — but it is doubtful there was ever any edict from on high to purposefully underreport the number of queers who showed up at the City and County Building June 13. In the end, the exact head count really isn’t that important. The big story was that the 2004 Pride Festival was a great success, and not only for those who participated. Seeing images of Utah’s vibrant and determined gay community on their television screens brought hope to countless viewers who, for whatever reason, were not able to attend.

From the Editor Who’s Being Funny? by Brandon Burt There’s a joke that has been circulating recently: It’s too offensive to print here, but perhaps you’ve already heard it: It’s the one that compares Matthew Shepard — the Wyoming college student who in 1998 was murdered because he was gay — to a tumbleweed. People don’t really laugh at this joke as much as widen their eyes and gasp when they hear it. It’s in such poor taste, most people acknowledge that it really shouldn’t be told at all. There was nothing funny about the Matthew Shepard case, period. The fact that six years have elapsed doesn’t make it a laughing matter, especially considering the way our legislature continues to shoot down every proposed workable hate crimes law. In some ways, the tumbleweed joke could be one of the filthiest jokes ever devised. Yet we still tell it. Obviously, if a homophobe ever told it, it would be utterly unacceptable. For some reason, though, when it’s told in a smoke-filled bar by a member of our community, it’s a bit easier for us to tolerate. Why this double standard? Why is it that when we tell it, it has shock value, whereas if they told it, it would seem an overtly hostile act? For one thing, we’ve learned that it’s possible to defuse a potentially hurtful joke by “reclaiming” it and making it our own. Each of us is hyperaware of the fact that the potential for anti-gay violence is omnipresent in this political climate, and telling a sick joke about Matthew Shepard may be a way of dealing with that very reasonable fear. Mostly, though, it’s that homophobes have such a hard time finessing a gay joke. For them, the fact that a swishy gay man or a butch lesbian makes an appearance is enough to make a joke funny — regardless of how tired the punch line is. Homophobes really don’t have much of a sense of humor to begin with and they just don’t get subtlety. After all, if they were intellectual, analytical thinkers, they wouldn’t be homophobes. A couple years ago, a photo was making the rounds on right-wing online blogs depicting a war protester holding a sign with the words “Lesbians Against Bush.” The rightwingers just couldn’t get over how “clueless” she was, and they took many crude pot shots at the woman. The fact that she had been making a slightly bawdy, yet good-humoredly self-referential joke — while simultaneously making a serious statement of her political views — was just too complicated for the typical homophobe to grasp. Even after the situation was explained to them, they couldn’t accept the fact that she was the one who thought of the joke first. One of the participants at the Dyke March that took place here on June 12 held a slightly different sign. It read, “Lesbians Against Bush. Oh! The Irony.” This one’s even more funny — and it has the added benefit that there will be less confusion among the homophobes over exactly who is being funny here. Humor is a very powerful weapon against ignorance — it makes our message much more accessible. Groups like Code Pink and the Cyber Sluts use humor (along with a hell of a lot of time and effort) to raise consciousness or funds in ways that wouldn’t be possible if either group just tried to “play it straight.” Humor allows mainstream society to see that we’re not as much a threat to America’s existence as our enemies claim. And, well, humor’s just valuable for its own sake. It keeps us from taking ourselves too seriously and helps our movement maintain its vitality in the face of considerable obstacles. Politicos on the far right have spent a lot of time and energy trying to make us out as humorless, oversensitive, and overly P.C. They try to make it look as though we can’t take a joke. Maybe that’s why they have such a hard time figuring out how marvelously multi-layered the “Lesbians Against Bush” slogan is. So does this mean that now we not only have to think up new and better jokes, but we also have to anticipate the many ways in which those jokes will be misinterpreted by the dittoheads? Nah. Let’s leave them to their confusion. Watching them tie themselves up in knots trying to figure out what just happened is always good for a laugh.


WILLIAM H. MUNK

Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson waves to the crowd at the 2004 Pride Day parade.

Anderson to LDS Church: Diversity Necessary for Economic Vitality by William Todd Park

JUNE 24, 2004

Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson upheld diversity as “necessary for a healthy, sustainable community” in his June 16 speech to the Downtown Merchants Association. Anderson pointed at a city’s diversity as an economic barometer, citing communities that “enjoy the greatest economic sustainability are those that are welcoming and hospitable to all people — people of all faiths, all races, different sexual orientations and all economic situations.” Anderson lauded Salt Lake City’s progress in promoting diversity, but noted the shortcoming in “equal treatment under the law, as members of our gay and lesbian community struggle for basic equal rights and, at the same time, equal respect and dignity as members of the community at large.” He went on to emphasize how critically important diversity is in the downtown area. While praising the commitment of the LDS Church to the city’s revitalization, the mayor encouraged the church to consider plans to include distinct uses of the downtown area such as “lively retail, mixed-income housing and many entertainment options — including restaurants and nightclubs.” He cautioned against a homogeneous downtown, noting it to be less welcoming to prospective new businesses and residents as well as diverse residents of the city and surrounding communities. Mayor Anderson pointed out several projects designed to energize the downtown core. Among these were the renovating of the Utah

Theater, giving a face-lift to Pioneer Park and completing the intermodal hub, which would extend light rail service to the airport. He also proposed more aesthetic features such as street artists and performers. Businesses have always located their centers of operation where their resources were. With companies shifting their emphasis from manufacturing to information, the new resources are talent-centered. Quoting from Richard Florida’s book, The Rise of the Creative Class, the mayor emphasized the link between diversity and economic growth: “Every aspect and every manifestation of creativity — technological, cultural and economic — is interlinked and inseparable.” Mr. Florida, Heinz Professor of Regional Economic Development at Carnegie Mellon University published a study with the Brookings Institution linking diversity and high tech growth. His “most striking finding [was] that a leading indicator of a metropolitan area’s high-technology success is a large gay population. Frequently cited as a harbinger of redevelopment and gentrification in distressed urban neighborhoods, the presence of gays in a metro area signals a diverse and progressive environment.” City Councilman Eric Jergensen expressed concern that the mayor cited ideas from Florida’s book asserting that it was criticized in academic circles. Some academic studies state that rather than a specific gay population concentration, the common point is a community atmosphere that is open to differences.

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AberRant Knock-off Labels by Laurie Mecham You can never be too rich or spread too thin. I don’t really believe that, but I think it’s clever, and it’s something I use when I talk about any of my New Projects. For example, I recently joined the U of U’s LGB, um, T … LMNOP speaker’s bureau, because they asked for volunteers to speak to classes and I’m all about participating in education (even if I never actually got one myself.) The protocol is for each speaker to introduce her/himself and tell his/her story. (The speaker’s manual says “hirself,” but then it also says “zhie” instead of “he” or “she.” Pardon my English, but — whatever.) Part of that story typically includes revealing one’s sexual orientation. I have this great original thing that I say — I copied it from my son when he was on a radio program featuring children of gay parents. I say, “I think labels are reductive. They allow people to see each other in such a limited perspective. However, I believe that they can be useful for political reasons, or to help us recognize allies.” Yes, it is sage wisdom. That’s why I stole it. Another project I’m involved with is a lesbian organization, and I’ve been calling myself “lesbian” for nearly ten years. But my partner is just so nitpicky. She says I’m bisexual just because I was married for 20 years and I used to be attracted to men. I guess I can see her point, but it seems to me that since I was called straight for all those years, I should now get to be called lesbian. To me, it seems that any label I select should define my current state. “Bisexual” sounds like someone who is available to be with either a man or a woman, and I’m not available to men. Apparently this is not enough to earn me my lesbian badge. (I do have my red wings, however — not that you wanted to know.) My partner’s thinking makes sense when I consider how different our earlier lives were. I have heard sad, difficult stories about the gay teen angst that she and so many others experienced. They couldn’t talk to anyone about their feelings or crushes. Each of them felt like they were the only one in the world who felt as they did. There was nobody at all like them on TV until Billy Crystal in Soap, and he still wasn’t a big lesbian role model. As a teenager, I talked about boys, I had crushes on boys, and — clueless as I was about the possibilities inherent in the situation — I could have sleepovers, completely devoid of sexual tension, with girlfriends. Well, there’s no going back now. At the

time, all I wanted was a guy to love me and to kiss me. When I compare my early years to those of my partner, I feel like I don’t deserve the label of “lesbian” because I didn’t pay the dues. Speaking of dues, labels, my ex-husband and other irritants, it bugs the hell out of me when people are able to accept a person’s homosexuality only if they see it as something immutable. “Like the color of your skin, or ... or a disease!” they chirp, hopefully, through twitchy little half-smiles. Of course the disease analogy is crap — I’m not even going to go there. The question is (since I am apparently not worthy of being labeled a Genuine Lesbian) I admittedly have no talent for running, throwing, or whistling. Can I talk about homosexuality at all? Am I gay? It sure seems like I am. I mean, ask my mom! (Or don’t, actually.) As far as the comparison with race is concerned, I know I’m not qualified to talk about that one. I’m so white I’m practically translucent. In the white, heterosexual world, I totally pass (she said, while noticing that her lipstick needed to be freshened because her whole face was too pale.) One of the unearned privileges of being so damn pasty is that ethnic origin is something I never have to even think about. For crackers like me, it’s a non-issue unless you’re filling out some kind of form. I think that the boxes usually say “Caucasian” these days, but actually I’m not certain. No, really. I’d have to look at something. Come to think of it, I’m pretty sure that the forms used to be different. I think this because I always found myself looking down the list — which used to be much shorter — for a word closer to the bottom. That would mean that I was looking for something nearer the end of the alphabet, wouldn’t it? Was it “white?” Could there have been a time where they actually listed that for race? I would hate to think so, but it’s possible — I’ve been filling out forms for myself for over 30 years. Ahem. “Anglo Saxon” sounds familiar, but weren’t the Saxons British? Maybe I just made that up. Maybe I’m getting it confused with Homo sapiens. They have the same number of syllables, pronounced with the same order of emphasis. Of course, that could just be my attachment to the word “homo,” my inner desire to be a Real Live Homosexual — which I am, no matter what my girlfriend says. As I puzzle over this, I’m actually getting kind of worried. It’s no secret that my memory is worse than my overhand throw. This is giving me kind of an identity crisis. Damn, I’m going to have to call someone for confirmation. “Mom?” I’ll ask her. “What race did we used to be?”

“When I compare my early years to those of my partner, I feel like I don’t deserve the label of “lesbian” because I didn’t pay the dues.”

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Obituary

Clair A. Wade October 28, 1957-June 11, 2004

There will be a celebration of Clair’s life to be held at his favorite watering hole, The Trapp, on Friday, June 25, beginning at 7:00 p.m.

JUNE 24, 2004

Clair Wade, friend to many in the gay community, passed away June 11 while at home surrounded by many friends and family. After a long battle with HIV and AIDS, Clair finally succumbed to the effects of this terrible yet still ever-present disease. His life, however, was filled with much. He had a positive outlook and always tried to make the best of any situation. His contagious smile and quick wit were his signature trade mark — even in the worst of times he still would find something to grin about or to make you laugh. Clair had been involved in the community for many years. He was loved and will be missed by many. He was very active in the gay rodeo and was a pioneer for gay rodeo organizations. Back in 1982 when the first gay rodeo was held in Reno, Nevada, he was the first recipient of the breakaway calf roping buckle and held that accomplishment with high regard. His partner at the time, the late Bob Elton, was the first Mr. National Gay Rodeo as well and together they promoted and encouraged participation in the rodeo organizations. Later on, Clair was the president of the UGRA and was instrumental in producing rodeos here in Salt Lake City. He was always willing to help out others and enjoyed the times when he could teach people how to throw a rope. He enjoyed showing off his talents at Pride Day, Blue Alley Fair, UGRA play days and anywhere else he could. He was an avid horseman and loved to help anyone out with their horse when he could. Clair had many facets to his life and was extremely talented in many ways: from backcombing a drag queen’s wig to writing a rodeo queen’s speech; from orchestrating a perfect horsemanship pattern for rodeo royalty to managing stock at a rodeo. He did it all and never looked back. Funeral services were held in his home town of Heber City, on June 16. To his dear friend and companion Rick: Remember the good and that life is here to live. Clair once wrote, ”Accept what comes as cheerfully as possible. You can’t always choose what life brings you, but you can choose how you react to it.” On behalf of Clair, his friends would like to thank Dr. Kristen Ries and the staff at clinic 1A for all the support and assistance given during this last year.

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Ruby Ridge Living Déjà Vu Again by Ruby Ridge

Pumpkins, I don’t care how hip, jaded, or detached you think you are, but when Nancy laid her head on Ronnie’s casket, didn’t your heart just break! Like millions of others I watched Nancy and the funeral on live TV — and let me tell you, darlings, as the sun went down over the Pacific, I was a sniffling gooey mess. Despite all of my Reagan-era baggage (and trust me its more than just a small carry-on and a hat box), I felt so sorry for the poor old girl having to face such a personal, intimate moment in front of the televised media and literally the entire planet. Can you imagine the emotional wreckage of seeing your husband, one of the most powerful men in the world, slowly disintegrate with Alzheimer’s long before losing him altogether? Even with all of the resources, support, family, and friends surrounding Nancy, her loss must have been terrible. But that’s where my sympathy ends. President Reagan and his wife had all of the advantages that wealth, healthcare, and a socially and legally sanctioned marriage could provide. I can’t help wonder what would happen if a long-term gay or lesbian couple went through the same downward health spiral with one of the partners suffering from Alzheimer’s. The process would be so different and so bleak. As a 40-something year-old who came out in the ’80s with hormones blazing, I sometimes wonder how on earth I survived the early AIDS crisis. I watched as dozens of my peers who were my age died — some quickly, some slowly, some by their own hand.

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A monthly magazine for lesbians and their friends in Utah and beyond! Womyn 4 Women is a localized and empowering publication written from a lesbian perspective for women of all sexual identities. W4W’s articles cover: • women’s stories • art • travel • relationships • community events and many other timely issues. Please help this unique publication grow by advertising in and subscribing to W4W. W One-year subscriptions are only: $25 - 12 printed issues, each one mailed in a discreet envelope $12 - 12 downloadable issues (PDFs) sent each month to your e-mail address You can subscribe on our web site and also check out our reasonable advertising rates. Or send a check or money order to W4W, P.O. Box 575708, Salt Lake City, UT 84157-5708.

With all of the fear and urgency surrounding AIDS it was a really tough time to see your government and especially your president do nothing. It was even more frustrating to watch as his Health and Human Services programs actually blocked efforts to target life-saving education and prevention to gay men. The unspoken subtext seemed to be “you’re immoral and you deserve to die.” Have things really changed in the last 20 years? Not in this state, kittens! Last month the Utah State Department of Health canceled a tobacco cessation contract targeted at gay youth. It certainly wasn’t for legitimate public health reasons, because our gay and lesbian kids are at much higher risk for tobacco use and all of its negative side effects — just as they are at elevated risk for depression, bullying, suicide, and drug and alcohol addiction. But in a conservative state with a cowardly public health bureaucracy dependent on legislative funding and moral grandstanding, gay and lesbian issues are inevitably the first to be censured. (If I had real women’s plumbing and not just the childbearing hips I would begin my rant on reproductive choice about here!) Seriously, muffins, have you ever seen any health education messages from the State Department of Health concerning sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea, syphilis, or hepatitis in gay men? What about methamphetamine addiction, or same-sex domestic violence? These are public health issues with huge impacts on the gay community and they need action from the government, not silence. God knows the world doesn’t need more Nancys kissing caskets. Ruby Ridge is one of the more opinionated members of The Utah Cyber Sluts, a camp drag group that raises funds for local charitable causes. Her opinions are her own and fluctuate wildly due to Ephedra withdrawals and a public school education.


Lambda Lore Thirty Years of Utah Pride by Ben Williams

expensive. Checks and balances were not in place and the organization found itself in financial trouble when the integrity of Pride Day leadership was questioned. In 2002, the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Utah absorbed the troubled Pride Day organization in a manner that was controversial due to the lack of community-wide input. Since then, “Utah Pride” has operated as subsidiary of the Center which has ownership of the event.

The Ladder. Her primary motive in all this was to make the process of coming out easier for closeted women and men. Harry Hay — Considered by many to be the father of the gay liberation movement, Hay was the first to recognize the power organized gay people have to affect the political process. With this in mind, he founded the Mattachine Society in 1950. He was later ousted from this society because his views were too radical. He went Harry Hay on to co-found the Radical Faeries, a gay spiritual organization, in 1979. Once again, his views reinvented gay politics. He taught that gay men are spiritually different from other men — more in touch with nature, bodily pleasure and a spirit embracing both male and female polarities. His belief and driving force during this period was that all sexuality is sacred. Frank Kameny — A civil servant for the U. S. Army map service, Kameny was fired after the government found out he was gay. With his release, he was barred from any future employment with the federal government. For three years, Kameny fought the system to try to regain his job. He lost the battle, but refused to lose the war. Unlike many other gay leaders of the time, Kameny embraced direct Frank Kameny action along the lines of the black civil rights movement. Along with Jack Nichols, he established the Washington D.C. Chapter of the Mattachine society. With Barbra Gittings and others, they took on the American Psychiatric Association. They argued that the oppression of homosexuals was directly related to the idea that homosexuality was sexual development disorder. Through his leadership and organizing efforts, homosexuality was removed from the APA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1973. Bayard Rustin — Maintaining a low profile in his activism, Rustin’s creativity and attention to detail made him an essential

yet unseen force in the societal changes of the mid-20th Century. He once described his methodology as “social dislocation and creative trouble.” He worked side by side with Martin Luther King, Jr. during the civil rights movement. In 1963, Strom Thurmond took the floor of the United States Senate and denounced the upcoming March on Washington by calling attention to Bayard Rustin’s homosexuality. When King stood in defense of Rustin, however, Thurmond’s effort failed. Bayard was a strong-willed activist and was jailed over 20 times in connection with his civil disobedience activities. Even his detractors openly recognize that there is no one else who could have accomplished the enormous lo- Bayard Rustin gistical tasks of organizing a mass political movement through diplomacy and coalition building. The gay and lesbian community would not enjoy the amount of freedom we now possess were it not for the efforts of those who went before us. During the Pride Celebration, let us remember we truly stand on the shoulders of our queer forefathers and foremothers as we work to lay the foundation for a freer, more accepting tomorrow.

Ben Williams is the director of the Utah Stonewall Historical Society and a long-time community activist.

Our Queer Past by Jace Garfield

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Pride celebrations are a wonderful time for the gay and lesbian community and our supporters as we celebrate the progression of acceptance and to gain fortitude for the battles yet to come in our struggle for equal human rights. Many months of planning and hours of volunteer work go into Pride Days around the world. Though these contributions are invaluable and greatly appreciated, it would be impossible for the gay community to enjoy these events and many of the Godgiven rights we now enjoy if it were not for the work of countless others who have gone before us. In the history of our movement, there are many who have given all they had — including their lives — in hopes that the future would be filled with more freedom and equality. Harvey Milk — In 1977, Milk became the first openly gay person to be elected to San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors. Galvanizing San Francisco’s gay liberation movement. His call to arms: “Come out, come out, wherever you are,” was the theme of this years’ Pride Celebration. After his brutal Harvey Milk murder in 1978, 100,000 people marched on the nation’s capitol in support of gay civil rights, chanting “Harvey Milk lives.” Barbara Gittings — With the support of her life partner Kay Tobin Lahusen, Gittings emerged as a crucial and articulate voice in the gay liberation movement. Gittings is considered by many to be the first true activist in the gay rights movement. She founded the first east coast chapter of Daughters of Bilitis, the nation’s original lesbian organization. She later became the editor of America’s first lesbian magazine, Barbara Gittings

JUNE 24, 2004

We celebrate Gay Pride Day in Utah as part of a national directive, which originated in 1969 when the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (ECHO) adopted the motion to hold “parallel demonstrations on the last Saturday in June.” This was to commemorate the rebellion at the Stonewall Inn (June 26-27, 1969), which began the modern gay rights movement. Utah has celebrated being gay and proud for the past thirty years — if one counts the “beer bust kegger” sponsored by the Sun at what was once known as “bare-ass beach.” The event was sponsored by Joe Redburn, whose Sun Tavern was, in the 1970s, the de facto Gay Community Center. Over 200 Gay men and women congregated on the southeastern shores of the Great Salt Lake to revel in being out of the closet and to celebrate the Stonewall Rebellion. The numbers at this event may appear to be small but consider the fact that this number comprised nearly the entire gay community from back then. The first “official” community-wide sponsored Pride celebration was held June 1, 1975 and was called Gay Freedom Day. The event was held up City Creek Canyon and was sponsored by the Gay Community Service Center — still run out of Redburn’s bar. Festivities included free beer, food, soft drinks, volleyball, and an all-day “do your own thing.” For the next several years, Utah’s Pride Days were known as Gay Freedom Days. The most ambitious of these Gay Freedom Days was the 1977 symposium in which Sgt. Leonard Matlovich, an ex-Air Force sergeant and winner of the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart, came to Salt Lake City to deliver a keynote address. As the heady “gay power” days of the ’70s began to wane, a community fragmented along gender lines tried to hold gay celebrations — but without much support. The spirit of Gay Pride was kept going by individual groups such as the Tavern Guild, Affirmation and LGSU. Gay Day at Lagoon became an annual event tagged onto Gay Pride during these years. In 1983, members of the Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire met to revitalize the true concept of a “Gay Pride Day.” They formed a committee and put together an event billed as a “basket social” and picnic in the park. This Pride Day committee sponsored the next several events and was the first to adopt the National Pride Day Committee’s theme. In the late ’80s, the newly formed Gay and Lesbian Community Council of Utah took over the responsibilities of holding Utah’s annual pride days. Donny Eastepp created the first Pride Day Community Service Award. It was presented to Dr. Kristin Ries for her humanitarian service during the worst of the AIDS epidemic. Pride Day committees of the GLCCU over the next seven years provided consistently successful

events, celebrating Utah’s sexual minority communities. Under GLCCU’s direction, Salt Lake City’s politicians even began to attend and the quality of Pride Day entertainers and speakers improved considerably. With the election of Jeff Freedman, the GLCCU’s Gay Pride Day Committee began its transition from being just a committee to being its sole entity. Freedman along with his many co-chairs operated the Gay Pride Day committees after GLCCU dissipated

in 1995. The Pride Day events of the latter half of the ’90s were stamped indelibly with Freedman’s vision of changing the event from a Gay and Lesbian celebratory rally to that of a non-political community party. He also served as co-chair of Pride Day longer than any other activist in Utah’s history. Gay Pride Day grew exponentially during the late ’90s, becoming one of the premier summer festivals of Utah. It became necessary for the event to become its own entity with its own non-profit status. Lesbian activist Kim Russo oversaw this transition and while these Pride Days were extremely successful, they were also becoming extremely


A Thousand Words Sis by Scott Perry I’ve asked around, and it seems that everyone born into my mom’s family has been a duck hunter or fisherman. Dad’s relatives were all farmers who spent their lives perched in the seat of a combine. This lineage made it particularly difficult — at family reunions all the guys would ask: (1) if I got my deer, (2) if I got my duck permit, and (3) if I had a girlfriend yet. All three were answered to the negative with a faux smile and bashful toe kick into the gravel parking lot. That was my signal to head for my gaggle of aunts in hopes of swapping a recipe or dishing some gossip. The ladies’ conversation wasn’t much better, though. They swooned about the five-pointer that Danny got or how windy it had been out at the gun club. Even mom, who doesn’t hunt and rarely fishes, refused to wear a dress or mist her pulse points with Enjolie. How, you might ask, did I happen to fall into this family — the sole gourmand, decorateur, and Drama Queen nonpareil? I have a theory. Sometime between May 3, 1960 when my brother Mark was born and early October, 1961 when mom became pregnant with me, she conceived what would have been my older sister. This, of course, wasn’t possible. If she had given birth to my sister she wouldn’t have become pregnant with me. But humor me — there is a point to all this. The point is that Laura (as mom would have named her) probably heard rumblings and conversations of the world out there and decided there was no way that anything feminine could make it in this world — not in this family, anyway. So after putting mom through intense emotional and physical agony, she went away as so many unborns do. No explanation, they just do. Here’s my theory: supposing her physical body washed away, but her spirit held on just waiting for the right time? Supposing I was conceived and shared a womb with Laura and we got to be pals — wombmates, as it

were? What if we joined forces and came into the world together? My body, her soul. Looking at old home movies, there are certain telltale clues that Laura is here. Perhaps it’s the nelly way I sashayed away from the big snowball that Mark threatened to clobber me with. There is also eightmillimeter footage of me dressed all too comfortably as Raggedy Ann. You can’t tell me Mom didn’t know my Sis was around. She was with us as the family camped on the North Fork of the Duchesne River. Gail and Mimi (my new stepsisters) played all day in the shallow river constructing homes out of river rock, and we furnished them with twigs and grass and wildflowers. The four of us played with Legos, but never created robots or helicopters. Sis and I would always make a 3-bedroom rambler using the smooth-top blocks for 300-count twin sheets on the beds. My pinewood derby car was an anomaly, too: The other boys painted theirs with skulls, flames, and daggers — sharp, streamlined and aerodynamic. Mine was a red and black polka dot bug — pudgy, with big floppy eyelashes and a friendly smile. When we grew and got our own rooms, Sis and I set up housekeeping. The other boys’ rooms reeked of expired milk, sweaty socks and the occasional doobie, whereas Sis and I lived in a lemon-scented Windex shine. Mimi shared a room with us for awhile, and while it was usually a good arrangement, it would occasionally look like a scene from The Women. Sis would get to be too prissy and dictatorial for the hardheaded Mimi and a catfight would ensue, while I stood by and watched in horror, not wanting to take sides. During adolescence, Sis would get crushes on my best friends and make passes at them as I looked on in panic. Sometimes she lucked out. Other times she left me the laughing stock of the school. Let’s not forget the time she wore white flats with crepe soles into the grocery store, oblivious to the fact that they clashed with my jeans and flannel shirt. Sis introduced herself to mom years ago. Actually, they have become the best of pals. They can dish gossip and swap recipes, just as I had always wanted to do. I’m just a shy observer.

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

“There is also the eightmillimeter footage of me dressed all too comfortably as Raggedy Ann.”


JUNE 24, 2004

SALT LAKE METRO

15


by JoSelle Vanderhooft

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

In 2002, Brian Lykins, a 23-year-old Minnesota man, died after having what was otherwise normal knee surgery. And had the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s investigation not discovered the bacterium clostridium sordelli in donated cartilage used in Lykins’ surgery, the young man’s death might never have made national news. Also, it might never have prompted the Food and Drug Administration to speed up the process of setting new rules for tissue donor eligibility, something it had been preparing to do since 1997. In May, the FDA established new rules requiring reproductive tissues like semen and ova to be tested for such diseases as HIV, hepatitis B and C, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and new diseases like west nile virus and SARS — diseases other tissues, such as musculoskeletal, eye and skin tissues, are tested for. But the law also established new criteria for who can donate tissue in the first place. Under the new rules, intravenous drug users and men who have had sex with other men in the last five years cannot legally be tissue donors — due, presumably, to this population’s statistically high risk for contracting HIV. That’s when the controversy started. Lambda Legal executive director Kevin Cathcart objected to the new policy, particularly its exclusion of gay men as sperm donors, saying it was based more on bigotry than on scientific reasoning. “HIV affects every part of our nation’s population, and the FDA needs to realize that fact and stop treating gay men as the only people who contract HIV,” a May 21 Associated Press article quoted him as saying. Likewise, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force executive director Matt Foreman called the regulations “misplaced” in a May 30 article in the trade publica-

tion Transplant News, saying that HIV tests are faster and more effective today then they have been in the past. Nonetheless, Jesse Goodman, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research program, said that current HIV tests were not 100percent accurate. And as such, precautions still needed to be taken. “While there have been tremendous improvements in laboratory testing, they’re not foolproof,” said Goodman. “For that reason, we routinely exclude populations where sound scientific evidence shows that there could be a risk to the person receiving the donation.” Only time and further research will determine whether or not these new rules hold water scientifically. In the meantime, the FDA’s new law may lead gay men to think they shouldn’t bother checking “yes” for organ and tissue donation when filling out their driver’s license applications. According to Ben Deiterle, public relations specialist at Intermountain Donor Services (IDS) and an openly gay man, gay men still have every reason to say “yes” to being donors because the new laws only prevent them from donating tissue — which, in most cases, the FDA sees as less essential to living than organs. “Organ donation and tissue donation are two different categories,” he explained. “Organs are necessary for living whereas tissues are optional because in most cases they improve life rather than saving a life. So, [donor services] are going to find any way they can, if possible, to transplant an organ

to a recipient because in most cases the recipient will die eventually if she or he doesn’t get that organ.” “It gets back to this: Nobody has died yet waiting for tissues such as a tendon or a cornea, so why take chances?” said Alex McDonald, director of public education at IDS. “With organs we’re a little more willing to take the chance, especially if it’s a very dire circumstance.” According to Dean Porcelli, one of IDS’s six organ coordinators, all organ donors and their organs are subject to extensive background checks in order to determine organ viability. Once organ coordinators have determined that the donor’s name appears in the Utah donor registry, coordinators begin testing his or her organs for function, suitability for transportation, and communicable diseases. At this time, coordinators also ask the donor’s family and friends to help them piece together the donor’s social and medical history. If the fact that the donor was gay comes up during this phase, Porcelli said that it isn’t something that would rule the donor out “automatically.” “We simply make the potential recipient centers aware of this and then we let them make their decision [whether or not to use the organ] based on this,” he said. “If those organs are healthy and that person wanted to be a donor, we’re going to want to recover those organs so we can save lives,” added Deiterle. Additionally, Deiterle said that gay men still have every reason to say “yes” to being donors because the new

policies regarding tissue donation are not set in stone. “In the case of tissue donation, these policies are constantly being updated,” he said. “So while men who have had sex with men in the last five years are excluded right now, in a year from now that could change. As tests become more sophisticated, they may be able to determine the viability of those donated tissues in a more accurate way so they can be used.” “There are obviously monogamous gay couples or people who don’t have diseases who are sexually active,” he continued. “We would hate to exclude someone who wanted to save another life when we have the technology to test those tissues to determine whether or not they were healthy.” Because donation centers receive thousands of requests for organ and tissue transplants each year, Deiterle said organ and tissue banks are “continually looking for ways to be inclusive, not exclusive.” “Quite honestly, I don’t think nationally there’s a lot of resistance to including the GLBT community [as tissue donors] other than safety issues,” he said. “We have to follow what the government sets as guidelines because we’re a government-designated agency and we want to be safe, but from our own personal standpoint we’re very progressive in that if the donor has viable organs or tissues for transplant, we want to use those. That’s what we’re in business to do.” Issues of safety and government regulation aside, some IDS workers


Although donors with hepatitis have been able to donate organs to hepatitis-infected patients for several years, the FDA has not allowed HIV patients to receive organs from HIV-positive donors. If recent legislation in the Illinois General Assembly indicates a growing national trend, however, this policy may soon change. In the first week of May the Illinois Senate overwhelmingly passed HB 3857. This bill, sponsored by HIV-positive state Representative Larry McKeon, D-Chicago, amends Illinois state law to allow HIV-positive individuals to donate organs to people with HIV or AIDS. The first bill of its kind anywhere in the nation, HB 3857 is part of Illinois Governor Blagojevich’s proposed $4.1 million increase to state funding for AIDS and HIV programs including a drug assistance program and various HIV-prevention services for blacks, Latinos, and other communities. Intermountain Donor Service workers like Alex McDonald hailed the Illinois bill as a step forward in donor services. “To me, an organ donor can potentially save the lives of nine

people,” he said. “If there are nine HIV positive people out there waiting for organ transplants, doesn’t it make sense to allow someone who was HIV positive to save those lives?” Although the Illinois bill allows organs from HIV-positive donors to go only to HIV-positive recipients, J. Noel Kvale said the bill may still help to open up more donor opportunities — including, someday, giving HIV-negative recipients the informed option to accept organs from HIV-positive donors if they so desire. “They give people the option to accept a donation from someone who had hepatitis,” he said. “So in my opinion, it’s not a great leap, considering that hepatitis C is now considered almost as bad or worse than HIV infection.” “I think what was demonizing about this was the fact that it’s HIV and people have this horrible association of death with HIV,” he continued. “I think that’s a little inaccurate because people are surviving with HIV. People are living and are able to lead high quality lives with HIV, with the proper maintenance. But when someone is dying because they have an organ that isn’t working anymore, I would have to say that I’d probably be willing to accept a donation from someone who was HIV or hepatitis positive just based on the fact that I may have a couple more

years based on that donation.” Despite the possible public controversy bills such as HB 3857 could raise, Kvale said HIV-positive individuals can only benefit from being fully included in organ donation. “I think some of the concerns that are there have been some historically famous cases, like the one at Duke University where a child was given the wrong organ,” Kvale said. “I think there are some of those concerns involved, but the biggest concern or controversy is that they are allowing someone with HIV to be a donor, and public perception is, ‘well, they’re doomed anyway.’ But in my opinion I don’t see why there is a controversy. Only because legislation is being introduced is there any kind of public scrutiny.” Although HB 3857 is the first bill of its kind in the United States, McDonald said he thinks potential exists for other states to adopt legislation like it. “I think this is really more of a national discussion,” he said. “But that’s not to say that if we couldn’t find a state legislator like the ones in Illinois who could write something up that it wouldn’t hurt to get this issue on the national radar a little bit more.” “If we got five or six states that are saying this is what we want to do, at some point [the federal government] will have to sit up and take notice,” McDonald said. — JV

SALT LAKE METRO ■

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Illinois Lifts Ban on HIV-Positive Organ Donors

JUNE 24, 2004

such as J. Noel Kvale, IDS tissue recovery coordinator and an openly gay man, said the FDA’s new rules seem out of touch with the realities of tissue donation. “As a professional, I have to accept these policies, but in what I do I see higher risk factors in sexually straight people than I have in gay male [donors], or gay people for that matter,” he said. “Our biggest concern is risk factors that would potentially make the tissue infectious,” he continued. “For example, we have found with cocaine use and drug use that the incidince of certain types of hepatitis and STDs go up, so it’s a risk factor we aren’t willing to accept. I see far higher incidents of deferrals based on IV drug use and STD sexual practices in sexually straight [donors], and more people being deterred based on drug use and issues other than sexuality. It’s not their sexuality that’s a factor. It’s the choices they make as individuals with drug use and other aspects of their lives.” Although sexuality may not ultimately be the strongest bar to a gay man’s wish to donate tissue, the FDA’s rules still stand — at least, for now. Even so, the IDS workers said that the gay community can do a variety of things to start changing this reality. “I think, first and foremost, every GLBT person in Utah should go to the Utah donor registry and sign up as a tissue and organ donor,” Deiterle said. “First off, if you’re not on the donor registry then what you desire to do as far as being a donor is not known.” “Secondly, I think there needs to be more public education like what we’re doing in our community to let people know that, number one, any gay or lesbian person can be an organ donor, even if there are limitations for gay men donating tissues right now.” He and McDonald also said gays and lesbians should write letters to their representatives in Congress and to newspaper editors in order to jumpstart public discussion on the issue of gay men donating tissue. Finally, Kvale suggested reminding people about the importance of tissue donation to families and to society at large. “Families really benefit a lot from the donation process,” he said. “It helps with grieving, bereavement. And I think families really benefit from the whole process. I think if we were able to offer the things we offer to one more segment of the population, being the families of gay men who have had sex in the last five years, I would feel even better. Because, as a gay man, I’d like to be able to help the part of the population that I am included in. I know my family would be supportive of a donation if it were something available to me.” “I often get questions such as, ‘is this really going to make a difference?’”, he added. “Any tissue donation, if the tissues pass serological testing, can benefit anywhere from ten to seventyfive people — perhaps more. This makes a family feel like their family member is constantly living on.” M


METRO PICKS Thursday, June 24 VIVACIOUS VESPAS. Salt Lake City is host to Amerivespa, the annual rally of the Vespa Club of America. A scoutour of Salt Lake, a ride up Millcreek Canyon, Gykhana obstacle course and a breakfast are the highlights of the weekend. Hundreds of motorscooters will be on display at the Gallivan Center. Through Sunday, various locations, www.amerivespa.org

Friday, June 25 SIMPLER DAYS? Old money, gold diggers—oh, for the days when a woman made a life for herself by choosing a husband, hoping to hook “a fine burgundy” and not a cheap port. Trophy husbands and 160-foot yawls are the trappings of Stage Right’s current play, Sabrina Fair, in which Sabrina struggles “to live life on my own terms.” Final weekend. 7:30pm, Friday and Saturday, Stage Right Theatre Company, 5001 S. Highland Dr. Tickets $10/$7 at 272-3445.

Get Tested National HIV Testing Day is June 27, and local health organizations are sponsoring free testing days. Same-day results are available in all facilities within Salt Lake County. All locations are walk-in, no appointment necessary. All locations are confidential.

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

Thursday, June 24 8am–12pm, Southwest District Health Dept., 168 N. 100 East, Panguitch, 435-673-3528 2–6pm, University of Utah, Student Health Services, 555 Foothill Blvd. 585-0234. 4–8pm, Copperview Recreation Center, 8446 S. Harrison, Midvale, 688-1009

Friday, June 25 1–5pm, Northern Utah HIV/AIDS Project, 536 24th Street, Suite 2B, Ogden, 393-4153 2–6pm, Utah African Faith Initiative, Central City Community Center, 615 S. 300 East, Salt Lake City, 364-3244

Saturday, June 26 10am – 3pm, Utah AIDS Foundation, 1408 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City, 487-2323

Every Monday 5–7pm, Utah AIDS Foundation, 1408 S. 100 East, Salt Lake City, 487-2323

VIVE LA DANZA. Mexico: A Dance Legacy is a unique showcase of the best of Mexican folkdance and culture. Colorful costumes, vibrant music and especially our native performers all serve to produce a truly authentic cultural event. 7pm, Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $10 through ArtTix, 355-ARTS.

RETRO FUNK AT MODIG’S. Money $hot is five funked-up characters who know how to bring the party. Delivering three white-hot sets of funk and R&B classics spiced with a little rock & roll — and a lot of attitude. Zero people able to resist the booty-call of the dance floor. 9pm, MoDiggity’s, a private club for members, 3424 S. State Street. 832-9000

Saturday, June 26 YOU CAN DANCE IF YOU WANT TO. Repertory Dance Theatre’s Community School will hold an open house featuring classes for adults of Modern, African, Ballet and Ballroom dance. 9am–3pm, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. Broadway, 534-1000, www. RDTUtah.org.

LESBIANA Slickrock Gypsies. See June 30. LATINA. Baile Mujeres! Latina dance for all lesbians, complete with lessons, sponsored by the Alternative Women’s Wellness project of the Center. Bring your favorite music and a dish to share if you wish. 8–11pm, GLBTCCU Black Box, 361 N. 300 West. $3 suggested donation. Women only please.

Sunday, June 27 WHAT RHYMES WITH ORANGE? The Provo Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, called Family Fellowship, hosts their quarterly symposium. Russ Gorringe will show a video and speak on his experiences with his marriage, having children, Evergreen and growing up in the LDS faith. A former poster boy of Evergreen, Gorringe is now branch president of Reconciliation. Followed by light refreshments and mixer. 5pm, Utah Valley Regional Medical Center Northwest Plaza, 1230 N. 500 West, Provo. 374-1447.

Stonecircle will play at the Anderson-Foothill Branch “Concerts by the Creek” on Wednesday, July 7.

Wednesday, June 30 JAZZ BY THE RIVER ON A SUMMER NIGHT. It’s summer and time once again for the Anderson-Foothill Library’s free “Concerts by the Creek” series. Join the library in the outdoor amphitheatre by the creek to hear jazz standards and pop/rock hits music by the local Slickrock Gypsies. 7:30pm, Anderson-Foothill Branch, Salt Lake Public Library, 1135 S. 2100 East. 594-8611.

Saturday, July 3

OLD FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY... ON THE THIRD. Dedication of Olympic flag poles in the International Peace Gardens with Olympic athletes attending. Traditional celebration – snow cones, cotton candy, cake walk, popcorn, fishing pond, hot dogs, watermelon, volley ball, children’s games, prize drawings, face painting Fireworks after dusk. 5–10pm, Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Salt Lake. Free.

A REASON TO RISE AND SHINE ON A SATURDAY MORNING. Get to the Farmer’s Market early each Saturday for the best selection of locally-grown fruits and veggies. A great, fun crowd mills about the park full of arts and crafts, Money Shot at MoDiggity’s. See June 25 coffee and bagels, tomatoes and tomatillos.

Sunday, July 4 GAY-OH! The Trapp brings in the Saliva Sisters to ring in the fourth of July in drool style. 10pm, The Trapp, a private club for members, 108 S. 600 West.

8am – 1pm, Pioneer Park, 300 W. 300 South.

Wednesday, July 7

FOR THE MORE ADVENTUROUS WEEKEND EARLY RISERS. Lambda Hiking will take off on an “easy hike” to Lost Lake in the Uintah Mountains. Lost Lake is about 10,000 feet above sea level and is “delightfully lush and cool.” This is only a 2-3 mile hike with a 200 foot change in elevation.

CREEKSIDE CELTIC TUNES. Stonecircle is a local band that is known for its variety of Celtic tunes from balads to upbeat ‘jigs.’ Part of the free weekly “Concerts by the Creek” series of the Anderson-Foothill Branch of the Salt Lake City Library. Sit creekside in the amphitheatre.

10am, Meet at the Chevron station at 210 S. 700 East. Carpool to trailhead located on the Mirror Lake Highway approximately 20 miles east of Kamas. www.gayhike.org.

7:30pm, Anderson-Foothill Branch, Salt Lake Public Library, 1135 S. 2100 East. 594-8611.


12:00-12:45 p.m.

Mary Tebbs, pop rock. Park Stage. 1:15-2:00 p.m.

The Joe Welsh Band, British jigs, reels, airs and polkas. Park Stage. 2:30-3:15 p.m.

Wendy Ohlwiler. indie poprock, Park Stage. 3:45-4:30 p.m.

8:45-9:45 p.m.

Harry Lee and the Back Alley Blues Band, traditional blues. Park Stage. 9:45-10:30 p.m.

Marv Hamilton Band, acoustic folk and blues. Big Mouth Cafe. 10:00-11:00 p.m.

Saliva Sisters, satire. Festival Stage. 10:00-11:00 p.m.

Odyssey Dance Theatre, jazz dance. Amphitheater Stage.

8:30-9:00 p.m.

5:45-6:30 p.m.

Melissa Bond, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

10:15-11:00 p.m.

8:30-9:30 p.m.

Patty Clayton, original ballads. Big Mouth Cafe.

The Trachtenburg Family Slide Show Players, conceptual art rock. Park Stage.

Mona, pop. Park Stage.

Friday, June 25

5:00-5:45 p.m.

12:00-12:45 p.m.

Gross National Product, jazz. Park Stage.

Midnite Expression, Latin variety. Park Stage.

5:45-6:30 p.m.

1:15-2:00 p.m.

Crosstowne, vocal jazz. Festival Stage.

Van Lizard String Band, bluegrass and jazz. Park Stage.

6:15-7:00 p.m.

Alborada International, Latin cumbias and salsa. Park Stage.

2:30-3:15 p.m.

6:30-6:55 p.m.

3:45-4:30 p.m.

Diane Fouts, literary. Big

The KlezBros, Klezmer music. Park Stage.

Brass Tacks Quintet, jazz and swing. Park Stage.

5:00-5:45 p.m.

Shanahy, Celtic music. Park Stage.

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, contemporary dance. Amphitheater Stage.

6:15-7:00 p.m.

The Disco Drippers, disco. Park Stage.

Salzburger Echo. Park Stage.

9:30-11:00 p.m.

6:30-7:00 p.m.

8:45-9:45 p.m.

Brave Combo, nuclear polka, Festival Stage.

Stone Circle, Celtic fusion. Festival Stage.

9:45-10:30 p.m.

6:30-7:30 p.m.

Georgia Barretto & Band, Brazilian jazz. Big Mouth Cafe.

ThaMuseMeant, swing string band. Amphitheater Stage.

10:00-11:00 p.m.

6:45-7:10 p.m.

10:15-11:00 p.m.

7:10-8:00 p.m.

The Trachtenburg Family Slide Show Players. Park Stage.

Wiseguys, comedy. Big Mouth Cafe. 7:30-8:15 p.m.

Kaki King. Park Stage.

Anke Summerhill, acoustic folk. Big Mouth Cafe.

12:00-12:45 p.m.

Jazz Jam. In The Round.

Llajtayku, music from South America. Park Stage.

7:45-8:45 p.m.

Lisa Marie & the Codependents, pop, rock and funk. Festival Stage.

1:15-2:00 p.m.

6:00-6:25 p.m.

2:30-3:15 p.m.

Great Basin Street Band, Dixieland jazz. Park Stage.

Natasha Saje, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

Gina French, acoustic pop. Park Stage.

6:15-7:00 p.m.

3:45-4:30 p.m.

The Sam Payne Project, folk and funk. Park Stage.

6:30-7:00 p.m.

Mouth Cafe.

Dave Stevenson, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

7:00-8:00 p.m.

6:30-7:30 p.m.

Donegal House Band, Irish step dancers. Amphitheater Stage.

Salt Lake Alternative Jazz Orchestra, big band jazz. Festival Stage.

7:00-8:00 p.m.

7:00-7:45 p.m.

Purdymouth, American roots. Festival Stage.

blue haiku, chamber folk music. In The Round.

7:00-8:00 p.m.

7:00-8:00 p.m.

Wiseguys, comedy. Big Mouth Cafe.

Jazz Jam. In The Round.

Pink Poetry Revival, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

Saturday, June 26

Slickrock Gypsies, pop, jazz, blues, celtic. Park Stage.

7:30-10:15 p.m.

The Diamond Experience. Amphitheater Stage.

5:15-6:00 p.m.

5:15-6:00 p.m.

The Trachtenburg Family Slide Show Players, nightly at 10:15.

Brave Combo, Friday at 9:30 p.m.

7:30-10:15 p.m.

9:30-11:00 p.m.

James McMurtry. Amphitheater Stage. 8:45-9:45 p.m.

5:00-6:00 p.m.

Andy Monaco, rock, funk ballads. Big Mouth Cafe.

The Sensations Soul Band, R&B. Park Stage. 9:30-11:00 p.m.

Bettye LaVette, soul vocalist, Festival Stage. Pat Carnahan Trio, jazz. Big Mouth Cafe. 10:00-11:00 p.m.

12:00-12:45 p.m.

8:00-8:25 p.m.

7:30-8:15 p.m.

Sara Caldiero, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

John Flanders and Double Helix, jazz, swing, funk and Latin. Park Stage.

4:30-5:15 p.m.

1:15-2:00 p.m.

8:30-9:30 p.m.

Thompson Woodbury Ensemble, classical string and guitar. In The Round.

New Generation of Gospel, contemp. gospel. Park Stage. 2:30-3:15 p.m.

Xebeche. Park Stage. 3:45-4:30 p.m.

Debi Graham Band, funk. Park Stage.

6:30-7:30 p.m.

The Mutilation of the Johnny People, jazz, rock. Park Stage. 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Sister Wives, rock and blues. Festival Stage. 6:45-7:10 p.m.

Andy Hoffmann and Tully Cathey, literary. Big Mouth Cafe. 7:10-8:00 p.m.

4:30-5:15 p.m.

Wiseguys, comedy. Big Mouth Cafe.

Dreamfield Duo, marimba, vibraphone. Big Mouth Cafe.

7:30-8:30 p.m.

5:45-6:30 p.m.

Stacey Board Band, acoustic folk rock. In The Round.

Helena, classical voice. In The Round.

4:30-5:15 p.m.

Repertory Dance Theatre, contemporary dance. Amphitheater Stage.

Fear No Film Festival – screenings of shorts at 3:00,5:00, 7:00 and 9:00 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, 1:00, 7:00 and 9:00 on Saturday and Sunday. City Library auditorium Street Performers – Kismet, Alphorns of Salzburger Echo, Polkatonics, Lorin Hansen, Salt City Saints, Wanderlust. Artists Marketplace – 130 visual artists booths open from noon-11:00 p.m., 8:00 p.m. on Sunday. International Street Theater – PrincessesPeluches, Bedlam Oz, Lurk, Checkerboard Guy. Art Exhibition – V. Douglas Snow’s “Capitol Reef the Interior Landscape,” 4th floor of the City Library. The Truth Art Yard – handson art for kids, toddler zone, face painting; closes at 8p.m. Luminarium – open noon8:00 p.m. $3 admission.

19

Mountain Jubilee Chorus, women’s barbershop. Amphitheater Stage.

5:15-6:00 p.m.

Ongoing

Doris Hudson-Trujillo

8:15-9:00 p.m.

Swamp Boogie, Cajun blues. Park Stage.

Salt Lake Men’s Choir, choral variety. Amphitheater Stage.

The Trachtenburg Family Slide Show Players, conceptual art rock. Park Stage.

SALT LAKE METRO

Salt Lake Jazz Orchestra, jazz commission premier. Festival Stage.

6:00-6:45 p.m.

10:15-11:00 p.m.

8:30-9:30 p.m.

Mambo Jumbo, salsa. Festival Stage.

John Whipple, American roots. Big Mouth Cafe.

9:45-10:30 p.m.

JUNE 24, 2004

Sunday, June 27

The Prevailing Winds, classical and popular. In The Round.

In the Pocket, jazz. Park Stage.

5:45-6:30 p.m.

6:15-7:00 p.m.

4:30-5:15 p.m.

8:00-9:00 p.m.

Kenshin Taiko, Japanese drums. Amphitheater Stage.

10:15-11:00 p.m.

Wiseguys, comedy. Big Mouth Cafe.

Mike McLane, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

5:15-5:45 p.m.

Kate MacLeod & the Pancakes, folk rock. In The Round.

7:00-8:00 p.m.

8:30-9:00 p.m.

Salsa Brava, Latin rhythms. Festival Stage.

The Diamond Experience, Neil Diamond impersonator, Amphitheater Stage.

Super So Far, pop rock. Park Stage.

5:00-5:45 p.m.

8:30-9:00 p.m.

Young Dubliners, Celtic rock. Festival Stage.

7:30-8:15 p.m.

Myke Place, literary. Big Mouth Cafe.

Young & Rollins, Latin guitar. Park Stage.

Realeyes Collective, hiphop mixed with jazz, rock and soul. Park Stage.

Children’s Dance Theatre, dance. Amphitheater Stage.

8:00-8:25 p.m.

8:00-9:30 p.m.

5:00-6:00 p.m.

8:00-9:30 p.m.

Kaki King, Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

Temporary Measures, jazz. In The Round.

Bonepony, contemporary. Festival Stage.

Miriam Murphy, literary. Insatiable, ska, reggae. Young Dubliners, Sunday at 8:00, 9:30 p.m. Big Mouth Cafe. Festival Stage.

The Trachtenburg Family Slide Show Players, conceptual art rock. Park Stage.

8:15-9:00 p.m.

Dorothee Kocks, literary. Big Mouth Cafe. 8:00-9:00 p.m.

9:45-10:30 p.m.

Mike Henderson and Dustin Rawlings, acoustic blues, rock and country. Big Mouth Cafe.

8:00-8:25 p.m.

OMTOWN / HIGHER OCTAVE MUSIC

Thursday, June 24

Dance Co., contemporary dance. Amphitheater Stage.

ANGILEE WILKERSON

Metro Guide to the Utah Arts Festival


Community Calendar Arts First & Third Wednesdays 7-9pm DiverseCity Writing Series. Free writing workshop for all ages and writing levels. The Center, 361 N. 300 West Sara Gunderson (801) 957-4992

Third Fridays 6-9pm Gallery Stroll. Several dozen of Salt Lake’s finest galleries remain open until 9 p.m. for viewing. Laura Durham (801) 533-3582

Men’s Groups Second & Fourth Tuesdays 7:30-9pm Gay and bisexual men support group. 18 years and older. Friendship, conversation. Gallery Room at the Center, 355 N. 300 West. gmsgglccu@yahoo.com

Northern Utah Mondays Pride Alliance of USU. Meets while school is in session. TSC 335. Courtney Moser, (435) 753-3135, cmoser4@comcast.net, www.usu. edu/pride

Political First Tuesdays 7:30pm Log Cabin Republicans. Salt Lake County Building, 2001 S. State Street, room N4010. www.LRCUtah.org

Second Tuesdays 3-4:30pm Public Safety Liaison Committee. Police are available for discussion regarding the safety of the gay and lesbian community. Gallery Room at the Center, 361 N. 300 West 7:30-9pm Parents and Friends of Lesbian and Gays. Group meeting. Black Box Theater at the Center, 355 N. 300 West

Fourth Tuesdays 7pm Human Rights Campaign meet-up. Organize against the Federal Marriage Amendment. Multiple locations. hrc.org

First Wednesdays 5:30-7pm Utah Stonewall Democrats. Executive committee meeting to discuss strategy. Black Box Theater, 355 N. 300 West. njmikeutah@yahoo.com, www.UtahStonewallDemocrats.org

First Sundays 10am-1:30pm Human Rights Campaign steering committee meeting. Gallery Room at the Center, 361 N. 300 West. HRCSaltLakeUT@aol.com

Eleventh Day of Every Month 3-4pm Homeless Youth Task Force. Group meets monthly to address the needs of homeless youth. Gallery Room at the Center, 361 N. 300 West

Religious Sundays

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

4pm Affirmation. Gay and lesbian Latter-day Saints. SLC, Ogden and Provo meeting sites. Rick Bickmore, (801) 860-6497, www.affirmation.org 9am First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake. 569 S. 1300 East. (801) 582-8687 9am Holladay United Church of Christ. All are welcome in our diverse community of faith. 2631 E. Murray-Holladay Road (801) 277-2631

11am Metropolitan Community Church of SLC. 823 S. 600 East. (801) 595-0052 Noon Restoration Church of Jesus Christ. 2900 S. State Street. (801) 359-1151 7pm Reconciliation. For those wishing to hold to some of the tenets of the LDS church. Regular lessons taken from approved church manuals. Russ (801) 2593800, (801) 296-4797

Quarterly Family Fellowship. A diverse collection of Mormon families engaged in the cause of strengthening families with homosexual members. SLC, Ogden and Provo. Gary or Millie, (801) 374-1447, wattsfam@aol.com, www.LDSFamilyFellowship.

Social Second Mondays 7-8:30 Integrity potluck. Open to all; a fun social gathering. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 4615 S. 3200 West IntegrityUtah.org

Second Tuesday 7:30-9pm Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. Group meeting. Black Box Theater at the Center, 355 N. 300 West

Wednesdays Noon Men’s sack lunch. A purely social group of local men meet to eat and chat. Gallery Room at the Center. 361 N. 300 West

Wednesdays 6:45pm Food, Flicks and Fags. Meet in the pool hall of Brewvies to pick the flick of the night. Admission $2. Men and women 21 and older. 677 S. 200 West 7:30pm Lavender Tribe. A spirituality group that explores everything from auras to Zen meditation. Dave, (801) 521-3857, www.lavendertribe.org 7pm* Affirmation/Reconciliation Movie Night. A combined activity for those from an LDS background. Sugarhouse 10 Theaters, 2227 S. Highland Drive. (801) 296-4797 *time depends on movie schedule

Thursdays 7:30pm Line Dancing. Utah Gay Rodeo Association offers free lessons. Paper Moon, 3737 S. State Street.

Fridays 7-11:30pm Off the Wall Improv. Stand up comedy featuring up-and-coming comics from across the nation. Black Box Theater at the Center, 355 N. 300 West Jake Arky, (801) 824-1359

Second Sundays 1pm South Valley Potluck Club for GLBT people that live between I-215 and the point of the mountain. draperlastresort@aol.com.

Second or Third Weekends 7pm Spicy Dinner Group. Casual suppers held at various locations in the Salt Lake City area. Bring your signature dish whether it is Gumbo Florentine or chicken vindaloo. Logan, (801) 654-2849

Various Weekends Couples Social. Salt Lake Couples is a social group for long-term, committed couples. Strengthening relationships, social networking, fun. Jesse, (801) 231-7776, groups.yahoo.com/groups/ slcouples

9am Glory to God Community Church. 375 Harrison Blvd., Ogden (801) 394-0204

Third Tuesdays

9:30am Provo Community Church. 175 N. University Ave., (801) 375-9115

7pm Parents, Friends and Family of Lesbians and Gays. Claudia, (435) 673-3356

11am Integrity. Episcopal ministry. (801) 566-1311 11am Glory to God Community Church. 375 Harrison Blvd., Ogden (801) 394-0204

Southern Utah

Wednesdays 7pm Dinner and a Homo. An evening of fun and flicks with the community. Bijou Theater at Bluff and Sunset, St. George. Aimie, (435) 635-0624, sugltcc@yahoo.com

5pm Southern Utah University Pride Club. All are welcome to participate. The Blue Kat, 90 W. Hoover Street, Cedar City. laundra@suu.edu, www. suu.edu/orgs/pride

First Wednesdays 7:30pm Alternative Gardening Club. Learn about plants, trees and foliage in general. Meet at the Sugarhouse Park Rose Bldg. in the northeast corner of the park. Don (801) 484-6414, roylance@msn.com.

Sundays 11am Latte Day Saints. Sunday morning coffee, bread and conversation. Xetava Gardens in Kayenta. 815 Coyote Gulch Court, Ivans Aimie, (435) 6350624, sugltcc@yahoo.com

Third Sundays 7pm Family movie night at Doug and Kim’s. Movie, popcorn and socializing. Doug or Kim, (435) 668-9702

Special Interest First Tuesdays 7-9:30pm Bi-Poly Group. Bisexual and Polyamorous group meeting. Black Box Theater at the Center, 355 N. 300 West

Wednesdays 6pm BDSM Discussion Group. Utah Power Exchange’s weekly coffee klatch. Stonewall Coffee Co., 361 N. 300 West. UtahPowerExchange.org

Last Thursdays 7pm Utah Bear Alliance. General meeting for bears, cubs and admirers. Black Box Theater at the Center, 355 N. 300 West. Noal Robinson, (801) 949-3989

Third Saturdays 10am Western Transsexual Network. Meet and discuss issues relating to gender change. Gallery Room at the Center, 361 N. 300 West 7pm Engendered Species – Crossdressers and Transgender people. They meet most weekends for dining and discussion and always the third Saturday for an open house. The Center, 361 N. 300 West, (801) 320-0551

First Sundays 11am Utah Bear Alliance brunch. Social/service organization for Bears, Cubs and their admirers. Call for locations. Noal Robinson, (801) 949-3989

Sundays 4pm Latin Divas. Latin drag organization plans for shows, activities and fund raisers. Black Box Theater at the Center, 361 N. 300 West. Juan Lopez (801) 577-5927

Sports and Fitness Mondays 6pm Slug Rugby. Salt Lake Rugby Assoc. meets for practice and play. All women of all levels welcome. Sugarhouse Park, 2100 S. 1300 East. www.slugrugby.org 6:30pm Frontrunners/Frontwalkers. Walkers make a 3-mile loop, runners do a 4-mile run at Sugarhouse Park. Meet at the northeast corner of Sugarhouse Park in the Garden Ctr parking lot. Geoff, (801) 712-9558, alliance@aros.net, FrontRunnersUtah.org

Second Tuesdays 7pm-8:30pm Stonewall Shooting Sports meeting. Doug’s Shoot and Sports, 4926 S. Redwood Road. www.StonewallShootingSportsUtah.com

Wednesdays 6:30pm Frontrunners/Frontwalkers. A beautiful route through north Bonneville Drive and up City Creek Canyon. Group meets at 11th Avenue and B Street, near the guardrail. Geoff Partain, (801) 712-9558, alliance@aros.net, FrontRunnersUtah.org

Thursdays 6pm Slug Rugby. Salt Lake Rugby Assoc. meets for practive and play. Women of all levels welcome. Sugarhouse Park, 2100 S. 1300 East. www.slugrugby.org

7pm Goodtimes Bowling League. Bonwood Bowl, 2500 S. Main St. Singles, beginners welcome. $10/night. Scott Millar, (801) 832-9745

Tuesdays and Thursdays 7-8pm Queer Utah Acquatics Club. Fairmont pool, 1044 E. Sugarhouse Dr. douglaskf@aol.com, quacquac.org

First and Third Saturdays 10am Lambda Hiking Club. Parking lot at 700 E. 200 South. Day hikes, overnight hikes during summer. Winter activities. Bring sturdy shoes, sun protection, food and water. Randy, (801) 532-8447, GayHike.org

Sundays

Third Saturdays 6:30pm sWerve Monthly. Gathering for lesbian and bisexual women to meet in a safe, social environment. SwerveUtah.com.

Sundays 2pm Northern Utah Women Recreational Opportunities Club. Social organization for women in the Ogden area. groups.yahoo.com/group/OgdenOutdoorWomen 11am-3pm Pride Softball League. Come join – we will fit you onto a team. Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West. Kaos168@hotmail.com

9am Frontrunnrs/Frontwalkers. Liberty Park/Avenues routes. Meet in front of Barbacoa Mexican Grill, 859 E 900 South. Geoff Partain, (801) 712-9558, alliance@aros.net, FrontRunnersUtah.org

Varying Saturdays

11am-Noon Queer Utah Acquatics Club. Water polo. Fairmont Pool. 1044 E. Sugarhouse Drive. Men’s and women’s teams; beginners and advanced teams. douglaskf@aol.com, quacquac.org

Unless noted otherwise, activites for youth are held at: Youth Activity Center at the Center, 355 N. 300 West. “bob,” (801) 539-8800, ext. 14

Noon Slug Rugby. Salt Lake Rugby Assoc. All women of all levels welcome. Sugarhouse Park, 2100 S. 1300 East. www.slugrugby.org

7pm Young Women’s Support Group. Open discussion, activities.

2:30pm Soccer. Fairmont Park, 2300 S. 1100 East. Open play. Martin Grygar, (801) 231-9453, jesper2@hotmail.com 3pm Volleyball. Fairmont Park, 2300 S. 1100 East. Open play. Martin Grygar (801) 231-9453, jesper2@hotmail.com

11am Utah Singles for single lesbian women. The Center, 361 N. 300 West. groups.yahoo.com/group/lesbian_singles

Youth Ages 13-19

First Wednesdays Second & Fourth Wednesdays 7pm Queer Slam. Open workshop for all young people into poetry slams and gettin’ the word out!

Third Wednesdays 7pm In Tune. For young singers, songwriters and musicians.

3pm Basketball. Fairmont Park, 2300 S. 1100 East. Pick-up games. Martin Grygar, (801) 231-9453, jesper2@hotmail.com

Thursdays

11am-3pm Pride Softball League. Hundreds of players of both genders. A fun social gathering. Newcomers welcome. Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West. kaos168@hotmail.com

Fridays

Third Sundays 11am Stonewall Shooting Sports shoot. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Lee Kay Center for Hunter Education and Public Shooting Range. 6000 W 2100 S. StonewallShootingSportsUtah.com

Saturdays or Sundays 10am or Noon Motorcyclists. Gay Bikers of Utah meet most weekends to ride through different scenic areas. Beans & Brews Tuesdays 6pm to decide route. 5900 S. State. Jamie, 598-0760, gaybikersofUT@yahoogroups.com

Substance Abuse Tuesdays 8pm Alcoholics Anonymous. St. Paul’s Church, 261 S. 900 East

Wednesdays 8pm Alcoholics Anonymous. Washington Terrace, 4601 S. 300 West, Ogden

Fridays 7:30-9pm Alcoholics Anonymous. Español. Gallery Room at the Center, 355 N. 300 West 8pm Alcoholics Anonymous. St. Paul’s Church, 261 S. 900 East

Saturdays 6pm Alcoholics Anonymous. St. Mary’s Church, 50 W. 200 North, Provo

Sundays 3pm Alcoholics Anonymous. Jubilee Center, 309 E. 100 South, rear door

Testing Mondays 5-7pm HIV Antibody Testing. Drop In. Free first Mondays. Utah AIDS Foundation 1408 S. 1100 East. Tyler 801-487-2323 Second and Fourth Wednesdays Free HIV/STD testing and counseling. Gallery Room at the Center, 361 N. 300 West

Women Lesbian support group. Call to get info. University of Utah Women’s Resource Center. 581-8030, www.sa.utah.edu/women

7pm Young Men’s Group. Ages 13-19. Open discussion and activities determined by participants and facilitator. 7:30pm Movie night.

Saturdays 2pm Queers in Action. Want to hold a “Queers for Peace” sign at a rally, plan Utah’s Queer prom, or start your own group? Join us. 4pm Gayme Time. PlayStation2, XBOX games. Use ours or bring yours. Board games and cards also available.

First Saturdays Generation Gap. An opportunity to share coming out stories and other queer stories between generations. Stonewall Coffee Co., 355 N. 300 West. “bob,” (801) 539-8800, ext. 14

Third Sundays 2pm Collage of Utah. Support group for children of gay or lesbian parents. Youth Activity Center at the Center, 355 N. 300 West Erica Summers, (801) 583-5300

Young Adult Ages 18-30 Mondays 7:30pm University of Utah Lesbian/Gay Student Union. Union Building, Room 411. (801) 587-7973, www.utah. edu/lgsu 7pm Pride Alliance of USU. Meets when school is in session. TSC 335. (435) 797-4297, www.usu.edu/pride

Tuesdays 8pm Weber State University Delta Lambda Sappho Union. Junction Room, Student Union. Katharine MacKay, (801) 626-6782, Julie_Drach@hotmail.com

Wednesdays 5pm Southern Utah University Pride Club. All welcome to participate. Blue Kat, 90 W. Hoover Street, Cedar City laundra@suu.edu, suu.edu/ksuu 7pm Salt Lake Community College GLBT Student Union. South City Campus, Room W111G. Gordon Storrs, (801) 957-4562, Gordon.storrs@slcc.edu.

Saturdays Various times Gay LDS Young Adults, An organization that welcomes everyone but has a focus on young adults with an LDS background. glya@hotmail.com, glyautah@yahoo. com, www.glya.com


LUCY JUAREZ

Edie Carey performing at an Equality Utah benefit at the Vortex.

Edie Carey Enchants Audience at Benefit by Mandy Q. Racer

SALT LAKE METRO ■

Edie Carey’s albums are available through CDBaby.com. Autographed albums may be purchased direct via EdieCarey.com.

JUNE 24, 2004 21

Edie Carey, barefoot on an outdoor stage and surrounded by pagan statuary, seemed a benevolent and feminine Pan, one who utterly charmed an intimate crowd at the Vortex. The Equality Utah benefit concert on June 6 drew experienced fans and created new admirers, all of whom felt immediately connected with the songstress. As Carey settled in, she asked if Main Street was always completely deserted on Sundays. “Nothing was open. It’s like Detroit, but not scary,” she said. While tucking her velvet guitar strap behind her back, she described her Sunday afternoon on Salt Lake’s streets as Zen-like: “You’re slowly baking to death, but you’re at peace with it.” Carey performed unplugged — a last minute decision spurred by the meager equipment on hand, and one that was celebrated by the audience. “This is how I prefer to play music anyway,” she said. “It will be very intimate.” Carey pulled a metal chair to the very edge of the stage and promised to project her voice, though she admitted she’d rather try out the Vortex’s pool: “Let’s not have a concert, let’s go swimming!” With her guitar in her lap and bare feet stretched up onto her painted toes, Carey began to sing. Whether the piece was from her self-dubbed “happy love repertoire” or of the haunting genre to which “Violently” belongs, she held her listeners captive even beyond the last note — wrung from her guitar with a gentle shake.

Witnessing Carey perform is voyeuristic — with eyes closed, she moves from a silky whispered hush to a velvety, liquid power drawn from a deep reserve. Carey’s lyrics lie exposed before the listener like so many bones in the desert, picked clean with blinding notes of white-hot honesty. “My songs tend to be more contemplative,” she said — a euphemism, perhaps, for her collection of mournful tunes. So when she “fell madly in love” about two years ago, she worried that she would stop writing “because I’m too busy driving and being happy.” Born of her contentment — and therefore proving that Carey’s well is far from empty, no matter how dry her eyes may be — is the song “I Need You,” which was “a long time in coming.” Written for her boyfriend, this “sweet, sweet love song,” finally celebrates the positive aspects of codependency: “I need you, all right, are you satisfied?” Carey, smiling, said, “I’m slowly letting people back in.” Carey’s magnetism as an artist is fueled not only by her carefully sculptured voice and her skilled songwriting, but also through her ability to indeed open up to others, whether live or on disc, baring her soul and becoming, in a sense, an empathic musical conduit.


Now Playing THE CHRONICLES OF RIDDICK

GARFIELD

After years of exile, intergalactic outlaw Riddick (Vin Diesel) travels to the planet Helion, his arrival coinciding with that of despotic Lord Marshall (Colm Feore) and his henchmen, the Necromongers. Only Riddick can save Helion’s residents from death or enslavement — that is, if he doesn’t become distracted by a visit to the hellish planet Cremoria. The Chronicles of the Ridiculous would be a better title for this sci-fi balderdash, which suffers from a lack of narrative coherence, amateurish special effects, dumb dialogue, and another lumbering performance by Diesel. The Helions and Necromongers are in awe of the pumped-up, short-tempered Riddick’s apparently superhuman strength — at last, a movie that celebrates ‘roid rage. Grade: D / Kinsey scale: 1 (If Diesel ever gives up on his dream of becoming an actor, that hot body could always model for muscle magazines. Costars Colm Feore, Judi Dench, Linus Roache, and Thandie Newton have all appeared in queer-themed films.)

Fat, lasagna-loving Garfield (the voice of Bill Murray) is annoyed when his human, Jon (Breckin Meyer), brings home an innocent, not-too-bright dog named Odie. But when Odie is dog-napped, it’s Garfield to the rescue. If that sounds like a slim premise, it is — and quite beside the point. The real reason this movie exists is to pump up the revenue stream of a comic-strip character who’s seen more popular days, and if audiences are mildly entertained in the process that’s just gravy. Thank goodness, then, for Bill Murray, who gives the CGI cat a much-needed shot of new personality. His voice performance is frequently witty and probably largely improvised, bearing more than a passing resemblance to his old Saturday Night Live lounge-singer routine. In other words, it’s something he can do in his sleep that will keep adults who wind up taking kids to see the movie from dozing off. Grade: B- / Kinsey Scale: 1 (There’s a passing, Garfield-delivered reference to “alternative lifestyles” as Odie winds up in a pair of lederhosen. Queer actor Alan Cumming voices a fey cat named Persnikitty, and Will & Grace’s Debra Messing voices Garfield’s feline girlfriend, Arlene.)

THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW

22

SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

Climatologist Jack Hall’s (Dennis Quaid) dire warnings of a new ice age come true as tornados demolish Los Angeles, baseball-size hail rains over Tokyo, and a tsunami swamps Manhattan, all in advance of a mega-storm that will freeze the northern hemisphere. As if worldwide catastrophe weren’t enough, Hall also faces the possibility of losing his teenage son, Sam (Jake Gyllenhaal), who’s trapped in the New York Public Library. This disaster melodrama rises above its inane plot on the strength of Quaid’s roguish charm, an excellent supporting cast, and superior computer-generated special effects, particularly as the twisters lay waste to L.A. But genuine thrills are kept to a minimum, thanks to too many action scenes that amount to little more than people trudging through snow. Grade: B / Kinsey Scale: 1 (Quaid played the closeted husband in Todd Haynes’ Far from Heaven. Co-stars Ian Holm, Dash Mihok, Sela Ward, Tamlyn Tomita, and Perry King have all appeared in queer-themed projects.)

HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN In his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) learns that Sirius Black (Gary Oldman), an inmate of Azkaban prison for his role in the death of Harry’s parents, has escaped and may be coming for Harry next. That’s the simple version: the more complicated tale involves shape-shifting animals, mistaken identities, time travel, and a very large teenager-hungry tree. Meanwhile, the kids in the cast are maturing, growing into their roles without a trace of awkwardness. The most important development, though, is the film’s running time. Even though the books get longer as the series goes on, this film installment is a little shorter than the first two, thanks to a looser, less slavish devotion to its source; as a result, it plays much more briskly. That may upset literal-minded devotees of the novels, but will delight those who

Kinsey Scale: 0 – not gay at all 6 – Gay as a bunny.

want their movies to actually move. Grade: A / Kinsey Scale: 1 (The large cast has lots of experience in queer-themed projects. Oldman played Joe Orton in Prick up Your Ears; co-star David Thewlis was Paul Verlaine in Total Eclipse; Emma Thompson recently appeared in Angels in America; and Julie Walters costarred in Billy Elliot and the independent films Sister My Sister and Just Like a Woman.)

MAN ON FIRE John Creasy (Denzel Washington) is a burned-out, alcoholic counterterrorism veteran who takes a job as bodyguard for a 9-year-old girl (Dakota Fanning) in kidnap-plagued Mexico. But this strange film can’t decide whether it wants to be the story of a downcast man redeemed by contact with a child who loves him, or a standardissue Hollywood revenge flick with extra helpings of graphic violence. As soon as the audience wraps its collective mind around Washington’s moody performance and Fanning’s poised-beyond-her-years personality (and impending kidnapping), the tone abruptly changes and bodies start getting mowed down. The unlikely pairing of a veteran Oscar winner and a whipsmart little girl makes the first half of the movie completely watchable; yet a Walking Tall/Punisher-style vigilante bloodbath makes the second half a big, yawning anticlimax. Grade: C+ / Kinsey Scale: 1 (Washington is now somewhat notorious for his career advice — which went something like this: never kiss another man onscreen — to a young Will Smith, just as that actor was preparing to play gay in Six Degrees of Separation. Washington went on to star in Philadelphia. Supporting cast member Mickey Rourke played a drag queen in the little-seen indie film Animal Factory, and co-star Radha Mitchell played a lesbian in High Art.)

MEAN GIRLS Cady Heron (Lindsay Lohan), homeschooled in Africa her entire life, moves to America and quickly finds herself at what can only be described as Lord of the Flies High School, where the caste system is vicious. Simultaneously falling in with the “art weirdos” (read:

queer kids) and the “Plastics” (rich, beautiful girls), she’s put up to the prank of infiltrating the latter to exact revenge on them for their years-long torment of kids lower on the social totem pole. The snag: in doing so, she finds herself craving their attention, acceptance, and access to cute boys. Saturday Night Live writer Tina Fey’s script is a dead-on attack of the uniquely horrible world of adolescent females, and it only suffers when forced to make nice in the third act. So while not the classic teen-angst comedy that was Heathers — where the revenge took on unapologetically murderous dimensions — it’s still a hilarious glimpse of high school hell. Grade: B / Kinsey Scale: 4 (Co-star Daniel Franzese plays the type of rebellious, chubby, high school gay boy you wish you had had the nerve to be, and co-star Lizzy Caplan is his comrade in popular-kid terrorism — a maybe-lesbian-maybe-not girl named Janis Ian. These two steal every scene they’re in, and if there were such a thing as artistic justice in Hollywood, they’d get their own queer Ghost World-esque sequel.)

RAISING HELEN When her sister and brother-in-law die in an auto accident, fast-living fashion executive Helen (Kate Hudson) must step in to raise her nephew and two nieces. She’s absolutely unprepared for the responsibility and needs constant help from her other sister, Jenny (Joan Cusack), a Supermom who resents being passed over for the job of guardian. Unsurprisingly, as with everything else in this painfully predictable and unfunny big-screen sitcom, Helen finally learns the true meaning of family, parenthood, and life, thanks to her exposure to the bratty kids and the near-poverty living conditions their presence creates. Every so often, Hollywood likes to sell this sort of lie to remind everyone unfortunate enough to buy a ticket that true happiness is the simple life of family values and store-brand macaroni-and-cheese. Don’t swallow it. Grade: D / Kinsey Scale: 1 (There’s a vaguely gayish atmosphere created by Helen’s nameless, disposable, gay fashion-world “friends.” Also, Hudson played a budding lesbian in Robert Altman’s Dr. T and the Women, Cusack starred in In & Out, and co-star John Corbett was a regular on Sex and the City.)

SAVED! Shocked when her boyfriend, Dean (Chad Faust), reveals that he’s gay, born-again Mary (Jena Malone) sleeps with him in the belief that Jesus wants her to set him straight. When Dean is sent away for therapy and she finds herself queasy with morning sickness, Mary creates a scandal at her Christian high school as she begins to question her faith. A talented ensemble lets the one-liners fly in this satirical teen comedy that genially skewers rigid beliefs and the social purgatory of adolescence with equal abandon. Some characters — notably Mary’s hellbent-for-heaven rival Hilary Faye (Mandy Moore) — are little more than rabid Christian stereotypes. But that barely detracts from a movie that delivers a message of unconditional love, acceptance, and, yes, faith — along with the belly laughs. Grade: A- / Kinsey Scale: 4 (A minor subplot involves Dean’s learning to accept his sexuality and finding a boyfriend in spite of therapy that encourages him to renounce his homosexuality. Malone and co-stars Heather Matarazzo, Martin Donovan, and Mary-Louise Parker have all appeared in queer-themed films. And ever since former child star Macaulay Culkin returned to the camera after

eight years, he’s appeared in this, Party Monster, and on Will & Grace.)

SHREK 2 They could have called this delightful sequel Meet the Parents, if that title hadn’t already been taken, because it sums up the plot nicely. Shrek (the voice of Mike Myers) and his new bride, Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz), with Donkey (Eddie Murphy) in tow, visit the land of Far Far Away to show Fiona’s parents (Julie Andrews, John Cleese) that she’s happily become an ogre in order to marry Shrek. Appalled that his daughter has wed a monster instead of the self-absorbed Prince Charming (Rupert Everett), the king enlists the help of a mean-spirited Fairy Godmother (Jennifer Saunders) in an attempt to steal Fiona back. What follows is witty, sweet, and love-affirming, leaving behind the smutty double entendres and (most of) the low-brow flatulence humor of the original. It’s that rarest of sequels — one that’s vastly superior to its precursor, and one that will leave you happily ever after. Grade: A / Kinsey Scale: 2 (Although there’s no explicitly queer content, it could be argued that the story, with its “love whom you choose” message, is a metaphor for same-sex marriage; in addition, one of Cinderella’s ugly stepsisters (voiced by Larry King) is a man in drag. Myers played gay in 54, Andrews starred in Victor/Victoria, Saunders stars on TV’s Absolutely Fabulous, and Antonio Banderas, who voices Puss-in-Boots, is a veteran of Pedro Almodovar’s films and played gay in Philadelphia. Everett, it goes without saying, is gay full time.)

SOUL PLANE On NWA Airlines, negative stereotypes rule: black passengers drink malt liquor and eat fried chicken; white passengers are named “Honky”; Latino characters’ entrances are accompanied by mariachi trumpets; Middle Easterners are turbaned terrorists; women are “bitches” and “ho’s”; and gay male flight attendants squeal, bat their eyes, and wear a lot of lip gloss. Meanwhile, the plot of this ensemble Airplane-style spoof involves a hip-hop airline that caters to African-American passengers with a high tolerance for incompetent, dope-smoking pilots (Snoop Dogg), trash-talking crewmembers (Mo’Nique and Loni Love), and the likelihood of a fatal crash. And as offensive as it is — and it is — the movie aims low and hits its mark with plenty of throwaway humor and crudely inventive visual style. Grade: C+ / Kinsey Scale: 2 (There are plenty of gay jokes flying around the cabin of this plane, and all of them are homophobic. Whether or not they should be seen as more or less offensive than the other thoroughly racist and sexist content is up to individual viewers. Sensitive persons should probably stay away. But for queer audiences interested in witnessing how far gay men still have to go with regard to African-American comedies of this sort, film school begins here. The one gay character with a name is flight attendant Flame — played by Gary Anthony Williams. Cast member Tom Arnold was a regular on Roseanne, a sitcom that broke lots of TV ground with its lesbian content.)

THE STEPFORD WIVES A fresh start in the suburbs sounds like a wonderful idea to Joanna Eberhart (Nicole Kidman) and husband Walter Kresby (Matthew Broderick) after Joanna loses her high-powered network-TV job. Behind the walls of gated Stepford, Conn., Walter quickly bonds with the local men; but the town’s women — perky, submissive, and oddly fond of chintz — repulse Joanna, who becomes downright frightened

when, one by one, her new friends mutate into typical Stepford wives. Screenwriter Paul Rudnick’s attempt at campy black comedy meets with only partial success. The dialogue is hilarious, and the cast sparkles, particularly Glenn Close as the spookiest of the wives. But an insufferable, tacked-on ending drags on seemingly forever as a 70-minute idea is stretched to a feature-length 90 minutes. Grade: B- / Kinsey Scale: 3 (Conservative Stepford welcomes its Log Cabin brethren, as one gay partner discovers when he, too, transforms into a Stepford “wife.” Gay screenwriter Rudnick wrote Jeffrey and previously collaborated with Stepford director Frank Oz on In & Out. The cast boasts one genuine queer icon in Bette Midler. Nearly all of the principals — Kidman, Broderick, Close, Roger Bart, Jon Lovitz, David Marshall Grant, Matt Malloy, and Lorri Bagley — have appeared in gaythemed movies or plays. Mike White of Chuck & Buck fame has a cameo.)

TROY Trojan prince Paris (Orlando Bloom) ignites a powder keg when he runs off with Spartan king Menelaus’ (Brendan Gleeson) wife, Helen (Diana Kruger). In answer to this insult, Menelaus’ brother, Mycenaean king Agamemnon (Brian Cox), unites the Greek tribes to make war on Troy. Joining him in the campaign is godlike warrior Achilles (Brad Pitt), fighting for neither king nor country, but purely for glory. This Greek mythology “lite” transforms formidable legend into soapy melodrama, wasting fine individual fight choreography, luminous cinematography, and Eric Bana’s transcendent performance as Paris’ protective brother, Hector. Inane dialogue, battles rendered in obvious CGI, and the egregious miscasting of the wimpy Bloom and petulant Pitt doom this would-be epic. It’s all cheese, no whiz. Grade: C- / Kinsey Scale: 2 (Achilles’ exceptional closeness with his cousin Patroclus leads one to wonder how Greek these Greeks really are. The battle togs of both sides reveal lots of shapely legs, and Bloom and Pitt display their bare bottoms — the best argument for why either was cast. Cox, Bloom, and co-stars Sean Bean and Peter O’Toole have all appeared in queer-themed films.)

VAN HELSING When Dr. Gabriel Van Helsing (Hugh Jackman) arrives in Transylvania to vanquish the vampire Dracula (Richard Roxburgh), he finds himself in a country teeming with monsters that include Frankenstein’s creature (Shuler Hensley) and a werewolf (Will Kemp). Though he likes to work alone, Van Helsing makes an exception for the headstrong Anna Valerious (Kate Beckinsale), the woman he’s vowed to protect and who insists on teaming with him to vanquish the festering evil. Jackman’s charm, coupled with some excellent special effects and a wonderfully atmospheric prologue that evokes the spirit of ’30s-era horror classics, promise a bang-up frightfest. But the movie quickly deteriorates into a monster mishmash, thanks to banal dialogue, overly frantic and pointless action scenes, and an inane story. Grade: C- / Kinsey Scale: 2 (There are homoerotic overtones to interactions between Van Helsing and Dracula and between Anna and Dracula’s brides. Jackman is currently playing gay singersongwriter Peter Allen on Broadway in The Boy from Oz. Beckinsale and co-stars Kevin J. O’Connor, Robbie Coltrane, and Samuel West have appeared in queer-themed films.)


Subtext Not Lost Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkabam by David Turner

UNHCR/B

Lost Boys of Sudan 4.5/5 stars Opens July 2 at the Broadway by Xenia Cherkaev “You are the future of Sudan,” village elders tell teenagers on their way to America. “Do not act like those people who wear baggy jeans.” The teenagers are some of the South Sudanese “Lost Boys,” whose families were exterminated in the 20 yearlong civil war. They lived in refugee camps until 2001 when 3,000 lucky ones received refugee status in the United States and flew here to receive an education, send money home, and to eventually come back and help their people. When they arrive in Houston, they are told that their rent will be paid for three months, after which they are expected to get jobs, support themselves, and go to high school. Never mind that most American teenagers cannot graduate high school while working full time, and never mind also that these are kids who have never been in a two-story building and who sheepishly admit to being afraid of “falling through the floor.” Our caring government sets them up with jobs in a plastics factory and even gives them a one week vacation in a summer camp. The Lost Boys of Sudan is about immigrant struggle, alienation, and good intentions gone awry. No one is really to blame for the low-class drudgery that the boys fall into. They seem to have just slipped through the bureaucratic cracks. Newly arrived Peter and Santino are estranged from their surroundings and from each other. Another Sudanese youth warns them that touching and holding hands is forbidden in America’s homophobic culture, and that their lives will be easier if they just forget their traditions. Americans — like the fellow high school student who tells Peter to not worry about girls yet, but to just “have fun” — are portrayed as well-meaning but clueless. When Peter tries to interact with American teenagers, who worry about “changing the schools” with Christian sing-a-longs and trying out for the basketball team, he finds himself a “poor child among rich children with parents.” The camera has seemingly unlimited access to the boys’ lives and feels like an unobtrusive observer in this non-narrated film. Consequently, the film’s message is understated. There seem to be no bad intentions, only callous misfortunes which destine the boys to a perpetually lost existence — alienated from their families, their old country, their new country and ultimately from each other.

The Revolution Will Not Be Studio-Produced Baadasssss! 4/5 stars Opens June 25 at the Broadway theatres by Xenia Cherkaev Baadasssss! (a.k.a. How to Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass) is a docudrama celebrating the trials of guerrilla film: specifically the Black Power film that forced Hollywood to rethink its portrayal of black characters. In 1971, Melvin van Peebles’ Sweet Sweetback’s Badass Song was rated X by an all-white jury. The film about a black hustler who kills racist cops and escapes unscarred was rejected by all the major studios, and was instead made on a shoestring budget under the guise of a porn film. Riddled with financial and casting problems — the stress of which partially blinded Melvin — it was also the highest-grossing independent film of the year. Melvin’s son, Mario van Peebles, appeared in his father’s film as the 13 year-old Sweetback losing his virginity. Mario writes, directs, and stars in Baadasssss! as the perpetually stressed out and often unsympathetic Melvin. “Entertainment-wise, is has to be a motherfucker,” says Melvin about Sweetback, because if the audience gets bored the message is lost. Mario follows his father’s formula in Baadasssss! which is as riotous as it is righteous. Desperate, intense, disenfranchised, sexy, but more than just a biography or a historical piece, it is a celebration of independent political filmmaking. Melvin declares in the beginning of the film that nothing revolutionary will ever come out of the studio machine, and then proceeds to use drug money to finance the project. (When that falls through, Bill Cosby steps up.) All the underworld has a hand in Sweetback. The porn industry, drug dealers and hippies help make it, and the Black Panthers help distribute it. It is shot with a racially diverse crew that is brought together by a mutual desire to fight the establishment — and with good reason: While shooting, this crew gets arrested on suspicion of grand theft because the cops cannot believe that such “racially diverse” people could legitimately own so much expensive film equipment. Regardless of how true it is, Baadasssss! is a celebration of uncompromising artistic and revolutionary spirit. It is also a sweet film paying homage to Mario’s difficult and often tyrannical father.

JUNE 24, 2004 ■

SALT LAKE METRO

The latest offering in the Harry Potter film series is Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkabam and the readers of Salt Lake Metro will find much to recommend it. Consider a film with no obvious gay subtext but a subtle lesson carefully delivered and lasting. Harry is about to begin his third year at Hogwarts. He is older, but so likely are the book’s readers. Hormones have kicked in. The very first scene reveals Harry sitting under the covers in his room. He is practicing the use of his magic wand. When the knock sounds at the door he is quick to pretend sleep. Once back at school Harry and his friends Ron and Hermione find themselves in the class of a new teacher, Mr. Lupin. He is the mysterious guy who has been hired to teach young wizards “Defense Against the Dark Arts.” Lupin is the perfect teacher for Harry. He comes along when Harry is emerging from childhood and is most awkward. As an orphan, Harry seeks any connection with his dead parents. Lupin knew them and he provides Harry a glimpse into what they were like. The conversation on the bridge between Harry and Lupin is touching because it demonstrates the connection possible between a good teacher and a student. Still, Lupin is secretive. There is something sad and distant about him. He sometimes disappears and seems ill and weak. During one of these absences, Snape — the teacher we love to hate — acts as the substitute. He assigns the students an onerous report on the subject of werewolves. The topic may be appropriate for their study of the Dark Arts but it is out of sequence in the curriculum and suggests a certain unexplained prejudice from Snape. Hermione, in her first act of adolescent rebellion rejects the assignment and Snape. She reminds him and the class that werewolves do not become werewolves by choice. They are simply true to their nature and to the circumstances under which they find themselves. This bit of reasoning comes from a young girl who has experienced life as the target of discrimination. As the daughter of non-magical parents, some students at Hogwarts consider her unacceptable: She is a mudblood and the outsider. As his name suggests, Lupin turns out to be a werewolf. He has never harmed a student or crossed the line between student and teacher, yet still his secret condemns him. He is exposed and forbidden to teach at Hogwarts. Harry learns the painful truth that when the word gets out about Lupin, the school will suffer. Parents will remove their children rather than let them be taught by someone who, although he may be the best teacher in the school, also happens to be a werewolf. Any adult will pick up the tragic irony in this situation. J. K. Rowling has been teaching Harry and her readers more than they realize at first reading. No wonder the religious right hates Harry Potter. Fortunately, the new director Alfonso Cuaron takes the time to make the point. The real magic of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is not the fantastical — it’s the magic that happens when a caring adult reaches a child. The heartbreak is that even in Harry Potter’s world such connections are fragile and can be lost.

Falling Through the Floor

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Sane Advice

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presents a special gay and lesbian night at the

The Artifact Exhibit

SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

September 18, 2004

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Our ‘B’

The evening begins with a Titanic-themed dinner party at Third & Main Bar and Grill by Chef Paul Willardson. The 200-artifact traveling exhibit covers 10,000 square feet of exhibition space and allows you to experience what life was like aboard the ship. Our package includes the audio tour. After the tour, a captain’s reception will be held. Ticket packages may be purchased with or without the dinner. For ticket info, please call the Metro offices at 801-323-9500 or go to www.slmetro.com

As a psychotherapist, I see many individuals who are struggling with sexual identity. Often, they enlist my help to understand who they are emotionally and sexually. We sometimes find that the truth lies in the multifaceted and dynamic arena of bisexuality and bi-emotionality. On the continuum of emotionality and sexuality there lie many possibilities. The realities of where we are now may change over time since sexuality is not static for many individuals. Even though we as a community are now represented by the acronym “LGBT,” a wonderful attempt at inclusivity, I think there is little understanding of the “B” part of our community. There are many nuances in sexuality and these realities or our awareness of these realities evolve. As with all sexual identity, it is the profound and intimate understanding by the individual of who they are and how they feel at any given time. The reality may be simply that the gender of the person is not the primary factor in determining to whom one is attracted. Individuals may be attracted to one gender more than the other, attracted to both equally or find gender unimportant. The bisexual FAQ website states that a bisexual person is one who in his/her own estimation feels the potential to have attraction to people of either gender, since not everyone has necessarily had the opportunity to act on their emotional, sexual or romantic feelings with individuals of both genders. Bisexuality is often not seen as an authentic or legitimate sexual identity. Sometimes bisexuality is seen as an identity that is not an identity but rather a sign of ambiguity, a category that defeats categorization. Bisexuals may be discriminated against from heterosexual communities for engaging in illegitimate/non-normative samesex relationships (especially if they have a “choice”). This is part of a heterosexist ideology. In the homosexual communities one may be characterized as being “confused,” “fence sitting,” “cowardly,” “just too afraid to come out as gay,” or as “wanting the best of both worlds.” This is a monosexist ideology.

Perhaps adding to the confusion is the fact that those who identify internally as bisexual may protect themselves by how they use language and how they decide to present themselves based on the audience, occasion, purpose and power (or lack thereof ) that they feel at any given time. They may disguise certain words or make strategic choices about what to talk about and how to phrase it. In short, bisexual individuals often do not declare themselves to be such, and the prevalence of this life experience may be underestimated. There has been very little support, inclusiveness and true community for bisexuals, though that is starting to change. There are many more websites where one can reach out. The Bisexual FAQ website states, “We are here to share our lives, though stories, history, friends and family. We want to reach out from one bisexual to another and bridge the gap between isolated bisexual communities — to be the human part of the interface. We are slowly coming together, demanding that our love of both sexes not be ridiculed or minimized. — demanding that as much as the gay and lesbian community wants recognition and respect from the straight communitity, we want recognition and respect from both.” Through understanding, the more rigid dichotomy between gay and straight can lessen and help bisexual individuals to feel less alienated, rejected and delegitimized. Since the concept of identity in all regards is fluid, perhaps we can conceive bisexuality as the identity with features of the greatest fluidity. Maybe the limitation is in language or the idea that we try to categorize the intricacies of the human circumstance. Given these complexities one may still identify as bisexual, although others prefer to call or conceive of themselves as: pansexual, nonpreferential, sexually fluid, ambisexual, omnisexual or biphilic. The magazine Anything That Moves has a mission statement that summarizes this topic well: They state, “Bisexuality is a whole, fluid identity. Do not assume that bisexuality is binary in nature, that we have ‘two’ sides or that we must be involved simultaneously with both genders to be fulfilled as human beings. In fact, don’t assume that there are only two genders. Do not mistake our fluidity for confusion, irresponsibility or an inability to commit. Do not equate promiscuity, infidelity or unsafe sex behavior with bisexuality. Those are human traits that cross all sexual orientations. Nothing should be assumed about anyone’s sexuality — including your own.” As we increase our awareness and embrace the possibilities inherent in the human experience, we are more likely to treat each other respectfully. This awareness may also allow others the dignity and support to live congruent with their deepest nature. Lee Beckstead, PhD; Lynette Malmstrom, LCSW; LaDonna Moore, LCSW; and Jim Struve, LCSW are all private practice psychotherapists in Salt Lake City.

If you would like SaneAdvice to address your issues in a future column, e-mail SaneAdvice@slmetro.com.


StarGayzer by Madam Lichtenstein The Sun ambles into Cancer this week during the Venus retrograde. Our attention turns to love sought, love lost and love gained. Who can keep count anyway? Your cup overflows which makes you especially popular. Enjoy the spillage.

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ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 20) There is a time to spread your personality all over town and a time to consolidate and enrich your personal space. Concentrate on the latter when the Sun enters Cancer. Proud rams are happily home-centered and yearn to cocoon while the cocooning is good. Single? Make some discreet inquiries. You wear your heart on your sleeve. Yuk. Be sure to do the laundry.

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TAURUS (Apr 21 to May 21) Stray thoughts take you far this week. A swirl of outer planets

charges your brain cells and pumps out quite a number of excellent theories and opinions. But don’t just sit there and contemplate your navel, queer bull. Take it to the streets, take it to a political power base, take it to the media. Use that fabulous mouth for more than creating a stiff breeze. Whoosh and it’s gone!

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GEMINI (May 22 to Jun 21) Your financial prospects brighten as the Sun shines in Can-

cer. Is there something that you have your heart set on acquiring, pink twin? You find that extra bit of pocket change to make it yours. It is your reward for years of careful planning. (You have been carefully planning, haven’t you?) Ah, but will money buy love? Perhaps not — but it can wrap it in ermine and dip it in champagne.

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CANCER (Jun 22 to Jul 23) As the Sun nestles in your own sign, gay crabs can’t help but

feel special and glowing. Maybe it is the over-exposed heat of center stage that eventually has you sweating. But no matter, comrade: You now have that certain grace and aplomb to become a star. Brush off any negativism and view the world with your sunny side up. Pack the oil while you are at it.

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LEO (Jul 24 to Aug 23) There is nothing that you cannot do while the Sun winds

through Cancer. At least that is what you think. You are brimming with good vibes and feel especially mellow. Spread the good cheer with charity work or some other good deed, proud lion. But, frankly, eating the last piece of cake so no one else has to worry about the extra sugar does not qualify.

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VIRGO (Aug 24 to Sep 23) There is something quite wonderful and charismatic about

queer virgins when the Sun shines in Cancer. Get out there and start new projects. You suddenly become the center of the social universe as everyone gravitates to your orbit. Will they crash and burn when they get into your atmosphere? Better cut down on the garlic and anchovy pizzas to avoid crash and burnings.

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LIBRA (Sep 24 to Oct 23) Gay Libras become career supernovas while the Sun heats up

in Cancer. Set your sights on the gold ring and the corner office and go for it while the energy is hot and ambitious. Jump into the tank and play the game. You are a corporate shark slayer, at least for the next four weeks. But do your deep sea fishing quickly and quietly. After that you may become shark bait.

Crossword Puzzle

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ACROSS 46 To fill with blood 1 Mouth stoppers 49 Ticket amount 5 Mennonite 50 Part of the heart 10 Basin 51 Big guns = big ___ 13 Saying 52 UK gay bar 15 UGRA event 53 By way of 16 Airport abbr. 56 This quickens when 17 Stonewall Shooting on bended knee toy for size queens 59 Uneven 18 Dog warning 61 Top left keyboard 19 Snoop Dog genre key 20 Fast plane 62 Cosmetic queen 21 Tense 63 Slut morals 23 Serves the red 64 Meet punch 65 Plane finder 25 Thrown at the 66 Human faults couple DOWN 26 Made prepared 1 Long fish 28 Former union 2 Center of rotation 31 Chili followup 3 Registry item 32 Before 4 Sun 33 West Hollywood 5 Couples likely to do area blue this on the big day 34 Directory abbr 6 Boner’s Ark maker 37 Wager 2 words 7 Nuptial answer 38 Cake special effect 8 Stitch 40 UK boyfriend 9 First country to euphamism adopt gay marriage 41 Compass point 10 Penned Nabucco 42 Circumcision 11 __ __ of Two Cities 43 Dream boyfriend 12 Recorded 44 Tons 14 Strength 45 Supreme Court says 22 Parody it’s OK. Not Utah. 24 Flurry

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The Fight for Gay Marriage

GROOM HOLLAND I DO INSURANCE MATRIMONY NORWAY

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Solutions to WordSearch and the Crossword Puzzle can be found in the Comics.

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SCORPIO (Oct 24 to Nov 22) The world is your oyster and this is the time to search for the pearl. Sun in Cancer provides you with vision, verve and great curiosity, so set out and see the world. You will find excitement and fun almost anywhere you choose but I personally suggest that you find it in a gorgeous resort rather than in a trash dump — unless you are into trash!

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov 23 to Dec 22) Gay archers are especially sexy and alluring while the Sun lolls in Cancer. What a nice change of pace! Cruise the scene and see who creates one just for you. Be discerning — you will find that you have a wide range of choice of potential lovers. But don’t waste too much time window shopping. Cash in on your fragrant scent before you revert back to your primordial ooze.

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CAPRICORN (Dec 23 to Jan 20) If partnerships were beginning to chaff, the Sun in

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PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Who are those wildly creative souls painting themselves lavender and dancing naked? Must be a school of guppies under the influence of Sun in Cancer. Your are quite the artist and full of energetic fun. It is a heady and exciting time. Chugalug around town and ride on the party train. But don’t go overboard with the intoxicants and wind up tripping up at the curb.

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Cruise TheStarryEye.com for prescient horoscopes and insightful articles. Madam Lichtenstein is the author of the highly acclaimed “HerScopes: a Guide to Astrology for Lesbians” from Simon & Schuster. This book would have won the Pulitzer had the voting not been rigged.

SALT LAKE METRO

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AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Aqueerians feel in the pink and have more energy than usual. Will you spend you time working for others on your job or working on perfecting yourself? Either choice will bring with it its rewards and accomplishments. Sun in Cancer suggests that exercise and the right diet will have a very good impact on your overall well being. I personally am on the see-food diet.

JUNE 24, 2004

Cancer will provide a welcomed balm. Pink Caps should use the next four weeks to strengthen and perhaps modify relationships to make them more secure and happier. Single goats still on the hoof will attract all sorts of potential mates. Will they be a billy goat gruff or a little lamb? Pack the mint sauce.


Queeriscaping High on Grass by Brandie Balken “In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous” — Aristotle Up to this point I have pretty much focused on the flowering perennials, and I realized that for all my touting of diversity I have not represented certain types of plants equally. I hope that you, dear reader, did not think that I was simply excluding the ornamental grasses due to my distinct dislike of good ol’ Kentucky blue grass. If that was indeed the impression you had, think again — this is the column for all you fans of the family Graminaea (a.k.a. Poaceae). Grasses can add so much to a landscape: silky, feathery plumes, steely blue blades, wonderful, colorful borders or large dramatic centerpieces. If you currently have a bare spot in your yard that is begging for something unique and interesting, you’d be hard pressed to find something better than a well-chosen grass. How do you choose? I have made it easy for you. Simply match the size of your bare spot to the size of the grasses listed below, plant and enjoy. Be prepared, though, for lots of questions and comments from friends and neighbors. Grasses are still seriously underutilized in most landscapes, and when people notice how fabulous they look, they will want to know what it is and where you got it!

Tall grasses — four to six-foot tall

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SALT LAKE METRO

JUNE 24, 2004

Feather reed grass (Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’) This is a very reliable, easy-to-grow grass with five-foot erect stems that produce wonderful, feathery, wheat-colored plumes in early fall. There’s also the Overdam variety with the same basic characteristics, but with a lovely pink blush to the foliage. Dwarf pampas grass (Cortaderia ‘pumila’) This has the classic structure of the larger pampas grass, but with a more manageable size and a hardier disposition. It’s a beautiful fountain-shaped plant to five feet. Its large silky white plumes stand approximately one foot above the foliage, generally appearing in midsummer. The dried plumes make a great addition to any arrangement.

Maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Dixieland’, Miscanthus ‘Huron Sunrise’) The Dixieland variety of maiden grass has lovely variegated foliage. The creamy white and green leaves grow to five feet and make a distinct bright spot in any garden. It has a strong arching habit, and doesn’t flop like other maiden grasses tend to. The reddish blooms appear in mid-August. Huron Sunrise stands four to 5 feet, with the blades carrying natural silver mid-rib. The true beauty of this grass comes out in mid-August when the profuse burgundy seed heads appear above the silvery foliage — quite a contrast! A note to those of you thinking of planting Miscanthus: It is wise to mulch these plants for the first two or three winters until they’re well established. They are listed to work in USDA zones four through nine, but they’re better mulched than frozen.

Medium grasses — two to four-foot tall Northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) Northern sea oats are a wonderful, clumpforming grass growing from two to four feet tall and up to two feet wide. The foliage is erect with a bright green color. Gorgeous, airy seed heads appear in late summer. They look like miniature goldfish dangling

on a line. The seed heads can be cut and dried for arrangements or left as a tempting and nutritious snack for local birds. Switch grass (Panicum ‘heavy metal’) This switch grass is well described by its name. Stiff, metallic blue foliage grows three to four feet tall. Then in late summer, it puts out delicate, airy, pink “flowers” 12-15 inches above the foliage. This plant is well utilized as a ground cover or a screen. Fountain grass (Pennisetum ‘Karley Rose’) This fountain grass is characterized by deep green blades forming a three-foot clump that later erupts into stunning, smoky, rosepurple flowers that slightly resemble small bottle-brushes. It is a longer-blooming and significantly more winter-hardy variety than other fountain grasses. Maiden grass (Miscanthus ‘little zebra’) This is a quirky little fountain grass growing to three feet tall with distinct yellow bands striping the medium-green foliage. Unlike other “zebra” grasses, it will retain its banding all season. Adding to its charm are the lovely, reddish-purple plumes that spike above the foliage in mid-August.

Short grasses — two feet and shorter Blue fescue (Festuca ‘Boulder Blue’, ‘Elijah Blue’) Blue Fescue is a tried-and-true performer in the world of grasses. Depending on variety, it grows from eight to 18 inches tall, and forms a delicious little blue “pom”. The

flowers are fairly insignificant — the true value of fescue is in its glorious blue color, and wonderful texture. Quaking grass (Brizia spp.) Quaking grass is a clumping grass with medium-green foliage growing to two feet tall and 16 inches wide. It is fairly common in appearance until it blooms and decorates the plant with precious little violet heartshaped “flowers” on open airy spikes. Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia caespitosa) This grass has some of the prettiest foliage I have ever seen. The blades are quite thin and are striped from the midrib out with spring green, creamy yellow and pale pink. It grows to eight inches tall and 10 inches wide. It is incomparable when paired with Scotch moss. Indian rice grass (Stipa or Oryzopsis hymenoides)

This rice grass is notable in that it is the official Utah State grass. It grows eighteen to 24 inches tall and 15 to 18 inches wide, blooming out in very open airy panicles that resemble sprays of white baby’s breath. It is incredibly hardy and drought tolerant. Now, dear reader, you must be thinking: This woman has got to be high — how could anyone ramble for so long about grasses? Yes it’s true; I am high, high on grass. Brandie Balken is a horticulturist in Salt Lake City and can be seen at Cactus & Tropicals.

Red,White & Bubbly Indestructible Wine by Beau Jarvis Everything shiny and new seems to break. I’m in the midst of a kitchen remodel. Within one day after the new cabinets were installed, someone scratched them. Later, I stood admiring the fabulous cork flooring and noticed it was scratched all to hell by an overeager appliance installer. If I see any more damage, I’m afraid I will begin pulling out my hair by the handful! Then there are my poor wine bottles, all wearing dusty coats of drywall particles. I’m starting to wonder if, like me, my wine will be permanently tainted by this experience. After the cabinets were finally repaired and reinstalled, I began rummaging around and unpacking the dozens of boxes containing kitchen items. In what was formerly the dining room (now a graveyard of stacked kitchen boxes), I found my bottle of five year-old Madeira wine. It had been unceremoniously dumped upside down in a box with olive oil and tuna fish cans, and then the box had been left sitting in an unforgiving, sun-baked location on the floor for well over a month. I almost threw out the half empty bottle, but decided to have a schluck. It still tasted grand. A tart sweetness bathed my tongue while a heady, roasted almond aroma filled my nose. My Madeira was neither broken nor tainted! To celebrate, I had a second glass. After my third, I began to wonder what made my Madeira so hearty and downright indestructible. Many wine drinkers may not have heard of Madeira, let alone had a chance to taste it. Madeira has been around for quite some

time. It’s rumored to have been G.W.’s favorite wine (by G.W., I mean George Washington of cherry tree axing fame). Madeira is also said to have been present at the signing of the Declaration of Independence — although it didn’t get to sign (that John Hancock was quite the space hog.) This age-old wine is made on the island of Madeira, a Portuguese property in the Atlantic Ocean, north of the Canary Islands. None other than Prince Henry the Navigator came up with the bright idea of growing wine grapes on Madeira Island in the 15th century. Soon, Prince Henry and his band of undoubtedly merry men began sailing their prized wine all over the place. Like Archimedes skinny-dipping in his tub and splashing upon the principle of displacement, Madeira wine traders serendipitously noticed how much better their unsold Madeira tasted after bouncing around in ships’ holds for months on end. One bright Portuguese soul made the connection between estufa (the unintentional semi-cooking of Madeira that occurred under the steamy, sweaty, sweltering conditions of a ship’s belly) and increased tastiness. Indeed, madeirized wine became the drink of choice for pirates, colonists and powdered wig wearing gentlemen around the world. In no small part due to its phoenix-like emergence after a journey through fiery, unforgiving conditions that would have destroyed most any other wine. Sadly, nowadays, bottles of Madeira lie quietly in lonely wine shop corners gathering dust. On the bright side, the lack of popularity means Madeira has an affordable price tag. Perhaps a Madeira renaissance is in order. How does it taste? It truly is one of the most unique wines around. Let’s begin with Madeira’s appearance. It’s often described as

having an “orangey-brown” color. Sometimes it appears coppery, while other times it looks like liquid rust. To me, Madeira’s appeal lies in the aroma. Smoke, toffee, wood, caramel and citrus all come to mind as I poke around a glass with my nose. There are both dry and sweet styles of Madeira. Both are delicious. The sweet versions are the most common. Unlike many dessert wines, Madeira doesn’t taste the slightest bit like cough syrup. It has a crisp, tangy-woody flavor that I believe everyone needs to experience at least once in life — if only so you can use the phrase “tangywoody” in a sentence. In my opinion, Madeira is best savored by itself. If you happen to own a velvet smoking jacket, then a Madeira drinking session is the ideal occasion on which to wear it. If you are currently sans velvet smoking jackets, drink your Madeira with almond biscotti. Remember to sip Madeira. It is a fortified wine, meaning additional alcohol is added. Madeira-chugging is not recommended. Locally, there is a fine selection of Madeira. For starters, I recommend two: Blandy’s five year-old Sercial Madeira is dry in style. It’s tangy and nutty. Serve it either chilled or at room temperature. This Madeira is $20, but the bottle will last quite a while. And, as I said earlier, Madeira is virtually indestructible. This means once the bottle is open, you don’t have to worry about your wine going bad. For a sweeter style, try Blandy’s five-yearold Malmsey (also $20). It’s darker, richer and makes a fine dessert-in-a-glass. Go on, dust off a bottle of Madeira at the wine store and discover how good a cooked, indestructible wine can be. Saude! Beau Jarvis is a Sommelier, wine consultant and wine educator. He operates BasicJuice.com — an independent wine review and info website.


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Metro, June 24 2004  

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