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North Hollywood Polytechnic

Community Adult School

Self-Study Report For WASC Postsecondary Accreditation of North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School April 22-25, 2012


SELF-STUDY REPORT WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES FOR

North HollywoodPolytechnic Community Adult School 12431 Roscoe Boulevard Sun Valley, CA 91352

April 22 - 25, 2012 Los Angeles Unified School District


Table of Contents Preface WASC Visiting Committee Members LAUSD - Board of Education, District Administration and Adult School Administration Self-Study Committee Members Leadership Team Members I. Institutional, Community, and Student Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Progress Report on Past Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 III.

Self-Study Findings based on the WASC Ten Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion VIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Criterion X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37 37 45 58 73 87 95 108 123 137 145

IV.

Revising the School Action Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Action Plan Item I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Action Plan Item II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Action Plan Item III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

153 155 156 158

Appendices A Glossary of Terms B Certificated Questionnaire C Classified Questionnaire D Student Questionnaire E Growth Area Items F Employee Lists ƒƒ Certificated ƒƒ Classified ƒƒ Support Staff


Preface The 2012 North Hollywood-Polytechnic CAS WASC Self-Study has been a collaborative effort which included all stakeholders - Student Council members, classified and certificated staff, administrators and community members. The accreditation process was launched at our 2010 Back-to-School meeting, with continuous discussion at general staff meetings and faculty meetings. Focus and Home Groups met or communicated regularly during the 20112012 school year as they finalized their assigned tasks in the completion of the self-study. The Self Study has provided all stakeholders with a more in-depth understanding of our programs and services and how we serve the needs of the community. In particular, certificated staff has been motivated to organize and improve their teaching skills, make better use of resources available, and have had the opportunity to learn about the programs and services offered outside of their areas of expertise. Support staff have become more informed about our school and its programs and services, enabling them to provide better customer service to our students, faculty, and community members. Based on the insight developed in the revision process, school stakeholders were better prepared to examine and update our mission statement and SLOs, redefining our purpose as an integral part of the school district and community, and emphasizing achievable goals for students. The process required input from all stakeholders, in order that the final version of the SelfStudy reflects the Division and school goals, student questionnaire results, and response to community needs. The outcome reflects SLOs that better represent and serve our students. As a result, our students are now benefitting from a revitalized mission statement and SLOs that address the needs of the students and community in a measurable and concrete format. Completing the Self-Study involved overcoming challenges faced by a school comprised of four main locations offering classes throughout the day and evening with several branch locations in the community. Staff members’ work schedules often conflicted with meeting times or the schedules of their Focus Group or Leadership team members. With a staff of 70 teachers and 30 support staff, stakeholders are to be commended for overcoming these challenges and coming to consensus during the Self Study process. Additional challenges included the following: ƒƒ Retirement of the APACS in 2010-11 required the assignment of a new APACS unfamiliar with the school, its staff, and transitioning from K-12 to the Adult Division ƒƒ The transfer of the APACS assigned in 2011, with the assignment of a third APACS to the position in February of the 2011-2012 school year.


ƒƒ Student class time was modified in order for staff to attend meetings. ƒƒ Most staff were asked to volunteer their time to attend meetings and complete tasks. ƒƒ Conflicting schedules required the extensive use of email and networking for group members to communicate and collaborate on their assigned tasks.

The creation of a schoolwide Action Plan that develops programmatic plans to address identified key issues. The creation of the new schoolwide Action Plan was finalized in January 2012. Focus Group members submitted their list of Growth Areas as part of their criterion narrative. Each list was added to a final summary list and distributed to the Leadership Team members at their early January meeting. Leadership Team members, as a whole, reviewed the summary list, then broke into small groups of three for further discussion. Each group reviewed the items based on specific criteria (see Appendix – Discussion Questions for Growth Area Prioritization Exercise), and narrowed down their choices to a list of three to five Growth Areas. A tally was taken from each small group and the top four items were selected to be included in the new Action Plan. Those items were: ƒƒ Communications – Improve event communication to staff ƒƒ Staff Development – Provide training to teachers and advisors on the new courses and assessment tools ƒƒ Resources – Fill book orders in a more timely way, and ƒƒ Student Support Services – Raise the profile of the counseling department at each campus. Action Plan details were completed by the same small Leadership Team groups, and finetuned by administrators. A final draft was presented to the Leadership Team for adoption, then circulated throughout the NHPCAS realm for all stakeholders to view via meetings, weekly bulletin, employees’ boxes, and school website.

The development of an accountability system for monitoring the implementation of the schoolwide Action Plan. Although not selected as one of our key issues in terms of Action Plan items, reinstituting our Leadership Committee did emerge as a Growth Area for Criterion 2, and it is our intention to reconstitute this committee with the purpose of monitoring and bringing accountability to our Action Plan process. We will be assembling our committee from current Leadership Team members and eliciting additional members from our employee and stakeholder populace, as interested in the further improvement in our school.


WASC Visiting Committee Chairperson: Mr. James B. Jones, Principal Hamilton Adult Campus Torrance, California

Members: John Ahn, Ed.D., Managing Director Centra Consulting Group Gardena, California Mr. Adder Argueta, Industrial Advisor East Los Angeles Occupational Center Los Angeles, California Mr. Jimmy Benavides, Director Los Angeles County Office of Education Downey, California Ms. Vicki K. Dickenson, Instructor Mt. San Jacinto College Temecula, California Ms. Joanna Haspels, Teacher (Retired) Inland Valley Education Center Chino, California


Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education: Monica Garcia, President Marguerite LaMotte Tamar Galatzan Steve Zimmer Bennett Kayser Nury Martinez Richard Vladovic

District Administration: Dr. John Deasy - Superintendent of Schools

Division of Adult and Career Education: Ed Morris - Executive Director Andres Ameigeiras - Administrator

North Hollywood-Poly Community Adult School: Carl Badeau - Principal Bea Zavala - Assistant Principal, Operations Cynthia Diaz - Assistant Principal, Operations Leo Lynch - Assistant Principal, Adult Counseling Services Carlos Santoyo, School Administrative Assistant


U n i f i e d

S c h o o l

D i s t r i c t

1 Regional Occupational Program

10 Career Technical Ed. Centers

20 Community Adult Schools

Staff Relations

Program for Adults with Disabilities

Human Resources

CTE/ Perkins

Director Isabel Vรกzquez

Administrator Andres Ameigeiras Program/Policy Development

Career Technical Education

Ed Morris

Executive Director

GED

Curriculum and Adult Secondary Education

Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Distance Learning

AEWC

Parent Education/ SRLDP

Administrator Vacant

Facilities

Economic Planning Services

Adult Basic Studies/ESL/ CBET/

Programs For Older Adults

Adult Education & AEWC

Assistant Director Budget/Fiscal Services Ted Nelson

Division of Adult and Career Education

Deputy Superintendent, Instruction Jaime Aquino

Superintendent John E. Deasy

LAUSD - DACE Organization Chart

A n g e l e s

Division School Operations

L o s

DIVISION OF ADULT AND CAREER EDUCATION

2011-2012 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART


Self-Study Committee Members Focus Group: Chapter 1 NAME

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Hoa, Long

Co-Chair

WIA

Poly

Orrantia, Jorge

Co-Chair

SIS

Poly/Whipple

Green, Angela

Member

CL

Poly

Ortega, Evelina

Member

WIA

Poly

Williams, Marcus

Member

PERKINS

Poly/Whipple

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Finch, Lorelei

Co-Chair

ASE

Whipple

Rios, Estela

Co-Chair

CTE

Whipple/Poly

Acevedo, Carlos

Member

ABE

Poly

Blidaru, Claudia

Member

CTE

Whipple

Jaffe, Linda

Member

DL

Whipple/Poly/NoHo

Lucero, Esperanza

Member

ESL

Sun Valley

Manriquez, Antonio

Member

CTE

Whipple Evenings

Miller, Grady

Member

ESL/DL

Poly

Murillo, Janet

Member

ESL

Poly

Quin, Margarida

Member

ESL

Whipple

Schmissrauter, Steve

Member

ESL

Poly

Smith, Norma

Member

ESL

NoHo

Vasquez, Kate

Member

ESL

NoHo

Zitle, Perla

Member

CTE

Sun Valley

Focus Group: Curriculum NAME


Focus Group: Instructional Programs NAME

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Poppleton, Sharon

Co-Chair

ABE/ESL

NoHo/Branch

Mallery, Sarah

Co-Chair

ESL/ABE

NoHo/Sun Valley

Burton, Don

Member

ESL

NoHo

Castro, Farah

Member

ASE

Poly/Whipple

Gibbs, Karen

Member

ESL

NoHo

Giffin, Kaytlin

Member

ICA

Sun Valley

Gonzalez, Gemma

Member

CTE

Sun Valley

Jones, Chris

Member

ESL

NoHo/Whipple

Pett, Ann

Member

ESL

Poly

Regalado, Elizabeth

Member

ESL

Whipple/Poly

Savella, Marilou

Member

ESL

Whipple

Schmidt, Kimberly

Member

ASE

Sun Valley

Sure, Jeffrey

Member

AWD

Whipple/Branch

Villafana, Rebecca

Member

ESL

Poly

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Bagamaspad, Anavic

Co-Chair

ESL

Poly

Garcia, Gabriela

Co-Chair

ASE

NoHo

Byrnes, Anne

Member

ESL

Sun Valley

DiBattista, Jane

Member

ESL

NoHo

Gasparyan, Narine

Member

ESL

Whipple

Kelley, Darren

Member

ESL

Poly

Kenion, David

Member

ASE

Poly

Lalaian, Sergio

Member

CTE

Sun Valley

Lichwa, Ewa

Member

DL

Whipple

Noree, Yensin

Member

ESL

Whipple

Pera, Anthony

Member

ASE

Whipple

Perez, Catherine

Member

AIDE

Sun Valley

Reed, Constance

Member

CL

Poly

Focus Group: Use of Assessment NAME


Focus Group: Student Support Services NAME

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Barrios, Nicole

Co-Chair

Whipple

Chow, Janis Bartolomei, Jorge Cabulong, Eleanor Campos, Juan Clemans, John Holcomb, Harald Kay, Lyndon Lalaian, Linda Mgshyan, Marina Nilssen-Mooney, Fjaere Palyan, Nvard Rabonza-Adkinsson, Lorlyn Sandoval, Pat

Co-Chair

ASE ASE PAR ESL ESL ASE ASE/ESL ESL ABE ESL ESL/POA Pre-K CTE ESL

Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member

NoHo/Sun Valley Poly/All Poly Poly Whipple Sun Valley Poly Poly NoHo Poly/Branches Whipple Whipple Poly

Focus Group: Resource Management NAME

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Albania, Susan

Co-Chair

Poly

Santoyo, Carlos Baires, Rosa Corado, Mario A. Daniels, Michael Harris, Shawn Hernandez, Ziomara Luria, Jonathan Nguyen, Loan Nordvall, Andy Rabanales, Allan Ramos, Lupe Saravia, Sixto Shearer-Aretz, Maud Weishaus, Marc Zarate, Miguel

Co-Chair

CL CL B&G CTE ESL AIDE AIDE CTE/ESL CL ESL/ASE AIDE AIDE ESL PAR ESL PLANT MGR

Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member

Poly Whipple Whipple Branch

Poly/Sun Valley Poly Poly/Branch Whipple NoHo/Whipple NoHo/Whipple Whipple

Sun Valley Poly/Branch Poly Whipple


Home Groups Chairs NAME

ROLE

Department

CAMPUS

Jones, Chris

Chair

Whipple

Schmidt, Kim Pera, Anthony Vasquez, Kate Villafana, Rebekah

Chair

ESL/ASE ASE ASE ESL/ASE ESL

Chair Chair Chair

Sun Valley Whipple Evenings/Sat. NoHo Poly

Leadership Team NAME

ROLE

FOCUS GRoup

Co-Chair Albania, Susan Resource Member Badeau, Carl Principal Co-Chair Bagamaspad, Anavic Assessment Co-Chair Barrios, Nicole Student Support Member Byrnes, Anne Assessment Co-Chair Chow, Janis Student Support Accreditation Chair Diaz, Cindy APO Co-Chair Finch, Lorelei Curriculum Co-Chair Garcia, Gabriela Assessment Member Harris, Shawn Resource Co-Chair Hoa, Long Chapter 1 Member Keene, Linda APACS Member Lucero, Esperanza Curriculum Co-Chair Mallery, Sarah Instruction Co-Chair Orrantia, Jorge Chapter 1 Co-Chair Poppleton, Sharon Instruction Co-Chair Rios, Estela Curriculum Co-Chair Santoyo, Carlos Resource Member Zavala, Bea APO

Department

CAMPUS

CTE ALL ESL ASE ESL ASE ESL/PAR/POA ASE ASE AIDE WIA ABE/ASE ESL ESL/ABE SIS ESL/ABE CTE CL CTE/ESL

Whipple Poly/Sun Valley Poly Whipple Sun Valley

Noho/Sun Valley Whipple Whipple

NoHo Poly/Sun Valley POLY

Noho/Sun Valley Sun Valley NoHo

Poly/Whipple Noho/Branch Whipple/Poly Poly Poly


Chapter

One

Institutional, Community, and Student Characteristics


Chapter

Notes

One

Institutional, Community, and Student Characteristics School Characteristics North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School (NHPCAS) is one of the 30 schools administered by the Division of Adult and Career Education (DACE) of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). LAUSD is the largest (in terms of number of students) public school system in California and second largest district in the United States. The Division of Adult and Career Education (DACE) is the largest public adult education provider in the country. DACE operates 19 community adult schools, five regional occupational centers, four skill centers, one employment preparation center, and a Regional Occupational Program. NHPCAS is part of Local District 2 and situated in the eastern San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles County. It primarily serves the communities of North Hollywood, Valley Glen and Sun Valley. The NHPCAS main administrative office is housed on the Polytechnic High School campus located at 12341 Roscoe Blvd. Sun Valley, California, 91352. NHPCAS is made up of multiple locations including four main campuses in local schools, and nonschool sites. The four main campuses are situated at Polytechnic High School, Sun Valley High School, North Hollywood High School and Whipple Campus. Programs offered at the main campuses include English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), Adult Secondary Education (ASE), Career Technical Education (CTE), Parent Education, Programs for Older Adults (POA), and Adults with Disabilities (AWD). Classes are available in the mornings, afternoons, evenings and Saturdays.

Chapter 1 Page 1


Notes

MAIN CAMPUSES: Polytechnic High Campus Adult School Administrative Office 12431 Roscoe Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352  (818) 394-3950  (818) 394-3961 fax

Whipple Campus 10952 Whipple St., North Hollywood, CA 91602  (818) 508-3600  (818) 509-5891 fax

North Hollywood High Campus 5231 Colfax Ave., North Hollywood, CA 91601  (818) 753-7450  (818) 753-7455 fax

Sun Valley High Campus 12100 Allegheny Street, Sun Valley, CA 91352  (818) 504-7504  (818) 504-7446 fax Website: www.nhpcas.com

BRANCH SITES: ARC - 6456 Whitsett Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91606 East Valley High School - 5525 Vineland Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91601 Korenstein Elementary - 7650 Ben Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91605 Lankershim Elementary - 5250 Bakman Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91601 Roscoe Elementary - 10765 Strathern Street, Sun Valley, CA 91352 Royal Bellingham Apartments - 12221 Chandler Blvd., Valley Village, CA 91607 San Pablo Church - 7400 Tujunga Avenue, Sun Valley, CA 91605 Studio City Stages - 11101 Ventura Boulevard, Bay #6, Studio City Valley Storefront - 12821 Victory Boulevard, North Hollywood, CA 91607 Valley Village Senior Apartments - 12111 Chandler Blvd., Valley Village, CA 91607

DISTANCE LEARNING OUTPOSTS: Madison Middle School Plainview Elementary School Strathern Elementary School Victory Elementary School

Chapter 1 Page 2


North Hollywood-Polytechnic CAS serves a diverse school population by offering a variety of educational programs. The breakdown of ethnic groups consists of Hispanic 6,684 (82%), White 942 (12%), Asian 253 (3%), African American 195 (2%) and Other 58 (1%). Gender is represented as Female (60%) and Male (40%). Ethnicity American Indian Asian Black Filipino Hispanic Pacific Islander White Total Unduplicated Enrollment

Male 4 87 86 16 2,722 0 352 3,270

Female 1 166 109 31 3,962 6 590 4,870

Notes

Student Characteristics

Total 5 253 195 47 6,684 6 942 8,140

Based on 2010-2011 SIS data for all students.

Ethnicity

International Day participants represent a variety of countries.

Chapter 1 Page 3


Notes

Unduplicated Enrollment Data by Program Program

Adult Enrollment 2008 2009

2009 2010

Concurrent Enrollment

Total Enrollment

2010 2011

2008 2009

2009 2010

2010 2011

2008 2009

2009 2010

2010 2011

Citizenship

172

0

0

0

0

0

172

0

0

Adults with Disabilities

44

45

41

0

0

0

44

45

41

Elementary Basic Skills

487

539

777

102

102

442

578

636

1,218

English as a Second Language

5,737

4,427

4,302

15

22

24

5,751

4,448

4,326

Programs for Older Adults

1,374

428

296

0

0

0

1,375

428

296

Parenting

1,061

1,137

1,180

101

120

273

1,151

1,255

1,444

Secondary Basic Skills

567

500

566

941

815

710

1,438

1,274

1,267

Vocational

712

502

794

414

256

91

1,116

752

883

9,528

6,952

7,101

1,433

1,201

1,053 10,859

8,098

8,129

Total

SIS data from 2008-2011.

Student Age Range Age / Response Options 16-17 18-44 45-64 65+ Answered Questions

Response Percent 9.4% 62.1% 25.5% 3% 100%

Student Questionnaire data 2011-2012.

Student Age Range:

Chapter 1 Page 4

Response Count (English) 83 274 104 22 483

Response Count (Spanish) 5 309 135 7 456

Total CounT 88 583 239 29 939


Notes

Upon review of demographic data obtained from the results of our 2011-2012 Student Questionnaire, the following information represents a synopsis of significant points of interest regarding NHPCAS’ student profile:

Education ƒƒ 25% enter our school with a high school diploma (may be from native country) ƒƒ 35% of students have a 7th to 9th grade educational level (may be native country) ƒƒ 20% have a 6th grade education or less (native country)

Household Facts ƒƒ 60% fall below the poverty line (annual household income of $19,000 or less) ƒƒ 38% of households have 5 or more persons residing within ƒƒ 60% are parents (with children under the age of 18)

Employment Statistics ƒƒ 28% are unemployed and seeking work ƒƒ 18% work part-time ƒƒ 32% work full-time Majority are employed in: ƒƒ Construction (16.8%) ƒƒ Childcare (16.2%) ƒƒ Hospitality/Sales (13.9%) ƒƒ Business-related (9%)

School-Related Percentages by program are: ƒƒ ESL

53%

ƒƒ Parent Education

18%

ƒƒ ASE

16%

ƒƒ ABE

15%

ƒƒ CTE

11%

ƒƒ POA

4%

ƒƒ AWD

0.5%

Chapter 1 Page 5


Notes

How they heard about the school: ƒƒ 53% Word of mouth ƒƒ 29% Community Outreach (flyers, school brochure, school marquee/signs, website, community events) Reasons for attending our school: ƒƒ 31% To improve English skills ƒƒ 23% To get a job or a better job ƒƒ 14.4% To earn a high school diploma ƒƒ 10% Personal interest

Campus attended

ƒƒ attend the Whipple Campus ƒƒ attend the Polytechnic Campus ƒƒ attend the NOHO Campus ƒƒ attend the Sun Valley Campus ƒƒ attend off-campus locations

Chapter 1 Page 6


DIVISION OF ADULT AND CAREER EDUCATION

Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, Budget, Use Permits, Emergency Procedures/School Safety, Staff Handbook, School Schedule, Facilities Reservations, Assemblies/Cultural Activities, Back to School Meeting, Campus/Classroom Clean-up, Stull Evaluations, Security, Para Educators, Compliance Issues, Branch Locations, Older Adults, Adults With Disabilities, SRLDP/Parent Ed, ESL Distance Learning, Community Liaison, Stull Evaluations

Whipple Campus

Polytechnic Campus/Sun Valley Campus

Cynthia Diaz

Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, Budget, Use Permits, Emergency Procedures/School Safety, Staff Handbook, School Schedule, Facilities Reservations, Assemblies/Cultural Activities, Back to School Meeting, Campus/Classroom Clean-up, Stull Evaluations, Security, Para Educators, Compliance Issues, Safe School Plan, New Teacher Orientation, ESL/CBET, WIA, CTE Programs, Community Advisory, Weekly Bulletin, Stull Evaluations

Bea Zavala

ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OF OPERATIONS

ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OF OPERATIONS

SY 2011-2012

and Academic Programs at all Campuses

NOHO Campus

Instructional Supervision, Academic Program, AEWC, Career Guidance, Concurrent Student Program, Graduation, Scholarships, Staff Development, Student Body Council, Substitutes, CTE Programs (Whipple/High School), Budget, Emergency Procedures, Satellite Sites with academic Classes, Stull Evaluations, High School Collaborations, Para Educators, BTS, School Schedule, Assemblies, Cultural Activities, Campus/Classroom Clean-up, Security, Compliance Issues, ESL/Academic Distance Learning

Leo Lynch

ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OF ADULT COUNSELING SERVICES

Attendance Rosters, ADA Reports, Fall Survey, Registration Procedures, Student Information, Class Demographics, Classification Reports, Input New Student/Class Information, Process Class Changes, Statistical Reports

Student Body Workers, Bank Reports, IFS Ordering, IMA Accounts, Internal Financial Reports, Imprest Funds, Student Body, Expenditures, Tax Filing

Clerical Supervision (All Locations), Correspondence, Emergency Records, ID Photos, Keys, Payroll/BTS, Counter Activities, Substitute Teacher Roster, Office Maintenance, Employee Assignments, Teacher Rosters, SIS Inputting, Attendance Rosters, Cashier/Back-up, ESL Certificates, Employee Records, Student Verifications

Jorge Orrantia

SIS COMPUTER COORDINATOR

Susan Albania (Interim)

FINANCIAL MANAGER

Carlos Santoyo

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

PRINCIPAL Carl E. Badeau

NORTH HOLLYWOOD-POLYTECHNIC COMMUNITY ADULT SCHOOL

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Notes

Governance structure of the institution

Chapter 1

Page 7


Notes

School-wide Student Learning Outcomes-SLOs: 1) Develop and apply learned skills encompassing listening, speaking, reading, writing, computation, technology, career and life skills. 2) Set and meet personal, academic, and/or career goals to develop as a productive and informed member of the community. 3) Successfully complete at least one NHPCAS course or program of study to achieve one or more - Course Completion, Program Certificate, High School Diploma, GED Certificate, High School Credit or Benchmark Gain.

Programs and Attendance Class registration is based on open and continuous enrollment. Most classes operate on a trimester calendar system except for High School Diploma/GED and Career Technical Education programs. The typical load for an average student varies from one to three classes at our various locations. According to the 2011 Student Questionnaire, the majority of students enroll through “word of mouth” and community outreach. Concurrent students are high school students aged 16 to 18 taking classes at NHPCAS through referrals from their high school counselors. These referrals require parental consent in which a concurrent contract is filled out by parents, students and high school counselors. Concurrent students come from local high schools such as East Valley High School, North Hollywood High School, Francis Polytechnic High School, Sun Valley High School, and Verdugo High School. Enrollment data on adult school students is stored within the District’s Students Information System (SIS). SIS is a student information database that stores students’ demographics information, educational record and progress. Program completion is tracked through promotional exams (ESL), certificates of completion (CTE), academic credits earned, attainment of high school diplomas and GED certificates. The adult SIS system is also capable of generating reports that reflect the schools attendance patterns, trends and teacher/student ratio. These reports provide essential information in assisting the administrative staff with decision making.

Student Enrollment, Hours of Attendance and ADA: YEAR 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012*

Student Enrollment 10,851.00 8,090.00 8,119.00 5,837.00

*Partial year until March 2012.

Chapter 1 Page 8

Hours of Attendance 1,031,297.53 721,280.55 802,182.00 436,589.50

ADA 1,964.38 1,373.87 1,527.97 831.60


Notes

Student Enrollment:

*

Hours of Attendance:

*

ADA:

*

*Partial year until March 2012

Chapter 1 Page 9


Notes

Staff Administration The NHPCAS Administration consists of one Principal, two Assistant Principals of Operations, and one Assistant Principal of Adult Counseling Services.

Certificated Staff The NHPCAS faculty is composed of new, experienced, part-time, full-time, tenured and non-tenured teachers. The certificated teaching staff holds a variety of different types of credentials. According to the certificated staff survey taken in November 2011, 73% of our teachers hold an Adult Education, Designated Subjects, 20% Elementary or Multiple Subjects and 7% hold a CTE credential. All teachers are processed through DACE including a thorough check of the candidate’s transcripts and credentials. Teacher credentialing is verified through the District Credentialing Unit. Copies of credentials are held on file in the main administrative office.

Academic/Vocational Preparation:

NHPCAS consists of 74 certificated staff members and 4 administrators. The diversity of our certificated staff contributes to an understanding of student needs and goals. NHPCAS teachers and administrators come from different ethnic backgrounds and some speak more than one language fluently. According to the Fall 2011 Certificated Questionnaire, teacher longevity at NHPCAS ranges from two to twenty years. (See 3.1 for more detailed information.)

Chapter 1 Page 10


Languages Spoken Certificated Classified

Spanish 12 12

French 2 0

Tagalog 3 1

Armenian 4 1

Russian 2 1

Portuguese 2 0

Languages Spoken Certificated Classified

Italian 1 0

Turkish 1 1

Polish 1 0

Persian 1 0

Chinese 1 1

Vietnamese 0 1

Notes

Certificated & Classified Languages Spoken

The chart below represents the results from the Certificated Questionnaire:

Ethnicity:

Gender:

Chapter 1 Page 11


Notes

Professional Development Professional development is important in keeping certificated staff updated on new techniques and self-improvement. It is provided by NHPCAS, DACE, District and other professional organizations. According to the Certificated Questionnaire, our teachers are members of professional organizations such as CCAE, CAROCP, CATESOL and Women Educators. (See following chart.) The Division hosts two free annual conferences each school year. The Division’s Fall Conference was held at Santee Educational Complex this year, 2011. The Division also provides ESL teacher training, Adult Secondary workshops, CASAS, CBET, and PERKINS workshops, Adult Basic Education workshops, In-services for Parent Educators, Distance Learning Academies, and the occasional CTE training (for example, Integrating Academic Skills into CTE NHPCAS Teacher Advisor presents at the DACE Fall Conference. Classrooms).

What professional organizations are you a member of?

Chapter 1 Page 12


The classified staff at NHPCAS consists of: one administrative assistant, one financial manager, one SIS coordinator, one senior office technician, three office technicians and one plant manager. According to the Fall 2011 Classified Questionnaires, 55% of our staff have been with DACE between 1-4 years, 25% between 10-14 years, 10% between 5-9 years, and 10% 12+ years. In addition, the classified staff attended various professional growth activities within the last three years (See following chart).

Notes

Classified Staff

Ethnicity:

Gender:

Professional growth activities attended in the last 3 years

Chapter 1 Page 13


Notes

Community Characteristics According to the 2010 United States Census, the population of Los Angeles County was estimated at 9.8 million. Los Angeles County is one of the major metropolitan areas in the United States. The majority of students around the community that NHPCAS serves are Hispanic. However, it is anticipated that the ethnic composition of the community will change due to an increase of new condominium projects around the North Hollywood- Studio City area. As a result, the overall student demographic of that area might change. The combined population of North Hollywood (118,397), Valley Village (19,533), Arleta (36,232), Studio City (41,863) and Sun Valley (53,501) is 269,562. The chart on the next page shows the population and ethnicity by neighborhood. Each DACE school serves a distinct geographic area. NHPCAS’ boundaries are Coldwater Canyon to the west, the City of Burbank to the east, Branford Blvd. to the north and the Santa Monica Mountains to the south. The primary zip codes within the area NHPCAS serves are 91352, 91505, 91506, 91601, 91602, 91604, 91605, 91606 and 91607. (See Student Questionnaire results for list of zip codes served.) California Highway 170 runs north-south through its center. The 101 Hollywood Freeway, 5 Golden State and 210 Foothill Highway provide easy access into the community. The Metro Orange Bus Line runs east to west from North Hollywood station to Canoga Park/Warner Center. The Metro Redline Subway runs from North Hollywood station to Downtown Los Angeles. Students are able to use public transportation to easily access our many sites. A variety of housing options is available across the region. Housing ranges from less expensive areas to the north, such as Arleta, Pacoima and Sun Valley, to more upscale housing in areas to the south, such as Toluca Lake and Studio City. The community composed of North Hollywood, Valley Glen and Sun Valley is very diverse in its different regions. The NOHO Arts District attracts visual and performance artists to the community. Studio City is home to many residents working in film, television, music and other entertainment-related industries. According to the Universal City-North Hollywood Chamber of Commerce 2010 Directory, the major occupations in the area are management/professional (31%), service industry (16.5%), and sales/office (28%). Potential business and job opportunities are available to NHPCAS students through ‘mom and pop’ shops, small businesses, book stores, restaurants and supermarkets along Sherman Way, Laurel Canyon, Lankershim and Ventura Boulevards, and other major cross-streets. The government officials representing our geographic area are Paul Krekorian (City Council – District 2), Tom La Bonge (City Council – District 4), Tony Cardenas (City Council – District 6), State Senators Alex Padilla and Carol Liu, and Assembly members Felipe Fuentes and Mike Feuer.

Chapter 1 Page 14


118,397 53,501 19,533 36,232 41,836

Sun Valley

Valley Village

Arleta

Studio City

Total population

North Hollywood

Neighborhood

272 0.75%

963 1.8% 1,135 5.81% 551 1.52% 1,950 4.66%

10,651 19.91% 12,592 64.47% 3,560 9.83% 31,175 74.52%

0.31%

129

0.69%

135

0.82%

438

0.71%

5%

27.91%

840

5,919

African American American Indian

33,050

White

6.74%

2,818

10.5%

3,795

5.60%

1,093

8.23%

4,405

7.32%

8,663

Asian

0.07%

29

0.09%

34

0.12%

23

0.11%

59

0.14%

169

Pacific Islander

3.15%

1,319

36.07%

13, 069

8.83%

1,724

32.42%

17,343

28.45%

33,683

Other

4.22%

1,764

4%

1,449

4.83%

944

4.09%

2,188

4.91%

5,818

Two or more Races

10.68%

4,466

77.53%

28,090

20.54%

4,012

68.95%

36,891

57.93%

68,585

Hispanic

Notes

Chapter 1

Page 15


Notes

The Community Profile is comprised of the following data from the 2010 U.S. Census:

Adult Population by Age Group:

Age group 18 to 24 years 25 to 44 years 45 to 64 years 65 years and over Adult Population

Number 31,405.00 104,264.00 76,406.00 31,789.00 243,864.00

Percent 13% 43% 31% 13% 100%

Housing – Rent vs. Own: Summary: Housing (Rent/Own) Owned with a mortgage or a loan Owned free and clear Renter occupied Total population in occupied housing units:

118,629 18,673 170,243 307,545

Average Household Income by Zip Code:

Average household income $56,185

Chapter 1 Page 16


Notes

Average Number in Household:

Average persons per household 2.80

Comparison of Student and Community Data Age Range:

In comparing the age range of the general adult population of the surrounding community to our students’ ages, we can conclude that our students’ ages are representative of working-aged adults in the community.

Chapter 1 Page 17


Notes

Student Household Income:

Community average household income $56,185

Number of Persons in Student Households:

Community average persons per household 2.80

In a comparison of the two tables above, it is clear that the majority of our students earn significantly less and have significantly more persons living in each residence than those of the average community household. In conclusion, after an analysis of the data above, it is quite apparent that the students enrolled at NHPCAS are those in need of further education in order to better their socioeconomic circumstances. This confirms our purpose and vision of providing the needed comprehensive programs to meet the educational and career goals of the underserved and economically disadvantaged population in the communities we serve.

Chapter 1 Page 18


Student performance is evaluated in many different ways from certificates, student observation to results from standardized CASAS and TABE exams. Certificates are provided for the completion of CTE classes. In addition, certificates are also awarded to ESL students based on the results of their promotional exam. After completing ESL Advanced Low, students have the opportunity to exit the ESL program by meeting the score requirements on the standardized TABE test. Furthermore, the results from the TABE exams qualify ESL students to earn their 8th Grade Diploma. NHPCAS awards high school diplomas and GED certificates to adult learners by meeting the necessary requirements for graduation.

Notes

Student Learning Data

Indicators of student learning are listed below: ƒƒ Self assessments ƒƒ Written tests ƒƒ Teacher assessment and observations ƒƒ Teacher-developed instruments ƒƒ ESL standardized promotional exams ƒƒ CBET Pledge cards ƒƒ TABE Exam ƒƒ Completion of academic subject course contracts ƒƒ CAHSEE test results ƒƒ Completion of vocational classes ƒƒ Certificates of Completion ƒƒ Attainment of GED Certificates ƒƒ Attainment of Adult High School Diplomas ƒƒ Student attendance patterns ƒƒ CASAS competency exam results ƒƒ California Benchmark totals ƒƒ Eighth Grade Diploma recipients

Chapter 1 Page 19


Notes

California CASAS Benchmarks CASAS assessments are valid and reliable for both native and non-native speakers of English. The CASAS test is administered on paper in modalities of reading and math. In addition to certifying basic skills attainment, CASAS measures learner progress on a standardized scale that ranges from the lowest literacy skills to high school exit and transition to postsecondary education. DACE sets a benchmark target goal each school year based on 40% of the unduplicated enrollment in ESL, ABE and ASE. Listed below are the four areas of achievements assessed:

The WIA Advisor scans all CASAS tests for benchmarks.

1. A Significant Gain is an improvement in knowledge and skills based upon standardized CASAS exams. 2. The Two Level Advancement refers to the gains resulting in two-level movements on California benchmark levels. 3. Benchmark by passing exam and attaining the GED Certificate. 4. Completion of the requirements for an adult High School Diploma.

Benchmarks Earned:

Chapter 1 Page 20


Notes

CASAS Data:

English as a Second Language Completers

Chapter 1 Page 21


Notes

High School Diplomas and GED Certificates Earned

Career Technical Education Certificates Earned

Chapter 1 Page 22

Vocational Certificates Awarded BUILDING AND GROUND COMPUTER CUSTOMER SERVICE GENERAL CLERK OFFICE TECH Total

2008-2009 51 63 207 1 10 332

Vocational Certificates Awarded BUILDING AND GROUND COMPUTER COMPUTER Animation CUSTOMER SERVICE Digital Imaging/Video Medical Total

2009-2010 9 99 4 174 54 9 349

Vocational Certificates Awarded COMPUTER Digital Imaging/Video Medical Security Guard Total

2010-2011 156 34 101 1 292


Chapter

Two

Progress Report on Past Recommendations


Chapter

Notes

Two

Progress Report on Past Recommendations The institution is to provide a summary of progress on the Action Plan that addresses key issues from the previous Self-Study Report. It should also include any recommendations that resulted from any other visit or report required by the Commission during the current accreditation cycle since the last full self-study visit. In narrative form, the school should provide the following information: ƒƒ Describe any significant developments that have had a major impact on the school or specific changes in programs since the last visit. Comment on any major changes in profile data (Chapter 1). ƒƒ Describe the school’s procedures for the implementation and the monitoring of the Action Plan. ƒƒ Comment on the accomplishment of each current Action Plan key issue; cite evidence, including how each area has met identified growth targets and contributed to the accomplishment of one or more SLOs for all students. Show how the schoolwide Action Plan addressed the key issues from the last full selfstudy. (Note: If the school’s last visit was an initial visit, the report should respond to the recommendations left by the Initial Visiting Committee.) ƒƒ Comment separately on key issues that have already been addressed and are not currently in the Action Plan. ƒƒ Describe how progress on the key issues in the Action Plan has impacted student learning.

Chapter 2 Page 23


Notes

SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS The following list encompasses the most significant developments and changes occurring in the past six years (2008-2009) from the original WASC visit, including those over the last three years since the Midterm visit in 2006-2007. 1. New Administrative Team: During the last six years, there have been two changes in Assistant Principals of Operations (2007-2008 & 2009-2010), two in Assistant Principals of adult counseling services (2008-2009, 2010-2011) and a new principal (2009-2010) assigned to the school, creating the team of four (4) who have been in place since 2010-2011. In February 2012, a new APACS was assigned. 2. R  eduction in Classified Staffing: Due to Reduction-in-Force action taken by the District, NHPCAS lost one Office Technician in September 2011, leaving four campuses to operate with only three (3) Office Technicians and a School Administrative Assistant. 3. Budget Cuts: Our Midterm Report notes a 15% decrease in funding in the 20082009 school budget. 2009-2010 saw an additional 19% cut; there was a slight increase of 5% in 2010-2011 from the prior year; and for the present year 20112012, funding was reduced by 13%. NHPCAS has endured a total budget reduction of 26% in the last four years. 4. Focus on Four Core Areas: Starting with the 2010-11 school year when adult education funds were cut and placed in Tier 3 status, DACE narrowed the focus of our programs to four core areas that were measurable and demonstrated concrete positive outcomes: Adult Secondary Education (ASE – high school diploma, GED), Adult Basic Education (ABE – Reading/Math Skills), ESL, and CTE. Program for Older Adults, Adults with Disabilities, and Parent Education classes have been reduced as a consequence. 5. Branch Sites – Expansion to Reduction: After having opened classes at 17 new branch sites for a total of 29 from 2006 to 2009, budget cuts and focus on core classes resulted in the eventual closure of all but seven. Through the vehicle of the Distance Learning program, new ESL outposts have been established to replace the traditional classes once held on some of the closed sites and to expand to new locations. Currently, there are four ESL DL outposts, and four Parent Education DL outposts. 6. ADA-Driven to Benchmark-Driven/Flexibility: In 2009-2010, state legislation froze 2008-2009 ADA designated funding as the determining factor for Adult Education funding. In addition, Adult Education funding was placed in the General Fund with budget flexibility rights given to LAUSD K-12 Division to do with as needed. In 2010-2011, benchmarks became the determining factor to justify and fund adult education.

Chapter 2 Page 24

7. Drop in Enrollment: No doubt in part a consequence of budget cuts, there has been a steady decline in enrollment not only in DACE, but in LAUSD as a whole. Possible other causal factors for the population decrease could be tighter immigration laws, emigration out of the area because of the sluggish economy and/or lower birth rates.


Notes

8. Improved Benchmarks/Outcomes: CASAS benchmarks gained (2323) met and surpassed our target (2063) for the first time in the 2010-2011 school year, despite budget cuts; the number of ESL Completers has increased; procedures for ordering CTE Certificates have been streamlined and improved, a CTE Improvement Plan mandated by state/Division has been implemented and helped augment our CTE completers. 9. Program Expansion: NHPCAS wrote and was awarded two proposals of $240,000 and $220,000 respectively which resulted in: ƒƒ Seven bungalow classrooms and one office bungalow on the Sun Valley High School campus ƒƒ The expansion of Whipple Campus hours, days and programs to include Saturday and evening classes New CTE Industry Sectors were introduced at the Whipple Campus: Medical Careers: First Responder, EMT and Health Information Technology Arts, Media, and Entertainment: Performing Artist, Screenwriting, Digital Imaging 1 & 2 Protective Services: Security Guard, First Responder Education, Child Development & Family Services: Childcare Occupations (still underway)

Sun Valley Campus Grand Opening.

10. Parent Engagement Program: At the Whipple Campus, in collaboration with the Division’s Parent Engagement Program, NHPCAS was awarded additional K-12 Beyond the Bell funding to offer GED Preparation in English and Spanish, teacherdirected ASE courses, ESL Parent Transition classes. 11. CTE Course Expansion/Improvements: NHPCAS wrote several Perkins grant proposals with the intent of bringing equipment to industry standards for existing classes (Computer Operation/1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, Digital Imaging/Fundamentals, 1 & 2) and adding new Industry specific CTE Certificate Programs (First Responder, Health Information Technology, EMT).

Chapter 2 Page 25


Notes

12. Academic Program: ABE Reading labs have instituted a new curriculum; the ASE program has implemented the new course outline and textbook for Psychology; Adult Independent Study (AIS) has expanded to three main sites, and Distance Learning Parent Education classes have expanded to four. We will begin using the new TABE 9/10 software, diagnostic tools and testing battery when received; the AEWC Program was transferred to El Camino-Reseda Community Adult School; and we administered the CAHSEE in summer 2011 for concurrent, senior nongraduates and served the most students of any one DACE school. 13. ESL/CBET Program: The ESL faculty textbook committee voted on new textbooks for the ESL Program; in 2010-2011, main campuses transitioned ESL classes from semester to trimesters; ESL Distance Learning expanded to outposts not served by traditional ESL classes and to supplement three main campuses; CBET minicourses were offered at several branch locations. 14. Campus Beautification / Improvement Projects: NHPCAS has improved the learning environment and general overall appeal of our four main campuses with upgrades of facilities and landscaping, purchases of office and classroom furniture, supplies, teaching materials and equipment, and new procedures to standardize operations over the past two years.

Staff and students participate in the Whipple Campus Beautification Project.

15. Partnerships: Administration has actively encouraged and pursued additional partnerships with the intent of producing positive effects for both the agencies involved and our school.

IMPLEMENTATION & MONITORING OF THE SCHOOLWIDE ACTION PLAN The goals of the Action Plan from 2006-2007 have basically been met by the previous administrative team. Current administrators have worked to maintain the results attained and to oversee the continual improvement of the school as a whole. In as much, administration seeks input from staff, students and community throughout the year, and re-establishes goals for each school year. These goals are communicated at the beginning of each school year at the Back-to-School meeting. Tasks to complete our goals are delegated to responsible parties under the supervision of assigned administrators. For example, in school year 2010-2011, one goal was to upgrade the office equipment, furniture and overall appearance of the North Hollywood Campus Adult School office. Administrators met with teacher advisors at that campus and

Chapter 2 Page 26


Notes

received their input. This information was used to prioritize the needs of the office in order to better serve students. Funds were received for this purpose and used to complete the project by August of 2011.

GROWTH AREA 1: COMMUNITY OUTREACH To increase the community and prospective student awareness of the educational programs and opportunities available. Action Steps 1 through 4 were deemed Critical Areas of Follow-Up by the Visiting Committee in 2006. Addressed in our Midterm Report, we are continuing with our efforts to work collaboratively with our local partners to meet the educational needs of the community by offering new high demand, high interest programs and to publicize all of our educational opportunities.

Action Step 1.

Identify new and innovative course offerings with the goal of increasing enrollment;

Action Step 4. Offer a larger variety of programs to maximize the use of the Whipple facility.

Enrollment figures spiked down drastically from 2008-2009 to 2009-2010 due to budget cuts which lead to consequent cuts to the number of classes offered. Despite an overall 26% decrease in teacher hours budgeted over the past three years, enrollment has stabilized at 8140 this year (2010-2011), up slightly from 8098 the year before. This stabilization is the product of careful and creative strategic planning and outreach efforts. High demand classes in the four core focus areas were continued and centralized to our four main campuses while new high interest CTE and minicourses were implemented. Classes with low attendance were discontinued. Most branch sites were closed. The Whipple Campus, our own stand-alone adult education site, was designated our CTE center and opened evenings and Saturdays to accommodate varied student schedules. Three CTE Industry Sectors were introduced: Entertainment, Arts & Media, Medical Careers, and Protective Services. To put in place a more comprehensive program, ESL, Academic, Computer and Building & Grounds Worker classes were offered as well. Security Guard, Building & Grounds Worker, and an ESL class were closed due to low enrollment. Waiting lists are kept for closed classes in the case that if enough potential students show interest, a class may resume. A Performing Artist class was added at off-campus stages nearby to give students real world experience.

Chapter 2 Page 27


Notes

Action Step 2. Create a committee to develop a plan for targeted

marketing of the school’s programs to recruit new students.

The school’s Marketing Committee came up with suggestions and a plan for future outreach from 2006 to 2009. Since that time, administration and assigned staff have assumed responsibility for marketing outreach. A Community Outreach Representative has been hired to assist specifically with this task. Publicity methods from these efforts have been widespread and varied. Professionally-designed flyers for all CTE classes, a specially-created Whipple CTE brochure, flyers for branch site classes and NHPCAS’ Schedule of Classes have been distributed throughout the community and are displayed in each main office. Postcards advertising our new Sun Valley Campus were mailed to neighboring zip codes. Professionally-made banners were displayed on school campuses to advertise our programs. The school website, www.nhpcas.com, has been revamped with a new, clean look, takes advantage of website technology with tabs and links, is user-friendly and is updated weekly. The weekly school bulletin is viewable to the community via the school website. The school utilizes a mass calling system, ConnectEd, to place recorded calls to all students and staff. Articles on NHPCAS classes have appeared in local publications, such as The Tolucan Times, Studio City Kiwanis and the online Valley News. The school has purchased ads in the Daily News to promote awareness and brand our name. The school purchased an ad to run on a monitor in an LA Fitness gym. The new Whipple Campus program was advertised by contacting industry-specific businesses and agencies, such as the LA City Fire Cadet Program and LAPD Cadet Program, security guard agencies, and medical offices. Online email blasts have been sent to get the word out about the Screenwriting and Digital Imaging (Video Editing) classes. School personnel visit and make presentations at Worksource Centers, CBOs, local K-12 schools, Chambers of Commerce meetings, Graphic Design is one of several CTE courses and community events. offered at the Whipple Campus.

Chapter 2 Page 28


schools, agencies, and the community to provide an environment for the free exchange of ideas.

Notes

Action Step 3. Establish partnerships with local businesses,

Community partnerships have been well-established since our last accreditation, and are an invaluable asset in the ongoing evaluative process. We have created new and maintained existing liaisons with community members. Our partners serve as a gauge to our community. We elicit input and feedback regarding current programs, future program offerings, and needs of the surrounding businesses and community at large. The Valley Complex: NHPCAS is one of seven DACE schools located in the San Fernando Valley, local districts 1 and 2, that make up the Valley Complex. The group meets several times each school year and communicates regularly. One of its purposes is to coordinate marketing efforts so that costs and the workload of presenting or participating in conferences and other local events can be shared. The group as a whole also hired Valley Economic Alliance to create and market our local DACE schools to businesses. It was through this connection that NHPCAS was invited to visit Sugar Foods, Inc. in Sun Valley, to entertain the possibility of onsite classes for its employees. Our School Advisory Council is composed of local business and community members from the Chambers of Commerce, local K-12 administrators and parent center directors, non-school based branch location directors, communitybased organization representatives, and shared-campus partners Carlson Hospital School and the State Preschool. The Advisory School Advisory Council Meeting in January 2011. Council meets annually to exchange information, share news and discuss the needs of their respective programs. EMT Partners: More recently, NHPCAS has built partnerships in order to bring the EMT class to fruition. North Valley Occupational Center (NVOC) shared information on how to implement a successful EMT program. West Valley Occupational Center donated instructional supplies and equipment. NHPCAS has contracted with Shaefer Ambulance and Providence St. Joseph Hospital to host our EMT interns at their sites. Local High Schools – Our APACSs have forged strong relationships with high school administration and counselors in order to serve their students in credit retrieval, while APOs have built bonds with administration, office staff and Parent Center Directors to offer Parent Education classes and to maintain good rapport at shared school sites.

Chapter 2 Page 29


Notes

Elementary and Middle Schools - Through specially-funded programs and grant funding, NHPCAS is able to offer Parent Education and CBET Tutoring and Computer classes to their parents on site. YPI (Youth Policy Institute) refers participants to our Health Information Technology (HIT) classes and subsidizes enrollment and textbook fees. YOM Valley (Youth Opportunity Movement) has partnered with us to offer HIT classes to their clientele on their site and to subsidize participants’ costs. Community Events: NHPCAS sends representatives to staff booths at local events held in schools, parks, malls, at job fairs, health fairs, city- and agencysponsored events.

NHPCAS participates in the Annual Community Job Fair.

GROWTH AREA 2: COMMUNICATION To improve the free exchange of ideas and innovations between all shareholders to assist in meeting student learning goals. With the advances in technology in the past few years and since the last accreditation, communication has continued to improve among all staff. Faculty members are required to have an LAUSD email account to complete Child Abuse Awareness Training online each school year prior to October 30. It has been the goal of NHPCAS to go “green” by communicating with all staff through email, reducing the use of paper and encouraging all staff to communicate among each other through email. The process of Accreditation is well-suited to the use of email and online exchange of information. Office staff and administration employ email daily to quickly send memos, and share important changes and information. The District’s email system has progressed to the point that larger quantities of information can be attached to email messages, allowing for larger documents and picture files to be sent and shared. LAUSD.net will be expanding to “in the cloud” technology shortly, permitting unlimited memory and data storage. Centralization of programs has aided communication with almost all teachers being assigned to main campuses. Administrators congregate every week and sometimes more frequently to ensure cohesion and the smooth operation of the school. Specific meetings are planned and take place every year, while other more informal meetings are held as needed throughout the year. The NHPCAS Staff Back-to-School meeting, Student Orientations, Safety Meetings, Student Council meetings, and School Advisory meetings are examples of usual, planned meetings.

Chapter 2 Page 30


Notes

The academic department meets regularly with the APACS to discuss progress on potential graduates, changes in ABE and ASE courses, goals of each program, and to share ideas and clarify issues. The Assistant principal overseeing the CTE program consistently updates CTE instructors with state and division requirements, changes in policy and courses, and ensures that all instructors follow the school’s CTE Improvement Plan guidelines.

Student councils are an important part of each campus.

Due to the geographic distance between our four main campus locations and diverse schedule of assignments, department faculty often meet informally and outside of work time to exchange ideas. However, administration supports requests for meetings by scheduling a limited number of meetings during work time. Campuses located on high school plants meet at least four times per year with all faculty when high school parent meetings are conducted. These one-hour meetings provide another forum for administration and faculty to discuss department and program issues, news and answer questions. Faculty meetings to address the change to ESL trimesters, major changes in classes at a location, budget cuts, addition of Distance Learning as a supplement to traditional ESL classes are all examples of meetings scheduled as needed. The Division sponsors professional development throughout the year and NHPCAS publicizes all of these opportunities by disseminating flyers in teachers’ boxes and announcing them in the weekly bulletin’s PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & EVENTS section. Administrators personally encourage teachers to attend trainings in their specific subject area. The Whipple campus is often host to Division workshops, so that NHPCAS faculty can attend more conveniently. At NHPCAS, there is a strong sense of community exemplified by annual events that staff and students alike participate in schoolwide: The Blood Drive, Food Drive, and Toy Drive, Campus Beautification Days, campus barbeques, the District’s Consolidated Charitable Campaign, holiday shows, end-of-term festivities in the classrooms, monthly perfect attendance awards, certificates of attendance and merit each term, and, of course, the major culminating event each year – the Graduation Ceremony which occurs at the Polytechnic campus in June. All faculty, staff and students are invited to the Poly auditorium for the gala event after which cake and refreshments are served and a DJ provides music for dancing.

Chapter 2 Page 31


Notes

In addition, NHPCAS hosts an annual International Day at the Whipple Campus every year in May, annual Pumpkin Pie Celebration at all campuses in November, Spelling Bees at NOHO and Poly campuses, and occasional student dances. The weekly bulletin, school website Annual Thanksgiving Pumpkin Pie Celebration. and job boards at each main campus list job announcements for students. Community events are highlighted in the weekly bulletin for students’ and staff’s extracurricular enjoyment. Whipple campus houses a Student Lounge in room 14 where students may congregate at their leisure, access student computers and the Internet, print documents, read books from the lending library, relax on comfortable furniture and purchase beverages and snacks from the student vending machines. NHPCAS and the District have promoted the objective of “going green” with the purpose of improving the school and community environment and eliminating waste. In addition to campus beautification projects, NHPCAS received 100 recycling bins to be placed in each Sun Valley Campus Green Team. classroom. All campuses are participating in this schoolwide project and is an addition to our collaboration with the Tree People organization supporting the District’s Greening Initiative. All of these small ecological projects combined enhance the students’ learning and school environment and encourage participation in school causes, involvement in school/ community projects, and engender pride in their school and community.

Chapter 2 Page 32


To increase awareness of available personnel, resources, and educational opportunities within NHPCAS and the adjoining community.

Notes

GROWTH AREA 3: STUDENT SUPPORT

Every student is welcomed to any campus they choose to attend. Accurate and complete information is given over the phone and in person. All office staff at every campus are continually provided with up-to-date information about the school. This process ensures that information given is consistent across all campuses and among all offices. A standardized intake procedure is in place at each main campus. All students sign in and are helped in the order they arrive. ESL and Academic Teacher Advisors are in place to serve students in those programs specifically, but have been cross-trained to assist any student. In addition, office staff are very familiar with intake procedures and may step in where needed.

Customer service begins with a welcome.

NHPCAS has a customer service attitude and treats each and every student respectfully and with the intention of meeting their individual needs. Teachers, who are most often sought out as information sources by students, are frequently made aware of program changes and interdepartmental information so that they may serve as spokespeople for the school. Our professionally-designed website furnishes students and the community with up-to-date information on campus locations, school programs, class schedules, and resources for students. Computers are available at the Whipple campus in the Student Lounge and in classrooms, at the Sun Valley campus in classrooms, and at the other two main campuses for students in computer classes and in weekly ESL computer labs. Students receive information about the school upon intake, in their classrooms, and at Student Orientations (described in Growth Area 2 above). At these Orientations, students receive information on various pathways to acquire career skills or enter institutions of higher learning upon achieving their goals at our school. In addition, students are encouraged to see a counselor for referrals to communitybased organizations and local agencies. Each counseling office maintains a Finger-Tip Resource Guide and Rainbow Book to refer students who need access to services such as low-cost medical care, housing, childcare and the like.

Chapter 2 Page 33


Notes

LA City’s 2-1-1 telephone or online referral system is another resource available to students needing assistance. New academic students are asked what their goals are in order to program them into the appropriate program and class. Teachers are encouraged to implement a needs assessment at the beginning of every term to better meet student needs. Moreover, teachers have been instructed to incorporate goalsetting activities into their lesson plans during the first three weeks of the term. Student goals are revisited every few weeks by either teachers or counselors. The SIS computer program continues to be the primary tracking system used by DACE schools to follow students through their educational L.A. city's 211 is an excellent counseling resource. path. Counselors maintain files of higher level ESL students, as well as ABE and ASE students, in an effort to impart guidance as they progress in their educational pursuits.

Chapter 2 Page 34


To enhance the student’s educational process through the use of technology.

Notes

GROWTH AREA 4: TECHNOLOGY

A Technology Plan was created in 2009 which included proposed projects to be completed by 2012. Needs were assessed and information compiled to determine the technology needs of staff and students. This resulted in the creation of new courses, the implementation of ESL Computer Labs, faculty access to computers and the Internet, and laptops for check-out for teachers. In addition, each DACE school received a one-time block grant during that school year which was used to purchase necessary technology for the Digital Imaging/Final Cut Pro class. NHPCAS has continuously upgraded our technology from that time on. Over the last two years, the new administrative team recognized that technology had expanded beyond the use of computers. Our view of technology now includes not only computerrelated equipment, but other state-of-the-art, industry-specific equipment and tools of the trade. In today’s career training, each student must be prepared for and trained to use that field’s high-level electronic equipment. With this in mind, NHPCAS has taken advantage of applying for numerous Perkins grants each year. These grants maintain current technology and upgrades where needed, and also provide the state-of-the-art equipment required for advancedlevel CTE courses, such as Digital Imaging 1 & 2, Health Information Technology, First Responder and EMT. These grants have totaled $460,000 over the last three years. Additional classes benefiting from these grants include the five computer courses in the Business and Finance Sector: Computer Operation/1, 2, 3, 4, & 5.

Perkins Grants provide the EMT program with needed supplies.

Computer technology is regularly upgraded through Perkins Grants.

CTE instructors are skilled in their specific career fields and, consequently, keep current with any new technological advances the field demands. All instructors are encouraged to improve their technological skills through Division workshops offered at conferences and throughout the school year at various locations. The Whipple campus has hosted several such workshops.

Chapter 2 Page 35


Notes

IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING Great strides have been achieved in each of the four Growth Area categories of the 2006 Action Plan, and each step taken benefits student learning either directly or indirectly. In the area of COMMUNITY OUTREACH, we have maintained well-established relationships and gained support and partnerships with a growing number of community businesses, organizations and fellow schools, resulting in additional resources for students, such as internships, speakers, onsite classes and job leads. We consider COMMUNICATION a top priority given our four main campuses, branch sites and varied work hours. With the advance of technology, we have been able to utilize more avenues to increase communication and awareness both internally with school personnel and students, and externally with our community partners. We have also invited student and community involvement to foster an open exchange of ideas. For students this translates into standardized services and procedures at all campuses, website access and more current knowledge of school information and activities. As far as SUPPORT SERVICES is concerned, even with the decrease in out-ofclassroom employees due to budget cuts, we have been successful at maintaining operations and, thus, student services at each of our main sites, by utilizing all of our employees, from Student Aides to Teacher Advisors, to their full capacities in order to meet the needs of students. The awareness of these services is communicated through Intake, Orientations, and information given out in the office and in the classroom. NHPCAS is on a continual quest to stay on the technological forefront for the sake of our students, whether it be to teach parents how to assist their children with schoolwork, to supplement students’ learning by use of computers and other TECHNOLOGY, to offer online or Distance Learning courses or to keep up with industry standards in our CTE classes. We make it our business to offer the best and latest courses taught by the most qualified teachers to prepare our students for the workforce and to contribute as community members.

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Chapter

Three

Self-Study Findings


Chapter

Notes

Three

Self-Study Findings Based on the WASC Postsecondary Criteria Criterion 1: Institution Mission and Schoolwide Student Learner Outcomes The institution demonstrates a strong commitment to its mission, emphasizing student achievement in career technical programs. The school communicates its mission internally and externally. Student Learner Outcomes (SLOs) are developed and reviewed annually to ensure that they are current.

1.1

The institution has a statement of mission that defines its broad educational purposes, its intended student population, and its commitment to high levels of student learning.

ƒƒ In what ways does the mission statement reflect the institution’s commitment to high levels of student learning? One key element of our mission statement is our inclusion of the term “comprehensive programs,” which denotes a cohesive progression of available learning opportunities and pathways from basic English skills to high school diploma to advanced career skills. Our surrounding community is ethnically, socially, and economically diverse in age and background, which is reflective of the “diverse student population” we support and serve at our school. (Please refer to Chapter 1 for student demographic information.)

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Notes

Our mission statement’s purpose is broad and thus designed to apply to all students as a whole: “…developing the skills, knowledge, and confidence necessary…” We state that our school is “committed” to high levels of student learning by indicating that we expect students to “meet their educational and career goals…,” and even go beyond their personal academic goals by declaring that they will consequently become “informed and productive community members.” ƒƒ How does the institution establish learning programs and services that are aligned with its mission and purpose and that match the needs of its student population? Our school accomplishes its task of establishing learning programs and services aligned with its mission statement and matching student needs by concentrating the vast majority of our course and program offerings in the four core areas of ESL, ABE, ASE, CTE, while at the same time meeting the needs of the local community by providing additional classes in such programs as: Beyond the Bell, Distance Learning, specialized CTE courses that match industry-certificated skills, Parent Education, Older Adults, Adults with Disabilities. Specific CTE courses we offer in response to community needs are Screenwriting, Performing Artist, Emergency Medical Technician, Health Information Technology, and Digital Imaging. We are staying at the forefront by planning the implementation of on-line CTE computer courses. Factors we consider when instituting classes and programs are geographic and demographic indicators, general overall economic and societal conditions, the job market, and career trends. Currently, there is a greater emphasis placed on College Preparation, and due to economic pressures (reduction in funding to high school summer school, intervention and remedial programs), NHPCAS has partnered with its local high schools to complement their programs by offering CAHSEE preparation and credit recovery courses. We also welcome the chance to partner with community-based organizations and apply for federal/state grants which provide opportunities for community members in low income areas. ƒƒ What documents does the school have that prove that the institution is legally authorized by the state or appropriate government agency to grant credits, certificates, or diplomas? All LAUSD, Division of Adult and Career Education, courses have received authorization by the Los Angeles Board of Education. Each year, the Board officially adopts courses approved by the Division and authorizes the deletion of obsolete courses. Every course needs Division and Board approval before requesting State certification that may also be necessary. DACE publishes a California state-approved Catalog of Authorized Adult Education Courses and distributes it to all DACE schools. LAUSD/DACE schools are accredited by WASC. The school complies with all State and Federal mandates per District and Division policy. In addition, federal and state programs are supported by WIA, Perkins funding, and also must meet requirements. NHPCAS follows guidelines set in place by the state, then handed down from DACE, regarding Adult Diploma requirements.

Chapter 3 Page 38


The mission statement is approved by the governing board, published internally and externally, and regularly reviewed and revised to connect to current student learning needs.

Notes

1.2

ƒƒ Who was involved in the development of the mission statement and how was it accomplished? The entire staff was encouraged and invited to participate in the process of revising our school’s mission statement. In April 2011, Home Group Chairs were asked to distribute worksheets for mission statement and ESLR revision to all employees at their respective campuses and assist The Leadership Team meets regularly. with gathering all worksheets by May 7, 2011. Administration, Leadership Team members, and Home Group Chairs encouraged participation of all employees. The Leadership Team met on May 18 to review collected results and discuss plausible revisions. Seven differently-phrased suggestions affirming basically the same meaning emerged during that meeting. Leadership devised a mission statement that incorporated the significance of all versions into one. The newly conceived mission statement was approved by the institution’s governing body: Administration and the Leadership Team. ƒƒ How is the mission statement communicated to the institution's constituents? The school utilizes several avenues to communicate its mission statement: distribution of bookmarks to staff, students and community partners, posting on the school website, publication in the weekly bulletin, posters in main offices and classrooms, inclusion in Schedule of Classes which is dispersed to the community at large, and on school folders. ƒƒ How often is the mission statement and school purpose reviewed and revised in order to maintain relevancy and effectiveness? The school’s mission statement has held its significance and relevancy over the last six years. Because of the accreditation process, it was reviewed again this past year and revised by the end of the school year 2010-2011. Although the school underwent this revision process, in the end only slight changes were made with the original meaning remaining intact. More significant changes were made to our Student Learning Outcomes, producing more attainable, measureable, and concrete goals for students.

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Notes

ƒƒ Who is involved in this review and revision process? All school stakeholders (administration, faculty, classified staff, paraprofessionals, students, and community partners) were invited to make suggestions and comments in order to gather feedback. When reviewing our school’s purpose, we took into account program attendance, Division goals and trends, Student Questionnaire results, School Advisory Committee input, and whether the school was continuing to respond to community needs.

1.3

The institutions mission statement is central to institutional planning and decision making activities.

ƒƒ How does the school consider its mission statement and SLOs in its planning and decision making activities? The school’s mission statement reflects student outcomes directly: obtaining skill sets, setting goals, and completing at least one course or program of study. Our planning and decision-making are based on meeting the outcomes or SLOs with much consideration given to and dependent upon our annual budget allotment. Determinations are then made regarding the quantity and types of classes to be offered, support staff and necessary instructional materials, supplies and equipment. ƒƒ What evidence does the school have to support the use of the mission statement and SLOs in planning processes? NHPCAS has the following evidence that is central to its planning and decisionmaking process: Budget Planning Worksheets, qualified and professional faculty and staff, availability of resources, implementation of courses and programs, securing of all materials to support instruction and student success, class duration, longevity, completion of competencies, completers, and lesson plans. ƒƒ How is analysis and review of the institution’s mission and achievement of SLOs related to the revision of the schoolwide Action Plan each year?

Chapter 3 Page 40

Accomplishment of the Action Plan supports the mission and SLOs which, in turn, support all of our programs. Data garnered from the school itself and received at Division-wide administrative meetings is brought back to the school and examined to monitor outcomes on a regular basis, at least bimonthly, throughout the year, and annual cumulative data and analysis is provided at year’s end from which decisions are made. Action Plan items are followed up on regularly and accordingly. In many cases, these items have been addressed completely; in some cases, progress is more gradual and continues toward its achievement; in other cases, the economic and/or political climate has deemed the item null and void for the time being; and in still other cases, additional changes must take place that have not been included in the original Action Plan. In this way the school addresses the Action Plan every year and on a continual basis, revising it according to changes in attendance patterns, trends in the community, K-12 system, and budget.


The institution establishes Schoolwide Learner Outcomes that identify the broad global goals for all students based on current and future student learning needs.

Notes

1.4

ƒƒ How were the Student Learner Outcomes (SLOs) developed and how are they measured? SLOs were developed by the same process and timeline as the mission statement. It was felt that the two went hand in hand and should be addressed simultaneously. It was agreed upon that the new SLOs should spring from the mission statement and be able to be measured and observed in terms of goals. Therefore, the SLOs correspond to achievable progress and completion targets that can be gathered from assessment and SIS data, and supported by teachers in the classroom. Outcomes will be measured using CASAS test results, GED and high school diplomas earned, course completions, certificates awarded, benchmark gains, and teacher observations. ƒƒ How do faculty members integrate these SLOs into their lesson planning? NHPCAS instructors integrate SLOs into their lesson plans and discussions in their classrooms on a daily basis. They are able to accomplish the Student Learning Outcomes we have developed because they are inherent in and derived from course content and apply to all students across the board. Course objectives include listening, speaking, reading, NHPCAS instructors assist and inspire writing, computation, career and/or life students in the learning process. skills. Each student enrolls in a class or program with the intent of completing it. And each instructor encourages and inspires his/her students to complete the class and reach their academic goals. ƒƒ How are all stakeholders connected to the Student Learning Outcomes? Just as there are academic goals for students, there are various targets for teachers and staff that assist them in monitoring achievement. Both groups are working together for the common purpose of student success. School administration, teachers, and teacher advisors strive to increase and surpass our yearly goals in a variety of programs. Goals from the various programs include: WIA benchmarks, CBET Pledge Cards and Tutoring Logs, CASAS gains, course completers, CTE certificates, and daily attendance figures. The WIA Advisor, CBET Advisor, and Perkins Advisor are employed to maximize their programs’ specific increases and outcomes. These advisors manage and generate certificates, forms, and reports to facilitate the collection and monitoring of data and inform involved staff of their students’ progress toward goals.

Chapter 3 Page 41


Notes

Student Council members are apprised of student successes, and the council supports the celebration of these successes by relaying the information to their classmates and volunteering at school events. Office staff show support by assisting with teacher needs and supplying information about our programs to teachers, students, and community. Teacher Advisors facilitate and support specific programs by assisting students in their objectives toward reaching their goals. They counsel students toward achievement of their objectives.

1.5

The Institution demonstrates the incorporation of current researchbased ideas into learning programs to ensure that the institution’s overarching goals (SLOs) are current and relevant.

ƒƒ What is process used to evaluate current educational literature and integrate new ideas that address current and future student learning needs? DIVISON: The DACE administers State and Federal educational programs through state-approved course outlines that are revised regularly and inclusive of current research in the content area. The Division also proposes new programs and class contracts that incorporate the latest research findings and must meet strict guidelines. CTE course outlines (skills/technology) are revised based on annual Division Industry Sector Advisory meeting feedback. The Division provides trainings, academies, and orientations as a support to implement these new programs or changes in existing programs. Contemporary teaching and industry trends emerging from educational research are covered in DACE workshops presented at DACE conferences and other professional development venues (e.g., Learner Persistence, EBRI). SCHOOL: At the school level, current teaching strategies are shared at faculty meetings, informal collaborations between teachers, and through bulletin items placed in teachers’ boxes. Administrators provide support by planning and attending meetings and encouraging collegial teamwork and creativity whenever possible. Teachers demonstrate a notable sense of commitment in providing high quality education by updating skills and utilizing new information in their classrooms. Faculty is involved in imparting the most current and best knowledge available by sharing best practices. They show their involvement by participating in committees, sharing best practices at the school (e.g., EBRI Reading Program), presenting at conferences, participating in curriculum development at the Division level, and volunteering in school activities. The administration is constantly seeking out new strategies to improve student attendance and retention, and has tried both open enrollment and managed enrollment, miniclasses, and a variety of new CTE classes (Security Guard, First Responder, Animation). NHPCAS Parent Educator presents at Parent Summit.

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Notes

ƒƒ What process is used to look at student learning data results to see what needs current students have and explore what new ideas might be useful to address these needs? Our Division holds regular meetings for administrators where results of data collection are reviewed. Administrators receive Division and individual school reports generated from data stored on centralized SIS and other database files. All this Division-wide and school-wide data is accessible and can be displayed via the Division’s DASHBOARD program on the DACE website: www.adultinstruction.org . At the school level, data results of student progress from TABE scores, ESL Promotional testing, “Completer” requirements, CASAS test scores, and annual schoolwide Perkins reports are shared with classroom teachers who use the information to further student learning and promote completers. Specific target areas of improvement for students are identified and re-taught and reviewed in the classroom. Teachers also use these target areas as topics for informal and formal teacher-to-teacher instructional sharing and enhancement. ƒƒ To what extent does the regular review and revision of SLOs include discussion based on current educational research? The broad skills and goals that comprise our SLOs are those our staff believes that all responsible and educated citizens and community residents should possess in our contemporary society and job market today. Every student in every class should learn a combination of the skills listed in our SLOs. They are applicable to every subject area. They are in line with the state and federal political climate concerning adult education. In this tenuous budget climate, outcomes are the primary objectives. We are compelled to abide by our local policies and guidelines which are conferred upon us by the state. Therefore, we have catered our SLOs to current findings on adult education per the Division, District, and state. Evidence-based instruction is incorporated into classroom teachings to change outcomes for the better and to reach the SLOs. Some examples of changes implemented to assist with improvements in programs and outcomes are new TABE diagnostic software, modified CASAS diagnostics, new CBET course and program requirements and guidelines, and procedural and curriculum changes in CTE courses that reflect industry standards, trends, new technology, and integrated academic standards. ƒƒ How does the review of profile data impact the review and revision of the SLOs? Administration and the Leadership Team at NHPCAS use profile data to review and/or revise the SLOs. Profile data includes student demographics, attendance patterns, and community characteristics. In addition, program data may also include information related to course enrollment or class schedules including benchmark data, all of which are taken into consideration when making changes regarding expectations for students.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the achievement of SLOs connect to the Schoolwide Action Plan? In examining data related to student outcomes, such as completers, certificates of completions, promotions, GED certificates, high school diplomas, etc., we can determine the areas in which students excel and those in need of improvement. Faculty is encouraged to share “Best Practices” with colleagues for those activities and lessons that are most successful in achieving outcomes. By improving classroom learning, achievement of SLOs is increased. It is part of our school mission to guide students toward the attainment of their goals.

Areas of Strength and Growth STRENGTHS: ƒƒ Addressing Areas of Growth ƒƒ Collection, Review, and Dispersing of data ƒƒ Funding classes and programs essential to the community needs ƒƒ Administration meets regularly to review, plan, and develop programs and set goals ƒƒ Taking advantage of District resources (grants/Program Advisors) ƒƒ Providing support (training, instructional materials and equipment, support staff, apply for grants) to assist teachers ƒƒ Instructional resources/materials ƒƒ Division Funding opportunities ƒƒ Staff opportunities ƒƒ Regular staff meetings ƒƒ Student Council

GROWTH AREAS: ƒƒ Timely printing and distribution of Schedule of Classes and other publications used to disseminate school information.

List of Evidence: ƒƒ List of those involved in the development of the mission statement and SLOs ƒƒ Minutes of Self-Study Committees, faculty meetings, administrative councils, student councils ƒƒ Minutes of meetings where the mission statement and analysis of learning data are reviewed ƒƒ WASC Postsecondary Accreditation Manual ƒƒ The institution’s catalog and staff handbook ƒƒ Publications, promotional materials, and other media that are used to provide information internally and externally about the institution and its mission

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Notes

CRITERION 2: Organizational Infrastructure and School Leadership The institution utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout the organization to provide for continuous improvement. The organizational structure and roles of governance are clearly defined and designed to facilitate decisions that support student learning and improve institutional effectiveness. The governing body enables the administrator/director to implement policy and lead the institution effectively.

2.1

The institution has clearly defined roles of governance that provide for ethical and effective leadership that results in continued improvement of the institution.

ƒƒ How do the organization structure and job descriptions promote efficiency and impact school improvement? Governance roles and job descriptions are standardized throughout the District. A high standard is expected of all employees to perform their job duties and responsibilities with a high degree of ethical comportment and professionalism; administrators are held to an even higher standard and must model such behavior and attitude to employees under their supervision. All employees are encouraged to learn other skills, so that all employees are somewhat cross trained. This has become even more important lately with reduction in positions at school sites. Job descriptions and structure allows us to encourage our own employees to promote. Opportunities are given to develop their skills, encourage professional development and mentor them in attaining advanced degrees to further their careers. This way they are also more aware of our school operation as a whole. Teachers require credentials issued by the State of California. The Division has additional requirements to support quality teaching methods and professionalism. CTE instructors’ requirements are specific for each industry sectors. Various sectors require certification and/or licenses; others mandate Continuing Education units. Academic teachers must hold appropriate credentials for specific subject matter they will be teaching. All positions have standardized job descriptions. Administration can request specific preferences and requirements. All job announcements are posted on the DACE online job site as well as in each NHPCAS campus’ main office for a minimum of two weeks.

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Notes

Training is advertised to all related staff by the weekly school bulletin, posting in the office and/or placing flyers in teacher boxes, or encouraging employees in person. The school supports training opportunities by allowing employees to attend job-related trainings on work time and/or paid time. School administration encourages staff to mentor, train or cross train co-workers. Staff is encouraged to make use of email and online resources available to them. ƒƒ How does the governing body implement its requirements for membership and training? The new administration in 2009-2010 evaluated programs at all campuses. Standardized procedures were instituted for intra-campus communication, District email addresses and usage by all staff, student registration procedures, Academic Counseling, ESL/ CBET administration, and data collection (WIA, Perkins, and CASAS). School administration has supported the Division’s prioritization of the four core area programs (ASE, ABE, ESL, and CTE), by expanding CTE Program at our Whipple Campus, responding to Division RFPs of grant proposals for expansion funding, and submitting Perkins Grant proposals for materials and equipment to support the expansion. The schoolwide ESL Program implemented new standardized ESL textbooks at all campuses that had been selected by the ESL Textbook Committee at the end of 20082009. The changes that have occurred in the past three years were contributed by the following factors: ƒƒ A complete change of administration ƒƒ An eventual modification of programs aligned to current needs (core areas, budget decrease, to name a few – see Significant Developments in Chapter 2) ƒƒ A reduction in out-of-classroom personnel ƒƒ A shift in objectives and goals ƒƒ A leadership style that stressed program improvement and outcomes The term ”Membership” is interpreted as being part of the school team. Members are employees who are motivated by including them in school planning and improvement and by encouraging them to be active participants. Members are encouraged to share information and outside the classroom to share responsibilities and to be cross trained. This sense of membership leads to improved classroom teaching and an efficient office environment, which leads to a more effective and efficient school.

Chapter 3 Page 46

The Administrative Team.


Notes

Based on newly-implemented procedures such as a new employee orientation, regular faculty and staff meetings, and the NHPCAS Staff Handbook, all employees know appropriate staff resources, the chain of command at each school campus, and are aware of who to contact to approach with issues that may arise at the their school site. Administrative supervisory responsibilities include planning, delegation, organizing, and following-up as well as informing, mentoring, and guiding employees in their charge and/or at their assigned campus (see NHPCAS Organizational Chart/ Faculty Handbook). All teachers are given Faculty Handbooks and review District, Division and school policies and procedures at the annual Back-to-School meeting. They are provided with a CD of bulletins detailing these policies and procedures for reference. In addition, every new staff member is given an orientation where the contents of the Faculty Handbook and policies and procedures are discussed as well as the Division New Teacher Manual and LAUSD/Division/nhpcas.com websites as resources. The Division provides direction, guidance, updates and training at Division administrator meetings. Administrators move on action items and planning, delegate tasks to appropriate staff and, in turn, guide and lead staff to accomplish goals. Examples include changes in CBET policy, budget cuts, focus on the four core areas, the CTE improvement plan, and school WIA benchmark goals. Division leadership executes policy and is available for guidance, leaving school administration to handle school site issues as they see fit in order to satisfy local needs and concerns. A check and balance system is in place: administration and advisors have confidence in employees, give them parameters and guidelines, then utilize open communication. School leaders give reminders and follow up at stages to instill confidence through providing strong support with thorough instructions after which they step back for them to carry on and succeed. Transparency, commitment, and modeling ethical and professional standards all inspire and demonstrate honesty and integrity at the school level. All administrators have an open-door policy. Administration sees through all aspects of planning and operations. Quality of instruction plays a big role in the reputation of our educational institution. Our School Advisory Council provides us an avenue to communicate current issues that we must deal with and consider. In addition, it gives all stakeholders a chance to voice concerns, ideas and suggestions. ƒƒ To what extent does the governing body handle policy issues and long-term planning while allowing the administrator/director to oversee the data-to-day operations of the school? School administration plans, facilitates, and enforces policies and procedures handed down by the DACE and District. Long-term planning guidance and recommendations come from the DACE, but local school adaptation is left to be determined by local school administrators. Day-to-day operations of the school include, but are not limited to, the following: ƒƒ New Employee Orientation – (Division/School/Individual Responsibilities) ƒƒ Mentoring

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Notes

ƒƒ Familiarize staff with policies and procedures: Faculty Handbook, CD-ROM, Weekly Bulletin, Division Training Manuals, School Safe Plans, District/ Division and School website ƒƒ Budget availability ƒƒ School benchmarks/outcomes ƒƒ Instituting new campuses/programs/classes ƒƒ Division Administrative/Program meetings (monthly, quarterly, annually) Direction ƒƒ New policies and procedures directed from DACE Administration, which in turn translates to our goal planning, program implementation, budget cuts, ƒƒ Program changes ƒƒ CTE Improvement Plan ƒƒ WIA benchmarks ƒƒ How does the governing body support the school leadership and hold them accountable without micromanaging them? With a school Division as large in quantity of schools and geographically spread out as DACE, there is not a sufficient number of Division leadership employed to be realistically capable of visiting every one of our 34 locations on a regular basis. Moreover, Division leadership holds school site administrators in high regard and trusts them with management, planning, budgeting, supervision, and daily operations of their local school sites. DACE trainings and the two-way open communication network instill confidence in school site administrators. DACE leadership directs and makes recommendations to all schools through a variety of communication resources, including emails, trainings, regularly scheduled administrative meetings, and an open line of communication. DACE administration has a check-and-balance system in place whereby they set deadlines, give clear direction, offer assistance, and check for understanding and clarity. Our Division heads hold individual schools accountable by keeping current on each school’s performance data. DACE and NHPCAS leaders are in constant contact regarding school site student achievement, and follow up with any issues or concerns. ƒƒ To what extend does the school leadership effectively lead the institution toward school improvement? The administrative team meets on a weekly basis to review issues and school data. The team continually proposes ways to increase student outcomes. The principal actively leads and takes part in the campaign to augment student achievement. A big part of our goal is to retain students so that they will stay in school longer and, in doing so, complete their educational program with us. To that end, school leadership sponsors many school-wide events that promote involvement, camaraderie, and school spirit. Such events include the Halloween Door Decorating Contest, Pumpkin Pie Celebration, Student Orientation, Holiday Shows, International Day, and Attendance Awards.

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Notes

An established Student Council, led by assistant principals, is active at each main campus, adding to the good morale and positive school culture. Student Council members participate in school events and bring back information to their classmates. They are representative of the student population and keep school officials in touch with the pulse of student affairs. Administrators examine student attendance statistics weekly and take note of any significant declines. Administrators observe and offer guidance and assistance to those teachers with noticeable decreased attendance figures. Administrators support the WIA Advisors' and teachers’ efforts to remediate student deficiencies in knowledge as shown by CASAS test results. Academic advisors remain in contact with high school diploma students throughout the school year to offer encouragement and monitor their progress toward earning their diplomas.

Perfect Attendance Club winners receive their prizes.

ƒƒ What evidence exists to show that the school leadership is trusted by the stakeholders? Certificated/Classified Questionnaire results show a strong sense of confidence in school leadership.

A winner in The Annual Halloween Door Decorating Contest.

ƒƒ Classified Staff - Good to Excellent 92% ƒƒ Certificated Staff - Good to Excellent 86% Teachers, students, staff and community members have all expressed their gratitude for partnering with them to inspire students to reach greater educational heights. Leadership conducts its school business in a transparent and inclusive manner, from hiring practices to incorporating policies and procedures. We have preserved old and established new productive and collaborative community partners due to the high standards we set for our educational programs and instructors. NHPCAS has maintained a reputation within our own school climate and throughout the community for providing quality basic education programs at low or no cost.

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Notes

ƒƒ To what extent does the board and school leadership demonstrate honesty and integrity in its relationships with stakeholders, other institutions or agencies, and with its own local community members? Our school leadership is bound by teacher and classified staff union contract agreements, as well as District and Division policy and procedures. NHPCAS school administration recommends personnel actions to the LAUSD School Board which the Board most often approves and passes. The most common occurrence in this respect is the closing of classes due to low enrollment. In this case, when administrators note low attendance over a period of time, they write a memo to the teacher in question warning him/her of possible class closure. It is then followed up with close monitoring of attendance and, subsequently, the actual class closure, if attendance does not increase within the indicated time period. Every attempt is made to improve classroom turnout. School administrators are open and honest in their dealings with school employees and the public. School policies and procedures are spelled out in the Schedule of Classes. Time frames for classes, events, services and office hours are pre-arranged and published. Agreements with community partners are upheld and supported.

NORTH HOLLYWOOD POLYTECHNIC Community Adult School Los Angeles Unified School District

|

Division of Adult and Career Education

|

Accredited by Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Ongoing ENROLLMENT! FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOUR NEEDS!

Polytechnic High School Campus

(Administrative Offices) 12431 Roscoe Blvd, Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 394-3950 Monday - Thursday: 1:00 - 9:00 pm Friday: 8:00 am - 4:30 pm Counseling Office: M-Th: 3:30 - 9:00 pm

North Hollywood High School Campus 5231 Colfax Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 753-7450 Monday - Thursday: 3:30 - 9:00 pm www.nhpcas.com

Administration also leads by example, holding itself to higher principles in order to inspire trust and serve as models of professionalism and efficiency. In performing Schedule of Classes Enroll September 6, 2011 - June 25, 2012 Now! their duties, our administrators function as sources of information, contacts for obtaining The 2011-2012 Class Schedule also teaching materials, supplies and equipment, includes school policies and procedures. instructional leaders who offer assistance and guidance, and central points of communications. Whipple Campus 10952 Whipple Street, North Hollywood, CA 91602 (818) 508-3600 Monday - Friday: 8:00 am - 3:30 pm Tuesday & Thursday: 5:00 - 9:00 pm Saturday: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm www.nhpcas.com

Sun Valley Campus

12100 Allegheny Street, Sun Valley CA, 91352 (818) 394-3950 Monday - Thursday: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm & 3:30 - 9:00 pm www.nhpcas.com

Open, continuous enrollment throughout the term.

www.nhpcas.com

2.2

The leadership of the institution creates a positive learning environment in a collegial and collaborative atmosphere that provides the foundation for school improvement and high levels of achievement for students.

ƒƒ To what extent does the administrator/director effectively lead the institution as both a visionary and academic leader? NHPCAS is fortunate to have visionary leaders with a focus on academic achievement. Our forward-looking administration has made our school stand out as a leader by staying at the forefront of technology and business trends. NHPCAS has been proactive in moving on new classes in addition to making sure teachers have all materials

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Notes

necessary to ensure success in the new endeavors. New and upgraded technology is provided in CTE and other classrooms, as funds become available. One idea that is currently in its infancy is to be the first adult school to offer an online CTE computer class. In spite of the budget outlook, administration has continued to look for additional funding sources, partnerships with community-based organizations, and rerouted defunct program monies to start new programs and expand existing Division and state-supported programs. School leadership has attempted to offset budget decreases by taking advantage of every funding source possible. During this time, we submitted proposals to expand our Whipple program to Saturdays and institute a new program at the Sun Valley Campus with the intent of reaching out to another geographical area. Per the NHPCAS School Profile received from DACE budget meetings, the principal determines resources and areas of improvement to plan, facilitate, and implement new areas of expansion and program implementation. As a team we are resolved to support the Division’s vision and focus on the four core programs, taking advantage of opportunities that arise (e.g., responding to the Division’s call for proposals to expand programs with available funding). Additional areas and actions taken that show confirmation that our principal, and administrative team as a whole, strive to execute the best programs for our students possible are: ƒƒ Referring annually to the Occupational Outlook Handbook (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) to determine CTE course relevance ƒƒ Hiring practices, staff justification, evaluation of staff placements of Teacher Adviser positions crucial and critical to the outcomes of student program needs and completions ƒƒ Improvement in all areas of program development ƒƒ The success of meeting our DACE designated targets in ADA, benchmarks and completers over past months (2010-11) ƒƒ Growth in Distance Learning outposts ƒƒ Incorporating EBRI, Math 1,2,3, U.S. History, new CTE standards into curriculum practice ƒƒ Future offering of on-line computer classes ƒƒ Expanding to main campus sites vs. branch sites ƒƒ Taking direction from the Division with the CTE Program Improvement Plan ƒƒ Changes in CBET procedures ƒƒ Partnering with the Parent Engagement Program ƒƒ Applying for Division grants to develop and expand programs with new sources of funding, to replace reduced funds (WIA, CBET, CTE) ƒƒ Taking advantage of all categorical funds available

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Notes

ƒƒ Developing new partnerships as community resources ƒƒ Addressing community needs ƒƒ Providing another option (the AIS program) to our high school diploma/concurrent students ƒƒ To what extent do school leaders effectively guide the institution toward school improvement? Faculty and staff are motivated by school leaders as shown by their overall performance on the job. They demonstrate engagement and focus, offer ideas and suggestions, attend meetings and trainings outside of work time, are readily involved in school events and activities, volunteer to present workshops, and share successes amongst their colleagues. (See more commentary in initial paragraph in this section, 2.2) ƒƒ What evidence exists to show that school leaders are trusted by the stakeholders? Stakeholders (students, community, and staff) show their satisfaction with our school by online and other questionnaires. They also express their opinions at our School Advisory meetings and have always had positive things to say, above and beyond their support for us during the recent times of budget shortfalls. In addition, communitybased organizations and schools contact our school regularly to request ESL, CBET, parent education, and CTE classes be held at their sites. ƒƒ To what extent do the faculty and staff display that they are motivated by school leaders to bring focus to student learning and school improvement? Administration places a lot of trust in its faculty and staff which brings about a spirit of collegiality and cohesiveness. Administration recognizes staff efforts and workmanship. Teachers and staff readily engage in tasks and are empowered to propose their own solutions and offer ideas to improve the learning process. One example of this collaboration is when administration and faculty met to discuss the best way to implement the new ESL trimester system. Administration sets aside time for teachers to share methods. They empower our advisors to make decisions and show initiative. Advisors, in turn, take their responsibilities seriously and go above and beyond the call of duty by coming in early, staying later, and attending meetings and school activities off school hours. They exhibit ownership of their positions. The Distance Learning faculty is counted on to establish and follow up on potential ESL Distance Learning outposts where DVD and online viewing with weekly homework is offered. Academic advisors and teachers have taken Evidence-Based Reading Improvement training, some on their own time, to improve their instructional practices.

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The institution’s governance, decision-making structure, and organizational processes are regularly evaluated to ensure their integrity and effectiveness.

Notes

2.3

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution include all stakeholders in the regular evaluation of the institution as a whole? NHPCAS hosts annual School Advisory meetings where feedback is elicited from community partners and other stakeholders that attend. Feedback from teacher advisors is gained at meetings between teacher advisors and administrators. Teacher input is acquired from faculty meetings at Poly and NOHO campuses. Trimester meetings and informal gatherings at Whipple Campus give teachers and staff the opportunity to contribute their thoughts. The administrators’ open-door policy builds trust among NHPCAS employees. Administration has assigned committees and allowed them to make decisions on textbooks and technology. Student Council meetings offer a forum where students can bring up issues and concerns. Hiring practices have put reliable, competent staff in place. Advisors and office staff are the eyes and ears of public opinion. Student Council meetings are held regularly.

ƒƒ How do stakeholders have a voice in the decision making processes of the school? Administration is open to new ideas, suggestions and changes and gives staff room for creativity to come up with solutions. Administrators delegate assignments to empower faculty and staff to participate in the decision-making process. NHPCAS uses a two-way communication process between administration and stakeholders. School leaders make modifications as needed whether daily, weekly, or monthly, with consideration of staff input. The goal is always to streamline procedures and standardize all campuses to maximize student learning and serve the surrounding community. ƒƒ How does the institution widely communicate the results of regular evaluations and use them as the basis for school improvement? Our communication system is multifold and regularly utilized. We have a weekly bulletin that is printed and distributed to all staff; our redesigned school website is accessible to all and displays our weekly bulletin and other information and successes; testing data results are publicized to teachers after every testing session; changes are noted on Change Forms distributed to key personnel so that all campuses are made aware; questionnaires for staff and students have been completed, results tabulated and published for schoolwide perusal and use in this accreditation evaluation process.

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Notes

ƒƒ What process does the institution use to evaluate its organization, governance structures, and decision-making procedures? Administrators make it known that they welcome ideas for program improvement that promote consistency, standardization, and student achievement. They invite staff to participate in the decision-making process by eliciting these suggestions. In this same way, NHPCAS faculty and staff are assertive about sharing their opinions as feedback for how specific changes have affected the school in a positive or negative manner, and how programs can still be improved. Even teacher assistants, student aides, student body workers, and infant care aides are active in voicing their outlooks. For example, infant care aides expressed a need for additional educational craft, game and toy items for the children they care for. While those children’s parents are attending our classes, our infant care aides are resolved to provide a quality and educationally sound program for their smaller counterparts. Staff and students attend School Safety meetings.

2.4

The institution has an established infrastructure of policies and procedures that provides stability and consistency for all institutional programs, activities, and events.

ƒƒ To what extent does the school document its policies and procedures in a Policy Manual? Despite being divided into four campuses and being separated geographically, we are able to standardize policies and procedures. In fact, this objective has been a continual process. Policies and procedures are publicized in the staff handbook, student body Budget Handbook, Counseling Handbook, Guide to Personnel Handbook, school and District websites, and CBET logs. Standardization at all campuses includes: ƒƒ Memos, emails, website ƒƒ Student Body Budget Handbook/Council Manual/ Guide to Personnel Manual ƒƒ Division/School website ƒƒ CD-ROM with Bulletins

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We follow written policies and procedures from our District and Division offices. The Division provides constant information, guidance and training related to policies and procedures, and modifies all of these reference materials as needed. Staff is made aware and regularly reminded of all policies and procedures by school bulletins, meetings, and as situations occur. For example, the weekly bulletin highlights a District or Division policy related to matters that our staff must be aware of and follow appropriately. These policy “reminders” ensure that our staff is kept up to date, informed, and know what to do in the event of a related situation. One example of a policy reminder is the District policy on Child Abuse and the steps to be taken in the event a staff member suspects abuse has taken place.

Notes

ƒƒ How do written policies guide the decision-making processes at the institution?

ƒƒ How does the organizational infrastructure support all academic programs, activities, and events so that students are able to achieve Student Learning Outcomes? Everything is organized and planned ahead of time in regards to events and activities, e.g., Thanksgiving Pumpkin Pie Celebration, the Spelling Bee, blood drives, food drives, toy drives, and speakers. Activities provide an occasion to build cohesion and positive school culture that results in higher student attendance. When possible, teachers are often provided with resources related to the event, cultural activity, or topic so teachers may create lessons for their students to enable them to be more fully informed and prepared to better appreciate the activity or event.

Student Council members participate in Scholarship Fundraiser.

The Annual Holiday Toy Drive benefits families in the NHPCAS community.

Academic Teacher Advisors make presentations to Advanced ESL classes to assist students in their transition from ESL to remedial programs in reading and math or entrance into the high school program.

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Notes

Speakers from local colleges and occupational centers have been invited to graduation meetings to better inform our potential graduates of the opportunities available to them after high school graduation. By providing support in a variety of ways to our staff and our students, our goal is to ensure that all students benefit from our programs and activities in an effort to reach their goals, complete their course, or succeed in the next level of their education. ƒƒ How often does the school review and update its Policy Manual? The policy manual is updated every year before the Back-to-School meeting. District and Division policies are updated. Changes to the District, Division or school are reflected in the Staff Handbook before being distributed at the fall Back-to-School meeting. These often include changes in personnel and school calendar as well. ƒƒ How do faculty, students, and staff members have established mechanisms for providing input into institutional decisions? We solicit other solutions, and then offer choices. We then explain. We are direct and clear in stating policies so there are no questions. If something is not working, we consider input, then make changes for the betterment of the school. (See 2.3 – Bullets 1 & 2) ƒƒ To what extent is the creation of new policies as well as the decisions made based on current policies done in a transparent and ethical manner? Changes made at the District or Division level are communicated to administration at the school level and mandated for implementation. School leaders take immediate action and abide by direction from central office, which often times is dictated by the state. Examples of these occasions are when there have been changes in CBET procedures, when DACE wanted to implement a Parent Engagement program at NHPCAS, and when our school was allocated a drastically reduced budget. School administration chose to respond to budget cuts by concentrating classes at centralized locations and, thereby, saving almost all adult school teacher positions. Significant change at the school level is preceded by communication, whether it be in the form of a memo, email, or staff meeting. If a situation has arisen that dictates a change in policy or procedures, administration communicates with staff. If possible, staff may be requested to provide their input on how best to resolve the situation. Sometimes, administration must make a change without staff input; however, the reason for the change is always communicated with those affected.

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STRENGTHS:

Notes

Areas of Strength and Growth ƒƒ Standardized hiring practices ƒƒ High standards for new employees ƒƒ Input from stakeholders is valued ƒƒ Teacher access to materials ƒƒ Standardized procedures at all sites ƒƒ Strong support network for all staff ƒƒ Access to equipment for all teachers for sign-out: computers/DVD Players/LCD projectors/laptops/camera/ ƒƒ Staff and Faculty support: Instructional materials, equipment, assistance and guidance, mentoring, staff development opportunities

GROWTH AREAS: ƒƒ Institute meetings with staff every six weeks or as needed ƒƒ Standardize procedures for new teacher processing and orientation ƒƒ Reinstitute Leadership Committee

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Addresses of all campuses affiliated with the institution ƒƒ WASC Postsecondary Accreditation Manual ƒƒ List of the institution’s governing body members by name, title, and professional and/or business affiliations ƒƒ Flow chart of organizational governance and decision-making processes ƒƒ Copy of any contract between the institution and any agency, corporation, institution, or individual that involves processing financial aid, instruction, administration, recruiting, or placement services, etc.

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Notes

CRITERION 3: Faculty and Staff The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs and services to ensure institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, evaluated regularly, and provided opportunities for professional development that impact student learning.

3.1

The institution employs personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience in line with its school mission and SLOs.

ƒƒ To what extent are the institution’s personnel sufficiently qualified to guarantee the integrity of programs and services?

CERTIFICATED STAFF Certificated personnel must have a current and valid California state credential with the subject area specific to class taught. Adult Education accepts single, multiple, Ryan designated-subject, and CTE credentials. The credential notebook is kept upto-date in the Polytechnic Campus main office. Teachers are notified two months in advance to renew their credentials. Job postings in-house and at DACE online site specify distinct requirements and applicants must now complete a standardized division application. According to the Certificated Questionnaire results, 30 faculty members hold Bachelor’s Degrees, 19 a Master’s Degree and one a Doctorate Degree. Of those, 36 have completed from 30 to 60 or more hours of coursework beyond a Bachelor’s Degree. The 56 questionnaire respondents possess a total of 78 credentials. The breakdown is as follows: 46, Ryan Designated-Subjects credential; eight, a Career Technical Education credential; 12, a Multiple Subject; and six, a Single Subject. Of these, 37 hold multiple credentials, including the six certificated staff that also hold Administrative or Pupil Personnel Services credentials (four administrators plus two teacher advisors). Faculty at NHPCAS has a wealth of experience in the DACE, many having taught and/ or held out-of-classroom positions, not only at our school, but throughout schools or other offices in the Division. This is demonstrated in our questionnaire data in which 35 have five or more years of service at our school, whereas 48 have five or more years of service in the DACE. In fact, 64% of our certificated staff have 10 or

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Notes

more years of adult education experience overall; and 42% have been with our school over 10 years. It is interesting to note that 64% of our respondents work only in the field of adult education. In addition to being highly qualified, our certificated staff values and participates in professional development. A variety of growth activities are available to all teachers: local adult education conferences, workshops sponsored by the District, Division, professional organizations and NHPCAS, vocational and higher education classes. The Certificated Questionnaire shows that 87% have attended conferences or workshops outside of our school; 75% have attended professional development activities at NHPCAS; and 62% have taken advantage of college or vocational classes to upgrade their skills. Our staff is more than willing to share instructional strategies and best practices, as evidenced by the Questionnaire in which 82% answered that they have done so. Moreover, about one third of our certificated staff have taught or led workshops or other professional classes in the last two years. Ninety-five percent of our certificated staff rate our school’s effectiveness in informing them of professional development opportunities as Excellent/Good. Students are very happy with the quality of our teachers.

CLASSIFIED STAFF Classified staff have all passed required District examinations, and submitted mandated application packets listing education, skills, and prior employment history. In addition, all classified staff must meet District job qualifications, legal standards, including submission of fingerprints. Certain positions are The Clerical Team. assigned according to a District list and based on seniority, while others are hired at the discretion of the administrators through an interview process. Per the Questionnaire, 57% of our classified staff exceed the educational background required for the position. In fact, NHPCAS administration strongly supports the educational advancement of its classified personnel, and encourages them to promote to higher paying jobs within and outside the District. Our classified staff are informed of professional development opportunities to improve their job skills and are encouraged to attend these trainings. If the SAA and principal find that an employee is deficient in his/her work skills, they may require that employee to attend training in the District's Personnel Commission's Organizational Excellence Program. All in all, 78% of our Classified Questionnaire respondents reported attending some kind of professional growth activity in the last three years. (See chart in Chapter 1)

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Notes

ƒƒ What methods does the institution use to assure that qualifications for each position are closely matched to specific programmatic needs and aligned with the school’s mission? The District and Division have clear and standardized qualifications for each position, sometimes surpassing state requirements. These requirements form the policy and procedure for hiring practices that the school must comply with. Every credentialed instructor must have a minimum number of units in the subject area in which they are hired to teach, or years of experience and/or education in the vocational field (for CTE instructors). This vast amount of education, training and experience of our certificated and classified staff provides a strong foundation for our school, so that students can develop skills and gain confidence to successfully achieve their goals, which is the core of our mission statement. These same qualifications embody the skills and expertise necessary to assist our students with achieving one or more SLOs: develop and apply learned skills; set and meet goals; and complete a course or program of study. ƒƒ How does the institution determine the number of faculty and staff members needed to meet the learning needs of all students? The number of faculty and staff needed to operate a smooth-running program is determined by: ƒƒ Budget allowance – Teacher hours allocation is limited and restricts the faculty that can be employed without overspending. ƒƒ Program requirements – Certain programs have policies outlining the ratio of student to teacher or to support staff (e.g., II Lab requires an Aide once there are more than 30 students in regular attendance.) ƒƒ Class size – The District and UTLA agreement states that a class may be closed if a minimum number of students is not maintained. (20 for all classes, except CTE and AWD which is 18.) ƒƒ Student enrollment/attendance – Classified employees and administration are assigned to a school based on the annual ADA figures, which are derived from student enrollment and actual attendance.

The Whipple Campus staff.

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The institution’s hiring process is marked by clear communication regarding job descriptions, expected job skills, and procedures for the selection of personnel.

Notes

3.2

ƒƒ Who is involved in the hiring process and to what extent is there transparency in the advertisement for open positions? The hiring process is dictated by a standardized District and Division process, thereby eliminating any instance of bias, and ensuring transparency and equity. In addition, this process and our interview process must follow guidelines set by the unions. Administrators at the school level screen résumés and determine the most qualified candidates to consider for possible interviews. The interview screening process is unbiased and equitable with common questions geared to a specific position. An interview team of at least two administrators conduct interviews. In the interview process, we express the job's underlying needs, that the teacher be well-suited for the job, and have an affinity to our school's mission. We look for additional positive traits such as desire to teach and potential for growth. For some teaching positions, we may ask for a lesson demonstration. Classified staff also have a similar established hiring process; however, it differs for a few positions in that a list of qualified applicants is supplied to the school administration by the District. ƒƒ To what extent do job descriptions accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and employer expectations? Job descriptions follow a standardized format and content, along with criteria we include that match our specific position needs. All jobs must be posted online on the Division’s website, www.adultinstruction.org, for two weeks before hiring can take place. Job announcements must be posted onsite at each main campus as well. Prior to posting, job announcements are submitted electronically and must meet the approval of Division Human Resources Department. Only school administrators are authorized to post job announcements, and must sign on to a secure website address with the school’s assigned User name and Password to do so. During the hiring process, we are also bound by UTLA requirements. ƒƒ By what means does the institution verify the qualifications of applicants and newly hired personnel? Once application packets are screened, references, and current and former supervisors of eligible applicants are contacted to validate experience and résumé information. Applicants must also submit a copy of their current California teaching credential and Child Abuse Awareness Training certificate with their application packet. Once a candidate is selected for employment, paperwork is forwarded to Central Office Personnel, where a check for complete requirements is conducted.

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Notes

Per District policy and procedure, if an employee is new to the District, he/she must succumb to a Tuberculosis test, Physical Exam, and fingerprinting. Only after all processing is done may the employee begin to work. On the job, there are set probationary terms during which employees are supervised closely, and offered assistance and guidance. If an employee is not up to par with the job requirements, administration may decide to terminate the employee at the end of the probationary period.

3.3

The institution develops personnel policies and procedures that are clearly communicated to all employees.

ƒƒ What processes does the institution use to develop and publicize its personnel policies? Most policies and procedures are developed at the District and Division levels, however when our administration sees the need for a new policy to take effect, they convene to discuss the most effective way to address the issue at hand. Some examples include procedures for photocopying requests (too much paper being used and copyright issues), punctuality, and office tasks delegated through the SAA. Administration makes certain that ALL staff are notified of any new policies and procedures. After new procedures are established, they are publicized in the following ways: meetings with office staff and teachers, written memos, announcements posted on counters and bulletin boards, and mentioned in the weekly bulletin. Administration and support staff follow up consistently with any breaches by meeting with the parties involved. Subsequent infractions may be followed up with conferences and written memos that include consequences. Documentation is kept in personnel files. ƒƒ How does the institution ensure that it administers its personnel policies and procedures consistently and equitably? As stated above, the majority of personnel policies and procedures are created and disseminated by the District and Division, and comply with federal and state laws and regulations. The school takes its responsibility of administering these procedures and policies very seriously. All employees are advised of personnel procedures and policies; administrators follow up with employees who violate any rules; and administrators make it a point to address all employees fairly and professionally.

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The District not only has a policy on ethical conduct at school, but has an Ethics Office in the District’s Central Office location. A summary of the Code of Ethics policy is included in our Faculty Handbook, "All staff are bound by certain expectations relating to their behavior and responsibilities as role models to their students. Additionally, respect must be accorded to pupils and fellow staff exemplifying professional ideals. Information on specific matters can be obtained from the main office." The three core principles are: integrity, excellence and commitment to responsibility. Moreover, administration is required to complete an online Ethics Training every school year through LAUSD’s Learning Zone.

Notes

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution have a written code for professional ethics for all personnel and communicate expectations to them?

The LAUSD Board of Education also has passed a resolution on the "Respectful Treatment of All Persons'" which states "The Los Angeles Unified School District reaffirms its policy that students and adults in both schools and offices should treat all persons equally and respectfully and refrain from the willful and negligent use of slurs against any person on the basis of race, language spoken, color, sex, religion, handicap, national origin, immigration status, age, sexual orientation, or political belief." Employees of NHPCAS make every effort to conform to the highest professional standards of demeanor expected as representatives of our school, the Division, and the District. All faculty and staff are aware of this obligation as public school employees. The North Hollywood Campus staff.

ƒƒ What are the institution’s provisions for keeping personnel records secure and confidential?

Personnel files are kept in locked cabinets accessible in the main office only to administrators and the SAA. The DACE Human Resources department and Office of Staff Relations at Central Office may also retain files, and also maintain the utmost confidentiality concerning personnel matters. ƒƒ How does the institution provide employees access to their records? Payroll records are available online. Union contract allows employees access to specific employee records, such as evaluations and disciplinary memos. Administration provides copies of these documents at the time the evaluation and/or conference takes place. Other records are kept in DACE Central office in Human Resources and/ or Staff Relations.

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Notes

3.4

The institution assures the effectiveness of its faculty and staff members by evaluating all personnel systematically.

ƒƒ To  what extent does the institution establish written Postsecondary Criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities? The disclaimer can be made that no institution can absolutely guarantee that all employees will effectively perform their jobs. The only assurance that the quality and integrity of the educational program be maintained is that a standardized, unbiased and equitable evaluation system is set in place and followed by supervisory staff. There exist three types of evaluation criteria in LAUSD: 1. Performance Evaluation for Permanent Classified Employees - LAUSD form – annual reviews conducted by SAA at the discretion of the principal and SAA; 2. Stull tenured certificated - Permanent employees create their own goals and objectives within five areas; 3. Non-tenured teachers are evaluated on the same set of criteria as tenured teachers, but do not create their own specific goals. In addition, administrators may perform evaluations of any staff members at any time at their discretion. ƒƒ How is the evaluation process built on a collegial spirit that fosters growth and improvement? Our responsibility is to use the evaluation process to offer constructive feedback, guidance and assistance to ensure quality and professional teaching practices. Evaluators keep in mind that a positive approach inspires collegiality and motivates change. Supervisors meet with teachers after each observation to review findings. Moreover, teachers are encouraged to share best practices and ideas with their colleagues.

Sharing Best Practices at a faculty meeting.

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Effective teaching is measured by meeting standards of observations, the number of promotions/completers per class, standardized assessments, student attendance and retention rates, certificates of completion (CTE), benchmark gains, participation in staff development, and student feedback.

Notes

ƒƒ By what methods does the institution define “effective teaching” in its evaluation process? How is that effectiveness judged?

Certificated administrators evaluate employees either formally or informally each school year. Tenured teachers must be evaluated using the Stull procedures set by the state of California at least every two years, or more often, if necessary. Tenured teacher evaluations are documented by utilizing the District’s online Performance Evaluation System. Non-tenured faculty are evaluated informally each year, with follow up assistance, guidance and documentation for those requiring improvement. After observation takes place, a follow-up face-to-face conference is held between the evaluator and evaluatee. A summary of findings is provided to the employee being evaluated and a copy is kept in their school personnel file. In the conference, issues that have to be addressed are discussed and noted. ƒƒ Who does the annual evaluations of employees and are the results of such evaluations documented and shared in follow-up meetings with the employees under review? ƒƒ What process is in place to assure that evaluations lead to improvement in job performance? Administrators are responsible for the annual evaluation of certificated personnel and select classified staff (SAA, Financial Manager, SIS Computer Coordinator). The SAA is responsible for the annual evaluation of classified staff under his supervision. Administration and the SAA offer assistance and guidance to employees under their supervision who fall below standards. Administration counsels underperforming certificated staff, brings to their attention areas for improvement, and provides suggestions and reference materials to help improve their performance. Techniques include arranging for a colleague to serve as a mentor, shadowing, observing other teachers and explaining and discussing a variety of teaching strategies. Additional observations, followed by conferences occur, and performance is monitored on a regular basis. After ample and appropriate assistance and guidance has been offered over time, and performance goals are still not met, administration considers options such as termination, an unsatisfactory evaluation, transfer to another position or not rehiring the employee the following term or school year. The SAA follows a similar process of assistance and guidance for underperforming classified staff. This may include recommendation for training, counseling in employment professional office procedures and demeanor, and closer supervision.

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Notes

3.5

Faculty members take ownership of student progress toward achieving stated Schoolwide Learner Outcomes.

ƒƒ What are the roles of teachers and other staff members in the development of SLOs? Home Group Chairs distributed worksheets with a memo asking for suggestions and input to make revisions to the school’s existing ESLRs on April 29, 2011. All responses were collected by the deadline of May 7, 2011. Results were compiled, written up and presented at the Leadership Team meeting on May 18, 2011. Leadership Team members reworked the Mission Statement and the SLOs. A consensus was reached, and the finalized statements of both the Mission Statement and SLOs were distributed back to the Leadership Team, and then to the entire staff. The new Mission Statement and SLOs were presented at subsequent staff meetings, included in the school bulletin and on the school website, and printed onto bookmarks and other school publications that are dispersed to the school community at large.

NORTH HOLLYWOOD POLYTECHNIC COMMUNITY ADULT SCHOOL www.nhpcas.com Polytechnic High Campus (MAIN OFFICE) § (818) 394-3950 12431 Roscoe Blvd., Sun Valley 91352 North Hollywood High Campus (818) 753-7450 5231 Colfax Ave., North Hollywood 91601 Whipple Campus § (818) 508-3600 10952 Whipple St., North Hollywood 91602 Sun Valley Campus § (818) 394-3950 9171 Telfair Ave., Sun Valley 91352 Classes are free or low cost. Learn English (ESL) in the morning, afternoon or evening. Classes offered Monday-Saturday.

PROGRAMS § High School Diploma or GED Certificate § Home Study (Adult Independent Study) § Reading Improvement § Parent Education § English as a Second Language § Computers from beginners to advanced § Graphic Design § Medical Office Careers § Emergency Medical Technician § Screenwriting § Performing Artist § Older Adults

NORTH HOLLYWOOD POLYTECHNIC COMMUNITY ADULT SCHOOL Schoolwide Student Learning Outcomes – SSLOs Students at NHPCAS will leave our school fully able to: 1 Develop and apply learned skills encompassing listening, speaking, reading, writing, computation, technology, career and life skills. 2 Set and meet personal, academic, and/or career goals to develop as a productive and informed member of the community. 3 Successfully complete at least one NHPCAS course or program of study to achieve one or more – Course Completion, Program Certificate, High School Diploma, GED Certificate, High School Credit or Benchmark Gain.

Mission Statement North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School is committed to providing comprehensive programs that support our diverse student population in developing the skills, knowledge, and confidence necessary to meet their educational and career goals, becoming more productive and informed members of the community.

NHPCAS SLO Bookmarks are distributed to all students and staff.

This awareness of and focus on student outcomes is essential in driving our instruction. Our SLOs are very concrete and measurable, therefore, easy to ascertain their accomplishment. To summarize, they have to do with learning basic skills, setting and meeting goals, and completing courses. ƒƒ How often do faculty members meet to discuss SLOs and analyze student learning data to ensure that students are achieving SLOs? Faculty members have an opportunity to meet and discuss student learning and SLOs during campus faculty meetings. These meetings occur once or twice per term. Teachers also meet informally with colleagues and/or teacher advisors to affirm proper placement and maximum progress for students. Due to the nature of adult education system and student population, we have the distinct advantage of being able to work more closely and personally with students. All teachers discuss their students’ academic goals with them during the first few weeks of class. Many devote entire lessons to that end. Teachers and counselors get to know students personally and express an interest in individual student’s achievement of their goals. Student

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Notes

Orientation presentations are offered each term to broaden students’ awareness of and encourage them to continue their educational pursuits. Counselors follow up with High School Diploma students’ progress throughout the year to ready them for graduation each June and discuss their plans for academic success after leaving our school. Teachers utilize results of the Oral Placement Test (ESL), CASAS test (ESL, ABE, ASE), the TABE test (ABE, ASE), Division Promotional Exam (ESL), classroom quizzes and tests, essays and projects (all subject areas), and industry preparatory assignments and jobspecific evaluations (CTE) to determine if students are placed in the correct levels, and then are gaining the required skills for passage of classes. Reports are generated and provided to teachers from CASAS test results; teachers can then access corresponding lessons that address test items missed. Student progress is measured in terms of skills and competencies in all adult education courses, and they are included as such in course outlines. In general, all teachers modify teaching strategies and review skills and competencies to reach all students and ensure that concepts are understood and learning takes place. Course completion and benchmark data are additional data sources that confirm student learning gains and can be broken down by class and teacher. Data is garnered about certificates that are awarded in CTE classes. High school diplomas and high school credits earned and GED recipients are counted each year. In adult education, attendance is not mandatory and students may choose to leave the class if they are not satisfied with the instruction, the teacher or the school itself. We use our attendance data to justify the existence and continuation of classes. Moreover, per union contract, if a class falls below certain minimums, that class must be canceled. For these reasons, one of our principle goals is to maintain maximum attendance in all classes. When attendance dips, administrators discuss possible reasons with the instructors. Teachers keep in touch with students and contact them by postcard, email or phone when monitoring their own attendance. Each of these measures is used to increase our goals for the following year.

3.6

The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for professional development.

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution plan professional development activities that are connected to student learning needs? School administration actively promotes staff development for all levels of employees, and encourages all staff to attend. Due to the budget shortfall, Division professional development activities have decreased in recent years, and now individual schools are not able to request that they be held on their campuses. However, the DACE still sponsors bi-annual free conferences, department-specific trainings and some general trainings throughout the year, such as technology, that can be applied to any subject area. NHPCAS teachers regularly attend these workshops, and some seek to expand

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Notes

their own education and update their academic or industry qualifications by attending outside classes and workshops. In addition, the District Personnel Commission offers workshops to classified employees. Most training is voluntary and free. At times teachers are asked to attend specific trainings to improve their knowledge in a certain subject area or skill set. Such trainings include the Counseling Academy, II lab and AIS trainings, and the ESL Teacher Academy. (See 3.1 above for more detailed information.) The District requires specified mandatory reminders and trainings each year to ensure a safe and secure school environment conducive to learning. These trainings are usually offered online and include Child Abuse Awareness for all employees, Sexual Harassment and Ethics for administrative employees. District NHPCAS academic teachers present policies that all employees must at the DACE Fall Conference. review every year are dependent/ elder abuse, anti-bullying, sexual harassment, non-discrimination, hate-motivated incidents and crimes, Code of Conduct with Students, student and employee security, Title IX, Uniform Complaint Procedures, Copyright law, Acceptable Use Policy, and the Employee Assistance Program. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution provide funding for professional development opportunities? We have agreed to offer our Whipple Campus for a training site for Division, OTAN and other outside agencies’ workshops to make it more convenient for our own teachers and staff to attend. Moreover, we provide opportunities for teachers to share best practices and teaching strategies at faculty meetings. Teachers and advisors also relay updates and new information acquired from division trainings back to their teaching colleagues at the school site. For example, our Distance Learning lead teacher attends the Distance Learning Academy every year and conveys policy changes and updates to all Distance Learning staff. Although the Division no longer sponsors its employees to attend out-of-district conferences and trainings, our school supports our staff at times by allowing them to attend trainings on paid work time.

Many of our faculty participate in professional development opportunities.

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Notes

The NHPCAS faculty and staff are mainly internally motivated to attend professional development activities for the betterment of student learning. The state of California no longer requires any staff development for credential renewal. However, the DACE offers seven steps of Salary Step Advancement that can be attained one step at a time by completing a verifiable 30 hours of professional development over a one or twoyear period. ƒƒ How does the institution ensure meaningful evaluation of professional development activities? Evaluation forms are provided at the end of every workshop. A debriefing session is held after each conference with DACE conference planners. Presenters receive a summary of comments from the evaluation forms to use as feedback. At times, attendees are asked to share the content on workshops they have attended with colleagues at our school, as well as share best practices or successful teaching techniques. Administrators and teacher advisors conduct ongoing, regular checks to ascertain that new policies and procedures are being followed and acted upon. Memos, bulletin items, and personal visits are used to remind faculty and staff of these guidelines. Teachers are provided with support for any instructional modifications emanating from division trainings. ƒƒ What impact do professional development activities have on the improvement of teaching and learning? How does the institution evaluate that improvement? Professional development has both immediate and long-term effects on student learning at NHPCAS. Program improvement takes place when new policies and procedures to raise test scores, maximize benchmarks and increase attendance are implemented and monitored. By learning to use data and report it correctly, school employees can access more accurate information and, in turn, can address corresponding issues directly. Teachers bring new materials, strategies and activities they have learned back to the classroom resulting in renewed zest for the teacher as well as varied strategies and approaches that benefit students. Statistical data demonstrates that student learning has taken place. SIS records of increased benchmarks, completers and certificates earned are clear indicators of improvement. This data is also available on the Division website’s “Dashboard.” (See Chapter 1 for Completion Data for last three years)

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Notes

3.7

The institution regularly evaluates all non-teaching support staff members and provides direction and support for improvement of their skills.

ƒƒ What process is in place for the regular evaluation of all non-teaching personnel? The principal evaluates the Financial Manager, School Administrative Assistant (SAA), SIS Coordinator, and other specially-funded advisor positions. The SAA is responsible for conducting annual classified staff performance reviews. Paraprofessionals such as Teacher Assistants, Education Aides, Student Aides, Student Body Workers, Community Representative and Infant Care Aides may be evaluated by administration. Plant Managers, Building and Grounds Workers and Security personnel are supervised by onsite school administration, but evaluation is done by their own Unit’s Local District’s Supervisory staff. However, school site administration may request or be requested to participate in their evaluations. Infant Care Aides at the Sun Valley Campus

ƒƒ To what extent are job descriptions and duty expectations regularly reviewed and revised to meet the current needs of the school? Pre-established job descriptions are created and reviewed by District’s Human Resources department following the union contract guidelines, state and federal mandates. At the school level, when we anticipate a change in the work situation, we inform our classified employees to make them aware. We tailor job duties and responsibilities to our local school site needs, while staying within the parameters of job descriptions and legal boundaries. ƒƒ How is the support staff included in meetings and processes (as appropriate) to engage them as important stakeholders in the learning programs of the school? Classified staff congregate at the annual Back-to-School meeting. Classified staff meetings are conducted by the SAA and the principal. School Safe Plan meetings, Student Orientations, and other staff meetings held at least twice per term involve teacher advisors and classified staff.

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Notes

Communication between all levels of employees is our key tool in keeping current and maintaining a professional business environment. Classified staff are updated on a daily, as-needed basis at each campus. Although we are comprised of four distinct geographical locations, we accomplish this task by speaking to colleagues in person, utilizing email communication School security officers are an important regularly, distributing memos, and part of our School Safe Plan meetings. making telephone calls. We also have established certain forms to facilitate transmitting information. An example would be the Change Forms we use when assignments are added, modified or closed. Once approved by the principal, these Change Forms are forwarded to all necessary staff.

Areas of Strength and Growth STRENGTHS: ƒƒ Our hiring process is exceptionally equitable and rigorous, upholding high standards for all school employees. ƒƒ Administrators are hands-on in providing regular constructive guidance and supervision to all faculty and staff, creating an atmosphere of trust and rapport. ƒƒ Our staff has a high level of professional development attendance due to personal drive and strong support from administration. ƒƒ Faculty and staff meetings take place on a regular basis, providing time for professional development, and program and schoolwide updates.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Include classified office staff in Change Form distribution system. ƒƒ Provide more opportunities for teachers to meet and share best practices.

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Notes

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Documents describing hiring procedures ƒƒ Sample job announcements ƒƒ Website where jobs are posted: www.adultinstruction.org, drop down “Personnel”, click on “Employment Opportunities”; www.lausd.net, drop down “Employment” ƒƒ Personnel evaluation forms ƒƒ Online Stull Performance Evaluation System at www.lausd.net, “Inside LAUSD” ƒƒ Faculty Handbook ƒƒ Code of Ethics ƒƒ Board Resolution of Respectful Treatment of All Persons ƒƒ New Employee Orientation Guide ƒƒ Job descriptions ƒƒ Teacher Observation Form ƒƒ Examples of written formal evaluations for tenured, non-tenured certificated staff ƒƒ Examples of written formal evaluations for classified staff ƒƒ Professional Development activity flyers and announcements

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Notes

CRITERION 4: Curriculum Curriculum: An Introduction In its quest to offer transformative, cutting-edge courses designed to foster our students’ success in life and meet the challenges of society and the job market in times of continual change, North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School relies on a phone-book-sized reference, Catalog of Authorized Adult Education Courses, published and revised annually by the Adult and Career Education Division of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The school’s curriculum is comprised wholly of courses selected from this book which encompasses the full range of courses NHPCAS offers: English as a Second Language (ESL), Career Technical Education (CTE), Adult Basic Education (ABE), Parenting, High School Diploma, Program for Older Adults (POA), Adults with Disabilities (AWD) Courses. This catalog of California standardsbased courses, vetted by the State Department of Education, is available on-line at adultinstruction.org and distributed to: ƒƒ Principals ƒƒ Assistant principals ƒƒ Administrative secretaries ƒƒ Adult SIS personnel ƒƒ Coordinators and is accessible on-line In turn, instructors at NHPCAS’ four main campuses and six satellite locations receive the pertinent course outline, a full-fledged book which does double duty as reference and instructional resource. It enumerates course competencies and provides competency-referenced class activities. Through syllabi and posters displayed in classrooms, as well as the course itself, teachers reinforce the curricular content and the SLOs to the student body. Against a shifting backdrop of budgetary uncertainty and financial distress, NHPCAS continues to implement the curriculum and meet its commitment to quality life-long learning and empowering its diverse students to meet the needs of an ever-changing society.

Life-long learning is exemplified in our Program for Older Adults.

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Notes

4.1

The institution has a documented curricular map that outlines courses of study necessary to reach stated outcomes, licensure requirements, or certificate expectations.

ƒƒ How does the school list all courses and provide course outlines and objectives for all stakeholder groups? Suggestions gathered from surveys, formal and informal discussions with teachers, students, and members of the community contribute to the selection of the courses that make up the school curriculum. All courses offered are from the annually-updated LAUSD/DACE Catalog of Authorized Adult Education Courses. Once a decision has been made and has received District's approval, the programs are listed on the school's website (www.nhpcas.com) and advertised through flyers available at the school offices. The information is disseminated through student assemblies, and at student intake and school outreach events. The course outlines describe the objectives of each course, the competencies to be learned, and other relevant information. The course outlines can be downloaded from the school website or from the LAUSD website. Teachers and counselors also receive hard copies of the course outlines from the administration. At the beginning of each course, teachers go over the competencies with the students, so they know what they are going to learn. The classes currently offered at NHPCAS include: ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE - ESL (CBET is included in the ESL classes) ƒƒ ESL Beginning Literacy to Advanced Low ƒƒ ESL Conversation ƒƒ ESL Vocabulary & Idioms ƒƒ ESL Multilevel - Computers & Internet – CBET ADULT BASIC & SECONDARY EDUCATION ƒƒ Adult Basic Education (ABE) Basic Reading; Basic Math; Basic language Arts ƒƒ High School Diploma Program - Individualized Instruction Labs (I.I. Labs) ƒƒ Adult Independent Study (AIS) DISTANCE LEARNING ƒƒ ESL Distance Learning ƒƒ Parent Education / Distance Learning

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ABE math lab students and teacher.


Notes

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION ƒƒ Computer Operations 1/2/3/4/5 ƒƒ Performing Artist ƒƒ Screenwriting ƒƒ Graphic Design - Fundamentals / Digital Imaging 1/2 (includes using software such as Photoshop, Illustrator & Design, Final Cut Pro (Apple Certification)) ƒƒ First Responder ƒƒ Health Information Technology (HIT) (five courses in Program) ƒƒ EMT- Emergency Medical Technician PROGRAMS FOR OLDER ADULTS ƒƒ Memory Enhancement ƒƒ Family History / Personal Recollections STATE PRE-SCHOOL

State Pre-School students and teacher enjoy a visit from the LAPD and LAFD.

ƒƒ Division of Early Childhood Education program housed on the Whipple Campus

ƒƒ To what extent does each course have clearly defined learner outcomes? Each course has its course outline. A course outline consists of the intent and content of the course. The course outline is written to be understood by the prospective student and tells the student the goals and purpose of the course. The course outline includes six elements: Goal and Purposes, Performance Objectives or Competencies, Instructional Strategies, Units of Study, Evaluation Procedures, and Repetition Policy.

Goals and Purposes The educational goals and purposes of every course are clearly stated. They state the major emphasis and content of the course.

Performance Objectives or Competencies Competency based instruction lets a student know before instruction what skills or knowledge they will acquire after instruction. This also helps the students attain individual goals measured against pre-stated standards.

Instructional Strategies Instructional Strategies include laboratory techniques, lecture method, small-group discussion, grouping plans, and other strategies used in the classroom.

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Notes

Units of Study The hours allotted for each unit are consistent with the needs of the students, and the length of the class ensure that students will learn at the optimum level.

Evaluation Procedures The evaluation criteria consist of performances based on instructors monitoring student progress. Assessments may be teacher-produced, textbook-related, or standardized assessment instruments. They may be designed to determine placement, progress, or promotion.

Repetition Policy that Prevents Perpetuation of Student Enrollment Students are not allowed to reenroll in the course after they have completed all objectives. ƒƒ How is institutional resource allocation connected to curriculum development needs? In order to promote the school-wide Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), NHPCAS allocates significant resources in the form of staffing, learning materials, and technology to facilitate the development and implementation of the mandated curriculum. To assess this relationship, it is helpful to briefly consider the three components of the NHPCAS program: 1) English as a Second Language (ESL); 2) Academics: Adult Basic Education (ABE – Basic Reading/Math) and Adult Secondary Education (ASE - GED, high school diploma); and 3) Career Technical Education (CTE). The ESL program at NHPCAS is the largest component with about 4,300 students (2010-2011). The focus of the program is: 1) to develop the four communication skill sets: listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and 2) to acquire life and job skills such as answering the phone and calling in sick. Unfortunately, textbooks generally either do not cover some required skills, or they cover them inadequately at best. The teacher, therefore, must in such cases either develop original material such as crossword puzzles, surveys, grammar exercises, and tests, or use published supplemental material. NHPCAS provides the necessary resources to fill any curriculum gaps: copying services for reproduction of original material; published supplemental materials like oversized picture cards, picture dictionaries, published district-generated lesson plans, and published reading materials; and various forms of technology for use in the classroom such as TVs, overhead projectors, CD and DVD players, LCD projectors, laptop computers, desktop computers and printers (which are located in the computer lab), and Internet connectivity. Teachers can use these resources to design effective lessons that appeal to students with different learning styles (aural, oral, or kinesthetic) and that are high interest.

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Notes

The Adult Secondary Education (ASE) program with about 1,300 students (2010-2011) is designed to help students complete their basic education in order to become more employable or to create a foundation for future job training or advanced education. The ASE program offers classes in U.S. history, American literature, math, psychology, and GED preparation among others. The academic course outlines are more explicit about which topics must be covered; thus, the teacher can focus on planning the implementation. In the Individualized Instruction (I.I.) lab, students can watch CDs and DVDs which make the material more accessible and appealing to students with different learning styles. The I.I. lab also has computers and a printer which students can use to complete assignments; they can also do research on the Internet. Math students can also access resources on the internet to prepare for the GED and the CAHSEE exams. The Career Technical Education (CTE) program with about 790 students (2010-2011) is designed to allow students to explore some possible career choices. The CTE program offers courses in computer operation, preparation for the emergency medical technician career, and computerized graphic design among others. CTE courses must follow a course outline which explicitly describes which topics must be covered, again allowing the teacher to focus more on implementation. All the forms of technology previously mentioned are available to CTE instructors to help them create effective lesson plans. In summary, NHPCAS expends considerable resources to promote the development and implementation of effective lesson plans that are comprehensible and entertaining, and that in turn will help our students achieve the stated school-wide Student Learning Outcomes. ƒƒ How is institutional resource allocation connected to curriculum development needs? In order to process an effective curriculum development for Career Technical Education that will give students the opportunity to gain or improve their skills, technology is required. School budget and grants such as Perkins are utilized to purchase books, computers, software, printers, paper, toner cartridges, site licenses, ergonomic chairs, desks, and Internet connectivity. Because today’s curriculum requires higher-level skills than in past years, allocations are also taken into account for upgrades. Entry-level positions and college institutions demand that individuals have knowledge of current software applications to perform successfully; therefore, school computers have to be upgraded continuously. Professional development is part of the curriculum development, and the school allocates for such by facilitating the use of a telephone to communicate information, promoting school objectives, contributing to learning activities.

Realistic equipment is an important part of the EMT program.

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Notes

4.2

The institution regularly reviews curriculum in order to ensure that the content taught in the classrooms is accurate and relevant.

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution have a curriculum review cycle in place that includes as many stakeholders as possible? All CBE course outlines that compose our school's curriculum have been developed by the LAUSD DACE Office of Curriculum Development. Course outlines are competencybased and written in accordance with the California Model Standards, and are approved by the State Board of Education. They are written by teachers who teach the course, teacher advisors, and administrators, who have been certified by the curriculum office. The course outlines provide "clearly stated competencies, which focus the components of instruction, assessment and remediation". Master file copies of each approved CBE outline are sent to principals of all Community Adult Schools and are used to make copies for the teachers and counselors. The school constantly reviews the courses that are offered, checking their compliance with state mandates and current educational trends, relevance to the stated SLOs, and response to student and community needs. Programs are changed or updated, obsolete courses are eliminated, and new courses are offered. Surveys and meetings with community members, students, teachers, teacher advisors, and administrators help bring suggestions for the courses that are included in the school curriculum. All courses offered need to be from the District's Catalog of Authorized Adult Classes. School administrators advise subject area departments of the need for revised or new course outlines. The need for Adult Education to keep current and in compliance with government regulations and mandates, education standards, and community needs is also reflected in the constant development and revision of course outlines at the DACE Office of Curriculum Development. Sources: 2010-2011 Catalog of Approved Education Courses/ESL Course Outlines ƒƒ To what extent does the curriculum review process result in written conclusions that are used to make allocation decisions?

Who reviews curriculum? Under the direction of the Division administrator and Division Program Supervisor, Division Advisors are responsible for curriculum reviews of course outlines in their purview. Most often the creation of new and revision of existing course outlines entail the collaboration of many well-respected educational professionals within our own Division. DACE prides itself on employing teachers who are highly qualified, some even published authors, and often seeks their input in creating and revising curriculum.

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Notes

For CTE curriculum review, annual trade advisory meetings are scheduled by the Division in each industry sector for gathering industry standards and trends that may be considered for inclusion in course outline revisions. Teachers may volunteer and/ or be asked to participate in this process. Participating parties are recognized on page one in the ACKNOWLEDGMENTS section in each course outline.

Who writes conclusions about the review process? Division Program Supervisors and Advisors include their findings when revising course outlines, keeping in mind state standards. The DACE Curriculum Advisor is charged with the task of editing and preparing the final versions of course outlines for press. Approval is required from the DACE Executive Director.

Who makes allocation decisions upon which these conclusions are based? A team of DACE Central Office personnel including the Executive Director, Division Administrator, Economic Strategist, and Fiscal Services Budget Director divides the appropriation allotted to the Division by the District among all the Division’s schools dependent upon the prior year’s ADA and other performance indicators. ƒƒ What processes are in place to ensure that learning materials are providing accurate and up-to-date information to students? The curriculum creation and review process is well-established with a check-andbalance system described above in place. Moreover, those involved are held to high academic and professional standards. Course outlines are reviewed regularly when Division Program Supervisors or Advisors deem them out-of-date and in need of revision. Course outlines are thorough and complete, consisting of explanations and content regarding competency-based components, usage in long-range lesson planning, core content of the course, additional components such as CBET, Technology, and state-required elements, implementation, sample lessons and activities, evaluation materials and activities, definitions, glossary of terms, and suggested instructional resources. Every few years, per faculty request, teachers volunteer to create a committee to evaluate instructional materials being used by each level of ESL classes. They comprise a committee that reviews available textbooks from the DACE list of authorized textbooks (at the end of every course outline), in order to replace an existing reference material. ESL core texts were selected by a textbook committee comprised of NHPCAS ESL instructors.

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Notes

This committee meets and studies several available materials, invites publishers and decides whether the book is cost-friendly and meets standards, CASAS competencies, and is suited to multi-level objectives and other learner needs. The committee also looks into Life Skills and Civics Competencies. ƒƒ To what extent are all teachers involved in the curriculum development process? In the FORWARD section of each course outline it is stated that the “outline was written and edited by teachers for teachers, with the hope that it would provide many ideas and suggestions for others in the field.” With that being said, select teachers are encouraged to offer their expertise in many areas, one of them being curriculum. Administrators and advisors often contact reliable and highly knowledgeable veteran teachers to ask them to participate in curriculum development and review. In CTE, industry partners in the public and private sectors may provide valuable input regarding current trends, new technology, materials and/or machinery, and business practices. ƒƒ How does the curriculum reflect the school mission, and how does it connect to the school's SLO's? The entire curriculum offered at NHPCAS is based on students’ needs. Requests for other courses are gathered from meetings conducted by the school advisory board, community outreach, contacts, meetings with private and public schools, community centers including senior citizens centers, businesses, and organizations. The curriculum and relevancy of the requests are periodically evaluated as student demographics change. ƒƒ How often is the entire school curriculum evaluated for relevancy in light of changing student demographics? Curriculum is directed by the District, but only subjects that are relevant to the area’s demographics are offered. For the past few years, CTE and arts subjects offered have had great response from the community as evidenced by the adequate number of attendees. Conversely, subjects offered but not well-attended are eventually closed. NHPCAS offers a comprehensive curriculum: ESL, basic education, academic, career technical education, parenting, older adults, and adults with disabilities courses. The curriculum reflects the needs of the community; the teachers implement instruction in line with the school’s mission thereby meeting the SLOs. The teachers refer to the course outline mandated by the district and implement what is appropriate to meet the needs of their students. To fittingly use the course outline for their students’ success, instructors initially and continually assess their students’ needs and goals.

Chapter 3 Page 80


Lifeskills lessons include Earthquake NHPCAS has responded by offering courses Preparedness procedures. such as Computer Operations, Medical Office Assistant, First Responder, EMT, Final Cut Pro 7 (Apple Certification), Digital Imaging, Screenwriting and Performing Artist.

4.3

Students have access to texts, learning materials, and information resources that are sufficient to meet the course learning objectives.

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution provide texts and/or learning materials in a timely manner?

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08-3600

NORTH HOLLYWOOD - POLYTECHNIC COMMUNITY ADULT SCHOOL

PLE CAMPUS

Whipple Street, North Hollywood, CA 91602

Polytechnic Campus North Hollywood Campus Sun Valley Campus Whipple Campus (Administrative Offices) (818) 753-7450 (818) 394-3950 (818) 508-3600 (818) 394-3950 www.nhpcas.com § Learn English! § Earn a High School Diploma! § Get a better job!

NHPCAS Logo lists all programs offered.

PROGRAM OFFERINGS

Closed Fridays

Welcome to North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School

Randolph Hall Room 142 lfax Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91601

53-7450

 High School Diploma or GED Certificate  Home Study (Adult Independent Study)  Reading Improvement  Parent Education  English as a Second Language  Computers from beginners to advanced  Graphic Design  Medical Office Careers  Emergency Medical Technician  Screenwriting  Performing Artist  Older Adults

OF ADULT AND CAREER EDUCATION

The type of texts and/or learning materials needed for the array of classes offered at NHPCAS varies. All texts and/or learning materials (with the exception of those that are “Teacher-Generated”) are authorized for instructional use by the Los Angeles Unified School District: Division of Adult and Career Education (LAUSD:DACE). “Teacher-Generated” materials may be appropriately subject to review by the administrative staff. NHPCAS provides texts and/or learning materials in a manner of timeliness appropriate to each program, course, or courses specifically.

North Hollywood-Polytechnic CAS is one of 29 public adult schools, occupational centers, and skills centers operated by the Los Angeles Unified School District. We offer students an opportunity to satisfy academic requirements for an eighth grade or high school diploma; to prepare to take the GED test; to learn English as a Second Language; to acquire skills for a career; to improve parenting skills; to improve personal skills, abilities, or interests; or benefit from the State Preschool for children ages 3 to 5 years old.

ommunity Adult School

TH HOLLYWOOD CAMPUS

f Operation – Thursday: 3:30 - 9:30 p.m.

Notes

ESL has always been one of the paramount needs of immigrants. As they learn to use the second language more, their needs advance to other courses or subjects that help them improve their employment, financial status, and quality of life. Many students in the ESL classes have expressed interest in being proficient with the computer, the basic skill needed for many employment opportunities.

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Notes

English as a Second Language (ESL) ESL Texts: Textbooks for ESL courses are available for students to purchase at all of the four main campus locations within two weeks of the beginning of a trimester. The stock of available textbooks for sale is maintained by office staff. New texts that replenish stock are available for sale to students within 10 business days after ordering (depending upon publisher’s stock). Distance Learning (DL) Materials: DL materials are renewed and distributed on a weekly basis and are available free of charge to students who are concurrently registered in ESL classes. Community-Based English Tutoring (CBET): CBET materials, in the form of pledge cards and tutor logs, are available to eligible students and the teachers that monitor learning materials, upon registration into an ESL class. CBET competencies are included in ESL course outlines, in addition to being offered through teacher-directed CBET mini-courses specifically.

Academic High School Diploma Classes: All texts and learning materials needed for the completion of courses in the NHPCAS high school diploma classes are available to students in the classroom after registration. Adult Basic Education (ABE): Reading and Math courses use texts and/or learning materials that are available to students in the classroom after registration.

Career Technical Education (CTE) Computer Operations 1/2/3, Digital Imaging 1/2/ (Photoshop, Illustrator, & InDesign), First Responder, Medical Assistant, Screenwriting, and Performing Artist: Texts for Career Technical Education classes are available to students in a manner similar to text availability for ESL students - within two weeks of the beginning of the term. Other necessary learning materials (i.e. computers, software, and Internet access) are available to students in the classroom after registration.

ESL Textbook Committee The following is a list of criteria for any subsequent NHPCAS textbook committee: ESL student books should have the following major components: ƒƒ Introduction -- notes to the teacher and/or learner ƒƒ Scope and sequence -- a table of contents listing the topics: vocabulary, skills, outcomes and standards covered in each unit

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Notes

ƒƒ Units -- each unit may include a presentation of new language (vocabulary, content, structures), practice activities, application activities, and an evaluation or end of unit performance assessment ƒƒ Tape scripts ƒƒ Answer keys ƒƒ Grammar appendices ƒƒ Index ESL teacher books or guides may contain these major components: ƒƒ Notes to the teacher ƒƒ Scope and sequence ƒƒ Objectives for each unit ƒƒ Lists of vocabulary, structures, or skills covered in each unit ƒƒ Correlations of textbook levels and standardized assessment levels used in adult education programs ƒƒ Lists of needed materials ƒƒ Step-by-step instructions for each lesson in a unit ƒƒ Suggestions for supplemental or extension exercises ƒƒ Reproducible illustrations, worksheets, quizzes etc. ƒƒ Suggestions The committee invites publishers to send their materials for review and a checklist is made for instructional materials that have the following attributes: ƒƒ The book contains learner-centered material content. ƒƒ The book contains teacher-friendly instructions and reference material. ƒƒ Principles of effective ESL instruction are the basis for format, context, and design (including art work, layout, font style/size etc.). ƒƒ Language skills are incorporated throughout instruction. ƒƒ Principles of adult education are implemented in lesson format, context, and design. ƒƒ The textbook series is affordable and can be used as a non-disposable resource if possible. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution provide sufficient library resources or access to such resources, to support classroom instruction? NHPCAS does not have a central library per se, but all of the campuses provide resource materials for both teachers and students alike.

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Notes

At the Whipple Campus, students can borrow fiction and non-fiction books in the student lounge. In the lounge, there are also two computers with Internet access available for student use. Each classroom also has at least one computer with access to the Internet for the use of both teachers and students. Next to the teachers' break room, on the Whipple Campus, a Resource Room is provided for ESL teachers to borrow materials to support their instruction. In the same room, teachers can use a computer with Internet access. At the Polytechnic Campus, the Teacher Resource Room is adjacent to the main office. This room has two desks and two computers with Internet access. It also has a bookshelf with extra sets of readers for ESL teachers to sign out. The principal is planning to order class sets of readers for each classroom in Spring 2012. At the North Hollywood Campus, there is a cabinet in the main office, with books that ESL teachers can borrow to use in their classrooms. Teachers can also use one of the computers with Internet access in the main office. In the Reading class at North Hollywood, there are books which the students can check out. Recently more have been ordered and will be available soon. The Individualized Instruction Labs (I.I. Labs), and Reading classes at all of the sites provide appropriate texts and reference materials for students to complete their assignments. ƒƒ How does the school make learning labs, computer labs, etc. available to students to support their learning needs? There are Individualized Instruction classrooms, and computer labs available at the four main campuses. Reading labs are available at three of the four main campuses and soon will be available in all of them. In addition, academic and ESL courses are also offered through the Adult Independent Studies and Distance Learning programs at most campuses and some of the branches.

Computer labs offer students an opportunity to learn a new skill or upgrade their current skills.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the institution support the quality of its instructional programs by providing technology and other learning resources that are sufficient in quantity, currency, and variety to facilitate educational offerings? All campuses are using the most up-to-date assessment tools available to ensure that instruction is individually tailored to the specific needs of each student. The school website is accessible to all students and teachers. It provides information on registration, schedule of classes, school news and events, and has links to student and teacher resources. NHPCAS encourages instructors to participate in professional development faculty meetings and Division conferences. Instructors have access to computer rooms, Resource Rooms, and LCD projectors. We offer classes that teach current media industry software and techniques utilizing the most updated curriculum. NHPCAS stays current with the latest technology by applying for grants to update and improve CTE programs with equipment, textbooks, and supplies that meet industry standards. NHPCAS also maximizes the utilization of the Whipple campus as well as the expansion of the main campuses by offering computer and other CTE programs such as Digital Imaging as sequences of classes.

Areas of Strength and Growth STRENGTHS: ƒƒ Willingness to incorporate more programs for students. ƒƒ Various locations to be of service to the community. ƒƒ Availability of free parking and programs at no cost or low cost. ƒƒ Free childcare offered at selected locations ƒƒ Participation and organization of activities for students. ƒƒ Integration of the latest technology into the classroom.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Fill book orders in a more timely way. ƒƒ Increase communication of events to staff. ƒƒ Teachers should have emergency lesson plans. ƒƒ Return of class sets of 5 – 7 textbooks for in-classroom use only. ƒƒ Make class sets of ESL readers available.

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Notes

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Curriculum guides and other documents that show the overall curricular plan ƒƒ LAUSD DACE Catalog of Authorized Adult Education Courses ƒƒ Division lists of changes in courses/curricula distributed to DACE schools ƒƒ Textbook Committee documents: minutes, textbook review forms, consensus results ƒƒ Course outlines for all classes ƒƒ Course learning outcomes for all classes ƒƒ Assessment results that show student progress toward curricular goals ƒƒ Student achievement data from school profile (Chapter 1) ƒƒ Budgetary figures showing the amounts budgeted for teaching resources ƒƒ Current inventory of NHPCAS physical teaching resources ƒƒ Distance Learning: DVDs, copies of pages from workbooks, record sheets ƒƒ Classified Questionnaire, Question #12 ƒƒ Certificated Questionnaire, Question #32

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Notes

Criterion 5: Instructional Program The instructional staff uses research-based instructional strategies and teaching methodologies that engage students at high levels of learning and allow them to achieve Schoolwide Learner Outcomes and course objectives. Faculty members are given ongoing training in various instructional strategies that allows them to address the varied learning styles of students in their classrooms.

5.1

The school provides high-level instruction with appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, and sequencing for all programs and courses.

ƒƒ How does the institution (NHPCAS) measure the quality of instruction in its classrooms? NHPCAS currently uses formal and informal student assessments to measure the quality of instruction. Academic classes use CASAS testing and tests embedded in course contracts. ESL classes use CASAS testing and promotional testing as well as an ESL Distance Learning program to enhance ESL students’ progress. Career Technical Education classes are competency-based with skills applications. Examples of informal assessments include: reviewing student oral work, observing conversation practice in either one-on-one or pair formats, dictation, textbook and teacher-generated quizzes and exams, chapter check-ups, student written and oral work and reports, graphic organizers, compositions/summaries, written answers to questions, grammar education and review based on curricular-appropriate levels, idioms, pronunciation, spelling, and listening to/viewing videos, stories and/or dialogues. The Division has instituted guidelines for administrators to conduct observations of ALL teachers throughout the year at each Division school covering areas of instructional excellence and practices, as well as areas of improvement. Furthermore, teachers are continually being evaluated through the Stull process (for tenured teachers), administrator or teacher observations, and student feedback. This enables administrators to offer guidance and assistance where needed. Observations are recorded on a standardized form and copies given to teachers. Classroom observations of all teachers are an important part of maintaining a high quality of instruction.

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Notes

The observations give administrators assurance that teachers are organized and prepared in their day-to-day lesson presentation to their students. Student feedback is processed through needs assessments at the point of registration and counseling as well as through teacher assessment, student surveys and questionnaires. Within the academic area, instructional assessments are numerous. Student performance on pre-tests and daily work (comprised of mathematics application and computation, objective, short answer, critical thinking, and essay assignments) reflects student mastery and I.I. Lab students also benefit from one-on-one understanding when they first time with the Instructor. enter the I.I. Lab. Subsequently, it is the I.I. Lab instructor who is instrumental in explaining and clarifying those concepts and skills not immediately grasped by the student on his/her own. Struggling students benefit from increased one-on-one time with the instructor who will often create supplemental exercises and assignments targeting the student’s problem areas, in addition to basic clarification and review. The results of these individual meetings, enrichment, and the student’s ensuing performance are the essential criteria the instructor needs to determine the effectiveness of instruction. Pace and number of individual “completers,” attrition rate, scores on daily work, contract quizzes and tests, the results of post CASAS, and the GED are the statistical results which reflect to some degree the quality of the classroom instruction. In addition to these statistical measures of instructional effectiveness are observations by the APACS and academic teacher advisors. Teacher evaluation may be based on classroom management, organization, quality of instruction, interaction with the students, attendance, and administration of tests. Besides administrative evaluation of teacher effectiveness, feedback is elicited from the students themselves in the form of daily verbal interaction, and a mandatory, written evaluation that the students must complete at the end of every contract. This written assessment provides the instructor with helpful feedback in specific areas, including what the student has learned, whether he/she received satisfactory help from the teacher, and an overall evaluation of the I.I. Lab experience. As for the concurrent students, additional comments come from parents and high school counselors. In the Program for Older Adults, quality of instruction is measured differently than it is in the academic curriculum. Keeping in mind the desired outcomes (which include furthering civic engagement, i.e., volunteerism, possible re-entering the work force, and maintaining a spirit of independence); evaluation is non-academic, but more determined by “action” observation. Assessment forms are completed quarterly by the POA teachers that measure the older adult learners’ ability to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, share, and disseminate information gained from course content. Also, the POA teaching staff develops DVDs that show the students assuming leadership positions in the classroom and teaching what they have been taught.

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The faculty of NHPCAS, in order to remain current with evolving standards, educational trends, and state and federal requirements, as well as to ensure the highest quality teaching methodologies and instructional strategies, partake in many diverse and enriching professional development opportunities.

Notes

ƒƒ How do teachers keep current in instructional strategies and methodologies in their areas of expertise?

Two sources of ongoing professional development are the annual Fall DACE conference, sponsored by the DACE, and the Spring Conference, co-sponsored by CCAE/CAROCP, two adult education organizations. Teachers attending these events have the opportunity to learn from colleagues of fellow adult schools, professional organization members, vendors, as well as Central Office personnel. Throughout the year, DACE also offers training workshops specific to department and program areas. Examples include the ESL Teacher Academy, EBRI Training, II Lab Training, and the TABE Diagnostic Software Training. Beyond the District, the faculty has the opportunity to attend state conference workshops and in-services, where they are introduced to new and improved teaching techniques. In addition, CalPro and OTAN provide both on-line and in-class courses, and many teachers also enroll in courses at local junior colleges and universities. Within the school, teachers attend on-campus in-service events throughout the school year. Teachers within the school share activities and strategies with each other when the opportunity presents itself. An online Teacher Forum has been developed on the school’s website to further expand these connections. Many ESL teachers make use of ESL websites to keep abreast of new ideas and to continually offer fresh activities to their students. Also, many try to stay current with the latest publications, by maintaining publisher connections. In addition to attending the DACE conferences and professional workshops, such as “Focused Assessment” and “Working with Concurrents in the Academic I.I. Lab,” academic teachers keep current on instructional information by visiting the DACE website. Other programs, such as the EBRI for the ABE reading classes are quite thorough and intensive, and range in length from hour-long to several sessions-long classes that include lectures, small-group and paired application of methodologies and strategies. Instructors are also encouraged to seek enrichment sources on their own. “Khan Academy,” for example, is a prodigious instructional website for mathematics, science, and history, where teachers can peruse and then share with students. Finally, APACS and APOs share instructional enhancement techniques at their assigned school sites. The Program for Older Adults is partnered with the UCLA Department on Aging. Therefore, teachers can attend trainings and seminars at UCLA in order to receive various teaching materials and information packets, which include short-term memory ability pre-tests, cognitive puzzles and games, and information on healthy brain diets, sleep, stress management, and life style.

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Notes

In addition, teachers endeavor to keep current with the latest technologies, such as using microphones, amplifiers, and print enlargers to assist students with disabilities, and smart phones as encyclopedic references.

5.2

The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the diverse needs and learning styles of its students.

ƒƒ What opportunities for dialogue are provided for faculty members to discuss student learning needs and pedagogical approaches? An open-door policy exists between faculty and administrators, and input or help is readily available to teachers who need to ask for assistance or direction. Teacher advisors are always willing to help in any way. During the Fall 2011 semester, for example, teacher advisors assisted teachers with resources, one-on-one assistance and with obtaining specific information from administrators. For example, one teacher was given a new and challenging assignment. Because the administrator was aware that the teacher was new to the assignment, the administrator observed, provided guidance to the teacher, and modeled methodology and instructional techniques. Teachers utilize opportunities before and after classes and during breaks, to share ideas and talk about students’ progress. Certain campuses have schedules that are better suited for this type of exchange than others. For example, the Whipple campus has a fifteen-minute break between classes and an available teachers’ lounge. There are occasions for pedagogic exchanges at conferences, workshops, and inservices during the school year. Also, NHPCAS has developed an online Teacher Forum on the school’s website to facilitate broader and more frequent opportunities for dialogue among teachers and teacher advisors. ƒƒ What teaching strategies and methodologies are used? ESL teachers use a variety of instructional activities that integrate the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) to emphasize meaningful, real-life interchanges in order to encourage students’ communicative competencies. The instructional activities are varied in order to address the different learning styles (i.e., auditory, oral, visual, and kinesthetic) of the students. Teachers often employ Active Learning (establishing learning cells, using think-pairshare activities, class discussions, short written exercises, co-operative learning, student debates, class games, and TPR), as well as more traditional methodologies, such as dialogue drills, early production questions, and grammar in context. A strong emphasis is placed on co-operative learning in the ESL classes and most teachers use this technique in small group work, such as Four Corners, Secretary/Messenger, and many more learning activities.

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Lessons taught follow the Division’s state-approved course outlines, California Model Standards, and SCANS and CASAS competencies.


Technological support is available to teachers for sign-out to assist them in meeting their various technological needs in the form of CD players, DVD players, TVs, overhead projectors, LCD projectors, laptop computers and other AV equipment. In addition, each academic classroom contains all required textbooks, materials, calculators and computer access. Computers and printers are provided for teachers in the classroom at the Whipple and Sun Valley DACE-owned campuses. ESL teachers sign-out teachers guides, student textbooks, and supplemental activity and testing books, some of which include CD-ROMs. Teachers are encouraged to attend the two local conferences offered free of charge each year. Various workshops and professional development trainings are offered through the Division throughout the year.

Notes

ƒƒ To what extent are teachers given support in developing differentiated teaching strategies to ensure that all students’ needs are addressed?

ƒƒ To what extent have faculty members discussed the relationship among teaching strategies, methodologies, and student performance? The number of formal or informal meetings held for this purpose varies at each location. Administrators hold faculty meetings that include staff development for teachers at various times during the year. Staff development is offered at the initial Back-to-School meeting and at staff meetings held at least twice a year, depending on campus schedules. Administrators and Teacher Advisors are always willing to share with colleagues the strategies and methodologies that work for them to improve student performance. In addition, all teachers are required to be observed during the school year. During these observations, teachers are given guidance and feedback for effective teaching methods. The effectiveness of methods or strategies also depends on each teacher’s planning and preparation, acquired teaching skills, applied training, delivery method, teaching style, rapport with students, classroom management, experience, and range of students’ abilities. Although one method might work well for one teacher or class, it might not have the same result for another. Therefore, an eclectic approach is encouraged, based on student progress and testing data, and supported by the collaboration of faculty and administration.

Students benefit from an eclectic approach in teaching methodology.

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Notes

5.3

The institution is actively engaged in integrating new technology into the instructional program of the school.

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution have a team in place to review technology advances in instruction and how it can be adapted and used effectively in the school? NHPCAS employs a CTE Advisor who has provided NHPCAS with suggestions for numerous technological improvements. NHPCAS now has a state-of-the-art and professional website available to all NHPCAS staff, teachers, students and community. The website provides technological information pertinent to the programs offered as well as resources and links for teacher technology enhancement. Another technological device is a new Teacher Forum on the website that allows teachers to communicate on a common venue that will serve as a useful communication and training tool for all NHPCAS teachers. It offers teachers the ability to observe the needs of the community, recruit students, interact with one another, and to share Best Practices with one another. The website also offers links to student, teacher, and community resources. (See Chapter 2 – Progress Report – Growth Area #4: Technology) ƒƒ To what extent does the institution have policies in place to govern the acceptance of credits earned through outside online programs? All adult school programs must follow DACE guidelines related to the evaluation of transcripts and accepted outside courses for credit. All APACS are trained to make these evaluations which may include reviewing foreign transcripts, work experience, and military experience. ƒƒ How are faculty members trained to use technology more effectively in their own classrooms? NHPCAS staff, teacher advisors and administrators are always available to provide assistance to teachers who need guidance using electronic equipment. NHPCAS has Teacher Resource areas available for all teachers at our main campuses in which they may use the computer and access the Internet. In addition, many classrooms are equipped with desktop computers and printers for teacher/student use. Teachers are able to use their classroom computers as a resource tool for lesson planning and record keeping. Moreover, the use of technology is a popular workshop topic offered at the two annual Division-wide conferences each year. The conferences offer a variety of technology workshops by teachers, publishers, and technical staff. The 2011 Fall Conference offered a specific room dedicated to answer any and all questions that teachers had with regard to using technology in the classroom. NHPCAS teachers are encouraged to participate by presenting and/or attending workshops in order to keep current on teaching strategies and technology trends that can be integrated into the classroom.

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Notes

Faculty have the opportunity to access resources available on the LAUSD website, and satisfy mandated teacher training online, such as the Child Abuse Awareness Training. LAUSD’s District website also offers secured links to all employees. Training includes teacher-directed classes, workshops, and online instruction through the District’s dedicated training venue called the Learning Zone. The Learning Zone’s delivery format offers a variety of computerized instruction support to teachers using instructional methodologies such as Instructor-Led Training, Web-Based Learning, Virtual Classes, Recorded Virtual Classes, and Expert-Led Training. Similar classes are offered by agencies such as CALPRO and the California Department of Education’s Outreach and Technical Assistance Network (OTAN). ƒƒ To what extent does the school offer online learning options or virtual classroom experiences for students? NHPCAS has recently instituted a new online class for our CTE program. This course, known as MOS Word (Microsoft Office Specialist) is the first of its kind in the DACE and provides specialized training in MS Word, and students receive an Industryapproved certificate upon completion. Students enrolled in this course take part in a virtual classroom while on their computers at home. The instructor and students communicate and learn via Eluminate, a software program approved and in use by LAUSD. Our school also administers ESL and Parent Education Distance Learning programs from our main campuses and from branch sites. While DVDs are offered as a way to view lessons, students are encouraged to view lessons at home online through the Distance Learning website, www.distancelearningtv.net.

Areas of Strength and Growth STRENGTHS: ƒƒ High level of instruction and a well-trained teaching staff. ƒƒ Students appreciate the wide variety of teaching approaches. ƒƒ Students appreciate the well-integrated curriculum. ƒƒ Teachers engage in continual professional growth. ƒƒ Distance Learning program enhances classroom instruction. ƒƒ School offers technological opportunities for teachers and students.

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Notes

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Teachers feel a need for more intercommunication -- a Teacher Forum for sharing teaching strategies and activities has been discussed and is in the early stages of development. ƒƒ More interaction is needed among classes for students to have a broader exposure to other classrooms and/or experiences. For example, one ESL class might perform a prepared presentation for another class, or an entire class might visit the next level up to be inspired and/or reduce any anxieties. ƒƒ Form a Technology Committee made up of the Principal, SAA, SIS, WIA, CTE Advisor and CTE Administrator to assess instructional and trainings needs for staff, and provide recommendations to meet those needs.

List of Evidence ƒƒ Representative student work in classrooms, in teacher files, in evidence bins ƒƒ Observations of students engaged in learning (photos, interviews) ƒƒ All main campus Distance Learning/Branch Site offerings list ƒƒ ESL Computer Lab classrooms and mobile cart ƒƒ Student interviews and self-reflections on learning ƒƒ Student learning data from school profile ƒƒ Flyers of DACE Conferences/Workshops and other Professional Development ƒƒ Documents used in training workshops from teachers related to instructional practices ƒƒ Resource materials (books, articles, etc.) that are used to improve the instructional program of the school. ƒƒ Teacher Resource Rooms with computers ƒƒ Classroom computers ƒƒ Sample Lesson Plans ƒƒ Documents used in the evaluation/observations of teachers that indicate how they are reviewed in regard to instructional practices used in the classroom ƒƒ Course Outline Instructional Strategies ƒƒ School website postings and comments ƒƒ DACE Website postings ƒƒ Student Questionnaire Results – Question 39

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Notes

Criterion 6: Use of Assessment The instructional staff uses established assessment procedures to design, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses, programs, and student learning levels. The institution recognizes the central role of its faculty for improving courses and programs through the assessment instruments and practices used in the school. Assessment is used to measure student progress, to modify learning approaches, and to carry out institutional planning and ongoing school improvement.

6.1

Clear learning outcomes are developed for each course so that success can be measured and students who are struggling can be identified and helped. ƒƒ How are core competencies and specific learning outcomes developed for every course? ESL course outlines are designed to integrate the competencies, structures and language skills set out in the California state model standards. They provide samples of integrated classroom activities that include SCANS skills and competencies. They are written by teachers for teachers. Distance Learning courses were developed by the Division to follow the ESL levels Beginning Low through Advanced Low, The Now and Future Parent, Surviving the Teen Years and GED Preparation course outlines. Academic courses follow the California High School Academic Content Standards. CTE courses are developed from input received from industry and teachers. A trade advisory meeting is scheduled by the Division for each Industry Sector. Academic Content Standards and SCANS competencies are integrated into CTE courses. Every CTE course includes preparation for employment. Courses are aligned with the California Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards. The California Department of Education publishes the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Frameworks. They serve as a how-to manual for teachers, curriculum specialists, and school boards in developing standards-based CTE pathways, courses, curricula, and assessment. It demonstrates how curricula can be integrated to provide our students with rigor and relevance in both academic and CTE knowledge and skills. Parent Education, Older Adult, and Adults with Disabilities Advisors at the Division level oversee course development in their program areas with content and research assistance from veteran teachers in the field. All courses are approved by the California Department of Education.

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Notes

ƒƒ How are courses regularly evaluated in regard to depth, breadth, rigor and sequencing? ESL: ESL course competencies follow the California State Model Standards and guidelines for adult ESL programs. ESL course outlines have recently been revised by LAUSD, Division of Adult and Career Education to incorporate new competencies in technology, language, and changing social mores.

CBET: Community-Based English Tutoring (CBET) courses are designed at the Division level specifically targeting immigrant parents of K-12 students, as a direct response to the passage of Proposition 227 in 1998 which allocated monies to fund English instruction for individuals pledging to provide personal English tutoring to children in their community. Courses have developed, changed and new ones have been added over time. Course evaluations have been incorporated into the course outlines as Pre and Post-tests. Tutoring logs verify parents’ time spent with children doing educational activities related to adult classroom lessons. CBET funding for the following school year is dependent upon pre and post testing, course completions, and completed, accurate tutoring logs.

Academic: The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were developed through a state-led initiative to establish consistent and clear education standards for each of the English language arts, mathematics, History-Social Science, Science, and Visual and Performing Arts. These standards were adopted to better prepare students for success in college, career, and the competitive global economy. The Curriculum Development and Supplemental Materials Commission reviews and recommends textbooks and other instructional materials to be adopted by the California State Board of Education (SBE). The framework uses the Content Standards for California Public Schools as its curricular platform and aligns curriculum, assessment, instruction, and organization to provide a comprehensive, coherent structure for language arts teaching and learning. The District/Division then shares and provides professional development to Academic teachers throughout Division schools. The school then supports the teachers implementation by providing materials, and encouraging professional development.

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Notes

Career Technical Education: California Education Code 51227 develops the Career Technical Education (CTE) standards and frameworks. Legislation requires the development and adoption of CTE standards that incorporate the integration of career technical and academic education. The California Career Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards are written for grades seven through twelve and specify learning goals in 58 career pathways organized around 15 industry sectors. The frameworks prepare students for both career entry and matriculation into postsecondary education. The framework provides examples of practices and research-based guidance for implementing the CTE Model Curriculum Standards. Based on the above CDE CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Framework, School Districts then have a model to write curriculum that include the standards. In addition, teachers and industry are involved in updating curriculum when deemed necessary. This is based on changes in industry, current trends and new technology. The Division reviews course outlines by industry sector and career pathways periodically or as needed based on feedback that is received from business and industry. Division Trade Advisory Meetings are held annually for each of the 15 California Industry Sectors. Based on discussions and recommendations, course outlines are updated to also meet industry standards.

Program for Older Adults: Overall assessment of each older adult student at NHPCAS is in relationship to the LAUSD's Programs for Older Adults' "Standardized Program Outcomes." Also to briefly summarize, students are assessed based on 1) the ability to self-maintain mental and physical health, as well as 2) the ability to lead, engage in problem solving, and participate as an active member of an organization (Civic Engagement) , i.e. as a volunteer, and/or member of the work force. Competency Rubrics for POA have been created and are completed three times a year. They document pre and post performance in class. (See POA link in evidence list)

The Program for Older Adults' Memories to Monologues special event.

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Notes

6.2

The institution gathers learning data from multiple sources, disaggregates and analyzes the results, draws conclusions, and makes recommendations for change based on assessment results. ƒƒ How does the school document the conclusions it reaches when analyzing student learning data so that recommendations can be made to address key issues? ESL/ABE/ASE There are systems and policies in place to integrate learning data to improve educational programs. One example is the use of CASAS test results. The WIA Advisor generates by-class reports, coded with the course number and the teacher's LAUSD ID number, that are distributed to each respective teacher. The reports after the Pre-test are the "Class Profile by Competency Report" and the "Class Performance by Competency Report." The former shows how each student did on each question, as well as a rawscale score and the number of questions each student answered correctly and which ones were missed. The latter report shows the content area of each question and the class percentage of correct responses on each question. Following the processing of the CASAS Post-Test, the WIA Advisor generates a report for each class called, "Student Gains by Class." Reviewing this report gives the teacher valuable data in analyzing student learning. Other tests are used to analyze the learning data such as Promotional Test and TABE testing which provide recommendations for student placement. ASE has contracts that provide the instructors with standardized procedures where pretests and post-tests are used to analyze students’ personal educational needs. ABE has implemented new assessment tools that break down each student’s reading level. It has four components based on alphabetics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. In the most recent Student Questionnaire, fifty percent of students reported that test results were discussed and used to continue their progression in the program. ƒƒ To what extent do the administration and faculty frequently meet to analyze student learning data and use results to improve the educational program of the school? Meetings take place on a continual basis as needed to discuss school and Central Office data, program and/or testing changes. Assessment data is analyzed by program, by course or by student with diagnostic testing or information to be shared by central office. We provide direction and information to the students with class reports. When we get information from central office on data about our school (principal’s monthly meetings), we share with the appropriate program/advisers (ESL, Academic, CBET, Perkins/CTE, WIA). CTE: The CTE Improvement Plan is an example of how Central Office is using data analysis to drive improvement of the educational program: Central Office advises NHPCAS administration who meets with CTE teachers as a group or individually in order to address the information and take action at our school.

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Notes

ABE: Through EBRI training, the Division is instituting new assessments to be administered in the reading classroom to provide more informed diagnostics with detailed results of student understanding in the areas of alphabetics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.

Reading Lab teachers work with NHPCAS APACS on new EBRI program.

ABE/ASE: Division schools are now equipped with new TABE Math Diagnostic tests that accompany the new math contracts. The school has shared this information with APACS/Teacher Advisers/Teachers on how math assessment is changing and what new procedures are being put in place. Data procured from the diagnostics indicate the specific areas for improvement. The teacher then works with the student on deficient areas. ASE: The new TABE Reading/English Diagnostic test is scheduled to be implemented in 2012-2013 and given to students at intake. The results will then be shared with teachers. Students enrolling in the HS diploma program are tested with the TABE Reading Test. If students score less than at a ninth grade level, they are registered into specific classes to improve those skills that are needed to have success in high school courses. ƒƒ What changes have faculty made in teaching methodologies or instructional strategies to improve learning as a result of learning data analysis? Teachers make decisions on what strategies they use to address deficiencies that are brought to light based on assessment outlined below specifically by program: ESL: CASAS Reports indicate weak areas that teachers then focus on. They review lacking areas, create lessons to improve them and utilize WIA lessons. ABE: TABE Diagnostic/Math & Reading test results target areas of improvement in Reading and Math classes. ASE: The Practice GED Test informs teachers which subjects students need to emphasize in their studies to prepare and pass the GED test. For other ASE courses, methodologies are pre-determined by contract; each contract states precisely what assignments, readings, tests, and materials the student is going to use and follow. Teachers are there to provide guidance and answer particular questions for students. Prescriptive lessons are used to address concepts and information with which students have difficulty. Teachers receive Division training on certain recommended instructional strategies and teaching methodologies, such as EBRI, TABE, and incorporating academic skills into CTE classes. In addition, after teachers receive the CASAS report, lessons are provided to teachers from the WIA adviser to improve student competency in the particular area of improvement. The lessons determine the instructional strategy in addition to strategies that teachers use on their own.

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Notes

CTE: For Career Technical Education courses, testing is based on competencies and industry-specific skills that the students need to master for that particular occupation and, in some circumstances, for the purpose of Industry Standards certification. For example, the Digital Imaging teacher videotapes his class lessons and provides students with additional instruction that enhances competencies, performance and application of skills. ƒƒ How are assessment results integrated into the institution’s teaching and learning process with a focus on individual student learning? As stated previously, CASAS test reports inform the instructor on individual student’s weak areas so that the instructor may provide lessons and exercises that focus on strengthening these areas. As part of the lesson planning stages, teachers consistently assess student understanding of objectives for each day’s lessons. An assessment is a regular and important part of each teacher’s lesson plans. Examples of assessments may include oral and written exercises to assist the teacher to determine each student’s progress toward mastery of skill objectives. This enables the teacher to target students' individual and collective areas of improvement. Teachers also incorporate their own tests and quizzes weekly, at the end of study units, and end-of-chapter tests to provide them with an additional means of assessment. Teachers also observe and evaluate a student's performance during class projects and other group work or pair work. These evaluations inform instructional strategies and teaching methodologies for the benefit of individual and whole class learning. This occurs in all courses, whether they be ESL, ABE, Academic, CTE, Parent Education, Older Adult or Adults with Disabilities. Students are motivated to improve their skills through regular encouragement by the instructor and acknowledgement of student successes. Students whose skills improve significantly are awarded Certificates of Merit at the end of each term to recognize student’s individual efforts. These awards motivate students to continue their educational pursuits and increase student retention.

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Certificate of Merit


There is constant classroom evaluation while students do writing, speaking, listening, reading, computation, career and/or lifeskills exercises. These evaluations are aligned with our Student Learning Outcomes. Instructors plan their lessons keeping in mind that they should relate to one or more of the SLOs: developing skills, gaining mastery and completing a course, meeting academic goals and becoming an informed member of the community.

Notes

ƒƒ How are assessment results evaluated with school SLOs in view?

ƒƒ How are the results of data analysis connected to the school wide Action Plan so that student learning needs are the driving force of the school? All four Action Plan categories and their respective Action items are either directly or indirectly derived from improvements that we believe will be consequential to student learning needs. By examining our CASAS data, for example, we surmised that ESL students often left the program before being able to take the Post Test. The resultant action was to change the term from semester to trimester in order to give students the opportunity to take the test and advance to the next level more rapidly. In the area of Communications, we have instituted a Teacher Forum through which teachers may communicate with each other on our website. We are encouraging instructors to share favorite materials, activities and teaching strategies through this forum. This will facilitate communication to grow among all instructors thereby overcoming the obstacle of being assigned at any of our four main sites. Another example is the area of Staff Development in which is included sharing best practices among teachers that specifically address activities to assist student achievement of SLOs. Instructors then have these instructional techniques and materials at their fingertips to use in the classroom. Teachers then address learning issues that are identified by the assessment data as needing attention. Also noted, as a Resource Management item, was a delay in the arrival of student textbooks for sale or class sets, which affected the ability of teachers to instruct the class through use of the core text. This is being resolved through a better system of inventory control and purchasing procedures. By having texts available at the onset of each term, students will be able to study, do exercises, practice, apply what they learn, and be evaluated on schedule from the beginning of the course. This permits the instructor to maintain an appropriate pace corresponding with the course competencies in the course outline, as well as class duration. Having a text on time and being on a regular timeline will benefit students by enabling them to be better prepared for both formal and informal assessments.

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Notes

It is also well-documented in the research on Learner Persistence that students who set goals early, revisit them frequently, and work closely with a school professional are more likely to remain in school and achieve their goals. Because of this, in the area of Student Support Services, our goal is to raise the profile of the counseling department at each campus for ALL students, not only ABE and ASE.

Students are encouraged to set goals.

Specifically related to ABE and ASE, the Division has implemented diagnostic testing software (TABE 9/10) to assess student skills in both math and language. Teacher advisors will then be more prepared to provide students with a more accurate evaluation of their academic needs. This information is shared with their teachers who, in turn, use it to provide materials for students to assist them in areas that need greater attention.

6.3

Student learning data analysis is used to make institutional changes that enable students to reach educational goals and achieve academic success. ƒƒ How often do the administration and faculty meet to talk about student learning levels, assessment results, etc.?

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The Division has had the foresight to provide permanent support positions at each school to assist instructors schoolwide. For example, the role of the WIA Advisor is not limited to simply organizing CASAS testing only. An important part of the position is to analyze results of each student’s CASAS test and share this information with instructors with the use of class reports and one-on-one communication. The WIA Advisor provides various exercises to address deficient skills. Other positions include CBET Advisor, ESL Advisor, Academic Advisor and Perkins Advisor. Each position, as created by the Division, allow administrators to delegate support staff to manage program-related tasks, leaving administrators to address more immediate issues related to the daily operations of the school. While administration does communicate with faculty regarding student learning and assessment, they do not have the time to maintain that level of contact with all faculty. Support staff, in the form of teacher advisors, are much more available to answer questions, resolve issues and address concerns that are programspecific. This creates more opportunities for teacher/advisor communication that may not be possible due to the multitude of responsibilities that an administrator NHPCAS Teacher Advisor assists must address on a daily basis. students with a smile.


At the classroom level, teachers use results from both formative and summative assessments to dictate teaching focus, strategies and pace of instruction. Being part of the second largest school district in the United States has its advantages, one of which is having assessment tools, textbooks and educational materials that cater to LAUSD/DACE course outlines and curricular standards. For example, adopted ESL textbooks contain topics, structures and grammar corresponding to course outlines and standards, including end-of-chapter and section tests. By utilizing both CASAS and textbook test results, teachers can gauge their teaching practices to best meet students’ needs.

Notes

ƒƒ To what extent do faculty members use formative and summative assessment results to modify learning and teaching approaches?

ƒƒ How has the analysis of learning data impacted the instructional program of the school and improved learning levels for students? As stated previously, analysis of assessments drive the direction of instruction in terms of tackling learning deficiencies particular to each subject. Teachers modify their instruction to maximize learning for all students. Our faculty and staff take pride in giving each student individual attention while keeping all students involved and on pace with classroom learning progression. This is the special capability and appeal of adult school as opposed to high school and college – we catch the students that have fallen between the cracks and carry them through to academic success. Each individual student is considered a valuable asset to our school family and our greater community. ƒƒ How does the school use assessment results to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs and courses it offers? Although the ESL and ABE programs for adults are most often non-credit, they are nevertheless taken seriously and learning in these programs is measured formally by the CASAS test and informally with tests and quizzes in class. Academic students take CASAS tests in the subject area in which they are enrolled. Benchmarks gained from CASAS testing are used as an indicator of how effective our ESL, ABE, and ASE programs are, and are the basis for partial funding for the following school year. Promotional tests are administered to test students for readiness for advancement to the next ESL level. TABE Reading and Math placement tests show when ABE students have advanced in their skill sets. Academic courses have tests embedded into the course contracts in which students must score at 80% or better to pass a section or class. CTE courses base success on mastery of competencies and passage of careerspecific certifications. Other appropriate assessments are used with Parent Education, Program for Older Adults and Adults with Disabilities. In the end, teachers consult both formal and informal assessment results to determine when students have completed courses. We then refer to the quantity of “completers” to rate each class’ or program’s success.

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Notes

Another measure of effectiveness is our Student Questionnaire. In answer to the question “Would you recommend this school to other people?,” an overwhelming 97% said “Yes,” and added comments mainly relating to the excellent and prepared teachers, and the quality of instruction. When asked, “Is your class meeting your expectations?,” a large majority of 92.8% replied “Yes.” On the average, 87% of students rated textbooks, materials, and class content relevant, challenging and effective, while use of technology was rated at 72%. Students rated as excellent to good: teacher expertise at 95%, high-level instruction at 90%, different approaches and a variety of activities at 88%.

6.4

Assessment results are reported regularly to all stakeholders so that accountability can be maintained and that student learning remains the focus of the school.

ƒƒ How often are student learning results reported to appropriate stakeholder groups, i.e. governing body, faculty, and community members? How is this done? Learning results are reported to the appropriate stakeholders via: CASAS benchmarks and reports to teacher and students, notification of promotional exam results to students and lists to each main office personnel. In addition, results are shared with all staff and the public through the weekly bulletin, the school website, and updated Fast Facts brochure. The Division also posts outcome data analyses from data that our school enters on SIS on the “Dashboard” on the Division’s website (www.adultinstruction.org). ƒƒ What processes are in place to use learning data analysis as a way to identify students who require additional help? NHPCAS has a check-and-balance system in place to catch students who require additional help. Primarily, students who need additional help are identified by classroom teachers through the assessment tools mentioned above and through classroom performance. Academic teacher advisors regularly review student progress of ABE/ASE students and follow up with their teachers and student counseling. Administration reviews SIS reports and benchmark data to get an overall picture of classroom performance, and may choose to discuss any irregularities with individual teachers. Administration, teacher advisors and teachers maintain three-way open communication regarding student achievement.

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As stated under the first bullet, learning results are shared with the community at large through the weekly bulletin, the school website, and updated Fast Facts brochure, and the “Dashboard” on the Division’s website (www.adultinstruction.org). NHPCAS also holds annual School Advisory Council meetings at which data is shared with community partners.

Notes

ƒƒ How are learning results reported to the community at large?

6.5

The institution relies on assessment results for institutional planning, Action Plan revision, and resource allocation.

ƒƒ Who is involved in the institutional planning of the school? Are all stakeholders represented? The administration meets regularly to plan, revise, and implement strategies that both directly and indirectly shape all facets of the institution. All stakeholders, including, but not limited to, certificated staff, classified staff, students, and community members are welcome to share their ideas and concerns with the administrative staff. All input from students, faculty, and the community is then considered when evaluating and making changes to various aspects of the school and its programs. For example, ESL teachers have voiced a need for new sets of readers for ESL classrooms to assist students in increasing their reading comprehension, vocabulary, and general communication skills. Administration has responded by ordering the sets this spring 2012. Another example is the EMT class which relies on specific pre-determined materials and community connections; administration has met the class requirements by being proactive with ordering supplies and establishing partnerships with an ambulance company, a medical center, fire and police stations, and local Division schools for information, internships, and publicity. ƒƒ How often is learning data analysis used to assess the relevance and appropriateness of course offerings at the institution? Learning data analysis is used to assess the relevance and appropriateness of course offerings prior to the start of every term, and on an ongoing basis. Tests such as CASAS and TABE provide invaluable information regarding course needs at each of our campuses and branch locations, based on learning outcomes and student progress. Understanding and evaluating this data is essential in designing the master schedule of classes at each site. When the Division found through data analysis that students were not achieving CTE certificates in line with state guidelines, administration followed up by implementing new DACE course outlines in sequences of classes within industry sectors, accompanying that with our school’s CTE plan, and meeting with each CTE instructor to discuss the plan’s implementation and requirements of our revised CTE program. Courses that did not meet the expected outcomes were eliminated. Changes were instituted resulting in a significant boost in the number of completions with the goal of continuing this progression in each year to come.

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Notes

ƒƒ To what extent does the governing body and administration make financial allocation decisions based on the analysis of learning data? Financial allocation for DACE is determined by the Los Angeles Unified School District, the Division then allocates funds to each DACE school. Each adult school receives regular adult education (1040) funds for general use, plus categorical funds, such as CBET, Perkins and WIA, that have specific designations and cannot be reallocated to other areas of need. Outcome data can be used to determine which classes are in highest demand, (i.e. the results of the TABE, CASAS, promotional tests, completion data, and attendance figures provide data that help to determine how many students need each class) so that Regular Adult Education and categorical funds can be apportioned equitably and where it is vital and essential. ƒƒ In what way has the assessment of learning data resulted in the modification of the school wide Action Plan? There is a strong correlation between the schoolwide Action Plan and the assessment of learning data. Sound decision-making is the result of prudent data analysis. The administration modifies the Action Plan by evaluating institutional needs based on WIA, CASAS, SIS, graduation and GED outcome data as well as Division recommendations and guidelines. In recent times, the budget deficit has effected an adjustment of priorities and goals. This is reflected in our most recent Action Plan in which projects that require additional funding have not been included. Nevertheless, any improvement items omitted from the current Action Plan remain on the school’s list of priorities for when funds are restored.

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STRENGTHS:

Notes

Areas of Strength and Growth ƒƒ Adherence to federal, state, Division, and District guidelines. ƒƒ Continuous upgrading of course outlines and assessment tools. ƒƒ Addition of new courses in response to students needs, wants, and changes in technology. ƒƒ System is in place whereby assessment data is analyzed, conclusions drawn and results drive instructional practices.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Funding to continue the process of reevaluating and adding assessment tools and courses. ƒƒ Training for teachers and advisers on the new courses and assessment tools. ƒƒ Developing new ways of integrating skills into instruction and learning. ƒƒ Teachers need to share test results with students more frequently in order for both to better gauge students progress.

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Assessment instruments: CASAS, TABE, Promotional Testing, Contracts, and EBRI. ƒƒ Student Learner Outcomes can be analyzed from the CASAS results in the “Students Gains by Class” report. Courses objectives in the ASE are provided in each contract. ƒƒ Documentation showing pass rate for each program requiring a licensure exam (such as noted in our “Fast Facts” brochure) CTE provides a test in each course outline to complete class and receive certificate. ƒƒ Evidence that analysis of learning data is driving the school’s programs and is embedded in the school wide Action Plan is listed in the “Class Profile by Competency Report and the “Class Performance by Competency Report”. ƒƒ Older Adult Program includes seven different templates: Three that record one set of data and four that allow for pre/post test recording on the same data sheet. POA Templates: http://poa.adultinstruction.org/documents/ assestool_template4b.pdf Standardized Program Outcomes for POA: http://poa.adultinstruction.org/ documents/OutcomeMeasures_POA_1010_revised.pdf POA Assessment Cover Letter: http://poa.adultinstruction.org/documents/ Assessment_coverletter_1011.pdf C TE Improvement Plan

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Notes

Criterion 7: Student Support Services The institution recruits and admits students who are able to benefit from its programs. Student Support Services address the identified needs of students and create a supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway through the educational experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning and success. The institution systematically assesses student support services, using Schoolwide Student Learner Outcomes (SSLOs), faculty, staff and student input, and other measures, in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.

7.1

The institution provides sufficient student support services that enhance the learning environment and encourage the achievement of School wide Learner Outcomes. ƒƒ What specific support services are provided to the students by the Institution? To what extent does the institution offer financial aid counseling, learning resource assistance, academic counseling, personal counseling, technology support, and health services North Hollywood Polytechnic Community Adult School (NHPCAS) provides various services to support and enhance the learning environments, in order to encourage student achievement at its four campuses. Each campus provides free student parking. Helpful school security guards monitor school grounds, and assist in providing directions to site locations. Free childcare for our students’ children 3 years and older is provided at the Sun Valley Campus and on Saturdays at the Whipple Campus.

School Security Officers provide safety on all campuses.

Upon entering our central offices, students are greeted by a bilingual office staff, who assist them in registering for English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), GED, Adult Secondary Education (ASE), Career Technical Education (CTE), Older Adult and Parenting classes. Free career and academic counseling are offered; resources such as "The Rainbow Guide" are useful in alerting students to social services available in the community.

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Notes

Weekly bulletins provide well-organized information about Academic and ESL tests, community events, holiday food drives, health information (vaccine and blood drives), safety drills, cultural and academic events. Flyers and brochures promote workshops and courses. Students have been invited, for example, to participate in a weekend gardening workshop organized by Tree People, as well as several school beautification landscaping projects. Public announcements inform students of perfect attendance awards, upcoming student council meetings, emergencies, and any other relevant community or academic information. We continue to provide daily computer instruction and lab time for Academic students, as well as weekly instructional time for ESL students, who visit the computer labs for instructional reinforcement. Lastly, the school's website, www.nhpcas.com, consolidates all information about student services. Current school news and events are listed on the home page, as are the addresses and phone numbers of each campus and essential links to registration, schedules, staff and student resources. There are links to photo galleries, and videos of school events. Other pages on the site contain photos and position titles of the Administrative Team, the school's mission statement, SSLOs, branch programs and class listings in Spanish and English. Campus phone numbers are listed, so that students can call for more information. An archive page includes past weekly bulletins. Off-site classes, such as "Memory Enhancement" and "Life Story Writing" for Older Adults are also documented, with photographs and details of special events. ƒƒ How does the institution demonstrate that these services support student learning? The effectiveness of our student services is evidenced by a constant commitment to improvement in benchmarks through CASAS testing, increased community and concurrent high school student enrollment and involvement, reduced public assistance, and goal achievement by graduates and completers, for our students ranging in age from 16-95. Distance Learning units and DVDs are used to teach conversation, grammar and sentence structure. Teachers keep track of student progress in completing logs of units completed when students pass unit quizzes. Students with young school-age children are encouraged to participate in Community Based English Tutoring (CBET). Teachers assist the students in completing logs of time spent with children speaking, reading and writing English. A CBET Advisor is available to assist teachers in recordkeeping as well as suggesting activities for parents and children. Lesson plans are collected in portfolios and evidence binders, so that teachers can learn from other teachers. Teacher advisors are in continual dialogue with both teachers and administrators, reviewing textbooks, workbooks, websites, time management and use of resources. We are currently looking at ways in which we can use new computer technologies, reducing our need for photocopying.

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Notes

ƒƒ How is information regarding student services shared with students so that they know all the options available to them? Information is shared in various ways. Brochures, flyers, calendars and weekly bulletins are available in every school site's office. The website is promoted on paper, as well as through teachers, administrators and staff. The welcoming school environment is bilingual and affordable. The strongest tool is "word of mouth." Students travel from Panorama City, Arleta, Sun Valley, Valley Glen, Studio City, Sherman Oaks, Valley Village, as well as North Hollywood.

NHPCAS Fast Facts brochure.

Teachers, too, are constantly promoting and encouraging their students. They send postcards created by the school to students who have not attended, and follow up with a phone call. Announcements about learning opportunities, testing, workshops, websites, community, and school events are shared every day in classrooms. But most importantly, this information is shared in a way that includes and encourages students. There is a "You Can Do It!" attitude on the campuses. Students matter.

7.2

The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or academic advising programs to support student development and success in the transition to further education or employment opportunities. ƒƒ How does the institution develop, implement and evaluate counseling and/ or academic advising? How does the counseling or academic advising program assist students directly with their transition to advanced educational opportunities or connection to employment opportunities? NHPCAS uses the Counseling Handbook created by DACE and District training to implement academic advising. Teacher advisors/counselors are trained by the Assistant Principal of Adult Counseling Services (APACS) to evaluate student tests such as TABE Reading and Math entry tests for placement of students in the academic program. Advisors, teachers and staff counsel students on what is available to them after they graduate. School administration and office staff serve the faculty, teacher aides, and students by constantly looking for new ways to provide positive learning experiences, and pathways to success for all our students. Through advanced state-of-the-art computer labs, we are able to offer questionnaires for student input to help us identify and address community needs. For example, in our student questionnaire conducted in November 2011, students were polled on which services they had used at the school.

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Notes

This data indicated that students took advantage of academic counseling and transition services from ESL to the academic program. Students also came to the office to apply for discounted metro passes and photo ID cards. The data indicated which services were underutilized by students as well. These services include personal counseling, referral to community resources, referrals to institutions of higher learning and referrals for job opportunities. Regular conversations take place between teachers, on campus, and through email communications. Teachers are constantly sharing with each other new methodologies, websites, and materials they use to enhance the learning environment within their classrooms. Administrators regularly dialogue with teachers, through email, to advise, support, and remain informed. Staff meetings convey information, but also help to create a common sense of responsibility and purpose. Teachers, staff and administrators come together to support one another. The cohesiveness of the school's professionals solidifies the supportive learning environment for its students. Professional support is available to educators through workshops offered by DACE. An ESL Academy offers a plethora of resources in the form of lesson planning strategies, activities, assessment tools, bibliography and helpful website lists. The Program for Older Adults (POA) also provides assessment tools, lesson plans, support, and workshops for POA teachers, involving, for example, The Arthritis Foundation, as well as The UCLA Center on Aging. DACE’s Parent Education Department provides workshops and instructional support for Division parent educators. Dissemination of information and resources is contingent upon a well-informed body of professionals who regularly meet, dialogue, and share the ways in which new tools can be shared with a very diverse student body. ƒƒ What professional development opportunities are provided to school counselors or advisors? DACE provides professional development opportunities during its fall and spring conferences. Conferences offer opportunities to examine new textbooks, share resources, attend workshops, listen to keynote speakers, and network with other professionals. DACE also conducts regular workshops for professionals in all fields: ESL, ABE, ASE, Parent Education, POA and AWD. The DACE website is full of information for development opportunities: grants, fellowships, workshops, and websites. Administrators provide support to school advisors and counselors, meeting with them for updates and problem-solving sessions. Advisors and counselors email and phone one another with new ideas and contacts. Local state universities offer courses, websites, and colloquia. Larger state-wide and national organizations, too, offer conferences which provide new resources and create new networks: OTAN, Women Educators, CTA, CCAE, EFL, TESOL, CAELA, and COABE.

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Notes

7.3

The institution provides support for all students from the recruitment and admissions phase to the successful completion of the school program of choice. ƒƒ How does school address: marketing, community awareness, recruitment of new students? One of the cornerstones of our institution’s marketing strategy to raise community awareness and enhance recruitment of new students is our professional and userfriendly website. It is extremely easy to navigate and filled with useful and valuable information such as upcoming events, schedule of classes, photos, and location and contact information. The website is routinely updated by a staff member dedicated to its maintenance and improvement. As a result, prospective and current students are assured that they are receiving accurate information. In addition, our annual schedule of classes is disseminated throughout the community, with copies handed out at all North hollywood-PolytechNic commuNity Adult School our campuses and branch sites. We employ a Anuncia la Gran Announces the Community Representative whose job it is to Apertura de Nuestra Grand Opening of its eScuelA de visit local schools, organizations and businesses SuN VAlley AdultoS comuNitAriA eN cAmPuS SuN VAlley hiGh School to publicize our programs. Posters and flyers 9171 TELFAIR AVE 9171 TELFAIR AVE SUN VALLEY, CA 91352 SUN VALLEY, CA 91352 publicizing our school and highlighting new course offerings are displayed at a number of local community organizations such as the Thai Temple, YMCA, and churches, all located in the Sun Valley/North Hollywood vicinity. Display cases located near two of our main adult school offices also feature important NHPCAS events and PRE-REGISTER INSCRíBASE POR information. Electronic billboards at the NHHS and FOR CLASSES ADELANTADO Polytechnic HS Campus and large, colorful banners CLASSES BEGIN CLASES COMIENZAN at the Whipple Campus, and Sun Valley HS Campus complete the published portion of our marketing Sun Valley Grand Opening postcards were mailed to 12,000 households. strategy. MONDAY – THURSDAY 3:30 – 5:30 pm • Adult Independent Instruction • High School Diploma Program • GED Preparation

MONDAY – THURSDAY 6:30 – 9:00 pm • English as a Second Language • High School Diploma Program • GED Preparation • Parent Education • Computer Lab • Math Lab

Monday – Thursday February 7 – 10, 6 – 9 pm

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2011

LUNES – JUEVES 3:30 – 5:30 pm • Instrucción Independiente • Programa de Diploma para Secundaria • Preparación para el GED

LUNES – JUEVES 6:30 – 9:00 pm • Inglés como Segundo Idioma • Programa de Diploma Secundaria • Preparación para el GED • Educación para Padres • Clases de Computación • Matemáticas

Lunes – Jueves 7 – 10 de Febrero, 6 – 9 pm

EL LUNES, 14 de FEBRERO, 2011

Another invaluable component of NHPCAS’ marketing strategy to increase community awareness and student recruitment involves more personal contact. On the frontline are well informed office technicians who field calls and inquiries by either providing reliable information themselves or referring the call to the appropriate staff member. Voice messages are routinely checked and returned. Members of our dynamic student council also effectively disseminate important information to the student body, their friends, and family. Finally, the administrators and advisors at NHPCAS make it a priority to build a strong relationship with the high school counselors and parents, thereby assuring that there will be ongoing dialogue to address the ever-changing needs of the concurrent student population.

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Notes

Moreover, our institution addresses these marketing issues with our presence at special high school and community events. Open houses and Back-to-School nights at local high schools have featured NHPCAS’ booths or tables packed with brochures, flyers, and motivational displays. Advisors often give presentations New and larger signage was an important at other events as well, such as the part of our marketing plan. NHHS’s parent night. Annual NHPCAS events which are open to the community also raise the profile of our school. These special events include: blood drives, flu shots, International Day, holiday donations, dances, Whipple Campus clean-up day, and Sun Valley campus’ BBQ. ƒƒ How does the school address: transitioning new students into the school? On intake, new students are given a written and verbal review of their educational plan and school rules. They are also oriented as to location of classes, parking, bathrooms, and other essentials. Every semester NHPCAS also features a school-wide Student Orientation Assembly which consists of PowerPoint presentation involving administrators, teachers, advisors, and school police who all give presentations on their area of expertise, including school safety, codes of conduct, ESL curriculum, GED/high school diploma program, and higher educational goals. Once they are in class, new students can expect assistance in the form of a peer-mentor relationship to help them navigate the first few days/weeks of school. Teachers also play a major role by presenting and maintaining a welcoming attitude and positive environment in the classroom at all times. ƒƒ How does the school address: providing meaningful learning experiences for students? To provide a meaningful learning experience for students, NHPCAS’ school curriculum is well-balanced, emphasizing both academic essentials and extra-curricular, school-wide activities, and serves to create a dynamic classroom bond and enhance campus culture. Lesson plans are also strongly related to practical life skills as assessed in the CASAS exams, Chinese New Year is celebrated with delineated in the course outline, and Fortune Cookies for all students. are notably competency-based and goal-oriented. In addition to teacher-directed lessons, students also receive individual attention and are regularly informed of progress, grades, and other important areas of assessment.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the school address: transitioning students into job placement or further education? To effectively transition students into further education, our administrators often invite guest speakers from colleges and DACE Occupational/Skills centers to make inspiring and informative presentations at graduation meetings, student council events, and orientation events. The idea of pursuing a higher education is also reinforced by our APACS’ presentations at these same events and in classrooms. Further support comes from academic advisors who keep college information such as brochures and application deadlines on file to assist students with their future, collegiate goals. Information is also investigated online, and subsequently shared with students. Job placement support comes in the form of postings on the community bulletin board located in each of our adult school offices, or in formica frames prominently displayed on the office counter. Immediate job openings have been shared through members of the student council and posted on job boards. Job postings are also listed on the school website. ƒƒ How does the school address: assessment of success in years that follow to ensure that the students reach their desired outcomes? Success stories of former NHPCAS students as well as featured graduation speakers who were also former students assure us that our school is playing an integral role in helping students better their lives. Administrators, teachers, and advisors frequently urge students to return to let us know how they are doing. ƒƒ To what extent does the school have clear admission policies in line with its mission that guides student admission? One of the significant aspects of our mission to provide effective student services is to admit students who are able to benefit from our programs. To meet this goal and to avoid placing students inappropriately, which would potentially set them up for failure, our school administers a series of succinct but thorough diagnostic reading and math tests which all prospective high school diploma or GED candidates must take. The academic advisor clearly informs the candidate of the score needed to pass the test and qualify for the high school/GED program. The overall score accurately determines whether a student needs preparation in the adult basic education (ABE) program, or whether he/she qualifies immediately for the GED practice tests, preparation, and exam, and/or high school diploma classes. Students are informed of the results and placed accordingly. These initial screening tools ensure that students are enrolled in the appropriate classes. In addition, our institution seeks to create a supportive learning environment in which adult students, in particular, can thrive. For this reason, only individuals 18 years or older who understand and sign an extensive list of rules and codes of conduct, may be admitted. Concurrent students under the age of 18 may be admitted, but only with a high school counselor’s referral form and numerous forms signed by both these students and their parents as to their attendance and behavioral expectations.

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Notes

Should the concurrent student, or an adult student fail to adhere to these guidelines, a series of progressive disciplinary steps are taken involving student, teacher, counselor, and concurrent student and their parents/legal guardians. Ultimately, all students are aware that they may be dropped from our program if they break any of these rules or cause a significant disruption to the supportive learning environment our institution strives to create.

Concurrent Students must adhere to all rules and codes of conduct.

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution provide students with information on school policies and procedures that clarifies expectations that impact them? As alluded to in the previous paragraph, every member of NHPCAS’ constituency is fully informed of school policies and procedures that impact them. Our institution provides clearly outlined and detailed rules in writing that every student must understand and sign. Furthermore, all school employees who may be involved in registering students (administrators, advisors, and other office staff) reinforce these written rules with verbal clarification and explanation. Every semester there is also a school-wide PowerPoint presentation (Student Orientation) which orients the entire student body to school curriculum, services, policies, and procedures that impact them. Administrators, selected instructors, advisors, and school police each give verbal presentations about their respective areas of expertise. Finally, at the individual class level each instructor imparts his or her own set of appropriate rules and procedures. In the Academic Individualized Instruction Lab, for example, every new, incoming student is given a “first day packet” comprised of instructions on how to properly label assignments, class rules that must be signed, and file folders in which to keep handouts and work in progress.

All students benefit from the student orientation program presented at each campus.

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Notes

ƒƒ How are students given counseling regarding the completion of their program so that they stay on track and successfully meet their goals? All students who come to NHPCAS with the desire to learn and meet other specific educational goals are welcomed by a teacher advisor who counsels them on the best course of study to achieve those goals. A one-on-one counseling relationship begins, therefore, on intake. In the initial academic evaluation and interview, for example, the academic advisor designs an optimal educational “game plan” based on the student’s TABE scores, goals, transcripts, past educational experiences and background, time constraints, and location requirements. Academic students are thoroughly apprised of the options available to them and the remaining requirements they need to earn their GED and/or high school diploma with the aid of the “Diploma Plus” worksheet, a clearly defined outline of GED and diploma requisites. Once these students are registered for the appropriate ABE or GED/high school classes, they are urged to check in frequently with the academic advisor to apprise him/her of their progress and to submit a credit slip when they finish each class. Special attention is paid to potential graduates for that school year to ensure that they stay on track to meet numerous graduation deadlines. In addition to unscheduled visits, academic advisors schedule routine, monthly appointments with potential grads to discuss progress, concerns, modifications to their study plan, and to simply offer encouragement and moral support. Prospective ESL students also undergo a thorough evaluation by the ESL advisor during their initial visit. They are interviewed verbally to test for speaking competencies and to learn of their prior ESL education and academic background. A written assessment is given at the discretion of the advisor. In the classroom, instructors become the primary “counselor”, educating, nurturing, and informing students of the competencies they need to achieve for promotion to the next level of ESL, and ultimately their GED or high school diploma. An additional tool used to optimize the completion of our students’ educational program is the “Steps-to-Success” handout, which illustrates graphically the steps needed to go from English language learner to high school graduate, thereby providing all NHPCAS’ constituents with the awareness of where they are in “the big picture”. Our institution’s “drop-in/opendoor” policy as well as the adult school office’s convenient proximity to classrooms and operating hours further ensures that every academic, ESL, and CTE student has easy access to the counseling guidance they need to achieve his/her goals. Teachers' Day is celebrated at all campuses to recognize our excellent faculty.

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The institution regularly evaluates student needs in order to provide support services that increase the likelihood of success for all students.

Notes

7.4

ƒƒ How does the institution research and identify learning support needs of its student population and provide appropriate services and programs to address those needs? Specific to our academic classes, on intake, new TABE 9D reading and Math 9M placement tests are given. We have more specific, accurate diagnostic tools due to computerized format which provide printouts of students' strengths and growth areas. This system is more comprehensive and more in line with CAHSEE and GED and can, therefore, more accurately predict success. This helps us track student progress over time. Also during intake, counselors evaluate students during one-on-one interviews to discuss an optimal educational “game plan” based on the student’s TABE scores, goals, time constraints, location, transcripts, and past education background. The assessments continue in class via quizzes, test, and teacher evaluations. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution offer appropriate extra-curricular and co-curricular programs (whenever possible) that meet the needs of its constituency? We keep our students engaged in school activities so they can get a feel of belonging to a community. This helps our retention rate, student scores and preparation for the working world. On our annual International day, each student is invited to represent and share their culture with others. Tree planting and Campus Beautification days are times when we build community by working as a team on a common goal with our students and staff. Monthly perfect attendance drawings motivate students to come to school every day. End of the year BBQ to raise profile of the Sun Valley campus, our newest branch. For our ESL classes, and our Individual classes do extra-curricular activities pertaining to holidays and topics from the course outlines, like keeping fit, visiting a library or conducting a transaction at the bank.

Students share their cultures at the annual International Day.

Sun Valley Campus End-of-Year 2011 BBQ.

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Notes

ƒƒ How frequently does the institution evaluate student support services and revise what is offered to meet current student needs? Teachers are free to address concerns to the administration concerning Student Support Services on an as-needed basis. If students indicate specific needs, then action will take place to implement changes to accommodate all students. A student questionnaire was conducted in November 2011, which included a section on Student Support Services. Students evaluated the counseling staff, registration process, student orientation and graduation among other components of the counseling department. 65% of students gave a positive rating of the counseling staff. About 32% answered that they were not familiar with the counseling staff, so while the counseling staff was rated positively, the questionnaire revealed that not all students had accessed our services. Percentage figures were similar for the evaluation of the registration process, student orientation and graduation.

7.5

The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and confidentially with provision for secure backup of all files.

ƒƒ How does the institution publish and follow established policies for release of student records? All authorized personnel involved in answering requests for student records are fully aware of established legal policies which govern this sensitive area of school culture. These key people include all administrators, teacher advisors, teachers, and adult student information systems (adult SIS) staff members. Critical privacy guidelines are disseminated primarily from administrators to advisors at department meetings and reinforced by district bulletins. Administrators and advisors also attend bi-annual counseling academies which often feature PowerPoint presentations by LAUSD’s inhouse counsel further detailing the legal parameters for release of student records. This invaluable information is shared with the rest of the staff at NHPCAS to ensure that all students’ records are handled properly. All student files are kept in locked, metal file cabinets in a secured area behind the counter or inside offices. Student records such as registration, credit, attendance history, and cumulative information also exist in digital form in the computerized and centralized adult student information system (adult SIS). Only school personnel who have been authorized by school administrators to receive the necessary passwords and codes are allowed access to the adult SIS, enabling them to view and modify the student record. Other critical and confidential information such as the CAHSEE and GED test scores are automatically imported into each student’s record by LAUSD. Additional personal student information that is kept secure and confidential is the information on the registration slips which is entered into the SIS system. The registration slips are then stored in secured boxes for the current semester or term.

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Notes

After the semester is over, they are kept in the SIS office, a space to which only authorized SIS personnel have regular access. In addition to the registration slips are the attendance records which the teachers complete each week and submit to the SIS coordinator for scanning into the SIS system. Scanned rosters are also kept in the SIS office. Since both of the aforementioned forms are considered legal documents, they are kept permanently by our institution. The SIS coordinator keeps them in the SIS office for a period of two years, after which they are transported to a secured and locked bin located at our Whipple Campus for permanent storage. Only authorized SIS staff members The SIS Computer Coordinator have access to these two types of documents. To further maintain the security of personal student information, additional copies of registration slips are routinely shredded once the semester is over, and other documents containing sensitive and private student information are shredded once the document becomes obsolete.

7.6

Institutional information is easily accessible to all stakeholders and prospective students and is free from misrepresentations or false promises. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution provide a catalog for its constituents with precise, accurate and current information? In addition to our website, NHPCAS has created a variety of polished posters and flyers, including our detailed “Schedule of Classes” for all four of our main campuses which are displayed prominently at each site. ƒƒ How does the school clearly identify where publications with policies and procedures can be accessed? Our Schedule of Classes includes the District policy on non-discrimination, our admission requirements, a description of our class fees and our refund policy. At the entrance of each main campus, flyers and class schedules are prominently displayed.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the school assure that accepted students can benefit from the program they enter? Our students' progress is continuously being monitored with the variety of assessment tools at our disposal. An example: the TABE Test is primarily used as a placement test to match the learner with his/her level of instruction. In addition, the CASAS Test is used to measure the student's progress in the area of Life Skills, providing the teacher with snap shots of students' strengths and weaknesses. Teachers also use assessments provided by the publishers of, their text books as well as teacher-created tests and quizzes. In addition to the assessments used to measure student progress, our students are also encouraged to establish personal goals, at the onset of their education; they are continuously encouraged to meet their goals. We offer students a comprehensive instructional program designed to lead them toward academic success. ƒƒ How does the school document the accomplishments of the intended outcomes? Our school documents the growth of the intended academic outcomes by carefully measuring student success using a variety of instruments. One of these, as already mentioned, is the TABE test. It not only provides us with valuable information regarding the strengths and weakness of the students, but helps us keep track of their growth. Before students are promoted to a more advanced level of instruction, especially in ESL, they are given a promotional test. Those that successfully pass the test are labeled as completers. This is a way of demonstrating positive student development outcomes. In addition, more concretely measureable achievements (benchmarks, completers, certificate, GED and HSD recipients) are entered into SIS and TopsPro programs. Once entered, reports are generated and data retrieved that show updated student outcomes. These outcomes are then translated into displayable format and publicized throughout the school to all stakeholders, appearing as postings in main offices (lists of students passing the CAHSEE and GED), on the school website, in weekly bulletins, in our Fast Facts brochure (annual outcomes), on handouts at School Advisory and Staff meetings, and on “Thermometer” posters at each main site showing benchmark gains.

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STRENGTHS:

Notes

Areas of Strength and Growth ƒƒ An expanded Adult Independent Study (AIS) program has developed a strong relationship with school counselors and concurrent students at North Hollywood, Polytechnic and Sun Valley High Schools. ƒƒ An Orientation Assembly is presented to all students at the Polytechnic, North Hollywood and Whipple campuses. A PowerPoint presentation outlines pertinent information about school programs, policies and procedures. ƒƒ All ESL and Academic students are provided with the “Steps to Success” handout, which includes FAQs and a mini-orientation to the academic programs at NHPCAS. ƒƒ Tracking of students who transition out of ESL is accomplished through TABE records. All students in the highest level of ESL are given the TABE test at the end of the semester. Scores on the TABE are used to determine whether the student progresses to ABE or the High School Diploma program. ƒƒ An additional campus at Sun Valley High School has been added. We now have four main campuses: Whipple, North Hollywood, Polytechnic and Sun Valley. ƒƒ CTE course offerings have expanded to include: Pro 7 (Apple Certification) Digital Imaging 1/2 (Photoshop, Illustrator, & In Design) Emergency Medical Technician Medical Assistant Program Computer Operations 1/2/3/4/5 Screenwriting Performing Artist As demographics in our North Hollywood and surrounding areas change, we study our student population to continue to offer courses that are relevant to their needs. ƒƒ Teachers are using a variety of assessment tools. An example: the TABE Test is primarily used as a placement test to match the learner with his/her level of instruction. ƒƒ The EBRI Reading Method has been implemented at all campuses, offering a new approach to teaching literacy. ƒƒ Teaching professionals are able to use email to communicate with one another regarding policy, lesson planning, meetings, and feedback. This has resulted in greater dialogue and connectivity. We maintain effective communication regarding student progress and its documentation. ƒƒ Teacher advisors at NHPCAS have compiled the “Finger-Tip Resource Guide”. The guide is a directory to the local community services that are most requested by our students.

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Notes

Growth Areas: ƒƒ As technology (the Internet, Smart Phones, Computers) expands, we need to stay current, examining how we can best use these technologies in our classrooms, as well as in recruiting new students, and managing and storing files and documents. ƒƒ Although teacher advisors give students information on financial aid for higher education on an informal basis, a future goal is to compile a list of financial aid resources for students. ƒƒ At last year’s graduation meetings, representatives from local community colleges were invited to speak. Students found this very informative. Relationships with community college counselors should be pursued and maintained, making the transition from adult school to community college easier for our students. ƒƒ As counselors help students prepare for their career goals, it would be extremely beneficial to develop workshops on resume writing and interviewing skills. ƒƒ According to our student questionnaire results, a majority of students rated the counseling staff favorably. About 33% of students marked ‘Not Applicable’ when asked about the counseling staff. With that in mind, we need to raise the profile of the counseling department at each campus. As the counseling staff becomes more visible, students will be able to identify the staff and know what services we offer.

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Written policies and procedures connected to student transcripts ƒƒ Student personnel records, including admission and scholastic records ƒƒ Placement information and follow-up data and studies regarding the transition of students from ESL to ABE, ABE to ASE and from school programs to places of employment ƒƒ Resources used by counselors and staff to refer students to community services (Rainbow Guide, Fingertip Resource Guide, 211) ƒƒ Professional development opportunities for support staff in charge of student services ƒƒ Hard copy of Powerpoint presentation given at Student Orientation Assemblies ƒƒ Photos of school events that provide a forum for student successes, participation and awareness: International Day, Spelling Bee, Pumpkin Pie Celebration, Chinese New Year.

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Notes

Criterion 8: Resource Management Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and services. The distribution of resources supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and services. The institution plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of financial resources provides a reasonable expectation of both shortterm and long-term financial solvency.

8.1

The institution has sufficient resources to offer its current educational courses and programs. ƒƒ Has the school stayed within budget for the past three years? NHPCAS has stayed within its budget by organizing and implementing a plan to utilize instructional hours used for teachers’ salaries, support staff (such as Student Aides), and all expendable monies in order to not exceed the allotted budget despite decreasing funds. NHPCAS receives an annual school profile consisting of an allotment of: teacher hours from the general fund, categorical program budgets (CBET, WIA and Perkins) and IMA (Instructional Materials Account). Select positions that are also included as part of our school budget profile are paid for at the Division level. These positions are most classified staff, administrators, financial manager, SIS Coordinator, WIA Advisor, and WIA Office Technician. We receive this preliminary school budget profile from DACE mid-spring for the upcoming school year. Based on our school budget profile, the administration projects how these funds will be best put to use for the entire following school year. Several factors that administrators must take into consideration are Division recommendations, community needs, the four core programs, tenured teacher hours, the best use of limited categorical funds, program support staff, conversion of general funds to specialized programs, maintenance of equipment, and the projection of supplies and materials needed. Through consistent monitoring of this strategic plan, the administration continues throughout the school year as adjustments occur and has been able to stay within budget every year. In order to successfully stay within the yearly budget the school recognizes the needs of the community and reorganizes its courses and staff to meet those needs. The number of branch locations and courses offered were decreased to a minimum with a new campus opened to compensate for closed sites while meeting adjoining communities’ needs.

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Notes

ƒƒ What evidence is there that the institution has sufficient revenues to support educational improvement? We receive an annual school budget profile which provides the school with funding from various revenue sources including the General Adult Education fund, based on the student performance outcomes and benchmarks, and Categorical funding, such as Workforce Investment Act (WIA), WIA Supplemental, Community Based English Tutoring (CBET), and Carl Perkins. Categorical funds supplement existing programs to provide teaching hours, additional support staff, equipment, computers, printers, instructional materials and other expenditures for specific programs, such as ESL, ABE/ASE, and CTE. In addition, Perkins grants are available to all schools to improve current CTE programs or establish new CTE courses. Each school year, NHPCAS has benefited from Perkins grants to update software, purchase new computers and technology, and acquire textbooks, industry-specific equipment and CTE-specific furniture (i.e., computer workstations). A new computer lab was created at the Sun Valley Campus through the use of Perkins grant funding, for example. In the school years 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, NHPCAS submitted school improvement plans to the Division for additional funds to be used for expansion of the Whipple Campus to evenings and Saturdays, and the opening of the Sun Valley Campus as a fourth main site. The Division matched these funds in subsequent years in order to continue these additions to our programs. To support these new programs, we also allocated funding to offer child care at the Whipple Campus in the evenings and on Saturdays, and also at the Sun Valley Campus in the morning and evenings.

Students enjoy a break at our Saturday program.

ƒƒ How does the institution review its mission and goals as part of the annual fiscal planning process? Our mission statement and SLOs were designed and approved by the Leadership Team while keeping in mind the needs of our community. The school’s mission is to provide “comprehensive programs that support our diverse student population in developing the skills, knowledge, and confidence necessary to meet their educational and career goals.” The Division has mandated that all adult schools focus their funds on the four core programs. In response to the mandate and in alignment with desired student outcomes, we have directed our funds to primarily support these core programs, while simultaneously meeting our mission, SLOs and students’ needs.

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The institution operates with financial integrity and transparency and has a management system in place with appropriate control mechanisms to ensure sound financial practices are followed.

Notes

8.2

ƒƒ To what extent are clear financial operating procedures in place with appropriate checks and balances? Beginning at the Division level, the departments of Accounting and Fiscal Services work with administrators to ensure that school funds are appropriately used. In addition, Fiscal Services informs administrators when a budget adjustment is required to pay for new positions, open new classes, and purchase materials. This is an important part of the checks-and-balances piece because it is not uncommon for Fiscal Services to show differing total balances in a school’s various accounts. Moreover, internal audits of student body funds are conducted to ensure compliance with Student Body fund policies. Schools are also randomly selected to participate in other audits related to the use of categorical funds. Schools must maintain current and accurate records of expenditures and equipment inventory at all times to verify to auditors that funds were used appropriately and equipment in being used in the corresponding programs. The school’s Financial Manager has set operating procedures which are periodically audited by her supervisor which include balancing all monies in and out. One factor that the Financial Manager does not work with is the use of monies for salaries. NHPCAS has implemented a procedure for the ordering and receiving of materials purchased. All requisitions must receive the approval of the principal before being ordered. Once signed by the principal, requisitions go to the Financial Manager who submits orders. All deliveries are received by the Whipple Campus Plant Manager who checks them against the requisitions for accuracy. Deliveries are then transported to the Financial Manager’s office at the Poly Campus. Packing slips and invoices verify the contents of items delivered. Once verified, the Financial Manager distributes the items to their respective destinations. The Financial Manager then reconciles purchases and forwards payment to vendors. ƒƒ What do the annual audit statements reveal about the integrity of the institution’s financial management? The Division works with the Financial Manager to monitor and maintain the school’s financial accounts and expenditures. The sharing of financial information among school and Division entities maintains a transparency of process and alignment with District and Division guidelines. The Financial Manager keeps the principal informed of account balances to make sure there are available funds for all purchases. Monthly financial statements are reviewed and approved by the principal prior to submission to Central Office.

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Notes

DACE Fiscal Services performs audits of the accounting books, expenditures, supply requisitions, Purchase Orders, cash register receipts and deposits to ensure the school follows guidelines and procedures set by the District. The audits are done yearly, but can be performed at any time during the school year, if deemed necessary or requested. The Financial Manager maintains records of all sales, purchases, checks and deposits. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution regularly review financial policies and practices and adjust to changing needs and conditions? At every Principals’ meeting, the principal receives a monthly statement called the Effectiveness Report containing the current balance of salary funds and a projected balance by the end of the school year. The report is used to assist administrators with analyzing their current salary budget to date. If the report indicates a negative balance by the end of the year, it is the responsibility of the administrators to make subsequent reductions; if the report indicates an overage, administrators are strongly encouraged to use these funds to increase course offerings. In addition, funds from programs such as Beyond the Bell and School Readiness Language Development Program (SRLDP) are monies that are monitored by other departments at the Division level which have allocated to provide specific programs to the community. Our Instructional Materials Accounts (IMA) are regularly monitored by the principal and the financial manager. NHPCAS has recurring, static expenditures which must be met on a yearly basis. These include maintenance agreements for all copy machines, copy paper orders for the entire year, and office supplies. Use of the remaining balances must be planned wisely. The principal must ensure that IMA accounts for all programs are available to last throughout the entire school year. It is, therefore, important to monitor them closely to avoid overspending before the school year ends. Conversely, the principal must spend all monies in all accounts by the end of the school year to avoid losing any positive balances. This is one reason why requisitions must be approved by the principal prior to submission to vendors: to make sure funds are available and to prevent draining the limited funds received by the school. ƒƒ How does the institution report regularly to all stakeholders with financial updates and decisions? NHPCAS hosts a Back-to-School Meeting at the beginning of the school year for the entire staff where we provide a budget update, how classes and programs have been changed and how it affects staff and schedules for the upcoming school year. Staff members are updated with new benchmarks goals, and how the benchmarks as well as course offerings in certain categorical programs are a vital part of producing income for the school. If there are Division-wide budget decisions, the school holds special meetings to inform staff of major changes affecting employees school-wide and District-wide.

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Notes

In the spring, NHPCAS receives its new school budget profile for the following year. If there is a significant decrease in budget allotment, administration holds meetings at each campus to inform and update staff of the budget shortfalls, issues affecting our financial status and its potential impact on the school, students, and staff members. NHPCAS hosts School Advisory Council meetings to update community stakeholders on school issues, including current financial status of the school and the Division. For example, in January 2012, community partners were informed of the critical cuts to District programs and the proposed elimination of adult education. Our partners responded in support by offering to write letters and contact local politicians. ƒƒ To what extent is there sufficient cash flow to maintain school programs? NHPCAS receives its annual school budget profile in March for the next school year. The administrative team plans and prioritizes which classes and programs will be offered to predict spending in order to stay within budget. The school has set forth limits to spending their IMA, and other categorical funding (WIA, CBET, etc.) by utilizing the guidelines and procedures the DACE gives to administrators. The school looks at the monthly ADA Report, the Effectiveness Report, and reviews all IMA and other accounts. Adjustments are made to best utilize the budget by expanding or reducing classes and programs, and readjust the monthly budget plan for expenditures. The principal receives an allotted amount for the school to be spent on teacher hours, other salaries, instructional materials and equipment. The above-mentioned reports aid the administrative team in making important financial decisions in a timely manner before the school year ends. ƒƒ To what extent are there sufficient reserves in place to respond to emergencies and budget shortfalls? The DACE Fiscal Services department is available to assist the principal with guidelines, policies, budget updates in an effort to support each school with management and regularly monitoring the school’s budget. At the school level, there are no reserves for use in times of budget shortfalls; therefore, it is important that each school monitors its annual budgets carefully. However, should a DACE school need an additional allowance of teacher hours or for emergency’s sake, the school may submit a Budget Augmentation Request. This form is reviewed by DACE Fiscal Services and our Division supervisors for approval. Principals are instructed to return unused salary funds (1040/1402) to Division Fiscal Services as soon as early winter, when projections show monies will unlikely be encumbered, in order that other schools in need of additional salary funds may request a transfer be made to their individual school accounts.

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Notes

ƒƒ To what extent does the institution have sufficient insurance? The Division works with the Principal of each school to ensure that all District guidelines and polices are adhered to for the purpose of providing a safe learning environment for all students and staff. Moreover, the District has a Risk Management and Insurance Services department which ensures that school assets are protected. In addition, the school must complete Branch Site Permits to conduct classes offsite at public and non-public branch sites. Every year a new permit is required for each branch site. These permits are signed by both branch site and school administrators, and are then forwarded to DACE Facilities who approves the locations. Once approved, students and the school are covered by District insurance. NHPCAS also works with the office of The Integrated Disability Management Branch (IDM) which is responsible for employee absence, disability management, and industrial injury-related functions in the District. IDM is composed of two sections: Disability Management and Workers' Compensation. Each section plays a unique role in promoting the return of injured, ill, or disabled employees to gainful employment. ƒƒ How does the institution oversee financial aid, grants, externally funded programs, contractual relationships, auxiliary organizations, and institutional investments and assets? The Division does not have any programs in place to offer financial aid or student grants. Courses are kept low cost in an effort to provide educational opportunities to all students interested in getting their GED, high school diploma, or participation in job training classes. In addition, registration or class fees may be waived for students who qualify, such as concurrent students, LAUSD employees, seniors 62 and older, etc. While the Division provides the majority of funding through the General Fund, NHPCAS is allocated categorical funds such as CBET, WIA, and Perkins to provide for salaries, instructional material and equipment in these programs. Perkins funds are also available to each school to support their CTE programs in the form of industry required equipment, upgrades to equipment or software, and textbooks. Through a process of application, a school may receive these additional Perkins funds for CTE programs in place, or to expand its CTE program. All categorical funds are overseen by the principal ensuring that they are used solely for the support of their respective programs. The Financial Manager works with the Division’s Fiscal Services department to monitor expenditures and follow all state and federal guidelines. Externally-funded programs such as School Readiness Language Development Program (SRLDP), Beyond the Bell, and Abriendo Puertas are overseen and facilitated by the adult Division. NHPCAS has supported these programs by providing trained and qualified instructors for classes offered within our community.

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NHPCAS has been a consistent member of the Sun Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Universal City/North Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. The Division provides each school with a funding line to pay for yearly memberships in local chambers of commerce or Rotary Clubs.


Notes

Site administrators follow guidelines that the Division has set in place for contractual relationships with community agencies or facilities. Such partnerships require a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) created by the Division, and signed by the Division and agency when both are in agreement as to the terms and conditions of the agreement. NHPCAS has MOUs in place with Providence St. Joseph Hospital and Schaefer Ambulance to provide internships for students in the EMT program. Additional MOUs exist with the Youth Opportunity Movement (YOM) and Youth Policy Institute (YPI) to allow students from their programs to attend classes at our school in the Health Information Technology program with all fees and textbooks paid by the agency. The Division requires that all purchased items valued at five hundred dollars or more be recorded on the Division’s inventory control form provided to all schools. Inventory control requires listing these items with their specific location, item type and model, serial number, and funding source. It is the responsibility of the principal to oversee inventory control. At the end of each school year, the principal must sign an affidavit that all inventory in accounted for, and submit this signed form to the Division. To control the use of equipment within the school, NHPCAS maintains a sign-out procedure at each campus. A binder for this purpose is kept on file with all sign out forms included to assist in inventory control for all equipment and textbooks. This provides each site with an easy way to track missing items, or determine who has last checked out equipment or textbooks.

8.3

Institutional planning reflects a realistic assessment of current financial resources and looks forward in long-range strategic planning. ƒƒ To what extent does the governing body and administration receive regular reports on the financial condition of the institution? As stated previously, the principal receives a monthly statement called the Effectiveness Report containing the current balance of salary funds and a projected balance by the end of the school year. The report is used to assist administrators with analyzing their current salary budget to date. If the report indicates a negative balance by the end of the year, it is the responsibility of the administrators to make subsequent reductions; if the report indicates an overage, administrators are strongly encouraged to use these funds to increase course offerings. The principal and the financial manager regularly examine our Instructional Material Accounts (IMA). NHPCAS has several recurring expenditures which must be met on a yearly basis, and reserves the remainder for ongoing expenses throughout the year.

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Notes

The school follows guidelines from the Student Body Financial Policies Handbook, a District-wide policy and procedures manual, to maintain the financial condition of the school. Every month NHPCAS generates a Month-End closing report which includes financial statements (trial balance sheet), and bank reconciliations (Student Body & Imprest). It is an essential control tool for administrative review and approval of the reconciliation process. Once signed, it is filed in-house. Copies of the quarterly reports are forwarded to the LAUSD Accounts Payable department. A copy of the yearly reports is forwarded to DACE Fiscal Services. ƒƒ How does the governing body and administration connect short-term and longterm financial planning with the schoolwide Action Plan’s identified priorities? NHPCAS receives its school budget profile for the following school year in the early spring. Each adult school’s allocation consists of funds from the General Fund as well as categorical programs. The allocation for categorical funding is based on the previous year’s program completions in CBET, WIA, and CTE, while the General Fund is based on the 2007-2008 school year. Because of the current state financial crisis and because the Adult Division has been placed in Tier three flexibility, the District has used the General Funds allocated to DACE to assist them with the budget deficit in K-12. As a result, the DACE cannot guarantee that allocations to adult schools will be the same from year to year. In fact, allocations from the General Fund have decreased significantly on a yearly basis since the 2009-2010 school year. This also affects the yearly categorical fund allocation, since with a reduced budget, classes must be reduced in all programs. With reduced programs, all allocations in successive school years are reduced as well. It is, therefore, difficult for any school in the DACE to make long-term plans at this time, especially those that rely on guaranteed funding from year to year. It was with this in mind, that the Leadership Team selected its four Growth Areas to be the basis of the Action Plan. The priorities selected do not rely on guaranteed funding from year to year, but are goals that can be accomplished with a limited regard to funding. These additional key points were also kept in mind by the Leadership Team: ƒƒ Could be accomplished at the school level ƒƒ Were self-sustaining ƒƒ Addressed one of the four core curricular areas: ESL, ABE, ASE, or CTE ƒƒ Improved student learning and were related to SLOs ƒƒ Were not dependent upon current specific administration or staff ƒƒ Did not require additional funding or were feasible within current budget constraints

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Notes

ƒƒ To what extent are institutional funds currently being used judiciously so that the facilities and support materials are sufficient for all the programs and courses offered? After each school in the DACE receives its School Budget Profile, a Budget Planning Worksheet (BPW) must be completed with all funding sources expended for the following school year. NHPCAS adheres to all state and federal guidelines related to the use of funds allotted to the school by the DACE. The General Fund (1040) may be used to provide teacher hours in all programs, while categorical funds are limited to the specific programs they serve. Any unused funds may be placed in that program’s Instructional Materials Account (IMA) to provide support funds for materials and supplies. Although certificated staff on the whole show satisfaction with the instructional resource support in relation to textbooks and materials (75%, excellent or good) and technology resources (69%, excellent or good), there is some discontent due to drastic budget constraints beyond the school’s control that have curbed purchasing during the last two years. The emphasis has changed from “want” to “need”, as in any dry financial spell. However, with careful and targeted planning, there is no lack of necessary instructional resources for our school’s classrooms. In addition, if extra 1040 funds are available, they may be converted to Distance Learning funds (2036) to provide teacher hours and support materials for this program, which provides students with another learning format, and assists the school in earning additional ADA. Currently, NHPCAS provides nearly all instructors teaching ESL classes with Distance Learning assignments to augment their regular ESL assignment. The BPW is submitted to DACE Fiscal Services in early spring for review by Central Office. Early planning provides Fiscal Services with the time needed to review each school’s budget and program offerings, to ensure that all guidelines and policies are followed, to guarantee that sufficient funds are in place to support the planned class offerings, and to distribute funds to each school’s accounts prior to the start of the new school year. Once approved, the school may then distribute offers of teaching assignments to the faculty. After this point, any changes to the budget throughout the next year must be submitted to DACE Fiscal Services through a Budget Adjustment Request (BAR) for approval. By working closely with DACE Fiscal Services, a check and balance system is in place at all times to ensure funds are available when needed.

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Notes

ƒƒ To what extents does the institution have plans for payments of long-term liabilities and obligations, including debt, health benefits, insurance costs, building maintenance costs, etc.? Under the umbrella of LAUSD, various departments exist such as Health and Benefits, Facilities Maintenance, and Real Estate, which provide services to the DACE, schools and employees. For example, qualified employees receive assistance and support from the Benefits Administration to cover medical and retirement programs. Through the Division of Risk Management, LAUSD provides liability insurance for its facilities that promotes a safe, healthy, and secure learning environment. At the Division level, the school is supported by Fiscal Services to ensure that each school has available funds to cover financial obligations for employee benefits, site expenditures, service contracts and other purchases made at the school site. Expenses for Alterations and Improvements for existing and new facilities are supported by the Facilities department of the Division to promote safe and secure learning environments. At the school level, large expenses are paid using a Purchase Order, once the financial manager verifies funds are available using the accounting programs Integrated Financial Services (IFS) and the Financial Reporting Data Base (FRDB). Funds are then encumbered to cover professional services, copier contracts, supplies, and other instructional materials. The site administrator approves the purchase order, and the financial manager forwards the paperwork to Fiscal Services for processing. The school also uses a Procurement card (P-card) to make smaller purchases from the District warehouse or outside vendors. All purchases are reconciled on a weekly basis by the cardholder and on a monthly basis by the principal. Supply requisitions are approved by the principal first before purchases can be made.

8.4

The institution provides facilities that are clean, safe, and wellmaintained in order to provide for an effective learning environment. ƒƒ To what extent does the institution annually review needs for improved or additional facilities with a focus on student learning? The school works with Office of Environmental Health and Safety (OEHS) which inspects the school once a year for asbestos, cleanliness, tripping hazards, and requires safety drills, such as earthquake preparedness exercises. Furthermore, OEHS conducts comprehensive health inspections on a regular basis. The Plant Manager complies with guidelines and policies on a daily basis to ensure that the school is a safe and healthy learning environment. The Plant Manager requests all repairs as needed at each campus.

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ƒƒ Accident Prevention

Notes

The Plant Manager and Building and Grounds staff are trained to comply with all guidelines and safety precautions in the following areas: ƒƒ Chemical Hygiene (CSCs) ƒƒ Emergency Services ƒƒ Environmental Assessment ƒƒ Environmental Compliance ƒƒ Facility Inspections In addition, the Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) is required to be updated annually. It is a plan to promote a safe and healthy school environment. Within its guidelines, any staff member who notices a safety hazard is encouraged to inform administration immediately. All hazardous conditions are reported to the Plant Manager for immediate correction by the Division’s Facilities Services. ƒƒ How is the learning environment enhanced by the facilities or how are the facilities an impediment to the successful completion of SLOs? ƒƒ To what extent do the facilities provide a safe and nurturing learning environment for students that makes them feel welcomed? Administration and staff all do our best to make NHPCAS the best possible environment for student learning to take place. NHPCAS consists of one main campus located at John Francis Polytechnic High school and three additional main sites; North Hollywood Campus, Sun Valley Campus, and the Whipple Campus. Each campus has peace officers that secure the campus during day and evening classes, and parking attendants at two campuses who are also available on site to assist students. Campuses are well lit, handicap accessible, and have secure parking. Classroom teachers provide a welcoming and respectful atmosphere where students feel comfortable. For example, the Individual Instructional Labs are designed to provide students with the most appropriate setting where they may proceed at their own pace, and a teacher is available for support. In regards to CTE classes, we have opened and updated our computer labs with state-of-the art equipment and software at each campus. Another unique feature of NHPCAS is that our computer classes are forums, covering beginning to advanced levels. This allows students the opportunity to learn a new skill or strengthen one that aids them in their current employment. Also, the Whipple Campus offers an Apple Certification through the Graphic Design class, complete with photo and video editing software, and an Emergency Medical Technician program with the latest medical equipment for student ESL classes are enhanced with Distance learning. Learning videos, providing students with another mode of learning.

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Notes

Custodial staff maintain safe and clean facilities. All campuses are clean, repaired and maintained to ensure a safe environment for students and staff. Administration have continually improved the condition and appearance of main offices and grounds by refurbishing all main offices, beautifying landscaping, upgrading lighting, paint and outside attached walkways, to name a few. At the Whipple Campus, the DACE Facilities department installed new A/C and heating units, decks and stairways were rebuilt for safety, and restrooms were retrofitted with improved ecological features. The campus classrooms were updated with new whiteboards, overhead projectors, bulletin boards, computers and printers. Beautification programs have taken place at the Whipple and Sun Valley Campuses to improve the environment and landscape through the planting of trees and flowers. Not only do these efforts create a better learning environment, but they also promote a stronger bond between community, students, and staff. NHPCAS has most recently partnered with Tree People, an organization supported by the LAUSD, at its Sun Valley Campus. Through grants, Tree People are able to assists schools with “greening” their campuses. Students learn about gardens and trees through a series of workshops conducted by Tree People. These student “Green Teams” then assist with caring for the trees provided by Tree People, after a campus planting project. The Sun Valley Campus now has a community garden, a fruit orchard, and many A welcoming campus environment. new flowering trees. According to the Student Questionnaire, an overwhelming 97% of students responded that they consider their class a welcoming and comfortable environment. In addition, when students were asked to rate the school facilities in terms of cleanliness, safety, maintenance, and overall environment for learning, the majority gave As and Bs as their answers to the following categories: campus (94%), classrooms (92%), cleanliness (90%), lighting (91%), security (91%), parking (85%), restrooms (85%), handicap access (90%), and catering truck (72%). The Classified Staff Questionnaire results back the students’ opinions. All classified personnel rate the school’s safety as either excellent (61%) or good (39%), while they are split equally between excellent and good regarding the school’s cleanliness. Certificated employees agreed with both students and classified staff. The Certificated Staff Questionnaire outcome showed that the majority appraised the school as excellent or good in regard to classrooms (89%), restrooms (80%), and general appearance (89%).

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STRENGTHS:

Notes

Areas of Strength and Growth ƒƒ Despite year-to-year budget cuts, the administrative team is able to maintain strong programs at each campus, making the best use of all available funds. ƒƒ Due of RIFs (Reductions in Force), NHPCAS lost its full-time financial manager in school years 2010-2011and 2011-2012 over a period of months each year. In the face of this, NHPCAS was still able to function well with the limited support of a financial manager in a 10-hour per week position. ƒƒ Through the judicious use of the Instructional Material Accounts, faculty continue to receive the materials they need to support their instructional efforts, and office staff are never without essential operating supplies. ƒƒ A dedicated adult school Plant Manager to oversee and maintain safety and cleanliness of the Whipple Campus. ƒƒ Security personnel are provided at all campuses. ƒƒ NHPCAS designates a set amount of financial resources to provide for school promotion within the communities we serve.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Copies of the Requisition orders need to be forwarded to the authorized person who receives new merchandise on a regular basis.

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Notes

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Copy of the institution’s current year budget. ƒƒ Financial management policies and procedures, including routine purchasing policies/procedures and guidelines and policies for use of categorical funds (WIA, CBET, Perkins). ƒƒ Copy of Time Performance Index (Effectiveness Report) ƒƒ Samples of Equipment and Textbook sign-out records ƒƒ Copy of the year-end closing audit by DACE. ƒƒ A copy of system and forms used in reporting accidents – reference online system accessible by principal and designees only (BUL 54061.0) at ISTAR https:// sopsincidents.lausd.net/ ƒƒ Reports of OEHS safety inspections. ƒƒ Risk Management & Insurance Services website http://notebook.lausd.net/portal/ page?_pageid=33,141580&_dad=ptl&_schema=PTL_EP ƒƒ School Safety Plans – v.1, 2, 3 ƒƒ IIPP (Injury and Illness Prevention Program) ƒƒ Earthquake and other natural disaster preparedness and evacuation plans. ƒƒ Each main campus’ Emergency Operations Chart ƒƒ Student Questionnaire Results – Question 43 & 44 ƒƒ Certificated Questionnaire Results – Questions 27- 29 & 33 – 35 ƒƒ Classified Questionnaire Results – Questions 8 & 9

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Notes

Criterion 9: Community Connection The institution seeks to enhance its educational effectiveness by developing close partnerships and relationships with community members. Connections within the community provide students with expanded learning experiences, including additional educational or vocational opportunities.

9.1

Efforts are made by the institution to connect to community leaders, businesses, and organizations that can enhance the learning opportunities for students.

ƒƒ What connections with local businesses and organizations are currently in place? We have established branch locations within our four main campus service areas at elementary, middle, and high schools. Of the four high schools located within a three mile radius, we have established main campuses on three of them and offer classes at the fourth. They include Polytechnic High School, North Hollywood High School, Sun Valley High School, and East Valley High School respectively. The number of branches has fluctuated from over 20 to 12, to 3 in the past three years due to budget cuts, restored funding, and back to budget cuts. At this time, we offer classes at five branch campuses (one church, three elementary schools, and one high school). We have established partnerships and have a good rapport with schools, businesses, community-based organizations, senior citizen centers, parks, and residential care facilities. In regards to the local K-12 schools, we are an intrinsic part of K-12 schools programs. We have collaborated with school administrators to provide ESL, Parenting, Academic and CTE classes to serve community members and high school students in order to supplement academic requirements as well as provide parents with adult school program educational opportunities. These educational opportunities translate into the academic success of parents and their school-age children. For example, parents take ESL classes to enable them to better communicate with their children and their children’s schools. High School students are able to obtain additional credits to remain on track for graduation. In addition, community members may enroll for job skill training to make them more employable in today’s economy.

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Notes

To maintain a connection to our community for the benefit of our students, we are members of two local Chambers of Commerce and regularly attend community events such as community fairs, job fairs, parent meetings, and LAPD Night Out, to name a few. Moreover, we promote our programs to local businesses which include the UniversalSheraton, L.A. City Worksource Centers, and L.A. City Fire and Police Departments. We have also partnered with industries directly related to the career training classes we offer. The Division’s Industry Sector classes in Health, Science, and Medical Technology include six courses that have recently offered as career training opportunities. The Health Information Technician (HIT) sequence of five classes is offered in partnership with the Youth Opportunity Movement and the Youth Policy Institute. The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) is one of only two offered in the entire Division. This course is dependent on our partnerships with Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center and Schafer Ambulance Services that provide our students with internships and the use of state-of-the-art equipment. In the past, NHPCAS has held classes at more than 25 older adult facilities as well as community centers and elementary/middle schools. However, due to budget constraints and prioritization of programs and funding, NHPCAS has had to limit classes offered at such community branch locations. Nonetheless, our school maintains positive relations and communications with as many organizations as possible by way of including them as part of our School Advisory Committee ƒƒ To what extent do community leaders come on campus for events and activities? NHPCAS holds several events throughout the year to which community leaders are invited and welcomed onto our campuses. Most notably these include our School Advisory Committee meetings, International Day Celebration, School Safety meetings, and graduation ceremony. Our annual graduation ceremony also attracts guests from our District, Division Central Office and from the local political arena: LAUSD school board members, city assembly members and council members. In addition, local community college representatives are invited to present at student high school graduation meetings held during the year.

Community leaders are invited to every graduation.

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The institution has outlets for students in community service or internship opportunities that are connected to student programs that will enhance their learning experiences in line with the institution’s mission.

Notes

9.2

ƒƒ What service or internship opportunities are currently in place for students? NHPCAS has been able to take advantage of our Division-owned Whipple Campus facility to expand our Career Technical Education (CTE) programs that match growth industries in our surrounding communities. Our Health, Science, and Medical Technology Industry Sector Program includes five Health Information Technology (HIT) sequenced courses. Information (Computer) Technology Industry and Performing Arts Industry (Sectors) are common occupations in the surrounding Whipple Campus. The local communities include the North Hollywood Arts District, Universal City, Studio City, and Burbank/Glendale communities. Industry includes hospitals and Medical Centers, Universal Studios, and the local business corridors, such as the Ventura Boulevard business District and large corporate development. These communities are located within a five-mile radius. Therefore, the Whipple Campus has been able to expand its schedule and course offerings with new classes based on community needs. Our Performing Artist Program is offered at the Studio City Stages. This studio offers our NHPCAS students an industry-equipped studio to practice their acting skills. In addition to offering the acting class, our Performing Artist instructor has collaborated with the Screenwriting instructor to develop scripts for acting students to perform. Taking it a step further, ESL students are offered an opportunity through enrollment in an “ESL Theater” at Studio City Stages. This version of the Performing Artist course is designed to assist English language learners to develop their acting skills while performing in a theater setting. Classes, such as our Graphic Arts/Digital Imaging classes, consist of students currently working or seeking employment in the entertainment industry. Students in these classes develop skills in movie-making such as video editing, photo enhancement, and visual computer graphics. The Whipple Campus Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program includes a mandatory internship requirement for Los Angeles County Certification. NHPCAS has partnered with Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank and Schaefer Ambulance Services in Los Angeles in order for our EMT students to satisfy this mandatory requirement. The two entities are stellar programs that operate within close proximity to our Whipple Campus and have excellent reputations for serving our students. North Hollywood-Polytechnic CAS and North Valley Occupational Center have partnered in support of each other’s EMT programs as the only Division schools (33) that are certified to EMT students benefit from internships offer EMT Programs within the District. in preparation for certification.

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Notes

NHPCAS has partnered with Los Angeles City, Youth Opportunity Movement (YOM) Agency to provide Health Information Technology classes for young adult students/ parents. Classes are offered at the L. A. City YOM facility at which students have an opportunity to enroll in any of the five HIT courses. This partnership allows our students to participate in another Internship Program. ƒƒ What evidence can be provided to indicate the reputation of the institution in the community? North Hollywood-Polytechnic CAS has established itself with collaborations, partnerships, recruitment, and community outreach; providing those services with integrity, resolve, and commitment. Because of its reputation within the surrounding communities that encompass a three-mile radius with four high schools and the feeder middle and elementary schools, NHPCAS has been able to establish stellar programs. NHPCAS has gained the trust of these schools and been thusly rewarded with actual campuses, offices, and classrooms with which to supply adult school classes. Since NHPCAS’s last WASC Midterm Review, the school has acquired a fourth main campus (transferred from Sun Valley High School to NHPCAS), implemented extended ESL Distant Learning Programs to supplement the budget cuts of ESL branch sites, established new partnerships with newly-constructed elementary schools, obtained administrative grants to expand our campuses and programs, and collaborated with Division schools to ensure that the programs we offer serve our students and community. Our school has been featured in community publications such as The Daily News, Who’s Who in Business, UCNH Chamber of Commerce Directory, Bally’s community services videos to name a few. We are often included on the agendas of Parent Center meetings throughout our communities. We are one of the few Division schools to be offered funding for Parent Education classes through Beyond the Bell and Abriendo Puertas. NHPCAS has been a continuous presence in the east San Fernando Valley community since 1939. Our reputation for providing excellent educational opportunities and services to our neighbors has been cemented into the fabric of our community. In relation to our reputation, our Student Questionnaire provided us with the following information: ƒƒ “Is the class meeting your expectations?” 93% stated “Yes.” ƒƒ “Would you recommend this school to other people?” 97% said “Yes.” ƒƒ 53% heard about our school from another person, a word-of-mouth recommendation. ƒƒ In reviewing the zip codes of our student population, we serve students from at least 22 different zip codes, representing areas as far away as Lancaster, Tujunga, Van Nuys, Panorama City, Burbank, and Los Angeles. ƒƒ Students rated as excellent to good: teacher expertise at 95%, high-level instruction at 90%, different approaches and a variety of activities at 88%.

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Throughout the year, NHPCAS participates in community service projects with a variety of local community agencies. These community service projects include those Valley wide events in collaboration with other Valley Adult Schools and community services within our own school boundaries. A list of community service projects in which we regularly participate include:

Notes

ƒƒ What efforts have been made to connect the school with its community through service projects?

ƒƒ Whipple Campus Beautification ƒƒ Sun Valley Greening Initiative, sponsored by the Tree People ƒƒ L.A.P.D. Nights ƒƒ Hire-a-Vet Job Fair ƒƒ Community Job Fairs (NVOC) ƒƒ Member of the Sun Valley Chamber of Commerce ƒƒ Member of the Universal City/North Hollywood Chamber of Commerce ƒƒ Member of Valley Economic Alliance ƒƒ Connected with Family Village Services (Annual Food and Toy Drives) ƒƒ Blood Drives (American Red Cross and USC Medical Center)

Staff donates blood at the Annual Blood Drive.

Flu shots are provided to NHPCAS students and staff annually.

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Notes

9.3

The institution informs its community regarding its mission, its programs and learning opportunities, recognizing the benefits that community support can bring.

ƒƒ How does the school use its profile (Chapter I of the Self-Study Report) to understand and connect to its community? In the process of compiling data to update our Chapter 1 - School Profile, we learned that our community changed negligibly in the last decade in terms of population, ethnic background and socioeconomic factors. The socioeconomic factors indicate that a high percentage of the households in the North Hollywood area earn less than $40,000 per year and have less than a high school education. The programs and courses we offer continue to be those of highest need in our communities. These include ESL, basic reading and math, and high school/GED courses. We also offer short-term career training courses to address unemployment issues and provide opportunities to upgrade skills. The area surrounding our Whipple Campus had previously not benefited from a local public institution that offered low-cost career training. Due to the increased need in the community and supported by Division’s focus on providing low-cost career training, NHPCAS moved forward in its goal to create such a center on our Whipple Campus in the evenings and on Saturdays. Similarly, the Sun Valley Campus was opened in Spring 2011 to serve like needs in the eastern Sun Valley community. This area within our school boundaries was isolated from our nearby Polytechnic Campus by freeways and undeveloped land parcels, as ascertained by our community survey in the fall of 2010. The Sun Valley Campus provides ease of access to adult programs, meeting the needs of a community previously unserved. ƒƒ How have students been successful in the community after leaving the school? Because of the transient nature of our student population, we do not have access to this information. There are not any formal procedures in place to track students once they have left our system. Unlike Occupational and Skills Centers, we do not offer job placement services and the Division does not currently have a system in place for follow-up. However, referring to our own 2010-2011 data, 266 CTE students completed their courses last year, making them job-ready. For the school year 2010-2011, we served 711 concurrent students whom we have assisted in their quest to graduate from their respective high schools.

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LEARNER RESULTS

ESL

ABE

ASE

Notes

Adult schools can only derive limited information from the CASAS Update Record (ESL, ABE, ASE). Based on an analysis of the 2010-2011 CASAS Record Summary Report by program, we have been able to ascertain the following information pertaining to students in attendance during last school year: All Programs

WORK Got a job

11%

10%

10%

11%

Retained job

28%

30%

8%

27%

Acquired workforce readiness skills

15%

4%

1%

13%

Other work related

27%

12%

25%

27%

Passed GED

N/A

.5% = 1 S

11%

7% (ABE/ASE)

Earned high school diploma

N/A

N/A

.44 % = 10 S

1% = 2 S

.34% = 1 S

.5%

Increased involvement in community activities

27%

28%

11%

26%

Other community related results

31%

15%

33%

31%

70%

61%

72%

71%

EDUCATION

Entered college

9% 9% (ASE only)

COMMUNITY

PERSONAL/FAMILY Met personal goal

ƒƒ What programs or processes are in place to connect the school to its community? NHPCAS has developed a variety of means to remain connected to the community and establish new partnerships throughout the school year. These include: ƒƒ A Community Outreach Representative to market and promote our programs throughout the communities we serve. ƒƒ An extensive and maintained website to communicate our schedules, programs, and school events ƒƒ Partnerships with community service organizations to participate cooperatively in community blood drives, flu shot clinics, toy drives, and food drives. ƒƒ Offering parenting programs, such as our SRLDP and Parenting classes to connect with parents in the community through classes on K-12 campuses. ƒƒ Use the District’s automated telephone messaging system, ConnectEd, to promote classes, share information and keep the community informed.

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Notes

ƒƒ Distribution of school schedules to community. ƒƒ Memberships in local Chambers of Commerce – Universal City-North Hollywood Chapter and Sun Valley. ƒƒ School Advisory Council meetings to solicit and obtain feedback from our dedicated partner schools, agencies, government entities, and industry businesses and that serve our surrounding communities. ƒƒ Regular participation in community events, such as job fairs and expos.

Students are very generous at NHPCAS' Annual Holiday Food Drive.

Areas of Strength and Growth STRENGTHS: ƒƒ Well-established partnerships that have endured through changes in administration and staff. ƒƒ Creativity in approaches and willingness to attempt new methods in outreach efforts. ƒƒ Flexibility in scheduling and location when meeting the demand for new classes. ƒƒ The scope and variety of community partners to meet an array of school purposes.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Continue to make new community connections that lead to internship partnerships to complement our CTE programs.

List of Evidence: ƒƒ List of local businesses that could potentially be of assistance to the school ƒƒ List of all service opportunities in the last three years ƒƒ Evidence of surveys or other efforts to follow graduates after leaving the school ƒƒ School Advisory Council Member List ƒƒ Community Outreach Materials ƒƒ Chamber of Commerce Directories and events announcements ƒƒ List of partner K-12 schools

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Notes

Criterion 10: Action Plan for Continuing Improvement The institution uses the self-study process to identify key issues that are inserted into a schoolwide Action Plan that governs school improvement activities and events. The schoolwide Action Plan is used regularly, reviewed annually, and monitored consistently by the governing body to ensure continuing school improvement.

10.1

The institution has created an Action Plan that reflects the efforts of all stakeholders to plan for future growth and improvement. ƒƒ To what extent does the Action Plan identify specific goals, timelines for completion, persons responsible, reporting instruments, and benchmarks to measure accomplishment? NHPCAS’ Action Plan is complete in that the four prioritized, specific Growth Areas are listed under four general umbrella categories (Communication, Staff Development, Resources and Student Support Services), and each Growth Area’s plan is broken down into smaller achievable steps that stipulate when, who, and how goals are to be realized. In formulating our Action Plan, the Leadership Team invited all interested staff, student and community members to participate and give input in the process. Therefore, the resultant Action Plan contains elements garnered from all stakeholders. ƒƒ How is the Action Plan reviewed annually and how are revisions made to respond to changing conditions and current student needs? Each year, and during the school year as well, Action Plan items are evaluated to verify that steps are being taken toward their accomplishment. Modifications in the Plan are made to accommodate changes in funding, program focus, community needs and staffing. Once an Action Plan item has been attained, it is duly noted and efforts are concentrated on the remaining key issues and new issues that have presented themselves. For example, once the original block grant funds for technology upgrades had been exhausted and targeted improvements had been made, administration saw the need to modernize outdated equipment, so proceeded with a plan to secure Perkins grant monies for purchase of new equipment for CTE classes.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the Action Plan focus primarily on student learning needs? When prioritizing Growth Area items, Leadership Team members were given a guide to use as a reminder and reference in order to narrow items to those that: ƒƒ Were high priority items ƒƒ Could be accomplished at the school level ƒƒ Were self-sustaining ƒƒ Addressed one of the four core curricular areas: ESL, ABE, ASE, or CTE ƒƒ Improved student learning and were related to SLOs ƒƒ Benefited the school as a whole and the majority of students ƒƒ Had the necessary personnel available to carry it out ƒƒ Were not dependent upon current specific administration or staff ƒƒ Did not require DACE support staff ƒƒ Had not already been addressed or were currently being addressed ƒƒ Did not require additional funding or were feasible within current budget constraints ƒƒ Were not luxury or “wish list” items By referring to the list above, one can conclude that no item would be selected that did not improve student learning, and that did not benefit the school as a whole and the majority of students.

10.2

As a result of the accreditation process, the institution has identified key issues (short-term and long-term) that will impact student learning and increase the achievement levels of students.

ƒƒ How did the self-study process identify the key issues for the school? For the Self-Study Report, narratives had to be written that included Growth Areas in all major components that comprise a well-run educational institution: Mission statement, student learning outcomes, organizational structure, leadership, faculty and staff, curriculum, instruction, assessment, student support services, resource management, and community connection. Each criterion was appraised, data analyzed, discussions ensued, and key issues emerged. Group leaders were instructed on how to guide their group members toward choosing relevant, vital, and attainable goals for their respective criterion’s narrative section.

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Once individual criterion narratives were completed and growth areas identified, a Leadership Team meeting took place where ALL growth area items were considered for inclusion in the Action Plan. A list of these growth areas was distributed (see Appendix – Suggested Growth Areas), indicating from which criterion the item was related. Small groups deliberated on which growth areas warranted being incorporated into the Action Plan. They referred to a handout as a guideline for selection. The top five areas of each group were tallied. The principal answered questions and elucidated the current circumstances for items under debate. After some items had been eliminated from the high priority list, groups narrowed down their selections to their top three. Four of the resulting tally received the highest number of votes and matched all of the guidelines for inclusion. The Leadership Team then voted to approve these four items, and also categorized them under broader headings.

Notes

ƒƒ How have the key issues been prioritized by the institution?

ƒƒ To what extent have all stakeholders met to discuss the Action Plan and give input to its implementation? At the Leadership Team meeting referred to above, Action Plan worksheets were disseminated to each of four groups, and group members were given instructions to compose a draft of the plan for their assigned growth area. They were given a chance to choose what they were most familiar with, so that, for example, our counseling staff naturally selected the item related to raising the profile of the counseling department at each campus. However, anyone interested in addressing an Action Plan item could provide input to the group or be part of that group. Final submissions from group members were reviewed by the administrative team for accuracy and completeness. Minor changes were made resulting in the final product. NHPCAS faculty and staff have all received a copy of the school’s Action Plan. Faculty was directed to inform their students. The Action Plan was shared with students at Student Council meetings. Community members were encouraged to view our improvement plan online via the school website, and will also receive a copy at the next School Advisory Council meeting. Any and all faculty, staff, students and community members are always welcome to offer feedback and suggestions for implementation of the Action Plan, and moreover, to propose further improvements be made above and beyond the Action Plan. NHPCAS has a reputation for readily responding to its students’ needs.

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Notes

10.3

The institution has procedures in place to implement the Action Plan with the support of stakeholders. ƒƒ For each Action Plan key issue, how has the school identified an individual group responsible to implement the needed action steps to address the key issue? After Action Plan worksheet drafts were submitted, administration used the Leadership Team’s versions and fine-tuned the details in sections they were more familiar with and had more experience in, such as delegation of tasks and timelines. Persons responsible were indicated, not by name, but by position, which guaranteed the attainment of school goals regardless of current staff. Once the Action Plan had been completed, administration disseminated it to school personnel and other stakeholders for their review, consideration and adoption. ƒƒ To what extent has the governing body and administration funded the activities or events needed to address key issues? School staff involved in the writing of the narratives, and subsequently, the Leadership Team, had been advised that growth area items requiring major additional funding would not be appropriate for inclusion in the Action Plan in light of the current budget deficit. They could still be included within individual criterion Growth Areas, though, to be considered in the future once funds become available. One-time minor purchases were a possibility during the present school year; however, future funding could not be relied upon. Therefore, focus groups made decisions on key issues while keeping the budget factor in mind. The Curriculum Focus Group elected to list the following items, for example: “Make a class set of ESL readers available to students,” and “Return to use of class sets of textbooks to classroom.” Although not a priority item in the Action Plan, the former is a suggestion that is already being acted upon because the funding necessary is available now. Yet the latter was rejected for inclusion because of the substantial amount of money needed to accomplish the task. ƒƒ What opportunities are provided for all stakeholders to have a voice in the regular review and revision of the Action Plan? To facilitate involvement of the maximum number of stakeholders in the review and revision of the Action Plan, the school has taken advantage of several channels of communication: the Leadership Team holds meetings, key members of the Team are consulted throughout the process, the School Advisory Council meets and reviews the school’s progress as well as elicits contributions from community members, Student Council meetings provide venues where student leaders can be kept up-to-date and participate in the process; they, in turn, return to inform their fellow classmates. In the end, all stakeholders are given ample opportunities to be involved as much or as little as they so choose.

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The institution has a definite plan for how the Action Plan is to be monitored to maintain accountability, as well as to report progress to all stakeholders.

Notes

10.4

ƒƒ How does the Action Plan specify how the improvement efforts will be monitored and who will oversee the process? The Action Plan format itself contains a column designated for the monitoring of action steps, while another exists to list persons responsible for their accomplishment. It is understood that school administration or designees, such as teacher advisors, will oversee the process as a check-and-balance system, note progress and update the Action Plan. As an added feature, a Leadership Team will remain in place throughout the school year and continue to meet several times annually to discuss school issues and review Action Plan progress. ƒƒ How will progress be reported to all stakeholders? As stated above, administration will regularly check for progress throughout the school year and update the Action Plan accordingly. The Leadership Team will convene on a regular basis to review the progress made on Action Plan items. Community partners are informed of progress at School Advisory Council meetings, at least once per year. Students are given an account of the state-of-the-school at each Student Council meeting. In addition, school successes are reported in the school bulletin and on the school website for all to observe.

10.5

The schoolwide Action Plan is used for institutional planning, resource allocation, and the evaluation of existing programs. ƒƒ To what extent is the schoolwide Action Plan user-friendly and practical for all stakeholders’ involvement? To a great extent, this particular Self-Study Report has been simplified in its terminology and directness of school goals, student outcomes, and mission. There has been a strong effort to make the entire Report, inclusive of the Action Plan, user-friendly and comprehensible. Action Plan items are feats that are realistically attainable and plainly stated. We realize that our stakeholders range from second language learners with nominal educational levels to faculty and business partners in the community who may have earned advanced degrees. As an educational institution, we are used to conveying information in a way that all can understand, and we certainly do so in regards to our Action Plan.

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Notes

ƒƒ How does the governing body use the Action Plan in resource allocation discussions? In discussions concerning the purchase of resources to support classroom instruction, administrators always keep the Action Plan, as well as other requests, in mind. Action Plan items are given priority consideration. Since funding has been an issue, serious dialogue takes place as to the importance and necessity of items requested, and whether other assets may be at the school’s disposal, such as Perkins grants. Items that have been included in the Self-Study Report, yet not selected for inclusion in the Action Plan, are kept on a “wish list” for possible expenditures as budget allows. ƒƒ To what extent does the school leadership use the Action Plan in its decisionmaking process? The administration takes into account Action Plan items when making decisions about school improvement issues. For the most part, this means always being thoughtful about ways to increase student learning outcomes first and foremost. When administrators meet, they discuss successes in movement toward school goals, such as benchmarks, completions, GED certificates and high school diplomas earned. The Leadership Team and other staff assist administrators by focusing school improvement efforts to classroom learning, and thus, to the Action Plan. Moreover, recommendations from the prior WASC Visiting Team often provide justification for requests for additional funds to improve current programs and implement new programs.

Chapter 3 Page 150


STRENGTHS:

Notes

Areas of Strength and Growth ƒƒ Action Plan items are concrete, attainable goals. ƒƒ Action Plan items have been agreed upon by consensus. ƒƒ Changing administrative teams have followed up to accomplish the Action Plan. ƒƒ Administration and Leadership Team are committed, not only to fulfill the Action Plan, but to making other priority improvements identified in the self-study process. ƒƒ All stakeholders are privy to the school’s Action Plan and its progress through the school website, Student Council meetings and School Advisory meetings.

Growth Areas: ƒƒ Leadership Team should convene on a more regular basis to review progress of Action Plan items.

List of Evidence: ƒƒ Minutes from meetings where Action Plan was discussed and evaluated. ƒƒ Evidence that the Action Plan is regularly used and has brought change to the institution.

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Chapter

Four

Schoolwide Action Plan


Chapter

Notes

Four

Revising the School Action Plan It was the goal of the Leadership Team to ensure that all stakeholders were involved in the development of NHPCAS’ Action Plan. Each Focus Group was given the task of submitting a narrative, inclusive of Growth Areas, for their respective Criterion. Focus Group members were specifically chosen to give each Focus Group representation from all campuses, programs and staff. Growth Area items were listed verbatim on a single page and presented to the Leadership Team for review. Student Council and School Advisory Council members were also given an opportunity to provide input at separate meetings during this process. The Leadership Team convened at a special meeting to review the complete list of suggested Growth Areas. All participants formed small groups and narrowed down their choices to achievable and realistic Action Plan items. The resultant prioritized Growth Area items fell into four general categories: Communication, Staff Development, Resources, and Student Support Services. Upon completion, the Action Plan was distributed to all stakeholders for their review, consideration and adoption. What follows is the finalized version of the Action Plan.

Chapter 4 Page 153


Growth Area #1 COMMUNICATION: Improve communication of events to staff. Rationale: Information that is disseminated in a timely manner allows for adequate preparation and planning time and prevents overlapping/ conflicting scheduling of events.

SLO’s Addressed: 2. Students will develop as productive and informed members of the community by taking part in school events.

ACTION STEPS 1. Identify events at administrative meeting with teacher advisor input.

TIMELINE Begin in early Spring term 2012

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE Site Administrators

RESOURCES Paper/Computer

Site Teacher Advisors Office Staff

WAYS TO ASSESS Make modifications through examination of prior years’ feedback of events

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS Review accumulative list of events and evaluations

Elicit teacher/teacher advisor suggestions 2. Schedule events at administrative meetings with staff input

Begin Spring term 2012

3. Distribute information to all campuses

Site Administrators

Master Calendar

Wall calendar at each campus

Site Teacher Advisors

 Hard copy

Office Staff

 Online

Print out of online calendar

Begin Spring term 2012

Site Administrators

Monthly updates to each campus

Site Teacher Advisors

Large Calendar posted at each major site in an easily accessible area.

Elicit staff feedback at end of each term with distribution of memo

Office Staff

Monthly calendars posted in every classroom. Calendar posted online.

Chapter 4 Page 155

Articles about events in bulletin, online and student-generated publications Results of feedback form shared with stakeholders


Growth Area #2 STAFF DEVELOPMENT: Provide training to teachers and advisors on new courses and assessment tools. Rationale: New instructional and assessment methods and materials should include training for implementation. SLO’s Addressed: 1 & 3. Improved methods and materials can positively impact student learning and lead to course or program completion.

ACTION STEPS

TIMELINE

1. Create a forum/blog on www.nhpcas. com for teachers to share techniques and materials

February 2012

2. C  ontinue to publicize DACE trainings specific to program areas.

Weekly in bulletin and on website.

3. Target specific faculty within program areas to attend trainings 4. Arrange meetings for attendees to inform related staff on trainings in order to implement strategies, materials and procedures.

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE CTE/Website Advisor Leadership Team

RESOURCES User-friendly NHPCAS website

Administration

Place flyers in targeted teachers’ boxes as they present themselves.

Administrators

DACE website

Office staff

DACE flyers

Trained faculty

School website Weekly bulletin

As needed after trainings occur.

Chapter 4 Page 156

WAYS TO ASSESS

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS

Administrators and website personnel monitor and print out forum postings to keep in Teacher Blog Log

As of 1/24/12, Marcus Williams created link to the Teacher’s Message Board where teachers can provide or add comments on teaching techniques, lesson plans, and shared ideas, etc.

Observations of teachers/staff putting training into practice

Keep one folder of staff development opportunities at each main campus

Feedback from trained staff

Maintain list of faculty/ staff attending trainings in Principal’s office


ACTION STEPS 5. Provide at least two occasions per semester for teachers to share out best practices. 6. S elect one faculty member per program to present at shareouts and pre-approve presentations. 7. N  otify faculty of shareouts in a timely manner.

TIMELINE October & March 2012 and each year thereafter

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE

RESOURCES

Administrators approve & set dates/times/ topics/speakers Administrators and teacher advisors select faculty presenters Administrators place events on calendar and write memos

Teachers to present Location/Rooms for staff development to take place Whiteboard, OHP, and other equipment, as requested.

Chapter 4 Page 157

WAYS TO ASSESS

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS

Share-Out evaluation form Results from evaluation forms Comments from attendees after events

Requests/suggestions for topic/content areas of future share-outs


Growth Area #3 RESOURCES: Fill book orders in a more timely way. Rationale: When vital instructional resources are readily available, teachers have access to appropriate and approved materials for their classes and may proceed on schedule, resulting in students learning according to course outline and advancing as planned.

SLO’s Addressed: 1 & 3. Students will learn skills corresponding to class requirements and be able to complete a course or program on schedule.

ACTION STEPS

TIMELINE

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE

RESOURCES

1. D  ecide on books to be used for the following term.

Midterm: October & April

Administration

Current textbooks

Due: Nov. 1 & May 1

Faculty

Catalogs

2. Take inventory of textbooks for sale  for replenishing supply at each campus  for pre-ordering each term

 Replenish: Weekly by advisors/administrators

Financial Manager

 Pre-Order: Prior to terms, 5X/year: August, October, early December, February, and April

Office Technician

Provide list

3. Submit requisition

August, October, early December, February, and April, as needed

Principal

Textbook request form from each campus

4. Place order 5. Report on status

WAYS TO ASSESS

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS

Faculty feedback on books being used

Site administrators submit findings by Nov. 1 & May 1

Use standardized list of textbooks and supplies

Submit completed list as request

Maintain and distribute to involved parties electronic and hard copy of textbook requests and requisition forms

Follow up on orders placed on a weekly basis

Sample texts

Student Body Worker

Financial Manager

Set aside time to take inventory.

Requisition form

Chapter 4 Page 158

Email communication of updates


ACTION STEPS 6. Receive orders and distribute to campuses

TIMELINE September, November, January, March and May

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE

RESOURCES

WAYS TO ASSESS

Financial Manager

Records of orders placed

Updated inventory list

Plant Manager

Requisition form indicating destination and quantity of texts to be delivered.

Record of textbook sales

Student Body Worker

Personnel and van for distribution

Chapter 4 Page 159

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS Financial Manager reports on distribution and sales of textbooks


Growth Area #4 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES: To raise the profile of the counseling department at each campus. Rationale: Better informed students will be aware of what services are at their disposal, how to access services, get personal and academic counseling, therefore enabling them to reach their goals.

SLO’s Addressed: 2. Students can receive assistance in achieving their personal, academic and career goals.

ACTION STEPS 1. U  pdate our orientation process to ensure that all students receive consistent information regardless of entry date or location.

TIMELINE Due to our open enrollment policy, students can register for classes throughout the school year.

1. Hold orientation 2. Review and schoolwide once update PowerPoint a semester. presentation each 2. Teacher advisors can term in preparation for visit each classroom orientations to present mini An orientation is orientations once currently presented per semester, or to all students once a upon request. semester at the Poly, NOHO and Whipple campuses. The PowerPoint presentation outlines pertinent information about school programs, policies and procedures. Emphasis is placed on encouraging students to take an active role in their own learning and on setting personal academic goals.

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE Site administrators Teacher Advisors

RESOURCES PowerPoint presentation of Orientation Laptop computer LCD Projector Screen Large room or auditorium

WAYS TO ASSESS Student feedback Student survey Outcome data

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS Follow up each office visit with a Student Feedback Form and assess results Conduct Student Survey once a year including questions on counseling services and meeting goals. Keep record of orientations on monthly calendars and on website (see item #3 below)

Chapter 4 Page 160


ACTION STEPS 3. I nclude a counseling section on the NHPCAS website 4. M  onitors in main offices can display school website  Introduce students to our teacher advisors at each campus.  Teacher advisor names, school phone numbers, e-mail addresses and hours.  List of services our counseling department provides, links to institutions of higher education and community resources.

TIMELINE Add to website by May 2012 Update website section each term thereafter or as changes take place Install monitors by June 2012

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE

RESOURCES

Principal and APACS Website maintenance staff

WAYS TO ASSESS

Personnel to maintain website

Keep track of website visits per counter

Updated Information

Log of students served in each counseling setting

Monitors installed in each main office

(order has been made)

Chapter 4 Page 161

MEANS TO MONITOR & REPORT PROGRESS Follow up and log each inquiry within 48 hours


Appendices


A Glossary of Acronyms/ Terms in Adult Education AALA

Associated Administrators of Los Angeles

ABE

Adult Basic Education

ACSA

Association of California School Administrators

ADA

Average Daily Attendance

AEWC

Alternative Education Work Center

AIS

Adult Independent Study

APACS

Assistant Principal of Adult Counseling Services

APO

Assistant Principal of Operation

ASE

Adult Secondary Education

AWD

Adult with Disabilities

BTB

Beyond the Bell

CACECA

California Adult and Continuing Education Counselors Association

CAHSEE

California High School Exit Examination

CALPRO

California Adult Literacy Professional Development Project

CAROC/P

California Association of Regional Occupational Centers/Programs

CAS

Community Adult School

CASAS

Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System

CATESOL

California Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages

CBET

Community-Based English Tutoring

CBO

Community-Based Organization

CCAE

California Council for Adult Education

CDE

California Department of Education

CMAA

Council of Mexican American Administrators

COABE

Commission on Adult Basic Education

CTE

Career Technical Education

DACE

Division of Adult and Career Education

DL

Distance Learning

EBRI

Evidenced-Based Reading Instruction

EDD

Employment Development Department


EMT

Emergency Medical Technician

ESL

English as a Second Language

FRDB

Financial Reporting Database

GED

General Education Development

HIT

Health Information Technology

HSD

High School Diploma

IC3

Internet and Computing Core Certification

IFS

Integrated Financial System

II Lab

Individualized Instruction Laboratory

IMA

Instructional Material Account

ITD

Information Technology Division

LAUSD

Los Angeles Unified School District

MOS

Microsoft Office Specialist

NHPCAS

North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School

NOHO

North Hollywood High School Campus

OTAN

Outreach and Technical Assistance Network

POA

Program for Older Adults

POLY

Polytechnic High School Campus

ROP

Regional Occupational Program

SAA

School Administrative Assistant

SCANS

Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills

SIS

Student Information System

SLO

Student Learning Outcome

SRLDP

School Readiness Language Development Program

SSO

School Safety Officer

TABE

Tests of Adult Basic Education

TESOL

Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages

TOPS

Tracking of Programs and Students

UTLA

United Teachers Los Angeles

WASC

Western Association for Schools and Colleges

WE

Women Educators

WIA

Workforce Investment Act


B

North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S.

Certificated Staff Questionnaire This questionnaire will help us compile the information needed to complete the school profile for WASC accreditation.

Professional/Personal 1. Academic/Vocational Preparation: (Circle your highest degree) a. High school diploma/vocational experience b. AA or technical experience c. Bachelor’s degree d. Master’s degree e. Doctorate degree 2. Semester units beyond Bachelor’s: a. 0-29 b. 30-59 3. Circle all credentials that apply: a. Adult Education, Designated Subjects c. Elementary or Multiple Subjects e. Administrative or Pupil Personnel

c. 60+ b. CTE (Career Technical Education) d. Secondary or Single Subjects

4. Number of teaching hours per week at North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S.: a. Less than 6 b. 6-12 c. 13-18 d. 19-29 e. 30 or more 1. Number of years of service at North-Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S.: a. 1-4 b. 5-9 c. 10-14 d. 15-19 e. 20 or more 6. Total years of service with the Division of Adult and Career Education: a. 1-4 b. 5-9 c. 10-14 d. 15-19 e. 20 or more 7. Other occupational pursuits: a. Full-time day teacher, not adult c. Full-time other profession e. None, adult ed only 8. Age: a. Under 25 e. 56+

b. 25-35

9. Ethnicity: a. Hispanic/Latino d. White 10. Gender: a. Male 1

b. Part-time teacher outside LAUSD d. Part-time other profession

c. 36-45

d. 46-55

b. Asian c. African American/Black e. Other___________________________

b. Female Tuesday, September 13, 2011


Professional/Extracurricular 11. What professional organizations are you a member of? (Circle) Professional/Extracurricular a. CCAE b. CAROCP c. WE d. CATESOL 11. What professional organizations are you a member of? (Circle) e. Other____________________ a. CCAE b. CAROCP c. WE d. CATESOL Other____________________ 12. e. List any leadership positions in professional organizations or in the community that you have held in the past 3 years. 12. ___________________________________________________________________ List any leadership positions in professional organizations or in the community that

you have held in the past 3 years. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

13. ___________________________________________________________________ Outside of teaching, are you currently working or volunteering in the subject area or field that you teach? If so, please describe. 13. ___________________________________________________________________ Outside of teaching, are you currently working or volunteering in the subject area or field that you teach? If so, please describe. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

Professional Development

Have you participated in any of the following related to your field over the past 3 Professional Development years? Have you participated in any of the following related to your field over the past 3 14. Conferences/workshops outside North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S. years? a. Yes b. No 14. Conferences/workshops outside North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S. a. Yes b. No 15. In-services and professional development opportunities at North Hollywood-Poly C.A.S.: a. Yes b. No 15. In-services and professional development opportunities at North Hollywood-Poly C.A.S.: 16. College/professional/vocational a. Yes b. No classes a. Yes b. No

16. College/professional/vocational classes 17. Shared a. Yes instructional techniques b. No and best practices with colleagues a. Yes b. No 17. Shared instructional techniques and best practices with colleagues a. Yes b. No 2

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

2

Tuesday, September 13, 2011


Have you taught/led any of the following in your field over the past 3 years? 18. Workshops/In-Services a. Yes b. No 19. College/professional/vocational classes a. Yes b. No 20. How would you rate your school’s effectiveness in providing information and opportunities for outside professional development throughout the school year (workshops, in-services, seminars)? a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

Instruction 21. What specific teaching strategies do you utilize in your classroom? (Circle all that apply) a. Lecture

b. Whole-class participation

c. Interactive activities

d. Independent work

e. Group discussions/work

e. Written exercises

f. Choral response

g. Student- directed activities

h. Technology

i. Textbook reading/assignments

j. Teacher-created assignments

k. Role-play/Teacher modeling l. Other __________________________________________________________ 22. What specific learning styles do you address in your classroom? (Circle all that apply) a. Visual

b. Oral (Speaking)

c. Aural (Listening)

d. Kinesthetic/Tactile

e. Other Special Needs _________________________

23. How do you integrate technology into your classroom instruction? a. In-class computer usage

b. Weekly computer lab usage

c. In-class distance learning d. Other video/TV/LCD/Powerpoint presentations at school e. Homework assignments requiring computer or online usage f. Other technology _________________

3

Tuesday, September 13, 2011


Assessment Assessment

24. Select all means of assessment you use to evaluate your students achievement and 24. progress. Select all means of assessment you use to evaluate your students achievement and progress. a. Promotional Testing b. CASAS c. TABE d. Written Test a. Testing f.b. Other CASAS c. TABE d. Written Test e. Promotional Industry Certification ________________________ e. Industry Certification f. Other ________________________ 25. How do you determine your students needs and goals? 25. a. How do youinterview determine your students needs and goals? Personal b. Needs assessment c. CASAS a. interview b. Other Needs assessment c. CASAS d. Personal Goal-oriented lessons e. __________________________________ d. Goal-oriented lessons e. Other __________________________________ 26. In what ways are students made aware of their progress? 26. In ways are students made ofmarks their progress? a. what Formal teacher conference b. aware Written c. Class progress chart a. teacher conference Written marks c. on Class progress chart d. Formal Standardized test scores b. e. Informal comments a daily or weekly basis d.Other Standardized test scores e. Informal comments on a daily or weekly basis f. __________________________________ f. Other __________________________________

Resources Resources

27. How would you rate the school’s instructional resource support in relation to and supplies? 27. textbooks, How wouldinstructional you rate thematerials, school’s instructional resource support in relation to a. Excellent b. Good textbooks, instructional materials, and supplies?c. Fair a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair 28. How would you rate the school’s instructional resource support in relation to and services? 28. duplicating How wouldequipment you rate the school’s instructional resource support in relation to a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair duplicating equipment and services? a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair 29. How would you rate the school’s instructional technology resources (i.e. computers, other classroom equipment)? 29. Audio/visual, How would you rate the school’s instructional technology resources (i.e. a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair Audio/visual, computers, other classroom equipment)? a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair 30. How would you rate the school’s instructional support staff (advisors, aides)? a. Excellent b. Goodinstructional support c. Fair staff (advisors, aides)? 30. How would you rate the school’s a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair 31. How would you rate the support you receive from the school’s office staff? a. Excellent b. Goodyou receive from c. Fair 31. How would you rate the support the school’s office staff? a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair 32. How would you rate the support you receive from the school’s administrative staff? a. Excellent b. Goodyou receive from c. Fair 32. How would you rate the support the school’s administrative staff? a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair

4 4

Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Tuesday, September 13, 2011


How would you rate the following at your school site or branch? 33. Classrooms: a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

34. Restrooms: a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

35. General Appearance: a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

36. Safety: a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

Personal 37. List any languages you speak other than English in the appropriate column. a. Some

b. Fluent

c. Native speaker

__________________ ________________ ___________________ __________________ ________________ ___________________

5

Tuesday, September 13, 2011


North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S.

Classified Staff Questionnaire North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S. Classified Staff This questionnaire will help us compile theQuestionnaire information needed to complete the school profile for WASC accreditation. This questionnaire will help us compile the information needed to complete the school profile for WASC accreditation. 1. Academic preparation: a. High school/trade 1. Academic preparation:school b. A.A. or equivalent c. Bachelor’s degree d. Master’s or higher a. High school/trade school b. A.A. or equivalent c. Bachelor’s degree d. Master’s or higheractivities attended in the last 3 years: 2. Professional growth a. Attended growth school activities b. Attended Attended training session 2. Professional attendedworkshop in the last 3c.years: d. Other _______________________ a. Attended school b. Attended workshop c. Attended training session d. Other _______________________ 3. Number of years of service at North Hollywood-Polytechnic C.A.S.: a. 1-4 of years of serviceb.at5-9 c. 10-14 C.A.S.: d. 15-19 3. Number North Hollywood-Polytechnic e. 20+ a. 1-4 b. 5-9 c. 10-14 d. 15-19 e. 20+ 4. Number of years of service with Division of Adult and Career Education: a. 1-4 of years of serviceb.with 5-9 Division of Adultc.and 10-14 d. 15-19 4. Number Career Education: e. 20+ a. 1-4 b. 5-9 c. 10-14 d. 15-19 e. 20+ 5. Ethnicity: a. Hispanic/Latino 5. Ethnicity: d. White a. Hispanic/Latino d. White 6. Age:

b. Asian c. African American/Black e. Other _____________________ b. Asian c. African American/Black e. Other _____________________

a. under 18 6. Age: e. 60+ a. under 18 e. 60+ 7. Gender:

b. 18-25

c. 26-39

d. 40-59

b. 18-25

c. 26-39

d. 40-59

a. Male 7. Gender:

b. Female

a. Male b. Female 8. How would you rate the school’s safety? a. Excellent b. Good 8. How would you rate the school’s safety?

c. Fair

a. Excellent b. Good 9. How would you rate the school’s cleanliness?

c. Fair

a. Excellent b. Good 9. How would you rate the school’s cleanliness?

c. Fair

Excellent b. Goodrelationship between c. Fair the teaching staff and 10. a. How would you rate the working the classified staff? 10. How would you rate the working relationship between the teaching staff and a. Excellent b. Good c. Fair the classified staff? a. Excellent

b. Good

c. Fair

1

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

1

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

C


11. Are you informed when changes in policies, programs, and procedures are made? 11. Are you informed when changes in policies, programs, and procedures are a. Always b. Often c. Sometimes d. Rarely made? e. Never a. Always b. Often c. Sometimes d. Rarely e. Never 12. How would you rate the school’s administrative staff? Excellent b. Goodadministrative c. Fair 12. a. How would you rate the school’s staff? Excellent Good to carry out your c. Fair 13. a. Are you provided with theb.supplies duties and responsibilities? 13. Are you provided with the supplies to carry out your duties and a. Yes b. No responsibilities? a.not, Yesplease write whatb. Noneed: If you If not, please write what you need: ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ 14. List any professional organizations in which you hold membership. ____________________________________________________ 14. List any professional organizations in which you hold membership. ____________________________________________________ 15. List any leadership positions in professional organizations or in the community that you have held in the past 3 years. 15. List any leadership positions in professional organizations or in the ____________________________________________________ community that you have held in the past 3 years. ____________________________________________________ 16. List any languages you speak other than English in the appropriate column. a. Some b. Fluent c. in Native speaker column. 16. List any languages you speak other than English the appropriate _____________ _____________ ______________ a. Some b. Fluent speaker _____________ _____________ c. Native ______________ _____________ _____________ ______________ _____________ _____________ ______________ _____________ _____________ ______________ _____________ _____________ ______________

2

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

2

Tuesday, September 13, 2011


D

NHPCAS Student Questionnaire STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE

 

The purpose of this questionnaire is to help us get a better picture of our students and improve our school. We will  include the results in our Accreditation Self­Study Report. Your answers are strictly confidential and anonymous.  Individual answers will be used only to gather statistical data. 

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

*1. Age: j 16­17 k l m n

 

j 18­29 k l m n

 

 

j 30­44 k l m n

 

j 45­64 k l m n

 

j 65 and over k l m n

 

*2. Gender: j Male k l m n

 

j Female k l m n

 

*3. Employment status: j Full­time k l m n

 

j Part­time k l m n j Retired k l m n

 

 

j Not employed and not seeking work k l m n j Not employed and seeking work k l m n

 

 

*4. Marital Status: j Married k l m n

 

j Domestic Partnership k l m n

 

j Single, never married k l m n j Divorced k l m n

 

 

j Widowed k l m n

 

*5. Zip Code: j 91352 k l m n j Other  k l m n

 

j 91601 k l m n

 

j 91602 k l m n

 

j 91604 k l m n

 

j 91605 k l m n

 

j 91606 k l m n

 

j 91607 k l m n

 

j 91505 k l m n

 

j 91506 k l m n

   

Page 1

 


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*6. What is your first language? j English k l m n

 

j Spanish k l m n

j Chinese k l m n  

j Armenian k l m n

j Thai k l m n  

 

j Arabic k l m n

 

j Hebrew k l m n

j Vietnamese k l m n

 

j Russian k l m n

j Korean k l m n

   

 

 

Other  

*7. How do you rate your English proficiency? j Very little/Beginner k l m n j Intermediate k l m n j Advanced k l m n j Fluent k l m n

 

 

 

 

j Native Speaker k l m n

 

8. How many people are in your household, including you? j 1 k l m n

 

j 2 k l m n

 

j 3 k l m n

 

j 4 k l m n

 

j 5 k l m n

 

j 6 k l m n

 

j 7 k l m n

 

j 8 or more k l m n

9. Of those, how many are children under 18? j 0 k l m n

 

j 1 k l m n

 

j 2 k l m n

 

j 3 k l m n

 

j 4 or more k l m n

 

10. What is your yearly household income? j 0­$10,000 k l m n

 

j $10,001­$14,000 k l m n j $14,001­$19,000 k l m n j $19,001­$25,000 k l m n

j $25,001­$35,000 k l m n  

j $35,001­$50,000 k l m n

 

j $50,000­$75,000 k l m n

 

j $75,000 plus k l m n

     

 

11. How many times have you moved in the past 2 years? j 1 k l m n

 

j 2 k l m n

 

j 3 k l m n

 

j 4 k l m n

 

j more than 4 k l m n

 

Page 2

 


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*12. What is your educational level?

Choose the highest level you have completed in the United States or any other country. j No School k l m n

 

j Elementary or Primary School (Kindergarten ­ 6th grade) k l m n j Junior High or Middle School (7th ­ 9th grade) k l m n j High School Diploma (finished 12th grade) k l m n j Vocational or Trade School k l m n

 

 

 

j Community or Junior College (2 years or AA degree) k l m n j University (4 years or BA degree) k l m n

j Graduate School ­ Doctorate/PhD. k l m n

j Physically Disabled k l m n

j Hearing Impaired k l m n

 

 

 

j Learning Disabled k l m n

j Mentally/Emotionally Disabled k l m n j Visually Impaired k l m n

 

 

j Graduate School ­ Master's Degree k l m n

*13. Disability:

 

 

 

j Learning Difficulties k l m n

 

j None k l m n

 

 

 

SCHOOL INFORMATION

 

*14. Where do you attend classes? j Polytechnic Campus k l m n

 

j North Hollywood Campus k l m n j Whipple Campus k l m n

 

 

j Sun Valley Campus k l m n

 

j Branch Site (Off­campus location) k l m n

   

Page 3


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire 15. How far do you live from school? j Less than 1/2 mile k l m n j 1/2 ­ 1 mile k l m n j 1 ­ 3 miles k l m n j 3 ­ 5 miles k l m n

 

 

   

j Over 5 miles k l m n

 

*16. How do you get to school?  

j Walk k l m n

j Bicycle k l m n

 

 

j Bus k l m n

j Metro k l m n

   

j Car (Driver or passenger) k l m n j Motorcycle k l m n

 

17. What is the main reason you are attending school? j To get a job or a better job k l m n

 

j To communicate in English better k l m n j To obtain a GED only k l m n

 

j To earn a high school diploma k l m n j To get high school credits k l m n j To enter the military k l m n

 

 

 

 

j To improve my parenting skills k l m n

 

j To help my children do better in school k l m n j For personal interest k l m n

 

 

18. How many hours per week are you attending our school? j 1 ­ 5 k l m n

 

j 6 ­ 11 k l m n

 

j 11 ­ 15 k l m n

 

j 15 ­ 20 k l m n

 

j More than 20 k l m n

 

19. How many days per week do you attend classes at our school? j 1 k l m n j 2 k l m n j 3 k l m n

     

j 4 k l m n j 5 k l m n j 6 k l m n

     

Page 4


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire 20. What time of day do you attend classes? (Choose all that apply) c Early morning (between 7:30 & 10:00) d e f g c Mid morning (between 10:00 & 12:00) d e f g c Afternoon (between 12:00 & 5:00) d e f g c Evening (between 5:30 & 9:00) d e f g c Saturday d e f g

   

 

 

 

21. How many classes have you taken at our school? j 1 k l m n

 

j 2 k l m n

 

j 3 k l m n

 

j 4 k l m n

 

j 5+ k l m n

 

22. How long have you been taking classes at our school? j less than 6 months k l m n j 6 months ­ 1 year k l m n j 1 1/2 years k l m n

 

 

 

 

j 2 years k l m n

j More than 2 years k l m n

 

GOALS & OBSTACLES

 

23. Within this school year, I am planning on: j Completing an ESL class or earning a certificate k l m n

 

j Completing a basic reading or basic math course k l m n j Earning a high school diploma k l m n

 

 

j Earning a GED certificate k l m n

 

j Obtaining high school credits k l m n

 

j Completing a career class and earning a program certificate k l m n

 

24. Has your teacher asked you about your goals and/or what you want to learn in your class?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

*25. Has attending our school helped you to set and meet your goals?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

Page 5


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire 26. If you are studying for a GED or high school diploma, have you seen a counselor about your academic goals?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

j N/A ­ Not appliclable k l m n

 

*27. When you are absent, what is the reason? j Illness k l m n

 

j Lack of childcare k l m n

j Personal/Family reasons k l m n j Transportation problems k l m n j Other (please specify) k l m n

   

 

j Change in work schedule k l m n

 

j Problems with the class/teacher k l m n

 

   

28. If you have ever started a class, then took a break from school and came back, HOW LONG WAS YOUR BREAK? j less than one month k l m n j 1 ­ 3 months k l m n j 3 ­ 6 months k l m n

 

   

j 6 ­ 12 months k l m n

 

 

j 1 ­ 2 years k l m n

j 2 or more years k l m n

 

j Did not take a break k l m n

 

29. Is your class meeting your expectations?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

If "No," please explain. 

Page 6


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*30. In which of the following areas are you currently employed? j Automotive k l m n

 

j Business/Office k l m n

 

j Computer/Technology k l m n j Construction k l m n

 

j Domestic/Childcare k l m n j Health/Medical k l m n j Manufacturing k l m n j Services/Sales k l m n j Not working k l m n

 

 

 

   

 

Other (please specify) 

*31. Where do you plan to further your education after finishing classes at NHPCAS? j Community College k l m n j University k l m n

 

 

j Vocational School k l m n

 

j Not planning on taking classes k l m n

 

OUTREACH AND MARKETING

 

*32. How did you hear about our school? j Someone told me k l m n

 

j School brochure/flyer k l m n j School marquee/sign k l m n j School website k l m n

   

 

j High school counselor k l m n

 

j Elementary, middle or high school referral k l m n j Other agency referral k l m n

 

 

j Job Fair or Community Event k l m n j Saw it in the neighborhood k l m n

 

 

Page 7


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*33. Why did you choose to attend NHPCAS instead of another school? j It's located near my home k l m n j It's located near my work k l m n

 

 

j It was recommended by a friend k l m n j It has a good reputation k l m n j I saw an advertisement k l m n

 

 

 

j It has classes at days & times I can attend k l m n

 

j It offers the career program I want to study k l m n

 

*34. Would you recommend this school to other people?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

Why or why not? 

RATE YOUR SCHOOL

 

Now is your chance to give your school a grade.     How would you rate the following items at our school?     (A = Excellent, B = Good, C = Average, D = Poor, N/A = Not Applicable) 

*35. CURRICULUM

How do you rate these items as relevant, challenging and effective in the classroom? A

B

C

D

N/A

Textbooks

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Materials

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Course Content

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Use of technology

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Page 8


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*36. CURRICULUM

Do you have access to everything you need to study? A

B

C

D

N/A

Books

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Materials

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Technology

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Other learning resources

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

List any additional resources you would like access to. 

*37. CURRICULUM

Are learning materials in your classroom accurate and up­to­date?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

38. CURRICULUM If you are taking a CTE class(Computer, Digital Imaging, EMT or HIT), are the materials and equipment up to current industry standards?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

If no, what is needed? 

*39. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

Rate the instruction you receive at school. A

B

C

D

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

High­level instruction

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Different approaches to 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Variety of learning activities

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Your learning needs are 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Teacher has expertise in  subject area

reach all students

met

Page 9


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*40. ASSESSMENT

How often.....?

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

N/A

Do you take tests at school?

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Does your teacher discuss 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

your test results with you? Does your teacher talk to  you about your individual  progress in the class? Does your teacher share  learning successes?

*41. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Rate the support you receive at school for a successful learning experience. If you are not familiar with an item, check N/A for Not Applicable. A

B

C

D

N/A

Counseling staff

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Office staff

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Registration

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Student Aides

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Administration

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Student Orientation

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Holiday Programs

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Spelling Bee

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

International Day

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Graduation

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Other

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Other (please specify) 

Page 10


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire 42. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Which services have you used at school? Check all that apply. c Academic counseling d e f g

 

c Transmittal of Credit slip/records d e f g c Bus Pass Application d e f g c Photo ID card d e f g

 

 

 

c Verification of Enrollment/Attendance letter d e f g c Personal counseling d e f g

 

c Referral to community resources d e f g

 

c Transition from ESL to academics d e f g

 

c Referral to institutions of higher learning d e f g c Job Board d e f g

 

 

 

c Internships d e f g

 

Other (please specify) 

*43. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

For the next two questions, you will rate the school facilities in terms of cleanliness, safety, maintenance, and overall environment for learning. A

B

C

D

N/A

Campus

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Classrooms

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Cleanliness

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Lighting

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Security

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Parking

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Restrooms

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Handicap Access

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Catering Truck (break time)

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Page 11


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*44. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Do you consider your class a welcoming and comfortable place to learn?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

Why or why not? 

MISSION STATEMENT & STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

The following questions refer to the school's stated mission and expected learning results for students. 

45. As a result of your education, are you... (Choose as many as apply) c More confident? d e f g

 

c Participating more in your community? d e f g c More aware of community resources? d e f g

 

 

*46. As a result of your education, how often...? Do you use what you learn 

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Never

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

in class? Do you work together with  other students in your  classroom? Are you involved more with  your family's education? Do you help your children  with their homework? Do you participate in your  children's school?

*47. Do you understand the requirements for passing your class?  

j Yes k l m n

j Somewhat k l m n j No k l m n

 

 

*48. Do you think you will complete your class?  

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

 

Page 12


NHPCAS Student Questionnaire

*49. SKILL DEVELOPMENT

How often do you practice the following skills in class? Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

N/A

Listening

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Speaking

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Reading

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Writing

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Computation (Math)

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Technology

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Career Skills

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Life Skills

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

50. Please share any additional comments with us here. 5 6  

THIS IS THE END OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

 

Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire. We appreciate your honesty and input. We will use this  valuable information to improve our school programs.    THANK YOU! GRACIAS! OBRIGADO! MERCI! DANKE! DIKY! KOSZONETTEL! BEDANKT! HVALA! TESEKKURLER!  EUXAPIOTW! GRAZIE! 

Page 13


Criterion  4:    Curriculum  -­‐  Improve  communication  of  events  to  staff.  

Criterion  4:    Curriculum  –  Have  teachers  keep  emergency  lesson  plans,  in  case  of  absence.      

8.

9.

 

12. Criterion  4:    Curriculum  -­‐Make  a  class  set  of  ESL  readers  available  to  students.          

   

  •

 

 

 

25. Criterion  9:    Community  Connection  -­‐  Continue  to  make  new  community  connections  that  lead  to  internship  partnerships  to  complement  our  CTE  programs.                  

24. Criterion  8:    Resource  Management  -­‐  Copies  of  Requisition  Orders  need  to  be  forwarded  to  the  authorized  person  who  receives  new  merchandise  on  a  regular  basis.  

23. Criterion  8:    Resource  Management  -­‐  Increase  publicity  toward  the  community  of  available  classes  and  campuses.  

22. Criterion  7:    Student  Support  Services  -­‐  Raise  the  profile  of  the  counseling  department  at  each  campus  

21. Criterion  7:    Student  Support  Services  -­‐  Develop  workshops  on  resume  writing  and  interviewing  skills.  

20. Criterion  7:    Student  Support  Services  -­‐  Relationships  with  community  college  counselors  should  be  pursued  and  maintained,  making  the  transition  from  adult  school   to  community  college  easier  for  our  students.    

19.

18.

17.

16.

 

  Criterion  6:    Assessment  -­‐    Provide  training  to  teachers  and  advisors  on  the  new  courses  and  assessment  tools.     Criterion  6:    Assessment  -­‐    Develop  new  ways  of  integrating  skills  into  instruction  and  learning.       Criterion   7:     Student   Support   Services   -­‐   Examine   how   to   best   use   new   technology   to   stay   current   in   our   classrooms,     to   recruit   new   students   and   to   manage   and   store   files  and  documents.     Criterion  7:    Student  Support  Services  -­‐  Compile  a  list  of  financial  aid  resources  for  students                                                    

 

Non-­‐applicable  items  (no  budget  or   included  in  curriculum)  

Items   that       will  be    addressed  although  not   in  Action  Plan  

15. Criterion  6:    Assessment  -­‐    Allocate  funding  to  continue  the  process  of  reevaluating  and  adding  assessment  tools  a   nd  courses.  

  14. Criterion  5:    Instruction  -­‐  Increase  interaction  between  classes  to  broaden  exposure  to  other  courses/experiences.  

13. Criterion  5:    Instruction  -­‐  Develop  an  online  chatroom  for  sharing  teaching  strategies  and  activities.  

 

11. Criterion  4:    Curriculum  -­‐  Return  to  use  of  class  sets  of  textbooks  to  classroom.    

10. Criterion  4:    Curriculum  -­‐  Integrate  latest  technology  into  the  classroom.  

 

Criterion  4:    Curriculum  -­‐  Fill  book  orders  in  a  more  timely  way.  

7.

 

Criterion  3:    Faculty  &  Staff  -­‐  Provide  more  opportunities  for  teachers  to  meet  and  share  best  practices.  

6.

Items  already  completed  or  in  progress  

Criterion  3:    Faculty  &  Staff  -­‐  Include  classified  office  staff  in  Change  Form  distribution  system.  

5.

Criterion  2:    Organizational  Infrastructure/School  Leadership  -­‐Reinstitute  Leadership  Committee.  

4.

Criterion  2:  Organizational  Infrastructure/School  Leadership  -­‐  Standardize  procedures  for  new  teacher  processing  and  orientation.  

3.

 

Criterion  2:  Organizational  Infrastructure/School  Leadership  -­‐Institute  meetings  with  staff  every  6  weeks  or  as  needed.    

2.

LEGEND     Action  Plan  Items  

Criterion  1:  Mission  Statement/SLO’s  -­‐    Timely  printing  and  distribution  of  Schedule  of  Classes  and  other  publications  used  to  disseminate  school  information.  

1.

SUGGESTED  GROWTH  AREAS  (from  Chapter  3)  

E


F Certificated Staff (By Program)

Academic

Acevedo, Carlos Castro, Farah Chow, Janis Clemans, John Finch, Lorelei Garcia, Gabriela Lalaian, Linda Poppleton, Sharon Schmidt, Kimberly Spritzer, Terry Career Technical Education Blidaru, Claudia – EMT Corado, Mario - Computers Gonzalez, Gemma - Computers Hajj, Lina – Graphic Design Lalaian, Sergio – Computers Luria, Jonathan – Acting Rabonza, Lorlyn – HIT Rios, Estela – Computers Zitle, Perla – Computers Program for Older Adults/ Adults w Disabilities Nilssen-Mooney, Fjaere Sure, Jeffrey

Distance Learning

Cabulong, Eleanor Jaffe, Linda Lichwa, Ewa Miller, Graydon Odjorian, Silva

SRLDP/Parent Ed Bartolomei, Jorge Choi, Luz A. Fonseca, Sandra Fresquez, Rosaura Homchick, Sandra Ioffe, Ella Shearer-Aretz, Maud Villalobos-Morrow, Cori

State Pre-School Palyan, Nvard - Teacher Barrera, Ana - Aide Tashyan, Ruzanna - Aide Marchenko, Tamara -Aide


Certificated Staff

Certificated Staff (By Program) (By Program)

Academic

English as a Second Language Distance Learning

Acevedo, Carlos Bagamaspad, Anavic Castro,Burton, FarahDon Chow,Byrnes, Janis Anne Clemans, John Eleanor Cabulong, Finch,Daniels, LoreleiMichael Di Battista, Jane Garcia, Gabriela Gasparyan, Lalaian, Linda Narine Gibbs, Karen Poppleton, Sharon Gregory, Virginia Schmidt, Kimberly Jones, Chris Spritzer, Terry Kay, Lyndon

Cabulong, Eleanor

Michael, Daniels Jaffe, Linda Miller, Graydon Lichwa, Mirzoyan, Ewa Elfrida Miller, Graydon Murillo, Janet Nilssen-Mooney, Odjorian, SilvaFjaere Nordvall, Andy Noree, Yensin Regalado, Elizabeth SRLDP/Parent Ed Quin, Margarida Bartolomei, Jorge Sandoval, Pat Choi, Luz A. Savella, Marilou Fonseca, Sandra Schmissrauter, Steve Fresquez, Rosaura Smith, Norma Homchick, Sandra Villafana, Rebekah Weishaus, Marc Ioffe, Ella

Kelley, Darren Lucero, Esperanza CareerMallery, Technical Sarah Education Mgshyan, Blidaru, ClaudiaMariam – EMT

Corado, Mario - Computers Shearer-Aretz, Maud Teacher Advisors Gonzalez, Gemma - Computers Villalobos-Morrow, Cori Hajj, Lina – Graphic Design Barrios, Nicole Lalaian, Sergio – Computers Byrnes, Anne Luria, Jonathan – Acting Cabulong, Eleanor State Pre-School Campos, Juan Rabonza, Lorlyn – HIT Palyan, Nvard - Teacher Chow, Janis Rios, Estela – Computers Holcomb, Harald Barrera, Ana - Aide Jones, Chris Zitle, Perla – Computers Tashyan, Ruzanna - Aide Kenion, David Marchenko, Tamara -Aide Pera, Anthony Program for Older Adults/ Schmidt, Kim Vasquez, Kate Adults w Disabilities Williams, Marcus Nilssen-Mooney, Fjaere Sure, Jeffrey

WIA Advisor Hoa, Long


Classified Staff Carlos Santoyo, School Administrative Assistant Susan Albania, Financial Manager (Interim) Jorge Orrantia, School Office Computer Coordinator Evelina Ortega, Senior Office Technician Loan Nguyen, Office Technician Angela Green, Office Technician Constance Reed, Office Technician

Custodial Miguel Zarate, Plant Manager (Whipple Campus) Jose Soto, Plant Manager (Sun Valley Campus) Rafael Trujillo, Assistant Plant Manager (Poly Campus) Rosa Baires, Building and Grounds Worker (Whipple Campus) Carlos Ortiz, Building and Grounds Worker (Poly Campus)


Aides and Teacher Assistants Marilyn Dong, Educational Aide Maria Ramos, Educational Aide Shawn Harris, Teacher Assistant Ryan Baker, Student Aide Mike Briseno, Student Aide Miriam Corbera, Student Aide Greg De Los Santos, Student Aide Fabian Duran, Student Aide Shelly Gonzalez, Student Aide Ziomara Hernandez, Student Aide Catherine Perez, Student Aide Allan Rabanales, Student Aide

Community Outreach Representative Jennifer Velez

Student Body Workers Ryan Baker, Student Body Evodio Bravo, Student Body Shawn Harris, Student Body

Infant Care Aides Kaytlin Giffin, Infant Care Aide Andrew Lopez, Infant Care Aide


North Hollywood Polytechnic Community Adult School Mission Statement North Hollywood-Polytechnic Community Adult School is committed to providing comprehensive programs that support our diverse student population in developing the skills, knowledge, and confidence necessary to meet their educational and career goals, becoming more productive and informed members of the community.

Schoolwide Student Learning Outcomes – SSLOs Students at NHPCAS will leave our school fully able to:  Develop and apply learned skills encompassing listening, speaking, reading, writing, computation, technology, career and life skills.  Set and meet personal, academic, and/or career goals to develop as a productive and informed member of the community.  Successfully complete at least one NHPCAS course or program of study to achieve one or more – Course Completion, Program Certificate, High School Diploma, GED Certificate, High School Credit or Benchmark Gain.

Book Layout and Design: Q Press, Pasadena

Printed on Recycled Paper.


NHPCAS Self-Study Report, 2012