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ADULT SCHOOL Learning for Life

SELF STUDY REPORT

Western Association of Schools and Colleges for

ABC Adult School 12254 Cuesta Drive, Cerritos, CA 90703 www.abcadultschool.edu

February 6-8, 2017


Self Study Report Western Association of Schools and Colleges for ABC Adult School February 6-8, 2017

ABC Adult School 12254 Cuesta Drive Cerritos, CA 90703 www.abcadultschool.edu


Preface In the six years since our last WASC report, ABC Adult School has been in a process of constant transition and renewal. With the passing of Assembly Bill (AB) 104 on July 1, 2015, the legislature provided the $500 million Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG) to the California Community College Chancellor’s Office to jointly work with the California Department of Education to expand and improve the delivery of educational services to adult learners across the state through the establishment of regional consortia of educational providers. Under AB 104, ABC Adult School is a proud member of PAACE (Partnership for Adult Academic and Career Education) consortium which includes Cerritos Community College, Downey Adult School, Norwalk-La Mirada Adult School, Bellflower Adult School, and ABC Adult School. The upcoming WASC accreditation will chart a new course for ABC Adult School, as the school is implementing its 3-year PAACE consortium plan during the WASC self-study years. ABC Adult School prides itself on the rigorous, standard-based programs we offer. We continue analyzing the data, looking at ways to improve our programs, and making our best efforts in completing the rigorous WASC self-study process during these Adult Education trying times. Our self-study began by conceptualizing our school’s Mission Statement and all of our students learning outcomes. We started the first chapter with the characteristics review of our school and the communities we serve. The second chapter presented the changes and the accomplishments of our school during this process. Following our success with the last accreditation, we retooled our instructional programs with the WASC standards. We differentiated the Expected School-wide Learning Outcomes (SLOs) to better support performance based student learning results. Blending the rigorous staff development and a conservative yet sound fiscal planning, ABC Adult School is now at the forefront of the new WASC guidelines. The School-wide Action Plan explained the education structures that will meet the school Mission Statement and will integrate Student Learning Outcomes into our daily instructions. Our self-study process has profoundly improved our services. WASC Accreditation is an ongoing process. It was clear to me that our stakeholdersour students, faculty, and community members were an integral part to the continued success of ABC Adult School. Our combined work informed the Action Plans that charted the course of the school for the last six years. The needs for Adult education are critical. Our stakeholders will continue to play an important part in our next six-years of innovation, education, and transformation. I look forward to implementing the schoolwide Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and the role we will play in furthering the mission of ABC Adult School!


Table of Contents Preface WASC Visiting Committee Members ABCUSD: Board of Education, District Cabinet Members and Adult School Administration Leadership Team and WASC Self-Study Co-Chairs Focus Group Members Home Group Members Institutional Advisory Committee Members Chapter I: Institutional, Community, and Student Characteristics Chapter II: Progress Report on Past Recommendations Chapter III: Self-Study Findings based on the WASC Postsecondary Criteria Criterion 1 Criterion 2 Criterion 3 Criterion 4 Criterion 5 Criterion 6 Criterion 7 Criterion 8 Criterion 9 Criterion 10 Chapter IV: Revising the School Action Plan Appendices Glossary of Acronyms Board of Education Member Information ABCUSD Organization Chart ABC Adult School Organization Chart Overview of Faculty Staff Survey Student Survey ABC Adult School Locations Map ABCUSD District Map Cuesta Campus Map Cabrillo Lane Campus Map ABC Adult School Mission Statement/SLOs Poster and Bookmark Sample ABC Adult School Fact Sheet 2015-2016 Sample Skills Reports


WASC Visiting Committee Chair: Dr. Stephanie Houston Superintendent, Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program

Members: Mr. James Altuner Magnets Coordinator, Downtown Magnets LAUSD Mr. Dan Christensen Teacher, Chino Valley Adult School Dr. John Kerr Senior Director of Adult School, Baldwin Park Adult and Community Education Mrs. Olga H. Lopez Assistant Principal, South El Monte High School Ms. Elizabeth O’Shea-West Principal, Vista Adult School Ms. Alison Pickering Assistant Principal, Escondido Adult School


ABC Unified School District Board of Education Members: Christopher Apodaca, President Soo Yoo, Vice President Leticia Mendoza, Clerk Olympia Chen, Member Lynda Johnson, Member Maynard Law, Member Sophia Tse, Member

District Administration: Dr. Mary Sieu, Superintendent Dr. Susan Hixson, Assistant Superintendent - Human Resources Valencia Mayfield, Assistant Superintendent - Academic Services Toan Nguyen, Assistant Superintendent - Business Services/Chief Financial Officer Dr. Cheryl Bodger, Director of Schools Dr. Rhonda Buss, Director of Secondary Schools Dr. Colin Sprigg, Director of Information and Technology


ABC Adult School Adult School Administration: Dr. PaoLing Guo, Principal Chuck Minear, Assistant Principal Nancy Pawlisz, Assistant Principal Ami Takanashi, Assistant Principal Natalie Maddox, Transition Counselor Winnie Wong, Financial Aid Coordinator

ADULT SCHOOL Learning for Life


Leadership Team Aasness, Janet George, Kathy - Retired Guo, PaoLing Hernandez, Rudy Hom, Nancy Jhun, Diane

Maddox, Natalie Minear, Chuck Murray, Kerri Palacios, James Paredes, Velia Pawlisz, Nancy

Pinedo, Mary Rose, Jean Schultz, Rachelle Takanashi, Ami Tabon, Todd Wong, Winnie

WASC Self-Study Co-Chairs Kathy George - Retired

Nancy Pawlisz

Curriculum Focus Group Aasness, Janet, Faculty Armiento, Carmen, Faculty Bao, Chit, Faculty Brookler, Julie, Faculty Campos, Vanessa, Support Staff Cham, Nancy, Faculty Chen, Chia-ling, Student Close, Barbara, Faculty Cohen-Doron, Jill, Faculty Craig, Julie, Teacher Elias, Lynda, Faculty Fattorini, Mercedes, Support Staff - Retired Gamble, Paula, Student Hernandez, Irene, Support Staff Hillstead, Lori, Faculty Jackson, Janice, Support Staff - Retired Jang, Lily, Faculty Judy, Laurie, Faculty Kholousi, Mitra, Faculty

Kuo, Christine, Student Kuo, Min, Student Locnikar, Joanne, Faculty Lou, Kimberly, Support Staff Marseille, Luz, Support Staff - Retired Murray, Kerri, Support Staff Nguyen, Esther, Faculty Nguyen, Hahn, Support Staff Ortega, Marta, Faculty Pawlisz, Nancy, Administration Ramirez, Adriana, Support Staff Salazar, Nattaly, Support Staff Shui, Bing, Support Staff Tabon, Todd, Faculty Uyeda, Sharon, Faculty Weston, Rynol, Support Staff Wilson David, Faculty Zalena, Cartagena, Student


Instructional Program Focus Group Ablovatskaya, Nina, Faculty - Resigned Atkinson, Rebekah, Faculty Caliz, Connie, Support Staff Cervantes, Carolyn, Faculty Dichter, Barbara, Student Doshay, Mona, Faculty Eble, Jolene, Student Fonseca, Maribel, Faculty Guo, PaoLing, Administration Hobrecker, Silvana, Faculty Jensen, Katie, Faculty Kellogg, Jennifer, Faculty - Resigned Kim, Jihyun, Support Staff - Resigned Lakin, Sandy, Faculty Lamoureux, Rosa, Faculty Matus, Randi, Support Staff Normoyle, Mike, Faculty Oliveira, Christine, Faculty Olivera, Nabawia, Faculty

Palacios, James, Support Staff Poirier, Brady, Faculty Reynolds, Cathy, Faculty - Resigned Reynolds, Wanda, Student Rodriguez, Thomas, Support Staff Rose, Jean, Faculty Sanchez, Natalie, Support Staff - Resigned Schulz, Rachelle, Faculty Skube, Margaret, Faculty Stenzel, Krista, Support Staff Takhar, Bob, Faculty Tehrani, Maria, Support Staff Till, Bob, Student Till, Karen, Student Torres, Jeanne, Support Staff Wong, Winnie, Administration Zhu, Chong Li, Support Staff Zimmerman, Linda, Student


Student Support Services Focus Group Bair, Richard, Faculty Burton, Frank, Support Staff Chen, James, Faculty Cherry, Tony, Support Staff Colvin, Deana, Support Staff Dennis, Karen, Faculty DeVries, Evelyn, Faculty Gonzalez, Robert, Support Staff Grissom, Georgia, Faculty Huntsman, Sandy, Faculty - Retired Jhun, Diane, Faculty Johnson, Vicki, Faculty Kane, JoDee, Faculty Kucera, Joyce, Faculty Li, Victor, Faculty - Resigned Lorusso, Virginia, Faculty Lubrino, Teresita, Faculty

Marseille, Robert, Faculty - Retired Mata, Micah, Faculty Mendoza, Carmen, Student Navarro, Arnold, Support Staff Ngo, Grace, Support Staff Olguin, Diana Contreras, Student Park, Charlene, Faculty Peterson, Janice, Administration - Retired Quest, Jane, Faculty Rodriguez, Laura, Support Staff Saavedra, David, Faculty Shepherd, Jessie, Faculty Suero, Mona, Faculty Tsai, Nancy, Faculty Vizcarra, Maria, Support Staff Young, Bonnie, Support Staff Yun, Chin Koo, Support Staff


Use of Assessment Focus Group Alfaro, Luis, Support Staff Barbosa, Rosalba, Faculty Caballero, Larry, Faculty Cepeda, Armando, Faculty - Resigned Echols, Elaine, Faculty George, Kathy, Faculty Hernandez, Rudy, Support Staff Hernandez, Terridawn, Faculty Hom, Nancy, Faculty Kirkwood, Jody, Faculty Le, Kimberly, Faculty Lebron, Yvonne, Faculty Lizarde, Erica, Faculty Madueno, Margarita, Support Staff Maestas, Matilda, Faculty - Resigned Mantilla, Gabriel, Faculty Mares, Lorena, Faculty Minear, Chuck, Administration

Muto, Kevin, Faculty Paredes, Velia, Faculty Payan, Felipe, Faculty - Resigned Pena, Brenda, Faculty Perez, Angie, Support Staff Pinedo, Mary, Support Staff Quezada, Glenn, Faculty - Resigned Richey, Shelly, Faculty Rodriguez, Jorge, Support Staff Rojas, Wendy, Faculty Salcedo, George, Support Staff Tanis, Carmen Flores, Faculty Tong, Rita, Faculty Vega, Jose, Faculty Vergara, Jessica, Support Staff Wang, Ming, Faculty Yao, Linda, Faculty


Support Staff Meeting Members Campos, Vanessa, Support Staff Colvin, Deana, Support Staff Fattorini, Mercedes, Support Staff - Retired Guo, PaoLing, Administration Hernandez, Irene, Support Staff Hernandez, Rudy, Support Staff Maddox, Natalie, Administration Minear, Chuck. Administration Murray, Kerri, Support Staff Pawlisz, Nancy, Administration Pinedo, Mary, Support Staff

Ramirez, Adriana, Support Staff Sanchez, Natalie, Support Staff - Resigned Salazar, Nattaly, Support Staff Stenzel, Krista, Support Staff Takanashi, Ami, Administration Tehrani, Maria, Support Staff Van Aaslburg, Melissa, Support Staff Vizcarra, Maria, Support Staff Wong, Winnie, Administration Young, Bonnie, Support Staff

Academics Home Group Aasness, Janet, Faculty Caballero, Larry, Faculty Cham, Nancy, Faculty Cuellar, Kara, Support Staff Fuentes, Lupe, Support Staff Hom, Nancy, Faculty

Lizarde, Erica, Faculty Madueno, Margarita, Support Staff Maddox, Natalie, Administration Torres, Jeanne, Support Staff Wilson, David, Faculty

Adults with Disabilities Home Group Cervantes, Carolyn, Faculty Jhun, Diane, Faculty

Pawlisz, Nancy, Administration Tabon, Todd, Faculty


Community Education Home Group Armiento, Carmen, Faculty Bao, Chit, Faculty Chen, James, Faculty Close, Barbara, Faculty DeVries, Evelyn, Faculty Doshay, Mona, Faculty Hillstead, Lori, Faculty Jang, Lily, Faculty Jhun, Diane, Faculty Kane, JoDee, Faculty Lamoureux, Rosa, Faculty Lebron, Yvonne, Faculty Lorusso, Virginia, Faculty

Mata, Micah, Faculty Park, Charlene, Faculty Pawlisz, Nancy - Administration Quezada, Glenn, Faculty - Resigned Sanborn, Bruce, Faculty Shepherd, Jessie, Faculty Tabon, Todd, Faculty Tanis, Carmen Flores, Faculty Teng, Whea-Fun (Gloria), Faculty Tsai, Nancy, Faculty Wang, Ming Hua, Faculty Yao, Linda, Faculty

CTC Home Group Barbosa, Rosalba, Faculty Cervantes, Carolyn, Faculty Caliz, Connie, Support Staff Dennis, Karen, Faculty Echols, Elaine, Faculty Elias, Lynda, Faculty Elsoudani, Nabawia, Faculty Grissom, Georgia, Faculty Laygo, Leslie Ann, Faculty Le, Kimberly, Faculty Lubrino, Teresita, Faculty Matus, Randi, Support Staff Mares, Lorena, Faculty Minear, Chuck, Administration

Muto, Kevin, Faculty Nguyen, Esther, Faculty Normoyle, Mike, Faculty Ortega, Marta, Faculty Pena, Brenda, Faculty Poirier, Brady, Faculty Richey, Shelley, Faculty Rodriguez, Desy, Support Staff Rodriguez, Thomas, Support Staff Rojas, Wendy, Faculty Schulz, Rachelle, Faculty Takhar, Bob, Faculty Urfano, Rose, Support Staff Vega, Jose, Faculty


ESL Home Group Ascensio, Julio, Faculty Bair, Richard, Faculty Fonseca, Maribel, Faculty Hernandez, Terridawn, Faculty Jensen Frasher, Katie, Faculty Johnson, Vicki, Faculty Judy, Laurie, Faculty Kholousi, Mitra, Faculty Kildall, Patricia, Faculty Kirkwood, Marta (Jody), Faculty Kucera, Joyce, Faculty Lizarde, Erica, Faculty Locnikar, Joanne, Faculty Lou, Kimberly, Support Staff Maestas, Matilda, Faculty

Ngo, Grace, Support Staff Oliveira, Christine, Faculty Paredes, Veila, Faculty Perez, Angie, Faculty Provence, Mark, Faculty Quest, Jane, Faculty Rose, Jean, Faculty Saavedra, David, Faculty Shui, Bing, Support Staff Suero, Mona, Faculty Takanashi, Ami, Administration Tong, Rita, Faculty Yun, Chin Koo (Jean), Support Staff Zhu, Chongli, Support Staff

Parent Education Home Group Aasness, Janet, Faculty Brookler, Julie, Faculty Cham, Nancy, Faculty Cohen-Doron, Jill, Faculty

Hom, Nancy, Faculty Lakin, Sandy, Faculty Nguyen, Hahn, Support Staff Takanashi, Ami, Administration


Institutional Advisory Board Members Clements, Marjean – SELACO Faldu, Dave – Denny’s Restaurant Jacildo, Dora – South Asian Helpline and Referral Agency (SAHARA) Kang, Steven – KAGW, LLP Guo, PaoLing, Ed.D. -ABC Adult School Lee, Bill – Gateway Guardian Newspaper Liang, Mary Li-Ling, Ph.D. - Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Los Angeles

Lipton, Daniel – Skill House Learning Minear, Chuck - ABC Adult School Nadeem, Sarah – Attorney at Law Pawlisz, Nancy - ABC Adult School Owen, Dorothy – Artesia Cerritos Women’s Club Shah, Parimal – Pioneer Money Corp. Takanashi, Ami - ABC Adult School


Chapter

One

Institutional, Community & Student Characteristics


Chapter

Notes

One

Institutional, Community, and Student Characteristics Institution’s Mission and Schoolwide Learner Outcomes Institutional Information ABC Adult School is a proud member of the ABC Unified School District. In 1965 Artesia, Bloomfield, and Carmenita School Districts unified and became known as the ABC Unified School District. Cerritos is often mistaken as the “C” in ABC Unified School District. Rather it is the former Carmenita School District that merged with the school districts of former neighboring cities Artesia and Bloomfield that eventually comprised the ABC Unified School District. The community served by ABC Unified School District includes the cities of Artesia, Cerritos, and Hawaiian Gardens, as well as portions of Lakewood, Long Beach, and Norwalk. Located in an attractive suburb on the southeast edge of Los Angeles County, the District is within easy driving distance of major Southern California attractions, Pacific Ocean beaches, airports, universities and within two hours of mountain resorts. The ethnically and economically diverse community is strongly supportive of ABC schools.

Chapter One Page 1


Notes

The ABC Unified School District is known throughout the State of California as a leader in educational planning and innovation. The District has received county, state and national recognition for its counseling programs, bilingual education, science programs, staff development opportunities, high school programs and other departments. Staff members have been selected to participate on state and national educational committees and have been invited to make presentations at national, state, and local conferences. Students have been recognized as National Merit scholars, Academic Decathlon winners and participants in the Model United Nations program. Approximately 85 percent of graduating students go on to higher education. Ongoing partnerships with community colleges, regional occupational programs, state universities, and local businesses are an integral part of the District’s planning process for educational improvement. An atmosphere of participative management prevails with teachers, administrators, and the community working together to build strong, quality programs. Noteworthy programs include magnet schools, a guidance program for elementary students, crisis intervention teams at each of the high schools, a teen parent program, an extensive staff development program, a university prep school, and a comprehensive adult school. Strong support services have resulted in well-maintained schools, an innovative data processing department and a self-funding food services operation. Programs for special education students, gifted and talented students and limited or nonEnglish speaking students are offered, as well as a wide variety of independent study, career technical education and Advanced Placement courses. The Superintendent is Dr. Mary Sieu. ABC Unified School District includes nineteen elementary schools, five middle schools, three comprehensive high schools, a college prep 7-12 school, a continuation high school, infant/child centers, extended-day care, and an adult school. The District is governed by a seven-member Board of Education. The diverse ethnicity of the community is reflected in the K-12 population, which includes American Indian/Alaskan Natives, Asians, African-Americans, Filipinos, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders and Caucasians. The precursor to what we now know as ABC Adult School was established in 1959, but ABC Adult School as a complete entity was established and began serving students in 1965, the same year the ABC School District was unified. ABC Adult School is one of the state’s leading comprehensive adult schools. Located in Southeast Los Angeles County in the City of Cerritos the Adult School’s main campuses serve almost 9,000 students per year in six major department areas. The Mission of the ABC Adult School is to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational and personal goals through lifelong learning.

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The main office and school site is headquartered at 12254 Cuesta Drive in the city of Cerritos, next door to the District’s continuation high school. The phone number of the main office is (562) 926-6734. Our extension campus, Cabrillo Lane Education Center (Cabrillo Lane), is located at 20122 Cabrillo Lane, Cerritos. Cabrillo Lane’s phone number is (562) 809-9011. Cabrillo Lane is shared with other District programs: Adult Transitions, BRIDGES, STEP, PATH, STAY and Independent Study for Special Education students.

Notes

The school currently operates during a traditional school year format. Classes tend to begin near the beginning of September and end in the middle of June. The school year is divided into quarters, trimesters and semesters, depending on the department. ABC Adult School also typically offers a four-week summer session depending on funding. This adds up to 177 instructional days during a regular, non-furloughed school year. Fifteen days of instruction were offered in summer 2016. As of the 2016 school year, ABC Adult School was the 12th largest adult school in the state of California. The Principal is Dr. PaoLing Guo and there are three Assistant Principals: Mr. Chuck Minear, Ms. Nancy Pawlisz, and Ms. Ami Takanashi. The Transition Counselor is Natalie Maddox and the Financial Aid Coordinator is Winnie Wong. In addition, the school employs a full time Job Developer: Mary Pinedo. The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing certifies and licenses all ABC Adult School teachers, with the exception of “Professional Experts” who teach courses for the CTE and Community Education programs. The average number years of teaching experience amongst the certificated staff is 19. Our Adult School employs the following: full time teachers (23), part time teachers (52), full time administrative staff (6), and other support staff (41).

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Notes

ABC Adult School is currently divided into the following departments:

Career Technical Education (CTE) – This department is fully accredited by COE - The Council on Occupational Education and includes courses designed to prepare students for Industry Certification and employment. Classes are organized into eleven programs. Students who finish a program are issued a Career Technical Diploma from the School District. To receive a Career Technical Diploma, students must have a high school diploma or equivalent. Students are also qualified for various industry certification exams including MOS, Adobe, QuickBooks, A+, Network+, Server+, Medical Assistant, Medical Billing and Coding and Pharmacy Technician. Licensure is also provided for Pharmacy Technician and Cosmetology. ABC Adult School houses a state of the art testing center on campus and most industry and high school equivalency exams can be taken on premises. CTE courses are offered on a quarter and semester system. This department operates independently from the other departments listed below but does maintain a working relationship with each. Programs usually take a hiatus during the summer although students may take supplemental, non-required courses during the summer including test prep courses or they may finish internship hours. Summer school depends on the availability of state funding but has been held for 15-19 instructional days with no night hours during the last couple of years. Typical program students take four to six hours of instruction five days a week, which allows them to finish most programs in one year or less. CTE delivers instruction in a traditional classroom which is a mixture of lecture and lab time. Work based activities are included in some programs and internship/externship/ apprenticeship is encouraged but not required in all programs except Medical Assistant and Pharmacy Technician, in which it is required.

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Besides the occupational programs offered, ABC Adult School also offers the following:

Notes

Academics - This semester based program offers courses for adults returning to finish their high school diploma, credit recovery for concurrent high school students, as well as preparation for and administration of the General Education Development Test (GED) and the High School Equivalency Test (HiSET). Academic students may take courses in directed labs or through online internetbased home study. The Learning Center Lab is open Monday through Thursday for self-paced instruction in a lab setting.

English as a Second Language (ESL) - This program operates on a trimester system with six instructional levels and offers literacy, beginning, intermediate, and advanced courses in English as well as citizenship classes to prepare students for the citizenship test. Other specialized skills classes are also offered, such as Daily News, Movie/ Idioms, Conversation, Grammar, Listening, Pronunciation, Reading, Speaking, and Vocabulary. The Language Media Center offers individualized teacher assisted learning to strengthen the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills of the students. A Distance Learning program with DVDs for home study in English and citizenship preparation is also available to students as well as online courses offered through Burlington English.

Adults with Disabilities (AWD) - This semester based program offers courses in communication skills, nutrition, independent living, physical fitness, socialization and workplace skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Teachers hold courses at in-patient care facilities in the community. Community Education - This program offers classes in Arts and Crafts, Health and Fitness, Home Economics, Music, Cooking and Baking Arts classes. Off-site courses are offered at the Cerritos Senior Center and Cerritos Park East Pool. Classes held at the Cerritos Senior Center are designed for seniors 50 years and older. Parent Education - This semester based program offers classes that require parent participation and serve parents and children from four months to five and a half years. Classes are offered five days a week at three sites in the District and include a designated preppy K class and an evening class for working parents. Assessment is ongoing and immediate feedback is provided on a daily basis as the teacher, parent and child communicate areas of strength and growth. Handouts, informal and formal discussions are provided on a variety of parenting topics including: safety, language development, the importance of play and kindergarten readiness. Besides time in class, parents and children attend field trips in the community each month. These parents become “lifelong learners,� as they continue to stay involved in their children’s elementary school programs and other activities. More than 300 parents participate each year.

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Notes

The Parent Leadership Academy (PLA), under the direction of the ABC Adult School, provides workshops to approximately 500 parents each year throughout the District on a variety of important topics. These include; college readiness, K-12 curriculum and changes, technology for students at home and at school, and the importance of positive social-emotional development. There are workshops presented in Chinese, Korean and Spanish, as well as English. Spanish translation is provided as needed. Parents are able to ask questions of the presenters and engage with other parents as well as learn the content at each workshop. Parents also provide input as to what topics they would like presented in the future. The ABC Unified School District, ABC Council PTA and the ABC Adult School hosts the annual Parent Leadership Conference (PLC) at the Sheraton Cerritos Hotel. This Golden Bell and Magna Award winning conference, which offers a variety of workshops, hosts more than 350 parents, elected officials, and educators from ABC Unified Schools. Workshops are available in English and Spanish and interpreters for Chinese, Korean and Spanish languages are available in an effort to serve the District’s diverse ethnic communities.

Significant School Developments Since the Last WASC Review The adult school is now a member of the PAACE (Partnership for Adult Academic and Career Education) Consortium. Members include: Cerritos College, Bellflower Adult School, Downey Adult School and Norwalk-La Mirada Adult School. The adult school is also now accredited through COE (Council on Occupational Education). As a result, ABC Adult School has changed focus to be more of a career training educational facility. Due to budget constraints, the school was served by only two administrators and now with new funding guidelines, the school is served by one principal, three assistant principals, one financial aid coordinator and one counselor. In accordance with state funding guidelines, the Adults with Disabilities program has been brought back. In addition, the Community Education program and Parent Education program have been changed to be completely fee-based student supported courses. In summer 2016, the adult school switched to a new and updated version of the online registration system, ASAP v3, (Administrative Software Applications Program, version 3). This new cloud-based system that is constantly updated was an upgrade from the last registration system. Many students had trouble registering online using the old system. The new system was launched during the summer when enrollment tends to be lower so that if any problems occurred, fewer students would be affected. Staff were trained during spring 2016 and Chapter One Page 6


training is still ongoing as questions arise. Explicit instructions regarding the new system were written and posted on the website for students to follow before registration occurred. Administrators also visited classes before the start of the summer registration to let students know about the new system. The new system allows the adult school to be in compliance with State and Federal accountability requirements.

Notes

As of September 2016, each department will not only have a TOSA (Teacher on Special Assignment) but also a department chair. The TOSAs focus is on curriculum and the department chair’s focus is on program growth. The school’s website was completely updated in fall 2016. The website had become cluttered with extraneous and out-of-date information. The website features a responsive design that adapts to mobile and tablet devices. It also allows students to register for classes from virtually any platform. The cloudbased registration now works independently of the adult school’s infrastructure making it more resilient to downtimes and internet outages. As of spring 2016, plans to move the current Cabrillo Lane front office to a more visible location at the front of the school were explored. Plans are being drawn by a District hired architect. No completion date has yet to be established. It was also recognized in spring 2016, that digital monitoring and surveillance systems on campus were needed. Plans and quotes were drawn and ABC Adult School will move forward with the installation of the surveillance system. The cameras on the Cuesta campus will be installed first followed by the Cabrillo Lane campus with the completion of the new front office. On the Cabrillo Lane campus, old kindergarten rooms were converted to a stateof-the-art cosmetology center. The Cerritos Beauty Academy has received State and COE approval and the program will begin in spring 2017. In spring 2015, also on the Cabrillo Lane campus, an old boiler room was converted to a student lounge. Vending machines were moved from the breezeway to the new student lounge. A sink and microwave as well as tables and chairs were also added for students to use. There is also a heater and fans for inclement weather since the student lounge is open to the breezeway. The original breezeway, next to the lounge, was dark and drafty. New flooring and lights were added and it is a welcome improvement. ABC Adult School built a professional assessment center in Room J on the Cuesta campus. This is an authorized Pearson VUE testing center with two Resource Testing Assistants. It is open Monday through Thursday from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm and Friday from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm. The Pearson VUE tests are wide-ranging, such as CASAS e-testing, TOEFL, GED and HiSET testing, typing certification, Microsoft Technology Associate, QuickBooks Certification, Adobe Certification, National Healthcare Association certification and various tests through Pearson VUE like CBEST, CSET, RICA, CPACE, A+, Network +, Microsoft, Cisco, Oracle and many others. AP Chinese and Japanese testing is offered in May to local high school students as well. Chapter One Page 7


Notes

An ADA compliant restroom attached to the Assessment Center was added in spring 2016. In conjunction with USC, a telehealth suite was constructed in one of the rooms of the Assessment Center. This is available for all enrolled students who wish to access mental health services offered via the internet in a private and secure room. The ABC Unified School District switched to a new Google based email system in 2013. District training occurred before the switch to ensure that all staff were familiar with the new email system. In addition, Google Drive was also included and available for all staff to use. The “apps� in Google Drive allow for sharing of documents, spreadsheets and forms. The Drive allows for unlimited storage. Training for the Google Drive apps initially occurred and is ongoing. On the Cabrillo Lane campus, a new state of the art multi-purpose room was completed in fall 2012 and is currently used for dance and exercise classes. Also in fall 2012, a new restroom facility opened, next to the multi-purpose room. It has two separate facilities, is handicap accessible and prevents students from having to walk across the parking lot for restroom use. Since the majority of students in nearby classrooms are seniors, it is a real improvement in school facilities.

Specific Changes in Programs Since the Last WASC Review In the CTE department, most of the 2015 Carl Perkins Grant funding was used to add the Cosmetology program. The LEA (Local Education Authority) is always expanding to meet the needs of the community. The Office Occupations program is being enhanced by upgrading to the 21st Technology Data Entry program which will include soft and professional skills. The plan for next year is to expand the Video Production/Animated Media Design program by moving to a bigger room and having a studio production area to allow students to work in a real video editing environment to create a professional portfolio. Online courses are being offered through Lynda.com to facilitate the learning experience for students who cannot attend traditional classes and prefer to work online. Biannual Advisory Committee meetings are held for each of the eleven career programs where advisory members give their input and recommendations to ensure that the quality of instruction meets the business standards.

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All teachers strive to introduce the newest technology in the classroom. They are always learning, researching and improving their teaching methods and tools to meet the 21st century technology and to make sure that students are ready to successfully enter the job market after graduation. Teachers are offered Lynda. com accounts which are accessible to them at any time to view tutorials and learn more about the subjects they are teaching in order to continuously enhance and improve their curriculum. New 55-inch and 65-inch Smart TVs were installed in all the CTE classrooms on both campuses to replace out-of-date projectors and screens.

Notes

In-house workshop training and staff development are conducted every week where teachers share ideas and learn about new topics. This year teachers were trained on Canvas, social media and Facebook for businesses, Google Classroom, Google Apps, and the new ASAP v3 attendance system that was implemented summer of 2016. All teachers were involved in the COE accreditation in 2015, and it was a learning experience for them. Teachers also attend local workshops, seminars and online webinars to bring the newest ideas to the classroom. Medical teachers and students always volunteer at health fair events where they share their knowledge with community members and learn what is new in the field from the health care providers attending the event. In the Academics program, to align with the PAACE Consortium, the math requirement was reduced to 20 credits as opposed to 30 credits required by the School District. During the 2015-2016 school year a structured math class that met two times a week was added to assist students who struggled with math, but the class was unable to continue due to low enrollment. The Learning Center Lab now has two instructors who have mathematics credentials who can assist students needing assistance with math. The instructors are available two mornings and three evenings to focus on math-specific questions. The Academics program expanded the online high school subjects program by adding 28 A-G approved courses and four levels of Integrated Math. GED and HiSET preparation courses are now available online as well as in class. Evening lab hours have been extended until 9:00 pm Monday through Thursday. In fall 2016, a transition counselor was hired to oversee Academics, assist with financial aid implementation and help students transition from department to department. As part of the PAACE Consortium, the adult school has partnered with Cerritos Community College in the PAACE Program. This program helps Academics students who have earned their high school diploma or high school equivalency to make the transition to Cerritos Community College. Representatives from the college meet with interested students to help them with the application process, financial aid forms, assessment, course planning and campus tours. In the future, the adult school is looking to offer entry level college courses on campus. The goal of the PAACE Program is to support students as much as possible in crossing the bridge to higher education. Chapter One Page 9


Notes

The ESL department purchased iPads for all teachers and paraeducators and three iPad carts, with 40 iPads each. To implement technology in the classroom, apps were purchased and installed on the new iPads. SMART Boards and document readers were also purchased to replace broken ones so that all classrooms had working equipment. New projectors and Apple TVs were installed in all ESL classrooms. To supplement the purchase of this equipment, staff development was focused on technology. Trainers from OTAN (Outreach and Technical Assistance Network), technology trainers from the District Office and school, textbook representatives, and authors came to the staff development meetings to offer technology training. They presented workshops on different technology such as Google Drive, Google Docs, Google Apps, textbook’s My LanguageLab, textbook training, interactive functions, as well as other language apps. Teachers were also sent to observe an Apple centric school to see how iPads were integrated in the classroom. Another emphasis in the ESL department was to provide students the skills to transition into post-secondary education and workplace readiness. Two new textbook series for all levels were purchased which addresses this curriculum: Project Success and Stand Out. Project Success was also purchased for the language lab. For the beginning levels two sets of Side by Side Plus were purchased. These are all-skills, standards-based programs that integrate life-skill competencies contained in CASAS and EL Civics. TOEFL preparation textbooks and materials were also purchased for the new class and the language lab. ESL teachers received further training at the annual California EL Civics and Citizenship Conference on January 29, 2016 for a day of workshops on COAAPS (Civic Objectives and Additional Assessment Plans), technology and citizen preparation. Building the program has been a goal of the department. Since 2014, two more classes were added in the evening, for a total of four classes. Having more ESL levels has better served the students. In the daytime, two “English with iPad” classes, an advanced pronunciation, an extra level class, and a TOEFL Preparation class were introduced. Evening classes started again on the Cabrillo Lane campus in January 2017. The evening classes at Cabrillo Lane were previously discontinued due to budget cuts. With new funding, evening classes were able to be reinstated thus serving a need for the South end of the district. In addition, three off-site classes were started at local elementary and middle schools. Four teachers were given “Status” (permanent) positions. The ESL department also started offering Saturday field trips. The field trips are scheduled every other month and are open to all ESL students for a nominal fee of $2.

Chapter One Page 10


Burlington English, an online program, was purchased to serve students who are unable to attend the regular ESL classes. It offers instruction and practice for every level—beginning to advanced. It includes practice in language skills, EL Civics-based life skills, as well as workplace fluency and career-path transitions. It also provides CASAS competencies lessons and practice tests. The Distance Learning teacher is able to access data analysis, performance overview features, and track student progress.

Notes

The Adults with Disabilities program was brought back in 2014-2015. Three classes are currently held at two off site locations. Building the program continues to be a goal. The program that was known as Consumer Awareness is now called Community Education. The fitness classes used to be listed under the Health and Safety title and now are listed under Health and Fitness. The Community Education program is now completely fee based and growth of the program continues to be a goal. In an ongoing effort to meet the needs of the students, the Parent Education program has updated the age ranges and times of the classes offered. More classes in the mornings were offered when demand is highest and an infant class for parents with children aged 4 - 15 months was also added. Parent Education has increased the number and variety of field trips offered in its classes in order to expand student awareness of community resources. Parent Education classes have also focused on multicultural diversity by giving students the opportunity to plan class activities that highlight their individual cultures. Students are invited to share artifacts, stories, songs, dances, foods, customs and crafts with their classmates. The Parent Leadership Academy and Parent Leadership Conference were honored in 2015 by the National School Board Association (NSBA). The NSBA’s highest honor, the Magna Award, was presented to the Parent Leadership Academy and Conference. The programs, now in their 21st year, were also featured in the April 2015 issue of the American School Board Journal. The PLA and PLC have continued to expand and improve by offering more PLA workshops throughout the year and by providing more workshops in parents’ native language. The Job Search Workshops and Job Search Skills series have been restructured. Initially, there were no specific dates or topics listed for the Job Search Workshops and the Job Search Skills were offered quarterly with a $20 charge. Both elicited low turn-out. With the addition of a new job developer in 2013 the series has been adjusted and the Job Search Skills Workshops series are now offered each quarter. They are held on Thursdays from 2:45 - 3:45 p.m. The workshops include: Self-Assessment - Strengths and Skills, Developing Your Resume and Cover Letter, Accessing Job Leads and Job Search, The Art of Completing Job Application and Present Your Best Self and Interview Skills.

Chapter One Page 11


Notes

The attendance at the workshops has improved and students have given positive feedback about the content of the workshops. In addition, a series of ten DVDs called Getting the Job You Really Want were purchased. The DVDs correlate to the workshops so that if students are unable to attend the workshop they can get similar instruction through the DVDs. In addition, students are encouraged to use a Job Readiness Checklist that was created to help them prepare for their apprenticeship and job search. A Resume Lab is also offered and is an open lab for students who need to create or update their resume. Students also typically ask for resume reviews. They also use the lab to create or update their cover letters, perform job searches and complete online job applications. Some students also use the lab to practice keyboarding/data entry skills or to finish homework for their current classes. ABC Adult School formed a marketing committee to explore and find ways to promote and market the school that are free or low-cost. One of the major ideas is to focus on social networking and update the school’s Facebook page. Increasing marketing strategies continues to be a goal of the adult school.

Student Demographics During the 2015-2016 school year, 8,781 unduplicated students attended ABC Adult School. The average student age is 46 years old. Of all Adult School students, 48.03% are native English speakers; 20.6% are native Spanish speakers; 9.10% are native Chinese speakers; 8.77% are native Korean speakers; 4.19% are native Tagalog speakers; 1.20% are native Vietnamese speakers; 0.74% are native Cambodian speakers; 0.29% are native Farsi speakers; 0.16% are native Russian speakers; 0.01% are native Lao speakers; 6.90% listed “other language” as their primary language, which includes Japanese and indigenous languages of India, Pakistan, Africa, and other areas.

Students’ Native Language  English speakers  Spanish speakers  Chinese speakers  Korean speakers  Tagalog speakers  Vietnamese speakers  Cambodian speakers  Farsi speakers  Russian speakers  Lao speakers  “Other language”

Chapter One Page 12


Of ABC Adult School students, 24.5% have had fewer than 12 years of schooling, with no diploma or high school equivalency certificate; 24.4% have a high school diploma or equivalent; while 35.1% have an A.A./A.S. degree or higher. Approximately 26% of students were educated outside of the United States.

Notes

Regarding work force status, 34.10% of students are currently employed; 29.04% identified themselves as unemployed; another 18.99% as retired; and 17.87% as not employed and not seeking work.

Students’ Work Force Status

 Currently employed  Unemployed  Retired  Not employed and not seeking work

The Adult School student body is evenly distributed across age ranges: 7.4% are under 18 and attend the Academics department, and 22.9% are over 61. Between the ages of 18-61, the student body population is 69.7% and is evenly distributed with groups ranging from 10% of the total school population.

Chapter One Page 13


Notes

The primary goals of students enrolling in ABC Adult School are: to meet a personal goal (41.08%); to improve English skills (19.12%); to meet a family goal (12.78%); to get a job (10.31%); to retain a job (8.67%); enter college or training (2.13%); to improve basic literacy skills (1.94%); to complete a work-based project (1.21%); to earn a high school diploma or high school equivalency certificate (0.40%); to enter the military (0.03%); to attain U.S. Citizenship (0.01%); other goal (1.65%); no specified goal (0.67%).

Students’ Primary Goals  to meet a personal goal  to improve English skills  to meet a family goal  to get a job  to retain a job  enter college or training  to improve basic literacy skills  to complete a work-based project  to earn a high school diploma or high school equivalency certificate  to enter the military  to attain U.S. Citizenship  other goal  no specified goal

Many students enroll in more than one course and often in more than one program, either concurrently or sequentially. Many students enroll with a specific agenda; others find their goals expand as they master initial coursework. Students learn about the school’s course offerings through semi-annual course catalog and quarterly schedules. Course catalogs are mailed to 76,000 area residents. The newly updated website also gives up-to-the minute information and allows for online registration. The adult school has a Facebook page where events are posted several times a week. However, “word-of-mouth” is probably the most effective method of advertising. Many satisfied students tell family members and friends about their experiences at the adult school, which in turn brings more students to the adult school’s programs. The student population at ABC Adult School reflects the diversity of the surrounding communities. The largest populations attending classes are Hispanic (34.68%) and Asian (34.12%). Other groups include: Caucasian (18.22%); Filipino (6.30%); African-American (5.19%); Pacific Islander (0.48%); American Indian (0.42%); Alaskan (0.02%); unspecified (0.37%); other (0.20%). Over one-third of the students are currently employed and 72% are female. The majority of students are between the ages of 20 and 61.

Chapter One Page 14


Students’ Ethnicity

Notes  Hispanic  Asian  Caucasian  Filipino  African-American  Pacific Islander  American Indian  Alaskan  Unspecified  Other

governance structure of the school The Principal, Dr. PaoLing Guo, is supported by Assistant Principals Chuck Minear, Nancy Pawlisz and Ami Takanashi as well as Financial Aid Coordinator Winnie Wong and Transition Counselor Natalie Maddox. There is a full Leadership Team that meets once a month and discusses schoolwide issues. It consists of Network Analyst II Kerri Murray, Technology Assistant Rudy Hernandez, Job Developer Mary Pinedo, Union Representative Jean Rose and General Maintenance worker James Palacios. All TOSAs are included in the team. They are Rachelle Schulz (CTE), Janet Aasness (Academics and Marketing), Velia Parades (ESL), Nancy Hom (Parent Education), and Diane Jhun (Community Education and AWD). Department Chairs are included as well. They are Rachelle Schulz (CTE), Janet Aasness and Nancy Hom (Academics and Parent Education), Velia Parades (ESL) and Todd Tabon (Community Education and AWD).

Chapter One Page 15


Notes

Student Learning Outcomes ABC Adult School has identified the following Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): ABC Adult School prepares students to be: Self-Directed Lifelong Learners who: ƒƒ Acquire knowledge and skills appropriate to their stage of life. ƒƒ Set and achieve career, educational and/or personal goals. ƒƒ Seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities. Effective Communicators who: ƒƒ Demonstrate appropriate listening, speaking, reading, writing, creative, and/ or computational skills. ƒƒ Apply communication skills to professional, technical and other real-life situations. ƒƒ Enhance and improve their ability to understand and be understood by others. Critical Thinkers and Problem-Solvers who: ƒƒ Exercise their powers of judgment, perception, and inference. ƒƒ Assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources. ƒƒ Apply knowledge to professional, technical and other real-life situations. ABC Adult School used a collaborative self-study process to develop the SLOs. Throughout this process, the school emphasized results that would apply to all programs and all students-who could be assessed-and that would serve as authentic foundations for the school improvement process. Through formal meetings and the distribution of memorandums and minutes, a core WASC Leadership group first provided an overview for students, staff and community representatives.

Programs Offered ABC Adult School has structured its program offerings to meet community needs. Career Technical Education classes, High School Diploma/High School Equivalency classes, ESL classes, Adults with Disabilities, Community Education and Parent Education classes all contribute to an excellent learning experience for the students. The total number of duplicated students during the 2015-2016 school year was 27, 833. ABC Adult School and its programs provide a vital service to the surrounding community. The school’s leadership continues to explore and plan proactively in anticipation of future community needs. Chapter One Page 16


According to the contract between the ABC Federation of Teachers and the ABC Unified School District, the minimum ratio is 20 to 1: Twenty registered students to each teacher. This is valid in most programs with the exception of the Academics program. Teachers work with administrators to set the maximum number allowed per class, depending on classroom size and subject taught.

Notes

There are eleven Career Technical diplomas that can be earned, a high school diploma and various certificates are available for any course completions. Students in any program (except Academics) can also request certificates of completion from any course that they finish. ABC Adult School follows the ABC Unified School District calendar to schedule the adult school master calendar. The calendar is available on Google and the school’s website. The District calendar is negotiated with the three unions: ABCFT (ABC Federation of Teachers), CSEA (California School Employees Association) and AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees).

total nuMBer of staff MeMBers Starting in July 2016, ABC Adult School has four full-time administrators. Principal Dr. PaoLing Guo is aided by Assistant Principal Chuck Minear, who is in charge of the CTE program and COE accreditation. Assistant Principal Nancy Pawlisz is in charge of the Cabrillo Lane site, Community Education and Adults with Disabilities programs. The third assistant principal is Ami Takanashi, who is in charge of ESL, Parent Education, and PLC/PLA. The administrative team also consists of the Financial Aid Coordinator Winnie Wong and the Transition Counselor Natalie Maddox who oversees the Academics department. TOSAs (Teachers on Special Assignment) help to add student and site support. They are used to assist administration and teaching staff in areas such as staff development, class scheduling, student career counseling, teacher and administrative support. Department Chairs were also added in September 2016 for program and school support. ABC Adult School currently employs 122 people. Out of this number, 80 are certificated teaching staff with an average of 19 years teaching experience, and 42 are classified support staff.

Chapter One Page 17


Notes

Community Information The ABC Adult School service area is made up of several very diverse communities. Some of those communities are highlighted below along with unique statistical data.

Cerritos Originally incorporated in 1956 as “Dairy Valley”, Cerritos has become an ethnically diverse, upper-middle class, educated community. In 1956 Dairy Valley was home to many dairies and poultry farms. In fact, cows outnumbered residents 29-to-1. In the 1960’s, increasing land values and property taxes made dairy operations less profitable, and residential housing began to develop in earnest. In 1967, the community changed its name to Cerritos, after the original Spanish land grant Rancho Los Cerritos. By 1970, the city had grown considerably, and city leaders adopted a program of controlled development. The city is innovative: in 1978, it opened the nation’s first solar-heated city hall; in the 1980’s, the Cerritos Auto Square was developed; in 1993, the world-class Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts opened; and in 2002, the nation’s first titanium-clad structure, the Cerritos Library, debuted with 82,500 square feet of space in three floors of architecturally fluid design. The Cerritos Sculpture Garden was dedicated to the community in 2006. The beautiful garden offers a setting for the city’s growing collection of public artwork. Today, Cerritos is a thriving commercial center with 50% of its land reserved for residents. Of city residents, 65% have a library card, versus a 20% national average. Cerritos has a population of 49,975 and a median household income of $91,487. The average home in Cerritos sells for over $596,500. Ninety-two percent of the population has a high school diploma or higher. More than 60% of residents speak another language than English at home. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Asian (61.9%), White (23.1%), Hispanic (12%), AfricanAmerican (6.9%), Pacific Islander (0.3%), Native American (0.1%), multiracial (3.8%), other (3.7%).

Artesia Once a farm and dairy center, is now a multicultural community named for the artesian wells in the area. Artesia was settled by Dutch and Portuguese farmers and today has a large number of Asian Indian-owned stores and restaurants along Pioneer Boulevard.

Chapter One Page 18


Artesia has a population of 16,961 and a median household income of $60,544. The average home in Artesia sells for $401,000. Seventy-seven percent of the population has a high school diploma or higher. More than 65% of residents speak another language than English at home. Artesia resides entirely within the ABC Unified School District boundaries. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: White (44%), Hispanic (38%), Asian (27%), African-American (3.6%), Native American and Pacific Islander (1%), multi-racial (5%).

Notes

Hawaiian Gardens Incorporated on April 9, 1964, this small city (less that one square mile) has 14,592 residents and has steady and stable population growth. The Hawaiian Gardens Casino is now the city’s largest employer. Located in the ABC Unified School District, Hawaiian Gardens contains one middle school and two elementary schools. Fifty-seven percent of the population have a high school diploma or higher. Over 75% of the residents speak a language other than English at home. The median house price is $242,000 and the median household income is $39,073. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Hispanic (75.9%), Asian (11.7%), White (8.1%), African-American (3.3%), Pacific Islander (0.3%), Native American (0.06%), multiracial (1.1%) and other (0.3%).

Lakewood Incorporated on April 16, 1954 with extensive development at the end of World War II. Lakewood has become predominantly a single-family community with 85 percent of its housing units being single-family detached structures, and about 72 percent being owner-occupied. Lakewood stretches over 9.5 square miles with a population of 81,611. The median household income is $79,113 and the average home sells for $415,000. Eighty-seven percent of the population has a high school diploma or higher. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: White (56%), Hispanic (22.8%), Asian (16.4%), African-American (8.7%), Pacific Islander (0.9%), Native American (0.7%), multiracial (5.7%), and other (11.6%).

Norwalk At the beginning of the 19th century, Norwalk had become established as a dairy center. It was also home of some of the largest sugar beet farms in all of Southern California. Today, the population is 107,096, making it the 14th most populous city in Los Angeles County. The median house price is $323,400 and the median household income is $58,973. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Hispanic (73.7%), White (10.8%), Asian (9%), African-American (4.1%), Native American (1%), multiracial (1%) and other (0.4%).

Chapter One Page 19


Notes

Anaheim Founded by 50 German families in 1857, the city’s name reflects its roots: “Ana” is derived from the nearby Santa Ana River, and “heim” which means “home” in German. Anaheim has a population of 353,741, making it the 10 th most-populated city in California, and ranked 55th in the United States. Anaheim is home to the world famous Disneyland, Anaheim Stadium, the Honda Center and the Anaheim Convention Center, the largest convention center on the West Coast. Disneyland is by far the city’s major employer. The median household income is $60,122 and the median home price is $413,800. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Hispanic (51.8%), White (27.4. %), Asian (15.7%), African American (2.7%), Pacific Islander (0.4%), Native American (0.1%), multiracial (1.7%) and other (0.2%).

Bellflower Bellflower derives its name from the “belle fleur”, a variety of apple which grew abundantly in the region. Bellflower was primarily settled by Dutch dairy farmers, and was later incorporated on September 3, 1957. It is the 25th largest city in Los Angeles County, with a population of 78,441 and a median household income of $49,360. The average home sells for $341,700. Seventy-seven percent of the population has a high school diploma or higher. Just over 50% of residents speak another language than English at home. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Hispanic (52.3%), White (42.2%), African-American (14%), Asian (11.6%), Native American (1%), other (25.8%).

Buena Park Officially incorporated in 1953, Buena Park covers an area of 10.29 square miles. Similar to its neighboring cities, it first became known as a dairy center and later for the well-known Knott’s Berry Farm. Buena Park’s population is 83,270 residents, the median home value is $401,000, and the median household income is $68,884. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: White (57.4%), Hispanic (33.5%), Asian (22.7%), African American (4.5%), Native American (1.8%).

Cypress The dairy theme continued into the incorporation of Cypress as “Dairy City” in 1956. Forest Lawn has a large cemetery and mortuary in Cypress, with bronze and marble statuary, and is the final resting place of Karen Carpenter. Today the population of Cypress is 49,290. and the median household income is $83,819 and the average home sells for $500,000. Over 92% of the population has a high school diploma or higher. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: White (54.4%), Asian (31.3%), Hispanic (18.4%), African-American (3%), Native American (0.5%), multiracial (4.9%). Chapter One Page 20


La Palma

Notes

In 1955 La Palma was home to 18 dairies. It was first incorporated as “Dairyland”. The name was much like the neighboring cities of Dairy Valley in Cerritos and Dairy City in Cypress. Ten years later in 1965 Dairyland changed its name to La Palma to honor Orange County’s Spanish heritage and the City’s main street, La Palma Avenue. Today La Palma spans 1.8 square miles with a population of 15,904. The median household income is $84,026, and home values average $577,300. Ninety-five percent of its residents have a high school diploma or higher. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: Asian (46.5%), White (37.8. %), Hispanic (17.4%), African-American (5.2%), Native American (0.4%), multiracial (4.4%), other (5.4%).

Long Beach After being first settled as a massive Spanish land grant, the city of Long Beach was incorporated in 1888. It is the seventh largest city in California and the 36th largest in the nation and has a population of nearly 474,140 and is home to 28 zip codes. Long Beach has a total area of 65.9 square miles (50.4 square miles is land; 15.4 square miles is water). The Port of Long Beach, one of the world’s largest shipping ports, is key in the global trade marketplace with more than $100 billion worth of cargo moving through the port annually. Long Beach generates about $15 billion in annual trade-related wages. Long Beach is home to the RMS Queen Mary, the Aquarium of the Pacific and every April hosts the Long Beach Grand Prix, a Formula One car race. The median household income is $52,944 while the median house price is $419,000. The race and ethnic origin is as follows: White (46.1%), Hispanic (40.8%), African- American (13.5%), Asian (12.9%), Pacific Islander (1.1%), Native American (0.7%), multiracial (5.3%).

Student Learning Data The primary goals of students enrolling at ABC Adult School are: to meet a personal goal, to improve English, to meet a family goal, to get a job, to retain a job and enter college or training. Many students enroll in more than one course, and often more than one program, either concurrently or sequentially. Many students enroll with a specific agenda; others find their goals expand as they master initial coursework. Students taking ESL and Academics courses are encouraged to transition to CTE classes, in order to gain job skills.

Chapter One Page 21


Notes

onlIne school prograMs The Academic department offers online high school diploma courses through the outsourced Compass Learning Odyssey program which was purchased. Online GED and HiSET preparation is offered through purchased licenses through GED Academy. Students wanting to take online courses must meet a minimum reading level requirement and must devote at least five hours a week to their online coursework. A credentialed teacher monitors the online program, Essays are graded by the credentialed teacher and run through a plagiarism site. For the diploma classes an in-person final is required. The ESL department purchased licenses for Burlington English, an online program, to serve students who are unable to attend the regular ESL classes or for any current ESL student who wants to take additional online classes. It offers instruction and practice for every level—beginning to advanced. It includes practice in language skills, EL Civics-based life skills, as well as workplace fluency and career program transitions. It also provides CASAS competency lessons and practice tests. The online instructor is able to access data analysis, performance overview features, and track student progress. CTE offers online courses through licenses purchased from Lynda.com. Students are tracked through subject matter use and the time spent per subject. There is no final assessment but a certificate of completion is available once the course is finished. All online students who need support can email the online instructor. Help is available for curricular or technical issues. Students may also see the online instructor in person during posted office hours. All online students are included in academic counseling, student awards and other school activities.

schoolwIde learner outcoMes Students taking courses through the adult school’s online program are able to seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities. Students are able to choose from a variety of courses available to improve their educational knowledge, learn and/or improve English skills and begin training for a new career program. Students assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources using available online information to choose appropriate course offerings that best fit their needs. Online courses offer students the ability to work at their own pace, in their own time frame and at their own desired location while providing meaningful educational opportunities. Chapter One Page 22


Chapter

Two

Progress Report on Key Issues since the Previous Self Study


Chapter

Notes

Two

PROGRESS REPORT ON KEY ISSUES SINCE THE PREVIOUS SELF STUDY Following the last WASC Review six years ago, ABC Adult School staff carefully studied the critical areas for follow-up of the visiting team’s recommendations and immediately began collaborative efforts to implement the chosen Action Plans. At the time of the self-study, four Action Plans had been selected and identified as priorities. The Leadership Team, WASC self-study co-chairs and focus group leaders were instrumental in providing the structure and guidance for the school community to gather data, develop plans and timelines, implement new programs, and evaluate progress since the last WASC Review. The implementation of ABC Adult School’s Action Plans has been supported by school and District staff, students, and the wider community.

Chapter Two Page 1


Notes

Action Plan #1 Enhanced counseling support services are needed. For the last six years, three TOSAs (Teachers on Special Assignment) have been providing much of the educational counseling. Rachelle Schulz is in the CTE (Career Technical Education) department with 30 hours per week, Janet Aasness is in the Academics program with 16 hours per week, and Velia Paredes is in the ESL (English as a Second Language) department with 18 hours per week. As of October 2016, a new counselor was hired who will be responsible for all academic counseling. These TOSAs also worked on transitioning students from ESL or Academics into the CTE program for job skills. The new counselor will now take over this responsibility. In addition, a financial aid coordinator was hired in August 2016 to assist with setting up a Student Financial Aid program and counsel students on available financial aid services. Counseling hours include two nights to assist students who work during the day. The new counselor will also be available for mental health counseling to students as needed. This will help to support the on campus USC Telehealth Suite which is housed in the Assessment Center. All students as well as staff may take advantage of these services. Quarterly Student Orientations are offered in the Job Center for new students in the CTE program as well as all other students to attend. For the 2015-2016 school year, day and evening orientations were held at both the Cuesta and Cabrillo Lane campuses. The orientation focuses on highlighting the available programs offered by the Academic, CTE and ESL departments. Students are introduced to career programs and general computer training classes. Students are informed about high school equivalency preparation; high school diploma or basic skills courses offered in the Academic department. Students struggling with English are directed to the ESL department. Finally, students are exposed to the Job Center and are educated as to which services are available to help them with career guidance, counseling and job search skills. Students are also informed of counseling hours and are encouraged to visit with the counselor to discuss course options. To increase interdepartmental transitions, a one-time fee waiver is also provided to students in the Academic, CTE and ESL departments. This fee waiver is used to expose students to courses offered in other departments, at no cost. A CTE or ESL student who needs high school equivalency preparation can enroll for a semester free of charge and begin studying material for the GED or HiSET. ESL or Academic students wanting to take a CTE class can enroll in that course for one quarter also free of charge. The goal is that once a student starts in a new department or program, they will enjoy what they are learning and continue attending class, paying on their own. To date, two referrals have been given for the academic program, seven for the ESL department and ten for CTE.

Chapter Two Page 2


The referral form was updated in fall 2016 and now students from Community Education, Parent Education and Adults with Disabilities programs can take a CTE, Academic or ESL class with the one-time fee waiver.

Notes

While counseling students, CTE Career Programs and general computer training classes are always mentioned. If an academic student needs elective courses, computer courses are suggested as well. If a student is struggling with English, ESL courses are recommended. The job developer also counsels students in job and career placement. Many students seem to not know what other courses are offered in the different departments at ABC Adult School. Advertisement of courses offered by the Academic, CTE, and ESL departments will continue to promote transitions. Students are constantly encouraged to attend class as much as they can so that they can gain skills and reach their goals. As part of the PAACE Consortium, the adult school has partnered with Cerritos Community College in the PAACE Program. This program helps Academics students who have earned their high school diploma or high school equivalency to make the transition to Cerritos Community College. Representatives from the college meet with interested students to help them with the application process, financial aid forms, assessment, course planning and campus tours.

Action Plan #2 Increase staff development opportunities for school staff. Develop and Implement a Program of Staff Development The CTE teachers meet weekly for staff development and to share skills and information. Webinars on effective teaching, professional growth, social media and marketing training, etc. are used by the CTE teachers, with each teacher creating a document listing individual training. Carl Perkins Grant money has been put aside to fund staff development. This year, individual teachers went to a conference on technology, training in current tax laws, training in new Billing and Coding issues and all teachers have access to Lynda.com which has a broad list of training areas in computer technology. The Advisory Committees also provide opportunities for school staff to learn about updates from the school’s business partners about technology and changes related to the specific business industry. The ESL department holds monthly TNT (Teacher Networking Techniques) meetings where technology and staff development training is the focus. Teachers have been trained on topics such as Google Drive, Google Docs and iPad use. ESL teachers also attended a conference on EL Civics and Citizenship in January 2016.

Chapter Two Page 3


Notes

Academics teachers meet monthly and have webinar training on such subjects as GED, HiSET, Aztec and GED Academy. The teachers regularly meet with the Compass Learning Odyssey representative and have received periodic training on Common Core, language arts, science, and other relevant subjects. Community Education teachers meet each quarter and staff development is regularly part of the agenda. Faculty are encouraged to connect with industry members to improve and refine their knowledge. Parent Education teachers meet periodically. This past year training for ASAP v3 occurred. All teachers are encouraged to participate in OTAN (Outreach and Technical Assistance Network) and CalPro training. Support staff has received training from the School District on such subjects as Excel, Word, etc. and union driven training through the PAL (Partnership between Administration and Labor) meetings. World Class Service training is a District goal for all support staff and is included on the agenda of each monthly support staff meeting. With the adoption of the new ASAP v3 registration program all faculty and support staff have undergone training.

Action Plan #3 Consolidate and streamline school policies and procedures to facilitate student support services. Consolidate school’s policies and procedures into one centralized document. The Community Education TOSA was appointed chair and a committee was formed, including a TOSA from each department. In September of 2011, the committee met to discuss the possible content and needs of the Teacher Handbook.

Chapter Two Page 4


Each TOSA gathered department policies and procedures and forwarded them to the chair. Using this information, the chair wrote an initial master document, keeping in mind that all information should be applicable to all departments.

Notes

The chair forwarded copies of this initial version to all committee members. Each member edited and revised this initial document and returned it to the chair. This process of discussion and revision took place at all department, Leadership, Union Representatives, and Administration Team meetings. Any corrections and revisions were given to the chair, who again made all needed changes, then sent the final version to administrators for approval in spring 2012. With the attainment of the COE accreditation in 2015, policies and procedures were further updated and added to the handbook. Due to severe budget cuts, it was decided that this handbook would not be printed out, but made available on the adult school’s website. Each department would announce this fact to all staff. The Teacher Handbook was linked to www. abcadultschool.edu. All forms needed by teachers were also linked to the website. They are to be found under the Resources menu - For Teachers and Staff. The Teacher Handbook is updated as needed. Having a Teacher Handbook has helped with policy and procedure consistency across all departments which contributes to students receiving standardized information.

Action Plan #4 Internet connectivity issues need to be addressed. Enhance Internet Connectivity Internet connectivity speed was improved to 100 Mbs at the Cuesta and Cabrillo Lane campuses. Once the speed was improved, the adult school was able to install a wireless system. There is an HP controller with 28 cameras currently deployed across three sites. There also is a “public” student network, a staff network, and a “media” network for iPads in the classroom.

Chapter Two Page 5


Chapter

Three

Self-Study Findings based on the WASC Post-secondary Criteria


Chapter

Notes

Three

SELF-STUDY FINDINGS BASED ON THE WASC POST-SECONDARY CRITERIA

ď Ş

crIterIon 1: InStItutIonal MISSIon StateMent and SchoolWIde learner outcoMeS (SloS)

Criterion: The school demonstrates a strong commitment to its mission, emphasizing student achievement. The school communicates its mission internally and externally. Schoolwide Learner Outcomes (SLOs) are developed and reviewed annually to ensure that they are current and relevant.

Indicator 1.1: The school has a statement of mission that describes its broad educational purpose, its intended student population, and its commitment to high levels of student learning. The adopted Mission Statement of the ABC Adult School is as follows: The Mission of the ABC Adult School is to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational and personal goals through lifelong learning. Chapter Three Page 1


Notes

The Leadership Team and Focus Groups concluded that the previous Mission Statement was still relevant to the school’s fundamental goals and mission. Continued discussions and collaboration led to a list of points most critical for the Adult School’s community, such as becoming career ready, entering higher education, and acquiring professional skills and standards. The Leadership Team concluded that the ultimate goal as an institution is to enable its community members with the knowledge, skills, and ability to pursue career, educational and personal goals through learning at every stage of life. The State of California’s goal for adult school students is to provide students with job readiness skills. The Mission Statement was then changed to reflect this. The realization of the Mission Statement is a major guiding principle of ABC Adult School. The previous Mission Statement was: The Mission of the ABC Adult School is to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill personal, educational and workplace goals through lifelong learning. ABC Adult School respects the diversity of its community and is thus committed to support student’s career, educational and personal goals through its curriculum. Course offerings reflect our Mission Statement with respect to our changing and diverse student population. Every course offered is filtered through the Mission Statement and it is included in every syllabus.

Indicator 1.2: The mission statement is approved by the governing body, published internally and externally, and regularly reviewed and revised to connect to current student learning needs. The revision of the Mission Statement was developed through a collaborative group effort of administrators, faculty, students and community members using the existing Mission Statement as the basis for discussion and revision to ensure that it accurately reflected the beliefs of ABC Adult School and the community. The collaborative process to review and refine the existing Mission Statement began in November 2015 through a series of Focus Group, Leadership and Support Staff meetings with representatives from all departments, community members and students. Once the revisions occurred, the revised Mission Statement was reported at the monthly meetings in December 2015. The Mission Statement is made public at all Advisory meetings, on the school website, in the course catalog, on each course syllabus and on posters that are displayed throughout the school. The Mission Statement is reviewed annually, as a part of the Strategic Planning. The schoolwide revision is usually done for the WASC accreditation every six years. However, if at any time, part of the Mission Statement is found not to be relevant, then a full revision would occur.

Chapter Three Page 2


Indicator 1.3: The institution’s mission statement is central to

Notes

institutional planning and decision-making activities. ABC Adult School adopts policies which conform to the Mission Statement and Schoolwide Learner Outcomes (SLOs). ABC Adult School complies with State and federal guidelines. All State supported adult education courses are approved by the California Department of Education and are consistent with State, academic, and Industry Standards and guidelines. Implementation of these policies is the responsibility of the principal, assistant principals and Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs). Administrators and TOSAs monitor classes to ensure that the policies are being implemented. TOSAs and ongoing assessment are identified school strengths. The TOSAs, under the supervision of the assistant principals, work with instructors to purchase books and equipment, coordinate and improve curriculum, advise students regarding career programs, provide certification testing, student testing and placement, ongoing student assessment, and mentoring. The Mission Statement and SLOs are guiding factors in the planning of course revisions, curriculum, professional development and equipment purchases to best meet the needs of the school community. The Leadership Team constantly keeps in mind the needs of the schoolwide Action Plans using the Mission Statement and SLOs as a model as how to address, implement and improve them. With every improvement and development, the Mission Statement and SLOs are constant guiding principles with the end all goal being Lifelong Learning. Courses and curriculum are planned accordingly and an important goal is to offer courses relevant to every stage of life.

Indicator 1.4: The institution establishes Schoolwide Learner Outcomes that identify the broad, global goals for all students based on current and future student learning needs. The adopted ABC Adult School Schoolwide Learner Outcomes are: Self-Directed Lifelong Learners who:  acquire knowledge and skills appropriate to their stage of life.  set and achieve career, educational and/or personal goals.  seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities. Effective Communicators who:  demonstrate appropriate listening, speaking, reading, writing, creative, and/ or computational skills.  apply communication skills to professional, technical and other real-life situations.  enhance and improve their ability to understand and be understood by others. Chapter Three Page 3


Notes

Critical Thinkers and Problem-Solvers who:  exercise their powers of judgment, perception, and inference.  assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources.  apply knowledge to professional, technical and other real-life situations. After revising the Mission Statement, the Schoolwide Learner Outcomes were presented for revision at the Leadership Team and Focus Group meetings. One of the main changes involved placing emphasis on career and technical skills. Everyone agreed that educational and personal skills are still very relevant to our students, along with professional skills. The revision of the SLOs was developed through a collaborative group effort of administrators, faculty, students and community members using the existing SLOs as the basis for discussion and revision to ensure that they are current and relevant. The collaborative process to review and refine the existing SLOs began in December 2015 through a series of Focus Group, Leadership and Support Staff meetings. Once the revisions occurred, the revised SLOs were reported at the monthly meetings in January 2016. When planning curriculum, the Mission Statement and SLOs are constantly considered and measured against individual lessons as they are structured. The SLOs are made public on the school website and in the course catalog. They are incorporated within each syllabus and course outline and are posted in each classroom and throughout the school. The SLOs are measured through the achievement of diplomas, certificates of completion, various CTE (Career Technical Education) certificates, student satisfaction, surveys, student completions, student apprenticeships, student pay increases, students obtaining jobs and attainment of benchmarks.

Indicator 1.5: The school demonstrates the incorporation of current research-based ideas into learning programs to ensure that the institution’s overarching goals (SLOs) are current and relevant. Current educational literature and new ideas are brought to the attention of teachers by attending conferences. Staff development also introduces new ideas and current curriculum. Teachers attend workshops as part of their professional growth to find out about updates in their given field. The Parent Leadership Academy and the Parent Leadership Conference bring new ideas to the students. CTE teachers have partnered with industry leaders to learn about current and future trends in their field. Teachers and the Apprenticeship coordinator work together to provide internships/externships/apprenticeships for their particular students and meet with their industry partners at least twice annually. Current labor market information is also obtained from the Employment Development Department (EDD) to assist students in entering the workforce as well as guiding the development of new career programs. Chapter Three Page 4


When the SLOs are revised, educational research is indirectly involved. Current educational research dictates the programs offered at the adult school. The SLOs must match the goals of the adult school which parallel the goals of the State which are based on the advisory committee’s suggestions as to current, helpful literature. They also present new ideas to the staff to help improve student achievement and learning.

Notes

The Leadership Team constantly keeps in mind the needs of the schoolwide Action Plans using the SLOs as a guide as how to address, implement and improve them. With every improvement and development, the SLOs are a constant guiding principle. The courses and curriculum are planned accordingly and the goal of the adult school is to offer courses relevant to every stage of life. The SLOs will continue to be reviewed annually to see if they are still relevant and pertinent and will be updated as needed.

Indicator 1.6: The school has a process in place to regularly review the courses and programs offered so that the needs of the community are met. Administration and teachers regularly review the courses and programs offered at ABC Adult School. Courses and programs are evaluated and reviewed through past and current enrollment, completion data, student survey results, community needs and Advisory Committee recommendations. The adult school also reviews and determines course offerings based on District needs. The adult school supports the District through high school credit recovery courses which are offered both onsite in the Learning Center Lab and through the online internetbased home study program. Schoolwide, if students are not satisfied and feel that the courses offered at ABC Adult School do not meet their needs they will not continue to attend class and the classes will be cancelled. Meeting student needs is a top priority of ABC Adult School.

Indicator 1.7: The governing authority’s online policies are directly connected to the school’s vision, mission, and Schoolwide Learner Outcomes. ABC Adult School offers online courses in three departments: Academics, CTE and ESL (English as a Second Language). The Online programs support the school’s Mission Statement by providing an alternative means for students to take classes. The school’s online policies are aligned with the District online policies. All of the online programs can be accessed on a desktop computer and most through handheld devices. Updated technology is used to enhance students’ learning experience.

Chapter Three Page 5


Notes

InStItutIon’S StrengthS and Key ISSueS for crIterIon 1 Strengths: 1. Revised Mission Statement and SLOs were completed after successful collaboration between certificated and non-certificated employees as well as students and community members. 2. Posters promoting the Mission Statement and SLOs were made available to teachers and students. 3. Teachers introduced the Mission Statement and SLOs to students in their classes.

Key Issues: 1. Community Education and Parent Education are completely fee based and many students struggle to pay for these programs. Our mission must be to continue to provide these services while faced with the daunting task of vastly reduced resources. 2. The Mission and SLOs need to be revisited often by all stakeholders to make sure they reflect the current practices of ABC Adult School.

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Chapter Three Page 6

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crIterIon 2: organIZatIonal InfraStructure and School leaderShIP

Notes

Criterion: The school utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout the organization to provide for ongoing improvement. The organizational structure and roles of governance are clearly defined and designed to facilitate decisions that support student learning and improve institutional effectiveness. The governing body enables the administrator/director to implement policy and lead the school effectively.

Indicator 2.1: The school has clearly defined roles of governance that provide for ethical and effective leadership and results in ongoing improvement of the school. ABC Adult School operates under the authority of the Board of Education of the ABC Unified School District which adheres to the rules and regulations put forth by the California Department of Education. The Board of Education has the authority to formulate policies of the School District. The Board meets bimonthly during the school year. Board policies, meeting dates, agendas and minutes are posted on the ABC Unified School District website. Community members are welcome and encouraged to attend and make presentations to the Board. Adult education is under the direct supervision of the Superintendent and supported by the Assistant Superintendents of Curriculum and Instruction, Human Resources, and Business Services as well as the Director of Secondary Schools. The principal heads ABC Adult School and is supported by three assistant principals, a financial aid coordinator and a counselor and is responsible for all school programs. All District site administrators, including the adult school principal are regularly given detailed training and support to carry out Board policies, adhere to the California Education Code, and promote and implement the District’s mission and initiatives. This training and support is facilitated by District administrators and Educational Services. The written policies on governance procedures specify appropriate roles for all staff and students in order to collaborate on the improvement of ABC Adult School. This is substantiated by the Board policy book, notices of Board meetings, Board agendas and Board minutes. Evidence of governance of effective leadership includes: the ABC Unified School District Mission Statement, bargaining unit contracts for certificated and classified employees, memorandums of understanding, the ABC Adult School organization chart, agendas from District Principal and Management meetings, and procedures for grants such as EL Civics, WIOA/231, and Carl Perkins. Chapter Three Page 7


Notes

Each member of the ABC Adult School staff is aware of their assigned duties and is given the freedom to fulfill those duties to the best of their abilities. The organization chart is updated annually or as needed, with a listing of areas of responsibilities. Administrators unanimously find that TOSAs help in the decision making by also acting as a liaison between administration and faculty. Most daily decisions are made on the department level. This is known as Departmentbased decision making. At ABC Adult School, students and teachers in each department identify specific issues to be addressed. Departments are then able to form a solid understanding of the problem and implement decisions and policies to address the issue. Department-based decision making creates a simple and effective way to implement the school’s policies. Department-based decision making reduces complexity and helps clarify any solution the school ultimately chooses. It has enormous power and has been routinely used to resolve various issues. This process entails budget development, distribution of resources, and policy development. ABC Adult School has established procedures to assure the highest ethical standards. The school’s goals reflect its commitment to excellence as defined by the SLOs that have been adopted by the governing board. ABC Adult School strives for a collaborative and approachable leadership style. Ethical standards are adhered to in such areas as the school budget, collection of fees, test administration, accurate publicity, and fair and equitable grading.

Indicator 2.2: The leadership of the school creates a positive learning environment in a collegial and collaborative atmosphere that provides the foundation for school improvement and high levels of achievement for students. ABC Adult School’s principal, Dr. PaoLing Guo, is both a visionary and an academic leader. During the recent budget crises when the future of adult education was unclear, she was paramount in fostering an environment of positivity and expectations of future improvement. By encouraging an environment of staff cohesion, student success remained at the forefront. She consistently communicates her vision of staff accountability and high levels of student achievement through monthly Leadership and department meetings, email communication, and an open door policy that encourages collaboration and demonstrates her respect and value for staff. To assist the programs of the adult school, she has been a member of local Chambers of Commerce and currently serves as one’s president. She attended every possible planning and decision making meeting as to the constant budget issues and the newly formed consortia. In 2015, she was also recognized by the State Legislature as Woman of the Year due to her school and community leadership roles. The principal also attends many community events and every school function.

Chapter Three Page 8


ABC Adult School’s Leadership Team is led by the principal and consists of the assistant principals, the financial aid coordinator, the transition counselor, the TOSAs, the department chairs, the job developer, a union representative, the accountant technician, the technology analyst and assistant and general maintenance worker. This team meets monthly to discuss matters of importance to the school and to participate in professional development activities. The Leadership Team places emphasis on school improvement and high levels of student achievement through its focus on the Mission Statement and SLOs. These meetings are opportunities for the Leadership Team to collaboratively assess and improve the quality of classroom instruction and student services.

Notes

The ABC Adult School principal meets monthly with representatives from the three unions; ABC Federation of Teachers (ABCFT), California School Employees Association (CSEA), and American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME). This is a forum for the principal to share decisions such as upcoming changes and events to the employee’s representatives before actual changes occur and the entire school body is informed. This has been a very positive collaboration in the past and continues to be so. ABC Adult School administrators have an open door policy. They are always there to support staff and students. The administrators communicate any developments and changes in policies to all staff members and welcome any and all feedback. The budget is a constant concern and for the most part all stakeholders trust that the school’s funds are being used in an equitable and ethical manner. Any budget updates and changes are made public to all staff members and students at various meetings and through email communication. Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend professional development opportunities if the training costs fall within budgetary allowances. The Leadership Team is encouraged to attend local Chamber of Commerce training events to promote school improvement. Often, if training for staff and faculty is needed, it happens immediately. If new programs are implemented, then training will occur. However, some staff feel that the training provided is too short and not detailed enough.

Indicator 2.3: The school’s governance, decision-making structure, and organizational processes are regularly evaluated to ensure their integrity and effectiveness. ABC Adult School regularly and consistently evaluates its organizational processes and decision-making bodies through a variety of practices. These practices ensure that all stakeholders have a voice in the decision-making process. During the budget crises, meetings were open to all staff members so that everyone was aware of what was occurring. The three unions regularly send out surveys about any changes. There is constant email communication from the administrators about any school or program updates and changes. Chapter Three Page 9


Notes

Through the monthly Union Representative meeting, any policy and budget changes are discussed, including how these changes will impact classified and certificated staff members and students. Some departments create surveys to illicit student feedback about individual classes. These surveys ask students input regarding class procedures, academic content, instructional support and campus facilities and safety. Survey results are shared with teaching staff and at department meetings. The adult school considers the results of student surveys as critical guiding principles to improve teaching and learning practices. During formal schoolwide, department and staff meetings, the discussion of school improvement, program development and student success is regularly considered. During these meetings, discussion occurs regarding decisions about matters affecting individual departments and programs. At both Leadership and department meetings, faculty and staff analyze various sources such as CASAS benchmarks and TOPSPro data, course completions and earned certificates to determine the effectiveness of current school programs and curricular practices. CTE Advisory meetings, the Technology Committee, the School Community meetings and the WASC Focus Group meetings are all held and staff, students, community and professional feedback is encouraged. Input is taken for curriculum, delivery and school operations. Any and all suggestions are heard and considered. The administrators have an open door policy and are always willing to hear ideas and suggestions. Administrators are visible on campus and students are encouraged to speak with them.

Indicator 2.4: The school has an established infrastructure of policies and procedures that provides stability and consistency for all institutional programs, activities, and events. ABC Adult School has developed and regularly updates the student handbook and teacher handbook, both of which are available on the school’s website. School policies including the refund policy are always included in the course catalog. The student and teacher handbooks were written through a series of meetings and email communication including staff from all departments. Limited hard copies are available upon request but it was decided due to budgetary concerns to post the handbooks on the school’s website. ABC Adult School follows all District and Board rules and regulations. These rules and regulations are available on the District website and hard copies are available in the adult school’s main office. Faculty and staff are aware that all decisions must adhere to school, District, Board and education code policies. These policies are discussed at department, Union Representative, Support Staff, Leadership and Administrator meetings.

Chapter Three Page 10


Organizational infrastructure supports all academic programs and activities through Master Calendar planning which occurs every year in May and is updated as needed. Any calendar changes are posted on the website for access to all staff members.

Notes

ABC Adult School reviews its policy and procedures annually though the Strategic Planning meeting, the 22 Advisory meetings and during other meetings as needed. These updates are determined by District initiatives, meeting feedback, staff and student input. The administration’s open door policy as well as effective leadership encourages staff to give their suggestions for providing services and resources to students so that they will reach their desired Student Learner Outcomes. All suggestions are taken seriously and acknowledged. In addition, there are regular meetings in which students, staff and faculty are invited to present suggestions and input about institutional decisions. Meeting minutes are available to all attendees and upon request. New policies are adopted in a transparent and ethical manner by having the same information discussed at various levels of meetings. All stakeholders are invited to the meetings, minutes are taken and shared. During Union Representative meetings contractual standards are discussed to insure that all policies are in alignment. Any new school and program updates are emailed to the staff by the administrative team and feedback is welcomed and encouraged.

Indicator 2.5: The school evaluates the effectiveness of online processes and procedures for involving staff in shared responsibility, actions, and accountability to support student learning throughout all online courses. Training is provided when new versions of current software is available. Training also occurs when requested by the staff using the programs. Training is provided for the online programs Compass Learning Odyssey, GED Academy, Burlington English and Lynda.com.

Chapter Three Page 11


Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 2 Strengths: 1. Administrators have an open door policy and are easily accessible. 2. There is an onsite administrator at the Cabrillo Lane campus. 3. T  he team of TOSAs is very strong and offers excellent support to teachers and students. 4. A  BC Adult School continues to build partnerships with outside agencies and work in collaboration with these agencies.

Key Issues: 1. A  dditional and longer training needs to be provided for staff members on new technological programs. 2. Increase staff attendance and participation in meetings and school functions.

Chapter Three Page 12


crIterIon 3: faculty and Staff

Notes

Criterion: The institution employs qualified personnel to support student

learning programs and services to ensure institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, evaluated regularly, and provided opportunities for professional development that impact student learning.

Indicator 3.1: The school employs personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience in line with its school mission and SLOs.

ABC Adult School administrators and instructional staff hold current Adult Designated Subjects/Professional Services and/or K-12 credentials that authorize them to perform in their assigned areas. Academic and ESL teachers have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Many of the ESL staff members hold a Master’s Degree and/or a TESL Certificate. The exception would be the Professional Experts who do not need a credential, but must show expertise and experience in their field. Certificated status staff must go through a panel interview process. Effectiveness of instruction is judged through credentialing, written employment application, and the panel interview which includes other faculty members and representatives from classified and administrative staff. The process is dictated and overseen by the State of California and the Board of Education. Classified staff must meet the District’s requirements for qualifications, including standard written and oral tests and must go through a panel interview process as well. The principal with input from the assistant principals and the Leadership Team makes staffing decisions based on a number of factors including budget, student enrollment, class size, necessary staff qualifications, experience, credentials and student needs. All ABC Adult School staff meet the required criteria for their specific positions including education, credentials, training and experience. District standards, California State Standards, and the California Education Code are followed in determining numbers of staff to support classes. The budget appropriation for certificated and classified personnel begins with a complete review of staffing needs by the Administrative Team and TOSAs. Based on historical patterns of enrollment and attendance by program areas and availability of classrooms, the Administrative Team in collaboration with TOSAs, develop master schedules for each department. After department master schedules are finalized, the Administrative Team makes certificated and classified staffing recommendations to the principal. Effective management of resources is the outcome of constant monitoring by the school’s Leadership Team.

Chapter Three Page 13


Notes

Indicator 3.2: The school’s hiring process is marked by clear communication regarding job descriptions, expected job skills, and procedures for the selection of personnel. ABC Adult School follows the District’s Human Resources hiring procedures in accordance with contractual agreements with the classified and certificated bargaining contracts. The District has a set of procedures that must be followed in the selection of personnel. For permanent adult school staffing positions Human Resources provides a description of duties, license and certification requirements, experience, education, details of the position, and application procedures. All applications and accompanying documentations are submitted to Human Resources. Open employment positions are advertised to the community through published job notices posted on the Edjoin website, on the ABCUSD website, in the Human Resources department and at each school site. After a position has been posted, Human Resources screens submitted applications to ensure that they have met minimum qualifications. It then forwards those that have met the criteria to the adult school principal who further screens to choose those whose qualifications and experiences closely align with the adult school mission and goals. All applicants must sit through a District qualifying interview panel followed by a final site interview panel. In the case of part-time, temporary teaching staff, the adult school principal and the Administrative Team have the authority to make hiring decisions based on program needs provided the candidate’s education, credentialing, fingerprinting, and background checks have been verified by Human Resources. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities and authority. Criteria for selection of faculty include knowledge of the subject matter or service to be performed, effective teaching and potential to contribute to the mission of ABC Adult School. ABC Adult School assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The adult school establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely and documented.

Chapter Three Page 14


Indicator 3.3: The school develops personnel policies and procedures

Notes

that are clearly communicated to all employees. All personnel policies are approved by the School Board and are available for public review and comment. Equitable treatment of employees is ensured by the Board policies. ABC Adult School operates under the authority granted to the Board of Education by the State Education Code in conformance with policies and procedures developed by the California Department of Education, Adult Education Office. All school employees abide by the code of ethics set by these groups and are given the District’s guidelines annually. All personnel files are confidential and shall be available only to the employee, persons authorized by the employee and those authorized by the Superintendent or designee. Personnel records shall be made available to the employee at reasonable intervals and at reasonable times. District employee files are housed at the District Human Resources department and can be viewed upon request by contacting the Human Resources department. Site employee files are housed in the administrator’s office and also can be viewed on request.

Indicator 3.4: The school assures the effectiveness of its faculty and staff members by evaluating all personnel systematically. Full time status teachers are evaluated every two years using the Stull Bill evaluation process. Teachers are required to set and meet goals and objectives and determine their professional growth goals. The evaluations provide instructors with the guidance they need to ensure teacher competency and continued quality in the classroom. Part time instructors are evaluated on an “as needed” basis. Evaluations are based on the State framework, standards, and guidelines. Through the evaluation process, teachers and administrators work together to set evaluation goals to be observed. Evaluations are an opportunity to have an open discussion with the administrator. Evaluations and observations allow the administrator the opportunity to apply input and constructive criticism when needed to aid the teacher. The teacher feels comfortable having the opportunity to discuss their job with someone who is supportive and experienced. Classified staff must meet the District’s requirements for qualifications, including standard written and oral tests. All are high school graduates. Paraeducators meet guidelines set by the District to be eligible for employment. They must pass a State mandated test that covers basic academic skills. Paraeducators and classified staff are evaluated every two years as well. The immediate supervisor of permanent certificated and classified employees performs the evaluations. The unions set the procedures and criteria and the procedures are confidential. Certificated staff members meet with their evaluator at least three times during the evaluation year. Informal and formal observations occur for evaluation. Classified employees meet at least once a year with their evaluator. Chapter Three Page 15


Notes

At the conclusion of the evaluation, the employee meets with the evaluator to discuss the observations and whether goals were met and if improvements need to occur. The employee receives a copy of the confidential evaluation which must be signed. The employee has the option to agree or disagree with the findings of the observation. For CTE certificated staff, the COE accreditation requires that the faculty have a certain amount of professional growth to be included in the evaluation. Each department defines effective teaching according to the goals of the department. CTE defines effective teaching by looking at job placement rates and certificates earned. Academics looks at earned diplomas and high school equivalencies. ESL looks at increased literacy levels, passing of tests, and gained benchmarks. Community Education and Parent Education looks at completed projects and gained skills. Adults with Disabilities looks at student participation and mastery of skills. Staff feel that during the evaluation years, through selfreflection, personal instructional improvement can occur. Through positive input from the evaluator, certificated and classified staff feel that they can achieve personal and job performance improvement.

Indicator 3.5: Faculty members take ownership of student progress toward achieving stated Schoolwide Learner Outcomes. All staff members participated in the WASC Focus Group meetings to revise the SLOs and input and feedback was requested and analyzed. Typically, SLOs are reevaluated annually during Strategic Planning. A full revision of the SLOs occurs during COE and WASC accreditation reviews. The SLOs are measured by job placement rates, graduation rates, course completions, entrance to college, transitions from other departments, testing results, entrance into career technical programs and by monitoring and collecting data.

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Indicator 3.6: The school provides all personnel with appropriate

Notes

opportunities for professional development. Professional development is scheduled according to need on a department and individual level. All faculty are encouraged to attend industry conferences and workshops as the budget allows, however, there are no state funds for professional development for Community and Parent Education teachers. The school recognizes the importance of professional development as a means to enhance student success and attainment of the SLOs. Any professional development must be pre-approved by administration and is scheduled according to available funds. Due to budget constraints, any available no cost professional development or inhouse training is encouraged and recommended. In all departments, professional development is a part of regular department meetings. In the past, funding was not available for much staff development training. With the new funding guidelines from the State through the consortium, new training policies and opportunities need to be evaluated and scheduled. Due to COE requirements, CTE teachers receive substantial professional development. CTE teachers must fill out a detailed form about training which includes dates, business and etc. according to need. The CTE department has scheduled weekly meetings for all teachers. In these meetings, department issues are discussed along with lessons on various technological techniques and upgrades such as Facebook for business, Google Classroom, Google Drive, Windows 10 and WordPress. Academic instructors receive training on Compass Learning Odyssey, GED Academy and District academic training. ESL teachers have access to professional development from OTAN, CASAS specialists and many attend the EL Civics conference. They also have a monthly Teacher Networking Techniques (TNT) meeting which can cover a variety of learning resources from lesson planning, classroom management and the use of technology in the classroom. All ESL classes have iPads available for students to use. Classified staff receive professional development through the District on such subjects as computer programs and customer service. The evaluation of professional development is most reflected by student satisfaction and learning results. This is evidenced by registration and attendance numbers and by periodic student surveys. Any amount of professional development improves the teaching ability and has a positive impact on the students. There is a need for increased professional development opportunities especially relating to technology in all departments except for CTE. Often, staff feel that the training that does occur is not enough. Some staff can easily take the training and incorporate it immediately into their classroom, while others feel that the training is inadequate and are hesitant to utilize it. Staff need to be regularly surveyed after each training session to see if the training was adequate or if more training needs to occur. Chapter Three Page 17


Notes

Indicator 3.7: The school regularly evaluates all non-teaching support staff members and provides direction and support for improvement of their skills. The evaluation of permanent classified staff follows Board policy and contract language that establishes a timeline and standards that must be met for employment. Classified staff participate in monthly meetings with administration where staff development needs and important issues are addressed. In addition, the District provides regular professional development for various classified skills. Administration provides continuous direction and support through close work with support staff in carrying out the functions required for the smooth and effective operation of the adult school program.

Indicator 3.8: The school implements effective supervision and evaluation procedures in order to promote professional growth of online staff members. The principal brings to the attention of the staff any opportunities for professional growth. Sometimes the opportunities are optional and sometimes they are mandatory. There is also a technology survey which is sent out district wide every year.

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School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 3

Notes

Strengths: 1. Regular and constructive evaluations. 2. T  ransparency with job descriptions and a set standard for hiring procedures. 3. D  ue to improvement of the budget, professional development opportunities are now available and encouraged.

Key Issues: 1. F  or new programs more than an hour of training should be scheduled. There should be a focus on one-on-one training or multiple trainings. Not all staff feel that the training is adequate and are uncomfortable using and teaching new programs since they do not feel competent due to the lack of training. However, staff in Community Education and Parent Education do not feel that there is enough funding to provide for professional development. 2. A  t the Cabrillo Lane campus office staff is very limited due to limited space. Students often complain during peak enrollment periods. Hiring additional support staff and enlarging the office is occurring.

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Notes

crIterIon 4: currIculuM

Criterion: The school demonstrates a conscious effort to support student

learning through the development of a challenging, coherent, and relevant curriculum that allows all students the opportunity to reach Schoolwide Learner Outcomes (SLOs). The school’s curriculum reveals its mission and SLOs and connects directly to current student learning needs. The school pursues current, research-based curriculum development information to keep its programs relevant and effective.

Indicator 4.1: The school has a documented curricular map that

outlines courses of study necessary to reach stated outcomes, licensure requirements, or certificate expectations. ABC Adult School publishes two main course catalogs a year that include the course listings; one in August and the other in January. Starting in the 2016-2017 school year, mid-term brochures were also produced. The catalogs are mailed to strategic zip codes in the area and hard copies of the catalogs and brochures are available in the main office as well. In addition, all of the courses are listed online on the school’s website and any changes are made as needed. Course offerings are selected from a state approved list. Once the courses have been selected, the School Board must approve them annually. All course outlines are updated every two years and kept in a binder in the front office and may be viewed by the public upon request. All teachers are required to have a current up-to-date syllabus for the classes they are teaching. All syllabi include the Mission Statement, teacher expectations and the current refund policy. All courses have clearly defined learner outcomes and are stated in the course syllabus. For the different programs there are different learner outcomes: in CTE the learner outcomes include course completions, individual course certificates, workforce transition, career technical diplomas and industry certification. For Academics the learner outcomes are passing scores on assigned work, completion of classes, earning a high school diploma or passing high school equivalency tests. In ESL, learner outcomes include benchmarks, increased learning levels and increased citizenship skills. For Community Education classes the measureable outcomes include increased balance, weight loss, attainment of skills and completed projects. In Parent Education the learner outcomes include increased positive parent interaction with their children and the observation of improved child health, fitness, intellectual growth and increased school success. In Adults with Disabilities learner outcomes include attainment of skills and completion of projects.

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Institutional resource allocation determines the level of staff development. According to the union contract, at the beginning of the fiscal year, 14 hours of curriculum development are budgeted for CTE and ESL staff members and six hours for Academics, Community Education and Parent Education staff members. Generally, individual training for staff is approved. For CTE, Academic, and ESL staff additional hours are available for staff development as the budget allows. Academic teachers are trained in the California State Standards as needed. Currently, no provision has been made for the Adults with Disabilities teachers for curriculum development time.

Notes

Indicator 4.2: The school regularly reviews curriculum in order to ensure that the content taught in the classrooms is accurate and relevant. Curriculum review happens through regular department meetings that include teachers, paraeducators and administrators. CTE holds biannual advisory committee meetings for each of the eleven career programs to determine that the current curriculum meets the Industry Standards. When State Standards are revised the Academic and ESL curriculum is revised. In Community Education every instructor updates the class syllabus each quarter/semester so curriculum is constantly being reviewed. State course outlines are revised and reviewed every two years. In CTE, industry standards are brought forth in the Advisory Committee meetings which determines curricular needs. In Academics curriculum is determined by the State Standards. For EL Civics the curriculum is updated every year. In Community Education and Parent Education teachers write their own curriculum and it is revised according to student needs. Adults with Disabilities currently has no State Standards as to curricular planning thus teachers must develop their own lesson plans according to student needs. Every teacher is involved in the curriculum development process. CTE has yearly meetings where updates to curriculum are reviewed and implemented. For Academics, the teacher on special assignment and the instructors give input for curriculum needs. For EL Civics the EL Civics curriculum coordinator picks from eight units and then students and teachers vote on which unit they are interested in. In Community Education, Parent Education and Adults with Disabilities, the teachers write their own curriculum according to student needs using the SLOs as a guideline. In all departments, curriculum development incorporates and is guided by the Mission Statement and SLOs. All staff and students are constantly aware of them and revisions of the curriculum occur at regular intervals to fit the needs of the students. In preparation for the WASC or COE Accreditation the entire school curriculum is evaluated and changes occur as needed. This process also occurs for mid-term reviews and the entire school is included. Chapter Three Page 21


Notes

Indicator 4.3: Students have access to texts, learning materials, and information resources that are sufficient to meet the course learning objectives. In CTE, students must order their own materials and are dependent upon outside sources. As a result, textbooks may not be received in a timely manner. Agency students sometimes have a problem receiving their books on time especially if they register late for class. CTE must order materials through the District warehouse which causes a delay on some supplies that are necessary. The entire process is not very effective and needs improvement. Academics and ESL have all needed textbooks and learning materials in place and accessible and updated materials are acquired as available. In Adults with Disabilities, textbooks and materials are ordered as needed. For CTE students, the Job Center is used as a library by the students with assistance from the job developer. In Academics and the Online Home Study program students may use school computers to access needed resources or consult with the counselor as needed. In the Learning Center, academic students receive assistance from a certificated instructor who is on duty. ESL has a language lab that students may use with the assistance of trained paraeducators. Distance Learning students check out DVDs, videos and handouts that can be used at home for learning. CTE has the latest software applications and they are regularly updated as new versions are available. Flat screen TVs are taking the place of outdated projector screens inside all CTE classrooms. ESL and Adults with Disabilities have purchased new iPads for student use in many classrooms. Off-site classrooms used for ESL have SMART Boards and document cameras. As equipment is updated in the CTE, Academics and ESL departments, the older working equipment is placed in Community and Parent Education classrooms, which is a welcome improvement.

Indicator 4.4: The school provides a comprehensive and sequential documented online curriculum that is articulated within and across grade levels for the improvement of programs, learning, and teaching. The online curriculum is completely outsourced and offered through Compass Learning Odyssey. The program is completely aligned with the District State Standards. Many of the courses are also A-G approved courses.

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Indicator 4.5: A rigorous, relevant, and coherent online curriculum to

Notes

all students is accessible to all students through all courses/programs offered. The Online Home Study program is offered at no charge to qualified students at the high school level with the high school counselor’s request. Students must meet a minimum 8.0 reading level on the Gates-McGinitie Reading Comprehension Test. Students are allowed two tries to meet the 8.0 reading level. If this level is not met, further instruction is offered in the Learning Center Lab. Adult students and out of district concurrent students are required to pay a lab fee. However-if there are extenuating circumstances, the lab fee is waived so that all students have access to the online curriculum. Accommodations have also been made for any special education students and physically disabled students.

Indicator 4.6: The school assesses the online curriculum and its rigor, relevancy, and coherency after examination of policies regarding course completion, credits, grading policies, homework, use of technology, etc. By running reports, it was determined in Spring of 2016 that students in the Online Home Study program were able to pass the class competencies without passing the final. A change in the grading policy was implemented so that students cannot pass the class without passing the final.

Indicator 4.7: Online students use resources for learning beyond the limits of the textbook such as library/media resources and community resources. Within the academic courses, Compass Learning Odyssey writer prompts are linked to external websites which are incorporated within the class. Students can use outside resources or search engines such as Google to look up information.

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Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 4 Strengths: 1. Curriculum is constantly updated 2. B  iannual Advisory meetings for CTE career programs ensure that those programs are on par with Industry Standards. 3. U  sed equipment is recycled to Community and Parent Education classrooms.

Key Issues: 1. CTE-books- takes too long to order them. 2. Adults with Disabilities- no standardized curriculum.

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ď Ž

crIterIon 5: InStructIonal PrograM

Notes

Criterion: The instructional staff uses research-based instructional strategies and teaching methodologies that engage students at high levels of learning and allow them to achieve Schoolwide Learner Outcomes and course objectives. Faculty members are given ongoing training in various instructional strategies that allows them to address the varied learning styles of students in their classrooms.

Indicator 5.1: The school provides high-level instruction with appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, and sequencing for all programs and courses. ABC Adult School measures the quality of its programs by measurable outcomes such as student completions, certificates, diploma and high school equivalencies earned. In CTE, Advisory meetings help to ensure that curriculum meets Industry Standards. There is testing, evaluations and certification for various career programs. Projects which assess the quality of skills are based on rubrics. Job placement and completion rates in the individual career programs and internship/ externship/apprenticeship programs are followed according to COE standards. Students can earn industry certifications and all courses are aligned with industry State Standards. In Academics, completion rates and passing scores on individual tests as well as completion of classes, earned diplomas or passage of high school equivalency exams determines the quality of instruction. In Academics, ESL and Adults with Disabilities, students must first take a pretest and then periodically students must take a posttest to compare progress and earn benchmarks. In Community and Parent Education student feedback and ability to perform the skill or complete the project determines the quality of the instruction. Assessments can be both verbal and written.

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Notes

Certificated staff members keep current in instructional strategies and methodologies by attending seminars or conferences in their fields and sharing that knowledge at department meetings. CTE has a subscription to Lynda.com for the instructional staff to use along with various internet resources. At Advisory meetings new strategies and upcoming trends are shared and learned with industry partners. Many faculty members work in the industry so they are aware of any new changes and opportunities and share this information with students and staff. CTE has weekly meetings where training on subjects such as Facebook, Canvas, Google Docs and WordPress are covered. In Academics, textbook and software training is regularly scheduled as well as District training for State Standards. ESL has monthly TNT meetings where items such as internet resources and iPad training occur. The school has made available updated software, books and professional subscriptions to faculty and staff. There is constant professional collaboration among the faculty where they share ideas and knowledge which includes peer coaching.

Indicator 5.2: The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the diverse needs and learning styles of its students. Curriculum is constantly updated to increase student performance. There is informal discussion among the faculty and there are staff meetings where instructional strategies and student needs are addressed. There are weekly or monthly meetings in most departments. All departments use in-service training regularly and as needed. The administrators, TOSAs and department chairs assist with teacher support when needed. There are monthly Leadership meetings and annual Strategic Plan meetings. The information from these meetings is brought to the attention of the individual departments by the TOSAs and department chairs. In CTE there are weekly meetings that focus on training to keep up with Industry Standards. Biannual Advisory Board meetings for the eleven career programs, conferences and outside training are available to instructors in each of their particular fields. In CTE there is verbal communication such as lecture, demonstration, application and tactile learning. Projectors, flat screen televisions, SMART Boards and document cameras are used to implement visual learning. CTE also focuses on hard core professional skills as was suggested by recent Advisory meetings.

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The Academics department holds monthly meetings where the needs of students is the main discussion. Both in-house and outside training are available as needed. There is constant informal discussion between teachers. There is one-on-one tutoring and curriculum explanations and lesson plans are adjusted to fit the needs of the students. Teachers provide scaffolding and differentiated instruction.

Notes

In the ESL Department, there are monthly department meetings and monthly TNT meetings where training focuses on student needs. The technology assistant is invited to discuss ways to improve student outcomes based on CASAS testing. Informal discussions among teachers between and after classes is common. There is a lot of teacher-to-teacher mentoring and classroom observation. There is a sufficient amount of in-house training but there is a need to have more outside training. Faculty also attend various conferences. A teacher share file has been created where all instructors can share materials and all instructors have access. A curriculum guide that follows the State Standards is available to all. SMART Boards, projectors and document cameras are used in all ESL classrooms and are visually easier for students learning needs. There is partner and group work. Distance Learning has one-on-one tutoring available. Teachers use both the natural and communicative approach to reach all students. In Community Education there are quarterly meetings and informal discussion between teachers. The Parent Education and Adults with Disabilities departments have regularly scheduled meetings where program needs and student success are discussed. In Community Education and Adults with Disabilities classes, the teaching strategies usually include lecture, demonstration, practice, application and observation. In the Adults with Disabilities program there is a need for better direction from the State. There is no set curriculum and materials are not always provided. In Parent Education, instructional strategies include group discussion, guest speakers, shared experiences, group projects, field trips, observation and modeling, as well as cooperative planning and teaching. Evaluations are periodically done by the parents on themselves as well as their child and class. Teachers pass out handouts on monthly parenting topics. There is also active participation by the parents under teacher supervision.

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Notes

Indicator 5.3: The school is actively engaged in integrating new technology into the instructional program of the school. ABC Adult School actively engages in integrating new technology into the instructional programs at the department level. CTE has weekly meetings where technology related demonstrations and lessons occur, such as training on programs like WordPress and Canvas. Since this information can enhance the curriculum, teachers are encouraged to use these new skills in the classroom. ESL has staff development at their monthly TNT meetings where half of the meeting time is focused on technology training. Technology such as SMART Boards and iPads are currently used by most teachers. ESL invites outside trainers and District technology personnel to demonstrate at their monthly meeting. CTE offers select courses through Lynda.com, however the courses cannot be taken as part of the career program track. Academics uses Compass Learning Odyssey and GED Academy for online learning systems. The ESL department purchased Burlington English, an online program, to serve students who are unable to attend the regular ESL classes. It offers instruction and practice for every level—beginning to advanced. It includes practice in language skills, EL Civics-based life skills, as well as workplace fluency and career path transitions. It also provides CASAS competencies lessons and practice tests. The Online instructor is able to access data analysis, performance overview features, and track student progress. The adult school technology analyst and assistant are always available to demonstrate new technology at the various meetings and for one-to-one training as needed. Beginning in spring 2016 there was ASAP v3 training at Support Staff meetings and department meetings. A Technology Committee has been formed, however it is theoretical and not instructional in nature. Instructors attend seminars and bring back information. The minutes from the Technology Committee meetings need to be shared with all instructional staff. Staff members outside of the CTE department feel that there is not sufficient technology training. They often are concerned about using new technology for fear of not having a good understanding of how to use it correctly. Many have asked for more training opportunities on a single subject with increased support once the new technology is implemented.

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Indicator 5.4: The administrators and teachers use a variety of

Notes

approaches to remain current in research-based professional knowledge and apply the knowledge to improve teaching and learning in the online environment. Teacher technology competencies are not assessed. It is expected that teachers learn technology that is being used in the classroom as part of their professional duties.

Indicator 5.5: The online teachers strengthen student understanding and achievement of the learning outcomes through the use of a variety of instructional strategies that effectively engage students at a high level of learning. Understanding and achievement is measured based on student outcomes. There is always a teacher available to assist students as needed and student online progress is closely monitored. The courses are structured in a realistic and achievable timeline. Time allowances are always offered on a need-to-need basis.

Indicator 5.6: Student work demonstrates critical and creative thinking, problem solving, knowledge attainment, and application skills. The Compass Learning Odyssey writer prompts are looked at and adjusted according to relevance and need. Elective classes were reviewed and determined not to be to the standard that the other online classes were and subsequently they were discontinued.

Indicator 5.7: Strategies are used by the instructional staff to develop personalized approaches to learning and alternative instructional options which allow access in the rigorous standards-based curriculum. Instructions are constantly being revised according to the needs of the students. Communication is relied upon through email. Concurrent students are monitored for weekly time requirements. Adult students are not monitored as closely. But the Academics department is devising a plan to closely monitor the progress of the adult students. All students are given information via email about deadlines and holidays. Interventions are looked at as needed.

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Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 5 Strengths: 1. Meetings regarding curriculum are well attended. 2. T  echnology analyst and assistant are always available to answer questions and provide training. 3. CTE has updated software and equipment. 4. ESL purchased new online program - Burlington English.

Key Issues: 1. A  dditional technology training is needed to ensure staff familiarity with new programs. 2. Adults with Disabilities has no standardized curriculum.

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crIterIon 6: uSe of aSSeSSMent

ď Ż

Notes

Criterion: The instructional staff uses established assessment procedures to

design, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses, programs, and student learning levels. The school recognizes the central role of its faculty for improving courses and programs through the assessment instruments and practices used in the school. Assessment is used to measure student progress, to modify learning approaches, and to carry out institutional planning and ongoing school improvement.

Indicator 6.1: Clear learning outcomes are developed for each course so that success can be measured and students who are struggling can be identified and helped.

ABC Adult School has developed clear learning outcomes for all courses. Model Standards set by the State of California are used in all courses where relevant. CTE instructors use Industry Standards and most have industry experience. Curriculum is constantly changed to better serve student needs, based on assessment, teacher observations, and student feedback. With use of new media, including SMART Boards, document cameras, computers, and new more interactive software, teachers can tailor lessons to better serve student interests and needs. Department meetings and TNTs are focused on ways and means to improve student learning outcomes by improving teaching techniques and course curriculum. In CTE, the Advisory Board members help to ensure that courses meet Industry Standards. Courses are aligned with State frameworks and Standards. There are industry requirements that need to be met for certification and pass rates, along with job placement rates, evaluations on apprenticeships, student feedback and input from industry advisories to measure core competencies. Advisory meetings are held twice annually for each of the eleven career programs. Department meetings are held weekly and student outcomes and classroom surveys are used to evaluate the courses. In CTE, there is regularly updated equipment and updated software programs as needed for particular classes. Curriculum is changed according to Advisory suggestions. All courses are re-evaluated each quarter and state course outlines are updated every two years. In Academics there are California State Standards as well as District standards. Pre and post testing and course completion determines improved instruction. In ESL, each level has skill descriptors which are posted in the classroom. Pre and post tests determine improved instruction and show progress. Students are made aware of CASAS levels through posters in the classroom and the levels are listed on the syllabus as well. For those students who do not understand the levels, there are pictures and the teachers use scaffolding for comprehension. Chapter Three Page 31


Notes

There are functional levels, competencies and life skills to measure core competencies. The gains and improvement in testing indicate increased levels. In addition, teachers teach an EL Civics unit each trimester. Some of these units include housing, employment, emergencies, and citizenship, to name a few. Students’ listening, speaking, and written skills are tested after 30 hours of instruction. There is differentiation of instruction and ESL teachers teach specific skills that enhance the quality of student lives.

In Community Education and Adults with Disabilities, there is a specific project or skill for the students to practice and/or complete. Students learn techniques needed to complete the project or learn the skill. There are student surveys that also provide feedback. In Parent Education there are collaborative activities and projects which provide curricular assessment due to student achievements. A course syllabus is prepared for each class and age range which includes: course objectives, prerequisites, suggestions, rules, student evaluation and the monthly agenda which includes parenting topics and children’s activities. Parent Education teachers developed these syllabi as a group in departmental meetings and reevaluate them periodically, taking into consideration parent input and changes in education (e.g. Common Core).

Indicator 6.2: The school gathers learning data from multiple sources, disaggregates and analyzes the results, draws conclusions, and makes recommendations for change based on assessment results. The Action Plan directs the Adult School’s focus on data. Regular analysis of student learning data is paramount for improving curriculum and instruction. Course completion rates, earned certificates and diplomas and enrollment data are constantly reviewed to direct changes for program enhancement. Students in all programs are surveyed to gather information regarding attainable outcomes. These outcome results assist in analyzing and revising curriculum. Chapter Three Page 32


All staff are aware of the SLOs. As a result, staff development and instructional decisions are based on assessment results and evolving student learning needs. The relationship between the school’s Mission Statement and the SLOs is considered as the assessment results are analyzed and when evaluating the effectiveness of courses. In addition, other factors such as students changing needs, State and District initiatives and COE guidelines are taken into consideration in the decision making process. Pertinent learning data is discussed at monthly department, Leadership, Administration Team and Union Representative meetings. Relevant data such as enrollment, attendance, completion rates, and test data are analyzed and disaggregated to formulate a plan for program/course improvement and increased student achievement.

Notes

CTE holds weekly staff meetings as well as biannual Advisory meetings for the eleven career programs throughout the year where course completion rates are analyzed. There is constant changing and updating of curriculum to better serve student needs due to the ever changing technological and medical fields. Academics has regular monthly meetings where student progress and changes are discussed. Academics looks at weak areas and focuses on those areas. Student results from math tests were analyzed and it was determined that students were not being successful in those courses. Therefore, a new structured math class was added to assist students to succeed in a teacher driven math course in spring 2016. The class was offered again in fall 2016 but due to low enrollment the class was cancelled. Instead, an instructor whose focus is on math was added to the Learning Center Lab evening staff. The reading requirement was lowered in the Online Home Study program and there is no longer a minimum reading requirement to take courses in the Learning Center Lab to meet the expressed needs of District students. In addition, A-G courses were added to assist college prep students. In ESL meetings, results from learning data analysis are presented and any weakness in the program is discussed, along with plans to focus on improvement in those areas. CASAS testing results are analyzed and used to focus on students who are on the cusp of levels which allows for payment points. Skills summaries, student competency summaries, student levels and skill profiles are also analyzed to obtain information and make adjustments. In Community Education, there are quarterly meetings where program adjustments are discussed. The curriculum changes quarterly and new projects and skills are the focus of each class. Student survey results dictate changes that need to be made to the curriculum or teaching strategies. Parent Education holds meetings as needed to discuss student learning data and there is an evaluation form for students to complete in each session and the results are evaluated and changes are made in accordance. Adults with Disabilities holds quarterly meetings to discuss curriculum. Analysis from pre and post CASAS tests determine if any adjustments in curriculum or teaching methods need to occur. Chapter Three Page 33


Notes

Indicator 6.3: Student learning data analysis is used to make institutional changes that enables students to reach educational goals and achieve academic success. Student learning levels are discussed at multiple meetings with different groups. Each of the departments uses a variety of assessment to aid in modifying learning and teaching approaches. Course effectiveness is based on completion rates and student satisfaction. In many courses, the student’s ability to perform or complete the desired skill or project being demonstrated leads to curriculum adjustments. CTE uses course completions, attainment of certificates and student surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of courses. Based on the discussions at the Advisory meetings and weekly staff development, recommendations are used to improve curriculum. A variety of assessment strategies from formal tests to completion of projects are used to demonstrate skills acquired. In Academics there are formative assessments such as chapter tests. Summative assessments include final exams. Recently, poor performance on math tests indicated that a change in the type of class was needed and a structured math class was added and then cancelled due to low enrollment. Instead, the math teacher was placed in the Learning Center and students struggling with math were advised to attend the Learning Center while the math teacher is working. Results from formative and summative assessments are evaluated and curricular changes occur if needed. In ESL, formative assessments occur every two weeks and CASAS testing occurs at each trimester. Recent analysis showed that testing needed to be scaled back because students felt that they lacked a sense of accomplishment due to being tested too frequently. CASAS testing uses data level gains that show actual progress. If functional levels show that students need improvement, teachers then can adjust curriculum to focus on those skills. Reports such as class performance, which looks at the entire class and at competency levels such as life skills and individual skills are used to determine where students need additional help. The attainment of student benchmarks helps to indicate if any given course is effective. A GED predictor is available through CASAS testing which shows the next step that students need to focus on in order to pass the GED. Adults with Disabilities uses CASAS testing at the beginning and at the end of the semester. Curriculum adjustments are made as a result of the testing data. In Community and Parent Education checking for understanding and student ability to perform the skill being taught is used as assessment. Instructors change and adapt curriculum as needed to promote the best possible student success from instruction

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Indicator 6.4: Assessment results are reported regularly to all

Notes

stakeholders so that accountability can be maintained and that student learning remains the focus of the school. Assessment results are reported at District School Board meetings twice annually and at staff meetings periodically. Reports are submitted to the PAACE Consortium, and in the community newspaper. Student learning results are also shared at Advisory Committee meetings and are available upon request. Reports are confidential and student names are withheld from any public or community source. Using the results of student gains in testing, ESL, Academics and Adults with Disabilities look at functional levels and if they have not been completed, then it indicates where students need further instruction. Through observation, instructors in Community and Parent Education determine the need for greater instruction in various skills and concepts. Academics and CTE survey students after completion as to job attainment or post-secondary school enrollment.

Indicator 6.5: The school relies on assessment results for institutional planning, Action Plan revision, and resource allocation. At ABC Adult School, administration and the Leadership Team are involved in institutional planning at the site level. At the District level, institutional planning falls upon the School Board and the District Cabinet members which include the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendents. Once decisions have been made for institutional planning needs, staff and the community are made aware through multiple meetings at different levels to release information. CTE and Community Education use analysis data to determine student needs on a quarterly basis. The ESL department uses data analysis at the end of the trimester. Academics, Adults with Disabilities and Parent Education looks at data at the end of the semester. Most departments look at students who need to test and look at the results to see who has progressed and to see if more classes are needed as a result of the testing and student completions. This helps to determine specific instructional needs to focus upon. In the Community and Parent Education courses, attendance and participation determines if a class is appropriate and meets student needs. The Parent Leadership Academy survey at the end of each module determines whether the topic was appropriate and what new things need to be offered. In CTE, financial decisions are made through data analysis to purchase new equipment and fund new programs to keep current. In ESL and Academics, learning data results and the availability of new materials determine financial distributions. The teacher, administrators and TOSAs look at the needs and spend accordingly. Chapter Three Page 35


Notes

Indicator 6.6: The school uses online assessment results to make changes in the school program, professional development activities, and resource allocations demonstrating a results-driven ongoing process. The number of students served by the online program is constantly measured. More hours are added to the program if there is a need. If there are too many students in the program at one time, a wait list is created so that students always have appropriate teacher support.

Indicator 6.7: The school staff has determined the basis upon which students’ grades and their growth and performance levels are determined and uses that information to strengthen high achievement of all students. A passing score on the placement examination as well as a passing score in the course determines if a student can advance to the next level. Students must complete all written assignments before moving on to the next assignment. If students seem to be struggling adjustments can be made, such as in spring 2016. Many students were not passing the final but still passing the class - the policy was changed so that students needed to have a passing score on the final in order to pass the online class. This was an important change in order to maintain course integrity. Quizzes, tests and finals are automatically graded through the online program. Essays are graded by a certificated instructor according to a set rubric. Academic integrity is insured by mandatory onsite testing for the final exam. In addition, essays are run through plagiarism sites to determine that they are student generated. The California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) was suspended in fall 2015 as a graduation requirement by the State of California. Adult students must take a CASAS test each semester but the results are not used to attain student achievement.

Indicator 6.8: A range of examples of student work and other assessments demonstrate online student achievement of the academic standards and the Schoolwide Learner Outcomes, including those with special needs. To demonstrate examples of student work, random samples of online essays are printed and placed in student files. Files are kept for three years. Any essays that have been found to be plagiarized are printed out and kept in student’s files as well.

Chapter Three Page 36


School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 6

Notes

Strengths: 1. Gather learning data from multiple sources. 2. Courses are current with State and Industry Standards. 3. Results are divulged at multiple meetings.

Key Issues: 1. Trying to keep up with the changes from the State.

Chapter Three Page 37


Notes

ď °

crIterIon 7: Student SuPPort SerVIceS

Criterion: The school recruits and admits students who are able to benefit from

its programs. Student support services address the identified needs of students and create a supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway through the institutional experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning, and success. The school systematically assesses student support services using Schoolwide Learner Outcomes, faculty, staff, and student input and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.

Indicator 7.1: The school provides sufficient student support services that enhance the learning environment and encourage the achievement of Schoolwide Learner Outcomes. ABC Adult School offers a myriad of support services. First and foremost is the teacher: students often first seek out the teacher and then the teacher can direct the student elsewhere. There are new student orientations held quarterly in the morning and evening at both campuses for students to attend in order to acquire more information about CTE and Academics courses. The Parent Leadership Academy is a support service available to all district parents and covers various topics relating to parent education. Transition services are used for students to explore the different departments and courses offered at ABC Adult School and include teacher-led tours of ESL students visiting CTE classes. There is the PAACE program in conjunction with the consortium to ease the transition of academic students to Cerritos Community College. Student Intervention Assistants (SIAs) are always on duty and available to direct students to appropriate places and keep the campus safe. The office support staff assists students with registration and questions about various programs, courses and schedules. The Job Center is available for student use with a full time job developer on staff. Services offered are: job search assistance, resume writing, interview preparation and training on basic professional skills. The Pearson Vue authorized testing center is open five days a week and offers a multitude of standardized tests required by State regulations or as part of industry certifications. The Assessment Center has appointments available morning, afternoon and evening with certified testing assistants available for help. Free parking is offered on both campuses. In addition, both campuses are well-lit with clean restrooms, comfortable, climate controlled classrooms and vending machines.

Chapter Three Page 38


Students can purchase identification cards, which allows them to use the beautiful Cerritos Library, however many students are not aware that this service is available. Students need to be made aware of the benefits of the student ID card.

Notes

Educational counseling is provided in academics, CTE and the Job Center. Prior to October 2016, academic counseling was managed by the Academic TOSA who looked over transcripts and assisted with course selection and postsecondary options. Starting in October 2016, the transition counselor started evaluating academic transcripts. For CTE counseling, the TOSA advises students on selection of career programs and on how to attain a career technical diploma, students can also receive career assessment advice. In the ESL department, students seek out the teaching staff as counselors as well as the assessment center staff. Administrators are also available to help with student support services due to the open door policy. The adult school is currently working to be able to offer financial aid sometime in the 2017-2018 school year. A financial aid coordinator was hired in August 2016. The hope is that with the availability of financial aid, student enrollment in the career programs will increase. The computer support analyst and technician ensure that all adult school computers function and are available for staff and student use. If a CTE student does not have computer access, computers in the Job Center are available for student use. If a student does not have access to a computer for online programs, computers for student use are available in the online office or in the Learning Center Lab. ESL offers a language lab staffed by a teacher/and or a paraeducator for student use. Support staff can assist students who struggle with online registration in the main offices. For personal counseling there is the USC Telehealth Suite that is being built in the Assessment Center and the transition counselor can assist with personal counseling if needed. The District also has links to services for homeless students. All teachers have been made aware of these services so that they can direct their students if needed. There is a health clinic in Hawaiian Gardens that is free and open to all students to use. Medical assistant students are covered under the District’s worker’s compensation rules. ABC Adult School conducts periodic surveys of the student body to assure the quality of student support services. These survey results are evaluated to assure their adequacy in meeting identified student needs. This evaluation provides evidence that the available student services contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes and identifies needed additions to these services. A comment box is available in both front offices, the CTE office and the Assessment Center and student suggestions are always accepted.

Chapter Three Page 39


Notes

Student support services are listed in the Student Handbook, in the course catalog and on the website. Information about student support services is made available during orientations, in display boxes around campus, on the school’s Facebook page, through announcements in class, and in email blasts. Even though we have a Student Handbook in place, many students are unaware of the handbook. Better effort needs to occur to make sure that students are aware of the services that are provided by the adult school.

Indicator 7.2: The school designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or academic advising programs to support student development and success in the transition to further education or employment opportunities. Program counseling services are provided in Academics, CTE, the Job Center and in the Assessment Center. For the last three years, the Academics TOSA was available for student advisement two mornings and two evenings per week. The TOSA evaluated transcripts and discussed program options available to students. A transition counselor was hired in October 2016 and currently evaluates academic transcripts and provides post-secondary counseling upon request. The counselor is available two evenings a week as well. If any changes occur to the Academic program, the counselor reviews current and past student transcripts for any discrepancies. The CTE TOSA acts as a counselor and focuses on the career program students but is always available to inform and direct any CTE student. Appointments are available upon request. New ESL students take a CASAS pretest to determine which ESL class level best fits their needs. They are then placed in that course. Periodically, the students are retested to determine whether they have progressed enough to change class levels. If a student wants to transition from ESL or Academics to CTE, the student is sent to either the academic or CTE TOSA at the Cuesta campus. The transition counselor can assist any student who has questions about post-secondary education. Through the PAACE program, students can easily transfer to Cerritos Community College. The CTE TOSA with the Job Developer places students enrolled in career programs in internships/externships/apprenticeships which often result in employment opportunities. Through the Job Center, students can get assistance with the skills needed to attain employment. Professional development opportunities relating to counseling include District Secondary Curriculum meetings, counseling events sponsored by Cerritos College and the Cerritos College Articulation Summit.

Chapter Three Page 40


Indicator 7.3: The school provides support for all students from the

Notes

recruitment and admissions phase to the successful completion of the school program of choice. ABC Adult School provides support for students from recruitment to completion of goals or graduation through a variety of methods. The main source of marketing is through advertising on the school’s marquees, through the school course catalog, in the community newspapers, on Facebook and through word of mouth. Outside marketing services have been evaluated but only recently have been hired due to the change in budget availability. The principal has served as a member of local Chambers of Commerce and currently serves as the president of the Artesia Chamber of Commerce which helps to keep ABC Adult School in the forefront of the community’s awareness. Course catalogs are mailed to strategic zip codes and distributed at the community Chambers of Commerce, District Office, and site offices. Recently, the mailing of a coupon brought in many new students and Bring A Friend Day was instituted to encourage new student enrollment. With federal guidelines, Academics and ESL courses have a reduced lab fee which increased enrollment. Teachers are encouraged to promote their own classes and are provided with as many flyers as they need at the school’s expense. Administrators, teachers, paraeducators and the job developer attend various District and community programs to present information about the opportunities available at the school and to recruit students. TOSAs, department chairs and the job developer and all other instructional staff are available to support student success. TOSAs can assist any student who wishes to transition from one department to another department. Post-secondary counseling occurs upon request and CTE students are assisted with internship/externship/apprenticeship placement. Through the Job Center, students can get assistance with the skills needed to attain employment. Students are often surveyed to determine whether course offerings are meaningful and suit the student’s needs. From the survey results, adjustments are often made to the instructional content so that the student receives the greatest value the course can offer. CTE and Academics have a process in place to follow up on things such as post-secondary education and training enrollment and attainment of employment. Admission policies and procedures are clearly listed in the course catalog, published biannually. They are also in the student handbook, available to students on the school website and in hard copy upon request. The Mission Statement and SLOs are guiding factors in writing and revising these policies. Each teacher has individual classroom policies and procedures which are listed on the syllabus and explained at the beginning of the course. On the website, school policies are listed and revised as needed.

Chapter Three Page 41


Notes

Indicator 7.4: The school regularly evaluates student needs in order to provide support services that increase the likelihood of success for all students. The learning support needs of ABC Adult School students are always being considered. Student support needs are discussed at various Leadership and department meetings as well as informal discussion among staff. Students are periodically surveyed to determine success and satisfaction with the program offerings. Through testing results, community demands and industry trends, programs are analyzed and adapted to meet student needs. All courses follow State educational code and federal guidelines. Students on the southside of the district expressed a need for additional off site ESL classes in their neighborhood and as a result, another class was added at the local elementary school. Many academic students were struggling with math skills and a structured teacher-led math class was added to assist these students. The Online home study program’s reading requirement was set too high and as a result, many District students who needed online access were unable to qualify for the program. To better serve these students, the Academic department lowered the reading requirement which has resulted in increased student participation and success. ABC Adult School holds a Back to School and Community Appreciation Night to introduce the first parent Leadership Academy workshop of the year. There is an Open House, Craft Fair and Fitness Fair every October on the Cabrillo Lane Campus. Students are invited to participate and rent a table to display and sell items learned in class. There is also a Career Fair held in March at the Cuesta site, where local businesses are invited to attend and meet with students who are prospective employees. The job developer holds monthly JOB (Join Our Business) Days which offer networking opportunities for students and local employers. The Pinning Ceremony is a time honored celebration, similar to a graduation, where medical assistant students receive their medical assistant pin and includes a candle lighting ceremony, a tradition for nursing students. The medical assistant students are also recognized for getting their Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) National Exam, their National Certified Phlebotomy Technician 1, (CPT-1) or their license by the State of California. The Parent Leadership Academy holds workshops for District parents to attend which cover subjects as college readiness and the use of technology in the classroom. The Parent Leadership Conference is an award winning event that has been occurring for over twenty years. District schools are invited to send parent representatives to attend workshops led by experts in their field. The Outstanding Student Awards Ceremony is held every April and honors adult school students who have shown exemplary dedication and effort in reaching their educational goals. The event is attended by family members, District representatives and local city and political officials. International Day is held every year in May. ESL students are invited to share their cultural heritage through displays and performances. This year the ESL Department has reinstated the ESL Cultural Field Trips.

Chapter Three Page 42


Every June, the Parent Education department hosts a special day to bring all the Parent Education classes together. Each year alternates between the theme of Mini Olympics and Carnival. Parents and children participate together in a variety of games, activities and crafts on the playground. Entertainment such as a puppet show, magic show or bubble show is provided each year. Pizza and drinks are available for sale at a small charge and there is a nominal admission fee. Families have the opportunity to interact with parents, children and teachers from other classes and sites. This event is also used to promote summer classes and introduce the fall schedule. Graduation is held every June and honors the achievements of high school diploma, high school equivalency and career technical diploma recipients. This event is the culmination of the school year and student achievement.

Notes

Administrators elicit student and teacher input about the needs of the off-site locations. Administrators frequently visit the off-site locations to support the teachers and students. When improvement is needed, the administrators work with the site facilitator to implement any changes and solve any problems as the budget allows. TOSAs are also available as a means of support and often visit off-site locations as well.

Indicator 7.5: The school maintains student records permanently, securely, and confidentially with provision for secure backup of all files. All faculty and staff are made aware of and follow established written guidelines for release of student information. Student information is kept confidential and secure and is available only to administrators, financial aid coordinator, counselor, TOSAs, office staff, accounting technician and technology analyst and assistant. Instructors have access to a limited amount of student records, including attendance records and contact information. Chapter Three Page 43


Notes

Electronic files are password protected for security and student written records are held in the adult school front offices in metal file cabinets. After three years, student files are shredded if they contain any personal information. In addition, any item with student information that needs to be discarded is shredded. Transcripts are released to students under the guidance of written rules only. Students can access their personal records by written release only.

Indicator 7.6: Institutional information is easily accessible to all stakeholders and prospective students and is free from misrepresentation or false promises. ABC Adult School publishes two main course catalogs a year and additional supplemental flyers. The course catalog and school information and policies are included on the school’s website. The catalog is current when it is submitted for print and revisions are sent out via email to the staff. The office staff updates the master course catalog which is kept in both offices. Changes and updates are posted on the website and communicated to the school community as they occur. The course catalog, mid-term brochures, teacher and student handbooks contain schoolwide policies and procedures. Catalogs and mid-term brochures are mailed to strategic zip codes twice a year and are placed in classrooms for students to view and take. Hard copies of the catalog, mid-term brochures and the student handbook are available in the offices. All policies and procedures are listed on the adult school website and can be updated at any time, as needed. Teachers and support staff are encouraged to advise their students where to find information regarding policies and procedures. Through the course descriptions in the catalog, students and staff can choose appropriate classes that best suit their needs. Testing and course recommendations can aid in choice of course selection. If needed, students can receive advisement from staff as to appropriate program placement. Accomplishments of intended outcomes are documented through earned diplomas and certificates, test results, grades, benchmarks earned, as well as skills learned and projects completed. TOPs reports are completed for most programs and detail student gains and outcomes and are shared with the State. Results are explained and shared at various levels of meetings, with the District, community and consortia members.

Chapter Three Page 44


Indicator 7.7: The school has available adequate services for online

Notes

students, including referral services, to support all students in such areas as health, career and personal counseling, and academic assistance. Online students are given the same counseling opportunities as the site based students. All students are directed to meet with the transition counselor before the start of their course work. Students may meet with the counselor at any given time. The counselor provides academic and post-secondary counseling. In the spring of 2016 there was also a marriage and family therapist intern who was available to all students for any personal counseling needs that students had. All enrolled students have access to this service. Currently, the transition counselor can also assist students with personal counseling needs.

Indicator 7.8: The school leadership and staff ensure that the support services and related activities have a direct relationship to online student involvement in learning, e.g., within and outside the classroom, for all students. Online students are offered the same educational support services as site based students. If a student loses access to their home computer, the academic Learning Center Lab or the online home study office is available for students to use the computers to complete their online course assignments.

Indicator 7.9: School leadership and staff link curricular and co-curricular activities for online students to the academic standards and schoolwide learner outcomes. Flyers that publicize upcoming events are always posted around campus about any school activities such as Open House, the CCAE sponsored Halloween costume contest, essay contests, raffle drawings, the Career Fair, the Outstanding Student Awards Ceremony and the graduation ceremony. Email blasts are also sent out to students announcing these activities and other outside activities and announcements are posted on the ABC Adult School Facebook page. Online students are welcome to participate if they choose to do so.

Indicator 7.10: The school has an effective process for regularly evaluating the level of online student involvement in curricular/cocurricular activities and student use of support services. Since ABC Adult School is an adult school, we do not offer the traditional secondary school extra-curricular activities such as clubs. Chapter Three Page 45


Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 7 Strengths: 1. T  he website and brochure are very accurate, timely, and widely distributed. 2. Online data base system is secure. 3. T  eachers and staff are frequently cautioned to not share their passwords. Faculty and staff have access to only the student information necessary to do their jobs. Passwords are changed frequently.

Key Issues: 1. A  financial aid program is being developed and set up but is currently not in place and as a result, student attendance is decreasing. 2. M  arketing needs to be addressed to promote the school and its services to prospective students.

Chapter Three Page 46


crIterIon 8: reSource ManageMent

ď ą

Notes

Criterion: Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning

programs and services. The distribution of resources supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and services. The school plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of financial resources provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term financial solvency.

Indicator 8.1: The school has sufficient resources to offer its current educational courses and programs.

As evidenced by financial statements and the monthly trial balance reports from the District Chief Financial Officer (CFO), ABC Adult School has stayed within budget for the past three years. Through financial statements, new State laws to fund adult education and allocations, there are sufficient funds to support the school’s programs and needed educational improvements. If there is a shortfall in available funds, the ABC Unified School District will cash flow adult school until the State funds are available. Funding is determined by the State and is distributed through the PAACE Consortium. The Mission Statement and goals are reviewed at Institutional Advisory meetings and at the Strategic Planning meetings which are held at the beginning and end of the school year. Any needed fee structure changes are ongoing and Board approved. The principal discusses the budget issues at various department meetings and is very transparent.

Indicator 8.2: The school operates with financial integrity and transparency and has a management system in place with appropriate control mechanisms to ensure sound financial practices are followed. The ABC Unified School District has annual audit procedures. In the previous two years, during the audit there were findings. The audit statement covers the entire District. If there are audit findings, documentation needs to be supplied and questions answered on how to remedy them in a timely manner. Proper procedures are then followed by the District CFO, who reports to the School Board and questions are answered on how to remedy the audit findings.

Chapter Three Page 47


Notes

The District has reserves and the adult school follows State guidelines which mandate a 3% minimum statewide reserve. Adult School is under the insurance umbrella of the ABC Unified School District as are all district schools. Grants are incorporated into the budget and are overseen by the accounting technician under the guidance of the District CFO. Any contractual relationship is under the direction and control of the District and Board approved. All procedures and guidelines are strictly followed. The principal has daily contact with the accounting technician and there is day-today evidence that shows the financial operating procedures. Yearly budgets are shared with all staff at Back to School meetings and the staff can question the school budget and expenditures at any time. At Leadership meetings, the budget, policies and practices are discussed. Any needed changes can be made rapidly because the accounting technician is at each meeting and can implement changes directly after discussion at the meeting. ABC Adult School reports on any financial updates and decisions through department meetings, Advisory meetings and Leadership meetings. The minutes from these meetings are shared with all stakeholders. ABC Adult School is currently applying for financial aid. A financial aid coordinator was hired in August 2016 and planning and training for financial aid is occurring.

Indicator 8.3: Institutional planning reflects a realistic assessment of current financial resources and looks forward in long-range strategic planning. The school receives monthly trial balance reports from the District CFO. The adult school has until December 2017 to spend all of the consortium funds. ABC Adult School is under the District’s umbrella in terms of insurance, benefits, school maintenance, and etc. Some of those are contractual agreements that the full faith and credit of the District goes behind. The District and School Board are made aware of the WASC Self-Study Report including the Action Plans. Any financial planning takes into consideration funds needed to complete the steps of the school’s Action Plans. Needs are discussed at department meetings and Leadership meetings. The Strategic Plan prioritizes those needs and the Schoolwide Action Plans and COE mandates help to implement such needs.

Chapter Three Page 48


Indicator 8.4: The school provides facilities that are clean, safe, and well-

Notes

maintained in order to provide for an effective learning environment. Student safety and comfort is very important to ABC Adult School. With a monthly Safety Committee meeting any safety issues are immediately addressed and corrected. The school Leadership Team, including administrators, work with the school custodians and SIAs to identify and correct possible upcoming safety issues. The Cabrillo Lane campus is a fenced campus while the Cuesta campus is an open campus. However, police cars are visible during the lunch hour and the police are quick to respond to both sites if called. There is always an administrator on duty in case of a student or classroom issue or for an emergency. Administrators always are available by two-way radio or cell phone. World Class Service activities as well as PAL workshops focus on how the support staff should interact with students so that the students feel welcomed. The needs for improved or additional facilities are looked at through staff and student surveys, Advisory meetings, Leadership meetings, program and course needs. These needs are assessed and prioritized through yearly analysis of student completions and earned benchmarks. Additional facilities are planned as program and community needs arise and as the budget allows. Many adult schools share campuses with alternative education programs. ABC Adult School has two campuses; the Cuesta site is a dedicated Adult School and does not share its facilities with any other program. Having a dedicated campus has proven to be very successful for students and faculty. The Cabrillo Lane campus is a shared campus with District Special Education and Alternative Education programs. There is a positive working relationship among all three programs. Cabrillo Lane students and faculty do not feel that having a shared campus is an impediment to the completion of the SLOs and course objectives.

Chapter Three Page 49


Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 8 Strengths: 1. Transparency with the budget. 2. Good working relationship with the District and Board. 3. Campus is well maintained. 4. Security is available at all times. 5. School is in compliance with OSHA laws.

Key Issues: 1. D  ue to State budget rules, the Community and Parent Education programs lack any funding and are completely fee based. Explore creative ways of increasing school operating funds including, the acquisition of more grants and funding from local and private agencies.

Chapter Three Page 50


crIterIon 9: coMMunIty connectIon

ď ˛

Notes

Criterion: The school seeks to enhance its educational effectiveness by developing close partnerships and relationships with community members. Connections within the community provide students with expanded learning experiences, including additional educational or vocational opportunities.

Indicator 9.1: Efforts are made by the school to connect to community leaders, businesses, and organizations that can enhance the learning opportunities for students.

There are eleven career programs in place and each one has local business representatives that attend the Advisory Committee meetings. The Advisory Committee consists of business representatives, CTE staff and program students from the various career programs. Suggestions and feedback are requested from the advisory board to help with better student job preparation. The representatives attend two meetings each year. There is also an Institutional Advisory Committee meeting once a year and business representatives are invited to attend. The adult school hosts an annual Career Fair and invites many business and organization representatives from throughout the area to participate. Students participate in the Career Fair for demonstrations representing the Medical Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, and IT Technician career programs. Students from the hair stylist and makeup artist courses also set up demonstration stations at the Career Fair to promote their classes. ABC Adult School works closely with local businesses and organizations that ask the adult school to assist in advertising their employment opportunities and to help in recruiting potential applicants. Business representatives are also invited to present at the monthly JOB Day events. Representatives are sent to participate in local business expos and resource fairs. The medical assistant students participate in groups at other local fairs to do health care promotions by volunteering in blood pressure checks. Representatives also participate in networking meetings with the Collaborative Community Network (CCN), local chamber events, career fairs and workshops occasionally offered to the community The qualified IT technician students are given hands-on opportunities to work on computers through the computer repair program offered to the community. The adult school works closely with local One-Stop Career Centers, Workforce Investment Boards, Veterans Administration, several GAIN/CalWORKs offices, Department of Rehabilitation, Department of Labor, EDD and other assistance agencies. Chapter Three Page 51


Notes

The School Community/Marketing meetings are held monthly and are well publicized. The meetings are listed on the adult school master calendar and email invites are sent out. During the past two years, through ConnectED, 10,000 phone calls were made, and a mass email was sent, inviting students and community members to attend the meeting and to give their input and suggestions for school improvement. During the 2015-2016 school year only ConnectEd emails were sent to advertise the Community/Marketing meetings. The principal is currently the president of the Artesia Chamber of Commerce and is also a member of the Cerritos Chamber of Commerce. The adult school held Business Academy workshops in conjunction with the Artesia Chamber of Commerce and Congresswoman Linda Sanchez’s office as well as monthly Community Coffee events where community members are invited to learn about what ABC Adult School has to offer. Community Coffee events are held alternatively on both campuses. In October 2016, the first Community Appreciation and Back to School Night was held on the Cuesta campus as a lead in to the first Parent Leadership Academy (PLA) workshop. All members of the School Board, the District Cabinet members and local political officials are invited to campus activities and events. At every event, School Board members and various District leaders are always in attendance. Members of local Chambers of Commerce and local business owners are also invited. Every year, various city and political officials are invited to attend the annual Outstanding Student Awards Ceremony. City officials, State Assembly members, State Senators and Congressional Representatives from the awarded student’s home districts are invited to attend in addition to the student’s friends and family members.

Indicator 9.2: The school has outlets for students in community service or internship opportunities that are connected to student programs that will enhance their learning experiences in line with the school’s mission. There are various internship/externship/apprenticeship opportunities available through the Career Technical program as the final step to complete a career program. Many of the teachers work with local businesses and can connect students with an appropriate position. There is a partnership list of 95 local businesses for the apprenticeship program that includes internship/externship/ apprenticeship opportunities for each of the career programs. ABC Adult School has a stellar reputation among the community. Many times a student in an internship/externship/apprenticeship program is offered a job once the program is completed. School Board members historically take classes through the adult school. Many teachers have loyal students who take any class that the teacher offers, year after year. The greatest advertisement is through word of mouth from community members who were satisfied by their adult school experience. Chapter Three Page 52


Indicator 9.3: The school informs its community regarding its mission,

Notes

its programs and learning opportunities, recognizing the benefits that community support can bring. Traditionally course catalogs are sent to strategic zip codes, according to enrollment. For the fall 2015 school year, the school attempted to try a “paperless” format and fewer mailed catalogs were sent out and instead a postcard advertising the school’s website was mailed. Many students were upset that they did not receive traditional catalogs and complained. As a result, for the spring 2016 catalog, the previous mailing pattern was used. For the current 2016-2017 year, semester catalogs were mailed to the traditional strategic zip codes as well as mid-term brochures listing available programs and courses. The school’s Mission Statement is included in all catalog mailings. Through follow-up phone calls, letters, emails and student surveys, reports on students are obtained to determine if students gained employment or bettered their employment, received a pay raise, or went on to higher education. Results are reported to the District, Board, consortium and COE. School events are publicized in local newspapers as well as on the school’s Facebook page. Regular postings about students and programs occur on Facebook. School catalogs are mailed out to students. Teachers can make flyers to promote their programs and are encouraged to distribute them throughout the community. Administrators and faculty attend local events to promote the adult school’s programs. Marquees on both campuses are regularly updated with current school information. Suggestions from community members are always well received and discussed at various staff meetings.

Indicator 9.4: The school ensures that the parents and school community understand online student achievement of the academic standards/ schoolwide learner outcomes through the curricular/cocurricular program. For concurrent students, the online policy is available for parents to view. Parents can check on the progress of their child’s online class and are encouraged to ask questions. Chapter Three Page 53


Notes

School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 9 Strengths: 1. T  he school offers courses during flexible hours to meet the student’s needs. 2. The school offers excellent customer service. 3. Online registration is available and is easy to use. 4. There are strong up-to-date programs that meet the community’s needs.

Key Issues: 1. More marketing needs to occur. 2. P  ossible child care which could result in increased attendance needs to be explored.

Chapter Three Page 54


ď ł

crIterIon 10: actIon Plan for ongoIng IMProVeMent

Notes

Criterion: The school uses the self-study process to identify key issues that

are inserted into a schoolwide Action Plan that governs school improvement activities and events. The schoolwide Action Plan is used regularly, reviewed annually, and monitored consistently by the governing body to ensure ongoing school improvement.

Indicator 10.1: The school has created an Action Plan that reflects the efforts of all stakeholders to plan for future growth and improvement.

Following the conclusion of the Focus Group meetings, ABC Adult School’s strengths and weaknesses were evaluated. Several key points were deemed necessary to explore. Possible Action Plans were voted on at the Leadership Team and the Support Staff meetings. From the results, four Action Plans were selected. Action Plans that focused on improving student needs were prioritized.

Indicator 10.2: As a result of the accreditation process, the school has identified key issues (short- and long-term) that will impact student learning and increase the achievement levels of students. In fall 2016, the current Action Plans were publicized to all stakeholders including faculty, staff, Board members, District personnel, students and community members. This occurred at Home Group or department meetings, Leadership meetings, Support Staff meetings and Union Representative meetings.

Chapter Three Page 55


Notes

Indicator 10.3: The school has procedures in place to implement the Action Plan with the support of stakeholders. In order for the Action Plans to be completed, it was necessary to identify who would be responsible for the process. With administrative approval, appropriate funding measures will occur to fulfill the Action Plans. At each step in developing the Action Plans, input and suggestions were elicited. As the progression of the Action Plans occur additional assistance and suggestions will be sought.

Indicator 10.4: The school has a definitive plan for how the Action Plan is to be monitored to maintain accountability, as well as to report progress to all stakeholders. For the four identified Action Plans, responsible parties were determined and a timeline was developed and will be followed for completion. Progress on completion of the Action Plans will be reported at various meetings throughout the next few years.

Indicator 10.5: The schoolwide Action Plan is used for institutional planning, resource allocation, and the evaluation of existing programs. Student success is what guides all policies and procedures implemented at ABC Adult School. This holds true for the development of the Action Plans. Student success is at the forefront of all decision making and budgetary decisions. All faculty and staff are keenly aware of this.

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School’s Strengths and Key Issues for Criterion 10

Notes

Strengths: 1. Gather input from multiple sources through a varied level of meetings. 2. T  hrough collaborative work, the Action Plans will result in increased schoolwide student achievement. 3. A  n organizational chart on who is responsible and who will contribute for certain steps of the Action Plan was developed and will be followed.

Key Issues: 1. Will take time to get financial aid in place. 2. Difficult to enlist teacher help to publicize student services.

Chapter Three Page 57


Chapter

Four

Revising the School Action Plan


Chapter

Notes

Four

Revising the School Action Plan Action Plan #1: Increasing Marketing Strategies ABC Adult School’s first Action Plan goal is to increase marketing strategies to raise student and community awareness of the offerings provided. The goal is to increase student enrollment and attendance through more visible awareness of the programs available through the adult school. In-house marketing attempts have occurred since 2013 with limited success. At the start of the 2015-2016 school year, a marketing firm was enlisted but insurance liability issues prohibited the use of the firm. Increased postings on Facebook as well as increased staff attendance at community events was implemented as a result. Before the start of the 2016-2017 school year, a new web hosting company was hired to update and redesign the school’s website to make it more user friendly. At the same time, a new marketing firm was also hired to promote general awareness of ABC Adult School. A new marketing committee was formed with two main foci: Facebook postings and community newspaper promotions. The principal also started an ABC Adult School Twitter feed and tweets important events and school happenings on a daily basis. In an attempt to increase enrollment, two promotional offers are available to students: there is a $5 “early bird” discount available for students when they pre-register using online registration during a designated time. The “early bird’ discount is available for each class registered. In addition, if a returning student brings in a new student to enroll at ABC Adult School, both the returning student and new student will receive a $20 school voucher that can be used immediately to pay toward enrollment.

Chapter Four Page 1


Notes

1. Website was cluttered and out of date.

2. Decreased enrollment and awareness of programs.

3. Attempted in-house marketing strategies.

4. Attempted to hire marketing firm.

5. Began to implement increased social media presence with limited success.

6. P  lan: Increase social media presence, increase community newspaper promotions, update school’s website and hire a new marketing firm.

Action Plan #1: Increasing Marketing Strategies Rationale: There were limited marketing strategies available to promote ABC Adult School. The self-study process found that increased marketing strategies would help to increase the public’s awareness of programs offered through ABC Adult School.

SLOs Addressed: All Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed?

Chapter Four Page 2

What Steps Need to Be Taken?

Use a marketing company to increase marketing strategies

Have regular meetings

Use a marketing Company to increase SEO (Search Engine Optimization) effectiveness

Have regular meetings

Follow advice of marketing company

Follow advice of marketing company

Tools and Materials Needed Budget School Information

Budget School Information

Timeline

Persons Responsible

Report of Progress

Fall 2016 and ongoing

Administrative Team, Leadership Team, Marketing Committee

Increased student awareness by increased attendance

Fall 2016 and ongoing

Administrative Team, Leadership Team, Marketing Committee

Increased student awareness by increased internet presence


Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed?

What Steps Need to Be Taken?

Create social media engagement via competition and activities

Create hashtags and postings on social media

Produce articles for community newspapers

Student information

Monitor feedback and share posts

Classroom activity information

Tools and Materials Needed Budget School Information

Timeline

Persons Responsible

Report of Progress

Fall 2017 and ongoing

Administrative Team, Leadership Team, Marketing Committee

Social media data analysis

Fall 2016 and ongoing

Marketing Committee

Increased community presence

Staff to assist with social media activities Budget Staff to write stories

Notes

School Calendar

Action Plan #2: Implementation of Financial Aid ABC Adult School’s second Action Plan is to implement Title IV Financial Aid. For the last several years, it has been increasingly clear that other local adult schools who offer financial aid have had strong programs. Trying to model after these adult schools, in 2011, the COE accreditation was sought. ABC Adult School must be able to offer financial aid to the students seeking to enroll in its programs to increase future success. In fall of 2015, ABC Adult School received COE accreditation which allows the school to implement Title IV Financial Aid. In August of 2016, a financial aid coordinator was hired and is currently undergoing training. 1. Decreasing CTE enrollment due to perceived high cost of programs.

2. COE accreditation sought and obtained.

3. Financial aid coordinator hired.

4. P  lan: Attend financial aid training and implement Financial Aid program and publicize availability of financial aid.

Chapter Four Page 3


Notes

Action Plan #2: implementation of financial Aid Rationale: The self-study process revealed a need to increase CTE programs and attendance. Offering financial aid is vital to the students needing to attend the CTE programs.

SLOs Addressed: All Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed?

What Steps Need to Be Taken?

Principal and financial aid coordinator need to attend training

Training

Implementation of Financial Aid program

Advertisement of Financial Aid program

Timeline

Persons Responsible

Report of Progress

Written policies

Spring Principal and 2017 and financial aid ongoing coordinator

Implementation of a Student Financial Aid program

Policies need to be written

Policy handbook

Advertisement of financial aid

Rules

As soon as training occurs and ongoing

Principal and financial aid coordinator

Students receiving financial aid

Emails, phone calls, updates to website, Facebook, advertisements,

Marketing company

As soon Principal and as imple- financial aid mentacoordinator tion occurs and ongoing

Awareness of Financial Aid program

Meetings regarding progress

Updates to catalog

Chapter Four Page 4

Tools and Materials Needed

Written policies


Action Plan #3: Increasing Student Awareness of Student Support Services

Notes

ABC Adult School’s third Action Plan identifies a need to more adequately publicize available student support services. Through surveys and contact with students it was determined that most students are unaware of the varied programs and services available to them. It became clear that a more successful means of conveying student support service information needed to be addressed and implemented. 1. Student Handbook was written and made available, but students were still unaware of its availability.

2. S  tudent Surveys and daily student contact demonstrated a need for more public awareness of student support services.

3. P  lan: Increase resources to make available student support services more widely known to students and the community.

Action Plan #3: Increasing Student Awareness of Student Support Services Rationale: The self-study process found that students were unaware of current student support services.

SLOs Addressed: All Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed? Have an area of the website dedicated to student support services

What Steps Need to Be Taken? Work with the website designer

Tools and Materials Needed Web hosting/ design service

Provide staff development Training Make students for teachers aware of where to be able to show their to access student support students where to access services information information on student support services

Timeline

Fall 2017 and ongoing

Persons Responsible

Administrative Team, Leadership Team, TOSAs

Report of Progress

Students’ awareness of offered student support services and increased use of the services

Chapter Four Page 5


Notes

Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed?

What Steps Need to Be Taken?

Use social media to increase student awareness of student support services

Design advertisements for social media accounts

Timeline

Persons Responsible

Report of Progress

ConnectEd, Fall 2017 Facebook, and Twitter ongoing

Marketing Committee

Social media data analysis

Translators

ESL Department TOSA and ESL Assistant Principal

Surveys of ESL students regarding awareness of student support services

Train staff on postings

Outreach to low Create flyers literacy groups in different languages to promote student support services Create emails/ voicemails in different languages using the ConnectEd system

Chapter Four Page 6

Tools and Materials Needed

Budget Parent Workshops ConnectEd

Fall 2017 and ongoing


Action PlAn #4: increAsing stAff tecHnologY trAining

Notes

ABC Adult School’s fourth Action Plan is to enhance and increase staff technology training. When the budget was cut and funding was very limited, staff training was reduced to the bare minimum. Once funding became secure, staff technology training for the CTE, Academics and ESL (English as a Second Language) departments resumed. However, many staff members except for the CTE department because of COE accreditation training mandates expressed a need for more in-depth technology training. In addition, there is very limited training available for the fee-based departments. There is also limited training available for the Adults with Disabilities department because of the reestablishment of the department and very limited direction from the State. 1. Budget cuts reduced availability of staff technology training.

2. The COE accreditation process dictated that CTE staff receive adequate technology training.

3. Secure funding allowed for increased technology training for State funded departments.

4. Plan: Address more detailed technology training for ESL, Academics, AWD departments. Also increase training for the fee based programs of Community and Parent Education.

Chapter Four Page 7


Notes

Action Plan #4: Increasing Staff Technology Training Rationale: COE accreditation process dictates that the CTE department receive staff technology training. The self-study process identified a need for increased staff technology training in all other departments.

SLOs Addressed: All Action Steps What Will Be Implemented or Changed? Provide Academics, ESL and AWD staff with increased technology training

What Steps Need to Be Taken?

Tools and Materials Needed

Survey staff to determine the needs

Surveys

Analyze needs and determine costs

Survey results

Obtain funding

School calendar

Timeline

Persons Responsible

Report of Progress

Fall 2018 and ongoing

Administrative Team, TOSAs and Department Chairs

Summary of surveys

Fall 2018 and ongoing

Community Ed. and Parent Ed

Summary of Surveys

Assistant Principals, TOSAs and Department Chairs

Updated school calendar

Training evaluations

Funding

Schedule and implement training Provide Community Ed./ Parent Ed staff with technology training

Survey staff to determine the needs

Surveys

Analyze needs

Survey results

Increase time of quarterly meetings Obtain funding

School calendar

Lynda.com Funding

Training evaluations Lynda.com completion report

Schedule and implement training Obtain additional Lynda.com licenses Provide CTE staff with technology training

Align with COE requirements

Survey Follow Adviso- results ry Committee School training recom- calendar mendations Survey staff to determine the needs Schedule and implement training

Chapter Four Page 8

Surveys

Fall 2018 and ongoing

CTE Assistant Principal, TOSA and Department Chair

Summary of Surveys Updated school calendar Training evaluations


Appendices


Glossary ABCFT

ABC Federation of Teachers

ABE

Adult Basic Education - generally includes primary school education (grades K-8)

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act

AFSCME

American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees

ASAP v3

Administrative Software Applications Program version 3

AWD

Adults with Disabilities

Burlington English

An online program for English language acquisition. It features any timeanywhere access to state-of-the-art online interactive courses. Students may study General English, English in America, and Career Pathways.

CAHSEE

California High School Exit Exam

CALPRO

California Adult Literacy Development Project

CalWORKs

California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids

Carl Perkins

A grant for technical education students

CASAS

Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems, used to assess adult basic skills.

CCAE

California Council for Adult Education

CCMA

Certified Clinical Medical Assistant

CCN

Community Collaborative Network-group of non-profit organizations offering social services to local residents.

CDE

California Department of Education

CFO

Chief Financial Officer

COAAPS

Civic Objectives and Additional Assessment Plans

COE

Council on Occupational Education

Compass Learning Odyssey

Online high school diploma courses offered through the Academic department.

ConnectEd

ConnectEd is a mass notification service that allows you to contact groups of students by phone, email or SMS. These messages can be informational, promotional or emergency notifications.

CSEA

California School Employees Association

Appendix Page 1


CTE

Career Technical Education - Classes that directly relate to obtaining employment.

EDD

California Employment Development Department - State agency tasked with employment and unemployment.

EL Civics

English language civics instruction to ensure that students understand the rights and responsibilities of being a citizen.

ESL

English as a Second Language

GAIN

Greater Avenues to Independence, a state program for low-income participants.

Gates-McGinitie

Tests to measure reading achievement.

GED

General Educational Development Test

GED Academy

Online GED and HiSET preparation courses offered through the Academic department

HiSET

High School Equivalency Test

HOH

Home Economics, Older Adults and Health and Safety program now referred to as Community Education.

JOB Day

Join Our Business Day

LEA

Local Education Authority

Lynda.com

A vast video library of several thousand online tutorials on a broad range of software topics. The topics are broken into 5-15 minute tutorials that are taught by experts in the field. Courses can be accessed around the clock for convenient, self-paced learning.

Mbs

Megabits per Second

MOS

Microsoft Office Specialist

NSBA

National School Board Association

PAACE Consortium

Partnership for Adult Academic and Career Education Consortium

PAACE Program

A partnership between the Adult School and Cerritos Community College designed to help our students transition smoothly to Cerritos Community College.

PAL

Partnership with Administration and Labor

PATH

Pointing Adolescents Toward Health

Pearson Vue

A global testing firm that develops, manages and delivers exams for various testing programs.

PLC

Parent Leadership Conference - held annually, provides workshops and education for parents.

Appendix Page 2


PLA

Parent Leadership Academy - helps meet needs of parents and strengthen community outreach and support.

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OTAN

The Outreach and Technical Assistance Network, a resource for links to information relevant to teaching adults.

SELACO

Southeast Los Angeles County Workforce Investment Board- fosters private-public partnerships to meet the needs of area residents and employers.

SEO

Search Engine Optimization

SIA

Student Intervention Assistant-security officer on campus.

SMART Boards

Interactive whiteboards

Smart TVs

A television set with integrated Internet and interactive features.

STAY

Smoking, Tobacco and You

STEP

Steps to Encourage Peace

Stull Bill

California State Legislature bill, used to evaluate all certificated personnel.

TESL Certificate

A certificate to teach English

TNT

Teacher Networking Techniques - held by ESL department, focus on staff development and classroom technology.

TOEFL

Test of English as a Foreign Language

TOPSPRO

Computerized database system designed for education

TOSA

Teacher on Special Assignment- has replaced Resource Teachers.

USC

University of Southern California

WASC

Western Association of Schools and Colleges - The official accrediting body for California.

WIOA/231

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

World Class Service

School District’s level of student support.

Appendix Page 3


Board of Education - 2016 Trustee Area 7: Christopher Apodaca, President of the Board, elected to the ABC Board in 2015. Chris Apodaca was born in Santa Ana, California to a working class family. As the middle of three children, he began working at the age of 15 as a janitor to help his family keep a roof over their heads. He is a product of the K-12 public school system and was a scholar athlete throughout his four years at Orange High School. He is the youngest Latino to be elected to the school board and serve as Vice President. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology, a Master of Business Administration in Accounting & Finance, and maintains a Federal NMLS License. Mr. Apodaca is actively involved in his community and has served on the board of various non-profit organizations. Among them are: the California Public Schools Advisory Council, the OC Children’s Language Center, Patriots & Paws, the ABC Education Foundation, and the Veterans Association of Real Estate Professionals (VAREP). He has received recognition from Congresswoman Linda Sanchez, State Senator Tony Mendoza, Assembly Member Cristina Garcia, and various local officials for his work with the Primary Intervention Program (PIP). In 2012 and again in 2014, he was named a “Presidential Management Fellow” semi-finalist. A competitive and prestigious program offered by the United States Office of Personnel Management on behalf of the President. He has been a member of the following organizations: Thomas I. Bergin Society, Pacific West Association of Realtors, the Surfrider Foundation, Young Professionals Network (YPN), the Orange County Association of REALTORS, the Santa Clara University Alumni Association, and the National Society of Hispanic MBAs. In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his Labrador retriever, watching Netflix, and playing the piano. He has also been sighted singing karaoke on occasion. “With education comes empowerment, not just for some but for all. I am proud to be your trustee and look forward to working with you to strengthen our community.” –Boardmember Chris Apodaca

Appendix Page 4


Trustee Area 2:Soo Yoo, Vice President of the Board, was elected to the ABC School Board in 2013. She is the Founder and Director of an afterschool Tutoring and College preparatory academy since 1994. Soo earned her Bachelor Degree from University of California, Irvine and a Master’s Degree in Counseling from Westminster Theological Seminary. Soo is fluent in English, Spanish, and Korean languages. Soo has extensive experience as a College Admission Consultant, newspaper education columnist, speaker for PTA sponsored college prep seminars at ABC Schools, and Committee Member on the City of Cerritos’ Let Freedom Ring Committee. She is also a member of PTA at Wittmann Elementary and served on the School Site Council at Gahr High School. Additionally, she served as a girl’s volunteer basketball coach for the City of Cerritos Park and Recreation. In 2007, Soo founded the American Red Cross, Gateway Chapter. She is the Artesia/Cerritos Annual Team Sponsor for American Cancer Society-Relay for Life since 2008. Soo is an advisor to the Mid-City Korean Senior Association. A Cerritos resident since1996, Soo is married to Sam, a Pastor, for 22 years. They have four children: Hannah, Amy, Rachel, and Abigail. They all attended, or attend ABC Schools at Wittmann Elementary, Carmenita Middle School and Gahr High School.

Trustee Area 1: Leticia Mendoza, Clerk of the Board, elected to the ABC Board in 2015. Leticia Mendoza, Clerk of the Board, elected to the ABC Board in 2015. Leticia “Letty” Mendoza is a lifelong educator who has dedicated her life to student success, community service and providing a helping hand to those most in need in our community. A product of public schools, Letty earned a Bachelors of Arts Degree in Child Development and a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential form California State University, Los Angeles. A second-generation educator, Leticia has been a local elementary school teacher for the last 18 years at Brooklyn Ave. School in East Los Angeles. Prior to becoming a teacher, she was a paraeducator at Brooklyn Ave. School, the same school she attended as a child. She comes from a family of educators and her husband is also a teacher; in fact, they met while teaching at the same elementary school. Additionally, Letty is also the president and co-founder of a non-profit organization, the Southern California LEAD Foundation. The foundation’s mission is to improve the quality of life of the South East Los Angeles County residents through programs, projects, sponsorships and scholarships based on Leadership, Education, Advancement, and Development. Letty has also been very involved as a parent in the ABC Unified School District. She was a parent volunteer at Niemes Elementary School and was a past president of Ross’ Colorguard Parent Group. She and her family annually support and sponsor the ABC Fun Run, which raises money for the ABC USD Foundation. In addition to her involvement with ABC USD, Letty has also been involved civically in her community. She is a member of the Artesia Parent Volunteer Group, which supports the City of Artesia’s Parks & Recreation Department by raising funds and volunteers at community events. She has served as the Team Mom for the past 3 years on her son’s baseball team at Artesia Park. Additionally, she and her family annually support and sponsor the Friends of the Artesia Library and North Artesia’s Posadas and toy giveaway. Letty is a mother of four – Samantha, Anndrea, Annais, and Antonio (three of which currently attend ABC schools). She resides in Artesia with her husband, State Senator Tony Mendoza.

Appendix Page 5


Trustee Area 2:Olympia Chen, Member of the Board, was first elected to the ABC Board in 1997. She also served as the Board President in 2000, 2004, 2009, 2012, and 2016. Olympia was a high school teacher and has been a resident of Cerritos for 30 years. She has extensive involvement in the school district and the community. She volunteered in her children’s schools, including serving as secretary of Carmenita PTA and Cerritos High School PTSA. Olympia was a board member for the Greater Long Beach Chapter of the American Red Cross as well as the Community Family Guidance Center. She is a member of Woman’s Club of Artesia Cerritos, a lifetime member of Friends of Cerritos Library, and a member of the Association of American University Women. Olympia enjoys “Read Aloud” events at the schools. Olympia feels it is critical to continue the collaboration between employee groups and the administration so that everyone can focus on student achievement. She also devotes herself to the mission that all students in ABC be college or career ready upon high school graduation.

Trustee Area 3: Lynda Johnson, Member of the Board, was first elected to the ABC School Board in 2011 and re-elected in 2013. Lynda has been a resident of Cerritos since 1971 and is a product of the schools in the ABC District. She attended Cabrillo Lane Elementary, Nixon Elementary, Haskell Junior High, and graduated from Artesia High. She valued the quality of education that ABC offered and therefore raised her three children in this community. All three of her children are also proud products of ABC and are graduates of Cerritos High School. Her daughter, Lauren, is a graduate of UCLA. Her son, Roy, is a graduate of Whittier College. Her youngest son, Ryan, is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy and is currently a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. Lynda was an active volunteer in the ABC classrooms and was part of the booster club for the Cerritos High School Model United Nations program and the Cerritos High School Cross Country Team. She also served as a three-term PTSA President at Cerritos High School. In the community, she has coached youth basketball, T-ball, and soccer through the City of Cerritos Parks and Recreation program. Lynda makes regular visits to the schools in the district and has been in the classrooms of all 19 elementary schools, 5 middle schools, 5 high schools, the adult school, as well as the Head Start Program, and Nutrition Services. Her visits help keep her connected with the schools and gives her a better understanding of the needs of our ABC students, parents, and the community. Currently she is the Board Liaison to the City of Lakewood. She has been involved with and volunteers for the Lakewood Pan American Scholarship Association, of which many of our ABC students are recipients of. Lynda has also served on the Service Academy Nomination panel for Congresswoman Linda Sanchez. Lynda encourages our ABC parents and the ABC community stakeholders to be engaged, involved and informed so that together, we can provide all of our students with a 21st century education. Lynda Johnson can be contacted via email at: abcboardmemberjohnson@gmail.com

Appendix Page 6


Trustee Area 4: Maynard Law, Member of the Board, was elected to the ABC Board in 2007, re-elected in 2011, and in 2015. Maynard is a retired Special Education Teacher as well as a retired public administrator. Maynard has been a resident of Cerritos for 38 years, with both of his sons educated in ABC. He has extensive involvement in the school district and the community. He has served the community on various ABC School District advisory committees, coached more than 40 youth sports teams, volunteered as a scout leader, as a member of the Friends of Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, as President of the Cerritos Optimist Club, and as Chairman of the City of Cerritos Parks and Recreation Commission. He feels honored to continue the leadership excellence that is the cornerstone of the ABC District. He believes that continuing strong partnerships among parents, teachers, administrators, employee groups, and the school board is a priority. He believes that a primary role of a board member is to ensure that every student has the resources to achieve academic success. Mr. Law is the liaison to the L.A. County Committee on School District Organization and the L.A. County School Trustees Association. Mr. Law serves on the Southeast ROP Board of Trustees.

Trustee Area 5: Sophia Tse, Member of the Board, was elected to the ABC Board in 2007, reelected in 2011, and in 2015. Sophia Tse, Member of the Board, was elected to the ABC Board in 2007, reelected in 2011, and in 2015. Sophia Tse is a Director of Post Partum, Nursery and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Sophia has been a resident of Cerritos for 27 years. All three of her children attended ABC schools. Sophia has been involved in her children’s schools as PTSA board member at Carmenita MS and Whitney HS, chairwoman at Whitney HS Chinese PTSA and volunteer nurse practitioner for Cerritos HS soccer teams. She has served in the community through the following organizations: Chairwoman and Board Member of the Southern California Chinese Culture Association; coach, team mom, and first aid provider for City of Cerritos soccer teams; participant in the March of Dimes Program for premature Infants; and community instructor for basic life support and parenting classes. Mrs. Tse is the liaison to the Career Technical Education Ad Hoc Board Advisory Committee. She believes that educational instruction should develop all aspects of the student, including the physical, intellectual, social, and psychological aspects, in order to create a wellrounded individual. She strongly feels that success in a student’s education can only occur through strong parental involvement and participation.

Appendix Page 7


Appendix Page 8

Director SELPA Dr. William Gee

Program Specialist Stacia Abe Joy Dye

Head of Health Services Michelle Ward

Coordinator Child Develop. Shanthi Tharuvai

Supervisor Child Develop. Tom Woodward

Supervisor Child Develop./ Special Programs Lisa Davis

Program Specialist Lang. Assessment/ ELL Sandra Hayase

Social & Behavioral Services Coordinator Kristin Guerrero

Supervisors Special Education Socorro Verduzco

Director Pupil Support Services Leslie Fagan

Assistant Superintendent Academic Services Valencia Mayfield

Program Specialist Migrant Ed/ Angela Fernandez

Program Specialist Districts Coaches Lena Bradshaw Diana Munoz Julianne Gray Eric Vieira

Program Specialist Curriculum/PD Danielle Saldavia Lora Ballard

Program Specialist Science/Health STEM Director Paul Killian

Supervisors Curriculum Instruction/Prof. Development Carol Castro (Sec) Dr. Beth Bray (Ele)

Program Specialist Info & Tech David Franklin Irene Orozco

Supervisor Graphics Chris Whelen

Manager Information & Technology (vacant)

Director Information & Technology Dr. Colin Sprigg

Assistant Superintendent Human Resources Dr. Susan Hixson

Program Specialist Teacher Induction Stacey Hamagiwa (.4 FTE)

Supervisor Human Resources Dr. Gina Zietlow

Supervisor Facilities/Maint Dalbert Campos

Supervisor Grounds/Bldg John Eddy

Supervisor Transportation Frank Padilla

Manager Maintenance Srvs Robbie Kay

Supervisor Purchasing Virginia Lewis

Supervisor Warehouse Shaun Love

Director, Maint. Oper, Trans, and Facilities James Poper

Director Purchasing/Risk Management Joshie Cox

Assistant Superintendent Business Services/ Chief Financial Officer Toan Nguyen

SUPERINTENDENT Dr. Mary Sieu

BOARD OF EDUCATION

Director School Services Dr. Cheryl Bodger

Supervisors Operations Senaido Gonzalez Jennifer Machado

Manager Nutrition Services Maureen Conklin

Supervisor Accounting Joseph Webber

Supervisor Payroll/ Fringe Benefits Gerardo Cruz

Director Fiscal Services Priscilla Thantrong

ABC UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT ORGANIZATION CHART

Program Specialist PBIS Rachel Santos

Coordinator Safe Schools (vacant)

Coordinator Child, Welfare & Attendance Bill Hundley

Supervisor Child, Welfare & Attendance Tim Catlin

Elementary Principals

Coordinator School/Comm. Partnerships Ann Griffo

Middle School. High School/Adult School Principals

Director Secondary Schools Dr. Rhonda Buss

2016-17 School Year


Appendix Page 9

Nancy Hom, TOSA/Chair - ext. 25021 Nattaly Salazar, Sec II - ext. 25017 Maria Tehrani, Senior Clerk Typist - ext. 25015 Bonnie Young, Sec I - ext. 25019

Parent Education, PLC, PLA

Vanessa Campos, Resource Testing Asst - ext.25089 Adriana Ramirez , RTA ext. 25056 Rudy Hernandez, Tech.Asst. - ext. 25045

Accountability

Velia Paredes, TOSA/Chair ESL - ext. 25040 Maria Tehrani, Senior Clerk Typist - ext. 25015 Nattaly Salazar, Sec II - ext. 25017

ESL, WIOA

Secretaries Extension Maria Tehrani, Senior Clerk Typist 25015 Nattaly Salazar, Sec II 25017

ESL, Parent Ed Duty Night - Thursday - 1:00 - 9:30 pm

Ami Takanashi - ext. 25018

Assistant Principal

Janet Aasness, TOSA/Chair - ext. 25046 Bonnie Young, Sec I - ext. 25019 Melissa VanAalsburg, Sub - ext. 25203

Marketing

(562) 926-6734

Kerri Murray, Network Analyst II - ext. 25104 Rudy Hernandez, Tech. Asst. - ext. 25045

School Websites/Tech Support

Mary Pinedo, Job Developer - ext. 25177

Apprenticeship

Job Development

Rachelle Schulz, TOSA/Chair CTEC - ext. 25175

Teacher on Special Assignment

James Palacios - General Maintenance Luis Alfaro - Custodian Jorge Rodriquez - Custodian Rynol Weston - SIA George Salcedo - Evening SIA

Extension 25014 25100 25109

Cuesta Plant Maintenance and Security

Secretaries Deana Colvin, Sec II - CTEC ___________, Sec II - CTEC Irene Hernandez, Sec II - CTEC

Career Technical Education, Apprenticeship, & COE Duty Night - Monday - 1:00 - 9:30 pm

Assistant Principal

Charles Minear - ext. 25024

Extension 25201 25203

Organizational Chart Revised 12/01/16

Maria Vizcarra, Sec II - ext. 25201

Emergency Procedures School Safety

Robert Gonzales, Custodian Frank Burton, Custodian Laura Rodriguez, Custodian Arnold Navarro, SIA Tony Cherry - Evening SIA

Cabrillo Lane Site Maintenance and Security

WASC

All TOSA & Department Chairs

Diane Jhun, TOSA, HOH & AWD - ext. 25307 Todd Tabon, Chair HOH & AWD

Teacher on Special Assignment

Secretaries Maria Vizcarra, Sec II Melissa VanAalsburg, Sub

Cabrillo Lane Health/Safety, Older Adults, Home Economics, AWD Duty Night - Wednesday-1:00 - 9:30 pm

Nancy Pawlisz - ext. 25212

Academics

Janet Aasness, TOSA/Chair ext. 25046

Krista Stenzel, Sec II Academics - ext. 25023

Natalie Maddox ext 25020

Transition Counselor

PAACE Consortium

Diane Jhun (AWD), Janet Aasness (ABE/ASE), Nancy Hom(K-12 Support), Velia Parades (ESL), Mary Pinedo, (Apprenticeship), & Rachelle Schulz (CTEC)

EFFECTIVE July 1, 2016

Assistant Principal

Winnie Wong, Financial Aid Coordinator - ext. 25012 ______________, Accounting Technician Maria Tehrani, Sec III - ext. 25015

Duty Night - Tuesday 1:00-9:30 pm

PAACE, Budget, & Public Relations/Marketing

Dr. Pao-Ling Guo - ext. 25011

Principal

ABC Adult School

Administrative Organizational Chart 2016 - 2017 School Year


Appendix Page 10

X X

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Community Ed. -Instructor

ESL - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

Community Ed. -Instructor

CTE - Instructor

Parent Ed. - Instructor

Maintenance

Academics - Instructor

CTE - Paraeducator

Testing Assistant

CTE/AWD - Instructor

Parent Ed./Academics - Instructor

Community Ed. - Instructor

Student Intervention Assistant

Community Ed. - Instructor

Parent Ed. - Instructor

CTE - Secretary II

ESL/Academics Paraeducator

CTE - Instructor

Community Ed. - Instructor

CTE - Instructor

Ascencio, Julio

Bair, Richard

Bao, Chit

Barbosa, Rosalba

Brookler, Julie

Burton, Frank

Caballero, Larry

Caliz, Connie

Campos, Vanessa

Cervantes, Carolyn

Cham, Nancy

Chen, James

Cherry, Tony

Close, Barbara

Cohen-Doron, Jill

Colvin, Deana

Cuellar, Kara

Dennis, Karen

DeVries, Evelyn

Echols, Elaine

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Lifetime Standard Secondary Credential

Life Standard Elementary Teaching Credential

Preliminary Career Technical Education Teaching Credential

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Focus Groups

X

X

X

X

X

Admin

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Adult Teaching Credential, Designated Subjects Adult Teaching Credential Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

X

X

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

X

Maintenance

X

Armiento, Carmen

Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

Alfaro, Luis

Staff

Parent Ed./Academics - Instructor/TOSA/ Department Chair

Faculty

Aasness, Janet

Credential

Program/Position

Name

Overview of All Faculty, Staff Administration WASC Action Team X

Leadership Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Home Group


Appendix Page 11 Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

ESL - Instructor

CTE - Instructor/TOSA/ Department Chair

Community Ed. Instructor

ESL - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

ESL- Instructor

Parent Ed. - Instructor

Kandalaft, Rachelle (Schulz)

Kane, JoDee

Kholousi, Mitra

Kildall, Patricia

Kirkwood, Marta (Jody)

Kucera, Joyce

Lakin, Sandy

Life Standard Elementary Teaching Credential

General Elementary Teaching Credential

Life General Elementary Teaching Credential

X

X

X

X

Designated Subjects Adult Teaching Education Teaching Credential

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Focus Groups

X

X

Admin

X

X

X

X

Staff

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Faculty

Adult Teaching Credential

Adult Education Teaching Credential - Foreign Language

Adult Education Teaching Credential - English

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Judy, Laurie

Life Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

Vocational Education Teaching Credential

ESL - Instructor

Community Ed. - Instructor

Hillstead, Lori

Multiple Subject Teaching Credential- CLAD

Johnson, Vicki

ESL - Instructor

Hernandez, Terridawn

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Network Technician

Hernandez, Rudy

Community Ed/AWD - Instructor/TOSA

CTE - Secretary II

Hernandez, Irene

Tier II Administrative Credential

Jhun, Mi Diane

Principal

Guo, PaoLing

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

CTE - Instructor

Grissom, Georgia

ESL - Instructor

Maintenance

Gonzalez, Robert

Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Jensen Frasher, Katie

Community Ed. Instructor

George, Kathy

Community Ed. - Instructor

Academics - Paraeducator

Fuentes, Guadalupe

Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Jang, Lily

ESL - Instructor

Fonseca, Maribel

Parent Ed./Academics - Instructor/TOSA/ Department Chair

CTE - Instructor

Elsoudani, Nabawia

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Credential

Hom, Nancy

CTE - Instructor

Program/Position

Elias, Lynda

Name

X

WASC Action Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

Leadership Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Home Group


Appendix Page 12

CTE - Instructor

Academics/Community Ed. - Paraeducator

Transition Counselor

CTE - Instructor

Community Ed. - Instructor

CTE - Paraeducator

Assistant Principal

Network Analyst II

CTE - Instructor

Student Intervention Assistant

ESL - Paraeducator

CTE - Instructor

Parent Ed. - Paraeducator

Lubrino, Teresita

Madueno, Margarita

Maddox, Natalie

Mares, Lorena

Mata, Micah

Matus, Randi

Minear, Chuck

Murray, Kerri

Muto, Kevin

Navarro, Arnold

Ngo, Grace

Nguyen, Esther

Nguyen, Hahn

Maintenance

ESL/AcademicsParaeducator

Lou, Kimberly

Palacios, James

Community Ed. - Instructor

Lorusso, Virginia

CTE - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

Locnikar, Joanne

Ortega, Marta

ESL/Academics - Instructor

Lizarde, Erica

ESL - Instructor

Community Ed- Instructor

Lebron, Yvonne

CTE - Instructor

CTE - Instructor

Le, Kimberly

Normoyle, Mike

CTE - Paraeducator

Laygo, Leslie Ann

Oliveira, Christine

Community Ed. - Instructor

Program/Position

Lamoureux, Rosa

Name

X

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Career Technical Education Teaching Credential

Tier II Administrative Credential

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

Professional Expert

X

X

X

X

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Pupil Personnel Services Credential

X

X

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

X

X

Life Standard Designated Subjects Business Education Teaching Credential

X

X

X

X

X

Focus Groups

X

X

Admin

Single Subject Teaching Credential

X

X

Staff

Life Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

X

X

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential - Home Economics

Professional Expert

Faculty

Credential

WASC Action Team

X

X

Leadership Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Home Group


Appendix Page 13

CTE - Paraeducator

CTE - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

Student Intervention Assistant

ESL/Parent Ed.- Secretary II

Rodriguez, Thomas

Rojas, Wendy

Rose, Jean

Saavedra, David

Salcedo, George

Salazar, Nattaly

ESL - Instructor

Maintenance

Rodriguez, Laura

Suero, Mona

Maintenance

Rodriguez, Jorge

Academics - Secretary II

CTE - Paraeducator

Rodriguez, Desy

Community Ed. - Instructor

CTE - Instructor

Richey, Shelly

Skube, Margaret

Testing Assistant

Ramirez, Adriana

Stenzel, Krista

ESL - Instructor

Quest, Jane

ESL - Paraeducator

ESL- Instructor

Provence, Mark

Shui, Bing

CTE - Instructor

Poirier, Brady

Community Ed. - Instructor

Job Developer

Pinedo, Mary

Shepherd, Jessie

ESL - Paraeducator

Perez, Angie

Community Ed. - Instructor

CTE - Instructor

Pena, Brenda

Community Ed. - Instructor

Assistant Principal

Pawlisz, Nancy

Sanborn, Bruce

Community Ed. - Instructor

Park, Charlene

Selnick-Doshay, Mona

ESL - Instructor/TOSA/ Department Chair

Program/Position

Paredes, Velia

Name

Adult Education Teaching Credential -English

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Career Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Professional Expert

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Adult Education Teaching Credential

Preliminary Vocational TC4H Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Standard Elementary Teaching Credential

X

Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

X

X

X

Faculty

Preliminary Vocational TC4H Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Tier I Administrative Credential

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Credential

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Staff

X

Admin

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Focus Groups

X

WASC Action Team

X

X

X

X

Leadership Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Home Group


Appendix Page 14

CTE - Instructor

Community Ed. - Instructor

ESL/Parent Ed. Senior Clerk Typist

Community Ed. - Instructor

ESL - Instructor

Academics/ESL Paraeducator

Community Ed. Instructor

CTE - Paraeducator

Takhar, Bob

Tanis, Carmen Flores

Tehrani, Maria

Teng, Whea-Fun Gloria

Tong, Rita

Torres, Jeanne

Tsai, Nancy

Urfano, Rosalina

Student Intervention Assistant

Academics - Instructor

Financial Aid Coordinator / Accounting Technician

Community Ed. - Instructor

Secretary I

ESL - Paraeducator

ESL - Paraeducator

Weston, Rynol

Wilson, David

Wong, Winnie

Yao, Zhi Qiang Linda

Young, Bonnie

Yun, Chin Koo

Zhu, Chong Li

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential, Adult Education Teaching Credential-English

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Community Ed. - Instructor

Wang, Ming-Hua

X

X

AWD/ Community Ed. - Secretary II

Vizcarra, Maria

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

X

Student Helper

X

X

CTE - Instructor

X

X

X

X

Vega, Jose Career Technical Education Teaching Credential

Professional Expert

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential

Professional Expert

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Focus Groups

X

X

Admin

Preliminary Adult Education Teaching Credential

X

Staff

Designated Subjects Vocational Education Teaching Credential

X

Faculty

Vergara, Jessica

Community Ed. Clerical Substitute

Assistant Principal

Takanashi, Ami

Van Aalsburg, Melissa

Designated Subjects Adult Education Teaching Credential, Career Technical Education Teaching Credential

Community Ed./AWD Instructor/Department Chair

Tabon, Todd Tier I Administrative Credential

Credential

Program/Position

Name

WASC Action Team

X

X

Leadership Team

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Home Group


Staff Survey

Appendix Page 15


Appendix Page 16


Appendix Page 17


Appendix Page 18


Appendix Page 19


Appendix Page 20


Appendix Page 21


Appendix Page 22


The cabinet in room in H9 is a little small for the video equipment, and the lock seems flimsy. It might be good to get a larger more secure cabinet for video equipment. Overall our school is excellent and continuously improving in the latest technology and quality resources for teachers and students. I would like to serve in a public relations / promotion position someday for ABC Adult School. There used to be a marketing position and would be nice to see that position retun and filled. N/A I am comfortable with only a beginning level of technology, thank you I am honored to work in such an amazing school with exceptional leadership and staff. Representatives from all the sites should be on the student advisory committee . Sites like Helen Rosas are never represented and the Cuesta-Cerritos site is always over represented. Re: referring students to other programs. I refer some of my students to computer classes to enhance their skills in using their computers or iPads. I use computer tech, emails, Dropbox,YouTube and other online content to enhance my students skills and learning in my class. The monthly staff meetings that require staff members to present topics (World Class Service) is not necessary. Staff members do not like presenting and will call out sick to avoid the activity. Also, now that staff members have to present if they attend a district meeting, they are no longer willing to attend the district training. Having to do a presentation during the staff meetings has stopped staff members from attending the district trainings. And I have noticed several office staff members who are in need of computer training, they lack the knowledge and skill to use Google, excel and word. Which hurts the rest of the office because either they have to stop their job to help or eventually they take over that responsibility because their coworker is not capable. This has also created an unbalance is work distribution. I feel that the administration could not care any less for how the staff feels. The administration does not ask for feedback from the staff that actually interacts with the students on a daily basis. The policies and procedures are all fly by the seat of their pants. The answers depend on who is asking and who the student is. You can get an answer one day and the next day it is a totally different answer. The answers also depend on which administrator or staff member you ask. Nobody is on the same page. The administration picks and chooses which staff has to follow the rules. There are different sets of rules for different class of employees. It's been nice working for Adult School. I'm not so sure it has been the same working for the district. Our school has a strong and caring administrative staff and TOSAs (Teachers on Special Assignment) who really work hard for our respective departments. This is a wonderful school!! ABC is known for having an excellent ESL Department. Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing are all emphasized in the teaching curriculum. The level classes and skills classes are unique to the students daily class schedule. Some if the answers do not apply to me but were still answered to the best of my knowedge. Where I skipped items, they did not apply to my situation. When I checked ventilation, I was referring to the over-zealous air-conditioning. The last Q about effective marketing is: It must be, because I have a steady influx of new students. Maaybe twice a year we could invite a motivational guest speaker to speak at our staff meetings. Staff is getting burned out of ideas providing World Class service presentations.

Appendix Page 23


Student Survey

Appendix Page 24


Appendix Page 25


Appendix Page 26


Appendix Page 27


Appendix Page 28


No

No

No.

No.

no

no

No!

No!

Would hope Would ABC hope sees the ABCvalue seesofthe myvalue teacher. of my She teacher. is veryShe student is very centered. studentAcentered. valuable Ateacher valuable in your teacher program. in yourHope program. you keep Hopeher! youShe keepisher! one She in a is one in a million! Would million! be very Would unfourtunate be very unfourtunate if she was not if she at was ABCnot andatteaching. ABC andMany teaching. of usMany look forward of us look to forward our classes to our and classes constant andlearning constantenviornment! learning enviornment! Need moreNeed time frame more time for class framebecause for classnot because finishing notwhole finishing bookwhole if we book lengthif class we length time class it's possible time it's possible Afternoon need Afternoon additional need review additional of the review allocation of the needs. allocation needs. Kathy George Kathy is the George absolute is theBEST absolute quilting BEST teacher!! quilting teacher!! (Continued on (Continued page 7) on page 7)

Appendix Page 29


No class timing may be syncronised with bus timing of COS so that commuting by bus is possible None I really have enjoyed taking all the classes that I have taken. Love it! athrooms could use a cleaning in the afternoon. They are clean in the morning but could use a second cleaning or check on supplies in the afternoon. It has opened my life more to art, relaxed me to I can enjoy life more!!!! No for the moment very good teacher is professional and nice school teacher is a professional and patient. no So far job fair is a bad experience. People attend job fair with a hope to get a job, but all you see is tons of advertisement and no serious job opportunity. This one thing is very disappointing. Hope the administration takes this into serious consideration and improve on putting up a real, meaningful job fair. I had trouble logging on called left messages to the teacher David never got a return call Half the time not many clerical staff members seem to know what they're doing. Not now. school fee are too high. is it a public school? Hand on books- hand out books Maybe a way of having an one on one tuturing session if needed I have been attending for many years and have watched the fees climb up sharply. In the beginning the classroom was easily filled. Now we have to register four times a year instead of the original two. Originally school was free for seniors. Then it was $10, and then $25 per semester. Now it is about $150 for a semester , which is split into quarters. My teacher has to orient new students four times a year. When the fees were doubled, enrollment fell off 50 %. All you accomplished was a reduction in enrollment, because you did not get more revenue. Too many people dropped out. Each quarter, there is a question of what we have enough students. That is very unfair for the teacher to have to go through this so often. I enjoyed my class a lot. Rest rooms poorly maintained in evening frequently out of paper supplies and need cleaning This is the first class I have taken on this campus, I find it to be a safe inviroment, friendly people and I'm learning a lot! Teacher should be focused on the subject matter and must be able to control the class discussion. Also, teacher must not make the class laugh at the expense of some students. Teacher should not snapped at student when they ask legitimate questions that the teacher does not know the answer....this discourages students to ask questions or talk. My work schedule changed and I had to leave the class as I could not change to the evening class. I had to wait on a list apparently, so I left when I had to. Overall the school is great. I feel I have learned a lot it being two weeks in. Definitely will be enrolling again as soon as my preferred classes are available. I have been help maintain a healthy and productive retirement as of a result of the Adult Ed. Classes I have taken. I love my quilt instructor Mrs. Kathy George she is great , patient, friendly, kind and knowledgable and a good representative of the school. I was looking for to the start your own business class but it was not offered the last time I tried to register for it. I am a first-time student at ABC and have so far been favorably impressed by the quality of instruction and course content. I will reevaluate on completion of my first course. Class cancel a lot alway last minutes, after I have plan every thing to take (Continued on page 8)

Appendix Page 30


(Continued from page 7)

I took the online course at the Cerritos campus. I was very pleased with the experience. N/A EVERYTHING IS PERFECT . I take a parentingredients class. My child loves her teacher and school. Reduce the class fee so more people will be able to affort and enjoy it! School has given me lots of learning opportunities with a relatively resonable tuition. Thanks to that. Kathy George is a wonderful teacher and is so helpful for any sewing needs the class may have. So enjoy the class. Unhappy with the increased cost of our classes but our teacher is so good we continue to come regardless of cost. I am a Vietnam War Veteran, retired. I came to ABC school to keep myself busy, and make my brain working,to prevent Alzeimer ! I am 79 years old, surely I became slower than young people ! But in the school, sometimes I get hurt from "Young teachers and teachers aid". I wish those young people never became old like me ! In the office too, sometimes, I met some ugly people.... * With me, Education is good for everyone, but the manner and spiritual from people hearts should be counted to be successful ! The school is fun thanks to the great teacher David. Yes. I am a senior on a fixed income, I am not sure if I will be coming back next semester the school fees are too expensive. I take Brazilian Embroidery and Quilting and I feel that seniors who have less income are being priced out of classes. Is there anyone who really care about seniors? These classes provide learning opportunities and socialization that help keep our minds sharp and alert. Instead of printing coupons, save that cost and lower our classes across the board. That would show at least that the campus staff cares about seniors!! We wrote a letter a year ago to send to the Governor voicing our concerns regarding a lack of funding for seniors and gave it to the Principal. The letter was never returned so we could get signatures and prepare it for mailing!! For the parent and me preschool classes it would nice if the teachers started class on time and also did not end the classes early so we could get are full two hours of instructor lead class each day Most of the above questions are not applicable to me and my class. I take a water aerobics class at the Cerritos Park East pool. The instructor, Todd Tabon is great. This class has many senior adults in it and it is very enjoyable. Teachers should be teaching more. I'm all for doing it myself, but some instruction beyond once a week, would be helpful. I'm retired and taking an Aqua Cardio class at the CPE pool, so most of this isn't as applicable to me. Ms Dennis, Georgia Grissom, Mrs. Cervantes and Mrs. Mares are some of your best instructors at your school. I have enjoyed your classes very much thank you all. I can see no logical reason why, if I paid for 10 classes and one is cancelled for reasons beyond my control, I do not get credit for the cancelled class to be used in the future. This has happened more than once. In the real world, no one would pay for 10 items and then only get 9 without there being a refund for one missing item or a sound reason why not. This would be called Highway Robbery or Bait and Switch - that is a crime. Spanish in the workplace with Mrs Balbosa was so fun and informative. I now am able to speak to my Spanish speaking patients at work. I am enrolled in this quarter to continue in her class but have had an impossible time getting off work in time. I'm working on changing my hours tho. She is awesome!! I have been attending ABC Adult School for years. It has been a rewarding experience. I've enjoyed all the teachers and the large selection of classes. I also appreciate the low cost. adult tap dancing Your registration fees for fitness classes are exhorbiitant. This is my last quarter in your fitness program. I have joined Chuze Fitness for $20/month which gives me unlimited classes with no holidays or vacation disruptions. The fee is $10/month without classes. Class fees are unreasonable in comparison to other adult ed schools Great program with a variety of interesting and beneficial classes. Only take aqua cardio class at the Cerritos Pool so reason most of info did not apply, thus did not answer. when a class is canceled it's a headache to get your money back

(Continued on page 9)

Appendix Page 31


(Continued from page 8)

Teachers are good but some they dont let us write note while listening to the teacher. Restroom stinks. Registration fees are too high, especially non academic ones such as jewelry making. Continue to offer discount coupons. The cost for life long learning classes for adults are TOO expensive. The housekeepers really need to clean the restrooms there very very very disgusting, durty beyond words that's why you have nats flying all over the place in the classroom The housekeepers really need to clean the restrooms there very very very disgusting, durty beyond words that's why you have nats flying all over the place also in the classroom Kathy George is an exceptional and engaging quilting instructor. She keeps her students interested in her instruction of quilt design,origin, and techniques from start and completation of quilt projects. Kathy is always willing to help with questions, ideas, and recommendations. I don't think you realize what a fantastic teacher you have in Yvonne with her sewing and specialized teaching techniques. She has helped me make my business double. I would like to see some better machines for use in her classes. The ladies in the office are very friendly, always pleased to see their kind smiles! They are always very respectful and helpful! Really appreciate the office staff's attitude and hard work! Some teachers don't have such an approachable or friendly demeanor, and need to work on their people skills The staff and students are very nice and quite in class ,I am able to learn a lot. If possible, provide occasional discount coupons as a means to draw more students to attend the adult school programs. Excellent school I took the Excel class and want to say that Elaine is an excellent teacher. She is thorough in explaining the information and very patient in her guidance. :0) I take the Upholstery Class and while not necessary I think a couple of option field trips outside of class time would be interesting. Suggested trips are to: 1) a production upholstery shop, 2) Cerritos College woodworking/furniture building class, 3) the LA Fabric District with an emphasis on both home fabric and trims and talking with designers and fabric showroom people about industry trends, working with designers/customers and generally how the trade works and 4) to the Maloof museum or to a set decorators warehouse for film/TV. Restrooms could be better maintained better computers, up-date technology. Mrs. Nguyen, the bookkeeping teacher never replied to my emails about questions regarding the class. I had a good attendence and got 100% tests passed, but she gave me grade B because I didn't make a Neat folder? Todd is an excellent teacher in all of his classes He treats everyone with respect and is a very good communicator. No, all my choices reflect how amazing I feel the Adult School is into a nutshell. I would like to commend the hardwork of Professor Bob Takhar and Thomas Rodriguez. They both work extremely hard and make every effort to help the student out. Everyday they give guidance in succeeding. I have received excellent education at ABC and it's all due to the excellent professor working there. Fees for classes like quilting are too high. I love the class, however the floor is dirty; I have allergies and have had scratchy throat while in the class Sewing equipment is sadly in need of repair/replacement. Federal funding for seniors I retired recently and one day I opened the ABC Adult School catalog for the first time. It has opened up a new world for me. Please add summer guitar classes at night. The bathroom on the campus needs to be cleaner in the evening. more practical and hands on in computer classes. Instead of university level tests, there must be entry level classes to help adults enjoy classes. Too much memorization for adults 60 and over in cimputer classes. Computer classes should be fun instead of stress. (Continued on page 10)

Appendix Page 32


(Continued from page 9)

No. Am retired and taking most of my classes at the Cerritos senior center. Very convenient! Staff is winderful Please add that there are books required for certain classes and indicate at least an estimate of the cost of the book to allow the student to be prepared for the additional cost as well as prepared for the beginning of the class. I AM RETIRED, I NEED SOME KNOWLEDGE IN COMPUTER, AND IT IS GOOD IN LEARNING ,EASY, STEP BY STEP. Cancellation is not Easy. Also, no refund? I Dont understand. IDont want to keep the school voucher. Ms Diane Juhn is an excellent instructor. Comparing fitness programs around the area, ABC's fees are higher but she is the only reason I'm registering the class with ABC. Add accent reduction class(advance class) or more video to access in the language lab. Also, I suggest to offer speech or public speaking class or club like toast master. Prices for senior classes are too expensive and not worth it ttextbooks used are very expensive district hould produce own tteaching material at cheaper cost teacher basically reading from textbook and not being pratical I appreciate the principal walking into classes to see our progress and praise our teacher. I appreciate how easy it is to access the administration and how graciously they listen to my comments and concerns and praise for my instructors. I appreciate the way the principal comes into class to observe our progress and praise our instructor. I appreciate how easily I ,ay speak to administration with concerns and praise. Great job over there! We would like to attend the English conversation classes, but it's only available in noon. We only cant attend night classes. I really enjoy the sewing arts classes Less students per class sometimes we are sitting elbow to elbow and can caused friction among the students. Some of the classroom walls are very thin so you can hear other teachers teaching in neighboring class rooms. Sometimes distracting. Mrs. Brookler and Mrs. Lakin are fantastic educators. It is because of their teaching that I make a conscious choice to enter my child in your programs. I am very satisfied with the ABC School experience The fees for the exercise class are expensive. Most of the classes are $50 for two months. as you aware a very high % of the students are retirees. The fees of the classes have gone up astronomically for the past few years. It is evident by the number of students registered to come to class. ABC School District attracts a lot of retirees because of its quality of teachers and closeness of the facilities. Please consider review your fees again and make it available for the residents in this area. Charge too much for some of the classes. No not at this time .Thank You a women in career office the treatment is not good Why can't classes be maintained w/15 students instead of 20? Downey only requires minimum of only 15 students. Let's try to keep the prices down. Some retired seniors are having a hard time with the tuition costs. This has to be in compliance with your mission statement of lifelong learning. Also, can you please, please, please get a drawing teacher of the quality of Mrs. Lio a few years ago. She was absolutely fantastic, and her replacements not great. My watercolor teacher Virginia Lorusso is superb. One other thing: too many spaces are marked for staff only in the parking lot of Cabrillo Lane. Stop charging for transfer fee when the classes are crowded and the instructor suggests you transfer to another class that is not full. In addition, if classes are not running due to holiday then we should be allowed a make up class (especially if we paid for X number of classes) I would like to see the sewing machines serviced at least once a year. I like to grammer class at 10 :00 to 12:00 class. The teacher is not teaching as per the catalog. Student take the class based on the catalog book and we get surprise when we actually attend the class. The office ask us to buy the book which cost $130 and teacher said we do not need to book! Then why we were force to buy expensive book? I wonder...what's going on in other pm classrooms, perhaps scheduled classroom visits?

Appendix Page 33

(Continued on page 11)


(Continued from page 10)

I've enjoyed taking Photoshop 1,with Gene Avila,Photoshop,and Lighting,with Shelly Richey,and am currently in Photoshop 2,with Mr Brady.All,are excellent teachers,and I would highly recommend them,to any student,looking at learning,at this field of study,from these teachers.I'm doing this for fun,but it's challenging,and I'm learning,and it's appreciated. Rosa from Sewing class i--she is excellent! I dislike sewing but she makes it fun and possibility i may like it by end of the class.. NO I am ABC adult school graduated a year ago but I couldn't find the job yet. Please help us to find a job. I had meeting in job career center but no result yet. thank you I would love it if you would offer T-shirt silk screening classes! Please keep the quilting classes. The bathrooms need to be serviced more often and cleaned better. I think the cost of the tai chi class is a good value for all the sessions it includes. restrooms could be cleaner- I take classes at nite and it seems they have not been cleaned since morning. By the evening classes the restrooms need attention. Especially the ones out by the trailers. Thank you for asking. Just wanted to say that Todd Tabon is a terrific instructor. He changes up the excersizes to make the class more fun and interesting. Thank you so much! Restrooms need more cleaning late in the day. At Cabrilo the restrooms need cleaning in the PM. (Tuesday evenings) The ladies room is not clean or well stocked. This is the one by the trailers. It could use some help. Thank you. The bathroom next to my classroom trailer needs to be cleaned more often. more parenting classes and classes for high school student to take Our sewing room (purse class with Yvonne Lebron) needs to have either another upholstery sewing machine or a cylinger machine. We often have to wait in line to use the sewing machine and often some do not get a chance to or you feel pressure to hurry up. We really need a cyclinder machine to make our purses look more professional with the right tools. Love this class. I think that it should be prepared about something to read in the office regually, for example newsforyou, any copy of magagins.. thanks.^^ Classes do provide me with useful information, however, it would be nice if classes where a bit more challenging. More quizzes and tests to see our learning progress and as an incentive to keep up with the reading material. Also, new testing material that differs from practice tests. I have taken the decorative painting class for a number of years and I am constantly learning new techniques and improving the quality of my painting so that I am able to sell my work and supplement my income. I would like there to be an entire class on outlook for the office occupations classes. Restrooms need to be clener r The bathrooms in the afternoon are messy with supplies low and should have someone clean them during the day. I really enjoy the technical classes like AutoCad, Inventor & Architecture and would really like to see some 3D modeling capabilities, although I know they are expensive. Cost of classes keep rising, class time gets is shorter. I appreciate the way the administration visits our classes and praises our teachers. I appreciate how easy it is to visit with administration and share information. Some of the courses are so advanced and the material projects are not covered effectively to assist in finishing your projects in time before the quarter classes ends and are forced to repeat the same course again in order to get your certificate. If you have developmental challenges and try to follow the course you may not receive the assistance to stay up with the class. Especially when most of the students have previous knowledge or have repeated the classes sometimes more than twice they move at a faster pace than needed. Lower fees for classes would benefit many.

(Continued on page 12)

Appendix Page 34


(Continued from page 11)

I enjoy the choices of classes, I am a retiree and there are few senior classes available for us . Thank You The cost of the classes is very, very high. I hope something could be done to lower that. Thank you Mona Doshay has been an amazing teacher! She puts in a lot of outside class prep time to make our experience in class excellent. She has been available outside of class time to help with class.projects. She is the reason I attend ABC Adult School. I take exercise classes in room 26 at Cabrillo. The room should be swept and mopped every night since we are working out, sweating, and doing floor exercises and in close contact with the floor. It might even be a health issue. Also, the custodian should turn on the air conditioning when he gets there in the morning so the room doesn't get so warm when 25 people are in there exercising. Again, a health issue especially when it isn't working. The ladies room should be cleaned again, in the early afternoon. More translaters in the school. My art class is an important part of my mental health and welfare. As a senior citizen it gives me a wonderful way to safely learn new skills taught by great teachers. Also I have made some wonderful friends there. I consider it to be mental therapy. You are doing a great service to the community. i am a new student in the cuesta campus, im from Mexico and English is my second language, i was worry about start classes because i was thinking that will be dificult to understand my teacher, but as soon i start taking my class, everything is perfect and im so happy learning somethimg new and helpful to my life. Sorry about the speeling mistakes, but what i said I speak Spanish as a first language. Thank you so much for the oportunity to do something bigger with our lifes, God Bless you for it.! The administrators are always hyping new classes, but never have the schedules ready when they talk about these things. So they come and try to excite you about stuff that isn't ready - be it field trips or classes. This is just frustrating to students and seems counterintuitive. Students in the art/ craft classes are never surveyed about what classes they would like to take, or provided a survey for evaluation of the teachers/classes. The classes are fairly expensive, and it seems that it would be worthwhile to not treat students if they are undeserving of input. The adults are treated rather like children - perhaps administrators are only accustomed to dealing with children. It could be good to have night classes at Cabrillo Lane School Que pudieran sacar a los alumnus a conocer lugares importantes dentro del estado que ayuden a mejorar el aprendisaje I like to have a substitute when the teachers have conferences horarios vespertinos Most of the computers are very inadequate. They do not have enough memory. They are extremely slow and often unresponsive. They are the weak link in an otherwise superb technical education program. everything is great! Please don't raise the student fees any higher. Carmen Flores and Barbara Close are excellent teachers. *If Acrylic Painting 2 day workshops could be offered. **We need plumbing in glass fusion class. Invite special guests to talk about their experiences. I particularly like my quilting instructor Kathy. The restrooms near the outer classrooms are not clean. We can't comment for now Bathrooms need to be checked periodically specially the ones by the bungalows. I enjoy very much the classes I take here. The teachers should be familiar with and use some of the great text books that cover many of the Adobe subjects taught at the school. Currently I have one instructor who does that and his instructruction is some of the best I have ever had. Thank you for years of giving. I am truly appreciated the talent of my teachers . The teacher should be willing to help students when they have questions and not be disrespectful and showing that their better than students. We are here to learn and not be ridiculed or put down. I'm attending to hair style class, and is really like it. (Continued on page 13)

Appendix Page 35


(Continued from page 12)

Restrooms by modular trailers should be cleaned/checked more than once a day. Please simplify the registration process, and provide live registration help more often. It is frustrating to get confused by the online registration, then to call for help and only get a voicemail box that indicates "full" or it does not accept messages. The communication needs to be more personal and user-friendly! This school provides an excellent opportunity for adults to learn, exercise, socialize, away from home and work. The teachers are of college level, and the prices for the classes, therefore, are very low!! We are very fortunate to have them in our neighborhood, and I wish more people were aware of all they can take advantage of!! especially since you end up sharing with your loved ones what you learn and you becoome an example to them. Thank you!! The classroom size should be big enough to hold many students to see the teacher's demonstration. I wish I can take a lot of speaking lessons at this place. Some classes have overlapped the contents of class. For example, they have dealt with 'News for you' during class. So we have studied the same articles in the different classes. Simple classes how tu use a computer Enhanced security at the parent Ed facilities like Damron. I'm not sure what could be done but there is nothing stopping anyone from entering the classrooms or playground. Maybe locking the classrooms once class has started and enhancing the security of the entrance gate would be helpful. Better safe than sorry. Instructors should take more control of their classes, by keeping the talking or chatter low or not at all, if it is only about school material. There is a no eating or drinking sign in the room students should follow it, or the instructor should implement it. New students should be notified about the school orientation when enrolling. And more campus safety personnel. Finally, students and instructors should a little more respect toward one another. Not all classes are the time leght that they said. You see a class will last like 3 hours but teachers start dissmising class 15 before. I like to have a bus for adult school. I want to have a cafeteria. I want to have a cafeteria . I like this school Excel 1 is my first class I've taken here at Cuesta. loved my teacher Lorena!! As a newcomer, it would be helpful if the instructor would provide and not assumed, at the first date of class, an explanation for students who participate for assigned laboratory during class instruction. You may note, there are students that are using class instruction for personal laboratory time to complete assignments for previous classes. I like to get restaurant in the school Teachers are very helpful and I felt they were professional. I respect them. My experience in this schoo has very good. Thank you ! I take the class cardio-zumba with Jesse, she has first cardio (zumba), then dance (cha cha) and then yoga or weights...I like the yoga and weighs but the cardio and cha cha dance is the same thing every course... she doesn't change any move at all...I mean she could introduce new exercise and in different order... When I am with her I know what is coming next...will be better add a new exercise and in not order...this will be better for no boring and specially for the body. NO. I made a good choice on enrolling in school to improve my school skills more and better teaching assistant. I love this school. ABC Adult School is excellent 100% (Continued on page 14)

Appendix Page 36


child care no It's excellent school Guadalupe Hernandez. Cel. 562 3132544 Kathy George is an amazing teacher. She brings a lot of creative and enjoyable projects for us to try. Her instructions and demonstrations are always informative and extremely helpful. She makes her classroom a safe and enjoyable environment in which to learn. It's been a wonderful experience for both my child and I this semester with Mrs Lakins Wednesday night class. Thank you Sandy for a wonderful semester.

Appendix Page 37


ABC Adult School Locations Map 7

ďƒŻ

1

14

12

2

91 d 9 4

605 d

91 d

11

8

6

5

d 605

3

10

13

1. ABCUSD Central Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16700 Norwalk Blvd., Cerritos 2. Cuesta Adult Education Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12254 Cuesta Dr., Cerritos 3. Fedde Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21409 Elaine Ave., Hawaiian Gardens 4. Burbank Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17701 Roseton Ave., Artesia 5. Cabrillo Lane Education Center . . . . . . . . . . . 20122 Cabrillo Lane, Cerritos 6. Cerritos Senior Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12340 South St., Cerritos 7. Cerritos Park East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13234 166th St., Cerritos 8. Clontarf Manor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18432 Gridley Rd., Cerritos 9. Damron Parent Education Center (Damron PEC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11111 Artesia Blvd., Cerritos 10. Fedde Community Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11949 215th St., Hawaiian Gardens 11. Founders House of Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18025 Pioneer Blvd., Artesia 12. Gonsalves Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13650 Park St., Cerritos 13. Helen Rosas Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22150 Wardham St., Hawaiian Gardens 14. Woodruff Elementary School . . . . . . . . . 15332 South Eucalyptus Ave., Bellflower

Appendix Page 38


ABC Unified School District Map

Cabrillo Jacob

195th

Nixon

5

Elaine

207th

214th

Fedde

14

y

Marquardt

Stowers

11

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South

Gradwell 23

Melbourne

15

223rd 226th 19 r Hawaiian tne or

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Other Facility High School

Middle School

Bloom�eld

221st Furgeson

Elementary School

Ball

Appendix Page 39

Valley View

Marquardt

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wa

KEY

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Carson

26

Cree

2

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ee

Del Amo

Palms

Claretta

39

Centralia

214th

Shoemaker

Westgate

10

Norwalk

Rossford

4

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Fr

Carver

25

205th

31

Pioneer

Roseton

19 Willow

Aloha

ks

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Haskell

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ac

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178th 38

32 Whitney

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Barnhill

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Ross

27

166th

Yvette

Tracy

20 Aclare

Burbank

7

Alondra

37 3 Cuesta 30 Cuesta 33 1, 34 35 Wittmann

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Appendix Page 40


-------------Ca bri llo La ne --------------

ABC ADULT SCHOOL * CABRILLO LANE CAMPUS Warehous 20A 19a 2 e 20 19

17

•Gas Shut Off

K-2a

Women Restroom North

Men Restroom North

15

16

R/R

13

14

R/R

11

12

9

10

7a

Mechanical Room

K-2 Kitchen

1 2 2

18 18a

K-4 K-3

K-1 Main Electrical Panel

Breezeway

Adult School Office Lounge Die Cuts Audi tori Auditorium um

Staff R/R Hall

SIA Offic e

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

Men Restroom South

Women Restroom South

Parking

2 4 Parking

2 5 Eas t R/R

2 6 2 8 Flag Pole Assembly Area

Emergency Operation Center

-------------------- Del Amo Blvd --------------------

Appendix Page 41


Mission Statement / Slos Poster in all rooms

ADULT SCHOOL Learning for Life

Mission Statement The Mission of the ABC Adult School is www.paace.net to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational and personal goals through lifelong learning.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Self-Directed Lifelong Learners who: § acquire knowledge and skills appropriate to their stage of life. § set and achieve career, educational and/or personal goals. § seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities.

Effective Communicators who: § demonstrate appropriate listening, speaking, reading, writing, creative, and/or computational skills. § apply communication skills to professional, technical and other real-life situations. § enhance and improve their ability to understand and be understood by others.

Critical Thinkers and Problem-Solvers who: § exercise their powers of judgment, perception, and inference. § assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources. § apply knowledge to professional, technical and other real-life situations. You’ll find something for everyone at ABC Adult School!

Register for high quality, low cost classes! Professional & friendly staff! Free parking! § Medical Occupations § Cosmetology § Office Occupations § Accounting Clerk § Web/Graphic Design § IT Technician § Computer Classes (Basic, Intermediate, Web Design, PC & Mac Classes) § Arts, Crafts, Food Preparation, Music, Sewing and Upholstery Classes § Fitness & Dance Classes § High School Diploma/High School Equivalency Preparation § English as a Second Language (ESL) § Citizenship § Parent Education § Adults with Disabilities Program Cuesta (Main) Campus 12254 Cuesta Drive, Cerritos (562) 926-6734 Cabrillo Lane Campus 20122 Cabrillo Lane, Cerritos (562) 809-9011 www.abcadultschool.edu Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/www.abcadultschool.edu/

Appendix Page 42


SLOs BOOKMARK GIVEN TO ALL STUDENTS

ADULT SCHOOL

ADULT SCHOOL

Learning for Life

Learning for Life

Cuesta (Main) Campus

12254 Cuesta Drive, Cerritos § (562) 926-6734

Cabrillo Lane Campus

20122 Cabrillo Lane, Cerritos § (562) 809-9011

www.abcadultschool.edu https://www.facebook.com/www.abcadultschool.edu/

Mission Statement The Mission of the ABC Adult School is to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational and personal goals through lifelong learning.

Register for high quality, low cost classes! Professional & friendly staff! Free parking!

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Self-Directed Lifelong Learners who: § acquire knowledge and skills appropriate to

Train for a new career!

their stage of life.

§ Medical Occupations § Cosmetology § Office Occupations § Accounting Clerk § Web/Graphic Design § IT Technician

§ set and achieve career, educational and/or personal goals.

§ seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities.

Effective Communicators who: § demonstrate appropriate listening,

Something for everyone:

speaking, reading, writing, creative, and/or computational skills.

§ apply communication skills to professional, technical and other real-life situations.

§ enhance and improve their ability to

understand and be understood by others.

Critical Thinkers and Problem-Solvers who: § exercise their powers of judgment, perception, and inference.

§ assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources.

§ apply knowledge to professional, technical and other real-life situations.

Appendix Page 43

§ Computer Classes (Basic, Intermediate, Web Design, PC & Mac Classes) § Arts, Crafts, Food Preparation, Music, Sewing & Upholstery Classes § Fitness & Dance Classes § High School Diploma/High School Equivalency Preparation § English as a Second Language (ESL) § Citizenship § Parent Education § Adults with Disabilities Program www.paace.net


ABC Adult School Fact Sheet, 2015 – 2016 ABC Unified School District

ABC Adult School ADDRESS: 12254 Cuesta Dr., Cerritos, CA 90703 PRINCIPAL: PaoLing Guo, Ed.D.

PHONE: (562) 926-6734 SCHEDULE: Modified Year-Round

MISSION STATEMENT

The Mission of the ABC Adult School is to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational, and personal goals through lifelong learning. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)  

Self-directed lifelong learners Effective communicators

SITES

STAFF AND STUDENTS

Staff Certificated .......................................................... 76 Classified............................................................. 40 Total Employees ............................................. 122

ABC Adult Sch. Main Sites .................................... 2 Partner Sites ........................................................ 13 Total Sites .......................................................... 15

PERFORMANCE

Average years of teaching experience: 17 Students Number of duplicated students .................... 11,271 Number of unduplicated students .................. 8,781

Standards Tests (CASAS) Performance

State Standards

ESL Beginning Literacy .................... 55.5%* ESL Beg. Low................................... 54.0%* ESL Beg. High………………………..60.0%* ESL Int. Low ..................................... 46.6%* ESL Int. High .................................... 48.0%* ESL Advanced.................................. 23.0%*

Number of males…………..……2,371……....…27% Number of females………....…..6,411……........73% Average Age of students:

Critical thinkers and problemsolvers.

46

65.0% 65.0% 61.0% 54.0% 50.0% 25.0%

*represents percent of students who completed level and met state performance goal

Ethnicity of students: Hispanic ..................................... 2898 ............. 33% Asian ......................................... 3,074 ............. 35% White, not Hispanic ................... 1,528 .......... 17.4% Filipino .......................................... 527 ............... 6% Black or African American ............ 430 ............ 4.9% American Indian/Alaska Native ...... 88 ............... 1%

BUDGET Revenue Revenue Limit ........................................... $7,712,847 Federal......................................................... $543,373 Other State .................................................. $324,444 Total Revenue ......................................... $8,580,664 ..

Average Cost per student ............................... $889

PROGRAM INFORMATION Programs (Duplicated): Total Enrollment 27,833 Career & technical Education (CTE)….….7,803.....32% English as a Second Language (ESL).…..9,712.....41% Parent Education (PE).….….…................1,070…..5% Health and Safety…………………….........1,208.…..6% Home and Consumer Economics.………..1,169……5% Adult Secondary Education (ASE)………..2,756.....11% Older Adults (OA)……………………....…......485.......2% Adult Basic Education (ABE)…...................507.......2% Adults with Disabilities …...........................235.......1%

Appendix Page 44

Expenditures Administration……………………………$3,875,904.71 Academics……………………………….…$232,010.76 Career Technical Education……………$2,070,366.68 ESL(Distance Learning)..…………………..$71,125.83 ESL ………………………………………..$1,261,89.44 Adults with Disabilities……………………….$2,749.32 Older Adults…………………...…………….$17,532.36 Parent Education…………………..……..$199,918.65 Staff Development..………………………..$38,149.41 Upholstery Center…..……………………...$32,584.68 Fee Based Classes..……………………....$16,207.71 Other Services………………………………..$445,860 Total Expenditures ............................ $7,810,856.01


Student Skills List PY2015-16 TimePeriod FA1516 Access 2013

Section#

0623021

Skill Description Applying Effects and Color Correction Create and edit queries Create and edit tables Create calculated controls Create, edit, and format forms Create, edit, and format reports Database Basics: understanding a database and it's objects

Pass Final Test Understand and respond to basic words and expressions. Advanced Grammar/American Culture

Section#

0322012

Skill Description Able to speak in casual and extended conversations. Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Aqua Cardio Fitness

Section#

0923060

Skill Description 1. Demo of proper form; use of correct posture in executing movement. 2. Demo of accurate body positions and timing in established choreography. 3. Ability to communicate knowledge & understanding of methodologies.

Artistic Paper Arts and Bobbin Lace

Section#

1030016

Skill Description 1. Follow instructions. 2. Embroidery on paper techniques. 3. Incire' techniques. 4. Spirelli techniques. 5. Quilling techniques. 6. Origami techniques. 7. Onarie' techniques. 8. Lace' techniques. 9. Working with card toppers. Page 1 of 44

Appendix Page 45


Auto CAD - 2D

Section#

0614516

Section#

0615026

Section#

1001564

Section#

0603012

Skill Description

Banking, Credit Cards Create Drawing Templates Manipulate Objects Work with Layouts Auto CAD - 3D Skill Description Create 3D forms from 2D Shapes Create solid forms Master the Userd Coordinate System Move Objects in 3D space Baking/Cuisine (Chinese) Skill Description

1. Use of the equipment. 2. Use of the ingredients. 3. Kneading of the dough. 4. Knowledge of fermenting. 5. Cut dough and blend eggs. 6. Make cake and bread. 7. Use of the oven. 8. Modifier bakery time. 9. Decoration of the product. Basic Computer Repair Skill Description Combining Paths with Grouping, Pathfinder, and Blending techniques Demonstrate how to remove software programs, remove hardware for upgarding, check for latest drivers and update

Disassemble and Reassemble computers, Identify components, Install operating system, Partition hard drive Practice using Operating System's maintenance tools, Practice PC cleaning Understand definitions of viruses, spyware, ad-aware Quizzes on understanding Understand the need for backing up data, Practice backing up data to other locations Understand various access modes, basic troubleshooting Understanding pro and cons of upgarding/building/buying a new computer

Page 2 of 44

Appendix Page 46


Beginning ESL - High 1 - El Civics

Section#

0353014

Skill Description

Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Beginning ESL - High 2 - El Civics

Section#

0354014

Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Beginning ESL - Low - El Civics

Section#

0351014

Skill Description

Ask and answer previously learned basic questions. Read and understand simple sentences. Understand and respond to basic words and expressions. Write simple sentences using previously learned vocabulary. Beginning ESL- Literacy - Low

Section#

0301512

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Beginning Esl- Multilevel

Section#

0306015

Skill Description

Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Beginning Grammar

Section#

0306052

Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations.

Page 3 of 44

Appendix Page 47


Beginning Grammar/Writing

Section#

0310012

Skill Description

Participate in simple face-to-face conversations. Read and scan for specific information in life skill materials. Understand simple yes or no and "wh" questions. Write comprehensible sentences. Beginning Speaking/Listening

Section#

0306050

Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Beginning Vocabulary & Reading

Section#

0301012

Skill Description

Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Bookkeeping/Accounting

Section#

0600511

Section#

1005011

Section#

1002162

Skill Description Accounting Equation, Debit/Credit Rules Bank Reconciliation Financial Statement Analysis, Closing the Books Journal Entries, General Ledger Worksheet Finacncial Statement Brazilian Stitchery Skill Description

1. Stem stitch-Couching, Bullions. 2. Pistle stitches-Blanket stitches-Leaves. 3. Detatched buttonhole stitches-Drizzles, Cast On. 4. Lazy Daisy-Create many different flowers. Cake Decorating I Skill Description 1. Baking and leveling cakes. 2. Crumb coating a cake.

Page 4 of 44

Appendix Page 48


Calligraphy

Section#

1020011

Skill Description

1. Has learned the handskills for the lower case alphabet. 10. Shows skill improvement. 2. Knows how to use suggested pens. 3. Knows spacing techniques. 4. Has learned upper case alphabets. 5. Can write both U & LC with sentences. 7. Turns projects in on time. 8. Has learned about color choices. 8. Increase energy level. 9. Shows genuine interest in projects. Cardio Kickboxing

Section#

0930016

Skill Description

1. Perform good/correct posture-correct body alignment. 2. Increase aerobic capacity. 3. Increase muscle strength and endurance. 4. Improve balance and joint stability. 5. Improve sleep. 6. Improve flexibility and increase range of motion. 7. Increase self-confidence and energy level. 8. Decreased blood pressure and reduced cholesteral level. 9. Maintain healthy weight. Caregiver

Section#

0644063

Section#

1007064

Skill Description Demonstrate appropriate infection control techniques

Demonstrate correct body mechanics Demonstrate safe transfer technique Demonstrate safe usage of assistive devices Ceramics Skill Description 1. Develop eye-hand motor dexterity. 2. Develop artistic skills to construct and finish basic ceramic pieces. 3. Increase muscle strength and endurance.

Page 5 of 44

Appendix Page 49


Chinese Folk Dancing: Ribbon & Fan Da

Section#

0945016

Section#

0620110

Skill Description

1. Maintain current weight. 10. Increase respiratory function. 2. Increase muscle strength in legs. 3. Increase muscle strength in arms and shoulders. 4. Increase muscle strength in stomach and back. 5. Increase balance. 6. Increase coordination. 7. Increase endurance. 8. Increase energy level. 9. Decrease mental stress or increase relaxation. Computer Essentials (A) Skill Description

Creating a personal movie (using Windows Live Movie Maker) Creating a simple Excel Spreadsheet Creating Word Documents Customizing Windows 7 Desktop Understanding Hardware and Software Computer Essentials (B)

Section#

0620313

Section#

0602220

Skill Description Creating Yahoo and Google e-mail accounts Creating a Powerpoint Presentation Creating a Web Page using Publiser 2010 Creating Business Cards using Publisher 2010 Creating Files and Folders on the Desktop Desgning and inputting data using Access 2010

Sending attachments via E-mail Computer Repair / A+ Certification Part Skill Description Fixing Windows Problems Maintaining Windows Networking Essentials Networking Practices Security Essentials Security Practices Supporting Notebooks Supporting Printers Tools for Solving Windows Problems Page 6 of 44

Appendix Page 50


Computer Repair / A+ Certification Part

Section#

0602010

Section#

1004016

Section#

0306032

Skill Description

All about Motherboards Installing and Supporting I/O Devices Installing Windows Multimedia Devices and Mass Storage PC Maintenance and Troubleshooting Strategies Supporting Hard Drives Supporting Processors Upgarding Memory Working With People in a Technical World Computerized Embroidery Skill Description ďż˝ 4. Basic computer operation.

1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 1. Program and edit IN sewing machine. 10. Sending designs to machine. 3. Proper hooping. 5. File organization. 6. Adding lettering and shapes using Emb. Software. 7. Downloading designs. 8. Resizing designs. 9. Design splitting. Conversation Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials.

Participate in simple face-to-face conversations. Read and scan for specific information in life skill materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Understand simple yes or no and "wh" questions. Write comprehensible sentences.

Page 7 of 44

Appendix Page 51


Daily News

Section#

0322013

Skill Description

Able to speak in casual and extended conversations. Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Decorative Painting

Section#

1021510

Section#

0605110

Skill Description 1. Technique-Proper loading of brush. 10. Accuracy-Differentation of brushes. 2. Technique-Different styles of painting. 3. Technique-Double loading. 4. Technique-Shading and Hi-lighting. 5. Technique-Blending of colors.

6. Accuracy-Terminology. 7. Accuracy-Surface preparation and finishes. 8. Accuracy-Using the correct brush. 9. Accuracy-Paint and water consistency. Digital Photography/Lightroom CC Skill Description Create photo books and layouts for printing Export photos for clients or for sale with a copywright watermark Importing photos to a catalog Know the differences between point and shoot camers, DSLRs, mirror less cameras and cell phone cameras Managing catalogs and photos on disk as well as rearranging photos within the folders panel of Lightroom Organizing, rating, and managing photos in Lightroom

Share photos and web galleris from Lightroom to social networking sites Using Lightroom to add keywords and other metadata Using the concept of the exposure triangle to take better pictures Using the tools and panels in the Develop Module to enhance photos and color correct Viewing photos in Lightroom

Page 8 of 44

Appendix Page 52


Dreamweaver CC

Section#

0651012

Section#

0651016

Section#

0643063

Skill Description

Adding and Formatting Text Adding Behaviors and Rich Media Adding Database Functionality Creating Reusable assets and Forms Creating Spry Elements and Alternate Style Sheets Learn the basic components of a web page Planning and Designing Web Sites Using CSS for Page Layout Working with Graphics and Tables Dreamweaver CC - Part I Skill Description Adding and Formatting Text

Adding Behaviors and Rich Media Adding Database Functionality Creating Reusable assets and Forms Creating Spry Elements and Alternate Style Sheets Learn the basic components of a web page Planning and Designing Web Sites Using CSS for Page Layout Working with Graphics and Tables Electronic Health Records Skill Description Build a patient's face sheet and perform various procedures in a patient's chart Create and conduct a chart evaluation, order tests, patient instructions and import a document into a patient's chart Decribe and create a new office visit

Define the concept of an electronic health record Describe Meaningful use Navigate the practice screen, office schedule, patient tracker, To Do lists, internal message and urgent messages Set up new patient, edit patient information, insurance companies and export patient lists

Page 9 of 44

Appendix Page 53


Excel 2013 - Advanced

Section#

0626310

Skill Description

Create advanced formulas and functions. Import, export, and distribute data. Pass advanced Final Test. Set up password protection; create, edit, and use macros. Summarize and consolidate data,; use data analysis features; create comments Work with advanced formatting techniques. Excel 2013 - Beginning

Section#

0626210

Section#

0651522

Skill Description Add Visual interest to workbooks. Create and modify charts. Create formulas and functions. Manage data, worksheets and workbooks

Pass Beginning Final Test. Understand spreadsheet basics and formatting. Flash CC Skill Description Animation and Transition Creating Animations. Developing Tween and Frame by Frame Animations. Creating Complex Animations Drawing Shapes, Adding text, and Crating Symbols Introducing Adobe Flash Professional CS5 Making a Document Interactive Planning and Creating a Flash Web Site Programming with ActionScript 3.0 Special Effects with Graphics and Gradients

Guitar - Beginning/Easy Intermediate

Section#

0840511

Skill Description 1 Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition 2 Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy 3 Demonstrate competency understanding the use of dynamic contrast 4 Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation 5 Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability 6 Pleasing tone quality 7 Turn in written assignments 8 Participation in outside activities; concerts, performances 9 Attend class on a regular basis. Page 10 of 44

Appendix Page 54


HTML 5 - Web Authoring

Section#

0650521

Section#

0608012

Skill Description

Absolute and relative links, URL, email and target Construct a web site Element tags, comments, structure Heading tags, paragraph and lists HTML images formats and attributes Hyperlinks, anchors, web site structores Inline elements, HR, Special Characters Introduction to HTML5 Introduction to Notepad ++ Illustrator CC Part I Skill Description Blending with the Mesh tool and Using and Customizing Symbols

Combining Paths with Grouping, Pathfinder, and Blending techniques Creating Vector Graphics with Shape Tools Effects and Customizing Graphic Styles Brushes and Swatches Mastering the Pen tool Typography (Character and Paragraph Panels, Type Area Tool, and Threading Text) Illustrator CC Part I

Section#

0608022

Skill Description Blending with the Mesh tool and Using and Customizing Symbols Combining Paths with Grouping, Pathfinder, and Blending techniques Creating Vector Graphics with Shape Tools Effects and Customizing Graphic Styles Brushes and Swatches Mastering the Pen tool Typography (Character and Paragraph Panels, Type Area Tool, and Threading Text)

Illustrator CC Part II

Section#

0608122

Skill Description Advanced ability to create innovate layouts for brochures, fliers, posters, and web design Creating freeform Vector Graphics with the Pen Tool Incorporating custom patterns into a composition Mastering the Pen tool Multiplying instances of a custom symbol and varying it with the symbol altering tools to create an intersting composition Understand how to use the Perspective Tools and 3D effects to create depth in a composition Using the Pathfinder to create a logo Page 11 of 44

Appendix Page 55


InDesign CC Part I

Section#

0611510

Skill Description

Crate a CD insert with a full bleed. Use the Scissor tool, Align Palette and Object arrange. Create new doc, text and colored graphic frames, place text/graphics into Placeholders, reshape text/garphic frames, use text/graph wrap, format text within frames. Create two versions of a document using the Layers Panel, Rules below, fractions, columns and symbols. Quiz Chapter 1 and 2: Terms and Palettes InDesign CC Part II

Section#

0611620

Skill Description Create two documents using tabs with mark ups and the E-scale. Design a 4 page newsletter using the Pages and Tables palettes in the design. Design a new document with text and colored graphics in frames, reshape text/graphic frames using the Pen Tool, Effects Palette and graphic wrap/format text with effects.

Intermediate ESL - Low - El Civics

Section#

0355014

Skill Description Participate in simple face-to-face conversations. Read and scan for specific information in life skill materials. Understand simple yes or no and "wh" questions. Write comprehensible sentences. Intermediate Esl - Multilevel

Section#

0316015

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics.

Intermediate Grammar

Section#

0316050

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics.

Page 12 of 44

Appendix Page 56


Intermediate Grammar/Writing

Section#

0313012

Skill Description

Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversations in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics Intermediate Speaking/Listening

Section#

0316052

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Introduction To Medical Occupations

Section#

0642063

Skill Description

Basic Pharmacy Technology Basic Understanding of HIPPA Basic Understanding of Medical Organizations OSHA & WHO Understanding Motion Graphics and the After Effects Interface Understanding Universal Precautions iOS Apps Development

Section#

0650316

Section#

1065016

Skill Description 7. Increase endurance. Basic Objective-C Basic Programming Logic Xcode Fundamentals Leather/Vinyl Bags And Purse Design Skill Description

1. Select fabrics for sewing projects by choosing pattern in store. 2. Prepare fabric for layout and cutting by following pattern instructions. 3. Choose matching threads and notions. 4. Read and follow pattern instructions step-by-step. 5. Evaluate finished projects for overall appearance, neatness, and difficulty.

Page 13 of 44

Appendix Page 57


Line Dance - Beginning

Section#

0944215

Section#

0944416

Section#

0944811

Section#

0944625

Section#

0944615

Skill Description

1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier. 3. Lost weight. 4. More confindent and positive self image. 5. Learned a variety of dances/counting/rhythm. Line Dance - Intermediate Skill Description 1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier. 3. Lost weight. 4. More confident and positive self image. 5. Learned a variety of dances/counting/rhythm.

Line Dance - Intermediate & Advanced Skill Description 1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier. 3. Lost weight. 4. More confident and positive self image. 5. Learned a variety of dances/counting/rhythm. Line Dance Review - Intermediate Skill Description 1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier 3. Lost weight. 4. More confident and positive self image.

5. Learned a avariety of dances/counting/rhythm. Line Dance Review with Sandy - Interm Skill Description 1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier 3. Lost weight. 4. More confident and positive self image. 5. Learned a avariety of dances/counting/rhythm.

Page 14 of 44

Appendix Page 58


Listening & Speaking

Section#

0302012

Skill Description

Ask and answer previously learned basic questions. Read and understand simple sentences. Understand and respond to basic words and expressions. Write simple sentences using previously learned vocabulary. Medical Assistant - Clinical - Module 1

Section#

0645060

Section#

0645373

Section#

0645560

Section#

0641560

Skill Description 10. Increase respiratory function. 2. Venipuncture 3. Infections Control Medical Assistant - Clinical - Module 2 Skill Description

1. Sterile Procedures 2. HHN with PF 3. Vital Signs 4. Dressings 5. Ear Lavage 6. EKG Medical Assistant - Clinical - Module 3 Skill Description 1. Lab 2. Portfolio 3. CAP Punctures 4. Infection Control Medical Billing And Coding Skill Description

Application of Billing and coding Techniques Creating patient, procedure, diagnosis, and insurance files Diagnosis Coding Procedure Coding Medical Coding Test Preparation

Section#

0641760

Skill Description Completion of Test Prep Exam #1 Completion of Test Prep Exam #2 Completion of Test Prep Exam #3 Completion of Test Prep Exam #4 in 5 hours or less with 70% Accuracy Page 15 of 44

Appendix Page 59


Medical Terminology & Anatomy

Section#

0641060

Section#

0322010

Skill Description

To pass Anatomy Exam (90%) To pass Medical Word Part Exam (90%) Movies Idioms/Pronunciation Skill Description Able to speak in casual and extended conversations. Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Multilevel ESL - Conversation Table

Section#

0330013

Section#

0330012

Skill Description Skill Descriptor by level advanced

Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low Skill Descriptor by level literacy Multilevel ESL - LAB Skill Description Skill Descriptor by level advanced Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low Skill Descriptor by level literacy

Page 16 of 44

Appendix Page 60


Network +

Section#

0654512

Section#

0705011

Skill Description

Ensuring Intergrity and Availability In-Depth TEC/IP Networking Introduction to HTML5 Network Hardware Network Operating Systems Network Security Networking Starndars and the OSI Model Topologies and Ethernet Standards Transmission Basics and Networking Media Troubleshooting Network Problems Voice and Video Over IP WANs and Remote Connectivity

Wireless Networking Parenting the 1.0 - 2.0 Years Old Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 2.0 - 3.0 Years Old

Section#

0710011

Skill Description

1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development

Page 17 of 44

Appendix Page 61


Parenting the 2.0 - 5.0 Years Old - After

Section#

0713016

Skill Description

1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 3.0 - 4.0 Years Old

Section#

0720012

Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom

2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 3.0 - 5.0 Years Old

Section#

0721061

Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students

3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development

Page 18 of 44

Appendix Page 62


Parenting the 3.0 - 5.5 Years Old - Scien

Section#

0721513

Skill Description

1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Pharmacy Technician - Module 2

Section#

0647360

Skill Description

. Dispensing medications filing capsules, unit dose and prepackaging Knowing the equipment used for weighing, measuring, and compounding of pharmaceuticals Knowing the storage and proper handling of medication during repackaging Understand psychopharmacology drugs Understanding respiratory, reproductive, gastrointestinal and nervous system Understanding the types of infection cause by bacterial, fungal and viral infection Use the proper aseptic technique Pharmacy Technician - Module 3

Section#

0647570

Skill Description Preparation of IV admixture and administrion, chemotherapy solution and total parenteral nutrition.

Transcribing physician order into MAR and pharmacy IV calculation. Understanding of the procedures, skills and technique used in the preparation of the sterile products using aseptic techique. Unit dose prepackaging, cassette filing. Photoshop CC Part I

Section#

0607011

Skill Description Greeting Card Exercise: create a card using template, Test, Text Warp, Transform, Rotate and Crop tool (with Crop options), design layout, print and cut finished card. Paint scanned line at using: Images, modes, Paintbrush and paintbrush Options, color and Layer Modes, Use the paint Bucket and the Gradient Tools. Select and Move Exercise: create a new document, use Move Tool to bring pics into document, use Rectangel, Elipse, and Transform tools, create a combine layers. Page 19 of 44

Appendix Page 63


Photoshop CC Part I

Section#

0607016

Skill Description

Greeting Card Exercise: create a card using template, Test, Text Warp, Transform, Rotate and Crop tool (with Crop options), design layout, print and cut finished card. Paint scanned line at using: Images, modes, Paintbrush and paintbrush Options, color and Layer Modes, Use the paint Bucket and the Gradient Tools. Select and Move Exercise: create a new document, use Move Tool to bring pics into document, use Rectangel, Elipse, and Transform tools, create a combine layers. Photoshop CC Part II

Section#

0607121

Skill Description Colorize a B/W image using Quick Mask, He/Sauration A.L., Variations, Paintbrush tool, Layers, and Color Mode. Create a composite using tonal adjustment, revise resolution, gradient mesh, merge, add canvas, frames, effects, size and type. Pen tool and Paths Palette: use nested tools to make paths Direct Sel. To adjust, Paths Palette to name save, stroke and color paths. Use Pointbrush with paths and Style Palette to add texture, bevels, and shadows. Complete with Beveled frame.

Piano - Beginning - Late Beginner

Section#

4587011

Skill Description 1 Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition 2 Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy 3 Demonstrate competency understanding the use of dynamic contrast 4 Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation 5 Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability 6 Pleasing tone quality 7 Turn in written assignments 8 Participation in outside activities; concerts, performances 9 Attentd class on a regular basis Piano - Early Intermediate - Late Interm

Section#

4587312

Skill Description

1. Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition. 2. Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy. 3. Demonstrate competency in understanding the use of dynamic contrast. 4. Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation. 5. Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability. 6. Pleasing tone quality. 7. Turn in written assignments. 8. Participation in outside activities. 9. Attend class on a regular basis.

Page 20 of 44

Appendix Page 64


Piano - Intermediate - Early Advanced

Section#

4587713

Skill Description

1. Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition. 2. Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy. 3. Demonstrate competency understanding the use of dynamic contrast. 4. Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation. 5. Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability. 6. Pleasing tone quality. 7. Turn in written assignments. 8. Participation in outside activities; concerts, performances. 9. Attend class on a regular basis. Pilates And Yoga with Jessie

Section#

0984012

Section#

1025011

Section#

0633011

Skill Description 1. Increase muscle strength.

2. Decrease pain in joints. 3. Gain more flexibility in body. 4. Decrease stress and increase relaxation. Portait Painting Skill Description 1. Follow instructions. 2. Draw proportions. 3. Color selection. 4. Mix colors. 5. Blend colors. 6. Apply textures. 7. Apply glazes. 8. Paint volume.

9. Likeness. PowerPoint 2013 Skill Description Animation and Transition Create Tables, SmartArt and Charts Linking, Embedding, and Exporting Open, save, modify, and present Pass SNAP Test Using Slide Masters

Page 21 of 44

Appendix Page 65


Premiere Pro CC

Section#

0652711

Skill Description

Applying Effects and Color Correction Applying Transitions Capturing Footage: Tapeless Media Transfer versus Digitizing Tapes Changing Motion Properties Creating Titles Finishing and Outputting In-Camera Editing: Planning a shoot with multiple camera angles, story boarding and creating a shot list. Mixing Audio Tracks Screening, Marking and Editing a Rough Cut Trimming to Refine Clip Duration Premiere Pro CC - Part I

Section#

0652720

Skill Description

Applying Effects and Color Correction Applying Transitions Capturing Footage: Tapeless Media Transfer versus Digitizing Tapes Changing Motion Properties Creating Titles Finishing and Outputting In-Camera Editing: Planning a shoot with multiple camera angles, story boarding and creating a shot list. Mixing Audio Tracks Screening, Marking and Editing a Rough Cut Trimming to Refine Clip Duration Premiere Pro CC - Part II

Section#

0652721

Skill Description

Applying Effects and Color Correction Applying Transitions Capturing Footage: Tapeless Media Transfer versus Digitizing Tapes Changing Motion Properties Creating Titles Finishing and Outputting In-Camera Editing: Planning a shoot with multiple camera angles, story boarding and creating a shot list. Mixing Audio Tracks Screening, Marking and Editing a Rough Cut Trimming to Refine Clip Duration

Page 22 of 44

Appendix Page 66


Pronunciation A

Section#

0301010

Skill Description

Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Pronunciation B

Section#

0302010

Skill Description Ask and answer previously learned basic questions. Read and understand simple sentences. Understand and respond to basic words and expressions. Write simple sentences using previously learned vocabulary. Pronunciation I

Section#

0301510

Skill Description

Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Pronunciation/Speaking

Section#

0303010

Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. QuickBooks 2014

Section#

0601012

Skill Description

Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Banking, Credit Cards Creating a New Company Final Comprehensive Project Payroll

Page 23 of 44

Appendix Page 67


Quilting - Basic Techniques

Section#

1050010

Section#

0914060

Skill Description

1. Cutting accurately. 2. Setting pieces together. 3. Pressing seams. 4. Accurate borders. 5. Quilting the quilt. 6. Binding or finishing the edge. 7. Applique work. Senior Aerobics Skill Description 1. Demo of proper form; use of correct posture in executing movement. 2. Demo of accurate body positions and timing in established choreograph. 3. Ability to communicate knowlegde & understanding of methodologies.

Speaking and Idioms

Section#

0313010

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversations in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics Watercolor Painting

Section#

1026010

Skill Description 1. Techniques 10. Participation. 2. Use of materials 3. Color mixing 4. Use of color

5. Drawing skill 6. Values. 7. Composition. 8. Creativity 9. Perspective

Page 24 of 44

Appendix Page 68


Wire Wrapped Jewelry

Section#

0816014

Section#

0637712

Skill Description

1 Identify the handtools and their use. 2 Identify materials and their use. 3 Assemble a jewelry piece. 4 Use color theory in choosing materials. 5 Recognize a problem and correct it. 6 Select appropriate materials for each project. Word 2013 - Advanced Skill Description Automating and Customizing Formatting Creating specialized tables and indexes Customizing Paragraphs and Pages Customizing themes, Creating Macros, and Navigating in a document

Inserting special features and references Pass Advanced Word final exam Proofing documents Word 2013 - Beginning

Section#

0637512

Skill Description Applying Formatting and inserting objects Capturing Footage: Tapeless Media Transfer versus Digitizing Tapes Creating tables and smart-art Customizing Paragraphs formatting Characters and Paragraphs Formatting pages Merging Documents Pass Beginning Word Final Test

Preparing Documents TimePeriod SM1516 Accounting Basics

Section#

0600501

Skill Description Accounting Equation, Debit/Credit Rules Bank Reconciliation Financial Statement Analysis, Closing the Books Journal Entries, General Ledger Worksheet Finacncial Statement

Page 25 of 44

Appendix Page 69


AdvancedConversation and Grammar

Section#

0322004

Skill Description

Able to speak in casual and extended conversations. Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Ballroom Dancing

Section#

0942002

Section#

0650500

Skill Description 1. Maintain current weight. 10. Increase respiratory function. 2. Increase muscle strength in legs. 3. Increase muscle strength in arms and shoulders. 4. Increase muscle strength in stomach and back. 5. Increase balance.

6. Increase coordination. 7. Increase endurance. 8. Increase energy level. 9. Decrease mental stress or increase relaxation. Basic HTML 5 Skill Description Absolute and relative links, URL, email and target Construct a web site Element tags, comments, structure Heading tags, paragraph and lists HTML images formats and attributes Hyperlinks, anchors, web site structores Inline elements, HR, Special Characters

Introduction to HTML5 Introduction to Notepad ++

Page 26 of 44

Appendix Page 70


Basic Web Design

Section#

0653501

Section#

0303000

Skill Description

Adding and Formatting Text Adding Behaviors and Rich Media Adding Database Functionality Creating Reusable assets and Forms Creating Spry Elements and Alternate Style Sheets Learn the basic components of a web page Planning and Designing Web Sites Using CSS for Page Layout Working with Graphics and Tables Beginning Grammar and Speaking Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words.

Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Beginning Vocabulary and Speaking

Section#

0301504

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Business Branding and Online Portfolio

Section#

0601701

Skill Description 1. Create and alter vector graphics to compose an original logo to represent your business brand in Adobe Illustrator.

2. Design a professional business card layout. 3. Use Internet tools available at sites such as WordPress.com, PaYPal.com and Google Sites in Google Apps and YouTube.com to create a professional website with a navigation menu, image galleries, forms, a resume page embedded videos and ecommerce. 4. Utilize social networking and blogging/writing posts to increase your clientbase/web traffic, and connect your Linkedin profile with your WordPress site to promote yourself professionally. 5. Animate your logo using Adobe After Effects to create an original promotional video to highlight your business brand and promote your website/online presence.

Page 27 of 44

Appendix Page 71


Cardio Zumba

Section#

0930502

Section#

0330005

Section#

1013001

Skill Description

1. More energetic, flexible, more stamina. 2. Stress was relieved, feels healthier. 3. Lost weight. 4. More confident and positive self image. 5. Learned a variety of dances/counting/rhythm. ESL Language Lab Skill Description Skill Descriptor by level advanced Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low

Skill Descriptor by level literacy Floral Arranging Skill Description 2. Select flowers that compliment each other in color and texture. 3. Create beautiful and visually balanced flower arrangements. 4. Understand design principles and elements. 7. Apply glazes. Pass SNAP Test Folk Dancing (For Age 16+)

Section#

0945202

Section#

0945201

Skill Description 1. Maintain current weight. 2. Increase muscle strength. 3. Increase muscle strength in arms and shoulders.

4. Increase muscle strength in sotmach and back. Folk Dancing (For age 9-15) Skill Description 1. Maintain current weight. 2. Increase muscle strength. 3. Increase muscle strength in arms and shoulders. 4. Increase muscle strength in sotmach and back.

Page 28 of 44

Appendix Page 72


Fun with Easy English I

Section#

0301501

Skill Description

Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Fun with Easy English II

Section#

0301500

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Glass Fusing - Beginning & Advanced

Section#

1015050

Section#

0313004

Skill Description

1. Safety rules and safety test. 2. Identifying glass tools. 3. Glass cutting techniques. 4. Types of glass used. 5. Glass design. 6. Pattern cutting-Assemble glass objects. 7. Basic safety rules for glass beveling machines. 8. Cutting a 45 degree bevel. 9. Color and design elements. Idioms Delight Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations.

Participate in conversations in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics Introduction to ICD-10

Section#

0641951

Skill Description 1. Complete ICD-10 Coding Practice 2. Complete ICD-10 Practice Questions 3. Complete ICD-10 Practice Test

Page 29 of 44

Appendix Page 73


MAC OS X - Basic

Section#

0649500

Section#

0641750

Skill Description

Creating a website Emailing and editing your photos Getting familiar with your hardware Introducing Mac OS X Snow Leopard Keeping your address book and schedule Keeping your Mac safe, updated, and Backed up Managing applications and files Setting up Snow Leopard Tailoring the Desktop to your linking Using iPhoto Medical Coding Test Preparation for CP Skill Description

Completion of Test Prep Exam #1 Completion of Test Prep Exam #2 Completion of Test Prep Exam #3 Completion of Test Prep Exam #4 in 5 hours or less with 70% Accuracy National PTCB Review Class

Section#

0648152

Section#

0313000

Skill Description Completion of Pharmacy Technician review exam #1 Completion of Pharmacy Technician review exam #2 Completion of Pharmacy Technician review exam #3 Practice exam final with 80% or higher within 4 hrs News and Discussion Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics.

Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversations in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics

Page 30 of 44

Appendix Page 74


Office Skills Lab - Keyboarding/Data En

Section#

0621000

Skill Description

Data Entry - Data Entry Jobs 1-11 Data Entry - OPAC 10 Key Testing 8000 kph required Data Entry - OPAC Data Entry Testing 8000 kph required Keybaording - OPAC and Micropace timing - 40 wpm @ 5 min Keyboarding - 5 to 10 minutes timing Keyboarding - Learn the Keyboard by touch Keyboarding - Type 25 Wpm with 5 errors or less on a 3 and 5 min timing Photoshop Elements

Section#

0606550

Skill Description Create Projects and a slide show using Photoshop Elements Slide show Learn how to use all the different tools Learn how to use different techniques to enhance photographs

Learn how to use different techniques to enhance potographs Start Photoshop Elements, Open Pictures, save and close existing work files Pilates And Yoga

Section#

0984001

Section#

0933002

Skill Description 1. Increase muscle strength. 2. Decrease pain in joints. 3. Gain more flexibility in body. 4. Decrease stress and increase relaxation. Power Sculpt Skill Description 1. Perform good/correct posture-correct body alignment. 2. Increase aerobic capacity.

3. Increase muscle strength and endurance. 4. Improve balance and joint stability. 5. Improve sleep. 6. Improve flexibility and increase range of motion. 7. Increase self-confidence and energy level. 8. Decreased blood pressure and reduced cholesteral level. 9. Maintain healthy weight.

Page 31 of 44

Appendix Page 75


PowerPoint 2013 Basics

Section#

0633051

Section#

0601002

Section#

1063501

Skill Description

Animation and Transition Create Tables, SmartArt and Charts Linking, Embedding, and Exporting Open, save, modify, and present Pass SNAP Test Using Slide Masters QuickBooks Basics Skill Description Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Banking, Credit Cards

Creating a New Company Final Comprehensive Project Payroll Sewing For All Levels And Lab Skill Description 1. Sewing machine/Serger operations & attachments. 10. Restyling a ready made garment. 2.. Fabric knowledge, measuring and cutting. 3. Pattern layouts, cutting, marking. 4. Sewing patterns; read understand instructions and terminology. 5. Pattern drafting principals, alterations and re-styling. 6. Construction and fitting seams, darts and curves. 7. Sewing notions; button-holes, zippers, piping, tucks and accent details.

8. Copying from ready-made garments. 9. Completing class projects. Sounds Great I

Section#

0310004

Skill Description Participate in simple face-to-face conversations. Read and scan for specific information in life skill materials. Understand simple yes or no and "wh" questions. Write comprehensible sentences.

Page 32 of 44

Appendix Page 76


Sounds Great II

Section#

0322000

Skill Description

Able to speak in casual and extended conversations. Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Tax Preparer

Section#

0601500

Section#

0303004

Skill Description Computerized Tax Program Credits Deductions and Standard Deduction Filing Status and Filing Requirement Income Vocabulary and Conversation Skill Description

Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Vocabulary, Conversation and Gramma

Section#

0310000

Skill Description Participate in simple face-to-face conversations. Read and scan for specific information in life skill materials. Understand simple yes or no and "wh" questions. Write comprehensible sentences. TimePeriod SP1516

Agency Students Only - Office Skills Lab

Section#

0621032

Skill Description Data Entry - Data Entry Jobs 1-11 Data Entry - OPAC 10 Key Testing 8000 kph required Data Entry - OPAC Data Entry Testing 8000 kph required Keybaording - OPAC and Micropace timing - 40 wpm @ 5 min Keyboarding - 5 to 10 minutes timing Keyboarding - Learn the Keyboard by touch Keyboarding - Type 25 Wpm with 5 errors or less on a 3 and 5 min timing

Page 33 of 44

Appendix Page 77


Bags And Purse Design

Section#

1065036

Skill Description

1. Select fabrics for sewing projects by choosing pattern in store. 2. Prepare fabric for layout and cutting by following pattern instructions. 3. Choose matching threads and notions. 4. Read and follow pattern instructions step-by-step. 5. Evaluate finished projects for overall appearance, neatness, and difficulty. Cake Decorating and Sugar Arts

Section#

1002081

Section#

0649041

Skill Description Beg/Advance piping skills Creating Titles Creativity in designing cakes Stacking & supporting a tiered cade Working with Royal Icing

Cloud Computing Skill Description Centralizing Email Communications

Collaborating on Calendars, Schedules, and Task Management Collaborating on Contact Lists Collaborating on Contact Management Collaborating on Databases Collaborating on Event Management Collaborating on Presentations Collaborating on Project Management Collaborating on Schedules Collaborating on school Projects Collaborating on Spreadsheets

Collaborating Word Processing Controlling it all with Web-Based Desktops Sharing Digital Photographs Storing and Sharing Files and Other Online Content Conversation Hour

Section#

0330033

Skill Description Skill Descriptor by level advanced Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low Skill Descriptor by level literacy Page 34 of 44

Appendix Page 78


Digital Photography/Lightroom

Section#

0605136

Skill Description

Create photo books and layouts for printing Export photos for clients or for sale with a copywright watermark Importing photos to a catalog Know the differences between point and shoot camers, DSLRs, mirror less cameras and cell phone cameras Managing catalogs and photos on disk as well as rearranging photos within the folders panel of Lightroom Organizing, rating, and managing photos in Lightroom Share photos and web galleris from Lightroom to social networking sites Using Lightroom to add keywords and other metadata Using the concept of the exposure triangle to take better pictures Using the tools and panels in the Develop Module to enhance photos and color correct Viewing photos in Lightroom

Ethical Hacking

Section#

0654332

Skill Description Accounts Payable Cryptography Enumeration Ethical Hacking overview Foot Printing and Social Engineering Hacking Web Servers Hacking Wireless Networks Linux Operating System Vulnerabilities Microsoft Operating System Vulnerabilities Port Scanning Programming for Security Professionals Protecting Networks with Security Devices

TCP/IP Concepts Review

Page 35 of 44

Appendix Page 79


Glass Exploration - Beginning & Advanc

Section#

1015080

Section#

0608130

Skill Description

1. Safety rules and safety test. 2. Identifying glass tools. 3. Glass cutting techniques. 4. Types of glass used. 5. Glass design. 6. Pattern cutting-Assemble glass objects. 7. Basic safety rules for glass beveling machines. 8. Cutting a 45 degree bevel. 9. Color and design elements. Illustrator CC Part II Skill Description Advanced ability to create innovate layouts for brochures, fliers, posters, and web design

Creating freeform Vector Graphics with the Pen Tool Incorporating custom patterns into a composition Mastering the Pen tool Multiplying instances of a custom symbol and varying it with the symbol altering tools to create an intersting composition Understand how to use the Perspective Tools and 3D effects to create depth in a composition Using the Pathfinder to create a logo Illustrator CC

Section#

0608536

Skill Description Blending with the Mesh Tool and Using and Customizing Symbols Combining Paths with Grouping, Pathfinder, and Blending techniques Creating Vector Graphics with Shape Tools

Effects and Customizing Graphic Styles Brushes and Swatches Mastering the Pen tool Typography (Character and Paragraph Panels, Type Area Tool, and Threading Text) InDesign CC Part I

Section#

0611542

Skill Description Crate a CD insert with a full bleed. Use the Scissor tool, Align Palette and Object arrange. Create new doc, text and colored graphic frames, place text/graphics into Placeholders, reshape text/garphic frames, use text/graph wrap, format text within frames. Create two versions of a document using the Layers Panel, Rules below, fractions, columns and symbols. Quiz Chapter 1 and 2: Terms and Palettes Page 36 of 44

Appendix Page 80


InDesign Part I

Section#

0611530

Skill Description

Crate a CD insert with a full bleed. Use the Scissor tool, Align Palette and Object arrange. Create new doc, text and colored graphic frames, place text/graphics into Placeholders, reshape text/garphic frames, use text/graph wrap, format text within frames. Create two versions of a document using the Layers Panel, Rules below, fractions, columns and symbols. Quiz Chapter 1 and 2: Terms and Palettes Microsoft Word For Medical Students

Section#

0637480

Skill Description Complete the Final Project with 70% or Higher Creating and Editing Documents Formatting Text, Paragraphs, Documents, Creating and Formatting Tables

Use Mail Merge and Develop Mail Merge Documents. Work with Styles, Templates and Forms Movie Making Using Adobe After Effec

Section#

0652031

Skill Description Advanced Animation Animation Workflow Media Management - Images, Video, and Audio Outputting After Effects Projects Understanding Motion Graphics and the After Effects Interface Working with 3D in After Effects Working with Audio Working with Masks, Track Matters, and Keys Working with Text Movie Making Using Adobe After Effec

Section#

0652041

Skill Description

Advanced Animation Animation Workflow Media Management - Images, Video, and Audio Outputting After Effects Projects Understanding Motion Graphics and the After Effects Interface Working with 3D in After Effects Working with Audio Working with Masks, Track Matters, and Keys Working with Text Page 37 of 44

Appendix Page 81


Parenting the 1.0 - 2.5 Years Old

Section#

0706031

Skill Description

1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 2.5 - 3.5 Years Old

Section#

0715031

Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom

2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 3.5 - 4.5 Years Old

Section#

0723031

Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students

3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development

Page 38 of 44

Appendix Page 82


Parenting the 3.5 - 5.5 Years Old

Section#

0725081

Skill Description

1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom 2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Parenting the 4.5 - 5.5 Years Old

Section#

0734031

Skill Description 1. The parent will develop and demonstrate confidence as the primary teacher of their child while working at "learning centers" in the classroom

2. The parent will learn about the physical, emotional, mental and social developmental levels of pre-school children through handouts and classroom discussions with the teacher and other students 3. The parent will learn about and utilize a variety of community resources developmentally approiate to their child 4. The parent will learn about people of many different cultures through our mulitcultural activities and diverse class make-up 5. The parent will learn to recognize and accept the uniqueness of every child in his/her personal development Pharmacy Technician - Module 1

Section#

0647080

Skill Description 1.Perform calculations and conversions in the retail pharmacy, institutional pharmacy and compounding pharmacy. 10. Identify and utilize commonly used presciptions abbreviations in the pharmacy.

11. Analyze pharmacy problems and determine solutions in dispensing medications. 12. Filling prescription medication. 2.Counting Medication using a counting tray and spatula� 2. � � 2. Counting medications usinga counting tray and spatula. 3. Measuring liquid using a gradulated cylinder. 4.Verifying Prescription labels using prescriptions. 5. Data Entry of Patient information. 6.Verifying Patient Information. 7. Picking Medications. 8. Verifying Prescriptions. 9. Identify commonly used terminology in the pharmacy and utilize them appropriately. Page 39 of 44

Appendix Page 83


Piano - Beginning

Section#

4587031

Skill Description

1 Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition 2 Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy 3 Demonstrate competency understanding the use of dynamic contrast 4 Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation 5 Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability 6 Pleasing tone quality 7 Turn in written assignments 8 Participation in outside activities; concerts, performances 9 Attentd class on a regular basis Piano - Early Intermediate

Section#

4587332

Skill Description 1. Demonstrate competency in chord/note recognition.

2. Demonstrate competency in rhythmic accuracy. 3. Demonstrate competency in understanding the use of dynamic contrast. 4. Demonstrate competency in correct interpretation. 5. Demonstrate technical proficiency to the best of your ability. 6. Pleasing tone quality. 7. Turn in written assignments. 8. Participation in outside activities. 9. Attend class on a regular basis. Portrait Painting

Section#

1025041

Skill Description 1. Follow instructions. 2. Draw proportions. 3. Color selection.

4. Mix colors. 5. Blend colors. 6. Apply textures. 7. Apply glazes. 8. Paint volume. 9. Likeness.

Page 40 of 44

Appendix Page 84


Power Sculpt - Step Aerobics and Muscl

Section#

0933032

Skill Description

1. Perform good/correct posture-correct body alignment. 2. Increase aerobic capacity. 3. Increase muscle strength and endurance. 4. Improve balance and joint stability. 5. Improve sleep. 6. Improve flexibility and increase range of motion. 7. Increase self-confidence and energy level. 8. Decreased blood pressure and reduced cholesteral level. 9. Maintain healthy weight. Sewing For All Levels

Section#

1063542

Skill Description

1. Sewing machine/Serger operations & attachments. 10. Restyling a ready made garment. 2.. Fabric knowledge, measuring and cutting. 3. Pattern layouts, cutting, marking. 4. Sewing patterns; read understand instructions and terminology. 5. Pattern drafting principals, alterations and re-styling. 6. Construction and fitting seams, darts and curves. 7. Sewing notions; button-holes, zippers, piping, tucks and accent details. 8. Copying from ready-made garments. 9. Completing class projects. Vocabulary/Reading

Section#

0301032

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information.

Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. TimePeriod WN1516 Advanced Pronunciation &Conversatio

Section#

0316024

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Page 41 of 44

Appendix Page 85


Conversation Table

Section#

0330023

Section#

0303022

Skill Description

Skill Descriptor by level advanced Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low Skill Descriptor by level literacy English with iPads Skill Description Ask and answer simple questions regarding basic needs and wishes with time words. Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Fill out simple forms with familiar terms and write simple materials.

Participate in conversation in various contexts. Read and understand simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Understand heard speech in familiar situations. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Grammar

Section#

0316060

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics. Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Idioms

Section#

0316062

Skill Description Comprehend main idea and/or theme of familiar topics.

Demonstrate understanding of lifeskill conversations. Participate in conversation in various contexts. Write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. Listening and Speaking

Section#

0301562

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions.

Page 42 of 44

Appendix Page 86


Listening/Speaking

Section#

0302022

Skill Description

Ask and answer previously learned basic questions. Read and understand simple sentences. Understand and respond to basic words and expressions. Write simple sentences using previously learned vocabulary. Multilevel ESL - Multilevel

Section#

0330085

Section#

0322025

Skill Description Skill Descriptor by level advanced Skill Descriptor by level beg. High Skill Descriptor by level Beg. Low Skill Descriptor by level Int. high Skill Descriptor by level Int. low Skill Descriptor by level literacy

TOEFL Preparation Skill Description Able to speak in casual and extended conversations.

Demostrate understanding of authentic, face-to-face conversations (at a normal rate). Understand authentic materials and understand new words from context. Write compositions on various topics using comprehensible sentences. Vocabulary Development

Section#

0301560

Skill Description Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. Vocabulary/ Reading

Section#

0301022

Skill Description

Able to print ABC's, numbers, personal info, and copy basic information. Answer previously learned questions with yes/no and one word answers. Recognize the alphabet and read simple previously learned words. Understand previously learned commands and basic expressions. TimePeriod YR1516

Page 43 of 44

Appendix Page 87


NHA Medical Test Prep

Section#

8601550

Skill Description

Completion of CPC Review Book Completion of Final Exam with 90% or Higher within the 5 hour time limit Completion of Post Exam with 80% or Higher Completion of Pre-Exam with 70% or Higher

Page 44 of 44

Appendix Page 88


ADULT SCHOOL Learning for Life

Mission Statement The Mission of the ABC Adult School is www.paace.net to improve the quality of life by providing our diverse community with meaningful opportunities to fulfill career, educational and personal goals through lifelong learning.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Self-Directed Lifelong Learners who:  acquire knowledge and skills appropriate to their stage of life.  set and achieve career, educational and/or personal goals.  seek continuing career training and/or educational opportunities.

Effective Communicators who:  demonstrate appropriate listening, speaking, reading, writing, creative, and/or computational skills.  apply communication skills to professional, technical and other real-life situations.  enhance and improve their ability to understand and be understood by others.

Critical Thinkers and Problem-Solvers who:  exercise their powers of judgment, perception, and inference.  assess and fulfill their own needs by finding appropriate resources.  apply knowledge to professional, technical and other real-life situations. Cuesta (Main) Campus 12254 Cuesta Drive, Cerritos (562) 926-6734 Cabrillo Lane Campus 20122 Cabrillo Lane, Cerritos (562) 809-9011 www.abcadultschool.edu

Book Production by Q Press, Pasadena


ABC Adult School Self Study Report 2017