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CONTENTS. PAGE

The Merchant and the Genie

9

26

The Story of the Fisherman The Enchanted Horse

The Story

of

55

Aladdin, or The Wonderful Lamp

.

.

Ali Baba

96 199

The Story of Kummir al Zummaun and Badoura, Princess OF China

233

280

SiNDBAD THE SaILOR

The Story

of the Little

Hunchback

313


,T "^

'* '^^,ti^

PROPERTY OF THE OF NEW YORK

COT

a22oS25 f'i^OH.JC

INTRODUCTION.

T HE

book of the Arabian Nights' Entertainment, or, more properl}^ The Thousand and One Nights, is not very ancient in its present shape. The book was first made known in the West by Antoine Galland, who in 1704 published a paraphrase in French of a manuscript which came into his hands. This manuscript, which was in existence in 1548, is not very much earlier than that date; and the internal evidence of tlie tales, the atmosphere and setting, points to a date not earlier than 1450 for their compilation in this form. While, however, the atmosphere is Moslem and the setting or local colour points to Egypt in the 14th to i6th centuries, the tales themselves point to Arabia, and in particular to the heyday of Bagdad with the Caliph Haroun al Reschid. Some of the tales have a historical basis; some are Persian or Indian; others are folk-tales or older than the hills; there are not a few repetitions. All this evidence indicates that the work is a compilation based on one or more older collections, and incorporating a number of stray legends and stories, one of the collections incorporated being Arabian and the final compilation having been made in Egypt somewhere about 1 500. Galland's French paraphrase is a charming work, but it was meant as a children's story book and has no pretentions to scholarly accuracy: it is very much shortened and selects only a part of the material. Two of the most famous stories, Aladdin and Ali Baba, together with others, did not proceed from this collection of the Nights at all, but from another manuscript, which was afterwards identified by Doctor Zotenberg in Paris. Upon Galland's paraphrase are based a number of other selections and adaptations. Earl)- in the 19th century Jonathan Scott produced an English revision or paraphrase selected from the contents of a manuscript in the possession of Edward \\'ortley Montague (181 1, reprinted later). This also contains only a small part of the original. In 1839, E. W. Lane made an independent English translation from an abbreviated version of the Arabic text, which has been several times reprinted and represents what the English reader regards as the Arabian Nights' Entertainment. He, like the rest, selected, abbreviated J-


8

INTRODUCTION.

countries where books are few, the hearing of stories is tlie spice of Hfe, lifting all above their own sordid surroundings, giving happiness to those in trouble and hope to all. The following description from a traveller who knew the Arabs well will illustrate this.

"The fondness of an Arab for the traditional history of the most distinguisht actions of their remote ancestors is proverbial professed story-tellers are ever the appendages of men of rank. It is a great exercise of genius, and a peculiar gift, held in high estimation among them. They have a quickness and clearness of delivery, with a perfect command of words, surprising to a European ear; they never hesitate, are never at a loss; their descriptions are highly poetical, and their relations exemplified by figure and metaphor, the most striking and appropriate their extempore songs are also full of fire, and possess many beautiful and happy similes. "Arab songs go to the heart, and greatly excite the passions. I have seen a circle of Arabs straining their eyes with fixed attention one moment, and bursting with loud laughter: at the next, melting into tears, and clasping their hands in all the Denham's Travels in Africa. ecstasy of grief and sympathy." From stories men gain their history and geography, their science and their rules of life they include for unlettered races I venture to hope that those their education and their religion. who may procure this book for their children will use it in the good old way and tell the stories by word of mouth, or at least read them aloud. Few memories are so lasting as those of the stories which we heard told or read to us in childhood, and to many the memory of a nurse or foster mother is among their dearest thoughts, bringing gratitude for the new worlds of imagination which they have opened up, never to be obliterated throughout the struggles of after life. W. H. D. Rouse. ;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

;


^WP^^^WMâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fc^

-u-^-y-^

THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIE. 'T^HERE

was once

property a great

was

number

obliged

journevs, carried

in

merchant who possessed much

a

lands, goods,

of clerks,

from

time

to

and money, and had

and

factors,

time

with

him he

a

wallet

had

containing

a great

where he could procure no

desert

having despatched

biscuits

his affairs,

and

to pass over,

of his

He

journey,

took horse again

order to return home.

The the

business

sort of provisions.

arrived without accident at the end

in

take

to

He

and on one occasion he took horse, and

dates, because

and,

slaves.

fourth dav of his journey he turned out of

road to rest for

a

while

beneath some

trees.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

lo

He

found a fountain near

branch

the

to

at

hand,

some

the fountain and took

seated

himself beside

biscuits

and dates from

he

of a tree,

tying his horse

so,

wallet.

his

As he lessly

dates

ate his

he threw the

different directions;

in

having finished

then,

being a good Mussulman,

his repast,

stones care-

he washed his

hands, face, and feet, and said his prayers.

Before

he

had finished he saw

with age

and of enormous

size,

him with

a scimitar in his

hand.

in

a terrible

kill

you

my

son."'

with

"How

this

could

He

spoke to him

bidding him "Rise,

voice,

scimitar,

kill

I

white

a genie,

advancing towards

you

as

vour son?'

that

I

may

have killed

exclaimed the

merchant, "I never knew, never saw him."

"Did you not sit down when vou came hither?" demanded the genie, "and did you not take dates out of your w^allet, and as you ate them did vou not throW' the stones about in diff^erent directions?"

"I did

that

all

"I cannot deny "If that

it

say,"

answered the merchant;

it."

be so,"

you have

When

you

reasoned

killed

my

the

son

:

genie,

and

in

"I this

you were throwing the stones about,

was passing

by and

you threw one

which killed him; therefore

I

must

"Ah! my Lord! pardon me merchant.

I

into

kill "

tell

vou

manner.

mv his

son eye,

vou."

exclaimed

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. "No "Is

not just to

it

"1 agree I it

no mercy,"

pardon,

kill is,"

it

killed your son

innocently

and

suffer

me

exclaimed the genie.

him that has killed another?" replied

the

merchant,

"but

was unknown to me, and

beg you therefore

I

;

it

ii

I

if

did

pardon me,

to

to live."

But as the genie persisted in his resolution the merchant begged that he might be granted a year's respite in which to return home, bid farewell to and children, and

his wife

"Do you genie,

settle his business affairs.

heaven

take

witness,"

to

the

cried

dav twelvemonth vou will return

"that this

to this spot?"

"I do," answered the merchant, whereupon the genie

left

him and disappeared.

The merchant then hastened and acquaint

family with

his

the

to

home

return

sorrowful

intelli-

There was great lamentation made, and his wife and children wept bitterly, the merchant himgence.

self

mingling

his

with

tears

but

theirs;

standing this he did not neglect to set his order, and at the end of his family adieu

and

the twelvemonth

set out

upon

his

notwithaffairs

in

he bade

journey to the

appointed spot.

He

reached

the

fountain,

horse, and seated himself

He

from

alighted

his

upon the ground.

had not been there

long when

he saw an

old man, leading a hind, approaching.

"Brother,"

said

the

old

man,

"

whv

are

you


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

12

come evil

to this desert place,

the resort of an

is

spirit?"

The merchant to

which

his cnriosity

and related

him the adventure which obliged him

to be there.

The

man

old

satisfied

astonishment

listened with

and when

he had finished exclaimed: "I will remain, Brother,

and be

yonr interview with the genie."

a witness of

Thev conversed together o J

perceived

then

another

time and

for a short

man

old

coming

towards

them, followed by two black dogs. After they

them what they

had

one another,

saluted

did

in

that

he asked

The

place.

old

man

with the hind told him the adventure of the merchant

and the genie, and

and the

second

between them,

that had passed

all

man

old

resolved

also

to

remain

and witness the issue of the meeting.

They had seriously begun to converse together when thev perceived a thick vapour, like a cloud of dust raised by a whirlwind, advancing towards them,

and out of the vapour appeared the genie,

having

a scimitar in his hand.

Taking the merchant bv the arm, he that

mav

I

kill

you

as

vou killed

mv

said:

"Rise,

son."

AVhen the old man who led the hind saw the genie lav hold of the merchant and about to kill him, he threw himself

at

"Prince of Genies, suspend your anger,

me.

I

will tell

the feet of the monster and said I

most

humblv request you

and do me the favour

vou the historv of

mv

life,

:

to

to hear

and of


'B t'other,"

said

the

old

man,

^^why

desert fiace

P"

aye

you

come

to

this


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. the hind you see

if

you think

more wonder-

it

and surprising than the adventure of the merchant,

ful I

and

;

15

hope

you

pardon the

will

man one

unfortunate

half of his offence."

The

genie

deliberating

after

the proposal hnally agreed to

So the old man began said he,

my

"is

living together I

took

cousin; nay, what

me

presented hated

wife,

aversion

so

was too

late.

is

well

"When my

and

that

I

This

slave.

a

my

son

;

wife.

to

my

concealed

knew nothing

wife,

of

of

Before

whom

I

mv

her

till

it

slave and her son, and prayed

take care of them durinjr

wife

slave

son was grown to a youth

recommended

mistrust, the

my

wife, being jealous,

but

obliged to undertake a long journey. I

more,

married her, and after

I

with a son, and

mother

both

"This hind,"

twenty years and having no children,

second

a

it.

his story.

She was very young when

on

time

short

a

was

I

I

it

went

had

no

her to

absence, which was to

be for a whole vear.

"But,

having studied magic,

her

enchantments

and

his

mother

in

changing

she succeeded by

my

son into a calf

into a cow.

"At my return I enquired for mother and child. "'Your slave,' said she, 'is dead; and as for your I have son, I know not what has become of him. not seen him these two months.' "Eight months passed and my son did not return.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i6

and,

my

being the feast of the great Sacrilice,

It

herdsman bring me

"He

bellowed

eves, that

to

make

piteouslv,

tears

was about

I

so

and

one,

having

the sacrifice,

but

from

her

falling

could not brins: mvself to give her the

I

blow; but delivered her

mv

to

herdsman, who took

her away and slaughtered her.

her

to skin

to sacrifice.

me

accordingly brought

bound her she

cow

a fat

bade

I

found

he

her

But when he came

to be

but skin

nothing:

and bone.

"'Take her

alms, or in anv

in

bring

a fat calf,

"He I

yourself,'

knew

eftort

to

way you

me

not

the

soon

calf

moved as

was

be so cruel

at

mv

and though

fat calf,

vet

son,

the sight

of

I

could not

On

him.

his

mv

that he broke his cord and

feet

as

to take his

as

a

he beheld me, he made so great an

come near me,

threw himself

vou have

if

her stead.'

in

at

'and dispose of her

please; and

returned shortly with

forbear being part, as

it

said,

I

if

conjuring

felt

a tender pitv for him, which

me on

his

behalf,

the calf

home and

bring

I

not to

life.

"I

and

me

bade

me

the

another

interested

herdsman take in

his stead.

"Although mv wife urged me again and again

make so,

the

sacrifice,

I

could not bring myself to do

and the herdsman led him awav.

morning the

to

herdsman desired

to

The speak

following with

me

alone.

"'I

come,'

said he, 'to

communicate

to

you

a


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. piece of intelligence for which thanks.

nie in

have

1

when laughed when

perceived she

moment

after

son

she saw him,

opposite

same time.

asked

I

I

:

other

and

in

her

why

a

"the

at

him

see

joy to

wept

I

our master's

is

with

and

brance of the the

home

"Father," said she,

laughed

alive,

still

skill

one and the

parts at

you bring back

calf

will return

the calf

led

I

a-weeping.

fell

two such

she acted

hope vou

daughter that has some

a

Yesterday

maffic.

I

17

rememwas made mother, who the

sacrifice that

day

of

his

was changed into

cow.

a

These enchantments were

made

by

wife,

^vho

our

master's

hated

mother and son."

"On He

broke

his

if

she were

and

coni

himself at

my

tlive'W

words

I

house

of

to

restore

my

these

hastened to the

mv herdsman

and asked

feet.

able

hearing

both '

son

his

to

daughter

his

former

shape.

"She answered me, and

I

well

know what

smiling, I

owe

'You

to

vou

are our master, ;

but

I

cannot

restore your son to his former shape, except on

conditions

my

:

the

first

is,

that

husband; and the second, that

punish the person

two

me for you allow me to

vou give him

who changed him

to

into a calf.'


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i8

"Having agreed damsel took a vessel over

that

it

I

herself to the

born a

a

both

to

these conditions,

of water, pronounced words

full

did not understand,

'O

exclaimed

calf,

man, and

art

changed into

and,

calf,

continue in that form

calf,

the

if

but

;

addressing

thou wast thou be

if

by enchantment,

a calf

return to thy natural shape.'

"As in

she spoke, she threw water upon him, and

an instant he recovered his natural form.

"We

embraced each other tenderlv, and

addressed him

acknowledgment to

is

"This it

mv

changed

whom

she

wife, as

I

consented joyfullv,

married she

you

then

I

doubt not but

'I

have promised.' but before

they were

wife into a hind,

and

this

see.

the history of myself and this hind.

is

in

vour deliverer you will consent

to

make her your

"He

words:

in these

Is

not one of the most wonderful and surprising?"

"I

admit

is,"

it

"and on that

said the genie,

account forgive the merchant one half of

When

the

the second,

am

man had

finished

his storv,

led the two black dogs, addressed

the genie and said " I

old

first

who

his crime."

:

you what happened to me, and these two black dogs you see by me, and I am certain

you

going to

I

my

will say that

prising than

when

tell

that

have done

to pardon the

story

which you have this,

I

hope vou

is

yet

more

just heard. will

merchant another half of

sur-

But

be pleased

his oflence."


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

19

"I will," replied the genie, "provided your story surpass that of the hind."

Then

the second old

man began

"Great Prince of Genies, you must know that

we

two black dogs and my-

are three brothers, the

when he, died, left each of us one thousand sequins. With that sum we all became merchants. A little time after we opened shop, my Our

self.

father,

one of these two dogs,

eldest brother,

and trade

travel

view he sold

foreign

in

his

estate,

countries.

resolved to

With

this

and bought goods suited to

the trade he intended to follow.

"He At

went away and was absent

the expiration

thought before

me

"'Is

nised

this

him.

'Ah,

'how could

I

concerning all

I

himself

cried,

him narrowly and recog-

at

brother,'

my

his

presented

you do not know me?' he

know you

into

year.

poor man who

a

alms

ask

to

looked

I

time,

whole

shop.

possible

it

him come lost

my

in

and upon

of this

come

had

a

cried

I,

embracing him,

in this condition?'

made

I

house, and having questioned him

misfortunes,

found that

I

he

had

goods and money through unfortunate

his

trading.

"I immediately shut up to a bath, ing,

gave him

on examining

stock, that

sequins,

I

is

mv

shop and, taking him

clothes

books, that

to say, that

gave

my

the best

I

I

I

had.

Find-

had doubled

my

was worth two thousand

him one-half;

'With

that,'

said

I,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

20

you may make up your the

loss.'

He

joyfully accepted

and having repaired

present,

we

fortunes,

his

lived together as before.

"Some

time

my

after,

second brother, who

the

is

other of these two dogs, also sold his estate.

to

He

"His elder brother and myself did all we could divert him from his purpose, but without etiect. disposed of

goods

were

as

and with the money bought such

it,

suitable

He

designed to follow.

At the end

parted.

which

trade

the

to

he

and de-

joined a caravan

of the year he returned in the

my

Having myself by this time gained another thousand sequins, I made him a present of them. With this sum he furnished same condition

"Some voyage: velled,'

Who

time

immediately

I

said

T,

can assure

constantly

refused;

solicitation five

much, that

I

but

after

years, they

I

my

thev overcame

had

it?

successful

resolution.

the time arrived that for

our

given

I

importuned me so

vovage,

and had not one dirrim

sand sequins

more

tra-

having resisted their

goods necessary to the undertaking, all,

a trading

in

'You have

shall be

to

In vain thev urged me, for

"When, however, make preparations

spent

came

brothers

declined.

that

whole

at last

my

what have you gained by

'and

me

trade.

should join them

I

than you have been.'

to

his

one of

after,

propose that

to

other brother.

and continued

his shop,

me

as

to each

I

to

we were buv the

found they had

left

of the thou-

of them.

I

did


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. not,

on

trary,

this

upbraid

account,

niv stock

being

shared the half of

with

it

six

still

them.

21

On

thousand

them, telling

con-

the

sequins,

them,

I

'My

we must venture these three thousand sein some secure place that our vovaije be not more successful than vours

brothers, quins, in

case

and hide the rest

We

put

was formerly, we

and to enable us I

as

to

sea

witli

:

a favourable wind.

may have wherewith to assist us, to follow our ancient way of living.'

gave each of them a thousand sequins, and keeping

much

for myself,

sand in a corner of

I

my

buried the house.

We

other three thou-

purchased goods,

and having embarked them on board

a vessel,

which


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

22

we

freighted

between

we

us,

put

with

sea

to

a

favourable wind.

"After two months'

where we landed and had

port, for I

we

sail,

our goods.

arrived happily at

very good market

a

mine so

especially sold

I

With

gained ten to one.

well, that

we bought

the produce

commodities of that country to carry back with us for sale.

"When we I

were ready

met on the seashore

to

me

and besought

hand,

return,

exceedingly

lady,

a

She walked up

some, but poorly clad.

my

embark on our

to

me, kissed

to

with great

hand-

earnestness

marry her and take her along with me.

"She assured me in the

world to be

begged me not

to

that

I

should have with

satisfied

all

the reason

and

her conduct,

object to her on

account of her

poverty.

"And

so

apparel to be ried her,

my

found

my

I

at last

made

I

yielded, and ordered proper

for her,

and, after having mar-

took her on board,

and we

many good

wife possessed so

my two

affairs

as

brothers,

successfully

who had as

not

had

I

qualities that

managed

mine,

envied

prosperity, and suffered their feelings to carry so

far,

night,

that they conspired

when my

both into the

"My

wife

and

against I

were

I

In the mean-

love for her increased every day.

time

set sail.

my

life,

asleep,

their

my them

and one

threw us

sea.

wife proved to be a fairy, and, by conse-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

23

quence, a genie, so that she could not be drowned but for me,

is

it

out her help.

when

I

she took

"When husband,

certain

I

had scarcely fallen into the water,

me

up,

and carried me

to an island.

day appeared, she said to me, 'You

by

that

;

must have perished with-

saving your

^

life,

I

have

see,

not

re-

flKM 6ff^ i

u-^

w

.--

-*Âť~

1

I

^^S^"^^11

/ met on the seashore a lady.

warded you

ill

for

am

your kindness to me.

being upon

know

that

shore

when you were going

to

embark,

strong desire to have you for

my

husband

mind

to

I

try

a fairy,

and

your goodness,

before you in disguise.

You must

and

You have

the seaI ;

presented

I

felt a

had

a

myself

dealt generously


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

24

bv me, and

am

I

glad

my acknowledgment.

ing

opportunity of return-

of an

But

your brothers, and nothing

I

will

am

incensed against

me

satisfy

but their

liycs.'

"I listened to this discourse with admiration and

thanked

my

way

wife the best

kindness she had done me.

my

for

'as

brothers,

'But, Madam,'

beg you

I

whatever cause of resentment I

am

could for the great

I

to

I,

them;

pardon

they have

given me,

not cruel enough to desire their death.'

"I pacified her by these words, and I

said

me in my own

had concluded she transported

from the island to the roof of

as

soon as

a

moment

house, and

then disappeared.

"I descended, opened the doors of

dug up the three thousand sequins went afterwards

my

mv

house, and

had formerly

I

shop, which

se-

creted.

I

opened,

and was complimented bv the merchants,

my

neighbours, upon

to

my

house,

I

to

me

When

return.

perceived

I

which came up

my

to

in a

there

I

two

I

also

went back

black

dogs,

very submissive manner

:

could not divine the meaning of this circumstance

until

mv

the fairy,

band, be not

appeared and said:

wife,

surprised

to see these

'Hus-

dogs, thev are

vour brothers.' "I was troubled

this

at

declaration,

and asked

her by what power they were so transformed. '"I did of

mv

sisters

it,'

to

said she,

do

it,

'or at least authorised

who

at

one

the same time sunk


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. You have

their ship.

board, but

your two brothers,

to

remain

that time,

if

had on

As

condemned them

have

I

such

a

to

Their perfidiousness

years in that shape.

five

well deserves

too

goods you

the

compensate you another wav.

will

I

lost

25

penance.

you conduct them

to

At

end of

the

my

sister

who

placed the enchantment upon them she will remove

and they will regain their natural forms.'

it,

"The ling in this

who

my it

five

quest

way,

I

years being

my

of

met

this

led the hind, historv,

O

now

wife's

expired,

sister;

I

and

am as

I

travel-

passed

merchant and the good old man

and

sat

down bv them.

Prince of Genies

!

This

is

do not vou think

very extraordinary?"

"I own account

I

it

is,"

replied the

genie,

"and on

that

remit the merchant the second half of the

crime which he has committed against me," and with that the genie disappeared.

The merchant

did not

fail

make due acknowThey rejoiced to see to

ledgment to his deliverers. him out of danger, and, bidding him adieu, each of them proceeded on his way. The merchant returned to his wife

and children, and passed the

days with them

in

peace.

rest of his


THE STORY OV THE EISHERMAN. 'T^HEKE

was once

aged fisherman,

an

who

was so poor that he could scarcely

earn

would maintain and

wife,

He went betimes

and

much

as

himself, his

three

children.

everv day to

imposed

as

it

upon himself not his

The

nets

fish

morning,

the

in

as

a

law

to

cast

above four times

fisheruian.

a dav.

He went

out one morning before daybreak, and

coming to the seaside cast in his nets. As he drew them towards the shore, he found them very heavy, and thought he had a good draught of fish, at which he rejoiced instead

of

;

but

fish

in

his

a

moment

after,

contained

nets

perceiving that

nothing

but the

much vexed to have made He mended his nets, which

carcass of an ass, he was

such a sorrv draught.

were broken second time.

in

several places, and threw

When

them

in

a

he would have withdrawn them


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

27

he found a great deal of resistance, which made him think he had taken abundance of

nothing

except a basket

fish,

but he found

and slime,

of gravel

full

which grieved him extremely.

He

threw awav the basket,

nets from the

slime,

and,

them the

cast

brought up nothing except stones,

washinc:

third time,

shells,

his

but

and mnd.

.}*^ÂŤ^B*

He

No

language

examined the

can

express

was almost distracted. appear he did

vessel

on all sides.

his

disappointuient

However,

not forget

to say

as

;

dawn began

his prayers,

like

he to a

good Mussulman, and he added to them this petition "Lord, thou knowest that I cast my nets only four :

times

a

dav

;

I

have

alreadv

drawn

them

three 3*


THE

28

ARAJ5IAN NIGHTS.

times, without the least reward

onlv to cast them once more

;

labour:

lor iiiv

I

am

pray thee to render

1

the sea favourable to me.''

The his nets

fisherman, having finished this prayer, cast fourth

the

difficulty

but

weight seemed that

it

vellow

of

vessel

a

lish,

not

was shut up and

upon

founder,

:

which

from

its

and he observed

;

having

This turn of

it.

"I

will sell

it,"

a

measure

of

buv

and

them

in

fastened with lead,

the impression of a seal

tune rejoiced him

empty

be

to

found nothing

copper,

it

with great

as formerly,

out,

but instead of

;

and when he thought

time,

was proper drew them

said he,

with

corn

for-

"to the the

money."

He it,

examined the vessel on

to try if

This

nothing. bottle

He placed tively

circumstance,

a knife,

turned

out, it

fact that the

made him

cover,

To

try

bottle.

mouth downward, but nothing surprised

before him,

there

and the

leaden

and easily opened the

the

which

a

but heard

noise,

something precious.

contained

it

he took

came

made any

contents

was sealed with

think that this,

its

and shook

all sides,

him

came out

a

very

He

extremely.

but while he viewed thick

it

smoke,

atten-

which

obliged him to retire two or three paces back.

The smoke ascended

to the clouds,

and, extend-

ing itself along the sea and upon the shore, formed a great mist,

which we may well imagine

fisherman with astonishment.

When

the

filled

the

smoke was


The smoke

ascciuicit

to

the

clo/iiis.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. all

of the

out

solid

body,

high

as

vessel,

greatest

the

monster of such

would

have

fain

was formed

of which

and became

re-united

it

At the

of giants.

fled,

a

twice as

genie

a

unwieldy bulk,

an

31

of a

sight

fisherman

the

but was so frightened that he

could not move.

"Solomon,' cried the genie immediately, "Solomon, great prophet, pardon, pardon

more oppose your

will,

I

will

obey

never

will

I

;

your com-

all

mands.''

The covered

above

died,

me your

Tell

hundred

eighteen

Solomon up

when he heard these words, recourage: "Proud spirit," said he, "it is

fisherman, his

years

and we are now history,

at

prophet

the end of time.

and how you came

be shut

to

in this vessel."

"Presumptuous fellow," to the

fisherman with

more

with

respect,

"Why man.

I

a

I

"That

me?"

kill

now

not just

set

my

will not save you,"

"I have only

"Speak

look.

pray you, else will

would you

"Did

the genie, turning

said

fierce

have you alreadv forgotten

I kill

manner

me

to

you."

replied the fisher-

you

at

liberty,

and

services?" the genie

answered,

and that

one favour to grant you,

the choice of what

me

the

since

is

would have

of death vou

put you to."

"But wherein have

I

offended you?"

demanded

the fisherman.

"Hearken

to

my

story,"

said

the

genie,

"and


THE

32

yon

nnderstand

then

will

ARAIilAN NIGHTS. the

case.

am one

I

of

those rebellions spirits that opposed the will of Solo-

He

mon, the great prophet.

me by

vants to take

and

as

shut

not

force and bring nie before him,

vowed

he

me up in break my

punish

to

He

me.

therefore

copper vessel; and that

this

prison

might

I

himself stamped the leaden

lie

cover with his great

He

seal.

then gave the vessel

one of the genies who had submitted to

to

me

with orders to throw

"During the ment,

swore that

I

if

the

expiration

him

rich

bevond

ever,

would open

all

my

imprison-

anyone should deliver me be-

of

period,

that

I

would make

That centurv ran

belief.

and during the second

out,

made an oath

I

howthat

I

the treasures of the earth to anvone

me

that might set

him,

into the sea.

hundred years of

first

fore

at liberty,

"In the third a

to submit to his

persisted in refnsing

still

I

authority

therefore sent his ser-

I

but with no better success.

promised to make

mv

deliverer

powerfnl monarch, to be alwavs near him

in spirit,

and to grant him every day three requests, no matter

what they might two former and

"At so long,

deliver

I

But

continued

swore that

me,

this

centurv passed

in

mv

I

would

if,

kill

as

the

prison.

being angry to find mvself

last, I

be.

afterwards,

a

prisonei-

anvone should

him without mercv, and

grant him no other favour but to choose the

manner

of his death, and therefore, since thou hast delivered

me

to-dav,

I

give thee

that choice."


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

33

For some time the fisherman reasoned with the genie, and endeavonred to dissnade him from his purpose; but seeing that

it

was useless he determined

to resort to stratagem.

"Since

must die then," said he

I

to the genie,

"I submit to the will of heaven; but before

choose

I

manner of my death, I conjure you bv the great name of the prophet Solomon to answer me trulv the question I am going to ask you." The genie having promised to speak the truth, the fisherman said to him: "I wish to know if you the

were

really in this vessel, for

cannot believe

I

it

is

capable of holding one of your size." "I swear to you that ing," replied the genie,

I

was there, notwithstand-

me

"just as truly as you see

here."

"Well,"

said the fisherman,

"I cannot and will

not believe you, unless vou go into the vessel again to

prove

Upon solve,

to

it

me,"

body of the genie began

this the

changed

and

before upon

the

itself into

seashore;

at

smoke, last

it

lect itself

and to re-enter the vessel,

remained

outside,

forth,

when immediatelv

which said to the fisherman

to dis-

extending

began to until

as

col-

no part

a voice

came

:

"Well now, incredulous fellow, do not vou believe me now?" The fisherman, instead of answering the genie, took the cover of lead, and, having speedilv replaced


THE Al^MUAN NIGHTS.

34 it

"Now

on the vessel, cried out:

beg

mv

you

to death;

but rather will

sea

whence

took

I

you

beware of such to kill

The liberty,

him

a

I

said

you

hard

struggled

but finding this

"What

you

to

build a house

will

and give notice

throw

to

that shall set

genie

to

shall put

I

their nets

in

wicked genie, who has made himself

set

to

at

endeavoured to

him out of the

let

a

libertv."

at

impossible,

persuade the fisherman to

he

1

will reside,

I

who come

to all fishermen

vow

way

throw you into the

I

and

:

your turn

it

favour and to choose which

upon the shore, where to

is

bottle.

wav of

was

onlv

the

fisherman,

bv

jest,"

said.

"() genie,"

replied

ment ago vou were one of the and

now

you one of the

are

course

will

return,

and there

signify

You

judgment. reject yours,

and

am

to

shall

rejected

greatest of

least.

nothing;

vou

"but

my

Your

the

stav

genies,

crafty dis-

vou

sea

until

pravers

resolved

all

mo-

a

the

and

must

day of I

now

throw

vou into

the genie,

"do not

to

the sea."

"My

good

friend,"

be guilty of such I

replied

cruelty.

If

you

promise to do vou no hurt, nav,

will far

let

from

me

out

that,

I

show vou a wav to become exceedinglv rich." The hope of delivering himself from poverty prevailed with the fisherman, and after making the genie take a great and solemn oath that he would not harm him, he took the covering otf the vessel. will


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. In an instant the

35

began to resume

genie

his form no sooner had he done so than he kicked the bottle ;

hiughed

into

the

face,

and bade

sea,

the

at

fisherman's

him follow him,

bringing

alarmed his nets

with him.

The fisherman took up his nets and followed distrust. They passed by the town, and came to the top of a mountain, from whence

him with some they

descended

them

to a lake that lay

When

into

vast

a

between four

reached

thev

"Cast

:

did

''

;

would make

the waters were full of

were of four colours, fie

threw

each colour. could

not

might get

in

white,

his nets,

for he could see his surprise

red, blue,

them,

considerable

they

and yellow.

and brought out one of

Having never seen the

but admire a

never doubting

and to

fish,

lake the

vour nets and J

in

so,

good catch,

a

brought

hills.

of the

the side

genie said to the fisherman O the fisherman catch fish that he

which

plain,

judging

and,

sum

like before,

for them, he

that

he

he

was very

jovful.

"Carry the

"and he

will

every day to

fish

to

your sultan," said the genie,

You may come

pay you well for them. fish

in this lake

;

but

I

give you warn-

ing not to throw vour nets above once a day, other-

wise you will repent." his

him

Having spoken

this,

he struck

foot upon the ground, which opened, swallowed up,

and then closed

The

fisherman, following the advice of the genie,

again.


AKABIAX NIGHTS.

Till-:

36

did not cast in his nets a second time, but returned

town and went immediately

to the

palace to offer his

The

the sultan's

to

fish.

was much surprised

when he saw them, and took them up and examined them closelv. "Take them," said he to his vizier, "and carry them to the cook, whom the Emperor of the Greeks has sent me. I make no doubt they will prove as good sultan

to the taste as to the sight."

The

them

vizier carried

delivering them to the

He him

to

gold,

then give

returned to the

his

fisherman

which he accordingly

The

money, could scarcely believe being

for his family with the

Now

soon

as

pieces

of

able

a

seen

much

jjood fortune,

his

dream,

until he

to provide

produce of

the sultan's

so

his

but

found

necessaries

Hsh.

cook received the

them and put them upon the fire frying-pan, with oil, and when she thought them enough on one side, she turned them upon the

she prepared

fish,

in

as

hundred

did.

thought the whole must be

by

who ordered

master,

four

are four

to dress."

who had never

fisherman,

otherwise,

"Here

cook, said:

which the sultan wishes you

fish

it

he was directed, and,

as

a

fried

other, but scarcely

were thev turned, when the wall

of the kitchen divided, and a voung: ladv of wonderful

in

beauty entered from the opening. flowered

pendants

in

satin,

after

She was clad

the Egyptian manner,

with

her ears, a necklace of large pearls, and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. bracelets of gold set with rubies, in

37

and carried

a rod

her hand.

She moved towards the frying-pan,

amazement of with

"Fish,

rod,

von

are

fish,

Then

the cook, and striking one of the hsh

end of the

the

to the great

said

faithful?"

the four fish lifted up their

heads and replied,

''Yes,

yes:

if

we reckon; if vou pay your debts, we pay ours." As soon as thev had hnished

you reckon,

ladv overturned

these words, the

frying-pan, and returned into

the

the open part of the wall, which

as

it

was before.

The cook was ened as

at

what had

soon

had

happened, but

fallen

But they were

sure

tell

voiuig lady of ivondcr-

as

fid beauty cnicvcd.

black as coal

to be carried to the sultan.

"Alas!" I

hsh

upon the hearth.

her greatly, and she

If

sufficiently

up the

took

she

and not ht

greatly fright-

had

she

as

recovered that

became

immediatelv, and

closed

said she,

the

sultan

he will not

to

fell

weeping.

"what what

believe

This troubled

will I

become

have

seen,

me, but will be

of I

me?

am

enraged

against me."

While

she

was

thus

bewailing

herself,

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

38

fish

were

had occurred, and the

vizier

grand vizier entered, and asked her

if

the

ready.

She told him sent

word

fish,

as a

the

genie

that

to the fisherman to bring four

more such

misfortune had befallen the others, so that

they were not

The

all

to

fit

be carried to the sultan.

fisherman, without saving anything of what

had told

him,

excused

day on account of the long

himself for that

distance he had to tra-

verse to reach the lake where he caught them

promised

to bring

them without

fail

but

;

on the morrow.

Accordingly he went away by night, and, coming threw

to the lake,

took four

fish

like

in his

nets betimes next morning,

the former, and brought

them

to

the vizier at the hour appointed.

The

them and carried them to the kitchen, and shut himself up with the cook whilst she prepared them and put them on the fire, minister

took

as she

had done the four others the day previously.

When

thev

were

fried

on

one

side,

and she had

turned them upon the other, the kitchen wall again

opened, and the same lady came her hand, struck one of the fore,

and

four gave her the

all

in

with the rod in

spoke to

fish,

as

it

same answer.

then overturned the frying-pan with her rod and

appeared grand

through

vizier,

said that

it

the

having

opening

witnessed

in all

the

She dis-

The

wall.

that had

be-

passed,

was too wonderful and extraordinary to

be concealed from the sultan and that he would

in-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. form him therewith.

much

being

man and such

and the sultan,

This he did,

surprised, sent immediately for the fisher-

said to

him

:

"Friend, bring

me

more

four

fish."

The

fisherman, having undertaken to do

immediately to the of

39

â&#x20AC;˘

net he

his

and

lake,

caught

four

immediately to the sultan,

at the first fish

went

so,

throwing

in

brought them

and

who ordered

four

that

hundred pieces of gold should be given him.

As soon them that

sultan had the

as the

be carried into

to

was necessary

himself up with

vizier,

that

he ordered

room, with

private

his

for frying them,

the

fish

all

and having shut prepared

minister

them and put them into the frying-pan, and when they were fried on the one side, turned them upon the other;

young

then the wall

ladv, there

a slave, staff in

came

opened, but instead of a

out a black, in the habit of

and of gigantic stature, with his

He

hand.

a great

addressed them

in

green

the

same

words the young lady had used and they answered as before,

and the this

whereupon the black overturned the pan became black as coals. Having done

fish

he disappeared through the opening in the wall.

"After what

I

have seen,"

shall not be able to rest until

said the sultan, I

know what

all

"I this

means."

He

therefore sent

for the

him where he had caught the to the palace.

fisherman fish

and asked

he had brought

"


THE ARABIAN XKiHTS.

40

"I lisbed

for

them

a lake

in

situated

"beyond

four bills," be answered,

between

we

tbe mountains

see from bence."

Tbe sucb

"No," replied tbe

lake.

a

mucb

sultan tben asked tbe vizier

as

beard of

it,

altbougb

be knew of

if

"I never so

vizier,

bave bunted bevond

I

tbe mountains for over sixtv vears." J J

The

bow

sultan asked tbe fisherman

far tbe

lake

might be from the palace, and the fisherman having

answered that journey,

tbe

it

sultan

ordered

commanded

horse, and

more than three hours'

was not

court

his

all

the fisherman

take

to

them

to serve

as a guide.

Thev of

foot

all

ascended

they saw,

it

to

the

mountain, great

their

nobody bad observed

plain that

and

surprise,

at

the

a

vast

tben, and at last

till

came to tbe lake, which thev found to be situated between four bills as tbe fisherman bad de-

they

Tbe water was so transparent, that fish swimming about and notice

scribed.

could see the

thev were like

those

tbe fisherman

they that

had brought

to

tbe palace.

The them

sultan then addressed his court and informed

that

he

was determined not

palace until be had

be

in

that place and

learned

whv

all

bow the

to

return

the lake fish

in

it

to his

came

to

were of

different colours.

Having spoken thus, he ordered bis court to encamp; and immediatelv his pavilion and the tents


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

were planted upon the banks of

household

of his

41

the lake.

When grand

came

night

and

vizier

with

retired

made known

once

at

sultan

the

his

plans

his

to him.

"to withdraw myself from

"I intend," said he, the

camp; but Stay

secret. inir,

my

my

in

pavilion,

the

emirs and courtiers

levee,

tell

them

am

and the following days

alone; thing,

I

fying myself as

we have

rences

to

come

the

cause

to attend

ill

and wish to be

tell

them the same

In the meantime

return.

I

till

absence a

and to-morrow morn-

when

that

my

keep

wish you to

I

of the

intend

I

strange occur-

witnessed."

In vain the

fjrand vizier

endeavoured

to divert

him the

the sultan from this design, representing to

dangers

which

to

suitable for walking,

he found that

might

he

sultan was resolved.

as

satis-

all

He

be

but

exposed,

put on a suit of clothing

took his scimitar, and as soon

was quiet

in

the

camp, went

out alone and climbed to the top of one of the

without

more on

much

difficulty.

He

found the descent

and when he came to the

easy,

until the

the

sun arose, and then,

at

plain,

hills still

walked

a considerable

distance before him, he saw a vast building.

As he drew nearer he found

it

ficent palace of black polished marble, fine steel,

the gates,

was

a

magni-

covered with

smooth as glass. He advanced towards one of which was open, yet he thought it

as

4


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

42

knock before entering.

best to

This he did,

but no one appearing, he

softly,

at

first

knocked again and

again, always louder and louder.

But

came

no one

and so he decided

if it

be inhabited,

no one

here

refreshment

be no

there

he

which followed

his

"I have nothing to fear;

have wherewith to defend

I

"Is there

who comes for The dead silence

passes bv?"

words increased

There was no one

his astonishment,

came

into a spacious

to be seen,

and he accord-

passing on his way, he

so,

one

receive a stranger,

to as

court.

summons

his

to

So entering boldly, he cried:

myself."

and

" If

to enter.

said he to himself,

in it,"

and

answer

in

imilv entered the "rand halls, which were huni: with

The alcoves and

silk tapestry.

with

stuffs

of

Mecca,

richest stuffs of India,

Next he came

and

the

each angle

at

mixed with gold and

into

of the

four

lions,

:

with

porches

superb

a

saloon,

middle of which was a fountain, with gold

were covered

sofas

water issued

and, as

it

fell,

the

silver. in

a lion of

the

massy

from the mouths

formed diamonds

and pearls.

The palace was surrounded on

three

sides

by

gardens containing the most exquisite flowers, and to

complete

number

the

beauty

of

the

place

an

infinite

of birds filled the air with their harmonious

notes.

The

sultan

walked from apartment

where he found

everything

rich

and

to

apartment, magnificent.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Suddenly he and,

tones,

these words

"O

heard

voice

a

with

listening

fortune!

who wouldst

thou

lot,

not suffer

The

is

it

sultan dycK~ncav

possible

that

I

and saluted

am

great

man

hall,

opened

it,

of a melancholy

and

saw

a

alive,

little

place

to the

after so

whence

door of a

handsome young

countenance,

seated on a throne raised a

sorrows.

liini.

still

coming

my

\V-.VX

manv torments as I have suffered?" The sultan advanced towards the the tones proceeded, and,

me

forbear to persecute me,

V,:

Alas!

distinguished

speedy death put an end to

a

lamentable

in

attention,

:

longer to enjoy a happy

and by

raised

43

richly

habited,

above the ground. 4*


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

44

The

drew near and saluted him, whereupon

sultan

young man returned the

the

ation of his head,

time he said

"My from

come

me

I

vour not

you

accept

heartily

"Being drawn

my

sad

necessity

risins:,

whatever

replied

it,"

I

Perhaps you

help.

But inform

pray you, the meaning of the lake near

why

How

castle?

this

I

will relate

Whose And

the palace, where the fish are of four colours. is

the

hither by your complaints,

the historv of vour misfortunes.

hrst,

same

"

to receive vou.

to the reason of

to offer

me

to

at the

rising,

am prevented bv

I

your apology be, sultan.

without

inclin-

:

lord,

risini?

"As

and,

bv an

salutation

came vou

to

be here?

are vou alone?"

questions the young

Instead of answering these

man began praying grief,

him

to

he said

At

showed the head to the

relate

the

upon

and

bitterly,

cause

the

sultan

excessive

of his

:

my

"Alas! grieve."

weep

to

lord,

how

these words

sultan that he girdle,

is

it

he

lifted

was

and that

possible but

a

up

his

I

should

robe and

man onlv from

the other

the

half of his

bodv was black marble. "You must know, my lord," he continued, "that my father, named Mahmoud, was king of this countrv. This is the kingdom of the Black Isles, which takes

its

name from

the

four

small neigh-

bouring mountains; for those mountains were former-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. ly

islands

the capital

:

resided, was situated

where the

45

my

king,

father,

on the spot now occupied by

the lake you have seen.

"When my

died

father

I

immediatelv afterwards married

most tenderly attached that

my

we had been married

my

wife's

conversing

ladies

me to be "One of them

believed

my

was

cousin. at

I

believed

first

But one day,

years,

five

and

her and

to

was returned.

aftection

succeeded him

I

after

overheard two of

when

together

they

asleep. said to the other:

'Is

the queen

wrong that she does not love so amiable a prince? Every night she mixes the juice of a certain herb not

with his drink, and this makes him sleep so soundly that she

black

able

is

and leave him,

to rise

who

slave

her

instructs

in

and

magic

visit

and

a

all

manner of wickedness that she will one dav no doubt use to the harm of our good lord and master.'

"You mav surprised

2:uess,

this

at

mv

lord,

conversation

awake without having heard

a

;

how much but

word.

I

I

was

feigned

That

niirht

supped with the queen, and when she presented with a cup of liquid drink,

I

went

to a

such as

I

to

was accustomed

I

me to

window which was open and threw

out the drink so quicklv that she had no knowledge of what

I

"Soon lieving

me

had done. afterwards to be

I

asleep,

lay said

down,

and

she,

loud enough for

be-

me


THE ARABIAN XIOHTS.

46 to

'Sleep

bear:

again

may

and

on,

never

voii

wake

!

"She then dressed herself and went out of the room.

I

robed myself

haste,

in

took

and followed her so quickly that

my

scimitar,

soon heard the

I

She passed through

before me.

sound of her

feet

several

which opened upon her pronouncing

gates,

some magical words, and the last she opened was Passing that of the garden, which she entered. entered little wood, where the garden she a through Listenshe was joined by an enormous black man. ing intentlv, I heard them discuss the magical means by which

my

kingdom,

be ruined and overthrown, be

made away

with.

I

I

myself was to

I

had hidden myself, and

blow with my scimispared, because she was my kins-

then struck the black a

The queen woman. I then

whilst

waited until the wicked pair

passed bv the spot where

tar.

and subjects were to

castle,

I

terrific

retired speedily without having

made

mvself known.

"The wound but by her

had given the black was mortal;

I

enchantments she preserved him

an

in

existence in which he could not be said to be either

dead or

alive.

As

well satisfied, and arose as usual,

my to

council.

me

for

when

I

I

When reason,

returned

to

my

bed

had rested some hours

dressed myself,

and

I

afterwards held

the queen next presented herself

she was clad in

of her the

me,

and

deep mourning. she

informed

I

me

enquired that

she


f^^^


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. had three

'mv

father has

her

and offered her

that

her

'I

mother,' said

and

battle,

in

had

she

black

my sympathy

this

mv

excuse for

suspected

not

slave's

me

of

misfortune,

and condolences

in

grief.

"She asked leave

to build for

herself a palace

of tears in which she could shut herself up and

had

for those she

this,

and when the building was

complete she caused the black slave there, and to

used

every

art

to

be carried

her power to restore

in

But though, by her enchantments, she

life.

succeeded

weep

lost.

"I consented to

him

have

a precipice.'

author of the

the

my

her making

concluded from

mourning

being

been killed

down

brother has fallen

"I

of affliction.

news of the death of

just received

she;

causes

distressing

47

preventing his actual death, she could

in

power of speech, neither was he able to walk or support himself. Every day the queen paid him two long visits and worked her magic arts upon him, but without avail. not restore to him the

"One day my her to the

the Palace

tears

she

wretch upon I

shed

whom

lost patience

induced

curiosity

of Tears,

and,

over the bodv

me

to follow

having witnessed of the

wicked

only just punishment had fallen,

and discovered mvself to her, telling

her that such sorrow for a base and ungrateful slave

was both dishonouring

"The queen

to her

rose up

in

and myself.

a furv

and accused

me


48

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

of being the

cause

misery which

of the

had over-

taken the black magician. "'Yes,'

him, for

I

I

replied,

indeed

I

ought to have

I

who

treated

you

manner, but spared you because vou were

woman. and

However,

will

I

have staved

I

now make

"I raised

my

she cried jeeringlv:

see

:

thee

a

among of the

become

to

my

After

me

into this

she destroved

mv

my

and half

became what vou

I

living,

had

capital,

and

enchantments

half marble

lord,

hall,

and populous, changing

understand,

and

a living

this cruel sorceress,

name of queen,

brought

hand too long,

then, raising her voice,

dead man among the the dead.

not

did

I

'By virtue of

Immediatelv,

man.'

kins-

scimitar to strike, but she quicklv

my arm became immovable; command

my

like

in

my

an end of you both.'

pronounced some words

I

chastised

him plotting the downfall of

overheard

my kingdom.

was

'it

man

im worth

changed me thus and

by another enchantment

which was verv flourishing

it

into the

lonelv lake which you have seen.

desert plain and

The

fishes in

the

lake, of four different colours, are the four kinds of

inhabitants, of different religions,

which the

The white are Persians, who worship

blue the Christians,

tained.

and the vellow the told

But

my

me

all

this

is

not

all

:

fire,

Jews.

the

The enchantress

she might add to

this that

citv con-

the Mussulmen, the red the

mv

herself

affliction.

every day, taking advantage of

helpless state, she

comes and gives me, upon my


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. naked

shoulders,

hundred

a

lashes

49

with

a

whip.

me

a

coarse

When

she has finished she throws over

gown

of

goat's

hair,

this

robe

of

mock me." moved bv the

recital

of

over

and

that

brocade, not to honour, but to

The

was greatly

sultan

this affecting story,

and,

anxious to avenge the suf-

ferings of the unfortunate prince, questioned to

where he might

find

him

as

wounded magician and

the

the wicked queen.

The

prince having informed him of the place in

which the Palace of Tears was everv day

sunrise

at

situated,

added that

visited

her fellow

queen

the

conspirator and carried to him the potion which had hitherto prevented his dying, although he had never

power

yet been able to regain the

of speech so that

he might thank her for her attention to him.

Bv

time, the night being far advanced, the

this

He

sultan retired to rest.

proceeded

the

to

perceived

soon

magician

lav,

Palace

the

arose with the of

upon

bed

dawn and he

Entering,

Tears.

which

and with one stroke from

black

the

his scimitar

deprived him of his wretched existence, dragged his

body

into the court of the castle, and threw

it

into

a well.

After

this

he went

covering his face

in

and lay down

such

a

manner

that

in the

bed,

the queen

could not detect the deception about to be practised

upon

her.

Before long she entered the apartment, and

at


THE ARABIAN XIGHTS.

50

the sight of the prostrate figure she began to

"Alas!" said

she,

"will

you be always

me at least, I conjure "Unhappy woman," replied the

one word to

tones,

blacks,

The

and groans

cries

you." sultan in

hoHow

should answer thee?

I

whom

husband,

of thy

thou

my

day with such barbarity, prevent

treatest every

Had you

sleeping night or day. I

Speak

silent?

pronunciation of the

and counterfeiting the "art thou worthy that

weep

disenchanted him,

and have

should long since have been cured,

mv

covered the use of

re-

speech,"

"Well," said the enchantress, "what would you have

me do?" "Make haste and

set

him

be no longer disturbed by

that

at liberty,

I

may

lamentations," replied

his

the sultan.

The enchantress immediately Tears,

had been

set

young

it

over

which caused

a fire.

She

the Palace of

pronounced

she

and, taking a cup of water,

some words over to the

left

it

to

boil as

after^vards

if

it

proceeded

king, her husband, and threw the water

upon him, saving: "Resume your natural form." Scarcely had she spoken the words than the king found himself restored to his former condition.

The enchantress then returned Tears and,

supposing

she

still

to the Palace of

spoke

to

the black,

informed the sultan of what she had done.

"What vou cient,"

replied

have done

the

sultan.

is

by no means

"The town and

suffiits

in-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. habitants

still

midnight, the

51

remain enchanted, and every night, their heads

raise

fish

ont of the lake

and cry for vengeance against you and me. the true cause of the delav of

my

and restore

things

former

your return

I

help

me

to

their

will give

you

mv

at

Go

cure.

This

is

speedilv

state,

and

hand and vou

at

shall

to arise."

I he qiiccii

sprinkled the waters of the lake.

The queen went awav at once, and when she came to the brink of the lake she took a little water in

her hand

and sprinkled the waters of the

Immediately the whole magnificence, and

city

was restored

Mohammedans,

to its

lake.

former

Christians, Persians,

and Jews, freemen or slaves, were

as

they were be-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

52

having

everyone

fore,

recovered

The sultan's numerous camped in the middle peopled

natural

his

form.

retinue found themselves en-

handsome,

of a large,

well-

city.

As soon wonderful

as

enchantress

the

change,

Palace of Tears.

hastened

she

"I have done

had

effected

return

to

the

to

von required

all that

me your

"I pray vou then give

of me," she cried,

this

'

hand and

rise.

"Come

near," said the sultan,

the pronunciation

of the blacks,

he suddenlv rose,

seized her

one blow of

his scimitar

done he

This

and

she did so

as

and with

bv the arm,

ended her wicked

her Iving

left

counterfeiting

still

Palace

the

in

life.

of

Tears, and went to seek for the young King of the

Black

When

Isles.

him

found

he

prince

the

at

once embraced him with great affection and thanked

him with the

8:reatest

sinceritv for

he had

that

all

done for him.

The to

him "

your

sultan

returned

his

embraces

and

said

:

You

mav henceforward

capital,

unless you will

peaceablv

dwell

accompanv me

in

to mine, "

which

is

but a few hours' journey distant.

"Potent monarch, replied the

young

king,

to

whom

"it

will

year to return to your capital.

I

I

take

so much,

vou

a

"

whole

do indeed believe

came hither in the time because mv kingdom was enchanted that

owe

vou

vou ;

mention,

but since the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. enchantment

taken

is

off,

things are changed

ever, this shall not prevent

my

and that

deliverer,

acknowledging willing to

may

I

You

my whole

accompany vou, and

are

you proofs of

give

during

this

how-

:

following vou, were

utmost corners of the earth.

to the

it

5s

to leave

I

life,

my my am

my kingdom

without regret."

The was so

far

from

young king

the

"The is

was very much surprised

sultan

to find he

own dominions, but answered

his

in the following

words

trouble of returning to

my own

country

recompensed by acquiring you since you will do me the honour

sufficiently

son; for

company me, as such,

as

have no child,

I

and from

this

moment

I

for

a

to ac-

look upon vou

appoint you

my

heir

and successor." Preparations were

at

once begun for the depar-

voung king appointing one of his nearest of reign as monarch in his stead, and, after taking

ture, the

kin to

affectionate leave

of his subjects, he

began their journey.

and the sultan

Thev took with them

a

hundred

camels laden with inestimable riches from the king's

handsome gentlemen on horseback, perfectly well mounted and dressed. They had a pleasant journev, and when

treasury,

and

were

they

approached

came

to

his

receive

the

the

by

followed

capital

sultan

the

fifty

principal

officers

and to assure him that

long absence had occasioned no alteration

empire.

The

inhabitants

also

came out

in

in

his

great


ARABIAN NI(}HTS.

Till-:

54

him with acclamations, and made

crowds, received

public rejoicings for several days.

The

sultan then acquainted his subjects with the

news of

his

Isles as

his son,

having adopted

King of the Black

them how he had been great kingdom to accompanv and

and

willing to leave a live

the

told

with him.

As of the

for the fisherman,

deliverance

as

he was the

of the voung prince,

first

the

cause sultan

gave him a plentiful fortune, which made him and his family

happy

for the rest of their days.


THE ENCHANTED HORSE. 'T^HE

day of the year

first

is

observed throughout Persia as a

solemn

rejoicings

Upon

festival.

are

that

come from

the

neighbouring states and most

re-

are encouraged to

mote

and are

parts of the world,

allowed to compete for large

llic

Hindoo.

dav

held and strangers

wards,

being

to the

sovereign

ventions

invited

and

to

display

various

the

re-

in-

contrivances

thev

the

most

have brought with them.

Upon one

of these

festivals,

after

ingenious artists of the country had repaired to the

Court king,

at

Sheeraz, had been entertained there bv the

and had been bountifully

rewarded

for

their

various productions, just as the assemblv was about

Hindoo appeared at the foot He had with him an artificial horse,

to break up, a

throne.

caparisoned, and so sight he

The

was taken

Hindoo

naturally

imitated

that

of the richly at

first

before

the

for a living animal.

prostrated

himself


ARABIAN NIGHTS.

THi:

56

and,

throne,

poinlini;

emperor, "Though

your

fore

Majesty,

I

horse,

present

I

yet

nothing shown to-day

on which

the

to

nivself

can

I

the

emperor, "than

the

replied

"Sir,"

that

so wonderful as this horse,

is

the horse," replied

in

the

horse

Hindoo,

but the use to which

when

well or better."

"it I

is

not

him, be

may make

where

it

through the

world,

I

it

if

his

recommend mv as

wonderful,

in

a

Majesty

if

Whenever

mount

This,

sir,

wonder which nobody and \\hich I ofTer to show vour :

a

you command me.'

Notwithstanding the manv prodigies

emperor had seen, he had never before

Hindoo

that

beheld

or

that

had promised he could not bring himself the truth of

of art the

came up to this. He told unless he saw him perform what he

of anything

The

I

wish to transport my-

very short time.

wonder of mv horse of,

I

most distant part of the

to the

air

can do

of him.

mav,

it

ever heard speak

heard

for

have communicated the secret to them, any

I

other persons

the

another

applv him, and which,

can

I

of

skill

your Majesty's examination

to

the

resemblance the work-

natural

outward form and appearance that

in

be-

vou

assure

man has given him, which the workman may possiblv execute as

the

last

beg vour Majesty would be pleased to

"T see nothing more

is

the

your eyes."

cast

self

to

said

to believe

it.

Hindoo

instantly

put

his

foot

into

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

57

mounted the horse with admirable

Stirrup,

and when he was seated

emperor whither he would be pleased him to proceed.

About

to

three leagues from Sheeraz

mountain,

lofty

from

discernible

the

agility,

asked

saddle

the

in

the

command

there

was

large

square

a

before the palace, where the emperor, his court, and

concourse of people then were.

a great

"Do pointing

vou see that mountain?" to

but

hence,

"it

it,

it

you can make

in

the eye cannot

a

a

great

distance

from

going and returning.

But because

to

vou so

follow

branch of

a

of the speed

you have been there,

me

not

is

enough

judge

far

is

said the emperor,

as

far,

proof that

a

expect that vou will bring

I

palm-tree that grows

at the

bottom

of the hill."

No

sooner had

Hindoo turned

a

the

emperor spoken than the

peg which was

the horse's neck, just by the

and

in

carried

the

in

pommel

his

rider

the

into

air

the rapidity of

with those

that

strongest sight could not discern

the

palm

descended, he

and then

branch

in

his

who had

the

Within

less

him.

than a quarter of an hour they saw

off,

of the saddle,

an instant the horse rose off the ground and

lightning, to such a height

with

hollow of

hand

him returning ;

but before he

took two or three turns

alighted

in

the

air

on the spot whence he

had

set

without receiving the least shock from the horse

to disorder him.

He

dismounted, and, going up to


THE ARABIAN

58

NK'.HTS.

the throne, piostrated himself, and laid the branch of the palm-tree at the feet of the emperor.

The emperor, who had viewed sight with admiration

as well

this extraordinary

astonishment, con-

as

ceived a great desire to have the horse, and thought

would have

that he

difficulty

little

treating with

in

Hindoo.

the

"Judging of the horse by he

said

Hindoo,

the

to

his

"I

outward appearance,"

did

not

think him so

much worth my consideration. As you have shown me his merits, I am obliged to you for undeceiving me and to prove to you how much I esteem it, I ;

purchase him of you,

will

"Sir," that

replied

if

he

is

to be sold."

Hindoo, "I

the

doubted

never

your Majesty, who has the character of the most

on earth, would

liberal prince

work

as

soon as

I

foresaw that

also

you would not only admire and commend would desire to have it. Though I know his render

my

my name

I

;

immortal

however,

I

approve of

with him,

it.

I

in

the world,

in

did

making

and

not

yet

in

marriage,

and

I

am

declaration,

this I

cannot re-

perhaps you

buv

this

horse,

tained him from the inventor by giving him

daughter

intrinsic

can resign him to gratify

have another to add, without which

solve to part

but

it,

continuing master of him would

not so fond of fame but

your Majesty

mv

had shown you on what account

I

he was w^orthy your attention,

value, and that

on

set a just value

promising

at

may

not

but

ob-

my

only

the

same


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. time never to

sell

him

exchange

for

him, but

if

parted with him to

I

something

that

should

I

beyond

all

else."

"I

am

willing,' said the emperor,

whatever you may is

ask

large and contains

in

59

exchange.

great riches

;

"to give you "Sly

kingdom you

give

will

I

value

the choice of what you like best."

This offer seemed roval and noble to the whole Court, but was in

much below what

am

"I

infinitely

"and cannot

generositv;

pleased

if

not resign

yet

I

obliged

The this

sufficientlv

my

he

your

for

must beg of vou not to be

horse

unless

I

tell

you

mv

I

dis-

can-

hand

receive the

of

wife."

courtiers could not forbear laughing aloud

demand

of the

Prince Firoze Shah, the eldest to the

Hindoo; but the

son of the emperor

crown, was most indignant.

The emperor, however, was might

vou

thank

have the presumption to

I

extravagant

and heir

your Majesty,"

to

the princess, your daughter, as

at

Hindoo had

mind.

his

said,

the

inclined to think he

sacrifice the Princess of Persia, so anxious

was

he to possess the horse.

Prince Firoze vShah,

what answer comply with

to

anticipate him,

who saw

his father hesitating

make, began to fear

the

Hindoo's

demand

lest ;

is

to

he said

"I hope your Majesty will forgive if it

he should

therefore,

me

for asking

possible your Majestv should hesitate about a


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

6o

demand from such an

denial to so insolent a nificant fellow?

beg you

I

to consider

insiir-

what von owe

your own blood, and the high rank

to yourself, to

of your ancestors." ''Son,''

emperor,

replied the

of your remonstrance, and for

preserving

the

do not consider horse

;

am of

lustre

sufficientlv

nor that the Hindoo,

mav make

the offer

despair

if

your birth

me

having exceeded

in

not say

excellence

should refuse him,

I

else,

prince

I

should

will

generositv, and deprived

me

esteem

I

thing in

the

vou would

self,

and give

purpose

his

me your

his

exorbitant

I

was

should be glad try

him vour-

opinion.'

fancied,

emperor

before

the

;

from what he had heard,

not

entirely

averse

therefore, he expressed

prince to

showed him how

with

But before

as well.

to guide

help

him

to

his

to

and that the prince might become

favourable to him ran

will

I

daughter, the princess, out

examine the horse,

The Hindoo the

most

as the

world.

mav make another agreement

I

answer

that

alliance,

the

in

of

conclude the bargain with him,

that

be

boast

mv

and, putting

of the question,

him that

this nice

cannot consent to grant him what he asked.

I

:

of this

where shall

I

Perhaps he has not well considered

demand

you

but

;

if

of the glorv of possessing what

singular and wonderful

zeal

the

somewhere

another

much approve

sensible of vour

may be waived.

point of honour

utmost

"I

much

more joy,

mount, and

and manage the horse.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. The feet

both

owner's use,

air,

quick

as

emperor,

peg

the

the

for

had seen

he

bow by

the

few

moments

the

and the numerous assembly

lost

and

Neither

a

in

nor

horse

prince

were

must have remarked the

was so hastv that he would not

him the necessary instructions Therefore the favour

I

make me accountable

permit

govern

to

:

prince

me to give my horse.

ask of your Majesty for

to

what had happened,

at

prostrated himself before the throne and said Majestv^

his

the

a

The Hindoo, alarmed

"Your

the

horse darted into the

arrow shot from

his father,

of him.

be seen.

but,

instantly

an

without staying

turned

archer,

adroit

sight

he

when

him most

stirrups

advice,

without

no sooner had he put

and

Hindoo's assistance, in

however,

mounted,

prince

6i

is

not to

what accidents may

befall

him."

The emperor was much surprised and and asked the Hindoo if there were no bring him back, other than

that

by which

afflicted,

secret to

he

had

been carried away. "Sir," replied

the

Hindoo, "there

hope that the prince, when he will that,

perceive another

peg,

is

room

to

finds himself at a loss,

and

as

soon as he turns

the horse will cease to rise, and descend to the

ground,

when he may

turn him

to

what place

he

pleases by guiding him with the bridle."

Notwithstanding all these arguments of the Hindoo, which carried great appearance of probabi-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

62

litv,

of Persia was nuich alarmed at the

Emperor

the

evident danger of his son. "

suppose," replied he,

I

my

whether

make

may

son

use of

a right

perceive

it

may

;

the ground,

of alighting on

"it

uncertain

and

other peg,

the

the horse, instead

not

fall

very

is

upon some rock,

or

tumble into the sea with him?" "Sir," answered the Hindoo, "I can deliver your

Majesty from

apprehension, by assuring you that

this

the horse crosses seas without ever falling into them,

and alwavs carries

And vour

to go. if

mentioned,

the

pleases.

is

It

anywhere

hnd out the other peg I where he carry him will

but

horse

not to be supposed that he will stop

where

but

he

make himself known." "Be it as it may," "as

Persia,

if

he

He

upon

ordered

officers

his

close

he retired to his palace of the

New

in

to

prisoner,

of

assurance

the

answer for

shall

safely."

then

Emperor

the

replied

and

assistance

find

does not return

Hindoo, and keep him

festival

can

depend

cannot

I

you give me, vour head life

wherever he may wish

Majesty may assure yourself that

does

piince

the

his rider

my

son's

secure after

the

which

great affliction that the

have proved so

Year should

inauspicious.

In the meantime the prince was carried through

with

the

air

an

hour's

prodigious

time

had

velocity;

ascended

and so

in

high

less

that

than

he


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. not

could

anything

distinguish

63

on the

but

earth,

mountains and plains seemed confounded together. think of returning, and It was then he began to conceived he might do

and

peg the contrary way,

by turning the pulling

But when he found

the same time.

the

same

bridle

at

that the horse

rose with the same swift-

still

his

alarm

turned

the

ness,

He

but

other,

was

fault

the

learnt

cautions

to

he

before ever, he

peg

great.

several

and

the

vain.

in

all

'

It

grew sensible

he

then his

was

way

one

times,

of

this

having

not

in

necessary

pre-

the horse

guide

How-

mounted.

examined

the horse's

head and neck with attention, and

perceived

behind

right ear another

than the other. that

peg smaller

He

turned

peg and presently per-

ceived that he descended the same quite

the

manner

as

Tlie prince descended in the

same manner. in

he had mounted,

although not

so swiftly.

Night had fallen over that part of the country

which the prince found himself when

at

in

length the

horse stopped upon solid earth.

He

was verv

faint

from hunger,

having eaten


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

64

nothing since

morning, when

the

the palace with his father to

He

found

a

the

of a mag-

terrace

about

which

staircase

the festival.

assist at

groping

and,

palace,

nificent ness,

himself upon

found

came out of

he

the

in

down

led

dark-

into

an

apartment, the door of which was half open.

Few

Firoze Shah would

but Prince

descend

tured to

those

dark

stairs,

as

have venwas, and

it

expose himself to dangers from unknown

was quite unarmed,

being of

but,

any noise, went softly down the not awaken anybody,

on

the

He

found the

staircase,

stopped

no other noise than

were

w^ho

fast

snoring

He

asleep.

that he might to a landing

door of

a great

of

advanced of

light

a

heard

listening,

some people a

little

into

saw

that

lamp

persons were black chamberlains, with

sabres

him

door and,

the

and bv the

the room,

those

by them,

laid

that

sultan

In

dis-

open.

it,

the

at

stairs,

when he came

and,

that had a light in

hall,

courageous

he opened the door wider, without making

position,

place

a

He

foes.

or

this

was

princess,

the

next

wdiich the

which

room

to

was enough

guard-chamber latter this

it

naked

to inform

some

of

proved

to

be.

the princess lay, as

appeared by the light streaming through a draped

doorway.

Prince Firoze Shah

without waking the curtain, went the

the in,

advanced on

chamberlains.

tip-toe,

He drew

aside

and, without staving to observe

magnificence of the chamber, gave

his

attention


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. to

He

something of greater importance.

beds arranged upon the

women

floor,

and

65

saw many

in these slept the

attendants of the princess, whilst the princess

herself reposed upon a raised couch.

He

crept softly towards the bed, without waking

women,

either the princess or her

and

beheld a beauty so extra-

ordinary that he straightway in

fell

love with her.

But having penetrated thus far,

that

the prince

soon

as

knew very

well

was

dis-

he

as

covered he would be most certainly

killed

bv

So he resolved sympathy of the fell

on

his

the to

guards.

enlist

the

He

princess.

knees beside her and

She opened her eves and, seeing a gently twitched her sleeve.

handsome man

on

TJic pyince opened the door

knees,

his

was greatly surprised, yet seemed

show no

to

sign

of fear.

The rising,

prince

said

bowed

his

"Beautiful Princess,

and

wonderful

bv the most extraordinary

adventure,

suppliant prince, son of the

was yesterdav solemn

head to the ground and,

:

in his Court,

festival,

but

is

now

you see

Emperor

vour feet

of Persia,

a

who

the celebration of a

at in

at

a

strange

countrv,

in


THE ARABIAN

66

danger of

his

life,

if

NICIITS.

vou have not the "goodness and

generosity to afford him voiir assistance and protec-

These

tion.

implore with the confidence that vou

I

will not refuse

me, as one possessing so

much beautv

and majesty must be incapable of entertaining any but the most

"

humane thoughts.

"Prince,"

she

replied

"vou have

courteouslv,

chanced upon no barbarous countrv. Vou are in the kingdom of Bengal, and mv father, who is the rajah, will no doubt extend to you the protection you have But I would have you tell me," she asked of me. " bv what miracle vou have come hither from added, the capital of Persia in so short a time, and bv what

enchantment you have been able as to

come

vifjilance of in

mv

to

mv

o;uards

need of food and

and

orders

give

to

;

rest

my

vour

fati2:ue

must

vet as vou I

will set aside

my women

show you an apartment, after

to penetrate so far

apartment, and to have evaded the

that

be sorelv

mv

curiositv,

regale you and

to

you may

and be the better

rest

yourself

able to satisfv

curiosity."

The

princess's

women, who awoke

words which the prince addressed

were

in

the

utmost

surprise

the

to

the

first

princess,

man at the conceive how he had

to

princess's feet, as they could not

at

come thither without waking them They no sooner comprehended the

see

a

or the chamberlains. princess's intentions

than they were readv to obey her commands.

They

each took a wax candle, of which there were great


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. numbers lighted up

in

67

the room, and after the prince

and con-

had respectfully taken leave, went before ducted him into

a

handsome chamber, where, while

some were preparing the bed, others went kitchen

;

into the

and, notwithstanding the unreasonable hour,

thev soon brought him a choice collation, and

he had eaten

as

much

The prince

the

trays

and

left

as

fell on

him

he

chose,

when

removed

thev

his knees beside Iter.

to

taste

sweets

the

of

repose.

In the meantime the Princess of Bengal was so struck

good

with

the

qualities

and other

charms, wit, politeness,

which she had discovered

in

her short

interview with the prince, that she could not sleep: but

when her women came

into

her

room

a^ain


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

68

questioned them as to the hospitality thev had shown him, and then proceeded to ask them more particu-

what they thought

larly

Thev handsome

to

him.

in

Bengal to be compared

would be happv indeed

marrv

him

thought

thev

that

as

he appeared amiable, that there was no

as

other prince that she

ot

her

assured

her

one

to

and

her father were

if

suited

so

to him,

her .in every

to

way.

The next day dressino^

done

ever

herself at the

tirins:

and

before,

women beyond

her to

and

trv

on

also

possessed, being dissatisfied

she

At length she

the richest stuffs of the for

kings,

Indies,

and

princes,

various grarments

with

was habited

of

anxious was she

so

the

off a2:ain

in

patience

the

tried

pains

than she had

ijlass

endurance,

and take

more

princess took

the

all

which

of them.

garment

a

in

is

onlv

She

princesses.

of

made

adorned

her head, arms, and waist with the finest and largest

diamonds she possessed,

and

she

after

had

and again consulted her glass she asked her one after another,

if

was wantinir

anvthing:

again

women, in

her

attire.

Being than ever,

assured

that

she sent to

was awake, and dressed,

and,

she

she

know

hearing

looked if

that

more

lovelv

the Prince of Persia

he

went immediatelv

was alreadv up to

pav

him

a

visit.

"I would have received you

in

my own

apart-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. "but

ment," she informed him,

guards has leave to come so

my

without rupted

my

gratify

came vou J

ing

New

various

came

said

be

manner

the

the

in

inter-

which

court.

Then

enchanted

horse,

to

recital

of

his

the

of

which

the

to

You mav

Princess,

father,

who

well

minutely,

it

think,

my

what

he

rare

and

not

cares

that

purchase such

a curiosity.-

Hindoo his that he would the

the princess,

emperor,

price,

sister,

saw

proposal,

whom

of courtiers

father,

I

The

Priticcss

and he replied

so

onlv in exchange for

he wished to marrv.

who

laughed

vagance of the demand indignant as

to

asked

the horse

give

my

mv

He

/

of Bengal.

"The crowd

horse.

is

would be very desirous

curious,

the

charm-

that the emperor,

gives for anvthing

to

and beg you to

:

"

ing

might

mention-

Year,

having described

and,

we

inventions

had been brought he

though no further

you,

began

description

a

of the

the

Shah

Firoze

with

festival

to

to

as

my

hither."

Prince story

came

curiosity

chief of

the

as

far,

feared

I

therefore

I

;

leave,

69

my

;

as for

stood about

loudlv

me,

I

at

the

the

extra-

was the more

father was inclined to consent

anxious was he

to

possess the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

70

"The

despicable Hindoo, thinking no doubt that

me over

he would bring

to

make

nie to

"

and

on

To

make

my

please

a peg,

as

as

father,

his back,

the horse

mount

into the

The

peg, the horse ascended

and

I

was presentlv

motion

the

I

jrrew

sensible

of

it

still

a greater distance

"xAt last

and then

I

I

an

From

I

I

the

un-

was exposed

endeavoured

to

;

turn

and carried me

from the earth.

perceived another peg, which

grew sensible

that

At length

guide the machine.

alighted and, examining

my

upon the terrace of

the steps and, seeing in

the

presently

surrounded with darkness that

through the room

arrow,

some time

for

the horse rose,

towards the earth, and

self

as

way

But the experiment did

the peg the contrarv wav.

not answer, for

to

touched

I

anv object.

was

I

apprehensive of the danger to which

when

before,

such a distance from the earth

at

could not distinguish

swiftness of

mv hand

as to the

instant swift

as

horse,

and did not wait

air,

from the owner

the

I

I

invited

the

put

Hindoo do

had seen the

I

should guide the animal.

that

once

if

horse,

mounted

I

was upon

I

to receive instructions I

of his

a trial of him.

soon

as

opinion

his

understood the singular worth

I

turned,

horse descended

found

myself so

was impossible

to

the horse stopped.

I

it

whereabouts, found my-

this

palace.

I

descended

door open, entered,

passed

which the guards were

asleep,

a

and entered vour chamber.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. "With what passed next you

And now,

feel

I

law of nations

make you an

my

I

are not unacquainted.

According

generosity.

am

mv

person; there onlv remains

heart: but alas! Princess, that

own, your charms have forced it

it

but yield

again,

princess blushed

she had been very

that

in

of

recital

declaring

she

shall

I

and

to you,

mistress

of both

heart and inclination."

The the

up

it

mv

no longer

is

from me, and

only beg for leave to declare you

my

the

to

already your slave, and cannot

offer of

never ask for

thank you for

obliged in duty to

and

your goodness

71

could

prettily

pleasurably

forbear

not

and replied by

entertained

wonderful

prince's

the

she

very

a

adventures,

shudder when

thought of the tremendous height he had been the

air,

descended of in

and

avowing her

delight

upon the terrace of her

some other

spot,

as

might

that

palace

had

he

instead

have

very easily

happened.

"As

to

should think lieved

so.

your

being

my

myself offended

slave," if

you

said

seriously

Assure yourself you are here

"I

she,

as

be-

much

at liberty as in the midst of the Court of Persia."

At this moment one of the princess's women announced that a meal had been served, and the princess led him into a magnificent hall where a cloth was laid, the table being covered with a great variety of dainty and choice dishes. fasted,

Having break-

they rose, and the princess again conducted


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

72

the prince

into

where they gardens

balconv overlooking the

a

in

Here they conversed very

of the palace.

pleasantly

and

down

sat

and magnificent apartment,

large

a

the prince

together,

describing his

home

draw verv Hattering

and managing to

country,

comparisons between the princess's beautiful palace

and

those in his

The

own

country.

no complaints to make her,

assured

father,

the

assuring him that she had

whilst

princess,

him

of

one

the

that

was

rajah,

palace

the

inhabited

bv

to

her

She begged him,

hner.

far

allotted

since chance had brought him so near to her father's capital,

pay him

to

might receive the

there, in order that he

visit

a

honours

due

to

prince of his

a

rank and merit.

The Prince

hoped

princess of Persia

Bengal, and to

a

visit

bv

that,

curiosity

to

exciting

see

the

in

capital

of

her father, the king, seeing him

handsome, wise, and accomplished

so

the

a prince,

might

perhaps resolve to propose an alliance with him, by offering her to

him

no wise averse

to the

this

course

prince,

as

a

did

And her

pleased

was

as she

handsome voung man

would have

however,

wife.

in

herself,

The

vastlv.

not return her an answer

ac-

cording to her expectations. "Princess," he

replied,

preference

"the

vou give the Rajah of Bengal's palace

enough

is it

:

and

to

induce

as to the

me

to believe

proposal of

mv

it

to

which

vour own

much exceeds

going

and paying


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. my

respeds

myself

do

only judge,

father,

an

but

pleasure,

should not

I

But

honour.

would you advise me to great a monarch like an

yourself,

myself before

so

and

without attendants

adventurer,

my

your

king,

a

Princess,

present

to

the

to

73

a train suitable

rank?"

"Prince," give you

any

replied

pain

want no money to

you please here of

make choice

of as

you

not

that

go,

you

shall

and attendants

train ;

"let

but

will

have what

nations in

all

princess,

you

if

;

will furnish

I

:

the

and we have traders and you may

great numbers,

many

as

you please

form your

to

household."

would most willingly accept

"I offer,"

replied

the

prince,

cannot sufficiently show

prevented father

by

must

the feel

my

thought

on

obliging

this

"for which, moreover, gratitude,

of

account

I

were not

uneasiness

the

of

if

my

I

absence.

mv I

should be unworthy of the tenderness he has always

had for

me

calm

his

to

permit me,

if

I

did not return

fears.

as

soon as

Afterwards, Princess,

and think

me worthy

to

if

possible

you

aspire

to

happiness of becoming vour husband,

I

my

stranger,

as

father's leave to return, a prince, to contract an

not

as

a

will

will

the

obtain

but

alliance with your father

by our marriage."

The

Princess of Bengal was too reasonable, after

what the Prince of Persia had longer in persuading him to pay

said,

to persist

a visit to the

any

Rajah


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

74

him contrary

of Bengal, or to ask anvtbing of

But she begged him,

and honour.

diitv

remain a few days longer him,

did she entertain

least,

days had extended

the

months before the prince could manage

into

to

her palace, and so well

in

that

at

to his

to tear

himself away.

But

at

length,

declaring seriously

in

that

he

could stay no longer, he entreated her to accompany

him

to his father's Court.

As

the prince

observed

not averse to this suggestion,

"As

it.

for

my

he continued

pleasure; and

to urge

father's consent, Princess," he

"I venture to assure you he will as for the

was

princess

the

that

said,

you with

receive

Rajah of Bengal,

after all

the love and tender regard he has expressed for vou

he must be the reverse of what Jvou have described

him

if

he should not receive

the embassy which his

my

a

in

father will

manner him for

friendly

send

to

approbation of our marriage."

The address, sufficient

princess

returned

him

answer

to

this

and eyes cast down, were

but her silence, to inform

no

that she

had no reluctance

accompany him into Persia. Her one objection was the fear that the prince might not be able to manage the enchanted horse but on the

to

;

prince's

well

as

declaration the

Hindoo

that

he

himself,

company him. The next morning,

a

could she

little

guide

consented

before

it

to

as

ac-

daybreak.


The

horse iiioniifcd into the air.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. when

went

and princess

The

palace.

turned

prince

his

waist

the

peg,

her

for

when

making

of the

horse

with

prince of

the

towards could

princess

her

arms

about

he

turned

than

mounted

haste,

two

in

the

security,

horse

usual

his

prince,

better

the

terrace

which she had no sooner

:

and was well settled

done,

the

where the

up behind him

easily get

the

asleep,

upon

out

and placed him

Persia,

and,

were

attendants

the

all

77

under

the

time

they

hours'

the

into

air

guidance

reached

the capital of Persia.

He would whence

not alight

had

he

at

nor

out,

set

the great square from in

the

directed his course towards a pleasure-house a

He

led

handsome apartment, where

he

distance from the capital. a

to

do her

and return servants

out for

loud

with

and tears

provide

then

the

his

of love and

eagerly quiries

questioned

were

horse

a

made

Hindoo's horse.

to

of

father,

as

to

to

his

the

be

He

joy

her,

he

arrival,

ordered she

by

saddled,

was

the re-

and

received

the

embraced

people,

him with

his eves.

He

was

adventures,

and

en-

tenderness in as

their

whatever

palace.

father's

his

of

to

that,

leave.

acclamations

emperor,

her

told

He

with

her

ordered

his

father

little

the princess into

was due

that

his

immediately.

her

and took

He set

inform

to

to

quired,

honour

the

all

would go and

but

palace,

whereabouts of the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

7^

He

was only too

had befallen him, kindness

the

and

each

other,

relate

to

particular

had received

he

that

upon

hands of the

the

at

all

stress

dwelt upon the love they bore

Princess of Bengal, to

anxious laid

and

confessed

finally

he

that

upon her to accompany him to riding with him upon the enchanted horse. prevailed

"Sir,"

Persia,

the

said

had

prince,

you

"I

feel

not

refuse

your consent to

our union,

and the princess

assured

will

awaits your decision as anxiously as at

the

I

She

do.

palace

Majesty often

is

where

now your

goes for your

pleasure."

"Son," replied the emperor, once

more embracing

him, "I not onlv consent to

your marriage with the PrinTlie prince set out for fatlier's

will

bring

liis

palace.

her

to

cess

of

Bengal,

but

1

will

go and meet her mvself, and

mv

palace

and

celebrate

your

nuptials this day."

The emperor than gave orders for his Court to make preparations for the princess's entry; the reannounced by the royal band of military music, and the Hindoo was to be taken

joicings

from

were

to be

his prison

and brought before him.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. When

had been done the emperor said

this

"I secured vour person

answer ever,

and

have

never

found

me

let

again

mv

of

out

returned of the â&#x20AC;˘and

with

had

informed her,

left

;

and

to

soon as

as

bethought him-

he

revenged upon the emperor and the

Without

prince.

was

also

palace

his

emperor's presence

of being

self

and

princess,

Shah

Firoze

emperor was making preparations

the

the

left

horse,

who brought

those

Prince

that

go and bring her to he

your

take

where he had alighted and

place

that

a

might

life

your face more."

see

prison

:

whom, how-

son,

go,

:

The Hindoo had heard from him

your

that

that of the prince,

for

I

79

losing anv time,

he went directly

to the palace, and, addressing himself to the keeper,

told

him he came Princess

the

through

of Bengal,

behind

seated

her,

from the

the

air

he

that

Court and

The

and that the

emperor

the

more

to

that

he

had

him

to

the

that

he

came

do

as

she

been

for

conduct

to

what he

princess,

at

said,

liberty.

him,

gave

because he saw

He

who no sooner

from the

in

Hindoo,

the

imprisoned

had

waited

the whole

sight.

knew

who

set

who

to gratify

wonderful

the

palace-keeper,

credit

was

emperor,

the

to

with

citv

of Persia

him upon the enchanted horse,

great square of his palace,

the

to

Prince

presented

understood

prince than she consented

believed the prince

The Hindoo, overioved

at

his

desired

her.

success and the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

So

ease

which he had accomplished

witli

mounted the turned the into

the

same

the

to the

advance receive

and instantly the

peg,

prepare

threats,

beyond

emperor

with

their

his

re-

prize.

had

saw what

happened,

him with reproaches

courtiers assailed

but

an

this

he had received,*

for the ill-treatment

the

all his

thinking

in

to

them both, and

brave

appeared above their heads

his

little

princess

the

The Hindoo,

opportunity to

When

on

and the prince rode a

father.

venge himself

and

liim,

mounted

horse

emperor was

the

might

he

that

excellent

time

palace,

his

he and

behind

princess

the

air.

At

way

took

horse,

his villainv,

more they could not do; he was and

power,

returned

they

the

to

overwhelmed with rage and vexation. But what was Prince Firoze Shah's grief at beholding the Hindoo hurrying away the princess,

palace

whom

he loved so passionatelv?

at first

how he should

act,

way

wicked

Hindoo.

the

pleasure

to

He

did not

know

but decided to at least

tempt to recover the princess the

He

from the power of continued

therefore

palace,

at-

where he had

his

the

leit

princess.

The that he

the life.

the

knew by

this

time

had been too credulous, threw himself

prince's

and

feet

"Rise," said loss

who

palace-keeper,

of

my

the

him

entreated prince,

princess

to

"I

you,

to

do not but

to

take

at

his

impute,

mv own


^


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Rut

want of precaution. a

dervish's

the

Not

far

a

that

it

for

is

him he readily obtained

and from

friend,

and, being

the

and

to

return

took a

in

a

it,

box

present for

travels,

deter-

attempt. to

the

Hindoo.

He managed

enchanted horse so well, that he arrived earlv

next morning

in

a

wood near

kingdom of Cashmeer.

the

capital

of the

Being hungry, and concluding

the princess was also, he alighted left

Prince

himself

as

his

to

he had found his princess,

until

the

in

it

disguised,

upon

out

set

to return

perish

But his

dressed

completely

thus

princess,

to

prince

which he had brought

mined not or

The

Shah.

of jewels

convent

a

the superior of which was the palace-

complete dervish's habit and carried

Firoze

me

me."

from the pleasure palace stood

of dervishes,

keeper's

no time, fetch

lose

and take care you do not give

habit,

hint

least

81

in

the wood, and

the princess reclining on a grassy spot, close to

a rivulet of

clear water,

whilst

he

went

in

search

of food.

The princess would willingly have attempted to make her escape, but she was too much overcome with fear, hunger, and fatigue to move from the spot.

When

the

Hindoo returned, she took eagerlv

the food he gave her, for she wished to recover her

strength sufficiently

to

be able to outwit him,

and

fortunately before long she heard the sound of horse-

men

advancing, and deeming that she could not verv


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

82

hands than those of the Hindoo,

well be in worse

she shrieked and cried for help.

company of horsemen proved Cashmeer and his attendants,

Fortunately the to

who, for

the

be

Sultan of

as they

were returning from hunting,

Princess

the

part of the

Bengal,

of

wood, and ran

happily

through

passed

that

to her assistance.

The sultan addressed himself to the Hindoo, demanded who he was, and wherefore he ill-treated The Hindoo, with great impudence, rethe lady. plied

she

that

was

between them.

right to interfere

The

had any

no one

and

wife,

his

princess,

who neither knew the rank who came so seasonably to

quality of the person relief,

lord,

my

sent to

distress

Heaven

me

has

and

no

give

credit

A

me awav from

the

on

to

the

that

to

impostor.

should be the wife of so vile

I

Hindoo!

a

was going

hither

whom Heaven

are,

have compassion on a princess

forbid that

has forced I

whoever you

assistance,

and despicable

whom

her

hastened to say

"My in

nor

wicked magician, who Prince

be united,

enchanted

of Persia,

to

and has brought

you

horse

behold

there."

The Princess more to persuade she told him was

of Bengal had no occasion to say the Sultan of truth.

Her

Cashmeer beauty,

and tears spoke sufliciently for her. at

the

insolence

of

the

Hindoo,

that

what

majestic

air,

Justly enraged

he

ordered

his


The

sultan addvessed

Jiiiiisclf to

the

Hindoo.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. guards

surround

to

him,

and

strike

85 his

oil

head

:

which sentence was immediately executed. The princess, thus delivered from the persecutions of the Hindoo,

The

sultan conducted her

lodged her his

in the

to attend

another no to

less

palace,

his

afflicting.

where he

most magnificent apartments, next

commanded

own,

slaves

He

into

fell

her,

a

great

number

and ordered

led her himself into

the

a

of

suitable

apartment he

women guard.

had

as-

signed her, where, w^ithout giving her time to thank

him

had received, he

great obligation she

the

for

said to her:

"As rest,

I

am

when vou

princess, that

you must want

my

leave of you

till

take

will

I

certain,

will

be better able to relate to

circumstances of

He The

then

to-morrow,

left

this strange

me

the

adventure."

her.

princess's joy

was inexpressible

at

finding

herself delivered from the Hindoo, and she flattered herself that the Sultan of

by sending her back

his generosity

Persia

when

alas! she

had

to

the Prince of

she should have told him her story, but

was deceived

fallen

Cashmeer would complete

in

love

in

with

her hopes, for the sultan her and

marry her himself the next day.

had resolved

For

to

that reason he

ordered great rejoicings to be made, and the princess

was awakened

at

daybreak by the beating of drums,

the sounding of trumpets, and noise of other instru-

ments expressive of

joy.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

86

When

who had given orders that he should be informed when the princess was ready to receive a

the sultan,

came

visit,

upon

to wait

her,

he had

after

enquired after her health, he acquainted her that those

rejoicings

more

solemn,

were and

at

to

all

render their

nuptials

the

same time

desired

her

the

assent to the union.

This declaration put her into such agitation that she fainted away.

The women slaves who were present assistance, and when at length she began from her swoon she resolved the

sultan

and

be

false

the

to recover

sooner than wed

that,

to

ran to her

prince, she

feign madness, thereby gaining a little time in to

make

So she began

plans for her escape.

the most extravagant expressions

and even rose from her seat

He

before

the

would which

to utter sultan,

as if to attack him.

was greatly grieved, fearing that

it

was

his

sudden and unexpected proposal that had caused the

As

attack. left

her

the

greatest

his

with

presence seemed to her

care

women, of

her

irritate

charging

and

them

never to

her, to

he

take

leave her

alone.

He

sent

many

times during the day to enquire

after her, but the reports he received

favourable. better,

to ask

and if

The

The next day the sultan

sent

were most un-

the princess was for his

still

no

Court physicians

they could cure her. princess,

who

feared

if

they examined her


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. too

closely they

resorted to all

be

potions,

pretended to

to,

anxious

afraid

would discover the

to

she

into

a

them, so

injure

approach

to

which

fly

her.

made

no

TJic princess fainted

ÂŤ7

she

had

of rage

and

trick fit

that

Some

were

thev

ordered

difficulty

in

her

taking,

away.

but which had no effect whatever in mitigating the disease.

When

the Sultan of

Cashmeer saw

physicians could not cure her,

but

without

effect.

Then he

that his Court

he called sent

in

others,

messages to the

Courts of neighbouring sultans, begging that the most

famous physicians might be allowed to come and their skill

upon the case of the princess.

try


THE ARABIAN NKiHTS.

88

physicians arrived

N^arioiis

tried

their

since

it

but

was

of success,

depend on medicine,

a case that did not

the will of the princess herself.

"on

During habit

in the

but none could boast

skill,

and

parts

all

iroiii

of a

and

provinces

Prince Firoze Shah, disguised

this time,

manv knowing which wav to

towns,

through

travelled

dervish,

not

whether he might not be pur-

direct his course, or

suing the very opposite road to which he

ought, in

order to hear tidings of the lost princess.

He made came

he

place

enquiry

diligent to,

at

till

her

after

through

passing

last,

every

at

much

Hindoostan, he heard the people talk

citv of

of a Princess of Bengal,

day of her intended

who went mad

marriage

with

the

a

the

very

Sultan

of

Cashmeer.

At

the

name

of the Princess

and

Bengal,

of

supposing that there could exist no other Princess of

Bengal than her upon whose account he had undertaken his travels, he hastened towards the kingdom of

Cashmeer, and upon

up

lodging

his

his

arrival

of the princess and the fate of the

and

felt

convinced that he had

beloved object of

his search.

provided himself with let

beard grow

his

could

went

easily to

the

pass

the

at

capital

took

khan, where he heard the story

at a

length found the

at

The following day he

a phvsician's habit, and,

during his

himself

sultans

Hindoo magician,

off

palace,

travels, as

a

where

he

having felt

phvsician.

he

he

He

presented


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. himself to the

and observed,

chief of the officers,

modestly, that perhaps

it

might be looked upon

as

a rash undertaking to attempt to cure the princess after

many had

so

from which he had

specifics,

experienced

might

success,

desired relief.

effect the

The told

chief of the officers

him

he

that the sultan

was welcome,

would receive

him with pleasure, and if

hoped some

that he

but

failed,

that

he should have the good

fortune

restore the

to

cess to her

might expect

reward

prin-

former health, he considerable

a

from

master's

his

liberality.

The Sultan

of Cashmeer,

who had begun hope

covery, the

when

new

ordered into

the

of

him

all

to

of

arrival

shown

be

The prince disguised

Then,

presence.

wasting

re-

heard

he

physician's

his

without

lose

to

princess's

any

as a dervisli.

time,

he told him the princess could not bear the sight of any physician transports,

him

which

straightway

without

falling

increased to

a

little

her

into

most violent

malady

room

;

from

and took

whence,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

go

through a

he might

lattice,

her without being

see

observed.

There princess

an

Prince

which

had

which

with tears

sitting in

air

Shah

Firoze

in

beheld

her eyes, and singing

deplored

she

deprived

lovelv

his

unhappy

her

fate,

perhaps for ever, of the

her,

object she loved so tenderly.

The

prince was

condition

he

and

him,

her malady

he

so

dear princess, but

his

was feigned

the

told

by the melancholy

affected

which he found

in

certain

felt

much

sultan

covered the nature of the

that

The

him

for

sultan

to

Firoze Shah went

princess

saw him (taking him by

As soon

in.

as

habit

his

to

the

be

threatening and

He, however, went straight towards

abusing him.

and said

the Prince

it

was absolutely

it

physician), she rose up in a rage,

might hear,

dis-

ordered the princess's door to be

and

her,

had

and that

speak with her alone.

opened,

a

he

complaint,

was not incurable, but added that necessarv

for love of

low voice,

a

in

no

one

else

am not a physician, but and am come to procure vou

"Princess, of Persia,

that

I

your liberty."

The voice,

he had

calm

once, and

as

knew

the

and the upper features of

standing

spread

who

princess,

at

her face.

possible

how

his

let

a

Firoze

his face,

beard grow so

secret jov

despair

sound

Shah

of

the

notwith-

long,

grew

and pleasure overtold

had seized

her as

him

briefly

when he


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. saw the Hindoo carry her away

91

the

;

resolution

he

afterwards had taken to leave everything to find her

and never to return home

out,

till

her; and by what good fortune,

and

fatiguing

journey,

at

had

he

he had regained after a long

last,

the

satisfaction

of

finding her in the palace of the Sultan of Cashmeer.

He

happened

that

away

to her,

that

till

moment when he had

greatest importance to

all

from the time she was taken the

to converse with her, telling her that

the

him of

then desired the princess to inform

know

most proper measures

it

happiness

was of the

that he might take

this,

her from the

to deliver

tyranny of the vSultan of Cashmeer.

The

princess, having

informed

him of

that

all

had happened, of her rescue from the Hindoo, and of the sultan's subsequent intention of marrying her,

added that she had been able

of no other

to think

mode of escaping than to feign madness. The prince then asked if she knew what had become of the enchanted horse. The princess, however, knew nothing of its whereabouts, but was quite

sure

the

sultan

had preserved

it

as

a

great

curiosity.

As Firoze Shah never doubted but the had the

horse,

he

tended making use of and

the

told it

to

princess

that

sultan

he

in-

convev them both back had

consulted

together

to

Persia

on

the measures they should take, thev agreed that

the

;

after

thev

princess should dress herself the

next day, and


(j2

receive to

the

THE ARABIAN

NKjllTS.

sultan

but

civilly,

without

The stated

was

sultan

him the

to

when

overjoyed

effect

his

On

when

day,

the

manner

as

vanced,

he regarded

the

him

persuaded

world

him

tented himself with telling her at

her

He

being

soon

likely

was

cure

her

in

how

to

this

well

order

in

begun,

and

then

retired

phvsician con-

rejoiced he was

recover

her health. skilful

what he

complete

to

a

ad-

far

state,

bade her follow the directions of so

physician,

to-

such

in

the greatest

seeing

and,

;

her

as

prince

the following

him

received

princess

the

had had

visit

first

wards the cure of the princess.

in

speakiii_<;

him.

without

a

had so

waiting

for

how

the

dominions

of

own country was

far

her answer.

The Prince Princess

of

Bengal

Cashmeer thus distant.

of Persia asked

came

into

alone, since her

This he

said

the sultan the

on purpose to introduce some

conversation about the enchanted horse, and to find out what had

become of

The

who

prince's

told

him

sultan,

motive, that he

it.

could not penetrate

concealed

nothing

had ordered the

from

into

him, and

enchanted horse

to be kept in his treasury as a great curiosity,

he

knew

not the

wav

to use

the

though

it.

"Sir," replied the pretended physician, "the in-

formation which your Majesty has given your devoted slave affords

me

a

means of curing the

princess.

As


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. was

she

horse

is

brought

on

hither

enchanted,

she

93

and

horse,

this

the

something

contracted

has

of the enchantment, which can be dissipated only by

incense which

a certain

am

I

acquainted

your Majesty would entertain yourself,

and the people of your capital with

was beheld,

prising sight that ever

brought

the

into

and leave the and

rest

me.

to

that assemblv,

all

Princess

of

and mind.

square

great

Bengal

in

But the better

be

requisite

dressed

as

magnificently

sur-

the horse be

let

the

palace,

few moments' time, the

a

restored

to effect

the as

what

bodv

in

propose,

I

should

princess

possible,

most valuable jewels

with the

most

the

promise to show you

I

that

If

your Court,

before

completely

will

it

with.

be

adorned

and

your Majesty may

possess."

The

sultan having eagerly consented to

was asked of him,

show

preparations were

made

that

all

for the

upon the following day. In the morning, bv the prince's orders, the horse to take place

was taken out of the treasury and placed

the great

in

square before the palace.

A

report having been spread through the

town

be

seen,

parts,

inso-

there

that

crowds

much the

of that

was

something

people the

flocked

sultan's

wonderful

from

all

to

guards were placed around

horse to prevent disorder and

to

keep

a

space

clear.

The

Sultan of Cashmeer, surrounded bv

all

his


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

94

and

nobles

ministers

of

was seated upon

state,

The

platform erected for the purpose.

Princess of

Bengal, attended by a number of ladies

went up

sultan had assigned her,

mounted with

horse

and

When

she was

in

whom

women.

help of her

the

the

enchanted

the

to

a

the saddle, and had the bridle in

her hand, the pretended physician placed round the horse,

a

at

proper

which

charcoal,

lighted

distance,

many

vessels

full

of

had

ordered

to

be

he

brought, and, going round them with a solemn pace,

and sweet-smelling perfume;

cast in a strong

with his

downcast breast,

he

and

eves

hands

his

charcoal

of

surrounded

the

sent

forth

princess,

a

so

turned

it;

and just

as

the

his

horse

the

which

cloud

nor

she

neither

jumped nimbly

the horse could be seen, the prince

up behind her, and reaching

horse,

The moment

dense

that

upon

crossed

paced three times round the

pronouncing some mvstical words. pots

then,

hands to the peg, rose

in

the

air

he pronounced these words, which the sultan heard distinctly

:

"Sultan of Cashmeer, when you marrv princesses

who implore your

protection,

learn

first

to obtain

their consent."

Thus the prince delivered the Princess of Bengal, and carried her the same day to the capital of Persia, where he alighted in the square before the palace. The emperor, his father, ordered everv preparation for the

solemnization

of the

marriage to

be

made


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

95

immediately, and the ceremony was performed with

due pomp and magnificence. After the days appointed for the rejoicings were over, the

and

Emperor

appoint

of Persia's

an ambassador

first

to

care was to

name

go to the Rajah of

Bengal with an account of what had happened, and to

demand

his

approbation and

ratification

alliance contracted by this marriage

;

of the

which the Rajah

of Bengal took as an honour, and granted with great

pleasure and satisfaction.


THE STORY OF ALADDIN OR

THE WONDERFUL LAAH^ l^^^%^^^v?^i^^;^^,â&#x20AC;&#x17E;^ '"'^A';*>'#^^^i3'"il

A '^%

ifii

I

T

N

large and

,

1

the capital

of one

of the

rich provinces of

kingdom of China, there lived a tailor, named Mustapha,

the

who was hardly,

so poor that he conld

by

his dailv labour,

himself

tain

and

his

which consisted of

main-

familv,

a wife

and

son.

His

son,

who was

called

Aladdin, had been brought up in a

very careless and idle

manner, and by that means TJ/c lamp.

habits.

the in

He

was

morning, the streets

of his

own

When father,

had in

the

contracted

habit of goin^ out earlv in

and would stav out and

manv bad

public

all

places with

dav,

plaving

idle children

age.

he was old enough to learn

not being

took him into

his

a trade,

his

able to put him out to any other,

own

shop, and taught him

how

to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. use

his

needle

keep him

was

his

but

:

work were

his

to

endeavours to

father's

his

all

97

no sooner

vain, for

in

back turned, than he was gone for that day.

iMustapha chastised him, but Aladdin was incorrigible

and

his

abandon

him

troubled

at

his

to

a

was

grief,

to

forced

was

and

idleness,

not being able

threw him into a

great

his

to

father,

reclaim

so

to

much

him, that

it

of sickness, of which he died in

fit

few months.

The mother,

finding

her

that

follow his father's business,

shut

would

son

not

up the shop, sold

and with the money she received, and

off evervthing,

what she could get by spinning cotton, endeavoured to maintain herself

Aladdin, the fear of a

and her son.

who was now no longer restrained by father, and who cared so little for his

mother, gave himself entirelv over to his idle companions.

custom,

One in

the

dav, as

he was plaving, according to

street

with his vagabond associates,

a stranger passing

by stood to observe him.

This stranger was

a matjician

who had

recentlv

arrived from Africa.

The African magician observing

in

Aladdin's

countenance something absolutelv necessarv execution of the design he was engaged artfully all

about

his family,

in,

for the

enquired

and when he had learned

he desired to know, went up to him, and, taking

him aside from

his

comrades,

said,

"Child,

vour father called Mustapha the tailor?"

was not


THE

9S

"Yes,

doad

a

NK'.Urs.

answorod the bov

sir,"

long

AKAl>l.\N

"biu ho has boon

;

tinio.

Ai ihoso words, tho Atrican magician throw

arms about Aladdin's nock, and with

timos,

toars

his

him sovoral

kissod

ovos.

his

in

who obsorvod his toars, askod him what mado him woo[\ "Alas mv son." oriod tho magician with a sigh, "how can torboar: am vour undo vour worthy tathor was mv own brother. havo boon manv voars abroad, and no\\ am come home with tho hopes ot seeing him. voii tell mo ho is Aladdin,

I

I

1

;

I

1

dead. griot

1

assure vou

to

mo

the comfort â&#x20AC;˘'C/*jV<i,

fi j^-

not

your fat/::

him. he gave him

he

and

son.

to

tell

her

that

have time, that

where his

I

mv good

as

deprived

expected.

ol

Then

"

asked

soon

as

putting

.\laddin.

into

his

purse,

whore

his

his

Aladdin had intormod

handful of small monov. saving.

a

mv

"Go.

1

be

groat

a

I

hand

mother lived; and

to

is

it

mv

vour mother, give I

will

mav have

visit

love to her.

her to-moriow,

if

1

tho satisfaction of seeing

brother lived

so

long,

and

ended

davs."'

As soon

as

tho

African magician

newlv-adopted nephew, Aladdin ran

to

had his

lott

his

mother,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. overjoyed

"Mother,"

said

replied

child,"

by your

mv

he I

bv

him

mv

you that what ing out

the

he

charged

he

has

vou

cried

father

was

you

tell

money,

greet

and

died

mav

he

that

"your father

dead a long

added

you and

to

will

the

see

had

time,

to

show

he, pull-

what he has given me;

"Indeed,

in.'

me that me when

and

truth,'

is

"see

and kissed dead,

he

says

assuring

father's side,

He

to

"I am just now

man who

a

any time to-morrow, he

mother,

been

I

me

a visit,

lived

mv

brother.

his

is

told

"from

Aladdin,

uncle

"you have no uncle

or mine/'

side

"No,

uncle?"

an

I

mother,

his

had given him.

uncle

his

"have

he,

father's

come," said is

money

the

at

99

and

house

child,"

I

you,

if

come and pay

brother,

a

tell

mv

father

replied

the

he

has

but

never

heard of

another."

The mother and son the

African

uncle

found

magician,

him

talked

but-

playing

the

no more then of

next

dav Aladdin's

another part

in

of the

town with other children, and, embracing him as before, put two pieces of gold into his hand, and said to him, "Carry this, child, to your mother, tell her that I will come and see her to-night, and bid her get

us something

show me the house where

for supper;

you

but

first

live."

This Aladdin did, and afterwards carried the two pieces of gold to his mother, and when he had told her of his uncle's intention, she went


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

lOo

out

and bought

day

in

it

She spent

provisions.

preparing the

was ready, said

and

supper,

to her

whole

the

when

night,

at

"Perhaps your uncle

son,

knows not how to find our house him if you meet with him." Just then somebody knocked

go and

;

bring

the

at

door,

which Aladdin immediately opened, and the magician

came These

loaded

in

he

where

put

and

mother,

his

eyes,

I,

not

to

The

I

"My

crying

on

sit

he

fell

his

the

down

with tears

out

how unhappy am give

to

down and began

you

the

all

brother

time

is

brother's,

my

native

to enter

"My

mother:

"do not be surprised

me

mv

sat

Aladdin's

with

said he,

to

at

good

your never

vou have been mar-

Mustapha of happy memory. place,

as

this

well

as

country,

my

late

and during that time have travelled into

Indies,

Arabia,

Persia,

resided in the

finest

afterwards crossed a longer stav.

was

saluted

to

have been fortv years absent from

the

fruits.

him the place

enough

soon

magician then

discourse

which

I

show

poor brother!

come

have

having seen ried

hands,

Mustapha she had so done times,

of

sorts

embrace!"

last

sister,"

to

all

used

several

it

in

into

her

desired

brother

his

and kissed

one

Aladdin's

into

and when

sofa;

wine and

w^ith

desirous

At to

Syria

and

Kgypt, have

towns of those countries, and

over into Africa, last,

see

as

it

mv

is

where

I

made

natural for a man,

native

countrv

again


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. and

my

embrace

to

dear

you the length of time endured

have

my

brotherly features

death,

the

in

my nephew,

distinguished him

among

a

plav.

It

as

find,

his

were,

it

my

number is

nothing

in

I

ever

hearing of

as

had

observed

a his

your son, and

of children with

comfort

a

brother

a

me to who has

for

son

most remarkable features."

The African magician to

I

tell

and what

always

I

friendship.

face of

at

but

not

will

me,

whom

whom

he was

I

much

so

for

and

love

took

hither;

me

afflicted

brother's

it

come

to

and

mortified

brother.

loi

then

Aladdin and asked him

Aladdin,"

said

his

addressed

name.

himself

am

"I

called

he.

"Well, Aladdin," replied the magician, do you follow?"

business

At

this

question

head, and w^as not a

answered,

"Aladdin

strove

all

he

could

not

standing

"what

could

succeed all

I

;

can

abashed when

little is

to

an

and since say

to

his

fellow;

idle

teach

down

hung

youth

the

him his

him,

his

mother father

his

trade,

but

notwith-

death,

he

his

does

nothing

awav his time in the streets as you saw him. For my part, I am resolved one of these days to turn him out of doors, and let him provide but

for

idle

himself."

After these w^ords Aladdin's mother burst into tears;

and the

nephew

;

you

magician

must

think

said,

"This

of helping

is

not

well,

yourself and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I02

Perhaps you did not

your livelihood.

getting

your father's trade

and

you have no mind

to

take a shop

me

tell

you

another.

handicraft,

If

will

I

Consult your inclination, and

what

always

prefer

learn any

for you.

freely

shall

would

like

you

think

me

find

my

of

ready

to

proposal;

keep

mv

He

told

word." This plan the

he

had

than

to

any other,

much

agreeable

a

him

obliged to

greater

inclination

"Since

magician,

the

said

you with me to-morrow, clothe you

take

somely

as the

we

wards

merchant

best

think

will

in

this

"I as

will

hand-

the city, and after-

opening

of

to that

and that he should be

for his kindness.

you,"

to

Aladdin.

flattered

magician

business

is

greatly

shop

a

as

I

mentioned."

The widow, who never that

the

longer doubted her son.

and

as

was

magician

after

magician took

He came

his

him

to

a

after

choosing a

the

one,

liberalitv

suit

his

new

Aladdin

found

and-

merchant,

bade Aladdin

Aladdin,

charmed with

uncle,

made

and the magician immediately paid

When

promised,

he

for himself,

preferred.

of

the

and retired. he had

with

intentions,

advanced

far

as

took Aladdin

one he

leave

pretty

kindness to

good

for his

no

brother,

again next day,

and

choose

was

night

then could believe

husband's

promise of

his

She thanked him the

till

her

choice for

of

it.

himself so handsomely


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. he

dressed,

He him

returned

uncle

his

promised never

part,

his

then showed him the largest and

to

or

and

sultan's

he

had

travellers

afterwards

and

access;

his

meeting

where,

some

to

where

palace,

free

khan,

with

the

brought him to

last

own

where

and

the

at

and to the

inns

merchants lodged;

and took

city

mosques,

khans

on

him.

round the

finest

who,

thanks;

forsake

to

103

merchants

he

had become acquainted with since

them and

his

gave

he

arrival,

them pretended nephew

a treat to bring his

acquainted.

till

The entertainment lasted night, when Aladdin

would have taken leave of his uncle

to

go home

magician would not Aladdin stood ivatching at

I

favours.

not that I

himself,

let

him

but

con-

as

ducted him to his mother, she saw him so well dressed, was

"Generous relation!"

transported with joy.

know know

by

the

door.

the

who, as soon

"I

go

;

how

mv

to thank

son

is

thank you with

your liberality!

you

for

not

deserving

all

my

said she,

soul,

of

vour

and wish


TIll^:

I04

niav

voii

which

regulating

and

sorry

because, I

will,

him

to

as

replied

believe

we

magician,

the

"is

by

call

the

in

good

a

do very well.

shall

Friday,

is

it

however, walk

son's

show than

better

cannot perform to-morrow^ w'hat

I

niv

conduct by your good advice."

his

I

witness

to

cannot

he

"Aladdin," boy,

iNIGIlTS.

enoiijrh

loni:

live

gratitude,

ARABIAN

shops

the

am

I

promised,

I

be shut.

wall

on him to-morrow and take gardens where

people of the

The African magician

best fashion generally resort."

took leave of the mother and the son and retired.

Aladdin rose himself and stood as

he perceived

early

next morning,

the

watching his

the

at

As soon

door.

coming,

uncle

dressed

he

told

his

mother, took leave of her, and ran to meet him.

The magician caressed "Come, my dear child, and things."

He

of the city, palaces,

might the lone:

the

then led him to

and

Aladdin will

I

show you

out at one

some magnificent

said fine

of the gates or

houses,

rather

with beautiful gardens into which

anybody

walk

through

After

enter.

gardens,

the

pursuing

African

w^av into the countrv,

their

magician

led

Aladdin

a

thev nearlv reached

till

mountains.

who had never been so far before, began to find himself much tired, and said to the magician, "Where are we going, Uncle? We have left the gardens a great way behind us, and I if we go much see nothing but mountains Aladdin,

;


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. further,

to

reach

garden

town

the

the

said

know whether

do not

I

false

which

I

ifJ5

be

shall

able

"Never fear, nephew," "I will show you another

again."

uncle,

surpasses

we

all

have

yet

seen."

Aladdin was soon persuaded, and the magician, to

Beautiful gardens into

make told

wav

the

him

At divided

a

last

seem

great

they

h'JiicJi

anybody might

and

shorter

many

enter.

less

fatiguing,

stories.

arrived

between two

mountains

by a narrow valley, which was the place

where the magician intended

to execute

the design

"We

that

had brought him from Africa to China.

will

go no further now," said he to Aladdin;

will

show

you

here

some

extraordinary

"I

things, 8


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

io6

when you have

which,

while

but

for:

dry

loose

strike

I

you

sticks

yon

seen,

can

np

gather

light

a

thank

will

all

the

a

fire

kindle

to

see,

me

with."

Aladdin found so many dried

that before

sticks,

the magician had lighted a match, he had collected a

The magician and when they were

heap.

great

on

fire,

in

some

which

incense,

This he

on

dispersed

in

raised

each

words

magical

several

presently

of smoke.

by pronouncing

side,

which

threw

blaze,

a

cloud

a

them

set

Aladdin

not

did

understand.

At

same time the

the

uncovered

and

ring fixed

brass

frightened

what

at

he

saw,

knocked him down.

that he

and

bling,

have

with

done,

I

manner?" of your

But

"I

I

obey

shall

me

bv virtue nounced.

to

have

mv

am vour

father,

child,"

in

tears

Uncle,

"I

magician:

caught

and gave him such

abused him,

hold

of him,

box on the ear

a

Aladdin got up tremeyes

his

be treated

in

this

supply

1

severe

answered

reasons,"

uncle,

"What

said,

the

place

the

and you ought to make no reply.

added not

would have

he

that

a

was so

Aladdin

middle.

the

into

with

horizontally,

laid

away; but the magician

run

for

stone,

a

opened,

earth, trembling,

he, softening,

ask anvthins:

"do not be

of vou,

You

see

what

of my incense Know then that

and

the

punctually.

under

but I

that

vou

have done

words

this

afraid;

I

pro-

stone there


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. is

hidden

which

will

monarch

in

destined

treasure,

a

make the

vou

107

be

to

than

richer

and

vours,

the

greatest

world."

"Well, Uncle," said Aladdin,

"what

to

is

done?

Command me;

ready

to

be

obey."

"I

am am

overjoyed,

child,"

said

the

magician,

embracing

"take hold of the that

lift

I

him,

and

ring,

"Indeed,

stone."

Uncle," replied Aladdin, "I

am

enough;

not strong

must help me."

no

""^^ou

have

for

my

assis-

answered

the

magi-

occasion

tance,"

cian;

"if

help

I

shall be able to Aladdin raised with

father will

take

the stone

and grandfather,

find

it

will

come

then

lift

it

it

on one

When a

cavity

a

little

"what I you are

vour

up,

and

you

as the

ease,

and

the stone was pulled up, there appeared

door,

my direct.

at

of

side.

of about

"Observe,

pro-

Aladdin did

easily."

we

ring,

names

magician bade him, raised the stone with laid

you,

do nothimr;

hold of the

nounce the

ease.

vou

the

three

or

four

and

steps

to

son,"

said

the

Descend bottom

feet

go

with

deep,

down

lower.

African

magician,

into the cave,

and when

of

those

steps

you 8*

will


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

io8

find

door

a

spacious

each

divided

vault,

which

of

you on

placed

cisterns

which

open,

silver;

but

them.

Above

each

you

all

things,

walls,

touch

the

clothes;

for

vou do

At

the end

laden

with

fruit

by a

path

which

a

a

and

vou,

lamp

it

liquor, put

the

me.

to

down,

may

you

garden,

of the

in

it

to

five

niche

that

in

and

the

door

fine

trees

steps

that

will see a

lighted

extinguish

it:

wick and poured

your vestband and bring

you should wish

If

a

find

where you

a terrace,

when you have thrown awav out

vour

instantlv.

planted with

lead vou

will

Take the

lamp.

die

will

you

that

walk directly across the garden

;

before

and

wuth

as

will

you

in

brass

gold

care

a

a

meddle with

not

vou

halls,

large

of

much

so

garden

upon

bring you

niche

do

so

great

full

have

of the third hall

which opens into

will

side,

into

voii

four

see

will

do not

if

three

into

care

take

lead

will

any of the

for

gather

much

as

fruit

as

vou

a

ring

please."

After these

words,

off his finger,

and put

him

was

that

he

while to

him.

boldly, 1

it

should

a

magician drew

on one of Aladdin's, telling

preservative

observe

After this child,

it

the

what he

instruction

and we

against

shall

he

both

all

evil,

had prescribed said,

be

"Go down

rich

all

our

'

lives.

.Vladdin steps,

jumped

into

the cave,

and found the three halls just

descended the as the

African


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. magician

had

with

the

all

down

precaution

lamp

the

wick and the put in

from

garden

without

On

observe

to

were

the

The white were

colours.

transparent,

diamonds

green, emeralds;

and

amethysts; sapphires.

or

grapes,

them so

of different

fruit,

the

;

deep

rubies

red,

were

the

;

cast,

preferred

figs

any other

although

he

but

fruit,

variety of the

some of everv

gather

yet

not the value

halls

and soon arrived

returned

of,

the

at

and took

he was

colours that he sort.

Aladdin having loaded himself with

knew

the

purple,

of vellow

Aladdin would have

pleased with the to

and

clear

for coloured glass of little value,

resolved

which he

All the trees

before.

that

out the

he stopped

of

turquoises;

blue,

those

threw

fruit,

pearls

the

;

the

took

magician desired,

extraordinary

loaded with

could

return

his

had only caught a glimpse

them

death

stopping,

niche, as the

and,

liquor,

through

of

fear

the

his vestband.

in

it

the

the

the garden

crossed

inspire,

He went

described.

109

riches he

through the three

mouth

of the cave,

where the African magician expected him with the utmost impatience. As soon as Aladdin saw him he

cried

to help

the

out,

me

out."

magician,

Uncle,

"Pray,

lend

me your

"Give me the lamp

"it

be

will

first,"

troublesome

to

hand, replied

you."

"Indeed, Uncle," answered Aladdin, "I cannot now, but

I

will

as

soon

as

I

The African magician

am

up."

insisted

that

he

would


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

no

lamp before he would help him

the

liave

who

had

fruit

that

Aladdin, with

his

refused

give

to

The

cave.

encumbered he

him

to

it

could

flew

into

incense

into

the

and

fire,

much

so

not

well

he

was out of the

no

get

a

at

it,

obstinate

this

at

threw

passion,

a

himself

provoked

magician,

refusal,

till

up; and

of his

little

pronounced

sooner

two magical words, than the stone which had closed the

mouth of the cave moved into its earth over it in the same manner

the

arrival

the

and

magician

of the

This

action

plainly

Aladdin's

uncle

but

as

lay at

it

Aladdin.

showed

him

be

not

From

his

to

magician.

true

a

place, with

youth he had applied himself to the study of magic,

and

forty

after

and reading

was

there

vears'

magic

of

the

in

experience

world

ful

knowledge

certain

was,

must receive

whom

Aladdin,

his

the

life

lamp

where

place

to take

and

he

he

had

looked

his

as

hands,

wickedness

remain of the

a

lamp

the

himself, but

it

from the hands of another person.

resolving,

into

the

had

he

thoufrh

addressed

upon

as

was of no consequence,

purpose,

avarice

it

reason

this

whose

the

was not permitted

he

For

of

lamp,

render him more power-

But

monarch.

anv

than

wonderful

a

possession of which would

had found that

he

books,

enchantments

in

so

transaction.

soon to

as

himself a

and he

sacrifice

that

young fit

to

lad

to serve

should

him

to

get his

no witness would


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. When trated

for

return

to

saw

he

that

he

ever,

same

the

started

but avoided

Africa,

hopes were

his

all

iii

day

town

the

According

to

appearances,

all

when he had

magician, the

forgot

was no

there

suspected

treachery from

this

more

easily

When

he found himself buried

called

out to

his

uncle,

him the lamp;

give

design

now his

get

to

was

opened

shut by the cries

and

any hope

of

ever

into

that

eating

upon death with

an

or as

He

passing

and

inevitable.

door,

was

then redoubled

again,

and

from the

in

a

present

death.

this state

in

drinking,

the

the steps, without

light

of speedy

Aladdin remained out

of

but

enchantment,

down on

seeing

melancholy certainty darkness

by

same means. sat

cried and

since his cries

garden,

before

tears,

he

expressed.

descended the steps with

the

into

never

him he was ready vain,

in

had

than

alive,

tell

but

He

could not be heard.

which

to

which

virtue.

pretended uncle,

his

imagined

be

to

But death,

his

its

who

Aladdin,

of

surprise

of.

his finger,

though he knew not

him,

The

contrived

he had put upon

ring

preserved

a

the

w^ith

prospect of Aladdin being any more heard

to

some

any suspicions and stop him.

entertain

is

his

on seeing him come back without him, should

boy,

the

on

lest

persons who had observed him walk out

frus-

on

He

two days, with-

the

third

clasped

entire resignation to the will

his

looked

hands

of God, and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

112

which the magician had put on

ring

immediately the earth,

and

genie of enormous

a

him

to

ready to obey of I

and

At

and

finger,

rose

out of

another

the

and

slave,

the

I

am

slave

on your finger

ring

of that

slaves

time

would you have?

your

as

possess

other

the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "What

you

who may

all

his

size

head reaching the roof of the vault,

his

said

rubbed the

he

his hands,

action of joining

this

in

ring."

would

Aladdin

have

been

frightened at the sight of so extraordinary a figure

he was

the danger

but

place,

made him answer

"Whoever von

out hesitation, this

in

you are able."

if

deliver

are,

He

;

with-

me from

had no sooner

spoken these words than he found himself on the very spot where the magician had caused the earth to

He

open.

was much surprised not to

find the

comprehend how he had got so soon out of the cave. There was nothing to be seen but the place where the fire had been. Rejoicing to find himself once more in the world, he made the best of his way home.

When see

and

thing

his

and

As soon were:

spoke

thing

to

could

not

mother's door,

got within his

faint,

dead.

he

he

her,

him

and

open,

earth

eat,

into

for

weakness

for

remained

he as

he

want of food, made for

my mouth

the

Mother,

have not put these

long

a

recovered,

"Pray, I

the joy to

first

give a

time

as

words

me some-

morsel of any-

three

His

days."

mother brought him what she had, and

set

it

be-


A

genie of enormous size rose out of the earth.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. "My

him.

fore for

son,"

dangerous;

is

it

Aladdin took

He

to her all that

mother listened

Aladdin's

much

with

of the

breaking

help

him

calling

barbarian,

could

she

out

ma-

enemv and

des-

She

troyer of mankind.

more

deal

great

magician's

she

who had and

but

a

the

finding

Aladdin,

talked

not slept for three days

began

nights,

him

left

said

against

treachery,

whilst

that

traitor,

deceiver,

assassin,

an

not

abuse,

into

perfidious

and

gician,

of the

perfidy

magician

African

when

but

patience,

heard

she

Aladdin

time."

a

at

little

then related

him.

to

"be not too eager,

she,

but

mother's advice, and ate and

his

drank moderately.

had happened

said

eat

115

to

his

she

doze,

to

and

repose

re-

K'as faint.

tired.

who had

Aladdin,

he

was

soundly thing

in

the

till

late

he

said

something to a

greater

"Alas!

subterranean the

to

his

eat,

bread to give you, I

had

in

the

abode,

house

very

slept

when

the

first

mother was, that he wanted

and that she could

said

while

eyes

his

next morning,

kindness than

child,"

closed

not

to give

she,

you

have

"I ate

him

up

yesterday

;

all

but

do him

not his

breakfast.

not the

a

bit

of

provisions

have

a

little


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

ii6

and

patience,

bring

some;

voii

have spun

me

day

get for

it

before

"Mother,"

replied

sell

me money

and the

it,

and

another time,

for

I

buy bread and

it,

brought home with

I

will

I

which

cotton,

little

dinner."

go and

will

I

;

lamp

the

long

sell

"keep your cotton

Aladdin, give

our

for

a

go and

will

I

:

something

have

I

be

not

shall

it

yestershall

I

serve both for breakfast and dinner,

will

and perhaps supper too."

mother

Aladdin's

"Here

her son,

took but

is,

it

lamp

the

very dirty;

is

it

and said to if

it

"X

were

a

more."

somethin<r

water rub

clean

to

than

it

cleaner

little

She

took

but

had

it,

an

in

instant

appeared before her,

obev you other

the

your

as

who have

those

that

slaves

a

fainted;

phantom

of her

am

in

hand,

lamp

large

dishes of the delicious

their

I

voice

a

am ready of

slave

hands

and

I

;

all

lamp."

terrified

the

cavern,

the sight

at

of the

and

said

tray,

genie

boldly,

to eat."

The

the

to

me something

silver

lamp out

snatched the

disappeared immediately, and a

have?

in

when Aladdin, who had seen such

hungry, bring

with

to

of gigantic size

her

and the in

and

begun

sooner

to

bring

sand

fine

genie

said

slave,

of the

Aladdin's mother, genie,

and

a

no

would

it

some

"What would you

like thunder,

to

believe

I

in

"I

genie

an instant returned

holding

twelve

covered

same metal, which contained the most

meats,

six

large

white

bread

cakes

on


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. two

two

plates,

appeared

done

was

this

:

recovered from

and two silver

wine,

of

these he placed upon

All

cups.

flagons

before

mother

Aladdin's

and sprinkled

it

was not long before she came

it

herself.

to

"Mother," and eat; at

dis-

her swoon.

and

face,

and

a carpet,

Aladdin fetched some water on her

117

not

here

such

let

His food.

what

is

same time

the

Aladdin,

said

delicious

mother

was

on

much "to

surprised

to

whom

we

Aladdin,

"let

"It

us

no

is

are

Has

and liberality?

us?"

heart,

in

extreme hunger;

made acquainted with our

compassion said

my

come

and

and do

meat get cold."

"Child," said she,

for this great plenty

been

put you

will

satisfy

up

"get

the

obliged

the sultan

poverty,

and had

matter.

Mother,"

down and

sit

see

eat,

for

you

much need of a good breakfast as myself; when we have done I will tell you." The mother and son sat long at breakfast, so delicious was the food, and when Aladdin's mother have

had

almost

taken

away

set

by what was

sat

impatience, and the

and

down by her son on the "I expect now that you should

went and ing,

as

genie

tell

and

me

you

left,

she

sofa,

say-

satisfy

my

exactly what passed between

while

I

was

a

in

swoon";

which he readily complied with. son

She was

in

as

great

her

as

at

the

told

amazement appearance

at

of

what her the

genie,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

ii8

"But

and said to him, with genies?

had

tance genie

never heard that anv of

ever seen

address

to

whom

to

I

How

one.

me,

himself to

had

he

what have we

son,

appeared

my

acquain-

came and

before

that

not

in

do

to

the

to

vile

vou,

cave?"

"Mother," answered Aladdin, "the genie you saw is

one who

not the

resembles him

ap]:)eared

size;

in

me,

to

though

he

they had quite different

no,

persons and habits; they belong to different masters.

you remember, he that

If

self the

slave

of the

my

on

ring

saw called him-

iirst

I

finger;

and

this

vou saw, called himself the slave of the lamp you had

vour hand

in

him, for

I

but

;

you did not hear

believe

I

think you fainted as soon as he began to

speak."

"What!" then

to

take

it

would

me out

please.

to

occasion

the

self

I

sell

death

of

rather

my

of

will it

the

cried

"was your lamp

mother, genie's

that

than sight,

and

never touch

addressing

Ah!

vou?

to

put I

it.

it

mv

himson,

where you

had rather you

than run the hazard of being frightened

by touching

again

take

my

ring,

and not have anything

advice,

you

it

would

;

and

part to

if

you would

also

with

do with genies.

the "

"With your leave. Mother," replied Aladdin, "I shall now take care how I sell a lamp which may be so serviceable both to you and me. Have not you been an eve-witness of what it has procured

us?

It

shall

continue

to

furnish

us with


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I

do,

You may suppose

and maintenance.

subsistence

my

that

iig

as

and wicked uncle would not

false

have taken so much pains, and undertaken so long

and tedious into

possession

his

before

preferred

knew was covered

the

show,

and

much,

where

I

caimot

and

And of

exciting

may

find

resolve

us,

making

am

be

not

you it

now,

alive

alwavs on

you and us

can

us."

when

part

want

I

with,

perhaps,

if

it

foresee,

and

had nothing the

provisions

to

say

next

the

from

against

night

genie

von ring

without

that

and though

;

were gone,

me leave to keep it, mv hnger. Who knows

may be exposed

I

great

The

it.

for

had

might

I

I

hope

and to wear

what danijers

which neither of

to,

which

As Aladdin's arguments were

Bv

any

a

out of your sight, and put

it

give

will

make

some moments hence; therefore

so

dis-

jealousy of our

vou would never have seen me again I

has

us

let

seen

since the genies frighten

it

to

have

I

chance

envy and

the

will take

I I

which

to

it

which he

silver

since

get

to

which he

lamp,

and

without

However,

neighbours.

it

halls,

it,

not been

wonderful gold

virtue

of

had

it

the

all

eyes.

use

profitable

if

this

the

in

mv own

with

so

journey,

a

it

may

deliver

his

mother

just,

them.

they

had

brought,

eaten

and

the

all

the

next

day Aladdin, w4io could not bear the thoughts of hunger, vest,

putting

went

out

one of the silver dishes under earlv

to

sell

it,

and

his

addressing


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

120

himself

to

took him

him the

dish,

that

he

would buy examined it,

was good

it

valued

it.

met

he

pulling

and,

aside,

he

if

whom

Jew

a

out

The

it.

and

the

would

as

at

Aladdin,

who knew

not

material

gave

of

not

profit,

his

ignorance,

that

get

but

overtake

with

retired

with

some so

into

of the

piece

and had got so

have

been

impossible

for

Aladdin

went

home,

called

and

mother,

who went and purchased

as

haste,

after him, to

change out fast,

monev,

lived

part

taking the

penetrated

he

bought some cakes of bread,

baker's,

last

and

far,

him

to

him.

Before

to

purse

exorbitancv of

the

not

to

sixtieth

much

so

the

offered

Aladdin,

plate.

was going to run

he ran

would

it

was but the

it

content

and

endeavour to

he

of his

out

was vexed he had

his

The

understood

of what

gold

the

eas^erlv,

the Jew,

of gold,

of

him

told

plain dealing,

this

at

Aladdin

value

though

worth

monev verv that

full

piece

a

him,

it

the

the

or

took

sell,

of

whether

doubting

value,

its

traffic,

judgment and honour.

Jew was somewhat confounded and,

how much

asked Aladdin

his

asked

plate,

silver

to

trust

streets,

cunning Jew took soon as he found

and never had been used to such he

the

in

on

his

return

them some time.

till

gave

the

pressed,

to

his

to

his

rest

provisions enough

After this

the

a

changed

manner they

Aladdin had sold the twelve dishes

necessity

at

Jew,

for

the

singly,

same


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. money; who, him less, for

When to

of

fear

first

time,

losing

so

he had sold the

and would

dishes,

but

purchaser,

that

have

him

to

pieces

where,

well

as

old

his

him home

after

the

he laid

Jew down

Aladdin was very

satisfied.

They

on

lived

and Aladdin,

had

off

left

since

pieces

with

idle

own

African

the

frugal

a

in

though used to an

playing with lads of his

adventure

his

ten

these

manner,

He

to

it

tray,

with which

of gold,

much

as

to bring

had examined the weight of the ten

bargain.

a

was too large and cumber-

it

mother's,

his

offer

had recourse

he

carried

some; therefore he was obliged with

good

dish,

last

not

durst

which weighed ten times

the tray,

the

the

after

121

life,

age ever magician.

spent his time in walking about and conversing

with

decent

whom

with

people,

he

gradually got

cipal

Sometimes he would stop at the prinmerchants' shops, where people of distinction

met,

and

acquainted.

gained

listen

some

When recourse hand,

to

all

money was

the

again

with

it

lamp.

the

to

looked for

rubbed

the

part

the sand,

I

and the slave in

their

am

He

where

rubbed

took his

it

ready to obey you

of

hands;

all I

those

and

the

Aladdin had

spent,

genie immediately appeared, and said,

you have?

which he

by

discourse,

their

knowledge of the world.

little

in

it

his

mother had

also,

when

the

"What would as

your

slave,

who have

that

lamp

other

slaves

of

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

122

lamp."

"I

something presently

am hungry," eat." The to with

returned

said Aladdin,

genie a

and

disappeared,

which

on

tray,

me

"bring

were

same number of covered dishes as before, set it down, and vanished. Aladdin's mother, knowing what her son was going to do, went out about some business, on purpose to avoid being in the way when the genie came, and when she returned was almost as much the

as before

surprised

However, she

lamp.

enough by

As soon

to

as

as

them two or three

last

he for

one

took

Jew

his

passed a goldsmith's shop,

very

the character of a

goldsmith said,

loaded

lad,

you

as

certain

Jew, 1

you

to

are

and

at

then

him

;

but

and

is

so

will

have anything to

I

called

come

man.

The

him,

and

to

and

present,

back

perhaps

vou

the greatest rogue even

is

sold,

owner of which had

and honest

fair

way he

his

have often observed

I

that he

show me

the

on

;

and

dishes

the

you go by with

talk

a

empty-

again

imagine that you carry something which

handed. sell

of

again

him,

perceiving

"My

days.

Aladdin found out their provisions

were expended, went to look

of the

down with her son, and much as they liked, she

sat

when they had eaten set

prodigious effect

the

at

will

among

the Jews,

nobody of prudence do with him. If you will

known, that

well

what

do not know

you

give

now

you

the

carry, full

and

it

worth of

is it,

to

or

be I


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. you

direct

will

cheat

other

to

of getting

more money from

induced Aladdin to

pull

and show

goldsmith,

that

it

it

the

to

w\is

made

"What

him

who

merchants

will

not

you."

The hopes

saw

123

if

he

Aladdin

a

told

villain!'''

him

for a piece

cried

the

what

is

that

past cannot

who

at

his

vest,

first

sight

cried the goldsniitli.

as that to the

he

had

of gold each.

goldsmith;

under

of the finest silver, and asked

had sold such

such,

it

for his plate

"but,"

which

"What

added

be recalled.

the value of this plate,

sold

is

Jew, when him twelve

he,

By

a villain!"

"my

son,

advising you

of the finest silver


ARABIAN NIGHTS.

THI-:

124

we

use in our shops,

the

Jew has cheated you." The goldsmith took a

the

an

and

dish,

would

plate

silver

fine

which he offered to

went

after

his dishes

as

him

for

advantage,

treasure

same

dressed

such

better;

clothes

as

she

as

dealing,

him

sold

much

as

so

and never

for

all

them

After their manner of

mother had an inexlamp, and might have

his

their

for

as

fair

to.

in

frugality

his

of gold,

pieces

but

and had

had whatever they wished the

his

any other person, tray,

him that

immediately.

to

and the

how much

took the gold,

Though Aladdin and haustible

sixty

weighed

scales,

assured

his

weight came

the

cost,

pay him

to

Aladdin thanked greatly

pair of

by weight

fetch

you see how much

let

had mentioned

he

after

ounce of

will

I

yet

for,

except

before, his

they lived with

mother,

by

earned living,

it

that

she

Aladdin

spinning

may

wore

only

cotton.

easily be sup-

posed that the money for which Aladdin had sold the

and trav was

dishes

some time. During

interval,

this

shops

of the principal

cloth

of gold

jewellery, sation,

and

and,

merchants,

frequented

silks,

oftentimes

joining

in

stuffs

their

and

conver-

knowledge of the world and

By his he came to know

the

where they sold

linens,

demeanour.

the jewellers

Aladdin

silver,

acquired a

spectable

maintain them

sufficient to

acquaintance that the fruits

re-

among which


TMK ARABIAN NIGHTS. he

had

had

he

but

anyone,

to

this

coloured

of

value;

One day town al

Buddoor,

lifted

Aladdin

as

the

crowd of

within

even to

not

three

opportunity

of

which

her

princess

was noted

throughout

beauty,

and

not

it

was

of charms,

the

wind

him an

The

face.

for

therefore

such

seen

enchanted.

dazzled,

after the princess

before

It

a

came

world

the

surprising

who had never

Aladdin,

time

is

by

she

gave

charming

the

Buddir

attended

When

of Aladdin

veil,

seeing

about

Princess

the

paces

her

of

walking

and slaves.

four

mention

to

mother.

daughter,

sultan's

ladies

or

corner

a

meet

to

not

his

was

were,

inestimable

of

prudence

the

lamp

the

stones

glass,

happened

he

great

when he took

gathered

instead

125

a

her that

blaze

was some

had passed bv before Alad-

din recovered from his astonishment and went home.

He

could

not,

his

mother,

ful

and

melancholv

happened

to

returned

on the

image

however,

perceiving

her sofa,

of

than

make him and

or

so,

but

remained

charming

he were

if

silent,

but

al

musing

He

ill.

down

carelessly

sat

Buddir

mother served the supper,

and

princess,

more thoughtasked what had

he was usual,

no answer,

the

the

forget

that

on the

Buddoor.

Aladdin could

His eat

little.

After supper she asked so all

melancholy. that

Aladdin

him

again

answered

by

why he was telling

had occurred that dav, and ended

her

bv sav-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

126

"I

ing,

and

press; I

love

my

the

am

and

than

can

I

ex-

moment, without the amiable Buddir al Bud-

as

cannot live

door,

more

princess

the

increases every

passion

resolved

ask

to

marriage

her in

of

her father."

sultan

Aladdin's mother listened with surprise to what

when he

her son had told her; but

talked of asking

must have

the princess in marriage, she thought he

taken

of his

leave

"Indeed,

senses. seriously,

cannot help telling you that vou have forgotten

"T

and

yourself;

you would put

if

vours into execution, prevail

you."

upon "You,

think

"that

she,

of

your

gotten

that

tailors

in

answ^ered

can

was

and that

marry their daughters but like

I

course

son," con-

assurance

Have you of

am

the of no

to for-

poorest better

themselves?"

you that

can sav;

engage

I

to princes, sons of sover-

"Mother," answered Aladdin, told

how

and do not you know that sultans never

extraction,

eigns

amazed

the

one

"I

mother,

are you,

have

daughter?

father

the capital,

the

cautious

Why, who vou

sultan's

your

of

proposal for

the

replied he immediately.

"I shall be

such an errand.

tinued

resolution

do not see w^hom vou can

I

yourself,"

and surprised,

this

venture to make

to

go to the sultan!"

in

mother

the

replied

son,"

and

nor

I

foresaw

tell

vour

vou

all

that

as^ain that

remonstrances

"I

have already

you have

said, or

neither vour disshall

make

me


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. my

change

mind.

ask the princess I

marriage for

and

of you,

desire

have told you that you must

I

in

my

in

"But reflect, my son," "nobody ever asks a favour taking is

to

fit

Consider

off'er?

which

object

could sav to

to

you

well,

him

dissuade

"I own. Mother,

presume

to

it

You

my

carry

persevere

sav

from

I

agree

of

it

fit

to

I

an

;

As

and can

the

shall her.

have nothing worthy never thought

I

I

have nothing

Mother, that what the

may be

cave

mean what you and I coloured glass; but now I am un-

and

tell fit

I

vou that thev are jewels of

for

the

greatest

monarchs.

I

worth of them by frequenting the shops

and you may take stones

I

me from

present?

both took for

know

and

I

to the necessity of a present,

do not you think.

acceptable

value

me

but

far,

marrying

of

and own that

brought home with

great

so

adore her,

I

but as to what you say, that

deceived,

and

design,

his

customarv to go to the sultan

with you,

offer,

mother

great rashness in

design

without a present, and that of his acceptance.

an

to

obtain."

to

that his

all

pretensions

my

in

not

is

it

without

aspire

vou

for

is

love the princess, or rather,

always

mother,

the

of the sultan

Aladdin heard very calmly replied,

refuse,

to

grave."

replied

impossible

is

it

a favour

is

it

:

and what present have you that

present,

a

me

beg of you not

I

you would see me

unless

127

which

I

my word

have seen

in

that all

the

the shops

precious

are

not to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

128

compared

be

beauty.

them; fetch

hold

and

it,

have,

either

for

porcelain

large

a

we have

look when

how

us see

let

them

arranged

they will

according to

he took the jewels out of the two bags

had kept them, and placed them

when

emitted

and

davtime,

the

in

After

admired

had

thev

of the

mother and beautv

the

son.

of

him,

favourable

"Mv conceive effect,

our

present

the

that

eye;

am

sure

mv

lose is

my mouth

open so

valuable

confusion trated;

to

but,"

endeavours to

She

used

;

and

tell

the

added please

many

its

I

shall

I

return

home

she,

"I

desired

have no power

which

that

cannot

attempt to

present,

shall

vou

if

shall

therefore

;

but

labour,

that I

"I

look upon me with

sultan will I

have

will

deliver your strange message to

gain you

will

good woman,

the

said

that

or

one which

is

the

to

reception."

son,"

a favourable

going

having a present to

not

of

here

since

from

yourself

under pretext

make a

excuse

cannot

sultan

the

"Now

jewels some time, Aladdin said to his mother,

you

they

lustre

variety

the

colours, dazzled the eyes of both

which he

in

order according

in

But the brightness and

fancy.

his

to

fit

Aladdin's mother brought the china dish,

to

or

size

dish

colours."

different

their

we

those

to

You have

not

you

exert

say

again

your hopes are will

only

my

in

frus-

best

you."

arguments

to

endeavour

to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

129

make him change his mind, but the charms of the had made too great an impression on

princess

Aladdin's

heart

him

for

be

to

design.

He

persisted in importuning his

execute

his

resolution,

and

from

dissuaded

she,

mother

much

as

his

to

out

of

tenderness as for fear he should be guiltv of greater

complied

extravagance,

As sion

was now

it

late,

"Child,"

the

next day.

din,

"if the sultan should

as

wish

I

for

with

proposal

be-expected

where

lie

your

and the time

said

reception

mother

me

receive

after

should

he should ask

me

Alad-

to

my

scarcely-to-

this

think

these than

till

favourably

as

me

asking

of

your riches and your estate after

off

even hear

should

and

admis-

for

was put

it

the

sake,

calmness,

sooner enquire say,

request.

his

was passed,

palace

the

to

with

(for he will

your person),

if,

I

these questions, what answer

would vou have me return him?" "Let us not be uneasy, Mother," replied Alad"about what may never happen.

din,

see

how

the

you.

gives,

sultan If

it

receives,

should so

fall

am

has supported

so long will

us

let

us

and what answer he he desires

out that

to be informed of what you mention,

of an answer, and

First,

have thought

I

confident that the lamp which

not

fail

me

in

time

of need."

The against that

tailor's

widow

could

what her son then

the

not

proposed,

lamp might be capable

sav

anvthing

but reflected

of doing

greater


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I30

wonders than

just providing

consideration

satisfied

removed

vented her from

promised her

"Above

of

have

pre-

she

had

Aladdin,

who

service

sultan

;

thoughts,

to her,

said

Mother, be sure to keep secret lamp,

the

we have

Aladdin

the

mother's

things.

success

caution

with

his

our possession the

same time

the

at

undertaking the

son

into

all

and

her,

This

food.

the difficulties which might

all

penetrated

them with

and

expect;"

to

depends

thereon

for

and

after

mother parted

his

this

go to

to

But violent love, and the great prospect of immense a fortune, had so much possessed the

rest.

so

son's

thoughts that he could not

well

as

he

awakened

daybreak, the

to

before

and the great their

seats

assisted

his

of

officers

the

in

admittance,

get

to

other viziers

vizier,

the

state

went

put

set

she

came

viziers

were

one

forwards

and just

of people,

to the

finer

for gates,

the

more easy

which

in;

the grand vizier,

the divan,

a

When

the other

of the

but, notwithstanding

she got into

carriage,

palace.

sultan's

most distinguished lords gone

in

dav before, wrapped than the other, which

tied at the four corners for

and

take

jewels the

the

two napkins,

in

to

in

where the sultan always

divan,

Aladdin's mother took the china dish,

was

if

person.

in

they had

before

rose

mother, pressing her to go

grand

the

He

wished.

and

palace

sultan's

possible,

have

could

himself so

repose

the

Court

crowd

spacious hall,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

131

the entrance into which was very magnificent.

placed

and

hand.

left

according

to

the

who

lords

great

and

right

before

herself just

the

sat

Several

the

until

generally the to

bv

were and

adjudged,

time

the

divan

broke

up,

when

returned

apartment,

attended

the

other

his

called,

rising,

sultan his

on

council

causes

pleaded

order,

their

grand vizier

sultan, in

She

2:rand

viziers

the

vizier;

and

ministers

of state then retired, as also did

all

those whose business

had called them thither: some with

pleased The

gaining

causes,

others dissatisfied

at

some

in

the sentences pronounced against them, and

expectation of theirs being heard the next

Aladdin's mother, all

not

seeing the sultan

sitting.

retire,

again

When

Aladdin

and resolved to go home.

day,

that

saw

her

designed for the sultan, of her

bring

success,

and

in

ill

news,

;

return

he

him some

her any questions

and

would

the people depart, judged rightly that he sit

their

sultan.

w^ith

knew

his

the

present

not what to think

fear

lest

she

should

had not courage to ask

but she told

him speedily what

had happened, and how she had found no opportunity ever,

of speaking to

to

the

sultan,

promising,

go again the following day.

how-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

132

Though was forced fortify

be

with

satisfied

to

find

that

had

which was

the greatest difficulty,

and to

delay,

mother

his

Aladdin

violent,

this

He

himself with patience.

satisfaction

to

was very

his passion

to

least the

at

had

got

over

procure access

to

the sultan, and hoped that the example of those

she saw speak to him would embolden her to acquit

when

herself better of her commission

might

opportunity

The next morning

sat

again the

and

shut,

the

davs

understood that

She went

next.

appointed,

and

morning,

thousand times to as sultan

her;

only

for

approached cause

one

in

the

its

sultan,

turn,

and

sixth

dav,

if

a

luckilv the

notice

particular

who came when each

those

gone

perhaps

purpose,

taken

not

directly

with

of

petitions

pleaded their

mother was not

Aladdin's

of them.

On

the

was broken

own

had

himself

must come

success as on the

little

have

little

council

herself always

placed

of

times afterwards on

six

might

gates

the

therefore she

before the sultan, but with as first

dav before,

as earlv as the

everv other dav,

but

the sultan's

came there she found the

she

divan

the

favourable

a

him.

repaired to

she

palace with the present,

and when

speak to

to

offer

up,

apartment,

some

have

for

who

attends

however,

when he

the

said

time

to

sultan

constantlv

everv

a

divan

the

returned

grand

his

observed

after

to

his

vizier,

"1

certain

day

that

woman, I

give


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Do

know what

vou

As

the

sultan

what she has

hear

niav

I

do not

say."

to

By

time the widow was so

this

did not think

her son

satisfy

anv trouble,

it

of the

ceived

her,

waited

so

and, long,

enter upon

hear

So she

divan;

answered: think

from

bid

of

the

her

the

woman

the

and

near,

I

let

business hrst."

was

and

called,

herself before I

"Before vou

vizier,

remember her come

mother

per-

having

the

sultan,

have observed vou beginning

to

when

the

he

to stand

rising

of

what business brings you here?"

mother prostrated

your

the

pardon

the sultan,

least offensive,

and

and

herself again

"I beg of vour Majesty,

my demand

replied

to

about;

prostrated

Aladdin's

first

for

and despatch

long time,

the

sultan

her

said

front

the grand vizier

the

"Good woman,

said:

in

compassionating

Aladdin's

had

audience

next

business,

anv business,

spoke to you us

of

report

could but

placed herself

and before

sultan as usual, his

The

him.

please

day she went to the divan,

had made

that

sultan,

she

if

to

neglected nothing that lay

that she

her power to

in

much used

and stand before the

go to audience, she

a

not know,

our next audience,

that

her,

call

to

fail

napkin.

a

in

wants?'

she

grand vizier did

the

"If she conies to

said:

wrapped up

with something

audience,

133

if

you should

to assure

forgiveness."

"I will forgive you, be

me

"Well,' it

what


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

134 it

no

and

may,

hurt

come

shall

you;

to

speak

boldly."

When precautions,

him

for fear of

had taken

she told

seen the Princess

Buddoor, the violent love that

al

these

all

the sultan's anger,

how Aladdin had

faithfully

Buddir

mother

Aladdin's

sight

fatal

had inspired him with, the declaration he had made

when he came home, and what representations she had made to dissuade him from a passion "no less disrespectful," said she, "to your to

her of

it

Majesty, daughter.

But,"

my

of taking

and

severe, act

if

I

than

sultan,

as

continued

me

threaten

refused

marriage of your Majesty; the

greatest

to his

more

my

request, to

son,

The mildness,

before

had

the

china

the

for

pardon for

and

that

which

it

me,

hearkened

brought tied dish,

of the

which

throne,

up

to

led

accede

to

this

discourse

had it,

Aladdin

also

project."

a

in

she

untied

desperate princess in

a

any answer,

her

per-

to

was not without

but

rash

so

and without showing the gave

the

was

I

as

beg your Majestv once

I

only

not

entertaining

sultan

he

she

foot

reluctance

ask

instead

son,

some

with

come and

to

"mv

she,

vour

princess

was so obstinate

advice, to

the

to

least

with

anger; but

asked her what

napkin. set

She took

down

and presented

at it

the to

sultan.

The

sultan's

expressible;

amazement and

surprise

were

in-

he received the present from the hand


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. mother,

of Aladdin's

"How

joy,

how

rich,

and

admired

crying out

the

all

transport

a

in

beautiful!"

handled

135

he had

Aft;^r

one

jewels,

dish,

"Behold, admire, wonder, and

said,

never beheld jewels so rich

confess that your eyes

and

"Well," continued such

my

present?

a

The

before."

beautiful

the

Is

ought

one who values her

"what

not

I

The

him

fied to

without

grounds,

He went

mind. the

ear,

said,

worthy

Majesty

he was

the

sultan,

that

to

time,

my

a

to

look

to

make

a

an

entire

ness

The was

son with

so

me

three

resolution.

final

on with

whom a

nobler

sultan,

but

by so

dazzled

might change

his

him

in

own

that the present

but

I

beg

of

your

months

before

you

hope,

before

that

I

favourable

than

will

eye,

Aladdin,

be

able

who

is

your Majesty."

though he was

possible

and not

you have had the good-

present to

signi-

the princess

afraid,

whispering

and,

princess,

grant

stranger

not

cannot

the

son,

a present,

him,

to

"I

of

to

come

it

therefore

and extraordinary

rich

is

;

extreme

vizier into

intention of bestowing

his

to

price?"

great

had some time before

sultan

his

on a son of

you

say

bestow her on

to

These words put the grand agitation.

charmed.

worthy of the princess,

so

at

was

vizier

sultan,

not

it

And

daughter?

after

showing

another, he turned to his grand vizier and,

him the

of

for

considerable

the

fully

vizier

a present,

persuaded that to

provide

yet,

as

his

he had


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

136

him

given

request.

he

said

Turning,

me

daughter

yet,

agree

I

but

;

the

as

preparations

answer,

favourable

confusion

told

her son of the

she

in

the

mother

his

of

the

at

more

had met

the

When

refusal

had

she

her mission, Aladdin

men,

all

and

had taken

she

pains

the

but

;

she

since

instead

result of

for

wedding

the

home much

thought himself the most happy of

thanked

my

princess

for

had dreaded.

and

tell

again."

had expected,

gratified than she a

time come

mother returned

Aladdin's

widow,

you have

proposal

the

to

cannot marry the

I

of that

expiration

granted

to the old

not be finished for three months

could

with

and

him,

to

therefore,

"Good woman, go home, and

to her,

your son that

made

hearkened

hopes,

his

affair.

When

two

of

his

mother went one evening

on

coming

The

shops,

drest

with

into

months

three

the

to

were

buy some

the city found a general

instead of foliage,

past,

oil,

and

rejoicing.

being shut up, were open,

silks

and

carpeting.

Aladdin's

mother asked the oil-merchant what was the meaning

of

all

preparation

this

of

public

festivity.

"Whence came you, good woman," said he, vou do not know the grand vizier's son marry the Princess Buddir daughter,

to-night?

are

to assist

the

ceremonv

at the is

to

These

al

Buddoor, the

officers

is

solemnized."

palace,

to

sultan's

whom you

cavalcade to the

be

"that

see

where


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. This was

She

ran,

her

son,

news enough

who

This

nothing.

to

marry the

night

of what

truth

Aladdin

Buddir had

she

she

was

of

spirits,

he

son

heard

She

so that from

it,

Any

thunderstruck.

soon

rival

his

bethought

but

;

himself

man

other

sudden

a

roused

of

his

lamp,

the

which had on every emergency been so useful and without venting

him,

against the

be

happy

so

as

Mother, he

my chamber

his

the vizier,

sultan,

"Perhaps,

said,

is

said.

disappointing

and

come

no reason to doubt the

had

he

You depend

Buddoor."

al

to

event.

vizier's

would have sunk under the shock hope

home

but they will

grand

the

Princess

how

related

circumstances

all

mother.

such

undone!

are

sultan's line promises,

to

any

suspected

little

"Child," cried she, "you

then

Aladdin's

for

she was quite out of breath,

till

upon the

137

rage or

the

he

son,

himself

:

only

mav

son

vizier's

promises

empty words

in

his

to

while

not I

go

moment, do vou get supper ready." She accordingly went about it, but guessed that her son was going to make use of the lamp

into

to

prevent the

When the

lamp,

a

marriage.

Aladdin was

rubbed

when immediately

it

the

in

in

genie

him,

"What would vou have?

you

as

your slave,

have that lamp

chamber,

his

the

same place appeared, I

;

I

all

took

before,

and said to

am readv

and the slave of

in their possession

he as

to

those

obev

who

and the other 10


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

138

"Hear nie," said Aladdin; "you have hitherto brought me whatever I wanted as to provisions, but now I have business of the of

slaves

lamp."

the

importance

greatest

demanded

you

for

Buddir

Princess

the

execute.

to

me,

only

requiring

instead of keeping

married ask

of

her to

you

the that

is

you bring

them

the

"I

genie,

grand

will

has this night

What

they are

as

hither."

but

delay,

son.

vizier's

soon

as

both

he

promise,

that

in

he promised her

months'

three

have

Buddoor

al

marriage of the sultan her father; to

I

I

married

"Master,"

replied

chamber,

supped

obey you."

Aladdin having then

his

left

with his mother, with the same tranquillity of mind as

and

usual,

marriage

as

concern

least

again

to

after

of

an

supper talked of the princess's affair

he then

;

await

the

wherein he had not the

retired to his

execution

of his

own chamber orders to the

genie.

In the meantime everything was prepared with the

magnificence

greatest

celebrate

the

princess's

was spent with rejoicings

When proceeded

till

the to

all

the

in

nuptials,

and the

the usual ceremonies

them

Aladdin's

evening

and great

midnight.

company had execute

dispersed,

Aladdin's

chamber.

down than

Aladdin

No

in

the

and

an instant

sooner had

ordered

genie

the

commands,

transported the bride and bridegroom into

palace to

sultan's

he genie

set

to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

139

again

young man and shut him up, and come the next morning before davbreak. The

genie

did

the

take

and

told,

which

upon him,

breathed

prevented

had

he

after his

stirring,

him.

left

Passionate cess,

only

but

the

an

to her

with

said,

unjust

particulars,

Aladdin

gave

could

and

surprising

alarmed

word from

favour

in

safety.

only

is

it

of

these

attention

to

what

and amazement of

fright

he

that

of myself."

nothing

unexpected

much

her so

"Fear

possessing you, contrary

little

The

air,

extremity

this

knew

very

say.

respectful

a

in

who

princess,

for the prin-

when they were

vou are here

rival

promise

sultan's

The

so

much

have been forced to

to prevent to

was Aladdin's love

adorable princess,

nothing, I

as

he did not talk

alone,

If

was

he

as

had

adventure

an

could

not

one

get

her.

Aladdin had no occasion the next morning

to

who appeared at the hour appointed, and said to him, "I am here, Master, what are your commands?" "Go," said

rub

the

Aladdin,

lamp

to

"fetch

where you

left

the

call

the

him,

genie,

vizier's

son

out

and take him

cess to the sultan's palace from

of the

place

and the

prin-

whence you brought

them."

The son,

and

palace

genie in

an

presentlv instant

returned

with the

transported

from whence they had

been

them

vizier's

into

brought.

the

All


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I40

however,

time,

this

either

princess

the

to

Neither did

genie

was

the

grand

or

hear anything

they

Aladdin

between

the

him

and

from

transportation

one

son.

vizier's

discourse

the

of

they

;

never visible

only

place

perceived

to

another,

which we mav well imagine was enough

to alarm

their

them.

The

and the

melancholy, not

and told

sultaness

and

princess,

received but

her

to her mother,

had

befallen

The

sultaness

very patiently,

he

could

he had found

her to

last

whether she

see

same manner.

but at

very

that

state

some time the princess

for

that

what

in

asked

the

in

finding

was

went immediately to the

her,

her

princess

the

sultan,

word from

get a

the

day

following

This

she

refused

was induced

to

did,

speak

to tell

all

her.

heard

the

all

but would

princess told

her

more

es-

not believe

pecially as the vizier's son,

when

it,

questioned, denied

would be thought mad if he acknowledged it. However, when night fell, and the festivities, which had again been kept up

the

all

story,

genie

of

couple in

to

the

vious

to

were

day,

he

being afraid

the his

same

over,

lamp house,

more

Aladdin once to

bring

and

discomfort

the

they passed

and

sent

the

newly-married

terror

the

as

the

night pre-

one.

The vizier's son now began pay somewhat dearly for being

to

the

think

he

had

sultan's son-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

141

in-law, and to wish the marriage might be annulled

and he

The

when questioned

princess

her father

question

bade the

truth,

convinced

he,

grand

vizier

son.

his

This

the

sultan

the

told

and

happened,

that

all

spoke

she

that

peace once more.

in

left

he

and

did,

the

poor bridegroom

was

his

own that he had misled them With tears in his eyes he begged previous day. father to express to the sultan how deeply he

felt

the

honour that had been conferred upon him

by

the

alliance,

anxious to

only too the

but

allowed to retire from not

just

the

that

beg

to

the

princess

palace,

exposed to so terrible

longer

The grand obtaining

what he asked,

mined already all rejoicings

a

the

as

orders w^ere

;

be

a

it

was

moment

persecution.

no great

found

vizier

alleging

should

be

might

he

that

difficulty

sultan

in

had deter-

given to put a stop to

the palace and town, and expresses

in

despatched to

all

mand them,

and

parts of his dominions to counterin

short

a

time

all

rejoicings

ceased.

This

both

sudden and unexpected change gave

of

out

and kingdom

in the city

and enquiries it,

;

but no other account could be given

except that both the vizier and

of

the

but Aladdin

himself

at

rise

to various speculations

palace

knew the

very the

happy

much

secret.

success

his

dejected.

He

son went

Nobody

rejoiced within

procured

by

his


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

142

Neither the sultan nor the grand

lamp.

had

Aladdin

forgotten

thought

least

and

enchantment which

caused

who

had

the

in

the

of

the

request,

his

had

he

that

vizier,

any the

concern

dissolution

marriage.

Aladdin

waited

completed which

the

three

the

till

months

were

had appointed before

sultan

the marriage between the Princess Buddir

Buddoor

al

and himself was to take place, and the next day sent

mother

his

to the palace to

remind the sultan

promise.

of his

Aladdin's mother went to the palace, and stood in

same place

the

The

sultan

as before in the hall of audience.

no sooner

eyes

cast his

upon her than

knew her again, remembered her business, and how long he had put her off; therefore when the grand vizier was beginning to make his report the he

and

sultan interrupted him,

"Vizier,

said,

I

see the

good woman w^ho made me the present of jewels

some months ago forbear your report till I have heard what she has to say." Aladdin's mother came to the foot of the throne, ;

prostrated

asked

sultan said in

"I

she,

name

the

months

come

herself as usual,

at

the

what

her

come of

mv

to

would

she

represent

son

promise."

to

Aladdin,

end of which

again are expired,

ber your

and when she rose the

and

to

vou

"Sir,"

have.

your Majesty, that

the

ordered

beg you

to

three

me

to

remem-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. The

143

when he had fixed a time to answer the request of this good woman, little thought of hearing any more of a marriage which he imagined must be very disagreeable to the princess, when he sultan,

considered the meanness and poverty of the widow's dress and appearance,

declined his

his

embarrassing

had

he

till

wav

a

J

is,

to

to

he

;

consulted

that,

however

with

it."

The vice,

Aladdin

their word,

he

be,

it

and

widow,

true

sultans

am

ready to

I

"there

the

match

complaint,

of

comply

cannot

grand

tailor's is

of

upon the princess

approving of the

turned to the

"(xood woman,

may

he

best

he,

said

cause

so high a price

rich

sultan,

any

the

avoid

to

^

set

to

opinion, sire,"

MaiJ est v vour J

for

giving

without

mv

him

advised

vizier

"In

ability.

which

by

him

for

vizier.

The grand is

answer

an

(jiving^

summons

this

was somewhat

promise

his

fulfil

but

vizier's

ad-

and said to her,

ought

to

abide

keep mine, bv

making your son happy in marriage with the princess my daughter. But as I cannot marry her without some further valuable considerations from your son, you may as soon as he

of

the

already m;ide

me

gold,

like as

full

tell

shall

him

send

same a

I

me

my

promise

fortv travs of

massive

will fulfil

sort

present

of,

of

jewels

and

you

carried

have bv the

number of black slaves, who shall be led by many young and handsome white slaves, all


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

144

ready

him and

bestow

to

I

wait

will

these

my

princess

the

conditions

you bring me

till

mother prostrated

Aladdin's

am

I

daughter upon

good woman, go and

therefore,

;

On

magnificently.

dressed

him

tell

so,

answer."

his

a

second

time before the sultan's throne, and retired.

When

herself

came home she said to her son, " Indeed, child, I would not have vou think anv further of your marriage with the princess. The sultan received

she

me

very

clined

kindly,

and

you.

After

to

him

of

served

that

before

her

gave

he

son

an

remember

whispered

me

promise,

his

with

his

She then

answer."

his

exact account

of what

and ob-

I

grand

his

vizier

gave

sultan had

the

match.

Afterwards she said to him,

sultan expects your answer immediately;

tinued

in-

to

and the conditions on which he consented

said to her, to the

he

to

represented

months were expired,

Majesty that the three

begged

had

I

was well

he

believe

I

she,

laughing,

"The

but," con-

"I believe he may wait long

enough."

"Not Aladdin; this

so long, Mother, as

"the

exorbitant

thoughts culties,

of the

sultan

demand

you imagine," replied

mistaken

is

if

to prevent

princess.

and that he would

he

mv

thinks

entertaining

expected greater

I

have

by

diffi-

set a higher price

upon her incomparable charms." /\s

soon as his mother was gone out to market,

Aladdin took the lamp and,

rubbing

it,

the

genie


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. and

appeared,

princess

large

of massive

trays

whence

of the garden from

fruits

and these he expects black

slaves,

white

slave,

me

"gives

gold,

of the

full

took

I

the

demands

but

marriage,

in

"The

usual.

as

him,

to

daughter

his

fortv

service

his

Aladdin

said

sultan,"

first

offered

145

lamp

this

;

have carried by as many

to

each preceded by a young handsome

Go and

richly clothed.

present as soon

possible, that

as

him

before the divan

him

his

command

breaks

me

fetch

this

may send it to The genie told

I

up."

should be immediately obeyed,

and disappeared. In a

with a

forty

black

afterwards

each

slaves,

heavy trav of pure gold,

rubies, all

to

time

little

genie returned

having

on

head

his

of pearls, diamonds,

emeralds and everv sort of precious stones,

larger and

the

sultan.

more Each

embroidered

tissue,

together

with

the

house, which was before

full

the

it

and

a

beautiful

tray

than those presented

was covered with gold

with

flowers

of

white

slaves,

quite

but a small small

garden

one,

the

behind.

silver

these,

;

the

filled little

court

When

his

mother returned from market Aladdin said: "Lose no time. Mother, but go at once to the palace with

this

present

as

dowry demanded

the

for the

princess."

Without waiting clamations

of

to

surprise,

listen

to

he opened

and made the slaves walk

out,

his

the

mother's

ex-

street door,

bearing the precious


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

146

His mother followed,

burdens with them. Aladdin,

the

shut

When

door.

splendid

this

and was shown

palace

cavalcade

sensible this present

Buddir

The moment forty trays,

full

dress

ever

and the richness

persons

so

like

manv

and

not recover from

he could

and

brilliant

and

seen,

on the

the

four-

the elegance of

theii-

magnificence of their he was

princes,

nevertheless

eyes

his

most precious,

he had

son

the Princess

it."

cast

who appeared bv

score slaves,

mv

"Sir,

but hopes

sultan

of the

jewels

beautiful

the

the

presence,

sultan's

and said:

accept

will

reached

much below

is

Buddoor's worth,

al

vour Majesty

that

the

into

Aladdin's mother advanced is

and he,

so struck that

his admiration.

Instead

of answering Aladdin's mother, he addressed himself

grand

the

to

vizier.

"Well, Vizier," think a

?

Do you

Buddir

The

al

vizier,

ments.

was

am

It

into

master's so

me

far

mv

preferred son,

was too

so extraordinarv

visible

roval feelings,

he

having

that

;

envy and grief

display his

not

Aladdin's

merit

to

alliance

his

be the sultan's

to

durst

sufficient

from

do vou

daughter?"

notwithstanding

his

more than

ceived his

before

"wlio

aloud,

think him worthv of the Prin-

Buddoor,

to see a stranger

in-law

he

can be that has sent

it

present

cess

said

anv

his

senti-

present

being

his

re-

consulting

therefore,

returned

son-

answer:

thoughts

that

"I the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. person

who

present

is

him, if

in

the

should

I

then

arms

competition

in

the

all

lords

This

who were

council.

and

longer

your son that

said, I

but

hesitation,

wait

"My

good

with

open

embrace him, and the more haste he makes

come and hands,

As

tell

no

mother and

Aladdin's

to

go to

made

sultan

receive the princess greater pleasure

the

soon

overjoyed

as

as a

the

in

he

such

exalted

daughter from

do me."

will

widow

tailor's

woman

my

had

fortune, the

sultan

all

retired,

must have

her condition

been, to see her son raised beyond to

a

greatest treasure

your Majesty's daughter."

princess,

The lady,

that the

was applauded by

in

turned

noble

much more,

deserved

he

say

world ought not to be put

the

so

unworthy of the honour you would do

that

speech

mv

vour Majesty

were not persuaded

I

with

to

made

has

147

expectations

end

put an

to

the audience, and, rising from his throne, ordered that the

princess's chamberlains

the

trays

he

went

leisure.

the their

into

their

himself to

The

palace,

mistress's

magnificent

sultan,

telling

whither

he had

that

his

at

into

the princess

of

them

be

ordered

appearance,

lattices

apartment,

slaves were conducted

brought before her apartment, through the

and carry

examine them with her

fourscore

and the

should come

she

to

might see

not exaggerated

in

his

account of them. Aladdin's mother hastened

home and gave

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

148

tired

summoned to

with

a

and

bath,

magnificent

immediately

up

taking

suit

afterwards

and

of apparel,

convev

to

him

provide

to

re-

lamp,

the

him

and ordered

genie

the

the

and

chamber,

his

to

him

He

message to her son.

sultan's

charger

a

that should surpass in beauty the best in the sultan's

"I also require," said

stables.

my

My

and twenty more

mother must

also be provided

with suitable raiment and with six attend

her,

and

slaves,

side,

richlv clothed, to walk by to go before me.

"twenty

he,

women

slaves to

require ten purses containing ten

I

thousand pieces of gold."

Almost as soon they were carried attired

and riding

the palace.

thing

as

out,

and Aladdin,

sumptuously

a magnificent charger,

When

prepared

Aladdin had given these orders set out for

he arrived there he found every-

for

his

reception

and was

led

at

once into the sultan's presence.

The

sultan

richlv and

been

and

and

very different late

astonished

magnificently habited

himself,

fine shape,

was

w^as

ever he

than

bv

struck

a certain air of

his

good

had

mien,

unexpected dignity,

meanness of

from the

more

him

see

to

his

mother's

appearance. But,

notwithstanding,

prise did not hinder

amazement and

his

him from

rising

off

his

sur-

throne

and descending two or three steps quick enough to prevent Aladdin's throwing himself

embraced him with

all

the

at

his feet.

He

demonstrations of joy


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

hall

He

arrival.

his

at

where

then

him

led

into

collation was

a delicious

149

spacious

a

laid

The

out.

sultan and Aladdin ate by themselves, and conversed

At

together very pleasantly.

meal

confirmed

so

formed

had

he

opinion

was

sultan

the

conclusion of the

the

of

son-in-law

future

his

high

the

in

that he suggested the marriage should be solemnized

very

that

day.

"though great

said Aladdin,

"Sir,"

my

is

im-

patience to avail myself of your Majesty's goodness, yet I

beg

I

you

have built

therefore

palace

a

of ground

spot

fit

you

petition

I

me

give

to

round too

my

;

there

consider

as

much

genie.

to

home

"Genie,"

said

commend your

if

you have any regard

protector,

you must show,

diligence

than

ever.

if

at

as

I

he

if

Court.

than he again he,

exactness

cuting hitherto punctually whatever

but now,

you

see

politeness

up and always lived

the

reason

cannot

I

daughter."

sooner had he reached

summoned every

my

with

leave

had been bred

No

"take what ground you

words he embraced Aladdin, who

After these

took his

the

space enough on every quarter

is

soon united to

may

I

respects."

sultan,

but

palace,

convenient

a

that

till

it

princess;

the

me

grant

near vour palace,

"Sir," said the

defer

to

receive

to

to

more frequently pay my think proper

leave

"I in

have exe-

have demanded

for the lamp,

possible,

more

zeal

your

and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I50

"I would can,

palace

a

from,

have you build

the

but

opposite,

sultan's,

Buddir

al

Buddoor.

of the

materials

to

vou,

jasper,

agate,

Princess

various

colours

But

building.

of

and also

I

expect that

crowned with

the

a

formed of

gold

and

each

shall

contain

of

which

all

tasteful

the

in

outer court

garden

out

to

of

of the

me

front

in

alternatelv

the

lattices

I

most

the

in

and

rubies

would

of the

be that

;

of the

have an

and

palace,

above

all

things,

take

a place

which you

shall

of

treasure

a

the walls

evervthing

world. in

that there be laid

point

exceed

but

;

bricks,

diamonds,

with

shall

ever seen

care

architecture

enriched

so

emeralds that thev

spacious

marble

windows,

six

be

shall

kind

a

porphvrv,

finest

laid

silver,

workmanship

inner and

choice

the

sav,

on the terraced roof

and that instead of layers of

front

the

you will build me a large hall dome, and having four equal fronts,

palace

this

to

is

or the

;

spouse,

leave

I

that

lazuly,

lapis

my

receive

to

fit

you

as

proper distance

a

at

soon

as

uie,

and

gold

silver

coin."

By

the time

respecting set.

the

Aladdin had

building

The next morning

and

said,

see

how vou

"Sir,

the

your palace like

it."

in

an

instant,

palace,

and

genie

the sun

was

genie presented himself is

finished

Aladdin

signified his consent than the

thither

instructed the

of his

had

come and

;

no

sooner

genie transported him

he

found

it

so

much


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. beyond

his

admire

it.

expectation that he could not sufficiently

The

through

the

all

what

but

and slaves

officers

and

rank

their

to

which they were

to

the

The

appointed.

ser-

genie

showed him the treasury, which w^as opened where Aladdin saw heaps of purses,

then

bv

according

habited

vices

him

led

and magnificent, with

rich

all

genie

where he met with nothing

apartments,

was

151

a treasurer,

of different

sizes,

and disposed

him

The

most excellent order.

in

him of the

assured led

piled up to the top of the ceiling,

genie

and thence

treasurer's fidelitv,

where he showed him some

to the stables,

in the world, and the grooms them from thence they went to the store-houses, which were filled with all things

of the

busy

finest

both

necessary

When top

to

horses

dressing

in

;

for

and

food

ornament.

Aladdin had examined the palace from and particularly the

bottom,

four-and-twentv windows, and found

it

indeed

can

be

should

I

better

be

much

to

said,

than

satisfied

blame

the

much bevond

whatever he could have imagined, he

no one

with

hall

if

I I

"Genie,

am

and

;

found any

There is only one thing wanting, which I forgot to mention that is, to lay from the sultan's

fault.

;

palace the

to

door of the apartment designed for

the

princess,

walk upon."

a

carpet

The

of

genie

fine

velvet

The

genie

her to

immediately disappeared,

and Aladdin saw what he desired instant.

for

then returned

executed

in

an

and carried him


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

152

home

before the

gates of the

palace were

sultan's

opened.

When

the

were amazed

came

find

to

open the

to

from

gates, they

and

obstructed,

it

spread

of velvet

carpet

who had always been used

porters,

open prospect,

to an

grand

the

see

to

a

entrance.

They did not immediately look how far it extended, but when they could discern Aladdin's palace distinctly, their surprise was increased. The news of so extraordinary a wonder was presently spread The grand vizier, who arrived through the palace. soon

the

after

amazed than others the it

be

to

have

that

gave

must

him leave

palace

prise

us,

from a

to

we

think

so

in

and

that little

make him

believe

"why will you You know, as well

sultan,

short

let

Aladdin's

be

build

to

done with money cerely

the

it

the

for

we

proof

After the

can

riches, a

replied

it

daughter.

less

novelty, ran and acquainted

at this

be enchantment?

to

it

I,

no

enchantment.

all

"Vizier,"

as

being

open,

endeavoured

but

sultan,

were

gates

palace,

reception of

had

have

strange that he a

time

?

which

He

only

wished

one night.

my his

should raise

us see what wonders are in

of

I

to surto

Confess

be sin-

enchantment you talk of proceeds

the

envy on account of your son's disap-

pointment."

The hour the

of going

conversation.

to

council

put

an

end to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. When had

Aladdin had been conveyed home and

dismissed

the

ordered the

desired

one of the

in

bring

to

the

had

he

suits

By

her.

mother up

his

time the

from the council Aladdin had prepared

rose

mother

his

genie

found

he

genie,

and dressing herself sultan

153

go to the palace with her slaves, and

to

her,

she saw the sultan,

if

him she

to tell

should do herself the honour to attend the princess

towards

evening to

her palace.

mother was received

Aladdin's

palace

the

in

with honour, and introduced into the Princess Buddir al

Buddoor's apartment by the chief of the

As soon

as the

and desired her

women

the jewels collation sultan,

saw her she

princess

her to

down on

sit

rose, saluted,

a sofa

;

which Aladdin had presented served

who wished

At

up.

to be as

and while

and adorning her with

finished dressing

was

guards.

with his daughter

as possible before he parted with her, came

paid

the

When of the

and

lady

old

accompanied with times,

own apartment

mother on her surprising

by

and

respect.

her father:

sultan

followed

in

was night the princess took her leave

it

other several

her

great

a

same time the

the

much

to her,

a

left

for

They embraced each

tears.

and

adieus were tender

their

at

last

Aladdin's

hand carried

hundred

magnificence.

women All

the

palace, in

a

slaves

the

princess

left

with

superb dressed

his

litter,

with

bands of music,

which had played from the time Aladdin's mother


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

154

bad

being

arrived,

cession,

followed

tbe like

number

with

as

tbe

pro-

ushers

and

Four hundred of

Aladdin's

of the

illuniinations

palaces,

made

as

light

the

new

it

day.

At

length

the

Aladdin her

receive

had taken

care

midst

the

the

at

princess

with

ran

to

of the

grand point

princess,"

soon

said

she

as

have the

he,

had

him out

in

aspiring

and

princess,

my

you that you ought charms,

not

sultan's to

princess,

her

him,

"Adorable

respectfully,

apartment,

as

"if

you by

I

my

possession of so lovely

daughter,

I

must

tell

blame vour bright eyes and

me." (as

"I is

you that

I

obey without reluctance."

Aladdin, charmed factory

her

to

I may now call you)," answered the am obedient to the will of my father; enough for me to have seen vou to tell

"Prince princess, it

to the

person.

his

saluting

to the

joy

mother

His

who surrounded

officers

entered

at

imaginable

misfortune to have displeased

boldness

and

arrived all

entrance.

and she was charmed with

a

state

their head.

at

together with the

and

palace.

in

by a hundred

led

young pages carried flambeaux on each

which,

sultan's

togetber,

of black chamberlains, in two fdes,

their officers

the sultan's side,

joined

an

answer,

with

would

so

not

agreeable and

keep

the

satis-

princess

standing, but took her bv the hand, which he kissed

wnth the greatest demonstration of joy, and led her


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

155

number

into a large hall, illuminated with an inhnite

wax

of a

noble

by the care of the genie,

where,

candles,

was served up.

feast

Aladdin led the princess to the place appointed for

and

her,

during

repast

the

harmonious instruments began without

intermission

When company

And

marriage al

with

thus

feasting,

Buddoor

ended there entered several

a to

dances.

figure

and

singing

of Aladdin

festivities

concert which lasted

end of the repast.

country,

the

of

most

of

who performed, according

of dancers

custom

the

the

to

supper was

the

a

band

a

dancing

the

and Princess Buddir

closed.

Neither the

had any reason

princess to

nor the

He was

husband.

sultan

her father

complain of Aladdin's behaviour loving

and

courteous

as

a

his

bride, generous and noble towards the populace,

who loved head

wise

him, in

and

soon

council

and

showed a

that

he

courageous

to

had

heart

a

in

So the sultan had no fear but that when the time came for him to retire from the throne Aladdin would occupy it most worthily in his battle.

stead.

Aladdin had conducted himself several

years,

designedly had high

to

so

his

recollection

after

his

a

when

in

this

the African magician,

manner

who

un-

been the instrument of raising him of prosperity,

pitch in

recalled

Africa, whither he

expedition.

And though

he

him

to

had returned

was

almost


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

156

persuaded that Aladdin must have died

abode where he had

the subterranean

in

he

formed

to

examine

dying

was

didly,

and

respected.

a

has

lamp!

I

eniovs

perish

the

in

arrived

at

the

first

capital

object

of Aladdin,

he went to the

places

where persons and

portunity

but

do,

whom

come

you?"

self to;

"you must

never till

he

what

walk

a

people

through

the

most public and frequented the

best

distinction in

and he took an

who

everyone was the

next

the

and

horse,

enquire

to

taking

admiration

said

or

of China.

of

of enquiring

but find

a great while

soon heard Aladdin's name spoken

respect

of

set

the

long,

it

forwards,

himself and

was

and,

was not

should

a barb,

town,

He

tailor's

of

labour and studv

enjoying

his

He

but to refresh

His said

prevent

attempt."

morning mounted

mv

of

fruit

anger,

sorry

and virtue

secret

on what he

deliberating

stopped,

"This

rage,

a

the

the

however,

will,

much honoured

believed his death to be certain,

I

he

that

in

of

lamp,

became inflamed with

magician's face

discovered

instead

lived splen-

wonderful

the

and was

princess,

and he cried out

his escape,

of

possession

in

married

son

made

cave, had

had

The

found that Aladdin,

he

it,

in the

him,

left

bv which, when he came

horoscope

a

miserably

early

op-

"From whence

speaking.

certainly

tones of

Aladdin might be

this

person

met.

addressed

he

be

a

stranger

himnot to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. have heard

Aladdin

Prince

of

and

157

wonderful

his

palace."

my

"Forgive

ignorance,"

replied

African

the

magician,

"I arrived here but yesterday, and came

from

farthest

the

of

part

reached when

of his palace had not

The

urgent as

which

business

my

that

me

brought

But

any acquaintance.

will

I

do

The person having pointed

as

or

out

me

so

soon

making favour

the

way,

the

When

he

the

magician went thither instantly.

African

was

hither

go immediately and

mv curiositv, if vou will show me the way thither."

satisfv

to

came away.

I

was to arrive

object

fame

the

without stopping anywhere,

could,

I

sole

where

Africa,

came

to

the

sides,

he

doubted not but that Aladdin had made

lamp

of the

use

The

next

lamp was him,

or

palace,

:

to

point

and had

build

it.

was

to

where an

as

he

of

sand,

he

travelled,

entered

he

kept

it

operation his

and

;

of

"I

about

it

he

this

geomancy.

the

with

was

As

to

soon

which he alwavs carried with him when and

he

after

and so great was

his

had

performed

lamp was joy

at

that he could hardly contain himself. he,

all

he took his square box

lodging,

operations, he found that the ;

on

it

where

ascertain

whether Aladdin carried

discover by

palace

examined

shall

preventing

have the lamp,

my

carrying

it

off,

and

I

some

in

Aladdin's

the

discovery

"Well,"

said

defy Aladdin's

and making him sink


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

158

his

so

hifjh

a

On

from which he has taken

meanness,

original

to

flio^ht,"

return

his

khan

the

to

which

at

was

he

staying he entered into conversation with the keeper of

and

it,

wonderful palace,

Aladdin's the

greatest

much

curiosity

when he

in

town,

but

but

has

gone

is

palace,

tunity

to

bought

at

is

into

he

He

a

basket,

set it

out

went

who

days

a

"

and

hanging the basket on

his

for

Aladdin's

As

he

hooted,

palace.

"Who

A

will

and thought him,

change new lamps

passing

no

by,

heed

a

to

but continued his cry,

change

crowd of children

to

as

did all

madman for

the

"Who

or

old

scoffing will

a

ones.

and

change

lamps for new?"

He and

on

days

he

to

laughter,

at

coppersmith and

to a

he began crying:

paid

not

too good an oppor-

be

The magician

any dav is

eight

last

to

offer

he

three

who chanced

old

so

copper lamps which

lamps for new ones?"

collected

to

this

dozen handsome

approached

fool,

of

replied the

him

present

these

which

neglect.

a

matter,"

difficult

The magician thought

old

owner

"you may see

khan,

the

hunting expedition,

arm,

had

he

that

behold the

to

no

be

will

master of

put

declared

of

beauties

the

magnificence.

"That

the

upon

expatiating

after

repeated

forwards

princess,

in

who was

this

so

front

then

often,

of in

the the

walking backwards palace, hall

with

that

the

the four-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. and-twenty windows,

hearing

man

a

and not being able to distinguish to

the

hooting

about him,

what he

of the

cry something,

owing

words,

his

children and increasing

women

one of her

sent

159

slaves to

mob know

cried.

The

slave

was not long before

and ran into the

laughing

hall,

giggler,"

returned,

"Well,

heartilv.

the

said

"will vou

laugh

she

princess,

me what vou

tell

"Madam,"

at?"

an-

swered the

slave, laughing

"who can

forbear laughing, to

still,

see a fool with a basket on his

arm,

to

ones;

the

new

lamps,

change them

for old

of

full

asking

tine

crowd about him hardlv

stir,

mob

and

children

so that he can

making

the noise

all

thev can in derision of him."

Another female slave hear" IV ho

ic'ill

chancre old

foy

°,,

lambs ^

new?"

,i-

â&#x20AC;˘

'

)

of lamps,

old

vou speak F 1

.

not w^iether

but there

it,

an

is

one upon a shelf of the prince's robing room,

and whoever owns

new one in its may have the silly

know

I

mav have observed

the princess

um "Now

-j

mothis, said, ft

as to

taking

it

will

stead.

pleasure

give a

If the

sorry

to

find

princess chooses,

of trying

new lamp

anything for the

not be

if

this

for an old

exchange."

fool

a

she is

so

one without


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i6o

The lamp ful

spoke of was the wonder-

slave

this

which Aladdin

lamp,

had

before he departed for the chase;

times

several

but

before,

upon the shelf

laid

neither

he had done

this

the

the princess,

slaves

nor the chamberlains had

ever taken

of

At

when hunting he

it.

carried

all

about

it

The

except

other times

person.

his

who knew

princess,

notice

not the value

of this

lamp, and the interest that Aladdin, not to mention

had to keep

herself,

and commanded

santry,

make

hall,

he

gates than

him,

me

safe,

entered into the plea-

chamberlain to take

a

and no sooner got

new lamp for this." The magician never doubted but

palace

the

to

saw the African magician,

showing him the old lamp,

and,

and

it

The chamberlain obeyed, went

the exchange.

of the

out

it

called

to

"Give

said,

a

this

was the

lamp he wanted. There could be no other such in the palace, where every utensil was gold or

He

silver. lain's

his

snatched

it

hand, and thrusting

breast,

offered

him

choose which he liked out

one and carried

As wanted,

hastened

he

eagerly out of the chamber-

for

it

his

basket,

the

to

had reached

a

town, lonely

from the wonderful palace

bade

him

princess.

he threw away the rest of of the

and

having obtained what he

the magician,

out

he could into

The chamberlain picked

best. it

as far as

new

lamps,

and never waited

until

some distance then he drew the lamp

spot ;

his

at


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. from

his

genie

the

have?

I

slave

the

rubbed

and

breast

and

appeared

am ready of

hands; both

I

that

summons

"What would you

said,

obey you

to

your

as

who have

those

all

At

it.

i6i

that

and

slave,

lamp

their

in

and the other slaves of the lamp."

command

"I

t/X4

you," replied

the magician, "to transport

and

immediately,

me

palace

the

which you and the other slaves "/ '1^^'^^^^^

^^

fwV^^^Q^

f-

lamp have

^^^

with

city,

built in this

people

the

all

in

it,

to Africa."

The genie made no but with the assistance

other genii,

the

of

the

slaves of the

immediately

lamp,

reply,

transported

him and the palace

entire

to

the spot whither he w^as desired to

A

convey

female slave.

it.

As soon

as the sultan rose

the next morning, according to custom, he went into his closet to

have the pleasure of contemplating and

When

admiring Aladdin's palace. way,

and instead of

such as he

it

a

palace

he looked again, in

front,

he

to

nothing more than

still

the

he

first

his

built,

he thought

eyes;

but when

saw nothing.

right

had

looked that

saw an empty space

was before the palace was

was mistaken, and rubbed

again

he

and

left,

He

looked

but

beheld

formerly been used to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i62

see from bis window. that

he

the

spot

it

stood

where

the

was no longer

His ainazeiiient was so "reat

some time

for

be

to

prehend how so large he

turnincT

had

palace

He

seen.

leaving

much

so

mistaken

have

been swallowed

up

mark

apartment,

not

he

quitted

the

be

sent

sat

down,

At

years, and

without

in

had

it

heaps

not the

fallen,

and

;

am

"I

himself, if

:

he

last

if

expedition, agitated

retired

had

it

the

and

grand in

the

bv so many

his

to

behind him

looking

ordered

spot,

mind

some

for

by an earthquake there would

without

his

which

behind.

to

lain

left.'

with

for

he there

materials w^ould

be some

stone

a

said

stood

it

;

where

but

should vanish so soon,

as

"Certainly,"

to

could not com-

a palace as Aladdin's,

had seen plainly every dav

but the day before,

eves

his

stood,

before to

vizier

meantime different

knew not what to resolve. grand vizier came with so much preci-

conjectures

The

that

he

neither

pitation

that

passed,

missed

he nor his attendants, as they

Aladdin's

palace

;

neither

did

the

they opened the palace gates observe

porters w^hen

any alteration.

When

him,

said

to

sent

for

failed

of

"The

into

haste

me makes me

ordinary has

day

came

he

happened,

public

at

in

since

the

and

presence

sultan's

which

believe

audience,

of attending

the

vour Majesty

something

vou know I

usual

he

should time."

this

not

extrais

a

have


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. "Indeed/' said the sultan, extraordinary, to

be

so:

as

me what

tell

something very

is

and von

sav,

voii

"it

163

become

is

allow

will

it

of Aladdin's

palace."

"His

palace!"

amazement,

thought

"I

as

grand

the

replied

passed

I

place

usual

my

sultan,

"and

into the

was

not

are

"Go if

it."

closet,

been.

the

me

tell

went

where he no

with

amazement than had

sub-

sfiand vizier O

struck

its

said

closet,"

you can see

The

such

;

removed."

easily

into

stood in

buildings

stantial

so

it

in

vizier,

less

the sultan

When

he was

well assured that there was not the least appearance of The

this

palace, he returned to

the

sultan.

(!rand vizier.

"Well,"

the sultan, "have vou seen Aladdin's palace?"

answered the that

I

honour

was the subject

immense a

least

your

;

you

that palace,

admiration,

\yith

which all

its

work of magic and was only but your Majesty would not pay the

attention

The

of

to tell

the

riches,

magician

"No,"

"but your Majesty mav remember

vizier,

had the

said

sultan,

to

what

I

who could

said."

not deny what the grand


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i64

had represented to him, flew into the greater

vizier

"Where

passion.

wretch?" said

"that

he,

immediately."

off "it

may have

I

head taken

his

grand

be sent

to

for,

vizier,

he came to take his leave

since

of your Majesty, on pretence of hunting; to

wicked

that

the

replied

"Sir,"

some davs

is

impostor,

that

is

what

us

tell

he ought

become

is

of his

palace."

"Command a detachment of horse me loaded with chains," said the

to

to bring

him

The

sultan.

grand vizier gave the order and instructed the officer

command how

in

escape.

not

from

The

him

that

Aladdin ujight

Accordinglv about

fiva

or six leagues

advanced

sultan

the

met

was

he

officer

him

formed

that

town

the

chase.

act,

he should

he had sent

was

his

from

returning respectfully

in-

to

see

impatient

so

party to

the

and

accompany him

home. Aladdin had not the reason

of

within

half

meeting him

their

league

a

least suspicion of the true

of

the

surrounded him, when the to

him and

that

I

and to

vou, I

declare

carrv

beg of you

ourselves

much

not

of our

Aladdin,

you the

to

to

duty,

at

is

this

it

great

regret

order to

arrest

with

sultan's

take

detachment

addressed himself

vou before him

who knew

surprised

it

when he came the

city,

officer

"Prince,

said,

but

;

ill

as

that

and to forgive

a

criminal

we

acquit

us."

himself to be innocent, was declaration,

and asked

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. officer

of what crime he was accused.

officer

was unable to reply,

was useless

to

resist,

Aladdin was obliged

I

A

follow him on foot.

round

his

arms were pinioned down the

not conscious that

sultan's

heavy chain was immediately put about and fastened

himself of

to

lam

it

and

or government."

person

his

this the

seeing

committed any offence against the

have

neck,

To

and Aladdin,

alighted from his horse,

"Execute your orders;

said:

165

at

the

troopers,

;

body,

so

that

his

both

the officer then put

head of the detachment, and one taking

hold

of

the

end

of

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i66

and proceeding

chain

who was

obli^red

led Aladdin,

after the officer,

him on

follow

to

the

into

foot,

city.

When

never doubted

criminal,

be cut

took

and

off;

other

none gathered stones, sultan

sooner was than

received

orders but

led

suburbs,

as

state

a

head

his

and

arms,

Aladdin

perceiving of

crowded

brought

was

to

the

instant

who had escort.

before

summoned

was

off

that

at

those

and followed the

strike

to

that

horse,

that

executioner

the

immediately;

but

thus

the

he was generally beloved, some

as

and

sabres

No

entered

who saw Aladdin

people,

the

detachment

this

and

head

prisoner's

grand

the

the

vizier,

populace had forced the guard

the

the

square

great

before

the

palace, and were scaling the walls in several places,

and

beginning to

way to will

in,

said to the

consider

hazard

knows what

"My can

sultan,

"

I

your

their

beg of your JMajestv

what you are going palace being

force

to

to

do,

destroyed,

vou

since

and who

consequence may follow?'

fatal

sultan;

"who

have that audacitv?"

answered

Majesty will square,

so

but

cast

the

grand

of what sultan

great a

I

vizier,

"if

your

your eyes towards the great

and on the palace walls,

truth

The saw^

them down

palace forced!" replied the

"Sir,"

the

pull

vou

will perceive

sav."

much alarmed when he crowd and how enraged they were was

so


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. ordered the

he

that

executioner

immediately into the scabbard, and

put

porters

the

him,

Those who had

retire.

upon

got

already

the

design

they

had

loved,

The

and got quickly down,

saved

and

tumult

Aladdin

turned

towards

sultan,

raised

moving manner, one

received,

which

"Your I

will

show

Aladdin before

came

is,

to

I

it

the in

a

add

to

already

crime."

you."

went

up

to

the

door,

he

the

into

said:

his

room.

"Go

in;

Aladdin looked, but saw nothing.

upon which

his

who went

sultan,

know whereabouts your palace stood and tell me what has become of it." spot

him

have

to

the

he

answered the sultan; "perfidious you not know it? Come hither, and

him and led him to

which

to

Majesty

me know my

let

the

;

perceiving

said

your

of

that

rage

crime,"

Do

wretch!

beg to

rest.

liberty,

at

and,

and

voice,

the

dispersed.

balcony,

"I

more

favour

their

himself

found

the his

of

mob

and the

amongst

dearlv

had done to Aladdin

populace

the

abated,

When

sultan

overjoyed that

man they

a

news

the

which the

disarmed

of

life

published

justice

soon

the

walls,

abandoned

and were witnesses of what had passed, their

to

pardoned

declare to the people that the sultan had

and that they might

sabre

his

unbind Aladdin,

to

same time commanded

the

at

to

167

palace

had

When you

;

he

ought

look round

He

perceived

stood,

but,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i68

being able

not

how

divine

to

had

it

disappeared,

and

was thrown into such great confusion

ment

mv

"Sir,

Aladdin, breaking silence, replied

and own

perceive

I

built

can

neither

is

not

but can assure you

am

"I

not

replied

palace,"

in

had no concern

I

much

so

the

otherwise

out,

struck

otf,

mv

from

and

is

"I

no

may

its

removal."

your

about

my

value

be,

daughter

and would have you

will

I

in

vanished;

it

concerned

sultan,

ten thousand times more,

her

but

place,

its

cause

head

your

consideration

shall

:

which

palace

the

that

your Majesty where

tell

I

demanded of and what has become

impatient,

your palace,

is

daughter?"

have

I

growing

sultan

"Where

him: of

not return one word of answer.

that he could

The

amaze-

find

be

to

divert

me

purpose."

"I beg of your Majestv," answered Aladdin, "to

me

grant in

that

offer

"I sultan,

vou, for

time

mv

disposed

forty days I

head of at

give

make my

to

enquiries

have not the success at

the

of vour

foot

I

and

;

wish,

will

I

throne,

if

to

be

your pleasure."

you the forty days you

"but think not to

ask,"

abuse the favour

said the I

show

by imagining you shall escape my you out in whatsoever part of the I will find resentment

world vou mav conceal vourself."

Aladdin went out of the

sultan's presence with

great humiliation, and in a condition worthy of pity.

He wandered

away,

far

from the sultan's Court


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. and

all

who had known him

those

Possessed by despair,

an

end

Mussulman, he wished to

the

before

of

river's

a

He

slid

the

but,

the

down and

a projecting

at

had

still

good went

is

as

praying,

had he not caught

fallen

Happily for him he

rock.

himself,

and slippery, he

being steep

would have

wash

to

Mussulmen

custom with place

being

first,

to say his prayers.

brink

river's

by the

determined to put

he

but

existence,

his

to

days

his

in

prosperity, and found himself at length brink.

i6g

on

the

ring

which the African magician had put on his finger before he went down into the subterranean abode to fetch the precious lamp.

In slipping

down

the

bank

he rubbed the ring so hard that immediately the same

whom

genie appeared

he had seen in the cave.

"What would you have?" am ready of

I

that

ring

little

expected

my showing me "Save

now

be

back where

of

on

their

stands, it

first

at

a

second time,

ring ;

slave

finger;

of the

you lamp."

replied

either

where the palace

I

by

caused

or immediately transporting stood."

"What you command me," answered not wholly in my power; I am only the

"I

an apparition he

present calamity,

his

to the place

it

built

in

genie,

life,

to

"is

genie;

and the other slaves of the ring."

Aladdin, agreeably surprised so

the

your slave, and the slave

as

who have

those

all

both

obey you

to

said

must

address

the genie, the slave

yourself

to

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I70

"If

be

that

command port me

the

my

where

spot

the

to

what part of the world soever

me down under al

Aladdin,

replied

case,"

you, by the power of the

window

the

ring,

palace

may

it

"I

to trans-

stands,

in

and

set

be,

of the Princess Biiddir

Biiddoor."

These words were no sooner out of than

genie transported him into Africa,

the

midst

large

of a

ment,

where

plain

no great distance

from

a

palace

his

and

city,

under the window of the

exactly

mouth,

his

left

him.

All

was

this

the

to

stood,

at

him

placing

apart-

princess's

done almost

an

in

instant.

notwithstanding

Aladdin,

knew

night,

his

advanced,

retired

to

and

some

his

There,

chance, able

happiness,

carried

from

before

the

and

full

in

than

when

the

sultan,

in

sat

night

the

the

palace,

down

he a

was

at the

indebted

much more

he

was

al

was he foot

now

being

his

to

comfort-

arrested

immediate danger of losing

amused himself

the

of hopes and reflecting

which

for

he found himself

situation

but as

;

was quiet

distance,

of a large tree.

on

all

of

and the Princess Buddir

palace

Buddoor's apartments again far

darkness

the

and

delivered life.

He

some time with these agreeable thoughts, but, not having slept for two days, was not able to resist the drowsiness which came upon him,

but

fell

for

fast

asleep.

The next morning,

as

soon

as

day

dawned.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Aladdin

went

and

rose

where he expected

towards

171

the

apartments

to find his dear Princess

Buddir

As he walked he began to consider with himself whence the cause of this misfortune

al

Biiddoor.

had

proceeded,

and,

longer doubted that

lamp out of

the

negligence

But what

him.

he

be

it

accused himself of

moment away from

a

him

puzzled

most was,

who had been

could not imagine

He would

happiness.

He

sight.

his

no

reflection,

was owing to having trusted

it

letting

in

mature

after

have

soon

had known that both

so

he

that

envious of his

guessed

this

if

and the palace were

he

name of which would soon in Africa, the have made him remember the magician, his declared enemv but the genie, the slave of the ring, had not made the least mention of the name of the very

;

nor had Aladdin

country,

she

The

princess

had

done since her transportation

by the to

palace

scornfully

once

that

window,

her mistress. the

jovful

and, noise

dav,

she

he

presence

had

dared

always not

princess,

than

into

Africa

was

forced

treated

who

it.

him

so

As she

looking through

and instantly told could not believe

hastened herself to the window,

Aladdin,

opening

she

reside in

one of the women,

The

morning

because he was master of

perceived Aladdin,

tidings,

seeing of

a

that

earlier

whose

but

;

was dressing, the

rose

magician,

support

the

enquired.

the

immediately opened

it.

window made Aladdin

The turn


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

172

head that way, and perceiving the princess he

his

her with

saluted

There was the

princess's

and soon

upon

has shelf

a

the

that

of

lamp

his

in

said

else,

tell left

I

left

I

answered the princess,

dear husband,"

;

and what

since

yourself,

might

of

"do

my

fault,

for

I

But

let

us

was entirely of

it.

The

princess then related

old

lamp

fetched,

thev were

was Africa by the by

his

new

a

might see herself

then

in,

ought

now has

fallen."

she had changed

it,

she

ordered

and how the

in

the

unknown

which

she

was

who had

traitor

has

it

which

one,

he

magic

I

blame

not

me what

tell

how

found

that

next morning she

countrv

;

and into whose hands

for

that

is

Aladdin,

think only of repairing the loss

happened,

to

it."

replied it

owing

be

me most

grieves

to have taken more care

thither

at this

he

reunion,

anything

of

was afraid our misfortune

be

beneath

just

become of an old lamp which in my robing chamber when

"Princess,"

to

joy.

dear princess

his

rapture

first

have been the cause

the

his

chase."

"Alas! "I

held

afterwards

me what

door

private

little

"Before we speak

her:

for

a

expressed

that

air

window, and Aladdin entered

After the

arms. to

an

told

transported her

art.

"Princess," said Aladdin, interrupting her, "you

have informed

we

are

in

me who

Africa.

He

the traitor is

the

is,

most

by telling

me

perfidious

of


Aladdin saluted her

tvith

an aiv that expressed his joy.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. men

but

;

vou

a

only

this

account of his

full

to

me what

tell

and where he

"He

it

me

to

villainies.

"and

pulled

this

are

come me, a

to I

"he

equally

treats

"do not be displeased

important

to

But

both.

us

repairs

how

you,

so

to tell

wncked and perfidious

you."

have been here," replied the princess,

I

once everv day to see me,

and persuade assuring

showed

and

what most particularlv concerns me;

"Since

you

you with so many questions, since

conjure

man

assure

me,

before

out

it

can

I

triumph."

in

trouble

I

they

you

it."

"Princess," said Aladdin, that

desire

I

carefully wrapt up in his bosom,"

it

princess;

he

because

nor place to give

he has done with the lamp,

put

has

carries

the

said

neither a time

is

175

me

me that

to

him

take

and to try

mv

for

husband,

you were dead."

Aladdin then told the prmcess

that

it

would be

necessary for him to leave her for a time, to carry out a plan he

had formed

to rescue

in

order

both of

them from the power of the wicked magician. "I shall return by noon," said he, "and will then communicate mv design to you and tell you what vou must do to ensure success. But that you may not be surprised, I think it proper to acquaint

vou

beg of you long

at

that to

I

give

shall

change

orders

that

the private door, but that

my I it

apparel,

and

may not mav be opened

wait


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

176

at

the

knock."

first

which the princess pro-

All

mised to observe.

When

Aladdin was out of the palace, he looked

round him on

sides,

all

going into the

to change

When

made

man went about

and entering a

city,

The to

and,

shop

druggist's

to.

country-

the

and Aladdin

business,

to

the

to

asked

for

a

thoughts,

habit

his

to

and that he had not money enough

poor, for

told

it,

upon

dear;

some

exchange,

judging Aladdin by

druggist,

very

pay

very

him,

after

powder.

certain

be

his

the

peasant

a

made a proposal the man agreed

him,

which

habits,

they had

perceiving

hastened

country,

when he had overtaken him

and

pulled

him he had it, but that it was which Aladdin, penetrating his

out

his

purse

him

showing

and,

dram of the powder, which the druggist weighed, wrapped up in a paper, and gave him, telling him the price w^as a piece of

gold.

a

for

Aladdin

staying

and, get

asked

gold,

little

half a

put

money

the

no longer refreshment,

returned

where he was not kept long

As soon he

disclosed

as

that

she

when

plan

his

ever distasteful a little

he was

it

town

the

in

in

into

at

to

the

his

than the

hand

just

to

palace,

private

door.

the princess's apartment

He

to her.

might be to

bade

her,

to

her,

how-

dissemble

the magician visited her, and pretend

she was no longer so averse to him, and that

was beginning

to

forget

Aladdin.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

177

She was to invite the magician to sup with her and tell him she would be glad to taste some of the wines of his country, which he would be sure to

go and fetch.

"During

powder

may

that

shall

agree

When

you.

drunk

as

setting

order

vou

signal

attend

to

upon,

it

let

her bring

you

He

will

so great a favour that he will not refuse,

the

will

arranged

women

charged her

her most gorgeous

he

backwards."

fall

out

carry

to

Aladdin then took

instructions,

princess

sooner will

him

see

having

princess

no

but

off;

it

have drunk, than vou these

cup to

to bring that

you choose,

as

but eagerly quaff

The

on a

you,

magician and you have eaten and

the

much

night

charge the slave

by,

it

the cup, and then change cups with him.

esteem

this

one of the cups you are accustomed

into

to drink out of and,

you

"put

absence," said Aladdin,

his

and

his leave,

dress

to

her

in

This they did and shortly

attire.

afterwards the magician arrived.

As soon

as

he

the

princess waited

an

enchanting grace

her

hand

till

he

sat

to

the

entered to

receive

and

most

great

the

smile,

him,

honourable

with with

place,

waiting

same she had never shown him

down, that she might

time, which was a civility

rose

pointed

she

and

w^here

hall

sit

at

the

before.

The African lustre

of the

magician,

princess's

dazzled

eyes

more with

the

than the glittering of


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

I7S

was much

the jewels with which she was adorned,

The smiling and

surprised.

received

she

When at

he was

her

to

the

all

seated, the princess,

him believe

time

be-

free

him

to

looking

first,

make

such a manner as to

in

he was not

that

former

heart.

his

embarrassment, broke silence

his

him

opposite

so

had quite fascinated

haviour,

from

him,

graceful air with which

odious

so

her as

to

she had given him to understand hitherto, and said

"You

to-day

altered

when

great a

amazed

doubtless

are

I

disposition

;

vour

but

so

surprise

vou that

acquaint

opposite

I

them as far away as possible. you of Aladdin's fate, I have

night I

have

in

this

this

and

China,

I

countrv,

me

procure

of

you

Having heard from reflected

that

and

a

all

my

me company

bear

will

no wines

palace

have

grief,

always strive to put

order supper to be prepared

will

I

so

not

and have therefore decided to

tears cannot recall him, If

be

naturallv

will

am

I

much

so

melancholy and

to

sorrow and uneasiness, that

grieve no more.

me

find

to

:

great

once

at

except

to-

of

those

desire to taste those of

vou

doubt not

will

be

able

to

some."

"I have," said the magician, "a flagon of wine seven is

the

and

years finest

will

old, in

return

The African expected

and

it

is

the world.

again

say

it

I

will

go and fetch

it

to

immediately."

magician,

happiness,

much

not too

rather

full

flew

of

hopes

than

of

ran,

his

and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. The

returned quickly with the wine.

make

doubting but he would

own hand the

not

with

her

powder Aladdin had given her

the

opposite

table

princess,

put

haste,

They

the cup set apart for that purpose. at

179

each

to

into

down

sat

other.

After they had eaten for some time, the princess called

for

some wine, drank

and afterwards full

right

tasted

him:

to

said

any so

wine,

since

he,

holding

a

never

I

delicious."

"Charming

princess,"

said

hand the cup which had

been

"mv

exquisite

wine

you had

"Indeed,

commend vour

to

magician's health,

the

becomes more

presented

in

to

his

him,

by vour appro-

bation."

When more, the

they had each drunk two or three cups

the

behaviour,

who had completely charmed

princess,

African

by her

magician

civility

and obliging

gave the signal to the slave who served

them with wine, bidding her bring the cup which had been filled for herself, and at the same time bring the magician a

had their cups

full

When

goblet.

they both

said

to

him,

know not how you express your loves parts when drinking together. With us

in

these

in

their

hands,

she

"I

in

China

the lover and his mistress exchange cups, and drink

each

other's

health;"

at

the

same

time

she

pre-

sented to him the cup which was in her hand, and held

make

out the

her

hand

exchange,

to receive his.

saving:

He

hastened to

"Indeed, Princess, we


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i8o

Africans

not

are

refined

so

art of

the

in

love

as

you Chinese."

With drained his

he

that

began

eyes

backwards,

The

to

to

women were

so

the

of

foot

no

to

great

that

the

word was

hall

he saw

hall,

The

and ran overjoyed to

seat,

embrace him; but he stopped cess,

it

is

not

yet

your apartment, and while

no

door was immediately opened.

from her

rose

to

magician w^as fallen

the magician stretched backwards on the sofa.

princess

the

her

for

the

Aladdin entered the

as

fell

order

Aladdin,

to

sooner given that the African

As soon

he

from

staircase,

backwards, than the

and

head

occasion

disposed

the

and

lips

sofa.

opened

be

his

when immediately

his

in

on the had

princess

to

drop,

last

roll

lifeless,

door

private

very

to the

it

cup

the

set

time let

;

me by

oblige

me

and said: "Prin-

her,

be

left

retiring

to

alone a moment,

endeavour to transport you back to China

I

as speedily as

When

you were brought from thence."

the

princess,

were gone out of the

women

her

and

guards

Aladdin shut the door,

hall,

and going directly to the dead body of the magician,

opened

his

vest,

took

was carefully wrapped up,

out

lamp,

as the princess

him, and unfolding and rubbing diately

the

it,

which

had told

the genie

imme-

appeared.

"Genie,"

command

you,

said

Aladdin,

"I

have

called

on the part of your good

to

mistress


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. lamp,

the

China,

transport

to

palace

this

whence

from

place

the

to

i8i

into

instantly

was brought

it

hither."

The dience,

bowed

genie

head

his

and disappeared.

Immediately

was transported into China, only

was

by two

felt

and both

hastened to the

time

this

visiting

the

From palace, for

the

to

go

it

down,

set

they

retired

apartment

princess's

and embraced her tenderly, but

by

one when

was

it

palace

the

removal was

its

the

when

other

obe-

of

very short interval of time.

in a

Aladdin

and

shocks,

little

the

up,

lifted

token

in

as

to

it

was very

late

without

first

rest

sultan.

the time of the transportation of Aladdin's

the

morning

every

viewing

himself with

many times

Before the

of her.

loss

in

the

had been inconsolable

father

princess's

into

the

day

his

palace

disaster

closet

used please

to

he

went

now

his

tears,

and

;

renew

to

he

plunge himself into the deepest melancholy, by the idea so

of no

much

more seeing to

him

The very morning the

sultan went,

in

a

pensive

how

he had

return

of Aladdin's

by break of day,

mood, he

Absorbed cast

his

in

into his

himself,

eyes towards

the spot, expecting only to see an open space

perceiving the

vacancy

lost

in this world.

of the

closet to indulge his sorrows.

and

which once gave him

and reflecting

pleasure,

what was most dear palace,

that

filled

up

he

;

but

looked again


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i82

more attentively, and was convinced beyond the power of doubt that it was his son-in-law's palace. Jov and gladness succeeded to sorrow and grief. He returned immediately into his apartment, and ordered

and brought to him

to be saddled

horse

a

mounted that without delav, thinking he could not make haste enough which

he

instant,

to

the

who foresaw what would happen,

rose

palace.

Aladdin,

morning by daybreak, put on one of the most

that

magnificent habits

up

the

into

wardrobe afforded, and went

his

from

windows,

twenty-four

of

hall

whence he perceived the sultan approaching, and got down soon enough to receive him at the foot of the great staircase, and to help him to dismount. "Aladdin," said the sultan, "I cannot speak to you till I have seen and embraced my daughter."

He

the

led

The

ment.

happy

bathed

face

her side,

sultan

father

showed

him

all

and the

her with

his

princess,

on

testimonies

the

apart-

princess's

embraced

of joy,

tears

in

the

into

of

the

extreme pleasure the sight of him afforded her.

He

then

enquired anxiously as to the method

by which so large so

quickly

from

a

one

had been transported

palace

place

"Aladdin had no concern cess;

in

it,"

said the

"I was mvself the innocent cause of

To she

another.

to

said,

persuade she

the

gave

sultan

him

of

a full

the

truth

account of

prin-

it."

of what

how

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. African

magician bad disguised himself, and ottered

change new lamps

to

amused herself

^^

in

for

ones

old

;

how

she

had

making the exchange, being en-

Aladdin, I cannot speak

tirely

183

to

yon

nntil

I

have seen

my

danghter.''

ignorant of the secret and importance of the

wonderful lamp carried

African

;

how

the

palace

away and transported magician,

who was

and herself were

into Africa,

recognised

with the

bv two

of


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i84

her

women

and the chamberlain who made the ex-

change of the lamp.

She also told the sultan of her meeting with Aladdin and how he had compassed the wicked

"The

magician's death.

rest of the story," said she,

"I leave to Aladdin to recount."

Aladdin thereupon took up the story and, having described the means by which he had recovered the

lamp

magic

invited the hall

and

and

transported

sultan

the

see

the

palace

accompany him

to

magician

to

China,

to

the

punished

lying

great

he

as

deserved.

The hall,

rose

sultan

where

saw the

he

and

went

into

magician

lying

dead

instantly

the as

Aladdin had described.

Thus had Aladdin once more escaped from the danger of losing

his

life,

but

before

long he was

again in peril.

The African magician had

who was

younger brother,

equallv skilful as a necromancer, and even

him

surpassed

As they

a

in

villainy

and

pernicious

did not live together, or

in

the

designs.

same

city,

they failed not every year to inform themselves, by their art, each

where the other resided, and whether

they stood in need of one another's assistance.

Some

time after the African magician had failed

in his enterprise against

who had heard no Africa,

but

in

a

Aladdin, his younger brother,

tidings distant

of him,

country,

and was not

in

had the wish to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. know

185

what part of the world he sojourned, the

in

state of his health, and what

he was doing; he had

recourse to his magic and found to his surprise that his

was

brother

no

longer

who had mar-

poisoned by a person of mean birth

and who was living

ried a princess,

been

had

but

living,

the capital

in

of China.

The regrets,

magician's brother lost no time

him

which could not restore immediately avenge

resolved to

useless

in

to

but

life,

death, and

his

set

out at once for the capital of China.

When

he arrived there he took a lodging, and

soon afterwards walked through the

amusement and

places of public

city, visiting

the

spots most frequented.

Here he listened to the converse around him and heard some persons speaking of the piety and virtue of a

woman As he

able

to

called Fatima.

fancied that this

him

in

the

woman might he

project

be service-

had conceived, he

took one of the company aside, and requested to be

more

informed

particularly

who

holy

that

woman

was, and what sort of miracles she performed.

"What!"

the

said

person

whom

he addressed,

"have vou never seen or heard of her? admiration austerities,

of the whole

and her exemplary

and Fridays, she never

and

on

those

days

town, she does an

on

She

is

the

town, for her fasting, her

stirs

life.

out

Except Mondays of her

little

cell

which she comes into the

infinite

deal of good; for there

is


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i86

not a person that has the headache but

cured bv

is

her laying her hand upon them."

The magician wanted

no

further

He

only asked the person

this

holy woman's cell was situated.

informed himself on

in

information.

what part of the town After he

had

he determined on the

this head,

detestable design of murdering her and assuming her character.

When

night fell he went straight to Fatima's opened the door, which was only fastened with latch, and shut it again after he had entered, without

cell,

a

When

any noise.

he entered the

cell,

Fatima by moonlight lying asleep on

awakened

The

and clapped

her,

ready to

stab

man

her,

make

cry out, or

the

trembling

frightened," give

with

it

said noise,

mv

"Do

magician;

perceiving

that

trembling,

to

again,

face,

the

you need not

away your

life."

kill

you

be

not

I

mav be he

'

He

poor creature her

so

much

"I only want your

take mine.

that

encourage

"If you

her habit, got

in

Fatima and he changed clothes. her: "Colour

will

I

much

her heart

at

her,

to

down

fear.

me and

to

dagger

shall direct you."

lain

the

said

I

He

dagger to her breast.

a

least

who had

Fatima,

with

and who

but get up, and do as

habit,

sofa.

a

pious Fatima, opening her eyes, was

surprised to see a

up,

a

he perceived

then said to

like

vou;" but

could

said,

fear anything

Accordingly

;

I

"I will

not tell

help

you

not take


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

187

Fatima lighted her lamp, led him into the

cell,

and, dipping a soft brush into a certain liquor, rubbed it

over

his face,

assured him the

change, and that his

own

her

on

:

after

his head,

face

colour would

not

was of the same hue

as

which she put her own head-dress

also a veil, with

which she showed him

Tlic magician entered the cell.

how After

to hide his face as he passed through the town. this,

she put a long string of beads about his

neck, which hung

down

to the middle

of his body,

and giving him the stick she used to walk with his

in

hand, brought him a looking-glass, and bade him

look

if

he was

not

as

like

her

as

possible. 13*

The


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

i88

magician found

himself disguised

he did not keep

as

he wished, but

at

once proceeded

promise, for he

his

her and then threw her body into a well.

to kill

The

Fatima, spent the remainder of the night

The next morning, two hours it

was not

on, he

dav the holv

a

crept out

of the

after

woman

cell,

the

in

cell.

though

sunrise,

used to

out

s.o

being well persuaded

nobody would ask him any questions

that

woman

magician, thus disguised like the holy

;

or,

if

thev should, he had an answer readv for them.

As soon

as the

they imagined him

him

about

a

in

others

blessing,

people saw the holy woman, as to

be,

kissed

his

hem

reserved, only the

they presently gathered

Some begged

crowd.

great

hand,

his

and others, more

of his garment; while others,

whether their heads ached, or they wished

to

be

preserved against that disorder, stooped for him to lay his

hands upon them, w^hich he

some words

in

form of prayer, and,

evervbodv took him

feited so well that

muttering

did,

in short,

counter-

for the holv

woman. After this

stopping

frequently

came

description he

at

to

last

Aladdin's palace.

eagerness

at

get

him

of

to the square before

The crowd was

to

people

satisfy

so great that the

increased

in

proportion.

Those who were the most zealous and strong forced their

way through

quarrels,

who was

the

and so great in

the

hall

crowd. a

noise,

There that

were

the

such

princess,

of four-and-twenty windows,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. heard

189

and asked \vhat was the matter; but nobody

it,

being able to give her an answer, she ordered them to

and

enquire

inform

One

her.

women

her

of

looked out of the window, and then told her

was

it

crowd of people collected about the holy

a great

woman

cured of the headache.

to be

The princess, who had long heard of this holy woman, but had never seen her, w^as very desirous to

have some conversation

of the

guards

matter

to

commanded

it

her

to

and

;

told

her

her,

if

which the chief

four

sent

was an easy

it

desired

and

expressing

her

guards

the

she

princess

the

immediately

he

wishes,

perceiving,

bring

her,

w^ith

for

pretended holv woman.

As soon as made way, and

crowd saw the

the the

guards,

magician, perceiving

thev

also

that

they were coming for him, advanced to meet them,

"Holy

overjoyed to find his plot proceeded so well.

woman,"

said

one

of

"the

guards,

the

princess

wishes to see you, and has sent us for you."

me

too great

replied the false Fatima, "I

am ready

"The

princess

command;" and

does

at

same

the

time

an honour,"

obey her

to

followed

the

guards to the palace.

When disguised great

a

hall

prayer,

the magician,

who under

a

holy garment

wicked heart, was introduced

into

the

and perceived the princess, he began

which

contained

vows and good wishes

a

for the

long

enumeration

princess's

health

a

of

and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

igo

might have everything she

and that she

prosperity, desired.

When

Fatima had

pretended

the

harangue, the princess said to

good Mother,

The

for

"I

thank you,

sat

;

"My

the princess, then resuming her discourse, said:

good Mother,

have one thing to

I

you must not refuse me

it

;

is,

request,

living."

"Princess," said the counterfeit Fatima,

my

neglecting

"That

shall

be no hindrance to you," answered

"I

have a great many apartments un-

you

;

"I beg

cannot consent to without

prayers and devotion."

the princess;

occupied

I

which

me, that

to stay with

you may edify me with your way of of you not to ask what

his

come and sit by me.'' down with aifected modesty;

your prayers

Fatima

false

hiin,

finished

shall

choose which you

like best,

and

have as much liberty to perform vour devotions if

you were

The to

in

magician,

introduce

much offer

your own

who

desired

nothing more than

himself into the palace,

to excuse himself

as

cell."

did

not urge

from accepting the obliging

which the princess made him. "Princess," said he, "whatever resolution a poor

woman as I am may have made nounce the pomp and grandeur of this world, wretched not

presume

to

oppose the

will

to I

re-

dare

and commands of

so pious and charitable a princess."

Upon with me,

this I

will

the princess,

rising up,

said:

"Come

show vou what vacant apartments

I


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. that

have,

191

vou may make choice of that you like

best."

The magician followed apartments

the

made

humility

she

and of

the princess,

showed

him,

pretended

with

choice of that which

all

was the worst

furnished.

Afterwards

the

him back again with her;

would

princess

into the great hall to

but considering

that

brought

have

make him

he should

dine

then be

obliged to show his face, which he had always taken care to conceal, and fearing that the princess should

was not Fatima, he begged of her

find out that he

excuse him, telling her that he never

earnestly to

ate anything but bread

and dried

own

to eat that slight repast in his

princess granted as

free

own I

cell

:

I

as

soon

you as

as

if

and desiring

The "You may be

apartment.

saying:

request,

will order

you

expect

his

good Mother,

here,

fruits,

you were

a dinner,

but

in

your

remember

you have finished your

repast."

After

the

princess

had

dined,

and

the

false

Fatima had been informed by one of the chamberlains that she

upon

was risen from

her.

"My

good

table,

he failed not to wait

Mother," said

the

princess,

am overjoyed to have the company of so holy a woman as yourself, who will confer a blessing upon this palace. But now I am speaking of the palace, pray how do you like it? And before I show it all to vou, tell me first what vou think of this hall." "I


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

192

Upon

part

the

much

as

to

ever once

hang down lifting

at

it,

looked up, and surveyed the hall from one end

last

the

When

other.

I

he had examined

"As

said to the princess: as

affected

better,

without so

his head,

to

the counterfeit Fatima, who,

this question,

act his

to

far as

who am unacquainted

am,

such

"What princess;

alwavs

nothing; but

if it

"Princess,"

but

mv

that

if

opinion a

have

does,

said

is,

if

false

me it

say,

wanted

it

I

be supplied." Fatima, I

with

great

have taken,

be of any importance,

egg were hung up

roc's

part,

the libertv

can

the

For my

heard

shall

it

the

"forgive

dissimulation,

truly admirable

is

conjure you!

T

and

believed,

being

good Mother?" demanded

me,

"tell

a solitary

there wants but one thing."

;

that,

is

well, he

with what the world

calls beautiful, can judge, this hall

and most beautiful

it

in

the middle of

would have no parallel in the four quarters of the world, and your palace would be the wonder of the universe." "My good Mother," said the princess, "what dome,

the

bird

is

this

a roc,

hall

and where may one get an egg?"

"Princess," replied the pretended Fatima, "it a bird of prodigious size,

of

Mount Caucasus

;

the

is

which inhabits the summit architect

who

built

your

palace can get you one."

After the princess had thanked the false Fatima for

what she believed her good advice, she conversed

with her upon other matters, but could not forget


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. the

which

egg,

roc's

resolved

she

193

request

to

of

Aladdin when he returned from hunting.

He

been gone

evening

and retired to

went

arrived, he

saluted and

him

that

Fatima had taken leave of the prin-

after the false

cess

returned

he

but

days,

six

had

his

As soon

apartment.

as

he

directlv to the princess's apartment,

embraced

her, but she

seemed

to receive

coldly.

"My

Princess,

"

said he, "I think

cheerful as vou used to be

during

my

;

which

absence

you are not so

has anything happened has

you

displeased

or

given vou anv trouble or dissatisfaction?" "It

a

is

matter,"

trifling

"which gives me so

the

replied

concern that

little

I

princess,

could not in

my

countenance; but since vou have unexpectedly

dis-

have thought you

have

could

covered some alteration,

will

I

perceived

it

no longer disguise

the matter from you.

"I

always

"that our palace was the

and complete

in

continued

believed,"

the world

the

princess,

most superb, magnificent, ;

but

T

will tell

vou now

upon examining the hall of four-and-twentv windows. Do not vou think with me, that it would be complete if a roc's egg were hung up in the midst of the dome?" "Princess," replied Aladdin, "it is enough that you think there wants such an ornament you shall what

I

find fault with,

;

see,

by the diligence used to supply that deficiency,

that there

is

nothing

T

would not do

for

vour sake."


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

194

Aladdin that

the

left

Baddir

Princess

moment, and went up

Buddoor

al

into the hall of four-and-

twenty windows, where, pulling out of

bosom

his

the

lamp, which, after the danger he had been exposed to,

he always carried about with him, he rubbed

it,

upon which the genie immediately appeared. "Genie," said Aladdin, "I wish a roc's egg to

be hung up you, in the

the midst

in

name

of the

dome

I

;

command

of this lamp, to repair the deficiency."

Aladdin had no sooner pronounced these words, than the genie gave so loud and terrible a cry that the

hall

and Aladdin

shook,

could

stand

scarcely

upright.

"What! wretch,"

said the genie,

a voice that

in

would have made the most undaunted man tremble, "is it not enough that I and my companions have done everything for you, but you, by an unheard-of

command me

ingratitude must

and hang him up attempt

in

deserves

to

the midst of this

that

you,

my

bring

your

master,

dome?

This

and

your

wife,

palace should be immediately reduced to ashes

but

:

you are happy that the request does not come from yourself.

Know

then,

that

true

the

author

whom

brother of the African magician, your enemy,

you have destroyed your

palace,

woman he

who

disguised

Fatima, has

as

whom

suggested

pernicious demand.

he deserved. in

habit

the

He of

he has nmrdered to

your wife

His design

is

is

to

;

the

is

now

the

and

make

in

holy it

is

this

to kill you, there-


"M_)' deav husband

_

what have you done?'


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. care

fore take

197

After these words, the

of yourself."

genie disappeared.

Aladdin

He

said.

how

and

lost not

a

word of what

woman

had heard talk of the holy she pretended to cure

returned

the

to

the genie had

He

headache.

the

and

apartment,

princess's

Fatima,

without

word

of what had happened, sat down,

and complained of

a great pain which had suddenly upon which the princess ordered

mentioning

seized

head

his

woman

the holv

how

had

"Come

and then told Aladdin

to be called,

that

the pretended Fatima came, Aladdin said:

good Mother;

hither,

at so

fortunate a time

my

violent pain in

I I

;

to

so

am glad to see you am tormented with a

head, and request your assistance,

and hope you will not refuse

you do

and

appointed her an apartment.

When here

;

had invited her to the palace,

she

she

a

many persons

me

that favour

with this

afflicted

which

com-

plaint."

So

The his

saying, he

counterfeit

hand

girdle

the time on

under

seized his

him

all

arose,

his

gown,

down

his

head.

a

dagger concealed

which

Aladdin

own

it,

in

his

observing,

and pierced

dagger.

dear husband, what have vou done?" cried

the princess in surprise.

woman." "No,

held

hand before he had drawn

to the heart with his

"Mv

but

Fatima advanced towards him, with

my

princess,"

"You have answered

killed the holy

Aladdin

with


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

igS "

emotion,

have not killed

I

who would have vented

me

assassinated

This

him.

Fatinia, but if

I

me

wicked wretch," added

murder me

clothes with intent to

know him

better,

he

is

:

brother

un-

he,

whom you

and disguised himself

of killing,

villain,

had not pre-

covering his face, "has strangled Fatima, accuse

a

in

her

but that you

may

to

the

African

magician."

Aladdin then informed

know

these

particulars,

her

how he came

to

and afterwards ordered the

dead body to be taken away.

Thus was Aladdin delivered from the persecution of two brothers, who were magicians. Within a few years afterwards, the sultan died in a good old age, and al

as he

left

Buddoor,

as

no male children, the Princess Buddir lawful

heir

of the

throne, and her

husband, Aladdin, reigned together many years, and left

a

numerous and

illustrious posterity.


ALT BABA.

N

a

I

town

Persia

in

two

lived

named Cassim,

anything;

scarcely

was he wished

Ali

left

them

w^hat

there

be divided

to

between them, and

equallv

seemed

therefore

been equal

it

though

as

ought

fortune

their

one

other

the

Their father

Baba.

there

brothers,

have

to

but chance deter-

;

mined otherwise. Cassim married

a wife

who

soon after became heiress to a Cassim' s

house

large

wife.

goods,

of rich

full

became one

of the

and lived

merchants,

sum of money and so

richest at

his

woman

wretched maintain

as

poor

habitation, his wife

of cutting wood,

which were

his

as

and

all

at

once

most considerable

and

ease.

Ali Baba, on the other hand, a

he

that

a ware-

lived

himself,

had

who had married very

no other means

and children but and bringing

a

in

it

whole substance,

his daily labour

upon three to

to

town

to

asses, sell.


ARABIAN NIGHTS.

THP:

200

One

dav,

had

just

and

saw

he

seemed

when Ali Baba cut wood enough

as

\\

load

to

a distance

to

be driven towards

a

him

forest,

his

asses,

of dust, which

great cloud

at

the

in

observed

he

;

it

very attentively, and distinguished soon after a bodv

Though

of horsemen.

robbers

of

think

might

they

that

considering what might to

was but himself

stood

tree

base

the

at

of a

craggy that nobody could

The

came

there dismounted.

and

from

that

thev were

doing

without

robbed

a

at

rendezvous. bridle

about

took

his his his

a

and

steep

so

it.

of

mounted

well

all

and

rock,

this

Baba tie

equipage

was

assured

a troop of banditti,

harm

distance,

neck

and the

Nor was he mistaken

were

any

horse,

rock,

foot

and

robbers.

Ali

placed

Ali Baba counted forty of them,

for they

his opinion,

He

them.

climb

the

to

looks

their

another that there

who were

horsemen,

and armed,

distance from the

being discovered,

without

passed

thick

large,

a

from whence he could see

middle,

the

in

that

between

space

little

up

one

to

to

without

of his asses, resolved

a little

at

began

and

such,

climbed

were so close

ground,

all

become

whose branches,

tree,

Baba

Ali

prove

He

himself.

save

had been no rumour

there

countrv,

that

in

and

in

the

made

watched

him

to

bag of corn.

saddle wallet, which

a

in

who,

neighbourhood, place

that

man

every shrub,

and

to

un-

hang

them Ali Baba

Then each seemed

their

of


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. of gold and silver from

be

full

whom

he

took to

wallet

on

his

to

be

back

its

20I

One,

weight.

came with his in which Ali making his wav through

their captain,

under the tree

Baba was concealed, and, some shrubs, pronounced these words, so distinctly that Ali Baba overheard him: "Open, Sesame." As

Ali Baba climbed up a large,

soon

as

the

captain

of

the

I

hick tree.

robbers

had

uttered

these words, a door opened in the rock, and having

made

all

his

troop enter before

him,

he

followed

when the door closed of The robbers stayed some time within the rock, and Ali Baba, who feared that someone, or all of them together, might come out and catch him if them,

itself.

14


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

202

endeavour

should

he

make

to

was

escape,

his

At last the door opened again, and the forty thieves came out. As the captain went in last he came out first, and stood to see them all pass by him, when Ali Baba heard him make the door close by pronouncEvery man went ing these words: "Shut, Sesame." obliged

and

to

patiently

sit

bridled

mounted again

and when

;

ready he put himself

all

returned

the at

saw them

captain

and they

head,

their

and

wallet,

his

way they had come.

the

Baba

Ali

tree.

fastened

horse,

his

the

in

immediately quit

not

did

his

tree,

"They may have forgotten something, and may come back again, and then I he to

for, said

he

open

could

same words

as

Making

his

the

and

curiosity to try

door by pronouncing

the

the

shrubs, he perceived

door concealed behind them,

"Open,

said:

flew

wide open.

dismal

and

ceived the

the

rock.

bales of piled

Ali

He

saw

stuff^,

one

before

it

The door instantly Baba, who expected a dark, form

from an

light

silk,

upon

the

in

stood

Sesame."

cavern, was surprised

spacious,

the

captain.

way through the

and

his eyes

after a consider-

and had the

time descended,

able

them with

followed

he could see them,

far as

if

He

be taken."

shall as

himself,

all

to see

of a

opening sorts

it

well lighted

vault,

of

at

which the

top

provisions,

re-

of rich

brocade, and valuable carpeting,

another,

gold

and

silver ingots in


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. great heaps,

and money

these

made him suppose

riches

The

bags.

in

203

sight of all

who had

occupied for ages by robbers,

have been

must

that this cave

succeeded one another.

Baba

Ali

what

sider

should

he

and as soon

into the cave,

door shut of

He

knew

he

because

But

itself.

as

this

did not trouble about the

time

of his

use

the

gold

coin,

which was

his

three

asses

could carry.

the

bags

and

with

in

did

not disturb him,

open

to

out

bags,

in

He

as

again.

it

made the much of

but

silver,

as

thought

he

loaded the

asses

wood over them

the

laid

immediately

had entered the

carrving

best

to con-

he

secret

the

went

but

do,

enough

long

stand

not

did

When

such a manner that they could not be seen.

he

had finished

he

stood

pronouncing the words closed

him,

after

when he was

his

had

it

cave,

it

shut

itself

remained

open

He then made the best When he reached home, he

he was out.

while

wav

though the

town.

to

asses

carefully,

into

threw

them

carried

a

off the

into

his

shut

yard,

little

wood

and,

door,

the

Sesame," the door

"Shut,

for

within

before

in

the

of his

drove

verv

gates

that covered the bags,

house,

and ranged them

in

She handled the bags, and,

order before

his

wife.

them

full

of money, suspected that her hus-

finding

band had been robbing, not

help

unhappy

saying, as

to

insomuch

"Ali Baba, "

"Be

have

quiet,

she

that

you

wife,"

could

been

so

interrupted 14*


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

204

Ali Baba, "do not frighten yourself,

He

may be one who

he

unless

then emptied the

heap and told beginning

end,

to

keep

her to

The

above with

rejoiced

by

adventure

from

recommended

all,

from

but

piece,

husband

her

good fortune, and was anxious piece

robbers."

into a dazzling

the whole

and,

robber,

secret.

it

wife

from

steals

bags of gold

wife

his

am no

I

to

their

at

count the money

Ali Baba dissuaded

this

her.

"If vou done," there

"But as

measure his

how much the

sure

a

little

as

was curious

to

to

substance giving

it

Ali

they

will

I

in

the

neighbourhood and

dig

the

hole."

possessed,

and begged

but

for

wanted

have.

she

that

to

to

lived

her a mea-

The sister-in-law readily knew Ali Baba's poverty, she know what sort of grain his wife while.

she

measure, at

his wife to lend

ran

who

of her brother-in-law Cassim,

by,

agreed,

it:

lost."

how much we

measure

gold

house

close

never have

and bury

hole

husband," said she, "let us know

while you

it,

a

Baba was somewhat opposed, even to this, wife had so set her mind on knowing

Ali

but

be

possible

a small

dig

will

to

at least,

near as

borrow

"I

no time

is

count vou will

to

be2:in

he;

said

the

and

bottom

artfully

of

the

put

some

measure

sticky

before

her sister-in-law.

Baba's wife

went home,

set

the

measure


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. upon the heap of gold, and again

again

AH

and

his

gold

had stuck

loan

of

As soon looked

wife

noticing

as Ali

gold,

back to their

that

a

piece

thanked her

to the bottom,

of

for the

home.

and returned

it,

it

the exact quantity

measure

the

without

but

sister-in-law,

emptied

Baba then buried the

carried

wife

and

it

knew

she

until

they possessed.

filled

205

Baba's wife was

gone Cassim's

the bottom of the measure and was

at

much surprised to find a piece of gold stuck Envy immediately possessed her breast, for to it. she could not bear to think that Ali Baba had so much gold that he had to measure and not count very

She waited impatiently

it.

from

counting house,

his

for her husband's return

was anxious

she

for

to

acquaint him with what she had discovered.

"Cassim," said she, when "I

know you

taken

if

at

length he returned,

but you

think yourself rich,

are mis-

you think vour brother Ali Baba than

well

off

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he

has so

He

vou.

much

Cassim asked

does not count

that he measures

her to

explain,

is

less

money,

his

it."

which

she

did,

and also showed him the piece of money she had found.

Instead of being fortune,

married

Cassim a

rich

pleased

was

widow

verv

he

at

his

jealous.

had

brother's

After

good

having

never treated

Ali

Baba as a brother, being too proud to notice him as such, and so he went to him the next morning


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

2o6

"How

and said angrily: be so poor and

is

need

yet

you pretend

that

it

measure

a

to

measure

to

your gold?"

"How, brother?" know what you mean;

"Do

ignorance,"

showing him the piece of gold

"My

him.

found

wife

Baba, "I do not

explain yourself!"

pretend

not

AH

replied

this

had given

bottom of the

the

at

Cassim,

replied

his wife

measure you borrowed yesterday."

Baba

Ali wife's

to

Cassim

and

his

and

so,

least

surprise

or

what

chance

he

the

thieves

He

offered

perceived

conceal,

folly,

wished

once

at

had

him

of his

part

the

the

retreat

place

was

treasure

to

the

they

all

brother by

his

discovered

where

and

told

his

showing

without

he

trouble,

knew

wife

by

that,

of

situated.

keep the

secret.

Cassim, Ali

against

after

threatening

Baba

information

give

to

were told

he

unless

absolutely

everything, including the magic words which opened the

door of

He

did

meant

not

the

cave,

intend

to

with

share

to be beforehand with him,

the treasure to himself.

long

before

with

ten

the

away well

went

the

sun,

He and

Ali

Baba

brother, but

hoping

to get all

rose the next morning, set

mules bearing great

road which

his

satisfied.

out

chests,

for

the

forest

and followed

had described

to

him.

Before long he reached the rock, found the entrance to the

cavern,

and pronounced the words,

"Open,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

207

The door immediately opened, and when he was in, closed upon him. In examining the cave he was delighted to find even more treasure than Ali Baba had told him of. He could have feasted Sesame."

his

eyes

day upon

all

remembered and that he cavern,

of bags

of gold

to

but

saw,

returning

He

lose.

on no account could

but

he

might be

robbers

had no time to

number

great

the

that

wealth

the

carried

a

the

door of the

he

think of the

make it open. He tried and more he endeavoured to remember the word the more confused his memory became. He walked distractedly up and down the necessary word

tried

cavern,

to

but

again,

the

nothing for the wealth around him,

caring

but only longing to regain his

liberty.

About noon the robbers chanced to visit their cave, and at some distance from it saw Cassim's mules straggling about the rock, on

Alarmed

backs.

their

galloped

full

with great chests

speed to the cave.

They drove away

which Cassim had neglected

the

mules,

and

they had

forest.

The

trouble

to

soon

strayed

robbers

pursue

far

never

them,

out

gave

being more

searched

the captain

in

their

Sesame,"

to

hands, it

rock,

the and,

opened.

door,

fasten,

themselves

to.

about the

to

of sight in the

know whom they belonged went directly

thev

novelty,

this

at

the

concerned

While some

of

and the

to

them rest

with their naked sabres

uttering

the

words

"Open,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

2o8

who heard

Cassim,

the

never doubted of the

feet,

and

approaching

his

make

an

he rushed to the

door, and

than he

and

out

could not escape sabres

robbers,

resolved

To

this

no sooner saw

it

to

end

open

threw the leader down, but

who

the other robbers,

him of

soon deprived

After this the robbers' the cave.

was

but

horses'

of the

arrival

death,

the

to escape from them.

effort

ran

of

noise

They found

all

with their

life.

first

care was to examine

the

bags of gold which

Cassim had brought to the door and carried them

Baba

again to their places, without missing what Ali

away before.

had taken

they deliberated

as to

Then,

holding

council,

a

what course thev should pursue

to protect their cave in future.

They could it

;

thev could not believe

door, in

not imagine

the

because cave

it

that

the door open

to

how Cassim had had come

he

was evident by he

had

let

posed he did not know^ the

in

by the

being

caught

been able

not

him out

his

:

entered

make

to

they therefore sup-

As

secret.

it

was

a

matter of great importance to them to secure their riches,

they

pieces,

to

other,

agreed to

cut

hang two on one side

just within

the

body in four and two on the

Cassim's

door of the

cave,

any person who should attempt to enter

Having they

left

departed.

put the

their

cave,

resolution

mounted

terrify

it.

into

their

to

execution,

horses

and


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. When

and

alarm

in

know

night

and

fell

"

said,

She ran

your brother,

Cassim,

not returned

happened

am

I

;

return

the

to

now

is

it

;

gone

is

not

Baba

to Ali

you

brother-in-law,

believe,

I

and upon what account is

Cassim did

became very uneasy.

his wife

209

forest,

and he

night

some misfortune has

afraid

to him."

who had guessed that his brother had forest, made no reflection on his un-

Ali Baba,

gone

to the

generous conduct of

him,

but

in thus

told

seeking to take advantage

frighten herself, for that certainly

think

be

was

more

keep the

to

Then her

was

her grief

keep

forced

to

foolish

curiosity,

to

penetrate

the

to

it

greater

herself.

and wished

into

the

secret,

her

believe

to

She went home again

patiently until midnight.

con-

it

business

persuaded

easily

brother-in-law.

and

the night

how much

considering

wife,

her husband

the

till

pretty far advanced.

Cassim's

cerned

not

Cassim would not

proper to come into the town

it

should

need

she

sister-in-law

his

and waited

fears redoubled,

that

in

was

she

She repented of her had never

she

tried

affairs

of

her brother-

night

in

weeping,

and

sister-in-law.

She spent soon

as

with

it

tears,

Ali desire

all

the

was day the

cause

went

to

to

go

telling

as

them,

of her coming.

Baba did not wait him

them,

and

and

see

for his

sister-in-law

what had

to

become of


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

2IO

begging of her

asses,

immediately with

departed

but

Cassim,

He

went to the

the

rock,

moderate her

to

first

having met neither his

brother nor

mules by the way, was seriously alarmed

some blood upon as an

spilt ill

magic words,

the

was

struck

met

his

gaze.

He

cut

He

other two

so

carrying,

:

and

door had

placing them

upon one

that

of

his

whilst

ass,

bags of gold.

loaded with

he

that

sight

remains

ghastlv

he

opened,

dismal

the

at

the

asses

at finding

which he looked

door,

the

horror

down

the

when he had pronounced

but

wood above them and above

placed

body,

the

with

body,

brother's

the

near the

omen

affliction.

when he came near

and

forest,

three

his

his brother's

he was

no one could detect what

and then drove the asses to the edge

forest,

where he waited

before

nightfall

until

of

venturing into the town.

When

he

asses laden with

the

care

home,

reached gold

drove

he

into his little

of unloading

them

his

to

yard,

an

at the door,

intelligent

court,

he

aside,

said

is

an

to

her:

inviolable

master's

When

girl.

ass,

"The

secrecy, for

body

and

left

Ali

he

Baba

which was opened by Morgiana,

unloaded the

necessarv both

Your

slave

two

wife, while

led the other to his sister-in-law's house.

knocked

the

and,

first

he came into the

thing

which

I

you

vour mistress' sake is

contained

Morgiana

taking

in

ask of you will

find

and

these

is

mine.

bundles.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. and

our

died

a

want

to

said

business natural

speak

with

Go,

had

he

if

your

tell

mistress

mind what

and

her,

as

I

have

I

you."

to

Morgiana went Ali

him

bury

to

is

death.

Baba

and soon brought

to her mistress

into her presence.

"Brother," said she with great impatience, "what

my

news do you bring me of husband?" Ali Baba then detailed

all

the incidents of his journey,

came

he

till

the

to

finding

when

of Cassim's body, and

broke

sister-in-law

his

into

to

trv

grief,

out

begged her

he

tears,

moderate her

and

so that they might

be able to

act

all

as

though

a

natural

Cassim had died Morsiana.

death.

Cassim's

widow agreed

Baba next took Morgiana instructed

returned

her

how

to

home with

Morgiana

went

act

to act her part,

into his

confidence

her part well

the

ass.

out

at

the

and Ali

same

;

time

and

he then

to

an

apothecary, and asked for a particular kind of lozenges,

which he prepared, and which were very in

the

most dangerous disorders.

enquired

who was

ill

at

efficacious

The apothecary

her master's.

She

replied,


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

212

with a sigh,

it

was her good master Cassim himself;

that they

knew not what

he could

neither eat nor speak.

his disorder was,

but that

After these words

Morgiana carried the lozenges home with

morning

next

the

with

and,

again,

essence which

only when

last

I

fro

that

day,

and

was surprised

"Alas!"

apothecary,

"I

lose

my

the

am

said afraid

than the

effect

good master."

wife were

his

seen to go to their

own

all

very melancholy,

nobody

evening to hear the

lament-

appeared in

people

extremity.

shall

an

for

sick

to

between Cassim's house and

and

apothecary

asked

eyes,

give

have no better

will

Baba and

Ali

same

the

her to

from the

it

and that

lozenges,

to in

used

the

remedy

that this

As

they

at

taking

she,

went tears

and

her,

able shrieks and cries of Cassim's wife and Morgiana,

who gave The

out everywhere that Cassim was dead.

who knew

Morgiana,

opened

morning,

next

his

stall

a

soon after day certain

than

earlier

old

appeared,

cobbler

most people, went to

him and, bidding him good morning, put of gold into his hand.

who piece

a

"Well," said Baba Mustapha,

his name, and who was a merry old fellow, good handling, and no mistake. What must

which was "this I

do

is

for it?

I

am

ready."

"Baba Mustapha," you

take

with

me

but when

;

blindfold

vou."

said

vour sewing

we come

Morgiana, tackle,

to a certain

"you and place

must

go with I

shall


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Baba Mustapha seemed these

"Oh! oh!"

words.

me do something against my honour?"

have

"Nay," gold

into

said

his

213

hesitate

to

replied

against

he,

my

a

little

at

"you would

conscience

or

Morgiana, putting another piece of

hand, "what

I

ask of you

" yoÂť would have me do souidliing against

contrary to your honour; only

my

is

nothing

conscience

P"

come along with me

and fear nothing."

Baba Mustapha went with Morgiana, who, after she had bound his eyes with a handkerchief at the place she had mentioned, conveyed him to her deceased eves

till

master's

he

house,

and

never unloosed his

had entered the room where she had


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

214

"Baba Mustapha,"

put the parts of her master's body.

make haste and sew these and when you have done I will

"you must

she,

said

quarters together,

you another piece of gold."

give

Baba

Mustapha had finished his task, she blindfolded him again, gave him the third piece of gold as she had promised, and, recommending After

secrecy to she

first

and

let

he

him,

curiosity

knew

to

stall,

place where

for

fear

the time Morgiana reached

was there and every preparation

man

and

arrived

should

have

when

she

went home.

safe she

deceased

he

and follow her;

return

to

was

all

By the

the

bound his eyes, pulled off^ the bandage, him go home, but watched him to see that

returned to his

the

him back

led

was

Cassim's

for the

made.

body

home

was

The

Ali

Baba

burying of neighbours

carried

to

the

by the ministers of the mosque Morgiana came next, beating her breast and tearing her hair, and Ali Baba followed after with followed

burying ground, ;

all

their friends

at

home

with to

mourning

the

the

and relations.

women

and

of the

Cassim's wife stayed

uttering

lamentable

neighbourhood,

cries

according

custom.

manner of Cassim's death was hushed up between Cassim's widow, Ali Baba and his wife, and Morgiana, and nobody in the city had the least knowledge or suspicion. Soon afterwards, deeming it more prudent that In

this

way

the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. they should

went

to

Cassim's

in

live

AH Baba

live together,

all

215

and

his wife

Their household

house.

goods were openly taken to the widow's house, but the

gold

been

had

that

from the robbers'

taken

cave was conveyed thither by night.

But next

When

to return to the forty thieves.

visited

retreat

their

greatly surprised

in

the

forest

body taken away

find Cassim's

to

they

they were

and some of their bags of gold missing.

"Without doubt,"

said

the

captain,

"the

man

we discovered here had an accomplice, and unless we succeed in catching him we shall graduallv lose

the

all

selves

which our ancestors

riches

have

amassed

with

much

so

and ourpains

and

danger.

"I

propose,

therefore,

go into the town, stranger, to try

if

you should traveller and a

that one of

disguised

a

as

he can hear any talk of the curious

man whom we killed, endeavour to find where he lived and who he was. It may be a

death of the out

town where for so long we have been unknown, and remember, also, that should he who undertakes the commission perilous undertaking to venture into the

be found betraying us suffer death at

The

forty

in

any way, he shall immediately

our hands." thieves

agreed

proposed, and one of their to undertake the

He

disguised

to

number

at

all

their captain

once volunteered

commission. himself and, taking leave of the


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

2i6

troop at night, went into the town just

and walked up and down, to

Baba Mustapha's

till

at

daybreak,

came

accidentally he

which was always open

stall,

before any of the shops.

Baba Mustapha was seated The hand, just going to work. bidding him good-morrow^, and, very old, said: "Honest man,

How

very early. well

it

should have

I

?

is

am,

I

it

you begin even

light as

I

tell

I

work

to

in a place

had

been

it

to stitch."

Baba Mustapha, "you must

and do not know

when

body together

me

eyes,

you that

where

I

I

:

for,

old as

and you sew^ed

I

will

dead

a

had not so much

have now."

The robber was overjoyed addressed himself so soon to a bability could

"A

seeing that he was

doubted,

have extraordinary good

not doubt

his

one of your age can see so

"Certainly," replied a stranger,

in

robber saluted him,

whether you could have seen

lighter,

be

an awl

with

give

had

to think that he

man who

in

all

pro-

him the intelligence he wanted.

dead body!" he replied with affected

amaze-

"what could you sew up a dead body for? You mean you sewed up his winding sheet." "No, no," answered Baba Mustapha, "I perceive I have betrayed myself; you want me to speak out, but ment,

you

shall

know no more."

The robber wanted no

farther assurance

to

be

persuaded that he had discovered what he sought.

He

pulled out a piece of gold and, putting

it

into


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. Baba Miistapha's hand, want I

your

to learn

me

it

which

thing

"If

I

can assure

you

if

you trusted me with

it.

desire

of vou

do

me

to

is,

where you

house

the

were disposed

I

do you that

to

Baba Mustapha, holding

hand,

"I

lieve

me

you

assure

on

where

place,

not

up the dead body."

stitched

replied

do

I

favour to show

the

"1

him,

to

though

secret,

would not divulge

The onlv

said

217

my

money in and you may the

cannot,

I

word.

I

was taken

was blindfolded,

1

favour,"

I

to

his

be-

certain

a

was then led to

same

the house, and afterwards brought back in the

manner."

"Well," replied the robber, "you mav remember a

Come,

of the wav.

little

eyes and

will

I

me blindfold vour And as everyone

let

walk beside you.

should be paid for his trouble, here of gold

for

And

vou."

he

word,

but

at

He

first

led

as

saying

without in

his

the robber wished.

robber

the

his

handkerchief over

his

side,

to

the

place

where

his

partly leading

eyes and then walked

farther,"

tied

by

him and partlv guided by

"I think," said Baba Mustapha

went no

;

a

purse and

Morgiana had blindfolded him, and the robber

him.

of

piece

a great temptation

length he put them

consented to do

another piece

another

put

money into the old man's hand. The two pieces of gold were Baba Mustapha looked at them

is

at

and he stopped directly

length, at

"I

Cassim's


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

2i8

where Ali Baba now

house,

handkerchief

the

off

which he had ready if

door with in

Mustapha

that was

he did

that as

replied,

neighbourhood he could not

The from

he had

that

and :

of

chalk,

then

asked

which Baba

to

not

man,

old

and

taken,

tell.

him

returned

he

while

him

thanked left

more

to

the

to

trouble

for

the

go

back to

his

persuaded

forest,

would be very well received by

he

that

in

live

robber, finding he could discover no

the

stall,

a piece

hand,

his

he knew whose house

taking

man's eyes, the thief

the old

marked the

carefully

Before

lived.

his

com-

rades.

A

while

little

the

after

robber

Baba

and

Mustapha had parted, Morgiana went out of the house upon some errand, and upon her return, seeing the mark the robber had made, stopped to observe

it.

"What said

she

to

master no it

be

can

herself;

good

was done,

Accordingly

the

it

is

this

"somebody intends

best to guard

fetched

mark?" my new

doors

against the worst."

piece

a

marked two or same manner, without saying three

or

of

however, with whatever intention

:

she

meaning

of

chalk

on each side a

word

to her

in

and the

master

mistress.

In the meantime the thief rejoined his troop in the forest and recounted his success to them, expatiating upon his

good fortune

in so

soon meeting the


"-^ilM ^-^'^t-'V '

*^

^-.^ -A--^wu '...^^H!.. e^uwM^yJm!i^^M^)l*, > '

'

'


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. who

person

only

could

him

inform

2ig

what

of

he

wanted to know. All the thieves listened to him with the utmost

and the captain,

satisfaction,

we have no

"Comrades,

said:

diligence,

lose

without but

its

we mav

that

suspicion,

go into join

be

shall

one

or

are

;

anv

two

town together, and

the

at

not excite

onlv

let

to

armed,

who we

appearing

his

time

us set off well

let

:

commending

after

our

rendezvous,

the

great

which

Our

square.

comrade, w4io brought us the good news, and house,

the

go and find out

will

I

we mav

that

consult

what had best be done." This plan being approved of

by ,,

,

.

Morgiana marked ^two three

doors

They'

,

ov

and

same

in the

The robber who Ali first

led

had

they

filed

off

in

without

plaved the

the captain

Baba was now

were

Succeeded

town

manner.

the morning

all,

living,

into

in

soon

parties of ^

two

entering

the

being part

the

ready.

suspected. of

street

spy in

where

and when they came to the

of the houses which Morgiana

had marked, he

But the captain observed that the next door was chalked in the same manner in the same place, and, showing it to his guide, asked him what it meant. pointed

it

out.

15*


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

220

The

was so astounded he knew not what

j^nide

and was

answer to make,

he and the captain saw

He

marked. could not

was

houses similarly

declared he had marked but one, and

tell

who had chalked

the rest, so that he

returned

captain

which was

to

be

robbers

the

was explained

return

there

square

and ordered

forest.

As soon

reason of their returninfr

and

the

robber

what he had undertaken

in

the

to

place

the

to

the

them,

to

directly

meeting

the

to

thev arrived

failed

cobbler had

at.

The

as

or six

five

unable to distinguish the house the

stopped

all

more puzzled when

still

to

who had

do was im-

mediately put to death.

Another of the of death, should

he

whom

troop, fail,

not even the fear

could daunt, undertook to

lind out the house.

He first

presented himself to Baba Mustapha as the

robber had done,

marked

it

being shown the house,

and,

with red chalk in a place which he thought

not likely to be noticed.

Not long afterwards Morgiana, whose eyes nothwent

ing could escape,

out,

and seeing the red chalk

marked the neighbours' houses by way of precaution.

The robber returned counted what all

of

he

stole

his

had done,

them thought

They

to

into

the

the

in

plan

and

the

same manner,

comrades and the

captain

re-

and

must succeed.'

town with the same pre-


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. caution as before, but on

were again several

The

doors.

when he and

coming

by seeing

baffled

into the street they

same marks on

the

was

captain

verv

who had been

the cause of the

mistake underwent the -same punishment

The

to the

pursuing

two brave fellows of of diminishing it too much by

having

was afraid

this

had been

as

first.

captain,

his troop,

and

angry,

the rest of the troop had returned to

the forest the robber

meted out

221

lost

plan to get information of the residence

of their plunderer.

He so

had found that

good

as

therefore

hands

their

resolved

on

such

and

occasions,

upon

take

to

men's heads were not

his

himself

im-

the

portant commission.

Accordingly he went and addressed himself to

Baba Mustapha, who

did

him the same service he

had done to the other robbers.

He

did not set anv

mark on the house, but examined it so that by passing it often it became impossible

particular

carefully for

him

to mistake

Well returned the

prevent

had

with

satisfied

to the

cave,

it.

forest

their

taking

succeeded

that

revenge gaining

in

attempt,

and joined

them

telling

his

his

captain

the

comrades

nothing

upon the

knowledge

in

now man who

could

of

their

secret.

out

He

had made

he

sent

them

a plan,

to

the

and

in

order to carrv

neighbouring

villages

it

to


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

222

buy nineteen mules one

jars,

of

full

and thirty-eight the

oil,

large

leather

empty.

others

In a few davs' time the robbers had purchased the mules and

men

oil

The

rubbed the outside of the

he

into each,

with

and, after having put one of his

jars,

from the

full

vessel.

thieves had originally been forty in number,

men and the thirty-seven men

captain

thirtv-nine

only

mules

nineteen

and the

jars

were laden with and

of oil

jar full

He until

he

as

he had

led

mules

he came to Ali Baba's

meant

doorway,

to

knock

taking

a

men

;

through

house,

fresh

little

at

the

market

;

and

it

w^here to lodge.

you,

do

me

with you, and

the I

is

now

If I

he

air,

wav, to

sell

whose door

I

in

stopped

at

so late that

the his

"I have

to-morrow's

do not know

should not be troublesome to

favour shall

streets

him seated

but seeing

a great

oil

them

dusk of the

the

mules, addressed himself to him, and said:

brought some

the

in

out with

set

the

that

intended.

laden

the

saw

his

in

it

now

there remained

:

captain

the

;

towards the town, reaching evening,

jars

to

me much

pass

let

be very

night

the

obliged by your

hospitality."

Although Ali Baba had seen the captain of the robbers in the forest, he did not recognise him in

He made him

the disguise of an oil merchant.

come

to

mules

to

his

house and

go into the vard.

opened

He

his

gates

called a slave,

for

welthe

named


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

and ordered him, when the mules were

x\bdoolah,

not only to put them

unladen,

223

but

into the stable,

them fodder; then he bade Morgiana get a good supper for his guest, and sat talking with him to give

had eaten

until he

it.

Baba had retired to rest the captain found means of visiting the vard.

It

that

He

was not

took the

men

a little

out

as

she

picion,

put the

down

self

readv to

to

left

him

and

;

light out

his clothes,

in

the

his

he,

soon

After

signal.

when Morgiana,

house,

the

conducted him to

light,

where

gave them

he

returned

taking up a

give

to

jars,

and bade them be ready to come

air,

as

each of the

off

lid

soon

he

this

until Ali

to after,

his

chamber,

avoid

anv sus-

and

laid

him-

more

that he might be the

rise.

^lorgiana,

who had

not

yet finished

her work,

found to her mortification, when her lamp suddenly

went

out,

what

to

that she had

no more

do she did not know,

oil till

in

the

the

house;

slave

who

had been called to stable the supposed merchant's

mules advised her to take a

which stood

eight jars

in the

little

from the

thirty-

courtyard.

So Morgiana took the oil-pot, and went into the yard what was her surprise upon approaching ;

the

"Is

first it

jar

when

the robber within

Many would have alarm,

it

said

softly

time ?"

but

not

so

uttered

Morgiana.

exclamation

of

Comprehending

at

an


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

224

once that some danger threatened her master, she a

whisper

in this

manner

only replied

She went

in

:

"Not

yet,

but presently."

to all the jars, hearing the

same question and giving the same answer, till she came to the jar of oil. By this means she found out that her master, instead of entertaining a harmless oil merchant, had She admitted thirty-eight robbers to his house.

made what

she could to

haste

returned to her kitchen, when, lamp,

her

lighted

she

took

her oil-pot, and

fill

as

a

soon

great

over a large

fire,

and

as

soon

as

it

out and poured sufficient of the boiling

robber within

iar to stifle the

All noise,

went

kettle,

again to the oil-jar, and tilled the kettle with it

had

as she

oil,

set

boiled went oil

into each

it.

she accomplished without making any

this

and having put out her lamp she waited to

hear what would happen.

Before long the captain of the robbers got up

and opened

which was

his

to

window, gave the appointed drop

few small

a

stones

window, but growing uneasy that he response, he went the

first

jar

down

and spoke

into the yard.

signal,

from the

no

received

He went

to

There was no answer,

softly.

and then he noticed the smell of hot

oil

and soon

discovered what had happened.

Examining found best

all

to

his

make

all

the

jars,

one

after

he

another,

comrades were dead, and deemed his

escape whilst he yet might.

it

He


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. found a door

in

yard

the

back to the

When the present

master and

Ali

Morgiana was

satisfied that all

was over, and

that

the

his

way

Baba

rose

all

his comrades

early

and

oil-jars

and

to

find that

danger for

had saved her

she

his family, she retired to

he returned he was very

the

into

forest.

The captain found

see

opened

and climbing over the wall made

garden,

When

which

225

bed and

to sleep.

were dead.

went

to

much

the

bath.

surprised to

the merchant had

gone.

He

enquired of Morgiana

how

this

came

and by way of answer she led him to the

and bade him look

inside.

about,

first

jar


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

226

AH Baba

did so, and, seeing a man, started back-

and cried

in alarm,

Morgiana,

"Do

out.

man you

"the

you nor anybody

not be afraid," said

He

any harm.

else

can neither do

there

see

is

Look

dead.

into the other jars."

When

he had done so he stood staring

when

giana for some time in silence, and

Mor-

at

length

at

he recovered himself sufficiently to be able to speak,

"And what

he said:

come

has

"Merchant!" answered one

as

exactly

all

"he

she,

She then recounted

am."

I

of the merchant?" is

much

as

to her

master

had happened, telling him how she

that

had suspected treachery from the time she had

first

observed the chalk marks upon the door. "If you reflect on she,

"you

whom

find

will

you saw

was

it

for.

of the

it

my

for

said

robbers

and two others are

captain

Therefore

upon your guard, and

a plot

Thirty-seven have

in the forest.

but the

perished,

unaccounted

that has happened,"

all

now still

behoves you to be part

I

shall

neglect

nothing necessary for your preservation."

When

Morgiana ceased speaking, Ali Baba was so sensible of the great service she had done him that he said to her:

"I will not die without reward-

ing vou as vou deserve for

the

first

you your

token of

liberty.

we have now

to

You do

wicked thieves with

is

all

owe mv life to vou, and my acknowledgement I give I

:

are to

no longer

a slave.

All

burv the bodies of these

the secrecv imas:inable, that


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. nobody may suspect what that labour Abdoolah and

is

I

become

227

of them,

will undertake."

Ali Baba's garden was very long, at the

farther end

Under

these

by

a great

and wide enough to hold

Tlie robbers

they were hid the

all

jars

number

and the slave dug

he

ivere

all

When

buried.

and weapons, and

for the mules, Ali

Baba

and shaded

of large trees. a

trench,

long

the robbers, and here

buried in Ali

all

But

Babas

this

as

garden.

was done they they had no use

sent them, at different times,

to be sold in the market.

But the

captain

of the

band of robbers was

not long before he planned revenge for the loss of


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

228

He

brave comrades.

his

the

ing

had no intention of remain-

occupant

sole

of

meant

collecting a fresh troop he

the

man who was

the

in possession of

before

but

cave,

end

to put an

to

such a dangerous

secret.

So the morning after his comrades had been destroyed he went into the town and took up his lodging

at

he had,

and

an

as the

of information,

He

inn.

worthy man gave him

He now

all

sorts

but none of a kind that interested

him, he judged that Ali

keep the whole

asked the host what news

Baba had thought

best to

a secret.

affair

determined to play the part of

merchant, and for

this

immediately opposite

a silk

purpose engaged a warehouse

which had belonged

that

Cassim and which was now

in

to

charge of Ali Baba's

son.

He

very soon made friends with the young man,

and, being well disguised,

ventured also to get into

conversation with Ali Baba and was again invited to

spend an evening

at

his house.

Morgiana no sooner

set eyes

mistrusted him, more especially so that

he had a special aversion to

that

none might be used

in

on him than she

when he declared salt

and begged

preparing the evening

meal.

Everyone knows if

a

will

man not

has

once

that

eaten

amongst Eastern nations salt

with

his

enemy he

harm him, and wise Morgiana was

quite


Mot'piana

held a da^ocy

m

Iwr hand.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

231

certain that this was the

reason the pretended

merchant would not eat

salt

When

at

silk

her master's table.

she perceived, moreover, that he had a dagger

hidden beneath

garments she determined to put

his

And

an end to him herself.

so, when supper was came in to dance before her master and his guest. The dance was a strange one, for she held a dagger in her hand and as she twirled about she made a pretence of presenting it now at her

over, she

master's breast, it

now

at his son's,

and

plunged

finally

into the robber's heart.

Baba and

Ali

son

his

were

shocked

at

this

Morgiana opened the pretended merchant's garment and showed them the dagger. "Look action,

until

well

him," she

his

at

fictitious

said,

"and you

face,

tearing the false beard from

w^ill

find

oil-merchant and the

him

to

be both the

captain of the forty

thieves."

Ali Baba and his son

knew

not

how

to express

their gratitude to the brave Morgiana.

"I gave you your liberty," said Ali Baba, "and

promised that but

I

now

my

gratitude

esteem by making you turning

to

should not cease there,

intend giving you a higher proof of

his

son,

my he

daughter-in-law." said:

mv

Then,

"Consider that

by

marrying Morgiana you marrv the preserver of our family."

As

the

son

readily consented

to

the

marriage

the nuptials were celebrated a few days later.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

232

The

body was

captain's

buried

the

in

same

trench as the rest of the troop and no one was ever

any the wiser concerning the matter. Ali

Baba waited

son's marriage

for

a

whole year

to

his

venturing near the cave, be-

before

whom

cause the end of the two robbers

had caused

after

be put to death was

the crosses

still

unknown

to him.

However, return to

the

at

length

Finding

cave.

been undisturbed

he

since

the

decided to venture to that

it

captain's

had evidently death

he de-

cided that the troop of forty robbers was now^ completely destroyed.

He

took away with him

as

much

gold as he could carry, and afterwards took his son to the cave

and taught him the

handed down

to

their

posterity,

secret,

who,

which they using

good fortune with moderation, lived always honour and splendour.

in

their

great


THE STORY OF KUMMIR AL ZUMMAUN AND BADOURA. PRINCESS OF CHINA. A

BOUT

twenty

days'

from the coast of

sail

Persia, there are islands in

the main ocean called the Islands of the Children of

These islands

Khaledan.

were

formerly

governed

named Shaw Zummaim, who would have by

a

king

thought himself one of the

most happy monarchs Badoura, Princess of China.

world,

in

the

on account of

his

peaceful and prosperous reign, had

not been that

it

he had been denied the blessing of children.

He

had

no son

and

this

caused him

to

succeed great

him on the throne,

grief and

uneasiness.

Think then of his joy when, Heaven sent him a son, and the beautiful al

that

he

gave

in

his

prince

old

age,

was

so

him the name of Kummir

Zummaun, which means "Moon

of the Age." i6


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

234

He

was brought up with

imaginable

all

care,

and when he had arrived at a proper age, his father appointed him an experienced governor and able

He

preceptors.

quitted

himself

address,

as

cularly

the

now

the

prince.

till

I

for

parti-

early

in

age,

manhood, began

his

to think

the throne to

it,"

me

to

said

"and think

he,

it

is

retire."

suitable

prince

that

he

wished he

was

marry,

and

marriage

before

had

no wish

to

very plainly.

charge

his

him

aversion

give

he

He

would

him time

However, when

a

to

not

marriage,

force

consider the

at

declared

still

single, the

king was very

council with his vizier,

little

his

end

of

yet

would

himself

his

the

grieved

nor exert his

contented

the prince

patience.

to

not

disobedience,

with

authority.

him

was

father

prince's

discover

paternal

but

and

borne the fatigue of a crown

of

a

wonderful

announced king.

so

telling

to

informed the

make

The not

him,

grown

But the prince

to

who saw

and wished to resign

then

publicly

said

and

father.

his

"I have

now proper to

grace

being advanced

am weary

He

all

had

he

of retirement,

him

with

sultan

he was taught and ac-

all

such

charm

to

When father,

learned

with

inclinations,

proposal.

another

year

intention of remaining

much annoyed. He took who counselled him to have


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

many things about Your Majesty will

"Patience," said he, "brings

seemed impracticable.

that before

235

have no cause to reproach yourself for precipitation, if

you

another

prince

the

give

will

year to

con-

sider your proposal."

The

anxiously

so

thought

married,

son

his

who

sultan,

grand

his

long

this

however, though with much

desired

delay

see

to

an

age

he yielded to

difficulty,

vizier's advice.

But the year expired, and, of the sultan, Prince

Kummir

to the

great regret

Zummaun

al

gave not

the least proof of having changed his sentiments.

One

day,

therefore,

when

was

there

great

a

Council, the sultan addressed him thus, in the hearing

of

while

since

to

the

and

regard

son,

it

my

for

same

my

vou

to

is

now

in

desire

you would

wishes, I

long

a

earnest

imagined

I

on vour part

resistance

a

propose

my

married,

more

had

have such

"My

expressed to you

I

you

see

to

Court:

his

all

but

after

have thought

fit

presence

of

the

Council."

The that he

prince

answered

with

would not comply with

so

much warmth

his father's request,

that the sultan, enraged to see himself thwarted by

him

in full

prince

Council, ordered the guards to take the

away,

and carry him to an old tower that

had long been unoccupied, where he was shut up, with only a bed, a

little

furniture,

some books, and

one slave to attend him. 16*


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

236

Kummir

al

Zummaun,

thus deprived of liberty,

was nevertheless pleased to be alone with

which

made him regard

difference.

confinement with

in-

he bathed and said

his

his

In the evening

his books,

and after having read some chapters

prayers,

Koran, with the same tranquillity of mind

had been self

him while he slept. In this tower was

a well,

davtime for a retreat to It

as if

sultan's palace, he undressed

in the

and went to bed, leaving

morme.

in the

was about

his

midnight

him-

lamp burning by

which served

a certain

he

in

fairv called

the

Mai-

when Maimorme

sprang lightly to the mouth of the well, to wander

about the world after her wonted custom, where her curiosity led in

the

her.

She was surprised

prince's chamber, and,

to see a light

entering,

approached

the bedside.

The

prince was fast asleep

that his eves

were veiled the

;

but notwithstanding

fairv

thouo^ht

him the

young man she had ever seen. She kissed him gently, without waking him, and took her flight As she was ascending she heard a great into the air.

finest

flapping

of wings,

and knew

it

to be a

genie

who

This genie's name was T)anhasch,

made the noise. and Maimorme at once accosted him and asked him where he came from, what he had seen, and what he had done that night.

"Since you desire to know," replied Danhasch, "I will

inform

vou that

I

come from

the

utmost


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. of China

limits

;

the

king

only daughter, the finest in the

as to trail

as

Her

world.

the

is

that ever

polished

Maimorme

and

kissed

full

mirror,

him

of

vermilion

her

eves

are

this

fire,

her nose

Her

teeth

to

black,

neither too

is

finest

like

are

exceed her

and of a

two rows of

whiteness.

in

imperfect sketch, vou

no beautv likelv

smooth

gently, imthout ivaking him.

and surpass the

word, by is

colour.

was seen as

is

long nor too short, and her mouth small

pearls,

an

brown, and of such length

on the ground, her forehead

best

sparkling,

hair

country has

of that

woman

237

may

in the

In

a

guess there world.


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

238

"Her

built for her seven

and

beyond

father loves her

magnificent

were

ever

belief and has

most extraordinarv

the

palaces,

that

all

known,

and

has

furnished them most sumptuously.

"Because of the fame of cess's beauty, the

most powerful neighbouring kings

have sent

ambassadors

The King

of China

manner,

obliging his

incomparable prin-

this

to

solicit

any of the

in

marriage.

all

in

the

received them

he resolved not to

but as

daughter without her consent,

like

her

same marry

and she did not

ambassadors were forced

parties, the

to return as they came. "'Sir,' said the

have

'you think

stately

me

married,

and

where

shall

I

find

as

are

inclination to see

me by

oblige

to

such

an

king her father,

princess to the

palaces

but

it;

and

gardens

delicious

me by your Majesty? Through your good pleasure I am under no constraint and have the same honours shown to me as are paid to yourfurnished

These are advantages

self.

anywhere love

else,

to be

cannot expect to find

I

whoever may be my husband

masters,

and

;

men

have no inclination to

I

be commanded.'

but

"The when

king

a very

asked her hand with the others,

single

he

bore^with her whim for some time; powerful in

and more opulent king

marriage

and

same scorn she had

became enraged and

she

treated

him

shown towards the shut

apartment, with only ten old

her up

women

in

a

to wait


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

239

upon her and keep her company, the chief of whom had been her nurse."

Maimorme, having Princess

of

Kummir

al

China,

listened to the story of the

told

her

Zummaun, and

as

story

of the

both

the

Prince

genie

and

the fairy persisted in saying that their special charge

was more beautiful than the other, Danhasch agreed

Danliasch returned, bringing the fair princess with him asleep.

to

go and fetch the princess that they might compare

the two.

Accordingly Danhasch flew

whence

he

soon

bringing the

her

fair

down bv

of the two.

and

with

princess with

incredible

him

the prince's bedside,

towards China,

asleep.

and truly

speed,

He it

set

was

determine which was the more beautiful

diflScult to

yield,

returned

off

it

Neither

was not

Maimorme nor Danhasch would until Maimorme had summoned


THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

240 a

named Caochcash,

hideous humpbacked genie,

matter was decided,

the

that

and he declared that the

prince and princess were both equally beautiful.

was

he, too,

who

It

suggested that they should awaken

the two sleepers in turn, and see what they thought

of one another.

So Maimorme transformed and

No

bit the prince.

herself into

a

flea

sooner was he awake than

he espied the sleeping princess and straightway

He

in love with her.

did

not

awaken,

He

chanted sleep. finger this

because

again

fell

she

was sleeping an

en-

next drew a ring from the princess's

and replaced

he

fell

her tenderly, but she

kissed

it

with one from his

into

a

own

after

;

profound and enchanted

sleep.

and

Danhasch next transformed himself into a flea in his turn bit the princess, who awoke from

her sleep, and on opening her eyes was very surprised to see a

her

much

handsome young prince lying by

side,

fast

asleep.

She

fell

in

love with him at once,

as

he had

done with

her,

and was somewhat disappointed that

she could

not

awaken him.

and shook him several times very soon she too

to

to

fell

She kissed ;

but

all

in

his

cheek

vain,

and

asleep.

Then Maimorme bade Danhasch carry her back her own apartment; this he did, and as day began appear Maimorme retired to her well. Kummir al Zummaun, on waking next morning,


Kummiv

al&