Page 1


BACHELOR OF FINE ART INTERDISCIPLINARY PRINT MEDIA

JEWELLERY AND SMALL OBJECTS

INTERDISCIPLINARY SCULPTURE

PAINTING

Liz Atkinson

8

Maneesha Bahuguna

26

Julie Thai

47

Gwyneth Baker

52

Alrey Batol

72

Rebecca Bailey

9

Jeremy Eden

27

Maikki Toivanen

48

James Barth

53

Tess Dallas

73

Lucy Tyler

49

Olivia Dean-Jones

54

Claudia De Salvo

74

Helen Bird

10

Lauren Edmonds

28

Laura Burstow

11

Kristian Fracchia

29

Nick Eckhardt

55

Corrie Furner

75

Jennifer Eales

12

Susanlee Fuller

30

Sarah Gillow

56

Jaden Gallagher

76

Angela Fok

13

BoHDi Gardener

31

Claire Goodall

57

Callum Galletly

77

Ari Fuller

14

Marisa Georgiou

32

Penelope Grills

58

Spencer Harvie

78

Susan Fuller

15

Fred Gooch

33

Loki Groves

59

Sha Hassani

79

Sarah Gillow

16

Domenica Hoare

34

Spencer Harvie

60

Tyneka Jane

80

Susan Hawkins

17

Cholena Hughes

35

Lillian Heenan

61

Sun K. Lizzett Kim

81

Rachel Matthews-Frederick

18

Ricky Larry

36

Rilda Hoffman

62

Saskia Levy

82

Lauren Ryan

19

Marta Larzabel

37

Serena Indigo

63

Aishla Manning

83

Tegan Rynne

20

Adrianna Mammino

38

Simone Linssen

64

Sally Molloy

84

M. Veronica Silva

21

Bronte Mark

39

Karyn McDonald

65

Naomi O’Reilly

85

Monique Tregenza

22

Ally McKay

40

Matthew Sneesby

66

Tania Olszewski

86

Rebecca White

23

Tess Mehonoshen

41

Anya Swan

67

Soulla Porfyriou

87

Aimee Nesbitt

42

Trevor Tierney

68

Kiah Reading

88

Mekosuchus 43

Todd Whisson

69

Danica Schlawe

89

Michelle Rubins

44

SHATRICK 90

Christine Scott

45

Rabin Sherchan

92

Courtney Spence

46

Kat Tansky

93


BACHELOR OF FINE ART WITH HONOURS

BACHELOR OF CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS ART

MASTER OF ARTS IN VISUAL ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS IN VISUAL ARTS WITH HONOURS

Pippin Backwell

96

Bridget Broderick

106

Julie Gibbs

111

Nicola Hooper

119

Blair Coffey

97

Dianne Hall

107

Yingying Huang

112

Jason Murphy

120

Clare Cowley

98

Maryrose Moxham

113

Svetlana Trefiolva

121

Paul Eves

99

Desley Rolph

114

Evan Gardner

100

Keiron Wilson

115

Travis D. Hendrix

101

Rebecca Kinsey

102

Vanghoua Anthony Vue

103


FOREWORD This catalogue marks a significant milestone for all involved: the completion of degrees, or, at the very least, the completion of a major. This is the point where students enter the world of the arts, either as artists or artworkers, or continue to pursue their research in the academic environment. The 2014 Bachelor of Fine Art graduates of the Queensland College of Art (QCA), Griffith University, leave with a world of possibilities ahead of them. The directions they will go are likely to be as diverse and rich with potential as their catalogue entries suggest. The work in this catalogue represents a glimpse of the outcomes of a wide variety of research that has taken place during the time these students have been at QCA. These diverse approaches within all the discipline areas—Interdisciplinary Sculpture, Interdisciplinary Print Media, Painting, and Jewellery and Small Objects­—mirror the complexity and diversity of the world they are entering. I hope that, along with reading this catalogue, you have the opportunity to view the exhibition. Remember what you see in here is just a moment in these graduates’ practice, a small insight into the artistic concerns being investigated in the final year of study. Over the last three years, the students will have variously felt challenged, elated, confused, and confident as they have progressed through the hurdles of tertiary education. The Fine Art staff have been with them along the way. We have witnessed the effort and energy the students have expended in rising to meet challenges and the sense of achievement this brings. We are confident the graduates will be leaving Fine Art as more assured, complex versions of their earlier selves who took the nervous plunge and enrolled in a degree. This is an exciting and important time for the graduates, who are ready to creatively contribute to discussion in the wider world. From here, the possibilities are endless; the challenge will be for the graduates to choose which way to go. We congratulate them on what they have achieved and wish them well in their future endeavours as they now become members of the illustrious and exclusive alumni of QCA. We look forward to what happens next. Elizabeth Shaw Convenor Fine Art


BACHELOR OF FINE ART


6


JEWELLERY AND SMALL OBJECTS


Liz Atkinson Jewellery and Small Objects greygrazing@bigpond.com My pieces focus on the large area of the neck, shoulder, and chest—this is the space where my pieces hold court. They seek attention rather than to complement attire. The elements are both graphic and strong—simple, pure forms that make a connection between line, shape, and colour. Untitled 2014 sterling silver, copper and aluminium 21 x 21cm

8


Rebecca Bailey Jewellery and Small Objects My art practice addresses a range of themes. I don’t focus on one aspect for too long as art is, for me, a leisure pursuit. Instead, I explore themes that interest me; for example, animal welfare, crime, and mental illness, just to name a few. While studying visual art in the last five years I have decided to broaden my horizons and utilise my knowledge in other fields, such as education. Top: Fashion of a Drug Lord 2014 bronze and brass dimensions variable Bottom: Endangered Arachnids 2013 sterling silver, solder, bronze, and brass dimensions variable

9


Helen Bird Jewellery and Small Objects helenhbird.wordpress.com What is remembered and what is not? Interpretations of history, both ancient and recent, drive my practice, including the way cultural memories inform our contemporary, globalised environment through material possessions representing human identity. My work blends ideas and motifs from different histories to create a collection of objects that could pose as a hoard of antiquities or historical artefacts of human past. Trace Series 2014 sterling silver, copper, brass, enamel dimensions variable

10


Laura Burstow Jewellery and Small Objects lauraburstow.wix.com/home My work is a response to materials and to my classical music training. By hybridising this training with metalsmithing techniques, I create wearables that make sound upon contact and movement with the body. I also create instruments that approach sound production in a new way. The creation of sound is a multi-sensory craft; the range of sounds that can be created is an exciting and driving force. Left: Tub Guitar (left) and Tub Harp (right) 2014 aluminium tub, MDF board, wood, guitar strings, machine heads (left) and aluminium tub, PVC pipe, guitar strings, piano tuning pins (right) 85 x 25 x 27cm (left) and 55 x 25 x 25cm (right) Right: Untitled (pendant) 2014 sterling silver 10 x 6 x 1.5cm

11


Jennifer Eales Jewellery and Small Objects j.eales59@hotmail.com I am interested in materiality. I enjoy hand skills and processes and don’t want to conceal the marks made during the making. Emotions can be communicated through the materials used and through character and form, yet the work of art is more than the sum of its parts. Layers 2014 mixed metals 4 x 4cm

12


Angela Fok Jewellery and Small Objects marassametalsmith. blogspot.com.au My experience in the jewellery and small objects major has taken me through a journey of self-discovery and has given me a gift of finding what I love doing most. From carvings of minuscule objects to seed storing and dispensing box jewellery, everything has been transformed from my inner-most desires into physical objects and has subsequently allowed me to discover the potential of my ideas and metalsmithing skills. Angela 2012–14 silver, brass, plant seed, bone dimensions variable, from 1 x 1cm to 3 x 2cm

13


Ari Fuller Jewellery and Small Objects arifuller.com Inspired by the conceptual development of “Object Permanence� within children, my art reflects a symbolic engagement with the idea that existence is permanent, continuing even if we are unable to perceive it or sense it, as in death. I believe creative activity is a political act in and of itself, supporting my position that sustainable, co-operative, inclusive, and creative activity is reflective of individuals who perceive existence as continual, rather than ceasing with their death. Left: Everything, Nothing, God, Self, Death: Same 2014 sterling silver, bronze, brass, aquamarine, granite, found objects 25 x 16 x 8cm Right: Bracelet of Boxes 2014 fine gold, fine silver, sterling silver, enamel, chrystanite and a spring 6 x 20 x 1cm

14


Susan Fuller Jewellery and Small Objects I re-purpose everyday objects in my works of wearable art and period costume design. I enjoy constructing objects that will be loved for a lifetime and beyond. I am focused on constructing the whole look, not single pieces. I have the skills needed to construct almost anything required to achieve a complete look. Left: Snakey 2013 cast silver and bronze, blue crystals 21 x 1 x 1.5cm Right: Liber Coelestium Anguli (Book of Heavenly Angles) 2013 mixed media 20 x 15 x 6cm

15


Sarah Gillow Jewellery and Small Objects sarahgillow@gmail.com Our perception of, and our response to our surroundings is a constant theme in my work. Focusing on that which is often overlooked or rendered inconsequential, I seek to subtly bring such things to the surface for re-evaluation. From top left to bottom right: Grandad’s Step, The Repercussions of Sowing Fennel, Venkat’s Mula, Pee the Bed, Grid Box 2014 silver, copper, carnelian, carpet, synthetic wool, steel dimensions variable

16


Susan Hawkins Jewellery and Small objects susiehawko@gmail.com Stacked is an odd collection of objects, arranged in small and considered piles, consisting of a range of made and found objects, including copper coaxial cable, old skirting board, a timber ball, and a timber spinning top, all sitting atop a piece of laminex. This assemblage of random stacks dismisses function in favour of an aesthetic appeal.

Stacked 2014 timber, copper, laminex dimensions variable

17


Rachel Matthews-Frederick Jewellery and Small Objects facebook.com/rmfartist Within my practice, I explore the ability of objects to act as both the subject of a story and as forms for telling. Generated during a process of intuitive making, the forms are symbolically charged and address notions of mortality, existence, and transience. They are records of memory and experience, melancholic works that are metaphysical mythologies given physicality.

Two Dreams of Death 2014 bronze 5 x 5.5 x 17.7cm

18


Lauren Ryan Jewellery and Small Objects laurenryanjewellery.wix.com/ portfolio The tragedy of memory is loss. It is intangible and therefore destined to be forgotten or erased. This loss may be thwarted through the imposition of memories upon objects. In their new vessel, memories may be worn, viewed, or touched. Once palpable, they are more easily grasped as they inevitably begin to fade. Anamnesis 2014 recycled sterling silver, bronze, and quartz dimensions variable

19


Tegan Rynne Jewellery and Small Objects thebestthingsinlifearefree.com/ birds_bees For me, art is an exploration of form, a journey unbounded by medium. Creation has become a balanced process of inserting meaning into my work and observing it emerge as the pieces take shape. While at times I am motivated by a concrete concept and other times by a more abstract inclination, inspiration remains an integral element of my process. Negative 2014 silver 2.5 x 3 x 1cm each

20


M. Veronica Silva Jewellery and Small Objects mveronicasilva.weebly.com An experience is a lesson in living. Through these lessons we learn of the fragile, evolving, and transient nature of our existence. My work is a reflection of my inner space, of the experiences, values, and memories that define me. My work is also a window into the introspection and experiences that shape who we become—a reminder that what we choose to show on the surface is not always what is contained within. Covet 2014 sterling silver, acrylic mirror 56 x 42cm

21


Monique Tregenza Jewellery and Small Objects moniquetsmallobjects. wordpress.com My body of work entitled Vast Expanses is a self-explorative series of small-scale objects and assemblage pieces that are outcomes of a response to materials process. Relating disparate images, materials and metal elements together, I arrive at intimate, contemplative scenarios. Individually and collectively, the works evoke narrative through the small scale and intriguingly inexplicit imagery. My intent is to actively engage the viewer so that they form their own narratives and personal meanings. Vast Expanses (detail) 2014 mixed media dimensions variable

22


Rebecca White Jewellery and Small Objects rebeccawhitew@gmail.com My naive approach to collecting found plant litter is defined by memories and places. These are then translated into wearable pieces and objects that hold particular significance. Flora Detritus Series 2014 brass, oxidized bronze, sterling silver, seed pods, hemp thread, vinegar patina, enamel paint dimensions variable

23


INTERDISCIPLINARY PRINT MEDIA

25


Maneesha Bahuguna Interdisciplinary Print Media abakusfawkes.com I am a New Zealand–born Indian artist whose work explores the mapping of autobiographical traces through diaspora, travel, and self-portraiture. My installation The Orient (2014) investigates past and present tensions existing between my oriental and assimilated identities. By utilising photographic and moving images, I create a dialogue between my hybridised Indian and European identities, which incorporates cultural attire and depictions European identity through respective cultural attire and depictions from the cities of Brisbane, Prague, and Dehradun. The Orient #4 2014 photograph 14 x 21cm

26


Jeremy Eden Interdisciplinary Print Media instagram.com/jeremyedenart I strive to create highly detailed graphite drawings inspired by the environments encountered in Brisbane. My work investigates the potency of representational drawing as a mode of visual communication. The attention to detail translates the environment in a way that is impossible to achieve through photography. Photographs instantly capture a moment in time, while the process of translation invests feeling, memory, and experience to that moment, expressed through the time-consuming act of drawing. Graphite Landscape 2014 graphite pencil 78 x 112cm

27


Lauren Edmonds Interdisciplinary Print Media laurenedmonds.webs.com My work addresses concerns regarding the news industry, particularly the manipulation of the masses through the distortion of information. It investigates underlying issues, such as the implications of ‘commercial logic’, the infestation of PR content, the irony of PR today, and the class separation between the manipulator and the masses. The work also recognises a ‘fish bowl effect’ where a conservative outlook is being circulated by the media as a consequence to the above issues. News Factory (film still) 2014 new media installation with two projections 3:25mins

28


Kristian Fracchia Interdisciplinary Print Media I explore the corporeal experience of adolescence through technology. Based on self-observation, these self-portraits reflect on the construction of sexual identity in the age of information. These images document fleeting moments in the narrative of a young man during times of intimacy and anxiety. Untitled (Self Portrait #4) 2014 graphite and charcoal 35 x 54cm

29


Susanlee Fuller Interdisciplinary Print Media facebook.com/susanlee.fuller I have enjoyed using print media since I was introduced to it at South Bank Institute of TAFE in 2010. I have gone on to continue learning more skills in this area. My recent work has been to highlight issues surrounding women’s health, abuse, and alcoholism, which are issues close to my heart. Twisted 2.1 2014 screen print, white ink on black paper 50 x 30cm Twisted 2014 screen print, black ink on white paper 60 x 50cm Knotted 2014 screen print, black ink and water colour on craft card with projection 1500 x 1500cm

30


BoHDi Gardener Interdisciplinary Print Media bgardart.carbonmade.com This process was a way of duplicating myself and becoming more familiar with my image. By installing myself into the crowd, I seek to finally see myself in some recognisable way. I wanted to see myself and I want to see how others see me and by introducing myself as my art to the audience, I can provide an open environment conducive to receiving this information. This is me getting myself out there. Faces in the Crowd 2014 stencil and linocut 60 x 30cm

31


Marisa Georgiou Interdisciplinary Print Media marisageorgiouart.com A visual inquiry into landscape cannot rest on representation; for a profound investigation, it must engage with that which is ordinarily imperceptible. Using experimental print methods, my works interrogate the transience of memory, archetypal or subconscious landscapes, and the ritualisation of time when experiencing place. My works serve as objects of contemplation; a lens with which to portray the simultaneous feeling of isolation, impermanence, and interconnection present in the Australian landscape. I Will Never Be Here Again (The Transience of Memory) 2014 fabric, salt, projector 300 x 450cm

32


Fred Gooch Interdisciplinary Print Media fredgooch.tumblr.com By focussing on nonchalant gestural mark-making along with unconventional techniques of applying colour, abstract forms, layers, and of constructing surfaces, my work contradicts the traditions and expectations of the printmaking discipline. Nevertheless, I do not shy away from the title of contemporary printmaker. Top: Untitled (Green and Blue) 2014 oil, timber lithography on torn paper dimensions variable Bottom: Untitled (Blue and Purple) 2014 oil, timber lithography on torn paper dimensions variable

33


Domenica Hoare Interdisciplinary Print Media domenicahoare.com.au In my art practice, I address issues of identity and people in place. In using black-and-white photographs as references, I then explore the figures within them in terms of who they seem to be and how they might relate to the world around them. The lithographic print medium, with its qualities of light, dark, and shading, allows me to explore the human subject by highlighting human qualities and ways of being. Left: Marion I 2014 lithographic print 53.5 x 41cm Right: Marion ll 2014 lithographic print 54 x 38cm

34


Cholena Hughes Interdisciplinary Print Media facebook.com/ CholenaDrewHughesArt My art practice keeps me grounded, almost a removal of mortality in my environment. The process of creating slows me down to the point where I become lost in my own world. My message comes through the medium and looking more closely becomes a form of meditation. When my artwork is resolved, my signature sets it free, and the viewer is left to observe the trace of my experience.

Intimate Surround 2013 gouache and cyanotype on fabriano rosaspina paper 70 x 150cm

35


Ricky Larry Interdisciplinary Print Media Using photography as a tool, the most effective way to interpret what we consider to be real, these works are an investigation of the nature in which we perceive the real and reality. I create illusions through materials and landscape to challenge the ideas of logical thought and representation. Top Left: Atomic.2 2014 photography and sculpture dimensions variable Bottom Left: Atomic.3 2014 photography and sculpture dimensions variable Right: Atomic.1 2014 photography and sculpture dimensions variable

36


Marta Larzabal Interdisciplinary Print Media martalarzabal.com South America in the 1970s was a place of political repression and terror. During Operation Condor, around 60,000 people were killed, 400,000 were imprisoned, and 30,000 went missing. My artwork focuses on the stories of tragedy during this time and has enabled a personal search for my own cultural identity as someone born in Australia whose parents left Uruguay in 1969 to start a new and better life. Top: The Disappeared [Los Desaparecidos] (detail) 2014 digital print on paper and thread 109 x 21.5 x 1.5cm Bottom: Death Flights [Vuelos De La Muerte] (detail) 2014 oil pastel on paper 21 x 30cm

37


Adrianna Mammino Interdisciplinary Print Media Adriannam-art.tumblr.com As an artist working mainly within the dimensions of illustration and etching, I identify with the processes in which the introspective mind relates to its environment and surroundings, turning experiences into abstracted symbols of representation and feeling. My works reflect this in a highly detailed manner, drawing upon allegorical and symbolic storytelling. Nesting 2014 copper etching 13 x 13cm

38


Bronte Mark Interdisciplinary Print Media bpmark@gmail.com ‘Middle class’ refers not as much to income as it does to the commonness of suburban lifestyle. Ardent non-proletarians find each other in competition against neighbourly non-competitors without the aim to ‘win’, only to tweak common behaviour their way through imperceptible hints and casual snoopery. Buzz thinks Declan’s woollen balaclava house clothes are faggy and devalue the street. Declan feels his neighbour barbeques too much and is trying a little too hard at making friends. Declan’s House 2014 lino print on paper 56 x 77cm Buzz’s House 2014 lino print on paper 56 x 77cm

39


Ally McKay Interdisciplinary Print Media My practice exposes intimate thoughts concealed within the mind, revealing relationship moments and awkward encounters through the staging and layering of familiar materials. The artist book format invites a private engagement with these unspoken thoughts, allowing snippets of text and concrete poetry to echo between transparent pages. Working with connotations of ready-made materials, surfaces and light, I aim to also generate installation and sculptural investigations into the tension between public and private. Undress 2014 artist book dimensions variable

40


Tess Mehonoshen Interdisciplinary Print Media tessmehonoshen@hotmail.com My work investigates intimacy of place. I am interested in the impermanence of places, and the connections formed through memory, time, and a sense of belonging. I am exploring the tensions that exist in the lived experience of opposing environments, and the alterations of self, which occur in-between. Using primarily cement and found red clay, I am exploring my own fragmented feelings towards the ongoing strain between identity and connection to places. Top: Untitled (Cement) 2014 cement-coated fabric dimensions variable Bottom: Untitled 2014 clay and cement-treated fabric, sewn dimensions variable

41


Aimee Nesbitt Interdisciplinary Print Media AimeeNesbittArt.com.au Charles Darwin called the process of domestication ‘unnatural selection’. Who are we to decide what is desirable, what is natural and what is beautiful? Unnatural Selection (detail) 2014 ink on fabriano 31 x 31cm

42


Mekosuchus Interdisciplinary Print Media mekosuchus.tumblr.com Abstract communication marries experience with the material world. The physical manifestation of memory occurs in the form of a visual language, creating objectivity on the journey from pure experience to translation. By and large, if art is about communicating ideas, then art should be por gratis in the same way that ideals are. Communication and interpretation can never be complete, so, in this sense, art is simply the medium that transmits ideas to the people. Love Letter to Latin America 2014 fineliner on cartridge paper 59.4 x 168.2cm

43


Michelle Rubins Interdisciplinary Print Media michellerubins.com The old saying like a moth to a flame” describes someone with an unswerving yet selfdestructive attraction. Attraction is an involuntary feeling, just as unthinking and automatic as the moth’s attraction is to light. Contemporary society’s unthinking attraction to the light of media and its content is changing the way we interact with each other. With the immensity of technology that bombards us daily, making eye contact and connections with people is becoming exceedingly difficult. Top: Blinded by the Light 2014 screen print on wood 41 x 83cm Bottom: Law of Attraction 2014 screen print on wood 41 x 83cm

44


Christine Scott Interdisciplinary Print Media christinescott.net My work examines the visible and invisible relationships people have with the physical world. I place images, symbols, and language on a variety of media to demonstrate the interplay of energies in these relationships. Shapes and materials are markers of the physical world, glyphs denote the human, and line depicts the tensions between them. Fragmentation breaks down literal readings to reveal underlying connections beyond the obvious and the visible. Spirals 2014 lino prints on cut paper dimensions variable

45


Courtney Spence Interdisciplinary Print Media As an intaglio print maker, I identify with the interactions that we, as humans, have within the natural and manmade environments we place ourselves in. I capture the structures, events, issues, and decisions that communities are exposed to as part of the human condition, forming works that are highly detailed and informative expressions of allegory and narrative. Hong Kong 2014 etching 50 x 72cm

46


Julie Thai Interdisciplinary Print Media jtwonderland.weebly.com I merge animal with human to make spiritual creatures that are metaphors. In traditional Japanese tales, demons disguise themselves as human beings, wearing large masks to hide their true form. Also there are many Japanese animals that have the ability to transform into humans. Folk lore is very significant within Japanese culture, teaching the people all about spirituality, life lessons, and a sense of duty. Top: Tengu 2014 etching on paper 29.7 x 21cm Bottom: Kitsune 2014 pencil on paper 29.7 x 42cm

47


Maikki Toivanen Interdisciplinary Print Media MaikkiToivanenVisualArtist.net The art of collecting and keeping memories triggers different experiences for those whose idea of travel evokes the idea of escaping one’s boundaries. Travel ephemera and found objects initiate the basis of my work, allowing me to let my intuition guide my art. Images of these graphic works and natural forms printed digitally onto diaphanous tracing paper symbolises the transient nature of my familiarities of travel and life. Left: Transient 1 2014 digital prints on tracing paper 172 x 61cm Right: Transient 2 2014 digital prints on tracing paper 172 x 61cm

48


Lucy Tyler Interdisciplinary Print Media My work interrogates our insatiable human desire to exert control over our surroundings or circumstances; to create order from perceived chaos. I am particularly driven by the innate sense of satisfaction derived through the recognition, and creation of pattern, which I believe to be a universal human trait. The tension between a pattern’s key elements of repetition and variation excites my imagination. I believe pattern serves a vital function in facilitating communication through the visual. Vernacular silkscreen prints on paper 16 x 20cm, total dimensions variable

49


PAINTING

51


Gwyneth Baker Painting My series, The Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, is about my family’s photographs and how some members are forgotten over time and some that are alive have more photographs to come. By mixing up the generations of my family, I have changed the narratives of the individual photographs into new anecdotes. By lapsing time between the generations, I have introduced newer to the older generations.

Top: The Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors series: Graces 2014 oil on canvas 76 x 122 x 3.5cm Bottom Left: The Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors series: Bicycle 2014 oil on canvas 36 x 46 x 3.5cm Bottom Right: The Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors series: Headless and the Ghost 2014 oil on canvas 25 x 30 x 3.5cm

52


James Barth Painting james.barth64@hotmail.com My works position me within queer visual culture, in order to examine the dominant values represented. My main area of focus is printed media, including pornography, fashion, and lifestyle. On one hand, I feel a certain love for the male beauty presented, but on the other hand, I dislike furthering, through painterly replication, the negative gender-locking values these images contain. Left: Self portrait (In a Towel) 2014 oil on board 29 x 20cm Right: Untitled 2014 oil on board 40 x 26cm

53


Olivia Dean-Jones Painting oliviadean-jones.wix.com/artist This project explores the nature of materials and sculpture in relation to human interaction by constructing intrusive portraits. By creating work that takes up space and commands attention, and demands to be physically manoeuvred around, I aim to create a stronger dialogue between the work and the audience. The strange alien ‘blobs’ are fleshy and real, and the faces are foreign and distorted yet clearly human. Spitting Distance 2014 expanding foam, paraffin wax, resin, spray paint, oil paint, polystyrene on board. dimensions variable

54


Nick Eckhardt Painting

Top: Untitled (Are You as Good as I Remember) 2014 watercolour on paper 65 x 59cm Bottom: Untitled (Are You as Good as I Remember) (detail) 2014 watercolour on paper 65 x 59cm

55


Sarah Gillow Painting sarahgillow@gmail.com

Jelly Wrestling at the Rocklea 2014 oil on canvas 91 x 92cm

56


Claire Goodall Painting Recently my paintings have been focused on the idea of constructed realities—whether from our own imagination or through the fragmentation of existing story-lines. My current painting series surrounding horror films centres on finding the faltering and often cryptic beauty in scenes of inherent chaos. Through freezing, rearranging, and combining these moments together as a body of work, I aim to challenge the overarching stereotype of what horror in cinema is. Top: ‘Home’ 2014 oil on board 44 x 60cm Bottom: ‘First Time’ 2014 oil on board 40 x 61cm

57


Penelope Grills Painting penelopegrills.tumblr.com Over a period of 168 days, I have documented my daily journey from my home in Brisbane to work and beyond; an examination of navigation around our imposed web of universal ‘city’ time. In these temporal maps, I have investigated the boundaries and parameters Western time enforces upon the individual, including the emotions that accompany the harmony and tension required to mediate between work and leisure. Led By Time 2014 digital print 99 x 99cm

58


Loki Groves Painting lokigroves.com I tell you, we are here on earth to fart around, and don’t let anybody tell you different. —Kurt Vonnegut Top: To 2014 pen and watercolour on paper 65 x 70cm Bottom: In There 2014 oil and acrylic on board 20.5 x 20.5cm (left) 21 x 18.5cm (right)

59


Spencer Harvie Painting spencerharvie.com Every picture I make, I’m one step closer to the business of The Truth. —Harvie T. Church

Top: Luna J.C connections 2014 gouache on board 75 x 90cm Bottom: Predicting the Death of Author Tom Clancy 2014 acrylic on board 60 x 51cm

60


Lillian Heenan Painting lillianheenan@live.com.au

Left: Self Portrait 2014 oil on canvas 71 x 45.5cm Right: A Marriage 2014 oil on canvas 155 x 120cm

61


Rilda Hoffman Painting I was born in Papua New Guinea, and have been painting for much of my adult life. Specialising in portraiture and nature, my pictorial narratives combine portraiture, landscape, and symbolism to encapsulate the joyful depictions of the everyday from a romantic and spiritual perspective. A Day In the Life... 2012 acrylic on canvas 60 x 200cm (4 panels)

62


Serena Indigo Painting serenaindigo.wix.com/indigo My body of work is a series of figurative paintings that seek to pay homage to icons of subjective selection that have left formative impressions on me as an individual. Through the avenue of portraiture, I’m capturing the mood, personality, and character of each of my subjects. I’m interested in the transcendent or immaterial part of a human and how to portray that visually onto a canvas through my own personal interpretation. Left: Jivan 2014 oil on canvas 102 x 69 x 4.5cm Right: Olivia 2014 oil on canvas 92 x 66 x 4cm

63


Simone Linssen Painting simonelinssen.wix.com/artist Throughout this series, I concentrate on the emotional and psychological elements entangled with the taking and dissemination of the ‘selfie’. I explore particular issues of identity, anxiety, and loneliness, which are often amplified through the use of social media. Top: Tumult 2014 oil on canvas 50 x 70cm Middle: Cocoon 2014 oil on canvas 50 x 70cm Bottom: That Moment 2014 oil on canvas 50 x 70cm

64


Karyn McDonald Painting karynmcdonald.com As a passionate scuba diver and environmentalist, my work focuses on global warming, climate change and the effects on marine ecosystems. Rising sea temperatures have had an enormous impact on the health, distribution, and abundance of marine species, with long-term effects still unclear. These beautiful, alien-like creatures may end up permeating our oceans or perishing completely. Thus we are heading into the great unknown, the darkness, the abyss…something we should all be afraid of... Top: Aglantha digitale 2014 oil on canvas 101 x 76 x 3cm Right: Winged Comb Jelly 2014 oil on canvas 25.5 x 20.5cm Bottom: Box Jellyfish 2014 oil on canvas 101 x 76 x 3cm

65


Matthew Sneesby Painting matthewsneesby.com m.sneesby93@gmail.com yellow stripe 2014 oil on canvas 110 x 99cm

66


Anya Swan Painting anya.swan@hotmail.com Purple woke up and found herself in a strange place. The people were lonely and isolated—living little lives thinking about the wrong sort of things. No one told jokes anymore and no one seemed to feel good and true when you looked them in the eye. People seemed scared, I was scared; but everything was kind of special. The Exorcist 2014 oil on board 17.5 x 26.5cm

67


Trevor Tierney Painting trevor.tierney@grittithuni.edu.au My primary interest is painting. My theoretical approach is in the modernist canon. I like my paintings to be representational and to have a narrative—even if the narrative is hidden. Left: Two Le Corbusier Chairs Having a Conversation 2014 oil on polyester 100 x 110cm Right: Portrait of Marisa 2014 oil on canvas 30 x 30cm

68


Todd Whisson Painting whissonart.com

Left: Splash of Nature 2014 oil on board 1300 x 1100cm Right: In the Eye of the Beholder 2014 oil on board 1300 x 1100cm

69


INTERDISCIPLINARY SCULPTURE


Alrey Batol Interdisciplinary Sculpture alreybatol.com alreybatol@gmail.com My practice explores theories of value within material and capitalist culture. By highlighting the obsolescence and the tyranny of things as well as utilising a number of skills that intersect across photography, circuit-bending, game design, internet art, sculpture, and superfiction, I find myself in a perfect position to express my own ontology and share a genuine and dialectic complicity with an affluent, capitalist culture. Top: Empty Shop 1 2014 digital C Type photograph 29.7 x 42cm Middle: Made In China 2012–13 new media 52 x 41 x 32cm Bottom: Museum Pieces: Clock Radio 2014 new media dimensions variable

72


Tess Dallas Interdisciplinary Sculpture I’ve been living in Australia for almost three years. I’m American by nationality and Australian by heritage. My work reflects my ideas, emotions, and the cultural changes that I’ve encountered since immigrating to Brisbane, Australia, from Seattle, USA. By drawing influence from American photographers and film makers, and incorporating common stereotypical Australian imagery, I hope to present a series of digital prints that parody an ever-changing and challenging time in my life. Mine’s a Prawn, Yours’a shrimp 2014 digital photograph 22 x 33cm

73


Claudia De Salvo Interdisciplinary Sculpture claudiadesalvoart.wordpress.com We are constantly exposed to an ecosystem of relationships. Between people and spaces, both on an intimate and monumental scale, we cultivate a place for ourselves. A place to feel exposed, empowered, isolated or loved. This work is an exploration of the plethora of interactions between people and places that are essential to human existence. The naturally constructed state of things 2014 mixed media dimensions variable

74


Corrie Furner Interdisciplinary Sculpture corriefurner.com I explore practice is process driven and derives from found and discarded objects. Using both artificial and natural light, she explores the industrial and domestic. My work encompasses still image, sound, video, and projection. fluorescence 2014 video projection, audio 400 x 600cm

75


Jaden Gallagher Interdisciplinary Sculpture jadengallagher.com jadengallagher@gmail.com I would hardly describe my work as an explosion. Untitled (Funny) 2014 speakers, chairs, amplifier, soundtrack of cartoon sound effects dimensions variable

76


Callum Galletly Interdisciplinary Sculpture Imagine having the flexibility of wearing your hair loose and flowing... maybe pulled back in a simple rubber band, or allowing your long locks to swing expressively in front of your face. It’s a natural feeling and style, that epitomizes your love for individualism, they are your Dreadlocks. —”The Dreadlock Society: A Creative Salute to Individualism, Shonte’ Stephenson”

77


Spencer Harvie Interdisciplinary Sculpture spencerharvie.com My work involves puzzles, cultural collisions, and deliberate misunderstandings. I’ve made trapdoors that lead nowhere, hammers too brittle to use, and flowcharts describing Lance Armstrong’s involvement in famous incidents of arson. When I think about my portion of the world, it feels like I’m wrestling balsa sheets in high wind. I feel as though if I make art, not as many little splinters will get in my little eyes.

Top: Hammer and Boxes 2014 clay dimensions variable Bottom Right: Sculpture Major, Class of 2014 2014 digital print 42 x 59cm

78


Sha Hassani Interdisciplinary Sculpture shasarwari.com It is in the process of art making that I feel free and am most at peace. While there is a premeditative aspect to making art, for me, intuition is most dominant. My recent work explores the found object, reinterpreting it and giving it new meaning. I am interested in creating artwork that has multilayered poetic narratives and also to comment on social and political issues, such as asylum seekers and refugees in Australia. Top: Deceptive Voyage (detail) 2013 newspaper, cardboard, staples, glue 300 x 100 x 100cm Middle: Deceptive Voyage 2013 newspaper, cardboard, staple, glue 300 x 100 x 100cm Bottom: Silent Conversation 2014 timber, postcards, newspaper dimensions variable

79


Tyneka Jane Interdisciplinary Sculpture tynekat@gmail.com Monsters in the Closet, a collection of drawings re-drawn, is a display of what people are afraid of, opening the doors on their hidden fears and uniting them through a topic that would otherwise alienate. It is a work driven by process; the process of collecting from the community, of reinterpreting what they have shared, of revealing their fears over and over. Monsters in the Closet 2013 timber wardrobe, chalk 141 x 108 x 48cm

80


Sun K. Lizzett Kim Interdisciplinary Sculpture ‘Anchae’ is an architectural term describing a Korean traditional woman’s room. The Anchae was a very private and restricted section of the house, secluded from the outside. In this room, mothers would educate their daughters based on their life experiences. In my artwork, the flowers represent wisdom, ethics, mysteries, and life lessons that the mothers taught their children. Women shared their experiences, hoping that their children would experience a more promising life. The Anchae 2014 acrylic painting on leather and cotton fabric 300 x 200 x 100cm

81


Saskia Levy Interdisciplinary Sculpture saskialevy1@gmail.com My work finds new relevance for an English fairytale from my childhood, ‘Mr Miacca’. It draws parallels between my experiences of being a Jewish child in Brisbane in the 1990’s and the original story where a boy is warned by his mother to be a good boy and not to go round the corner or Mr Miacca would catch him. The Henchman is the informant for a suburban madman in the retelling of this tale. The Henchman 2014 porcelain, fabric, wire, mohair, acrylics, cotton thread 17 x 16 x 10cm

82


Aishla Manning Interdisciplinary Sculpture aishlamanning.com Disruption of preconceived notions, an overwhelming scale, and disembodied actions to create discomfort. Scrub 2014 3-channel looped HD video projection, colour, sound 1:37 / 1:44 / 1:33mins

83


Sally Molloy Interdisciplinary Sculpture sallyymalloy@hotmail.com ‘landscape’ anthills and energy biscuits poetry leaking from nature and from self. Yellow Poem 2014 clay dimensions variable

84


Naomi O’Reilly Interdisciplinary Sculpture naomioreilly.com fleshly |ˈflɛʃli| adjective (fleshlier, fleshliest) 1. relating to human desire or bodily appetites; sensual: fleshly pleasures. 2. having an actual physical presence. ORIGIN: Old English flæsclic (see flesh,-ly1). Fleshly forms allow consciousness to function in a physical world, but its delicate impermanence imposes physical limitations on the limitless consciousness. It enables. It contains. Amalgamate: Disintegrate 2014 double exposure chemigram c-types photographic series of nine 10.16 x 15.24cm each (Installed 31.4 x 46.72cm)

85


Tania Olszewski Interdisciplinary Sculpture taniaolszewski.com I use performance video and 3D installation works to explore themes of internal dialogue, often personal, exploring the deeper layers of the psyche and our inter-relationships. The Annunciation 2014 digital photograph 374.4 x 550.5cm

86


Soulla Porfyriou Interdisciplinary Sculpture soullapants.com facebook.com/soullapants I chose the Neighbours theme to instantly grab viewers’ attention because whether you watched Neighbours years ago, still watch it today, or have never seen an episode, you will still know its theme song. This video work was very much inspired by a comedian that I personally look up to, Chris Lilley. Just like Lilley, my video raises hardhitting truths within society by using a range of characters and humour. Without humour, it’s just too harsh. Neighbours: The Hidden Episode 2014 video 5:06mins

87


Kiah Reading Interdisciplinary Sculpture kiahreading.com Be Your Own Boss! New Business. Business, business. Comma, comma. It’s a great day for a great day. I know you will be happy here. I am fit, I am healthy. I am fit, I am healthy. I am fit, I am healthy. This is a permanent error; I’ve given up. Sorry it didn’t work out.

88


Danica Schlawe Interdisciplinary Sculpture danicaschlawe.wordpress.com danica.schlawe@outlook.com 0481 387 107 Examining the recurrent pursuit for physical perfection within women, The Bulge explores the underlying issues associated with personal body image and self-identity in the modern world. It identifies the punishing length individuals go to to meet normative standards of beauty set by media and popular culture. Top: The Bulge 2014 recycled panty hoes, synthetic fibre filler 110 x 40 x 40cm Middle: The Bulge 2014 recycled panty hoes, synthetic fiber filler 110 x 40 x 40cm Bottom: The Bulge 2014 recycled panty hoes, synthetic fiber filler 120 x 40 x 40cm Modelled by Jessica Laughton Smith

89


SHATRICK Interdisciplinary Sculpture Shannon Tonkin and Patrick Zaia The world premiere of Bathtime Romance A digital drama brought to you by the pioneers of ‘tele-theatre’. ~ The Prophecy ~ Sperm that humans do excrete, Through the drainpipes they shall meet, Flushed into a race to procreate, An alien egg is left as bait, Only three days you have to find, You will make the solar systems bind. Left page: Bathtime Romance (Sperm—Character Plan) 2014 digital collage 29.7 x 42 x 21cm Top of right page: Bathtime Romance (Installation Miniature) 2014 mixed media 29.7 x 42 x 21cm Bottom of right page: Bathtime Romance (Film Still) 2014 video dimensions variable

90


91


Rabin Sherchan Interdisciplinary Sculpture rabinsherchan.com rabinsherchan@live.com +61 415 291 991 Communication devices such as the telephone enables us to reach others far away and converse in our own comfort privately. My interactive piece does the exact opposite by engaging the audience to communicate with each other through the phones within close proximity, challenging our understanding of personal, physical and cyber space. On the Other End 2014 Sculptural installation consisting of telephones dimensions variable

92


Kat Tansky Interdisciplinary Sculpture kjlotansky@gmail.com The artist Paula Rego once said, “Every change is a form of liberation. My mother used to say a change is always good even if it’s for the worse.” Everything changed in my life two years ago. This work expresses the strengthened bond between mother and daughter. Untitled 2014 installation dimensions variable

93


FOREW0RD In terms of tertiary education, the Honours year is a very special one. It sits between the ‘sample-bag’ of undergraduate experience and the point where a student can choose to move through into deeper, more focused research. For Fine Art students, the year is a kind of hothouse, where ideas must be steadily refined, where critical inquiry becomes more acute, and where clearly articulated research aims and objectives clarify and stabilise the process of creative decision-making. And yet, despite the rigour of academic inquiry that is required as core to this year of study, this is also a time during which it is crucial for artists to trust the special kind of process involved in studio research. Because artists—as with other researchers engaged with praxis—cannot ‘know what they think until they see what they make’. The skills in interpreting intuitive creative responses into forms that contribute to existing knowledge are diverse, and artistresearchers will be required to possess the following attributes: (1) they must understand the particular history that has informed their production; (2) they must also recognise and be informed about the issues of concern the work shares with the broader contemporary milieu; (3) the artist-researcher must therefore also be cognisant of relevant theories, philosophies, and arguments that are woven into the context of their production; (4) they must also know, and be able to interpret, the creative work of other artists who have worked in their particular field of enquiry; (5) they must understand the conceptual implications of the medium they choose and the skills required to make that medium come to life in such a way that ideas and images are brought together as one; (6) and they must perceive the capacities of their particular audience in terms of what might be anticipated, and the degree to which this can be challenged.

Seems quite a task list? It certainly is. The contemporary world is more visually crowded than ever before, yet too few have the skills to understand and express visual language in ways that can extend our understanding of who we are. While it is true that, fundamentally, everyone loves the idea of art, all too few are prepared to accept that those who are trained in it are knowledgeable, highly skilled specialists who should be respected as essential contributors to our contemporary world. Change is part of tradition, and artists have always drawn from both in their search to provide new visual languages with which we can speak to each other, and through which we can establish new, more positive, and effective ways of engaging with our changing environments. The 2014 Honours graduates are part of a cohort of brave, innovative, intellectual, passionate, and highly creative emerging artists who have committed their time, efforts, energies, and resources to providing us—their community—with new possibilities for seeing the world. It has been an enormous pleasure to work with each of them, and to watch them engage as individuals and as a collaborative community. I join with all of the QCA community in celebrating their achievements. Professor Pat Hoffie Honours Convenor Fine Art


BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS


Pippin Backwell Fine Art with Honours pippinblackwell.com Through this work, I ask people to engage with their personal experience of the worn object. Untitled (Choose One) 2014 (7000) seven thousand soap rings hand cast and carved dimensions variable

96


Blair Coffey Fine Art with Honours blaircoffey.com My current practice reflects a fascination with medical images that render the human body transparent. I use printmaking techniques to explore issues that arise from the ‘medical gaze’. As medical technology advances, more faith is placed in diagnostic imaging devices. I seek to question the confidence placed in these technologies, and invite the enigmatic once again to images of the body’s interior. Under Observation 2014 acrylic on canvas 127 x 163cm

97


Clare Cowley Fine Art with Honours clarelizabethart.tumblr.com My performative actions oxygenate interiors and landscapes with erratic line and colour. To emphasise the essential presence of the body in my practice, I articulate ideas through movement, extending into the spaces around me, recording my experience in multiple mediums, including charcoal, oil paint, print, and video. Interested in the discipline of the ‘happening’, the videos, paintings and drawings I produce are characterised by spontaneous energies. Why Do You Move Me So? Residuum of Collaboration 2014 charcoal, found objects with paper installation dimensions variable

98


Paul Eves Fine Art with Honours pauleves.com In my practice-led research, I use my vinyl records as the site for investigation; I examine the additional layers that have been added through my experiences with my records. These marks and scratches become evidence of that experience and provide analogies and metaphors to personal memories and authenticity. In my art practice the record becomes the matrix; the source of imagery and sounds. Perpetual Change 2014 inatglio print 7.5 x 15.5cm

99


Evan Gardner Fine Art with Honours E_Gardner_XX@hotmail.com This Honours project is an exploration of personal and psychological experiences particular to gender dysphoria, as expressed through an autoethnographic arts inquiry. I wish to artistically relate problematic lived experiences, such as somatic dislocation, abjection, and otherness in my work. In my studio research, I have deployed combinations of digital photography, drawing, and model making. These studio outcomes explore the potential of new media technology to provide alternate spaces to express gender fluid subjectivities. Dysphoric Bodyscape Experiment Series 2014 digital, mixed media dimensions variable

100


Travis D. Hendrix Fine Art with Honours travisdhendrix.com Maps have a profound effect on our perception and understanding of the world we live in, that goes beyond simply finding our way. Our mythologies and hopes lie over the horizon in uncharted waters. Mystery and speculation are derived from the inaccuracies and blanks that are mostly missing in digital modern maps. These works explore this theme and encourage us, in our search for identity, to push the boundaries of our known world. Top: Setting Sail 2014 mixed media 77 x 77cm Bottom: Tabula Rasa 2014 pen on paper 110 x 74cm

101


Rebecca Kinsey Fine Art with Honours rebeccakinsey.com I will use and recycle collected materials from my everyday life and studio. I will weave around my body. I will document the process with video. I will take however long it takes. Left: Labour (64hrs) 2013–14 digital video 63:49:06hrs Right: Labour (Ongoing) 2013–14 digital video 88:03:10hrs

102


Vanghoua Anthony Vue Fine Art with Honours vanghoua-anthonyvue.com Tradition and adaptation, preservation through innovation, expansion against degradation, cannibalisation then regurgitation—enduring existence through instinctual means of dynamic radicalisation. Paj Tog (Flower Chair) # 1 and # 2 (after Rietveld’s Red and Blue Chair) 2014 wood, spray paint, acrylic, and a range of trash, DIY and everyday materials dimensions variable

103


FOREW0RD The Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art (CAIA) students’ thirdyear graduating exhibition is based on the concept of ‘toxic identity’. It examines issues relating to Aboriginal identity and the contemporary health problems currently faced by Aboriginal society. The concept implies an unhealthy relationship to one’s identity, making reference to the psychological impact of questioning one’s Aboriginal identity. Toxic Identity connects the negative psychological affect of identity-shaming to the Aboriginal health epidemic, linking it to self-medication and the impact of assimilation. Toxic Identity clearly addresses the ongoing impact of assimilation on Aboriginal people by critiquing the protocols associated with the politics of skin (‘But you don’t look Aboriginal’) and our ongoing relationship to the Western diet of ‘Flour, sugar, tea’. All of these are contemporary impacts of colonisation, which have a huge effect on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people today. These graduates are reclaiming traditional and contemporary practices and challenging currently accepted norms regarding Aboriginal Australians’ creative output. In particular, Toxic Identity aims to erode the belief that Aboriginal art and culture is a static and homogenous thing by exploring diversity and challenging artistic notions and cultural stereotypes. This exhibition features two graduating students: Bridget Broderick, who is a descendant of the Mbarbarrum people from far North Queensland, and Dianne Hall, who is a descendant of the Kamilaroi people. These students have embraced contemporary practices and work in a range of mediums, from ceramics, painting, sculpture and performance to photography and new media. Each of the graduating students brings a unique vision into the exhibition, which, when viewed in its entirety, reveals subjects and experiences shaping contemporary Aboriginal art today. Key works in this exhibition provide us with an insight into the future of contemporary Aboriginal arts practice in Queensland.

104

This exhibition is a snapshot of the achievements, excellence, and diversity of the graduates from the CAIA program. Furthermore, these graduates are a testament to the ongoing success of the program. The staff of CAIA would like to congratulate them and wish them well for their future career pursuits. Bianca Beetson Convenor Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art


BACHELOR OF CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS ART

105


Bridget Broderick Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art My work is influenced by my Aboriginal identity, heritage and culture. This work is about showing that even though we may look different we are the same at a basic human level. Skin colour alone does not define who we are. I have chosen lead crystal as the medium because it gives the work another layer of meaning that pushes the discussion of colour in yet another direction of invisibility and otherness. Invisible Identity 2014 lead crystal 19 x 28cm

106


Dianne Hall Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art disyulawirri@bigpond.com Working with ephemeral products, such as sugar and lollies, my work explores the toxic effects sugar continues to have on Aboriginal society. Using sugar as a metaphor of whiteness, I look at how this substance has been used as a key commodity of colonisation and how this history has been sugar-coated. This work makes reference to the early mortality rate of Aboriginal people due to sugar related illnesses, such as diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. For the Love of Sugar 2014 silver cachous lollies on plaster skull 16 x 12 x 21cm

107


FOREW0RD In times of uncertainty and hostility, conservatism reigns and change is feared. Incumbent governments find new life (read: power) and orthodoxy holds sway. These are those times. Our media are full of dread and the twentyfour-hour news cycle markets anxiety in mega Orwellian doses. A greyness descends and those who take the least risks become our leaders. Yet, these are the times when courageous thinking is required. An era when heroic action encourages us away from timidity and towards a boldness to defy normative thinking and to dare to consider alternatives. These are the times of artists. Art reminds us of why we aspire to certain goals and what is worthy of such aspiration. It reminds us that hardship and deprivation are prices worth paying if humanity is ultimately enhanced. Art tells us where we have been and what we have achieved, but, most of all, it reflects humanity at its best. It lets us know that we can be magnificent, even if it is only for a fleeting moment. Art allows us to glimpse our soul in all of its splendour or all of its blackness. However, in these times of uncertainty, art is set aside, ignored, and, at best, considered frivolous. The officeholders take over as we await better times. Too often and for too many, the social purpose of art is forgotten and the discipline is dismissed. It cannot fly a rocket to the moon nor can it cure cancer. But it provides the desire to be more than we are and, maybe, more than we can be. Therefore, the Master of Arts in Visual Arts (MAVA) is much more than an arts program. Its mission is to graduate students who challenge orthodox thinking, who dare to consider the alternative, and who seek to remind us of why life’s struggle is worthy of great effort. The MAVA seeks graduates who are bold, but not reckless; who are brave, but not foolish; and who will remind us, with the stories they tell, that life is one mighty journey. But achieving this is a team effort, and thanks must be given to the academic and administrative staff who give generously of their time. Fundamental to the success of any graduating cohort are the graduates themselves, for it is they who ultimately determine the quality of the program. Their input, curiosity, and tenacity are the ingredients of the scholarship achieved and the boldness derived. Congratulations on your success demonstrated in this exhibition and your graduation. David Lloyd Deputy Director Learning & Teaching 108


MASTER OF ARTS IN VISUAL ARTS

109


110


Julie Gibbs Master of Arts in Visual Arts jooliegibbs.com ‘Flood Language’ is inspired by debris caught on fences after flooding (in particular, the Gympie area). I have likened the analogy to urban graffiti, by suggesting that just as graffiti is seen as a challenge to authority and ownership, and making a specific claim for spatial identity, so it is with flood language. Drawing is my main discipline, but has been supported with paper making, printmaking and encaustic works in this project.

Top: Are You Speaking My Language? 2012 ink, Mary River flood mud 77 x 110cm Bottom: Testing the Waters 2014 ink, Mary River flood mud, pastel 110 x 330cm

111


Yingying Huang Master of Arts in Visual Arts yingyinghuangblog.tumblr.com I want my paintings to be personal and to connect with a real story. I want to show the beautiful things, such as, their faces with smiles, their postures of prayer, and other actions in their daily life. Every time I make a painting, especially if the subject is a friend, I feel like we are still living together. It takes me to another world and I feel free. Top: Tibetan Elderly Couple 2014 acrylic on canvas 75 x 50cm Bottom Left: Tibetan Child 2014 acrylic on canvas 50 x 40cm Bottom Right: Mother and Son 2014 acrylic on canvas 75 x 50cm

112


Maryrose Moxham Master of Arts in Visual Arts I am interested in assumptions about nature, notions of the real, and the ephemerality of memory. I remain focused on the line, the space between distillation and ambiguity, for the viewer either to make meaning or to escape it. Untitled 2014 oil on wood 124 x 102 x 10cm

113


Desley Rolph Master of Arts in Visual Arts desrolph.com The Mt Coot-tha Project documents Mt Coot-tha and the surrounds of Brisbane historically, using oil paint on canvas to create forty-two small works painted en plein air. This project’s challenge was to portray the visual language of a particular environment through the rendering of the here and now, the transitory nature of a quickly changing atmosphere. The work explores the connection of the human spirit to landscape, through the theory of phenomenological embodiment. Top: JC Slaughter Falls I (from the Mt Coot-tha Project) 2014 oil on canvas 12.7 x 18.7cm Middle: JC Slaughter Falls II (from the Mt Coot-tha Project) 2014 oil on canvas 12.7 x 18.7cm Bottom: Bushland (from the Mt Coot-tha Project) 2014 oil on canvas 12.7 x 18.7cm

114


Keiron Wilson Master of Arts in Visual Arts kieronwilson.wordpress.com The ‘Rubber Duckie’ is symbolic of Western icons now manufactured and massproduced in the East. Made in China 2014 porcelain 7.5 x 7 x 8cm

115


116


MASTER OF ARTS IN VISUAL ARTS WITH HONOURS

117


118


Nicola Hooper Master of Visual Arts with Honours nicolahooper.com/page/gallery I have long been inspired by the delicacy of Victorian botanical and anatomy drawings. I have tried to replicate this in my current work, using old methods to create artworks that address modern issues of identity and related themes. The examination of the benefits and shortfalls of new medicines and scientific research constitute the framework of my current studio practice. Left: Lab Rabbits, Cannonball and Coral Diptytch part 1 2014 hand-coloured lithograph 100 x 70cm Right: Lab Rabbits, Cannonball and Coral Diptytch part 2 2014 hand-coloured lithograph 100 x 70cm

119


Jason Murphy Master of Visual Arts with Honours These works are investigations of human identity. The painting Easy Targets references the political, media, and social contexts where Aboriginal people are forced to defend and justify their identity. The Caste System references the impact political policy has in separating people from their culture. Government then forces them to affirm their identity under set principles recognised from outside of their culture. Easy Targets 2014 acrylic 130 x 160cm The Caste System 2014 acrylic 95 x 160cm

120


Svetlana Trefilova Master of Visual Arts with Honours svetlana.id.au My identity is flexible and unstable; I belong to four different nationalities and two different vocations—art and science. Personal cross-cultural experience and memory are strongly represented in my physical process of painting and the visual result. I perceive myself and the world around through all those cultural facets and how I see it is mirrored on canvas through my own ‘watery painting’ technique. Left: Facets (Self-Portrait) 2014 acrylic 91 x 61 x 4cm Right: The Wreath 2014 acrylic 104 x 76 x 4cm

121


FINE ART AND CAIA STAFF AND SUPPORT 2014 Fine Art Academic Staff

Ms Clare Poppi

Ms Elizabeth Shaw (acting Fine Art convenor)

Dr Bill Platz

Dr Prue Ahrens Dr Jess Berry Professor Mostyn Bramley-Moore Mr Russell Craig Mr Sebastian Di Mauro Dr Craig Douglas Dr Julie Fragar Dr Miles Hall Dr Rosemary Hawker Professor Pat Hoffie Ms Catherine Large Dr Donna Marcus Dr Susan Ostling Dr George Petelin Associate Professor Debra Porch Mr Glen Skein Professor Ross Woodrow

Ms Jude Roberts Mr Nasan Pather Dr Jennifer Sanzaro-Nishimura Dr Lynden Stone Ms Jenny Watson Mr Carl Warner Ms Susie Woodhouse

Fine Art Tutors Mr Nick Ashby Mr David Jones Ms Carolyn McKenzie-Craig Ms Leena Riethmullers Mr Brian Sanstrom

Fine Art Technical Staff Ms Ann Chadwick

Fine Art Sessional Staff

Mr Andrew Forsyth

Dr Chris Bennie

Mr Dave Sawtell

Mr Simon Degroot

Mr Jonathan Tse

Ms Jo D’Hage Mr Joe Furlonger Ms Maren Gotzmann Ms Elise Hilder Dr Jennie Jackson Ms Sara Manser Ms Julie Ann Milenski Dr Tim Mosely Ms Kellie O’Dempsey Ms Sonya Peters

122

Mr Andrew Lowrie Ms Katie Stormonth

CAIA Academic Staff Ms Bianca Beetson (Acting Convenor)

CAIA Sessional Staff Mr Robert Andrew Ms Karis Hill-Milnes Mr Laurie Nilsen Mr Nasan Pather Ms Zoe Scrogings Ms Debbie Taylor Ms Nancy Torrense

Administration Staff Ms Sandra Kane Fine Art Administrator and Team Leader SLTC Ms Aileen Randle Art Theory and CAIA Administrator


PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY: ADFAS Brisbane Inc. The Association of Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Societies

IAIN TURNBULL MEMORIAL BURSARY

TREVOR LYONS

123


Bachelor of Fine Art Graduate Exhibition 2014 Queensland College of Art Griffith University EXHIBITION 27–30 November 2014 OPENING NIGHT Thursday, 27 November Queensland College of Art Griffith University PUBLICATION Designed at Liveworm Studio Designers: Stephen Kolesaric and Stephanie Dutta Creative Director: Megan Harrison liveworm.com.au Editor: Evie Franzidis Printed by The Buckner Group Cover – 300gsm Sovereign Silk Internals – 150gsm Sovereign Silk Published by Queensland College of Art Griffith University ISBN 978–1-922216-56-4


PRICE $10

2014 Queensland College of Art Fine Art graduate catalogue  

Featuring graduate work from students of the Queensland College of Art Fine Art program, 2014.

Advertisement