Page 1

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FLOWER POT GARDENING

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THE BRASS CANNON

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SALAMAT PO, Y’ALL

prince william living May 2013

The premiere lifestyle magazine of Prince William and Greater Manassas

FORE!

Women Get into the Swing of Golfing PAGE 4

Learning about Golf and Life“The First Tee” Way PAGE 24

www.princewilliamliving.com


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table of contents May 2013 Vol. 3 No. 5

FEATURE STORY Women Get into the Swing of Golfing..................4

DEPARTMENTS from the publisher..................................................3 advertiser index......................................................3 on a high note Woodbridge Dance Company & Woodbridge Academy of Dance: Creating Artistic Opportunity ..............................10

4

destinations Honoring Our Veterans at Quantico National Cemetery ................................14 taking care of business Mona Tisler: Keeping Kids Classy on a Budget ........................18 family fun Digging into Flower Pot Gardening......................20 giving back Learning about Golf and Life “e First Tee” Way..............................................24

10 Photo courtesy Woodbridge Dance Company

local flavor e Brass Cannon: Dynamic Cuisine with a View ..............................28 calendar ..............................................................32 tambourines and elephants Salamat Po, Y’all ..................................................35 distribution sites..................................................37

COLUMNS

18 Photo courtesy Classy Kids

health & wellness ................................................16 home & hearth ....................................................26 your finances ......................................................30 Discover Prince William & Manassas................33

prince william living May 2013 | 1


The premiere lifestyle magazine of Prince William and Greater Manassas

Prince William Living Publisher Rebecca Barnes rbarnes@princewilliamliving.com Contributing Writers Lisa Collins-Haynes, DeeDee Corbitt Sauter, Audrey Harman, Olivia Overman, Ann Marie Maher, Helena Tavares Kennedy, Jennifer Rader, Elizabeth Federico, Paul Keily, Valerie Wallace, Vickie Williamson Editorial Staff Emily Guerrero, Peter Lineberry, Valerie Wallace Photography Sean Flores Graphic Design and Production Alison Dixon/Image Prep Studio

Prince William Living 4491 Cheshire Station Plaza, PMB 55 Dale City, VA 22193 Phone: (703) 232-1758 Efax: (703) 563-9185 Editorial offices: (703) 232-1758, ext. 2 Efax: (703) 563-9185 Advertising offices: (703) 232-1758, ext. 1 Efax: (703) 563-9185 Editorial Have a story you’d like our staff to cover? Contact Prince William Living editorial staff, either by phone at (703) 232-1758, ext. 2, or by email at editor@princewilliamliving.com. Advertising Prince William Living accepts display advertising. For complete advertising information, contact Rebecca Barnes, Prince William Living publisher, either by phone at (703) 232-1758, ext. 1, or by email at rbarnes@princewilliamliving.com. Social Media

Advertising Account Executives Michelle Geenty and Jennifer Rader Prince William Living, the premiere lifestyle magazine of Prince William and Greater Manassas, is published monthly by Prince William Living, Inc. e opinions expressed in the magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Prince William Living. © Copyright 2013 by Prince William Living, Inc. All rights reserved. Materials may not be reproduced or translated without written permission. Visit the Prince William Living website at www.princewilliamliving.com for reprint permission. Subscription rate is $12 (Continental U.S.) for one year. Change of address notices should be sent to Prince William Living Publisher Rebecca Barnes at rbarnes@princewilliamliving.com. Reprints and Back Issues: To order article reprints or request reprint permission, please visit the Prince William Living website: www.princewilliamliving.com. Order back issues by calling Prince William Living Publisher Rebecca Barnes at (703) 232-1758, ext. 1. For further information about Prince William Living, visit www.princewilliamliving.com, or contact Prince William Living at (703) 232-1758.

Prince William Living can be found on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube and Google+.

Want MORE Prince William Living? You don’t have to wait a whole month for more great information about your community. Simply visit www.pwliving.com, any time. There you can get daily updates on events, the arts, nonprofits, dining and entertainment in your neighborhood. Look for PWL contests, get togethers, deals and more. Get involved by answering a survey, participating in a focus group or submitting a story or event. Stay plugged into what is happening and what is important to you. Prince William Living is YOUR community magazine, all month long!

We Welcome Contributors Are you a writer or photographer who would like to be published? Prince William Living is currently looking for contributing writers and photographers. If you live in the Prince William/Manassas area and are interested in seeing your byline or photo credit in this lifestyle magazine, email us at rbarnes@princewilliamliving.com and send two to three samples of your work. College students are encouraged to apply. Are you majoring in English, journalism or communication and interested in developing writing samples and honing your skill? Contact us. We also welcome media and photography majors as contributing photographers. Candidates should possess excellent organizational and communication skills and must be able to work independently. Position is unpaid.

2 | May 2013 prince william living


from the publisher F

or many, the beautiful weather of May signals the return of golf season. Now more than ever, you will find women getting their clubs out and heading to one of Prince William’s scenic courses. Our feature, “Women Get Into the Swing of Golfing,” by Lisa Collins-Haynes (page 4), explores what local courses are doing to welcome women to the sport of golf and how you can join in the fun.

Youngsters can also take part in this popular sport. is month’s “Giving Back,” by Olivia Overman (page 24), features e First Tee of Prince William County. Based at Lake Ridge Golf Course, this local chapter of the national organization seeks to build character along with putting skills. We also look at keeping people of all ages on the move in “On a High Note,” by Val Wallace (page 10), all about Woodbridge Dance Company and Woodbridge Academy of Dance. Learn how sharing the love of dance in the community has become a family affair for Lucetta Furr. Speaking of family affairs, May flowers are popping up in this month’s “Family Fun,” “Digging into Flower Pot Gardening” (page 20), by Dale City mom and horticulturalist Elizabeth Federico. Discover how to turn this simple form of gardening into an enjoyable learning experience for your children.

Advertiser Index ACE Hardware (Pitkin’s)............................................................27 ACTS ..........................................................................................36 Advantage Physical Therapy ....................................................17 Alpha Pets ................................................................................36 Ameriprise Financial ................................................................31 Apple FCU ................................................................................31 AVON/Teresa Giltner ................................................................36 B101.5 ........................................................................................13 Bargain Relo..............................................................................36 Beacon Electrical Services ......................................................36 Best Western Battlefield Inn ....................................................27 CAP Accounting, LLC................................................................31 Christ Chapel ............................................................................36 City of Manassas Park—Parks & Recreation ..........................29 Confidence Realty ....................................................................30 Cruise Planners ........................................................................36 Dansk Day Spa at Occoquan....................................................36 Discover Prince William & Manassas......................................33 Dominion Eye Care ....................................................................9 Edgemoor Art Studio................................................................36 FURR Roofing............................................................................33 Gainesville Ballet ......................................................................12 GEICO ........................................................................................12 Golden Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics ............................16 Hard Times Cafe & Cue ............................................................17 Historic Manassas, Inc. ............................................................35 Imagewerks ..............................................................................36 Lake Ridge Nursery ..................................................................36 Lavender Retreat ......................................................................27 Love by Cupcake ......................................................................36

In “Tambourines and Elephants,” DeeDee Corbett Sauter brings us “Salamat Po, Y’all” (page 35) as she describes her parents and how DNA does not define her. Or does it? For me personally, I know that the guidance and example set by my parents very much defines me. My mother ingrained in her children the need for service and charity, as well the love of community that drives Prince William Living. As we go to print, my mother is in hospice and our family has had to deal with many difficult issues. I drew from this experience in developing “Reasons to Hire an Elder Law Attorney” (page 30) and “Living Life to the Fullest, to the End: How to Choose the Right Hospice Care” (page 16). I hope that both articles can help others navigating this often uncertain territory. Being prepared and informed makes a world of difference for all involved. And so, with May also being the time we celebrate Mother’s Day, I hope you will indulge me as I dedicate this issue to my mother, Barbara Stuck. Without her, none of this would be possible. ank you Mom! Sincerely, Rebecca Barnes Prince William Living Publisher

Linton Hall School ....................................................................11 Lustine Automall ........................................................................9 Madison Crescent ....................................................................23 Magnificent Belly Dance ..........................................................36 Merry Maids ..............................................................................33 Minnieland Academy................................................................29 Nova Music Center ..................................................................27 Novant Health ..........................................................................C4 Old Hickory Golf Club ..............................................................22 Options for Senior America ....................................................36 Parrish Services ..........................................................................8 Peggy and Bill Burke, Long & Foster Realtors ......................26 Persnickety Cakes ....................................................................36 Potomac Place ..........................................................................12 Prince William Chamber of Commerce ..................................17 Prince William Historic Preservation Society............................7 Prince William Ice Center ..........................................................9 Rainbow Therapeutic Riding Center ......................................36 Ready Hands ............................................................................12 Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center ............................C2 Slumber Parties ........................................................................36 SPARK..........................................................................................7 Stonewall Golf Club....................................................................7 Tea Time Tea Room ..................................................................36 Tiny Dancers ............................................................................34 Upscale Resume Services........................................................36 Village Realty ............................................................................21 Washington Square Associates ..............................................36 Westminster at Lake Ridge ......................................................34 Winestyles ................................................................................27 Yankey Farms............................................................................25 Your College Planning Coach ..................................................31

prince william living May 2013 | 3


Women Get into the Swing of Golfing By Lisa Collins-Haynes, Contributing Writer

M

ore women are getting into the swing of playing golf. e National Golf Foundation reports that women golfers are the fastest growth segment of new golfers.

Difference between Men and Women Golfers: It’s All in How the Game’s Perceived

Historically this has been a male-dominated sport, but the ball is quickly turning. With the abundance of world-class and signature-designed courses in the Prince William region, there are many local opportunities for women to join their male counterparts. Golf is opening doors for women in business, health and social aspects.

“Men are playing for the challenge, for business and they play for exercise,” according to Virginia Oaks General Manager Tom Miller. Golf is a challenging sport to master, taking patience and concentration, he said. It is also a popular pastime among business people. Many corporate deals have been hashed out during the course of 18 holes. Additionally, golf is a low-impact activity with minimal risk of injury.

Although the number of women golfers has exploded over the past few decades, it’s still not where it could be. According to Nancy Berkley, president of Berkley Golf Consulting, female golfers aged 6 and older represent only 22 percent of golfers in the U.S.

ese reasons are also important to women. However, they often look through a different set of lenses. Yes, women also like the challenge, but they are more likely to think of golf as a confidence builder, Miller said. Many women feel they have something to prove when they set foot on the course.

e staff at Virginia Oaks Golf Club in Gainesville is one of the many courses in the area realizing the need to create initiatives to bring more women to the golf course to learn and enjoy the game. Strategic programming is essential, even though the reasons why women are attracted to the sport are only slightly different than the reasons men are.

When Debra Lee of Woodbridge began golfing a year ago, there was so much to overcome, she said. Lee explained that she was fearful of looking less than graceful, concerned about what her peers would think and didn’t have any confidence in her abilities. She was determined, however, to learn the concept, excel and become a competent player. Lee said that self-doubt can lead to

4 | May 2013 prince william living


an intimidation factor, causing some women to not take up golfing in the first place. However, more special interest programming and initiatives geared towards women are being developed all the time to remove the apprehensions they may have about learning to play. With an increase of women breaking through more glass ceilings in corporate America and sitting at the head of more boardroom tables, there’s no reason why women shouldn’t be closing multiple deals on the greens as well. As for exercise, without a golf cart and caddie this sport is on the top of the list for calorie burning and staying in shape.

Other clubhouses in Prince William offering “Golf Fore Women™” include Forest Greens Golf Club in Triangle, Prince William Golf Course in Nokesville and General’s Ridge Golf Course in Manassas Park.

Getting Started: Lessons of “Golf Fore Women™” e clubhouses offer these five lessons as part of the program: ■ Lesson 1: ■ Lesson 2: ■ Lesson 3:

Changing Perceptions: Golf’s Not Just for Men Miller said his staff is working on changing the perception that golf is only for men. He wants to emphasize that golf is “not only addicting, but it’s fun and relaxing,” he said. While clubhouses have realized that women are taking an increased interest in the sport and are actively accommodating them, they haven’t always been receptive to the changing trends. Recent years have shown a positive progression, however, as clubhouse staff have learned to market differently to men and women. For example, Virginia Oaks has an assortment of women’s apparel to select from in its pro shop and has even gone a step farther in its efforts to cater to women. Recently the club partnered with TaylorMade-adidas Golf, the largest and most profitable golf equipment, apparel and footwear company in the world, to present a golf apparel fashion show which showcased the latest trends and styles. Attendees also received a discount on pro shop purchases. Online retailers are also getting into the mix. Birdie-Tree.com offers an extensive assortment of golfing apparel for woman. It’s a wonderful resource to locate matching hats, gloves and shoes, according to golfer Janis White of Woodbridge. “So even if you’re having a bad day on the golf course, at least you look good,” she said.

Clubhouses Are Getting Creative in Attracting Women to the Sport Miller pointed out other non-traditional activities geared towards getting more women through the door, such as Virginia Oaks’ monthly bingo and comedy nights. Another popular event at the club is “Nine & Wine” in April, geared towards women who enjoy a little wine with their golf game. Typically 50 to 80 participants sign up for this 9-hole and wine-tasting event, where there is a wine scorecard rating at every other hole, Miller said. Virginia Oaks is among the courses in Prince William also taking part in “Golf Fore Women™,” a nationwide initiative adapted from the Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) of America “Golf Get Ready.” e program exposes women to the game basics in five lessons and is designed to spark their interest to try the sport at a relatively low cost.

■ Lesson 4: ■ Lesson 5:

Awaken the Golfer In You Become One with the Course e Turn Driving School Take Your Swing

Certified golfing professionals coach the lessons, focusing on golfing etiquette, the process of renting equipment and removing the intimidation factor to make women feel more comfortable coming out to the courses and playing with confidence. Lessons can be done solo, with family and friends or through an open group session. For those without their own set of clubs, the club will outfit them with a set to use during lessons. Mary Ann Graham of Bristow was part of the winning team at the 2011 Executive Women’s Golf Association (EWGA) Champions Cup. EWGA is a nonprofit organization with nearly 20,000 members in more than 120 chapters throughout the U.S. and international chapters in Canada and France. e organization’s mission is to educate, encourage, mentor and empower women in the game. Graham emphasized the importance of starting with lessons. She recalled feeling less intimidated when she discovered her first instructor was a woman. Graham said that she felt that her instructor encouraged her and didn’t have any preconceived notions about her abilities or lack thereof. Another discovery: “I didn’t realize how competitive I was, until I starting taking lessons and playing golf,” she said.

Making the Game Their Own: Women’s Leagues and Golf Organizations Most area clubhouses also offer league play for women, with set schedules where they can join a league of their own. “e women’s league experience is a way to connect and network with other women over four hours on a pretty course, doing nothing but concentrating on golf and friends,” said Graham. Women of all ages and skill levels are typically invited to join the local leagues. Erika Larkin, director of instruction at Stonewall Golf Club at Lake Manassas in Gainesville, recommended the league experience. Larkin believes that the game of golf is 90 percent social and 10 percent playing. Her advice to women with a desire to take up golf or join a league: “Just relax and enjoy the experience.” (continues on page 6) prince william living May 2013 | 5


(continued from page 5)

sightings at Stonewall and Bull Run Golf Club in Haymarket as a “feast for the eyes.” She often takes her camera along during a day on the course. Prince William Golf Course is one of Northern Virginia’s most historic and golfer-friendly courses. Built in the 1960s by a group of farmers who traded their tractors for golf carts, the course has an unusual beginning that sets it apart from other golf properties in Northern Virginia. A substantial 85 percent of the course’s fairways are wide open and generous, making it an easy walk or cart ride. is is in vast contrast to the classically traditional tree-lined and hilly courses found in this region. Heritage Hunt Golf & Country Club in Gainesville has a spectacular 18-hole championship layout designed by Arthur Hills, considered one of the top four golf course designers in the world. e course features several dramatic elevation changes going in and around hardwoods and pines and through numerous cascading streams, ponds and natural wetlands.

Photo courtesy E. Larkin

e newest course in Prince William is slated to open this summer. Potomac Shores Golf Course is a Jack Nicklaus Signature designed 18-hole course overlooking two miles of shoreline along the scenic Potomac River. “Carved through mature hardwoods on a hilly peninsula, the layout offers dramatic vistas, native wetland buffers and more than 200 feet of show-stopping elevation changes,” according to the website (www.potomacshores.com/golf/). Erika Larkin coaching one of her golf students.

For an even more enriching experience, women may also want to consider joining the EWGA D.C. Metro Chapter (www.ewgadc.org). e D.C. chapter is comprised of women from all over D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Virginia members meet weekly to play and join in travel tournaments, charity golfing events and more. Virginia resident Tiffany Faucette is an EWGADC member. A former touring golf pro with the Ladies’ Professional Golfers’ Association and a LPGA Class A professional member, she holds EWGA golf clinics in the area. She developed an interest in the sport as a teenager “out of boredom,” she said. “Golf is a game for life, so just come join the fun,” Faucette advised women who want to learn to play or join a women’s golf league or association. She encourages all her students to ease into the game at their own pace and feel free to “compete against yourself,” she said.

Another Draw: The Courses Themselves For women who do take up the sport, one perk to golfing is being outdoors on beautifully designed courses. Prince William has 18 courses to choose from, all offering something unique. Each course has its own personality, character and charm. Donna Wood, an avid player from Haymarket and member at Stonewall, described the scenery, lake, mountains and wildlife 6 | May 2013 prince william living

Golf as a Travel Activity: Enjoyed All Over the World For women who golf, the world is your forward tee. Tourist Worldwide ranks golf highest in the tourism industry as a favorite vacation pastime. Golf has taken up residence at many vacation destinations. In Virginia, the question isn’t whether to take your next golf vacation here, but where in Virginia you should go, according to www.virginia.org. Virginia boasts some of the country’s best designed courses. For women venturing outside the commonwealth, visit www.golfworldmap.com for locations. ere are endless possibilities worldwide to incorporate golf into your next trip. “Golf is a lifetime sport,” said seasoned golfer eresa Carl, who’s been golfing more than 50 years, since the age of five. She encourages women to try golf if they like to be outdoors and enjoy being with fun people. Her parents both loved golf and introduced her to the sport, she said. “Golfing with your spouse and friends really is an incredible way to build stronger relationships and friendships,” Carl said. Lisa Collins-Haynes lives in Woodbridge with her husband and daughter and is a freelance entertainment and travel writer and selfprofessed out-of-control travel spirit (OCTS). She invites everyone to follow her travel blog at www.octsblogger.wordpress.com. She can be reached at lhaynes@princewilliamliving.com.


Stonewall Golf Club Where The Only Thing We Overlook Is Lake Manassas Enjoy a spectacular round of golf at one of the “Top Public Courses You Can Play” - Golf Magazine. ng att the th Brass B Experience dining Cannon Restaurant or relax on the patio overlooking the 18th green and picturesque Lake Manassas. Choose our versatile accommodations for weddings, social gatherings, and corporate events. Our elegantly adorned Magnolia Room can accommodate mmodate up to 200 guests. us now for and For teeContact time reservations Mother’s Day Brunch reservations. information, call 703.753.5101 703.753.5101 or visit or visit stonewallgolfclub.com stonewallgolfclub.com

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Natural History Abounds With Prince William County Historic Preservation Events Ben Lomond Historic Site Rose Garden Tea May 18th, 1-3pm $20 per person Enjoy tea and light refreshments while learning about this unique antique rose garden.

Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park Wildlife Walk May 25th, 9-11am $5 per person Learn about this complex ecosystem with local wildlife, wildflower and birding experts.

Rippon Lodge Historic Site 15520 Blackburn Rd, Woodbridge 703-499-9812

Rippon Lodge Historic Site Bird Walk and Breakfast June 8th, 8am $10 per person Join local birding experts on a walking tour then enjoy breakfast overlooking the river. Natural Wonders June 8th, 11am—4pm $5 per person Explore the 18th century natural world through modern science. Why did the Port of Dumfries silt in? Was George Washington bitten by mosquitoes?

www.pwcgov.org/historicpreservation Ɣ 703-792-4754

Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park Iron Brigade Unit Ave & 10th Alabama Way, Bristow 703-366-3049

Ben Lomond Historic Site 10321 Sudley Manor Dr, Manassas 703-367-7872

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on a high note

Woodbridge Dance Company & Woodbridge Academy of Dance

Creating Artistic Opportunity By Val Wallace, Contributing Writer

W

hen she returned to her hometown of Woodbridge after studying, teaching and performing dance for years in New York and Los Angeles, Lucetta Furr came to a realization.

area. “e main focus is to highlight artists in the area,” said Lucetta. ere’s also an academy recital in May or June at a local high school. is year’s, June 29 at Forest Park, celebrates the studio’s and company’s 10th anniversary.

“I just thought of all the opportunities I had and that it’s a shame that wasn’t already here in our area,” she said. “A lot of times people feel they have to go to New York and LA and that there’s not enough places or companies in our own area to just stay here and still dance. … I realized that people who train their entire childhood have nowhere else to go after they graduate.”

Also this year the company’s adding a performance in August that Furr hopes will become an annual event. Like January’s performances, August’s show is at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas.

So about two years after her return, Furr started Woodbridge Academy of Dance and a year later founded Woodbridge Dance Company, a nonprofit organization now in its ninth year based on when it received nonprofit status. “We opened this avenue of choreographing and performing professionally within our own community. is way dancers don’t have to either stop performing or travel at length to be a part of something like this,” said Furr, artistic director of the dance company and academy, located at 14000 Crown Court in Woodbridge. Furr said that in starting Woodbridge Dance Company she wished to help “all of the young talent and artists in the area because they don’t have a company where people from other dance studios and avenues could come together to create.” “Dancers don’t have enough opportunities to perform,” said Catherine Furr, executive director of the dance company and president and chair of its board of directors. She’s also Lucetta’s mother. If dancers want to continue to dance after going onto college “they pretty much have to go to New York or California,” she said. Lucetta has “brought professionals back to dancing in Prince William County,” she said. Every January the dance company puts on “A Coffee House Concert Collection,” a performance bringing together eight to 10 choreographers and about 50 dancers from throughout the 10 | May 2013 prince william living

Along with other dancers, the academy students are encouraged to audition, Furr said. Some are in the performances—including Dawn Whitaker. “People come from various studios across the area,” said Whitaker, a Woodbridge resident. “It’s always interesting to see what pieces they’ll bring, and I’ve always been impressed with the high caliber of the choreography and the execution that the dancers give to the pieces.” Whitaker said she's fortunate to attend Woodbridge Academy of Dance. “I had a very hard time finding a studio that offered adult classes that weren’t entry level,” said Whitaker, 32. Also, many dance studios only teach the young, she said. Furr’s school accepts students age 2 through adult. Eight instructors, including Furr, teach the academy’s 150 students. “ey’re all very professional … and passionate about what they do,” said Whitaker. “Studios have different vibes to them. Woodbridge Academy of Dance is a very inviting familytype environment.” In addition to Catherine Furr, other Furr family members are involved in the company and academy. With impressive professional credentials that include cheerleading for the NBA’s Washington Wizards and more recently for the NFL’s Washington Redskins, Lucetta Furr’s sister Sabrina taught dance and cheer at the academy most of the years it’s been open. Sabrina, who was also the company’s co-artistic


Photo courtesy Woodbridge Dance Company

Dancers performed “Cry of the Wounded” in Woodbridge Dance Company’s “A Coffee House Concert Collection” this past January at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas. The piece was choreographed by Kellie Corbett, a former Prince William resident and instructor at Woodbridge Academy of Dance. Corbett lives and works in California.

director, retired last year from the studio, company and as captain of the Redskins’ cheerleading team, Lucetta said. eir brother Jason teaches tumble part-time at the academy. He’s a former junior Olympic gymnast who has performed nationally and internationally and has national championships to his credit. Lucetta Furr’s credentials, which include two years of study at Juilliard, are impressive as well. According to her bio on www.woodbridgedancecompany.com, she also attended the Joffrey Ballet School, has won several choreography awards at local competitions and is an American Ballet eater certified instructor. She brings all this to her academy, which provides classes on a variety of dance programs, including ballet, tap, jazz, tumble, cheer, contemporary dance and hip-hop. Shontal Snider, of Waldorf, Md., teaches hip-hop at the studio. She said academy students can expect “high energy, fun atmosphere, always something new. Come expecting something new every week.” Kelly Hogan, 17, can attest to that. In her second year as a student at the academy, the Woodbridge resident is taking classes in hip-hop, ballet, point and contemporary dance, “and I love them,” she said. “All the teachers are really great, and they’re knowledgeable in all subject matters.” is year Hogan is on the academy’s competition team, which participates year-round in dance competitions throughout the area. Her younger brother and sister, also academy students, have been in competitions, too, said Hogan, who graduates from high school this year and will leave the academy. “I’ve learned a lot, and it will help me in college when I further my dance career,” she said. She plans to major in dance. Other students, including Aaron Gilliam, 20, of Lake Ridge, continue taking academy classes while in college and performing for the dance company. His mother Debby Gilliam, secretary on

the company’s board, said her son has been an academy student since his high school sophomore year and in numerous dance company performances. She and her husband Felton Gilliam, also Lake Ridge residents, regularly attend performances, although not just to see their son on stage, she said. Each show “leaves you wanting more and definitely not disappointed,” she said. “I equate the performances to something I’d spend $80 in New York City for and not blink an eye. … [e dancers] are really enjoyable to watch. ey are sharp, crisp, on time, on point … and very entertaining.” Manassas Park resident Val Wallace is a freelance writer, editor and proofreader and a frequent contributor to Prince William Living. She can be emailed at vwallace@princewilliamliving.com.

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destinations Honoring Our Veterans at Quantico National Cemetery By Helena Tavares Kennedy, Contributing Writer

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veryone’s heard of Arlington National Cemetery, but did you know there’s a national cemetery right here in Prince William?

Quantico National Cemetery, located on Route 619 in Triangle, is considered an “unknown” national treasure, according to Steven Fezler, director of Quantico National Cemetery/Culpeper National Cemetery Complex. e complex includes the Quantico cemetery, along with the national cemeteries in Alexandria, Culpeper, Winchester, Staunton and Balls Bluff. Prince William is an ideal location for a national cemetery, said Mark Shaaber, chair of the Prince William Chamber of Commerce’s Veterans Council. “Military service is a longstanding element of Prince William culture,” he said. “To have this hallowed ground in our backyard is truly a fitting tribute to those [who] have served. It is a place to find inspiration when anyone finds themselves being expected to make sacrifices. Many of those remembered in Quantico have given all they had.” ose buried at Quantico National Cemetery are a reminder of our military’s sacrifices to protect the nation, according to Fezler. “Freedom is not free. As an employee of the National Cemetery Administration for 27 years, more and more each day as I serve

14 | May 2013 prince william living

the veterans and their families, I realize how precious and costly freedom truly is.” Quantico National Cemetery is more than a place for families to visit and pay respects to their loved ones. Many people who visit the cemetery don’t personally know anyone buried there. Tourists commonly visit—to honor veterans, pay respects at the graves of notable soldiers and experience the cemetery’s peaceful, serene landscape. Louis R. Lowery is one of the notable buried at Quantico. e World War II Marine combat photographer snapped the first U.S. flag-raising on top of Iwo Jima's Mount Suribachi in 1945. Lowery is interred in Section 1, Grave Site 6422. e U.S. flag he photographed is said to be the first flown over Japanese territory in World War II. (e famous photo of the second, staged flagraising was taken by Joe Rosenthal.)

Visiting the Cemetery Attracting tourists to Quantico is the work of Discover Prince William & Manassas, the local visitors and convention bureau, which is involved in a new initiative to bring groups to the cemetery and provide them with a one-of-a-kind experience.


Photos courtesy Discover Prince William & Manassas

About a year ago, Discover Prince William Director of Sales Mark Kowalewski read about a special event the Missing in America Project (MIAP) was holding at Quantico National Cemetery, he said. Since its launch nationwide in January 2007, the nonprofit corporation has been locating, identifying and interring American veterans’ unclaimed cremains through the joint efforts of private, state and federal organizations. As part of its Veterans Recovery Program, the MIAP verifies deceased veterans’ status and schedules memorial services for them and their dependents. e Quantico cemetery includes a section for missing in action (MIA) veterans. Kowalewski thought it would be a moving experience for group tours, highlighting the rich military history of Prince William, he said. Soon after, the tours began. Visitors come to Quantico National Cemetery to pay respects to loved ones, and also to honor all veterans interred there.

Tours Bring Awareness Cemetery staff greet groups or motor coaches for a driving tour of the cemetery. e bus stops at the MIA section, where a MIAP representative boards the motor coach and talks about efforts to find and bring home the remains of veterans that have been left unclaimed all around the world. Tour groups can walk around, view gravesites and place flags provided by Quantico National Cemetery on them. What was planned as a 20- to 30-minute tour has grown to more than an hour, accommodating visitors who spend time reflecting at the sites. “e stories they told us and the emotions that it brought up truly made me feel honored to be a part of something so special,” Delaware Express Tour Operator Gerry Hartman said about her former experience with the MIAP at Quantico. “What they are doing for veterans is so amazing and something that needs to be done. Being able to not only hear the stories, but learn how we could help was great.” Hartman has a Vietnam War Prisoner of War (POW) bracelet, she said. POW bracelets first became popular in the 1970s when millions of Americans bought and wore the metal bands inscribed with the name of an American soldier who was missing in action or a POW in Vietnam.

Many wearing the bracelets were able to get in touch with the POW whose name was inscribed on their bracelet, if the soldier returned from the war. If not, they were able to contact the POW’s survivors. Some, however, such as Hartman, were unable to locate “their” soldier’s remains or survivors. After her experience at Quantico, Hartman contacted the MIAP and within hours, MIA staff found her POW’s daughter in a remote Alaskan village. “When I wrote her explaining who I was and why I was trying to locate her dad, she was amazed,” Hartman said. “He sadly had died three months earlier, but she and her sister were so excited to get the bracelet back to their family. is would never have happened if not for the Missing in America Project.”

Not Just for Tourists Quantico National Cemetery isn’t just for tourists. Its location allows Prince William residents to locally honor American veterans. Quantico includes several memorials dedicated to war heroes. e cemetery itself was formally dedicated in 1983 after the U.S. Marine Corps donated 725 acres of its land to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ National Cemetery Administration to establish a facility at Quantico, adjacent to a Marine base.

Involving the Community Quantico National Cemetery often needs volunteers, said Fezler, who also encouraged residents to come out and support veterans. e cemetery holds special events honoring veterans on Memorial Day and Veterans’ Day. “I appreciate all support that is given to our veterans. ... I personally thank those who live in Prince William for their continued support,” he said. Quantico National Cemetery is open daily from sunrise to sunset. A nonprofit marketing director, Helena Tavares Kennedy also enjoys freelance writing in her spare time. She has lived in Manassas with her husband and two children for 12 years and can be reached at hkennedy@princewilliamliving.com. prince william living May 2013 | 15 Photo courtesy Sean Flores


health & wellness Living Life to the Fullest, to the End: How to Choose the Right Hospice Care By Rebecca Barnes, Prince William Living Publisher hen a loved one is facing terminal illness, there are many choices. Hospice care is often a valuable option to consider and can bring competent care and education, as well as comfort the entire family.

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Hospice care is for patients with a prognosis of six months or less to live. It isn’t focused on dying, but about living out the rest of the ill person’s days comfortably, pain free and with dignity and respect. According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), hospice: ■ Is not a place, but a high level of care that focuses on comfort and quality of life. ■ Serves anyone with a life-limiting illness, regardless of age or type of illness. ■ Provides expert medical care and spiritual and emotional support to patients and families. ■ Serves people living at home and in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. ■ Is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid and most insurance plans. Research shows that people receiving hospice can live longer than similar patients who do not opt for this kind of care.

How to Choose the Right Hospice Care The Professional Patient Advocate Institute recommends considering the following when selecting a hospice: Location: The location of staff is important in case of an immediate need and could play a big part in how responsive an agency will be to your loved one. Keep this in mind when deciding whether hospice care should be provided at a nursing home, hospital or the patient’s home. Quality: www.wheretofindcare.com has an online database of hospice providers. You can compare agencies by their consumer score, as rated by hospice patients who report on the quality of care. Levels of care offered: When choosing a hospice, the ill will need a provider that can accommodate their specific needs. Hospice staff: Medicare requires hospice agencies have physician participation, nursing services, home health aide services, social services and spiritual care. Look for providers that have a full-time medical director, home health aides, chaplains and volunteers. Bringing comfort and peace at the end of life is a gift of love. I wish you the best in making tough final care decisions for your loved one and family. 16 | May 2013 prince william living

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taking care of business

Mona Tisler Keeping Kids Classy on a Budget By Jennifer Rader, Contributing Writer ome of the best ways to create a successful business aren’t always traditional. Entrepreneurs often have the ability to take everyday ideas and add twists that make them memorable and, many times, profitable.

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10,000 square feet and able to accommodate several thousand for parking. We don’t have a full-time staff, just a few contractors and volunteers who work in order to be able to shop before events open to the public.

We spoke with Mona Tisler, owner of Classy Kids Consignment, about how she selects options, builds small and moves forward in business. By doing her research, this Nokesville mom of four has built a small enterprise that suits her family, the community and even the environment.

It started with a small inventory and has grown to the level of the last sale where 45,000 items came in with 30,000 being sold. Consigners make 60 percent to 70 percent on their sales of their items. I like the idea of recycling and reusing items versus them going into a landfill.

PWL: When did the company begin and what was the inspiration behind the start of Classy Kids Consignment?

PWL: Did you have previous business experience before starting Classy Kids Consignment?

Tisler: It started in March 2005. Our family moved from Milwaukee, Wis., where I was introduced to consignment sales. After moving here I got tired of driving out of the county to save on my kids’ clothes and toys. Prince William was the fastestgrowing county, and we really needed something here. PWL: Did it begin as a second job or hobby and how has it evolved into your current life? Tisler: We started very part-time, as a small event that has developed into a full-time job. It’s a family operation. My parents work with me, and my husband developed the point-ofsale software for the ever-changing inventory, tagging system, tracking, sales and reports. PWL: What is Classy Kids Consignment about? Tisler: We don’t have a store front. e sales are always at different locations, and we have three seasons we book events: spring, back-to-school and fall. We look for sites that are about 18 | May 2013 prince william living

Tisler: No, I didn’t have previous business experience. I have a degree in behavioral psychology and had previously been a teacher working with autistic children at a residential school. PWL: Did you ever think you would become an entrepreneur? Tisler: No, no, I was a stay-at-home mom and I thought that is what my job ought to be. But I got a little stir-crazy and thought this would benefit the kids, the community and it wasn’t full-time. PWL: What business challenges have you overcome? Tisler: One challenge was meeting the demand of how quickly we were growing. Purchasing the needed items like enough computers [and also] dealing with being robbed at a location where our computers were stolen is memorable. Storage is always a problem and also finding a location. It’s surprising how nobody returns a phone call.


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Classy Kids Consignment is one of the largest consignment sales of children's clothing and toys in Prince William. More than 30,000 items have sold during a single sale.

PWL: What have been the most positive parts of founding Classy Kids Consignment?

PWL: What is your future vision for Classy Kids Consignment?

Tisler: e biggest blessing occurred at the first sale. I met a few ladies [who] really liked the concept and they’ve stuck with me. ey have been a huge part of our success. We, as a family, schedule life around the sales.

Tisler: I just want to continue to improve each event. We are always tweaking things to make it an even better experience for the shopper and the consigner. I’m really not looking to grow any further. I like staying in the area and focusing on Northern Virginia. I don’t want to grow too big where we lose integrity with our brand and lose touch with what is important.

We were recognized in 2010 and 2011 as a “Best Regional Consignment” [by] Consignmentmommies.com. And we were included in the 2012 “Best of Prince William County” list by InsideNova. But the biggest benefit has been the people I’ve met through the sales. PWL: Is there a unique story behind your name development? Tisler: I had a different name picked out for the business. A friend who is a graphic artist was working on the logo and typed “Classy Kids.” It just looked so much better than what I had picked out. PWL: What has been the most effective way to get Classy Kids Consignment in front of potential customers? Tisler: e most effective has been Craigslist and Facebook. Online marketing and word of mouth has been the way to go for us. When people sign up for the mailing list, nine out of 10 said they heard about us from a friend. Even ebay has a place to advertise events and we’ve done that as well. Postcards are also used as a reminder and we’ve added a magnet to the card that lists all our upcoming sale dates and locations. e magnet was a big success.

PWL: What advice would you give others considering starting a business? Tisler: Actually sit and talk with people in a similar business. When I first started with the idea, I spoke with a woman [who] had a store in Woodbridge. Because of her advice, I realized I didn’t want a store because the overhead is high and it limits the amount of merchandise you can carry at once. It was a pleasant surprise of how many people I could call on to help me with questions about business. To stay informed about Classy Kids Consignment events, volunteer and consigning deadlines, visit www.classykidsconsignment.com and subscribe to the business’s mailing list. “Like” them on Facebook for even more news.

A nonprofit development director for more than 10 years, Jennifer Rader now works as a freelance writer while studying nutrition and wellness. She lives with her son and husband in Manassas and can be reached at jrader@princewilliamliving.com. prince william living May 2013 | 19


family fun

Digging into Flower Pot Gardening By Elizabeth Federico, Contributing Writer

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ith spring here and flowers beginning to bloom, kids are ready to get outside. What better way to focus your children’s energy and spark their curiosity while spending quality time with them than to plant flowers together? “But wait,” you cry. “I don’t have the space or time to deal with gardening.” With flower pot planting, you do. Flower pot planting teaches kids about science, helps them learn responsibility and passes on an appreciation of nature. With basic materials, and just a few simple steps, you and your child can have a flower pot garden of your own.

Steps to Starting Your Flower Pot Garden: 1. Select your flower seeds. Pick fast-growing flowers, such as marigolds, sunflowers, snapdragons and impatiens, which are colorful and easy to grow in our area. Pay attention to whether the package is marked for shade (no direct sunlight), partial sun (up to four hours of direct sunlight daily) or full sun (more than six hours of direct sunlight daily). Full sunflowers will not grow well in the shade. So have some idea of where the garden will live. 2. Get your container ready. Prepare your seed container. Your container can be anything from paper Dixie cups to an old shoe, as long as there are holes in the bottom for water to drain out. Have your child fill the container completely with potting soil. Sprinkle the soil-filled container with water until the water drains out of the bottom. is will settle the soil enough on which to lay the seeds without washing them out. 20 | May 2013 prince william living

3. Examine your seeds. Take a good look at your seeds. Notice the different sizes, shapes and colors. Packed in that little capsule, each seed has enough food to grow a small plant with its first two to four leaves and its first inch or two of root. After that, the plant will get its food from the sun, water and soil. 4. Plant. Lay one to five seeds in the center of each container. Larger seeds need more space so make sure to read the directions on the back of the package; you don’t want to overplant your chosen container. Sprinkle a light layer of new soil over the seeds to cover, and gently water again. 5. Find the right spot. Place your container (or containers) in a proper location based on the amount of sun the plants need. Use a tray to catch any water that may drain out of the container if it is indoors or in an area where slips and falls can easily occur.

Other Tips: ■ Let your children make most of the decisions. Kids will enjoy this project more if you let them take ownership. If they feel it is “theirs” they will be more inclined to take responsibility for it. ■ Leave sunflowers where you plant them. at’s how they grow best. Sow these seeds directly where they will remain for the season. ey come in a wide variety of sizes, heights and shapes so choose wisely. e Mammoth variety will get to its predicted 10 to 12 feet in height. (continues on page 22)


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prince william living March 2013 | 21


(continued from page 20) ■ Get dirty and HAVE FUN! Hands-on experiences are just as important to your child as intellectual ones. Protect your counters or tables with newspaper to catch spills, but remember that it’s just dirt. It will wash off when your project is complete.

Check Out the Plants While They Grow As your plants grow, periodically check on them with your child to observe the changes and watch as they get bigger. is is a great time to talk about the lifecycle of plants, environmentalism and nature. However, don’t go overboard or your kid will check out on you. Plant extras so you can examine the roots at different stages. You can use a spoon or fork to gently lift the seedling out of its container. Look at the new white roots. If

roots are touching the edge of the container, you may need a bigger one. If roots are light brown and slimy, cut back on water. If seedlings suddenly start folding over and dying, this is a mildew problem. row them out and try again. Also keep the soil damp, but not soggy. Do NOT allow the newly emerged seedlings to dry out, but do not permit water to sit in the catch-tray either. Just pour it out onto the ground. Once the plants reach three to five inches, transfer them to bigger containers if needed. Fit a flower pot garden into your and your children’s spring and summer, and watch your kids’ interest in nature and understanding of science grow. Local mom Elizabeth Federico is a degreed horticulturist and a Dale City native. She is a graduate of Virginia Tech’s horticulture program and a lifelong resident of Prince William County.

Where to Learn More about Gardening Saturday in the Garden Prince William Master Gardener Volunteers, with the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE), teach programs in the Teaching Garden at St. Benedict Monastery, located at 9535 Linton Hall Road in Bristow. When: 9 a.m. to noon May 18, June 15, July 20, Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and Oct.12. All programs are free; registration is requested.

Local Garden Centers Locations in Prince William where you can ask a Master Gardener Volunteer your gardening questions include: ■ Lowe’s in Gainesville: 13000 Gateway Center Drive ■ Lowe’s in Woodbridge: 13720 Smoketown Road ■ Merrifield Garden Center in Manassas: 6895 Wellington Road ■ Southern States in Manassas: 9751 Center Street When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 4 and May 18.

Local Farmers’ Markets You can ask a Master Gardener Volunteer your gardening questions at these Prince William area sites. For more information, call the VCE at 703-792-7747. Dale City Farmers’ Market Located at Dale Boulevard Commuter Lot at Dale Boulevard and Gemini Way in Woodbridge. When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second and fourth Sunday of the month during May through October, and Nov. 10. Manassas City Farmers’ Market Located at the corner of West Street and Prince William Street in the heart of Old Town Manassas. When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second and fourth Saturday of the month May through October, and Nov. 9.

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giving back Learning about Golf and Life

“e First Tee” Way By Olivia Overman, Contributing Writer

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Photos courtesy Prince William County Department of Parks and Recreation

ince 2002, our community has boasted a chapter of the international nonprofit youth golf organization, e First Tee® . e local chapter, e First Tee® of Prince William County, is based at Lake Ridge Golf Course, where its instructors give lessons on the 9-hole golf course to children age 4 to 18. Program instructors teach more than the physical aspects of golf. “e First Tee teaches young people valuable life skills,” said Dianne Cabot, public relations manager for the Prince William County Department of Parks and Recreation. “e mission of e First Tee is to impact the lives of young people by providing educational programs that build character, instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy choices through the game of golf.”

In addition to Lake Ridge, the chapter offers its program at three regulation 18-hole golf courses in Prince William: Forest Greens Golf Club in Triangle, General’s Ridge Golf Course in Manassas Park and Prince William Golf Course in Nokesville. e First Tee of Prince William County also offers a voucher program for children of active National Guardsmen and reservists and this March started e First Tee program at the driving range of Locust Shade Park near Quantico in Dumfries, said Jenny Vogt, chapter coordinator and head coach.

The First Tee of Prince William County teaches children life skills, along with the game of golf.

e chapter’s goal for Prince William: “To bring golf to the youth of the area, but I just want to make a difference in these kids,” Vogt said. “I want to give them the opportunity to be exposed to golf and to [decide] whether they want to continue it. It’s a great sport. It can be played throughout their lives, and if I ... and my staff can make a difference in one child’s life, it definitely brings a smile to our faces.”

e First Tee of Prince William County provides life skills coaching not only on golf courses, but in schools through inschool and after-school programs. e First Tee National School Program is implemented in 36 elementary schools throughout Prince William, where more than 23,000 area elementary school children received in-school golf lessons last year in physical education classes, Vogt said.

Life skills that children learn through the organization’s instruction include “problem solving, managing time, controlling one’s emotions, making friends with diverse peers, working well with others and improving relationships with family and community,” Cabot said.

“It is an impressive number. I’m extremely happy with it. I’d like to get into more schools, but we need a little help with the funding,” she said. Vogt added that since the chapter started, it has also reached more than 2,500 local children in e First Tee’s certification program and last year taught more than 1,000 youths

24 | May 2013 prince william living


■ Ace: When students have progressed through all program levels, they can become Ace-certified, setting goals for golf and career education, and giving back to the community. (Required minimum age: 14 or entering ninth grade.) e local chapter has also created a “Little Swingers” level for children 4- to 6-years old, Vogt said. It is an introduction to the game and certification program. “We take them out on the course and show them parts of the course and get them swinging with some specialized equipment, which is called SNAG equipment,” she said. SNAG (“Starting New at Golf”) includes “oversize plastic clubs, small tennis balls, Velcro targets. Everything is colorful,” she said. e certification process is designed so that while children have fun learning the ins-and-outs of golf, they also learn values, such as respect for themselves and others, that help them build character and deal with situations in everyday life, as well as in golf. The First Tee's local chapter in Prince William follows The First Tee's five-level certification program, which includes levels for older youths as well as younger children.

through TARGET Outreach classes held at YMCAs and health fairs in the county. TARGET Outreach is designed as an introduction to golf and e First Tee Life Skills Experience™, e First Tee certification program. Components of the TARGET curriculum: “Take Aim,” “Anyone Can Play,” “Respect,” “Golf Is a Game,” “Enjoy Yourself” and “Try It.” e certification process forms the core of e First Tee curriculum. “Golf instruction, rules, etiquette and ‘life skills’ instruction are handled by professional golfers,” said Cabot. “e First Tee coaches raise young golfers’ self-esteem, discipline, honesty and integrity, all while [their students] learn and play this great game.” Last year the Prince William chapter successfully served 242 participants in the certification program, Vogt said. Participants advance through the certification process in five levels, with general requirements that include core lesson exposure and life and golf skills knowledge and application. To move to a higher level, participants must “demonstrate their understanding of the core golf and life skills. ey will show their ability to apply the lessons learned both on and off the golf course,” said Cabot.

Paramount to e First Tee program are the “Nine Core Values:” honesty, integrity, sportsmanship, respect, confidence, responsibility, perseverance, courtesy and judgment. e program also encapsulates “Nine Healthy Habits”: energy, play, safety, vision, mind, family, friends, school and community. ese form a foundation for achieving e First Tee’s goal of helping millions of youths at its 200 chapters nationally and five international locations. e chapter relies on donations to help support its programs. e First Tee of Prince William County will hold its annual fundraiser golf tournament on Friday, May 24, at Forest Greens Golf Club. For details, visit www.thefirstteeprincewilliamcounty.org.

A graduate of American University’s School of Communication, Olivia Overman has written articles for a number of online and print publications. She can be reached by email at ooverman@princewilliamliving.com.

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Cabot described the certification program’s levels: ■ PLAYer: Introduces playing the game of golf with special emphasis on e First Tee Code of Conduct, appreciating the rules and etiquette of the game and developing a game plan for both golf and life. (Required minimum age: 7.) ■ Par: Focuses on interpersonal communications and selfmanagement skills. (Recommended minimum age: 9.)

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home & hearth Framing and Displaying Your Family Photos By Vickie Williamson, Custom Framer and Interior Designer here are your old family photos? Are they stored under a bed or high up in a closet? Maybe they’re even in the attic or the basement where heat and humidity are adversely affecting the very paper on which your memories are stored.

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In any event, it’s time to get them out of storage and up on the wall. I know what you’re thinking: it’s too expensive, or there are just too many to sort through. Don’t panic—you can do this, and I’m going to help.

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For starters, take it slow. Just start going through the pile of photos and sort out only your favorites. Then set those aside and put the others away (preferably not in the basement or attic). Now it’s time to narrow your favorites down to the four you like most. Later you can work up to growing your collection. Take a close look at the four you’ve chosen. Are they ready for a frame as-is, or do they need some help? Remember, photo restoration doesn’t have to cost a fortune. If you have a scanner, scan the photos and make any needed changes that you can on the scanned images to enhance them. If you don’t have a scanner, then try your local printer. Printers often will do this for a reasonable fee. Then, print the enhanced images on heavy photo stock paper and you’re ready to frame. It’s now time to display them, either in ready-made frames or custom framing. Use conservation matting and glass for framing to help preserve the memories for future generations. Contact a local custom framer for these, as they're usually not in readymade frames. Before you get busy with a hammer, lay out the framed photos on the floor. Arrange and rearrange them in a way that looks appealing to you. Three Techniques for Arranging Artwork: 1. Aim for a shape—triangle, square, rectangle or circle. 2. Keep the space between each frame even.

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3. Line them all up on either the left or the right. Once you have a design that is pleasing to you, it’s time to start hanging. Entryways, stairways and family rooms are all great places to display photos. Embrace the fact that you are also preserving precious memories. Prince William resident Vickie Williamson owns Fine Design Custom Framing & Interiors in Woodbridge. Williamson has been working in the fine art, framing and decorating industry for more than 25 years and has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Valdosta State University. 26 | May 2013 prince william living

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local flavor

The Brass Cannon Dynamic Cuisine with a View By Paul Keily, Contributing Writer

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he Brass Cannon Restaurant, operating since 2001, is tucked away off Route 29 in Gainesville, inside the clubhouse of the Stonewall Golf Club at Lake Manassas. Many people mistakenly think that the restaurant is private and only accessible to club members, but it is open to the public daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. e golf course is also public, with a daily fee.

A brunch buffet is served on Sundays from 10:30 a.m. till 1:30 p.m. Its offering of breakfast and lunch items includes a soup and salad bar, omelet and carving stations, kids’ corner and desserts. Each brunch commonly brings in 140 to 150 golfers, so reservations are a good idea. Lately, the restaurant has also seen a surge of non-golfers, including a busy business lunch crowd on weekdays.

e restaurant’s large windows overlook the tree-lined hills surrounding Lake Manassas, offering a scenic view for diners. e sights are part of what keeps customers coming back. “Around lunchtime I like to sit by the window that overlooks the lake and watch the golfers finish at the 18th hole,” patron Ron Beckner said.

is April, the Brass Cannon started serving breakfast every day, from 7 a.m. till 11 a.m. “Only two other places serve breakfast in Gainesville and we wanted to give people, and especially golfers, another option. However, our main focus will continue to be on the lunch menu,” Schwarz said.

e view is not the only beauty to be found in the restaurant. Two traditional brass chandeliers hang from the ceiling, and the wooden walls are dazzling in the sunlight, as are the red and white carpets. A portrait of Stonewall Jackson, for whom the golf club was named, hangs above the fireplace. Several other paintings of outdoorsmen adorn the walls. Calming small-combo jazz music plays in the background, audible enough to add ambiance but not so loud as to stifle conversation.

All menu items are available at any point in the day. “Not everyone starts their day at the same time; we want to be able to serve people the food they need for where they are in their day,” said Schwarz, who also cooks up daily specials.

Making Every Event Special Connected to the restaurant’s main room is the Magnolia Room, used mainly to host private events, such as weddings, golf tournaments and corporate lunches. e gorgeous scenery and décor make the Magnolia Room, which can hold up to 200 guests, an excellent choice for any event. e friendly and helpful staff and a flexible catering menu also enhance the experience at the Brass Cannon. “Our catering menu differs for events depending on the party. We work with guests to make every event special,” said Executive Chef and Director of Food and Beverage Andrew Schwarz. “It is common to have two events a day. About four or five times a month we have to close the restaurant early [for private events]. I would encourage patrons to call ahead in advance, especially on weekends,” he added. Last year the clubhouse hosted 386 events. 28 | May 2013 prince william living

Changing Menu Keeps More than the Food Fresh Schwarz, who has been with the Brass Cannon for four years, has an extensive professional kitchen resumé spanning 35 years, including stints at Marriott and Disney. His experience inspires a dynamic menu that changes completely, from appetizers to entrees, every six months. e food is mostly American-style cuisine with a wide variety of salads, sandwiches and meat-based entrees. e menu is spiced up with appetizers, such as the roasted garlic hummus and spring rolls. e ever-changing menu is also influenced by the many repeat customers, who often suggest new items to be added to the rotation. e restaurant’s fresh approach is not limited to its food. e Brass Cannon has a 12-seat bar where you can watch golf on the big-screen television, talk with friends about your day on the links—and enjoy a variety of alcohol selections that also keep changing.


Service and Accommodations "Beyond Par" Beckner described the Brass Cannon as “comfortable and cozy.” He added, “I have been eating at the restaurant for five years, and the staff is very friendly, the food is consistently good, and the atmosphere is usually quiet. It is also a good place to entertain business clients, especially for after-business-hours gatherings.” Beckner recommended the homemade chicken salad. Photo courtesy Stonewall Golf Club

A customer of the Brass Cannon for nine years, Trish Langley of Gainesville echoed Beckner’s praise, calling the atmosphere “very inviting.” She said, “e staff and service [are] excellent, and they make you feel welcome.” Langley’s favorite menu item is the crab cake sandwich. She also suggested the Brass Cannon as a wonderful place for brides-to-be looking for a wedding location. “eir service and accommodations are beyond par,” she said. The Brass Cannon seats 150 diners, and overlooks the 18th fairway and 18th green.

“We offer a variety of uncommon wines. We wanted to make a change from the classic variety of merlots, chardonnays and white zinfandels to more exotic and intriguing grape varieties like tempranillos,” said Restaurant Manager Sergio Cabrera. “We also change the beer selection every two months to match the season. In winter we have heavier wheat beers, and in the summer we have much lighter beers on tap.”

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e Brass Cannon is located at 15601 Turtle Point Drive at Stonewall Golf Club at Lake Manassas. It is open Sunday through ursday from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m., when it closes for private events. Lunch and dinner are served Monday through Sunday from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. till 5 p.m. For more information and to make reservations, call 703-753-6140. Paul Keily recently graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in English and a concentration in creative writing. He currently lives in Fredericksburg and is seeking professional opportunities.

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your finances Reasons You Should Hire an Elder Law Attorney By Rebecca Barnes, Prince William Living Publisher ay is National Elder Law Month. If you or someone you care about is a senior, consider consulting an elder law attorney to make sure your financial and medical affairs are in order. Without specialized help, actions taken may have unintended legal effects.

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What Is Elder Law? According to the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, elder law is a specialized area of law that involves representing, counseling and assisting seniors, people with disabilities and their families in connection with a variety of legal issues. Typically, elder law attorneys address the client’s perspective from a holistic viewpoint by discussing legal, medical, financial, social and family issues. Demand for Elder Law Is Growing The number of older individuals in the population is projected to increase to 71.5 million in 2030, representing nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population (www.agingstats.gov). The result will be a growing need for specialized legal advice about aging-related issues. Elder law attorneys specialize in handling: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Estate planning and probate. Estate and gift tax planning. Guardianship and conservatorship. Medicaid and Medicare. Entitlement programs. Retirement benefits. Dumfries, VA Age discrimination. Elder abuse and neglect. Housing and long-term care financing. Medical decision making. Disability planning and insurance.

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Why Hire an Elder Law Attorney? 2 Homes available quickof mind that Hiring an elder law●attorney will give youfor peace settlement the legal advice you seek will come from an expert in the specific legal needs that arise as people age.

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“Failure to plan and seek an experienced professional can instructions on upgrades; result in paying moresettle taxes,late littleFeb control over who gets your property, and many times hurt feelings that leave family 3rdConstance Phase foundations poured members at odds,”●said Bourne, an elder law attorney in Gainesville.

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For more informationwww.thepointdanforth.com/ about the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, go to www.NAELA.org. Lifelong Prince William resident Rebecca Barnes, when not producing Prince William Living, is the Public Information Officer for the Occoquan-Woodbridge-Lorton Volunteer Fire Department (OWL VFD). You can reach her at rbarnes@princewilliamliving.com. 30 | May 2013 prince william living

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calendar Spring Gallery Walk May 3 • 6 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Old Town Manassas | Manassas Merchants of Old Town Manassas display special artwork created by local featured artists in this free annual event. Follow balloons to each destination. For more information, visit www.manassasgallerywalk.com or call Sarah McHugh at 703-361-6599.

youth scholarships. Tickets are $50. For tickets, call Debbie Edenhart at 703-5777702. For event information and sponsorship details contact Tiffany Suarez at 703-926-6878.

Youth Orchestras of Prince William Spring Concert

May 4 and 6 • Noon – 2 p.m. Intersection of Routes 15 and 29 | Gainesville Merchants of Madison Crescent invite you to join them for an afternoon of face painting, balloon twisting, giveaways and treats. For more information, visit www.madison-crescent.com/marketplace.

May 5 • 4 p.m. Patriot High School 10504 Kettle Run Road | Nokesville YOPW concludes the 2012-2013 season with performances by all large ensembles. e concert highlights the progress that each ensemble has made throughout the season and the development of the student members. e performance begins with the Preparatory Orchestra and ends with a featured selection from the Youth Symphony Orchestra. Event also features a silent auction. Tickets are $10 for adults, $6 for students and seniors and are available at the door. Children younger than 6 free. For more information visit www.yopwva.org.

PW Compost Awareness Day and Paper Shred

Legislative Wrap-up Breakfast

May 4 • 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Balls Ford Road Yard Waste Compost Facility 13000 Balls Ford Road / Manassas Features WTOP’s “Garden Guru,” Mike McGrath. Learn about backyard composting and the benefits of compost from McGrath and Virginia Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners, Soil and Water Conservation District, Brentsville High School Future Farmers of America and Manassas Top Soil. e events are free and open to the public. Visit www.pwcgov.org/trashandrecycling for paper shred rules, restrictions and compost event details or call the Solid Waste Division at 703-792-4670.

May 7 • 8 a.m. – 10 a.m. Old Hickory Golf Club 11921 Chanceford Drive | Lake Ridge Enjoy breakfast with members of the Prince William Chamber of Commerce and the Prince William delegation to the General Assembly at this annual event. Receive an insider’s look at the political climate in Richmond and a report of how the representatives’ voting record matches with chamber priorities, such as transportation funding and regulatory improvements. Visit pwchamber.org/events/calendar for more information and admission cost.

Saturdays on the Sidewalk

may

Bull Run Rotary Club 17th Annual “Monte Carlo Night”

May 4 • 6:30 – 11 p.m. Virginia Portuguese Center 8509 Lee Court | Manassas Now in its 17th year, the Bull Run Rotary Club’s annual “Monte Carlo Night” includes food, Monte Carlo gaming, starter “funny money,” a raffle, door prizes, “horse racing” and a silent auction. Beneficiaries this year are Transitional Housing-BARN, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Prince William, Matthew’s Center, Prince William American Red Cross, rotary programs and 32 | May 2013 prince william living

PW Chamber Business Awards 2013 May 15 • 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Hylton Performing Arts Center 10900 University Boulevard | Manassas Spend an evening with the movers, shakers and innovators of the Prince William region as the Prince William Chamber of Commerce recognizes the stars of the local business community. In addition to honoring business achievement, this signature event features the presentation of the Agnes L. Colgan Community Service Awards to two outstanding nonprofit organizations. Tickets include a cocktail reception (with cash bar), dinner and ceremony. Learn more at pwchamber.org/events/calendar.

The Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District Pond Seminar May 17 • 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Windy Knoll Farm 11602 Kettle Run Road | Nokesville Topics to be covered are pond weed management, creating wildlife habitats solutions to leaking ponds, fish stocking and a fishery survey management demonstration. Guest speakers are Lloyd Hipkins with the Virginia Cooperative Extension, John Odenkirk with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) and Joe Ivers with Virginia Waters & Wetlands. e cost is $10 per person. For more information and a registration form, visit www.pwswcd.org, call 571-379-7514 or email nicoleethier@pwswcd.org.

6th Annual Rainbow Center Golf Classic May 20 • 9:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. Dominion Valley Country Club Dominion Valley Market Square | Haymarket Participate to raise funds for Rainbow Center, a 4-H erapeutic Equestrian Program. Captains Choice Time begins at 9:30 a.m. Registration and practice begins at 11 a.m. Shotgun start begins at 4 p.m. Dinner and an auction are included. For registration information, email rainbow@rainbowriding.org.

The New Dominion Choraliers Spring Concert “Love and the Spirit” May 11 • 7 p.m. May 12 • 3 p.m. Freedom High School 15201 Neabsco Mills Road | Woodbridge e Choraliers will fill hearts and uplift your spirits with the beautiful and powerful melodies of songs. Celebrate and share, with family and friends, the rebirth and renewal of life, hope and dreams that are the promises of spring. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors, students, military and veterans; $5 for ages 5 through 13 and free for ages 4 and younger. For more information, visit www.newdominionchoraliers.org or call 703-590-2147 or 703-498-8906. Have an event? Email us at calendar@princewilliamliving.com or visit princewilliamliving.com/events to submit details to our online calendar.


Discover Prince William & Manassas

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am thrilled to announce that Discover Prince William & Manassas launched its new website last month! Our marketing staff spent the last year working with local business partners to create this image-rich, user-friendly site that engages and assists both local residents and visitors as they discover everything our community has to offer.

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DiscoverPWM.com now features everything from attraction listings and accommodations to a comprehensive directory of local shops and restaurants. It also boasts several brand new features, such as an online booking engine that allows visitors to make lodging arrangements directly through the website, bypassing online booking fees and travel agency commissions. Other new features include sample itineraries, a downloadable copy of the 2013-2014 Visitor Guide and individual pages dedicated to group tours, meetings, reunions, weddings, sporting events and the press.

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Ann Marie Maher Executive Director Discover Prince William & Manassas

Our new events calendar is a perfect place for residents to find what’s happening in the community. The calendar allows for customized searches based on specific interests and the ability to sign up for email event alerts. While DiscoverPWM.com is our main website, we will maintain ManassasBullRun.com, which is solely about the area’s rich Civil War history. I invite you to visit the new website to discover everything Prince William and Manassas have to offer. Come back often as we will continue to enhance the website and add new features including videos and short stories on our attractions and community gems. Ann Marie Maher is the executive director of Discover Prince William & Manassas. For more information about what’s going on in Prince William and Manassas, visit DiscoverPWM.com.

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A DAY AT THE PARK. A DAY AT THE POND. A DAY ON THE TOWN.

%JTDPWFS UIF WJCSBOU BOE FOHBHJOH MJGFTUZMF PG 8FTUNJOTUFS BU -BLF 3JEHF  MPDBUFE OFYU UP UIF IJTUPSJD town of Occoquan. MaintenanceGSFF DPUUBHFT BOE BQBSUNFOU IPNFT  TVQFSC EJOJOH  BO JOEPPS IFBUFE QPPM  B GVMMZ FRVJQQFE ëUOFTT DFOUFS  IPVTFLFFQJOH  XBMLJOHUSBJMT FOUFSUBJONFOUBOEPOTJUFIFBMUIDBSFA visit to Westminster is a day well spent!

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tambourines and elephants Salamat Po, Y’all By DeeDee Corbitt Sauter, Contributing Writer I have fabulous friends who run the gamut of personality extremes. After all, no one individual has everything. So I love collecting different types of characters; they all entertain me. One of these people attributes all of her characteristics and quirks to her Italian ancestry. She is convinced these tiny chromosomes control every aspect of her being. No free will there, simply DNA. She’s loud, does not have an inside voice, often confuses rude with opinionated and loves all carbs. Pasta and bread are her dietary mainstays. She is constantly talking about her European heritage and its influence on all her decisions from child rearing to fashion accessories. Ironically, she has never lived outside the Commonwealth of Virginia, where she, her siblings, her parents and even her grandparents were born and reside. None of them even have a Southern accent, let alone an Italian one. She is almost positive that her great-great grandmother on her mother’s side suffered great injustices and braved significant hardship to come to the United States via a battered, leaky boat. That single connection passed on through oral histories allows her to reference the past as if it was her own, as often as possible. She is not sure of her father’s past, nor is she familiar with her husband’s background. So they are never mentioned when family trees are discussed. Her children are only aware of Italy and Italian cuisine and Italian style. However, for someone deeply entranced with her heritage, she seems to know very little about the actual history compared to exaggerated caricatures of cartoon Italians. In the long run it doesn’t matter because she entertains me regardless of her background, even though it’s hard for me to relate. I am a mutt and I never thought twice about it. I have not considered my heritage while making decisions or decorating my house or naming my children. I just was me without being attached to a past I never experienced. My mom was German. Born in a farming area in the cold Northern part of the country

in the middle of World War II, she thought it was healthiest to sleep with open windows during blizzards. To this very day, I get an inane pleasure at watching the flurry of snowy activity outside while I cuddle behind the sealed glass next to a fireplace. Simple pleasures. She was organized, quick and highly opinionated. The German language is hard with rolling letters and the people have a dark history mixed with gaiety, dance, music and the arts. It’s deeply complicated. She came to the U.S., through Ellis Island, to be a nanny. She quickly met and married my dad, never returning to live in her homeland, thus bringing her genetics over the Atlantic to further grow the diversity in this country. I doubt she did that intentionally. My father was created in the Philippines. He lived the first few years of his life witnessing the fight between the Axis and Allied powers outside of Manila. He is not fully Filipino; Welsh, English, Spanish and Southern also course his veins. I primarily think of him as “Dad” and not someone of mixed heritage, even though he did teach me a Tagalog phrase that he himself uses often when out. “Salamat Po” means “Thank you very much, honorable one” or something like that. He receives huge smiles whenever he uses it. But, again, I have never considered myself German or Filipino. My world of heritage appreciation changed last year when my mom passed away. To connect with and honor her family, my father and I went to Germany to attend my maternal grandmother’s 100th birthday party. What a grand celebration it was! It started with a breakfast which moved to a lunch-dinner, complete with a dozen cakes at a fancy restaurant. Octogenarian women held ornate canes as they visited with each other during the meal. The animated conversation included girlish laughter, and I could see their eyes twinkle from across the room. I was the youngest one there. Their energy never waned and somehow while I was slumping in my seat with exhaustion, their colorfully embroidered skirts and suits

looked crisp and spotless. They all wore heels, some smaller than others, but even their walkers and canes sparkled along with their owners. I watched them whisper and cavort as they took shots of schnapps and ate cake. They had all survived World War II, and Germany was not known as the best place to live in the 1940s. Some had even lived through World War I, losing family members dramatically to disease, famine and hardship. However, they had not only survived; these German women were a testament to strong living and neverending hope as they raised and influenced the next generation. I couldn’t stop watching them. And, for the first time, I understood the drive and joy of identifying with a particular cultural group. Although I have a fierce patriotic streak that previously hampered my ability to see beyond this country’s borders, I can say, without equivocation, I am proud of my German heritage. Salamat po.

DeeDee Corbitt Sauter is a resident of Prince William County. Her column, “Tambourines and Elephants,” appears monthly in Prince William Living.

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distribution sites Pick up a free copy of Prince William Living at one of the following fine locations: Appliance Connection 13851 Telegraph Road, Suite 101, Woodbridge

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Prince William Living May 2013  

Prince William Living, the premiere lifestyle magazine of Prince William and Greater Manassas

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