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2009-10

annual report

Department of Computer Science 305 N. University Street West Lafayette, IN 47907-2107 (800) 320-6132 www.cs.purdue.edu

Purdue is an equal access/equal opportunity university Produced by Purdue Department of Computer Science Annual Report Design by Shawn Dildine and Nicole Piegza


The cover image shows Professor Xiangyu Zhang’s architecture of the Comparison Based Automatic Debugging System. More information on Prof. Zhang’s research with automated software debugging is on page 44 of this report.


Table of Contents 2

Year in Review

4

Departmental Research Areas

26

Research Funding

40

Research Highlights

48

Graduate Student

55

Diversity

56

Departmental Support

58

Engagement

64

Guest Speakers

66

Events

67

Facilities


n i r a Ye

w e i v Re

August 1, 2009 through September 1, 2010 The 2009-10 year included some significant changes for the department. The faculty approved a new undergraduate curriculum based on a compact common core of courses and allowing students to choose from a variety of tracks in which to specialize their computer science knowledge. The new curriculum started in the fall 2010 semester. Initial demand from students was positive. Enrollments in both the undergraduate and graduate programs increased this year and are on track to increase again next year. On the research front, a multi-institutional team, under the leadership of Prof. Wojtek Szpankowski, was selected as one of only five NSF-funded Science and Technology Centers (STC) to study the Science of Information. The $25 million center is the first ever STC in the State of Indiana. The story of the Science of Information STC is on page 40. In the first Midwest University-Industry Summit, held at Purdue in fall 2009, Prof. Douglas Comer started a dialogue between faculty at midwestern universities and representatives of local industries. The goal of the summit series is to bring industrial research problems and priorities to the attention of faculty who have the interest and capabilities to address them. The summit location will rotate among midwest universities, with the next workshop to be held at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2011. Prof. Daniel Aliaga’s research was on display this year at two museums in Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Museum of Art and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. Along with his students, Alvin Law and Yu Hong Yeung, Aliaga implemented a system to virtually restore cultural heritage artifacts by projecting digital light sources onto the artifacts. These projections, which minimize impact on the artifacts by using the minimum amount of light necessary, allow the viewer to “step back in time” and see the artifact as it appeared when it was created. The work was also featured in a mini-documentary from the Discoveries and Breakthroughs Inside Science branch of the American Institute of Physics. The 2010 Transactional Memory Workshop was held in April, hosted by Computer Science faculty Profs. Suresh Jagannathan and Jan Vitek. The program brought together researchers from academia and industry to discuss current and future research in the area of transactional memory, including software, hardware and hybrid transactional memory systems. Graduate students Armand Navabi, Fadi Meawad, and Lukasz Ziarek served on the organizing committee. The Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS), under the direction of Prof. Eugene Spafford, partnered with Northrop Grumman Corporation and two other universities to create the Northrop Grumman Cybersecurity Research Consortium. The group will work to accelerate the creation and deployment of technologies in information protection and privacy. More information on the consortium is available on page 42.

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Awards, Honors, and Promotions Faculty CSNET, the research networking effort from the early 1980s, which included Prof. Douglas Comer and other researchers from Purdue, received the 2009 Internet Society Jonathan B. Postel Award. Prof. Alex Pothen was selected as the 2009 Distinguished Alumnus by his alma mater, the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (IITD). Prof. Ahmed Elmagarmid was named as a 2009 recipient of the ACM Distinguished Membership and in 2010 was named a Fellow of the IEEE. Prof. Wojtek Szpankowski received the 2009 Humboldt Research Award. Prof. Eugene Spafford was named a Distinguished Fellow of the Information Systems Security Assurance Association (ISSA). The Pinta group, which is organizing a database of expertise information, was recognized in the 2010 Burton Morgan Business Plan Competition. Computer Science participants included Profs. Luo Si and Aditya Mathur, and PhD students Yi Fang and Suli Xi. Congratulations to CS faculty in their career paths. Prof. Susanne Hambrusch is taking a leave of absence to serve at the National Science Foundation as the Director of the CISE Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF). Prof. Ahmed Elmagarmid is on leave to serve as the executive director of the Qatar Computing Research Institute. Prof. David Yau is currently on leave as a distinguished scientist at the Advanced Digital Sciences Center in Singapore. Prof. Daniel Aliaga was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure. Prof. Jan Vitek was promoted to Full Professor with tenure. Staff CS Outreach Coordinator, Mindy Hart, was elected to the board of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students Arman Suleimenov, John Bohlmann, Zhanibek Datbayev, and Wenyu Zhang were interviewed on WBAA for their participation in the ACM Regional Programming Competition. A Purdue undergraduate team, including Computer Science students Yilong Jin, Scott Toland, and Gabriel Martinez Vidiri received the fall 2009 EPICS AMD Award for their Judicial Database System Project. They were assisted by CS graduate student William J. Culhane. Nwokedi Idika received his PhD in August 2010, making him the first black student to obtain a doctorate from the Purdue Computer Science Department. William Sumner received the Maurice H. Halstead Memorial Scholarship. Alumni David Dodson and Roberto Kohler were recognized as Outstanding Alumni in the fall of 2009. Thomas “Curtis� Holmes, Jr. was recognized as the Distinguished Alumnus for 2010 in the spring. Michael Goodrich and John Riedl were named ACM Fellows in 2009. Looking Ahead The Commons in the Lawson Building will undergo a dramatic change with the installation of a large, 16 by 9 foot video wall, donated by Harris Corporation. The wall will provide a focal point for workshops and colloquia held in the nearby University Meeting Room, a viewing point for special events (such as graduations and campus-wide forums), and as a showcase for faculty research projects. Special software from Harris will allow partitioning the display to view multiple programs simultaneously, with audio available via Internet channels. With enrollment growth expected at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, we will be busy in the coming years preparing students for careers in computer science. Providing the necessary guidance, direction, and motivation are key departmental priorities.

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d n a s c i t a m r o f n i Bio

a n o i tat

u p m Co

Faculty in the area of bioinformatics and computational biology apply computational methodologies such as databases, machine learning, discrete, probabilistic, and numerical algorithms, and methods of statistical inference to problems in molecular biology, systems biology, structural biology, and molecular biophysics. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology research enables researchers to process the massive data becoming available with novel experimental methodologies in genomics and proteomics. Current work addressing this need includes the design and implementation of biological databases and text/data mining for life sciences, in particular, automatic gene function annotation from the literature. Advances in molecular biology and systems biology involve the extraction of information and patterns from data. Work in this area includes finding context-sensitive modules from multiple cancer networks, identifying protein-DNA binding sites, analyzing flow cytometry data to find cancer stem cells, algorithms and statistical approaches for functional annotation of molecules based on their sequences, identifying protein biomarkers for lung and prostate cancer using clinical data and experiments with model organisms, and studies of biomolecular networks. Data for these projects are obtained by a variety of experimental technologies, including gene expression microarrays, protein-DNA binding data, flow cytometry data, sequence data, mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics, and ionomic profiling. Progress in structural biology and molecular biophysics requires models that incorporate physical properties of biomolecules as well as data. Work in this direction includes prediction and analysis of the relationship among protein sequence, structure and function, determining protein structure via NMR, determining transition paths of conformational change of proteins and free energies of protein-ligand binding, and simulating DNA dynamics and self-assembly. Faculty involved in bioinformatics and computational biology at Purdue include Ananth Grama (p. 7), Daisuke Kihara, Alex Pothen (p. 7), Yuan (Alan) Qi, Luo Si (p. 17), Robert Skeel (p. 7), Wojciech Szpankowski (p. 25), and Olga Vitek.

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nal

y g o Biol

Daisuke Kihara

Publications Rayan Chikhi, Lee Sael & Daisuke Daisu Kihara, “Real-time ligand binding pocket database search using local surface descriptors”, Prote Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, 78:2007-2028.(2010). Troy Hawkins, Meghana Chitale & Daisuke Kihara, “Functional enrichment analyses and construcwith high confidence function prediction by PFP”, BMC Bioinfortion of functional similarity networks netw matics, 11:265.(2010).

Olga Vitek

Vishwesh Venkatraman, Yifeng D Yang, Lee Sael & Daisuke Kihara, “Protein-protein docking using region-based 3D Zernike descriptors”, BMC Bioinformatics, 10:407(2009). A. L. Oberg, O. Vitek, “Statistical design of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic experiments”. Journal of Proteome Research, 8, p. 2144-2156, 2009. I. R. Baxter, O. Vitek, B. Lahner, B. Muthukumar, M. Borghi, J. Morrissey, M. L. Guerinot, D. E. Salt, “The leaf ionome as a multivariable system to detect a plant’s physiological status”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105, p.12081–12086, 2008. A. Nesvizhskii, O. Vitek and R. Aebersold, “Analysis and validation of proteomic data generated by tandem mass spectrometry”, Nature Methods, 4, p. 787-797, 2007.

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d n a e c n e i c S l a n o i t a t u p m Co

n i g En

Computational science and engineering, or scientific computing, provided the impetus for many of the early Computer Science departments in the 1960s. Purdue is one of the few programs nationwide that have consistently maintained a leadership position in this important discipline. The computational science and engineering group includes seven full-time faculty members (one with a joint appointment in Mathematics). The group’s research activity focuses on the development of algorithms (numerical as well as combinatorial), parallel and distributed techniques, software infrastructure, and novel computing platforms. These research efforts are driven by state-of-the-art applications in modeling of materials and biochemical processes (ranging from atomistic to systems-level models), novel microelectromechanical systems, structural mechanics and control, robotics and advanced manufacturing, image processing and visualization (with applications in life-sciences and health-care), and critical infrastructure protection (e.g., power grids and other civil infrastructure). The algorithmic research activities concern the development of novel solvers (linear and non-linear system solvers, eigenvalue/singular-value decompositions), techniques for real-time control, numerical methods for modeling many-body systems, combinatorial scientific computing, Automatic Differentiation, and computational geometry algorithms for reasoning about shapes and mechanisms. Systems development efforts support these applications through the development of advanced compilers, runtime systems, data management and storage, and data analysis on scalable parallel platforms and distributed infrastructure. Faculty involved in computational science and engineering at Purdue include Ananth Grama, Christoph Hoffmann (p. 13), Bradley Lucier, Alex Pothen, Elisha Sacks (p. 13), Ahmed Sameh, Robert Skeel, and research faculty member Assefaw Gebremedhin. Publications Bogdan Carbunar, Ananth Grama, Jan Vitek, Octavian Carbunar, “Redundancy and Coverage Detection in Sensor Networks”, ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2006. Mehmet Koyuturk, Yohan Kim, Shankar Subramaniam, Wojciech Szpankowski, and Ananth Grama, “Detecting conserved interaction patterns in biological networks”, Journal of Computational Biology, 13(7), 1299-1322, 2006. Ronaldo Ferreira, Suresh Jagannathan, and Ananth Grama, “Locality in Structured Peer-to-Peer Networks”, Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, Volume 66, Number 2, pages 257-273, 2006. Doruk Bozdag, Umit Catalyurek, Assefaw Gebremedhin, Fredrik Manne, Erik Boman and Fusun Ozguner, “Distributedmemory Parallel Algorithms for Distance-2 Coloring and Related Problems in Derivative Computation”, SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, Vol 32, Issue 4, pp 2418--2446, 2010. Assefaw Gebremedhin, Alex Pothen and Andrea Walther, “Exploiting Sparsity in Jacobian Computation via Coloring and Automatic Differentiation: A Case Study in a Simulated Moving Bed Process”, In C. Bischof et al. (Eds): Proceedings of AD2008, Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering 64, pp 339--349, 2008, Springer.

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g n i r nee Assefaw Gebremedhin, Gebremedhin Arijit Tarafdar, Fredrik Manne and Alex Pothen, “New Acyclic and Star Coloring Algorithms with wit Applications to Hessian Computation”, SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, Vol 29, No 3, pp 1042--1072, 2007. Antonin Chambolle, Ronald Ro A. DeVore, Namyong Lee, and Bradley J. Lucier, “Nonlinear Wavelet Image Processing: Variational V Problems, Compression, and Noise Removal through Wavelet Shrinkage”, IEEE Tran Transactions on Image Processing: Special Issue on Partial Differential EquaShrinkage” tions and Geometry-Driven Diffusion in Image Processing and Analysis, 7(3):319-335, 1998.

Ananth Grama

Bradley Lucier

Namyong Lee and Bradley J. Lucier, “Wavelet Methods for Inverting the Radon Transform with Noisy Data”, IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 10(1):79-94, 2001. Maria Kallergi, Bradley J. Lucier, Claudia G. Berman, Maria R. Hersh, J. Kim Jihai, Margaret S. Szabunio, and Robert A. Clark, “High-performance wavelet compression for mammography: localization response operating characteristic evaluation”, Radiology, 238(1):62-73, 2006. Bruce Hendrickson and Alex Pothen, “Combinatorial Scientific Computing: The Enabling Power of Discrete Algorithms in Computational Science”, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4395, pp. 260-280, 2007.

Alex Pothen

Assefaw Gebremedhin, Alex Pothen, Arijit Tarafdar, and Andrea Walther, “Efficent Computation of Sparse Hessians using Coloring and Automatic Differentiation”, INFORMS Journal on Computing, Vol. 21 (2), pp. 209-223, 2009. Ariful Azad, Johannes Langguth, Youhan Fang, Alan Qi and Alex Pothen, “Identifying Rare Cell Populations in Comparative Flow Cytometry”, Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop on Algorithms in Bioinformatics (WABI), Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics, Vol. 6293, pp. 162-175, 2010. Murat Manguoglu, Kenji Takizawa, Ahmed Sameh, and Tayfun Tezduyar, “Nested and Parallel Sparse Algorithms for Arterial Fluid Mechanics Computations with Boundary Layer Mesh Refinement”, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, Volume 65, Issue 1-3, pp.135-149, 2010.

Ahmed Sameh

Maxim Naumov, Murat Manguoglu, and Ahmed Sameh, “A Tearing-based Hybrid Parallel Sparse Linear System Solver”, Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Volume 234, Issue 10, pp. 3025-3038, 2010. Murat Manguoglu, M. Koyuturk, Ahmed Sameh, and Ananth Grama, “Weighted Matrix Ordering and Parallel Banded Preconditioners for Iterative Linear System Solvers”, SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, Vol 32(3), pp. 1201-1216, 2010.

Robert Skeel

J.C. Phillips, R. Braun, W. Wang, J. Gumbart, E. Tajkhorshid, E. Villa, C. Chipot, R.D. Skeel, L. Kale, and K. Schulten, “Scalable molecular dynamics with NAMD”, J. Comput. Chem. 26, 17811802, 2005. R. D. Skeel, “What makes molecular dynamics work?”, SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 31, 1363-1378, 2009. R. Zhao, J. Shen, and R. D. Skeel, “Maximum flux transition paths of conformational change”, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2411-2423, 2010.

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a t a D d n a s e s a b Data

g n i n Mi

The database and data mining group at Purdue is composed of Professors Walid G. Aref, Elisa Bertino (p. 15), Bharat Bhargava, Christopher Clifton, Ahmed Elmagarmid, Susanne Hambrusch (p. 25), Jennifer Neville (p. 17), Sunil Prabhakar, and Luo Si (p. 17); Research Associate Professor Mourad Ouzzani; and over thirty graduate students. The group conducts fundamental and cutting-edge research in database systems, database privacy and security, data mining, web search, information retrieval, and natural language processing. Current projects and topics include: -Context aware database management systems (Aref, Bhargava, Ouzzani) -Cyber infrastructure (Elmagarmid, Ouzzani) -Data and service integration and schema matching (Elmagarmid, Ouzzani) -Data quality (Elmagarmid, Ouzzani) -Database security and online auctions (Bertino, Bhargava) -Location privacy (Aref, Bertino, Bhargava) -Massively parallel spatiotemporal data management (Aref, Ouzzani) -Privacy enhancing technologies for data, text, and data mining (Clifton) -Private and secure data dissemination (Aref, Bhargava, Clifton) -Scientific data management (Aref, Elmagarmid, Ouzzani) -Search and Intelligent Tutoring (Si) -Self-learning disk scheduling (Bhargava) -Statistical relational models (Neville) -Stream Data Management (Aref, Elmagarmid, Prabhakar) -Uncertainty data management (Hambrusch, Neville, Prabhakar) Members of the database and data mining group engage in high-impact multidisciplinary projects and collaborations that involve multiple disciplines including Agronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Physics, and Social Sciences. Since 2003, the database and data mining group has graduated over 20 PhD students who have started their careers in various universities (e.g., Arizona State, Calgary, Minnesota, Rutgers, SUNY Albany, Texas at Dallas, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Waterloo, and WPI) and industry (e.g., Amazon, Google, IBM, and Microsoft). Details about the above research conducted and the multidisciplinary projects can be found at www.cs.purdue.edu/icds. Publications Thanaa M. Ghanem, Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Per-Ă…ke Larson, Walid G. Aref: Supporting views in data stream management systems, ACM Transactions on Database Systems (TODS), 35(1): (2010).

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Walid Aref

Chi-Yin Chow, Mohamed F. Mokbel, Walid G. Aref: “Casper*: Query processing for location services without compromising privacy”, ACM Transactions on Database Systems (TODS) 34(4): (2009). Long-Van Nguyen-Dinh, Walid G. Aref, Mohamed F. Mokbel, “Spatio-Temporal Access Methods: Part 2”, (2003 - 2010). IEEE Data Engineering Bulletin, 33(2): 46-55 (2010).

Bharat Bhargava

M. Hefeeda, B. Bhargava, and D. Yau, “A hybrid architecture for cost-effective on-demand media streaming”, Computer Networks Journal, Volume 44, pp. 353-382, 2004. B. Bhargava, X. Wu, Y. Lu, and W. Wang, “Integrating Heterogeneous Wireless Technologies: A Cellular-assisted mobile ad hoc network”, Mobile Networks and Applications: Special Issue on Integration of Heterogeneous Wireless Technologies, No. 9, pp. 393-408, 2004. A. Habib, M. Khan, and B. Bhargava, “Edge-to-Edge Measurement-based Distributed Network Monitoring”, Computer Networks, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp. 211-233, Feb 2004. Jaideep Vaidya, Chris Clifton, and Michael Zhu, “Privacy Preserving Data Mining”, Volume 19 in Advances in Information Security, Springer, New York, 2006, (url).

Christopher Clifton

Mummoorthy Murugesan, Wei Jiang, Chris Clifton, Luo Si and Jaideep Vaidya, “Efficient PrivacyPreserving Similar Document Detection”, The VLDB Journal, 19(4):457-475, August 2010, (url). M. Ercan Nergiz and Chris Clifton, “δ-Presence Without Complete World Knowledge”, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, 22(6):868-883, IEEE Computer Society, June 2010, (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=04912209). Hazem Elmeleegy, Mourad Ouzzani, Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Ahmad M. Abusalah, “Preserving privacy and fairness in peer-to-peer data integration”, SIGMOD Conference 2010, 759-770. Mohamed Yakout, Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Hazem Elmeleegy, Mourad Ouzzani, Alan Qi, “Behavior Based Record Linkage”, PVLDB 3(1): 439-448 (2010).

Ahmed Elmagarmid

Mohamed Yakout, Mikhail J. Atallah, Ahmed Elmagarmid, “Efficient Private Record Linkage”, Proceedings of the 25th International Conferenceon Data Engineering ICDE 2009, Shanghai, China. Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Arjmand Samuel, Mourad Ouzzani, “Community-Cyberinfrastructure-Enabled Discovery in Science and Engineering”, Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 46-53, September/October, 2008. Chris Mayfield, Jennifer Neville, Sunil Prabhakar, “ERACER: A Database Approach for Statistical Inference and Data Cleaning”, Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Management of Data (SIGMOD), June 2010, Indianapolis, USA. Yinian Qi, Rohit Jain, Sarvjeet Singh, Sunil Prabhakar, “Threshold Query Optimization for Uncertain Data”, Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Management of Data (SIGMOD), June 2010, Indianapolis, USA.

Sunil Prabhakar

Sarvjeet Singh, Sunil Prabhakar, “Ensuring Correctness over Untrusted Private Databases”, Proceedings of the International Conference on Extending Database Technology (EDBT), March 2008, Nantes, France.

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s m e yst

S d e ibut

r t s i D

The distributed systems group focuses on designing distributed systems that are scalable, dependable, and secure, behaving according to their specification in spite of errors, misconfigurations, or being subjected to attacks. Areas of focus include: Virtualization technologies. One thrust is developing advanced virtualization technologies for computer malware defense and virtual distributed computing. Researchers at the FRIENDS lab (Lab For Research In Emerging Network & Distributed Systems) have developed a virtualization-based experimental platform for malware containment, observation, and analysis. Ongoing research efforts in the computer malware defense area include: operating system level information flow tracking for user-level malware investigation; virtual machine (VM) introspection for stealthy malware monitoring and detection; and VM memory shadowing for kernel-rootkit prevention and profiling. In the virtual distributed computing area, the lab has proposed and instantiated the concept of “virtual networked environment� for creating virtual infrastructures on top of a shared physical hosting infrastructure. The concept and its enabling techniques have been applied to support a number of emerging applications such as scientific job execution, virtual organizations, and tele-immersion. Intrusion tolerant systems. Researchers at the Dependable and Secure Distributed Systems Laboratory (DS2) are designing distributed systems, networks and applications that can tolerate insiders, while maintaining acceptable levels of performance. Recent research lies in designing intrusion-tolerant systems in the context of (1) replication services, (2) routing for wireless ad hoc networks, and (3) unstructured overlays for peer-to-peer streaming. Model checking and simulation testing. Another thrust is studying the utility of distributed-system model checking and simulation testing by coupling it with dynamic program slicing and machine learning. Each of these techniques have the ability to summarize and focus the massive amounts of available information so the programmer-designer can focus on the significant parts of the execution while ignoring the rest. The goal is to develop enabling technologies and prototype frameworks for collaborative high-performance distributed computing and simulation that may be adapted and enhanced to deploy scalable and portable systems. Experimental analysis. Researchers at the RAID laboratory are conducting scientific research in a variety of subjects related to experimental analysis such as: communication experiments for distributed applications, network communication measurement experiments, experimental analysis of communication infrastructure, adaptability experiments for distributed systems, replication and recovery experiments for distributed database systems, concurrent check-pointing and rollbackrecovery algorithms, concurrency control for distributed database systems, efficient implementation techniques for distributed systems, digital library, and mobile communication.

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Charles Killian

Faculty involved in distributed systems at Purdue include Bharat Bhargava (p. 9), Patrick Eugster (p. 21), Ananth Grama (p.7), Antony Hosking (p. 21), Suresh Jagannathan (p. 21), Charles Killian, Cristina Nita-Rotaru (p. 15), Kihong Park (p. 19), Vernon Rego, Dongyan Xu, and David Yau (p. 19).

Vernon Rego

Publications Charles Killian, James W. Anderson, Ranjit Jhala, and Amin Vahdat, “Life, Death, and the Critical Transition: Finding Liveness Bugs in Systems Code”, Proceedings of Networked Systems Design and Implementation, 2007, (Awarded Best Paper). Charles Killian, James W. Anderson, Ryan Braud, Ranjit Jhala, and Amin Vahdat, “Mace: Language Support for Building Distributed Systems”, Proceedings of Programming Languages Design and Implementation, 2007.

Dongyan Xu

Darren Dao, Jeannie Albrecht, Charles Killian, and Amin Vahdat, “Live Debugging of Distributed Systems”, Proceedings of International Conference on Compiler Construction, 2009. Jorge Ramos and Vernon Rego, “Efficient Implementation of Multiprocessor Scheduling Algorithms on a Simulation Testbed”, Software: Practice & Experience, Vol. 35, No. 1, pp. 27-50, 2005. J.C. Gomez, V. Rego, and V. Sunderam, “Scheduling Communication in Multithreaded Programs: Experimental Results”, Concurrency and Computation: Practice & Experience, Vol. 18, No. 1, pp. 1-28, 2006. Jorge Ramos, Vernon Rego, and Janche Sang, “An Efficient Burst-Arrival and Batch-Departure Algorithm for Round- Robin Service”, Simulation: Practice & Theory, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 1-24, 2006. Z. Lin, X. Zhang, D. Xu, “Automatic Reverse Engineering of Data Structures from Binary Execution”, Proceedings of the 17th Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS 2010), San Diego, CA, March 2010. A. Kangarlou, P. Eugster, D. Xu, “VNsnap: Taking Snapshots of Virtual Networked Environments with Minimal Downtime”, Proceedings of IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN-DCCS 2009), July 2009. R. Riley, X. Jiang, D. Xu, “Guest-Transparent Prevention of Kernel Rootkits with VMM-based Memory Shadowing”, Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Intrusion Detection (RAID 2008), September 2008, (Awarded Best Paper).

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n o i t liza

a u s i V d n a s c i h p Gra

The graphics group performs research in graphics, visualization, computational geometry, and related applications. This report describes major projects on which the group focused. Model acquisition. The graphics and visualization group developed self-calibrating methods for acquiring high-quality geometric models (accuracy as high as 0.05mm) of objects and of room-size scenes. They combined photometric measurements with geometric measurements and used algebra to eliminate many calibration parameters. This approach led to better algorithms for capturing dynamic scenes, for acquiring models of highly specular and interreflective scenes, and for changing the appearance of objects. Simulation. In collaboration with civil engineers, the graphics and visualization team produced a high-fidelity simulation of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center. The interest in such a simulation transcends civil engineering and includes emergency response, defense, and society in general. The simulation follows the laws of physics as closely as possible. The results are presented through a visualization that is eloquent to users outside of civil engineering. The visualization has been downloaded over five million times. Image generalization. Images are used in computer graphics and visualization to convey information in cases like 3-D scene exploration, remote visualization, acceleration of high-cost rendering effects, and video surveillance. Images are computed by sampling data with rays defined by a camera model mostly by using the planar pinhole camera model, which suffers from important limitations. The camera model design paradigm is an infrastructure-level innovation with broad applicability used to overcome these limitations and advocates designing the set of rays that best suit a given application and optimizing it dynamically according to the data sampled. Camera model design is a flexible framework for generating images with multiple viewpoints and with a variable sampling rate. Like conventional images, the generated images are continuous, non-redundant, and can be computed efficiently with the help of graphics hardware. Scientific Visualization. Computer simulations and high-throughput measuring devices produce an overwhelming volume of data across science, engineering, and medicine. Current research spans a range of topics in visualization and geometric data processing to devise new models and efficient algorithms for the effective visual mapping and analysis of information. We have created new spatial data structures that dramatically increase the performance of a broad class of rendering and visualization methods. We have addressed the computational bottlenecks of advanced saliency models in fluid dynamics applications. We have investigated new representations and study the structural properties of large-scale particle assemblies in granular material simulations. We have applied topological concepts and advanced numerical algorithms to the efficient analysis and visualization of Hamiltonian systems in problems related to magnetic confinement and space mission planning. Finally, we have proposed a new hybrid CPU/GPU method for the extraction of ridge surfaces from three-dimensional datasets in scale space. Urban modeling. Faculty in the area of graphics and visualization are working on the modeling and simulation of large urban environments. The goal is to obtain digital models of large-scale urban structures in order to simulate physical phenomena (e.g., changes in weather, vegetation, etc.) and human activities (e.g., population and employment changes). Purdue researchers have developed algorithms that use ground-level imagery, aerial imagery, procedural modeling, and street and parcel data to create and modify 3D geometry and 2D layouts making models more easily modifiable.

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Daniel Aliaga

Robust computational geometry. Computational geometry algorithms are formulated in a model where arithmetic operations have infinite accuracy and unit cost. We developed robust versions of five core algorithms and validated them on examples that far exceed the capabilities of prior work. Geometric computations and constraints. Complementing computational geometry, computations on nonlinear geometric structures are developed and analyzed. Applications include discrete manufacturing. Of particular interest are new techniques for solving geometric constraint problems and including into the vocabulary curves and surfaces from CAGD. Also under consideration are data formats for succinct archival of geometric data in manufacturing and sensory image acquisition.

Christoph Hoffmann

Faculty involved in graphics and visualization at Purdue include Daniel Aliaga, Christoph Hoffmann, Voicu Popescu, Elisha Sacks, and Xavier Tricoche. Publications D. Aliaga, Y. Xu, “A Self-Calibrating Method for Photogeometric Acquisition of 3D Objects”, IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 32, no. 4, 2010. A. Law, D. Aliaga, A. Majumder, “Projector Placement Planning for High Quality Visualizations on Real-World Colored Objects”, IEEE Visualization, Oct., 2010.

Voicu Popescu

O. Stava, B. Benes, R. Mech, D. Aliaga, P. Kristof, “Inverse Procedural Modeling by Automatic Generation of L-systems”, Computer Graphics Forum (Eurographics), 29:2, 10 pages, 2010. C. Chiang, C. Hoffmann, P. Rosen, “Hardware Assistance for Constrained Circle Constructions II: Cluster Merging Problems”, Journal of Computer-Aided Design and Applications, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2010. C. Chiang, C. Hoffmann, P. Rosen, “Hardware Assistance for Constrained Circle Constructions I: Sequential Problems “, Journal of Computer-Aided Design and Applications, Vol. 7, No, 1, 2010.

Elisha Sacks

S. Kim, C. Hoffmann, V. Ramachandran, “Analyzing the Parameters of Prey-Predator Models for Simulation Games”, ICEC 2010, Sep., 2010. J. Cui, P. Rosen, V. Popescu, C. Hoffmann, “A Curved Ray Camera for Handling Occlusions through Continuous Multiperspective Visualization”, IEEE Visualization, 2010. V. Popescu, P. Rosen, L. Arns, X. Tricoche, C. Wyman, C. Hoffmann, “The General Pinhole Camera: Effective and Efficient Non-Uniform Sampling for Visualization”, IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2010. P. Rosen, V. Popescu, K. Hayward, C. Wyman, “Non-Pinhole Approximations for Interactive Rendering”, To appear in IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 2010.

Xavier Tricoche

N. Andrysco, X. Tricoche, “Matrix Trees”, Computer Graphics Forum, 29(3), 2010. S. Barakat, X. Tricoche, “An Image-based Approach to Interactive Crease Extraction and Rendering”, International Conference on Computational Science, 2010. M. Hlawitschka, C. Garth, X. Tricoche, G. Kindlmann, G. Scheuermann, K. Joy, B. Hamann, “Direct Visualization of Fiber Information by Coherence”, International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, 5(2), 2010.

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d n a y t i r cu e S n o i t a m r Info

n a r u Ass

Faculty involved with information security and assurance are often affiliated with the university-wide Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS). CERIAS is generally considered to be the top-ranked such group in the world, with faculty from over a dozen departments at Purdue. Their research covers all aspects of computer and network security, privacy, and cyber crime investigation. Areas of special focus by CS faculty include: Identification, authentication, and privacy. There is a tension between increased confidence and granularity of authorization provided by better identification of on-line entities, and with the need to protect the privacy rights of individuals and organizations. This area includes research in role-based access control, privacy-protecting transformations of data, privacy-protecting data mining methods, privacy regulation (e.g., HIPAA), oblivious multiparty computation, and digital identity management systems. Incident detection, response, and investigation. Systems are attacked, and sometimes attacks succeed. This area of our expertise includes intrusion and misuse detection, integrity management issues, audit and logging analysis, sensor and alarm design, strike-back mechanisms, dynamic reconfiguration, honeypots and ‘jails’, cyberforensics. Cryptology and rights management. Controlling information from being read or altered by others, preserving marks of ownership and origin, and breaking the code of adversaries are all of interest in information security. Research interests include encryption, number theoretic foundations, cryptanalysis, and watermarking. Data security. Data is often the most important asset that organizations have and it is the target of almost all attacks. Relevant research includes: secure architectures for databases, security of streaming data, high-assurance integrity systems for databases, anomaly detection and response system mechanisms for databases. System security. Advanced virtualization-based techniques are developed for the detection, prevention and profiling of both user-level and kernel-level computer malware. Research includes the use of these techniques for protection from botnets. Trusted social and human interactions. How does IT change our interactions, and how can more trustworthy IT change them further? This includes studies of on-line trust, ecommerce (business-to-business and business-to-consumer), digital government services, e-conferencing, on-line personae and anonymity, online news, on-line research and the ephemeral nature of information, on-line propaganda, and spam. Faculty involved in information security and assurance at Purdue include Mikhail Atallah, Elisa Bertino, Bharat Bhargava (p. 9), Christopher Clifton (p. 9), Sonia Fahmy (p. 19), Ninghui Li, Cristina Nita-Rotaru, Kihong Park (p. 19), Sunil Prabhakar (p. 9), Vernon Rego (p. 11), Eugene H. Spafford, Jan Vitek (p. 21), Samuel Wagstaff , Dongyan Xu (p. 11), and David Yau (p. 19). Publications Hao Yuan, Mikhail J. Atallah, “Data Structures for Range Minimum Queries in Multidimensional Arrays”, Proceedings of Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA 2010), Austin, Texas, 2010. Mikhail J. Atallah, Keith B. Frikken, “Securely outsourcing linear algebra computations”, Proceedings of the 5th ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security (ASIACCS 2010), Beijing, China, 2010. Daniel Aliaga, Mikhail J. Atallah, “Genuinity Signatures: Designing Signatures for Verifying 3D Object Genuinity”, Proceedings 30th Annual Conference of the European Association for Computer Graphics (Eurographics 2009), Munich, Germany, 2009.

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ance

Mikhail Atallah Elisa Bertino

Q, Ni, E. Bertino, J. Lobo, C. Brodie, C.-M. Karat, J. Karat, A. Trombetta, “Privacy-Aware Role-Based Access C Control”, ACM Transactions on Information and System Security, Vol. 13, N. 3, July 2010. Shang, M. Nabeel, F. Paci, E. Bertino, “A Privacy-Preserving Approach to Policy-Based Content N. Shang Dissemination”, Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Data Engineering, ICDE 2010, Dissemin March 11-6, 2010, Long Beach, California, USA. IEEE 2010.

Ninghui Li

R. Nehme, E. Rundensteiner, E. Bertino, “Tagging Stream Data for Rich Real-Time Services”, Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on VeryLarge Databases (VLDB 2009), Lyon (France), August 24-28, 2009. N. Li, T. Li, S. Venkatasubramanian, “Closeness: A New Privacy Measure for Data Publishing”, IEEE Transactions on Data and Knowledge Engineering (TKDE), 22(7): 943-956, 2010. N. Li, Z. Mao, H. Chen, “Usable Mandatory Integrity Protection for Operating Systems”, Proceedings of IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, pp. 164--178, May 2007. T. Li, N. Li, “On the Tradeoff Between Privacy and Utility in Data Publishing”, Proceedings of 2009 ACM SIGKDD Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD-09), June 2009.

Cristina Nita-Rotaru

J. Dong, E. Ackermann, B. Bhavar, and C. Nita-Rotaru., “Mitigating Attacks against Virtual Coordinate System Based Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks”, ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, vol 6., issue 4, July 2010. R. Curtmola and C. Nita-Rotaru, “BSMR: Byzantine-Resilient Secure Multicast Routing in Multi-hop Wireless Networks”, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing (TMC), vol. 8, no. 4, April 2009. A. Walters, D. Zage and C. Nita-Rotaru, “A Framework for Mitigating Attacks Against MeasurementBased Adaptation Mechanisms in Unstructured Multicast Overlay Networks”, In IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, vol. 16, no. 6, Dec. 2008.

Eugene H. Spafford

Travis D. Breaux, Annie I. Antón, and Eugene H. Spafford, “A Distributed RequirementsManagement Framework For Legal Compliance And Accountability”, Computers & Security, Elsevier; 28(1); pp. 8-17; Jan 2009. Yu-Sung Wu, Bingrui Foo, Gaspar Modelo-Howard, Saurabh Bagchi, and Eugene H. Spafford, “The Search for Efficiency in Automated Intrusion Response for Distributed Applications”, Proceedings of the 27th IEEE Symposium on Reliable and Distributed Systems (SRDS 2008), October 2008; pp. 53-62; Napoli, Italy. Xuxian Jiang, Florian Buchholz, Aaron Walters, Dongyan Xu, Yi-Min Wang, Eugene H. Spafford, “Tracing Worm Break-in and Contaminations via Process Coloring: A Provenance-Preserving Approach”, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, 19(7); pp. 890-902; Jul 2008.

Samuel Wagstaff

P.L Montgomery, S. Nahm and S. S. Wagstaff Jr, “The period of the Bell numbers modulo a prime”, Mathematics of Computation, v. 79 (2010), pages 1793-1800. J. Gower and S. S. Wagstaff Jr, “Square form factorization”, Mathematics of Computation, v. 77 (2008), pages 551-588. E. Bertino, N. Shang and S. S. Wagstaff, Jr, “An efficient time-bound hierarchical key management scheme for secure broadcasting”, IEEE Trans. on Dependable and Secure Computing, v. 5, no. 2 (2008), pages 65-70.

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o i t a rm

fo n I d n a g n i n r a e L e n i h c a M

With massive data available from various engineering, scientific, and social disciplines, machine learning and information retrieval have played an imperative role in discovering hidden patterns or relationships between intertwined components (e.g., people, web pages, or genes, in a complex system), understanding properties of various systems, and making meaningful predictions for a variety of applications. In the past few years, Purdue has grown a strong machine learning and information retrieval group with strengths in multiple areas of this field. In particular, Professor Jennifer Neville works on multiple problems in relational modeling, such as fusion and analysis of multi-source relational data, and modeling relational communication on distributed team effectiveness. Her team also integrates machine learning methods with agent-based models to form a compositional model, which will combine components that are learned from data with components that are hand-engineered using traditional methods. This combination will produce powerful tools for understanding the emergent behavior of complex social and organizational systems. Professor Luo Si develops federated text search, which is the search beyond traditional engines such as Google, Yahoo! or MSN by finding information that is “hidden’’ behind many search engines. His team also uses cuttingedge computer science techniques to construct an exploratory but fully functioning differentiated instructional system of mathematical word problem solving. Professor Christopher Clifton (p. 9) addresses problems in privacy-preserving data mining by developing technology that share some information to calculate correct results, where the shared information can be shown not to disclose private data. Professor S.V.N. Vishwanathan works on kernel methods and interactions between machine learning and optimization. Professor Yuan (Alan) Qi’s (p. 5) research interests span several areas in machine learning and computational biology. His team develops new methods to detect context sensitive modules for complex biological and social networks, combines statistical learning with ab-inito methods for computational materials design, and design Bayesian matrix factorization methods for collaborative filtering (with applications to online recommendation systems) and text clustering. Faculty in this area have obtained significant funding support for their research activities. They have also received external recognition such as the IEEE “AI’s 10 to watch” for Prof. Neville, an NSF career award for Prof. Si, and Microsoft Breakthrough research award (one out of ten nationally) for Prof. Qi.

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e R n o

Publications T. LaFond and J. Neville, “Randomization tests for distinguishing social influence and homophily effects”, Proceedings of the International World Wide Web Conference (WWW), 2010.

Jennifer Neville

Yuan (Alan) Qi

J. Neville, B. Gallagher, and T. Eliassi-Rad, Eliassi-Ra “Evaluating Statistical Tests for Within-Network Classififiers off Relational Data”, ” Proceedings of the 9th IEEE International Conference on Data Mining, 2009. J. Neville and D. Jensen, “A Bias/Variance Decomposition for Models Using Collective Inference”, Machine Learning, 2008. Y. Qi and T.S. Jaakkola, “Parameter Expanded Variational Bayesian Methods”, Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, 19, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2007. Y. Qi, A. Rolfe, K. D. MacIsaac, G. K. Gerber, D. Pokholok, J. Zeitlinger, T. Danford, R. D. Dowell, E. Fraenkel, T. S. Jaakkola, R. A. Young, D. K. Gifford, “High-resolution Computational Models of Genome Binding Events”, Nature Biotechnology, vol. 24, 963-970, August, 2006.

Luo Si

Y. Qi, M. Szummer, and T. P. Minka, “Diagram Structure Recognition by Bayesian Conditional Random Fields”, Proceedings of International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2005. Luo Si and Jamie Callan, “Modeling Search Engine Effectiveness for Federated Search”, Proceedings of the Twenty Seventh Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval, 2005, ACM.

S.V.N. Vishwanathan

Rong Jin, Luo Si, ChengXiang Zhai, “A Study of Mixture Models for Collaborative Filtering”, Journal of Information Retrieval, 2006. Luo Si and Jamie Callan, “A Semi-Supervised Learning Method to Merge Search Engine Results”, ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 24(4), 2003 ACM. Jin Yu, S. V. N. Vishwanathan, Simon Guenter, and Nicol N. Schraudolph, “A Quasi-Newton Approach to Nonsmooth Convex Optimization”, Journal of Machine Learning Research, 11:12011242, April 2010. Choon Hui Teo, S. V. N. Vishwanathan, Alex J. Smola, and Quoc V. Le, “Bundle Methods for Regularized Risk Minimization”, Journal of Machine Learning Research, 11:311-365, January 2010. S. V. N. Vishwanathan, Nicol N. Schraudolph, and Alexander J. Smola, “Step Size Adaptation in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space”, Journal of Machine Learning Research, June 2006.

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p O d n a g n i k r o w Net

m e t s Sy

Faculty in the area of networking and operating systems are tackling fundamental problems at different layers of the network protocol stack, ranging from the medium access control layer all the way up to the application layer. The group uses theoretical models, simulation, emulation, and extensive testbed experimentation to develop and evaluate their proposed solutions. The group has leveraged techniques from game theory, information theory, complexity theory, optimization, and cryptography in their solutions. The group has implemented their methods on a variety of platforms, ranging from large clusters, to network processors and resource-constrained wireless sensor motes. Projects that the faculty have undertaken include fault localization in enterprise networks; packet classification and scheduling in Internet routers; Internet measurement; secure and scalable media streaming over the Internet; secure network coding in wireless mesh networks; design of defenses against malware and denial of service attacks; scalable network simulation; and coverage, localization and data fusion in energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. A project led by Professor Douglas Comer investigates hybrid packet schedulers that achieve low delay and a high degree of fairness. Comer and researchers in his group are investigating the implementation of their algorithms on network processors to achieve performance sufficient for a 10 Gbps link. Another project, led by Professor Sonia Fahmy, considers scalable network security experiments. A primary reason for lack of deployment of network security mechanisms is that most mechanisms have not been validated under realistic conditions, or at sufficiently large scales. The project includes two complementary efforts to address both the fidelity and scale challenges in security experiments by designing: (1) high-fidelity yet scalable models for routers and other devices based on simple device measurements under a few well-crafted scenarios, and (2) techniques to simplify experimental scenarios before studying them using simulation, emulation, or testbed experiments. Professor Ramana Kompella conducts research on scalable measurement solutions for next generation networks. In particular, his recent work involved designing streaming algorithms for high-fidelity latency measurements within routers. Another ongoing project designs new flow measurement architectures that offer network operators with flexibility required to satisfy a wide-variety of network management tasks. Faculty involved in networking and operating systems at Purdue include Douglas Comer, Sonia Fahmy, Charles Killian (p. 11), Ramana Kompella, Cristina Nita-Rotaru (p. 15), Kihong Park, Dongyan Xu (p. 11), and David Yau. Publications D. Comer, Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 1: Principles, Protocols, and Architecture, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, Fifth edition, 2005. D. Comer, Essentials Of Computer Architecture, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2005. D. Comer, “Consequences Of IPv6 Addressing�, Journal of Internet Technology, vol 5:4 (2004), 305-309.

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Douglas Comer

J. Mirk Mirkovic, A. Hussain, S. Fahmy, P. Reiher, R. K. Thomas, “Accurately measuring denial of service in sim simulation and testbed experiments,” IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing (TDSC), volume 6, issue 2, pp. 81-95, Apr/June 2009. (TDSC Fahmy and M. Kwon, “Characterizing overlay multicast networks and their costs”, IEEE/ACM S. Fah Transactions on Networking, 15(2):373-386, April 2007. Transa

Sonia Fahmy

O. Younis and S. Fahmy, “HEED: A hybrid, energy-efficient, distributed clustering approach for adhoc sensor networks”, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 3(4):366-379, Oct-Dec 2004. Myungjin Lee, Nick Duffield, Ramana Rao Kompella, “Not all Microseconds are Equal: Enabling Per-Flow Latency Estimation Using Reference Latency Interpolation”, ACM SIGCOMM, New Delhi, India, 2010. Myungjin Lee, Nick Duffield, Ramana Rao Kompella, “Two Samples are Enough: Opportunistic Flow-Level Latency Measurement Using NetFlow”, IEEE Infocom 2010. Ramana Rao Kompella, Kirill Levchenko, Alex C. Snoeren, George Varghese, “Every Microsecond Counts: Tracking Fine-grain Latencies with Lossy Difference Aggregator”, ACM SIGCOMM, Barcelona, Spain, August, 2009.

Ramana Kompella

J. Choi, K. Park and C. Kim, “Analysis of cross-layer interaction in multi-rate 802.11 WLANs”, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 8(5):682-693, 2009. A. Ferrante, G. Pandurangan and K. Park, “On the hardness of optimization in power-law graphs”, Theoretical Computer Science, 393:220-230, 2008. H. Kim and K. Park, “Tackling the memory balancing problem for large-scale network simulation”, Proceedings of the IEEE MASCOTS ‘08, pp. 299-308, 2008.

Kihong Park

Chris Y. T. Ma, David K. Y. Yau, Nung Kwan Yip, and Nageswara S. V. Rao, “Privacy Vulnerabilities of Published Anonymous Mobility Traces”, In Proceedings ACM International Conference Mobile Computing and Networking (MobiCom), Chicago, IL, September 2010. Jren-chit Chin, Nageswara S. V. Rao, David K. Y. Yau, Mallikarjun Shankar, Yong Yang, Jennifer C. Hou, Srinivasagopalan Srivathsan, and S. Sitharama Iyengar, “Identification of Low-Level Point Radiation Sources Using a Sensor Network”, ACM Transactions Sensor Networks, 7(3), September 2010. Chris Y. T. Ma, David K. Y. Yau, Nung Kwan Yip, Nageswara S. V. Rao, and Jiming Chen, “Stochastic Steepest-Descent Optimization of Multiple-Objective Mobile Sensor Coverage”, In Proceedings IEEE International Conference Distributed Computing Systems (ICDCS), Genoa, Italy, June 2010.

David Yau

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m o C d n a s e g a u g n a L g n i m m a r g o r P The programming languages and compilers group engages in research spanning all aspects of software systems design, analysis, and implementation. Our faculty have active research projects in functional and object-oriented programming languages, both static and dynamic compilation techniques for scalable multicore systems, scripting languages, distributed programming abstractions and implementations, realtime and embedded systems, mobile and untrusted computing environments, and runtime systems with special focus on memory management and parallel computing environments. Some highlights of this year include Purdue becoming the first University with on-site access to an Azul appliance. The PL/C group acquired one of the world’s largest flat symmetric multiprocessor, an Azul Vega 3 7300 with 864 cores and 384 GB of coherent memory. The Vega is the first 64-bit RISC based general purpose processor optimized for virtual machinebased applications. The Vega comes with the Azul virtual machine software which supports memory heap sizes up to 199 GB and uses pauseless garbage collection to improve response time, and optimistic thread concurrency to improve application scalability. The Purdue PL/C group also was among a small group of universities awarded access to Intel’s Single-Chip Cloud Computer. This is an experimental 48-core single-chip `concept vehicle’ created by Intel Labs as a platform for many-core software research. The PL/C group is actively involved in the core scientific events that define the community, regularly serving on program committees of the most prestigious conferences in the field (POPL, PLDI, ECOOP, OOPSLA, ICFP, etc.). Prof. Vitek was named vice-president of AITO in 2010, the association that manages the prestigious ECOOP conference. In 2010, Vitek was the General Chair of ISMM, the Symposium on Memory Management and a program chair for the TOOLS conference and the JTRES workshop. Jagannathan, Hosking and Vitek organized the first Purdue-NSF Transactional Memory Workshop as well as the NSF Workshop on Dynamic Languages for Scientific Computing. In terms of education, the PL/C group organized the ECOOP summer school in Maribor Slovenia and the International Trends in Concurrency summer school in Bangalore, India. The PL/C group has strong industrial ties. This year, students and faculty jointly authored more than 10 papers with co-authors from Microsoft, IBM, Mozilla and NEC. Their students interned at Microsoft Research, IBM Research, NEC laboratories, Samsung, and Intel, and the group has received substantial funding from all these institutions. Faculty involved in programming languages and compilers at Purdue include Patrick Eugster, Antony Hosking, Suresh Jagannathan, Zhiyuan Li, Jan Vitek, and Xiangyu Zhang. Publications P. Eugster and K.R. Jayaram, “EventJava: An Extension of Java for Event Correlation”, 23rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2009), pages 570-594, July 2009. K. Hoffman, P. Eugster, and S. Jagannathan, “Semantics-aware Trace Analysis”, 2009 ACM Conference on Programming Languages Design and Implementation (PLDI 2009), pages 453-464, June 2009. Hao Yuan, Patrick Th. Eugster, “An Efficient Algorithm for Solving the Dyck-CFL Reachability Problem on Trees”, European Symposium on Programming (ESOP), 2009, pages 175-189. Phil McGachey, Antony L. Hosking, J. Eliot B. Moss, “Pervasive Load-Time Transformation for Transparently Distributed Java”, Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science, 253(5): 47-64, 2009.

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Patrick Eugster

Antony Hosking

Kalibera T, Pizlo F, Hos Hosking AL, Vitek J, “Scheduling hard real-time garbage collection”, IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium Sym (RTSS), Proceedings of the 2010 ACM SIGPLAN conference on Programming language design and implementation, 2010. Hellyer L, Jones R, Hosking Hos AL, “The Locality of Concurrent Write Barriers”, ACM SIGPLAN International Symposium on Memory Management (ISMM), Proceedings of the 2010 international symposium on Memory management, 2010.

Suresh Jagannathan

Muralikrishna Ramanathan, Ananth Grama, Suresh Jagannathan, “Static Specification Inference Using Predicate Mining”, ACM Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation, 2007. Lukasz Ziarek, Suresh Jagannathan, “Lightweight checkpointing for concurrent ML”, Journal of Functional Programming, 20(2): 137-173, 2010. Lukasz Ziarek, K. C. Sivaramakrishnan, Suresh Jagannathan, “Partial memorization of concurrency and communication”, International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP), 161-172, 2009. Lixia Liu, Zhiyuan Li, “Improving Parallelism and Locality with Asynchronous Algorithms”, Proceedings of 15th ACM SIGPLAN Symposium on Principles and Practice of Parallel Programming (PPoPP), January 9-14, 2010, Bangalore, India.

Zhiyuan Li

Lixia Liu, Zhiyuan Li, Ahmed H. Sameh, “Analyzing memory access intensity in parallel programs on multicore”, Proceedings of 22nd ACM International Conference on Supercomputing (ICS), Pages 359367, Island of Kos, Aegean Sea, Greece, June 7-12, 2008. Douglas Herbert, Vinaitheerthan Sundaram, Yung-Hsiang Lu, Saurabh Bagchi, Zhiyuan Li, “Adaptive correctness monitoring for wireless sensor networks using hierarchical distributed run-time invariant checking”, ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems (TAAS), 2(2), pp. 8:1--8:23, 2007. Mandana Vaziri, Frank Tip, Julian Dolby, Christian Hammer, Jan Vitek, “A Type System for DataCentric Synchronization”, European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP), 304328, 2010.

Jan Vitek

Wrigstad, Zappa Nardelli, Lebresne, Ostlund, Vitek, “Integrating Typed and Untyped Code in a Scripting Language”, Proceedings of the Conference on Principles of Programming Languages (POPL), 2010. Pizlo, Blanton, Hosking, Maj, Vitek, Ziarek, “Schism: Fragmentation-Tolerant Real-Time Garbage Collection”, Proceedings of the Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation (PLDI), 2010. B. Xin, N. Sumner, and X. Zhang, “Efficient Program Execution Indexing”, Proceedings of the Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation (PLDI), 2008.

Xiangyu Zhang

X. Zhang, A. Navabi, and S. Jagannathan, “Alchemist: A Transparent Dependence Distance Profling Infrastructure”, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Code Generation and Optimization (CGO), 2009. D. Weeratunge, X. Zhang and S. Jagannathan, “Analyzing Multicore Dumps to Facilitate Concurrency Bug Reproduction”, the 15th International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS), 2010.

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i g n E e r a w t f So

The software engineering group conducts research on applying advanced program analyses towards problems related to fault isolation, various kinds of bug detection including those related to race conditions in concurrent programs, and specification inference for large-scale software systems. Aspect-oriented abstractions and new program slicing and mining techniques are some of the mechanisms that are being explored to address these issues. Faculty involved in software engineering at Purdue include H. E. Dunsmore, Aditya Mathur, Vernon Rego (p. 11), Eugene H. Spafford (p. 15), Xiangyu Zhang (p. 21). Publications Ammar Masood, Rafae Bhatti, Arif Ghafoor, and Aditya Mathur, “Scalable and Effective Test Generation for Role-Based Access Control Systems”, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Volume 35, Issue 5, September-October 2009, pp. 654-668. Ammar Masood, Arif Ghafoor, and Aditya Mathur, “Conformance Testing of Temporal Role-Based Access Control Systems”, IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, 21 Jul. 2008, IEEE Computer Society Digital Library, IEEE Computer Society, 2010. Scott Miller, Raymond DeCarlo, Aditya P. Mathur, “Quantitative Modeling for incremental software process control”, Proceedings of the 32nd Annual IEEE International Computer Software and Applications Conference, pp. 937-942, Turku, Finland, July 28-August 1, 2008. Vinaitheerthan Sundaram, Patrick Th. Eugster, Xiangyu Zhang, “Efficient diagnostic tracing for wireless sensor networks”, ACM SenSys, 169-182, 2010. Kevin J. Hoffman, Patrick Eugster, Suresh Jagannathan, “Semantics-aware trace analysis”, Programming Language Design and Implementation (PLDI), 453-464, 2009. Kevin J. Hoffman, Patrick Th. Eugster, “Cooperative aspect-oriented programming”, Science of Computer Programming, 74(5-6): 333-354, 2009. Dasarath Weeratunge, Xiangyu Zhang, William N. Sumner, and Suresh Jagannathan, “Analyzing Concurrency Bugs using Dual Slicing”, International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA), 2010

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H. E. (Buster) Dunsmore

Dasarath Weeratunge, Xiangyu Zhang, Suresh Jagannathan, “Analyzing multicore dumps to facilitate concurrency bug reproduction”, Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS), 155-166, 2010.

Aditya Mathur

Gregor Richards, Sylvain Lebresne, Brian Burg, Jan Vitek, “An analysis of the dynamic behavior of JavaScript programs”, Programming Language Design and Implementation (PLDI), 1-12, 2010. Bard Bloom, John Field, Nathaniel Nystrom, Johan Ostlund, Gregor Richards, Rok Strnisa, Jan Vitek, Tobias Wrigstad, “Thorn: robust, concurrent, extensible scripting on the JVM”, Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages & Applications (OOPSLA), 117-136, 2009. Tobias Wrigstad, Filip Pizlo, Fadi Meawad, Lei Zhao, Jan Vitek, “Loci: Simple Thread-Locality for Java”, European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP), 445-469, 2009. W. N. Sumner, Y. Zheng, D. Weeratunge and X. Zhang, “Precise Calling Context Encoding”, International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), 2010. T. Bao, Y. Zheng, Z. Lin, X. Zhang and D. Xu, “Strict Control Dependence and Its Effect on Dynamic Information Flow Analyses”, International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA), 2010. William N. Sumner, Xiangyu Zhang, “Memory indexing: canonicalizing addresses across executions”, SIGSOFT Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE), 217-226, 2010.

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d n a g n i t u p m o C f o y r o e h T

th i r o Alg

Research interests of the members of the theory of computing and algorithms group range over many areas of algorithms. These areas include analysis of algorithms, parallel computation, computational geometry, digital watermarking, data structures, graph algorithms, network algorithms, distributed computation, computational biology, information theory, analytic combinatorics, random structures, external memory algorithms, approximation algorithms, data mining, bioinformatics, and text indexing. Much of the research reflects interaction with other areas of the field, such as information security, databases, and geographic information systems. The ongoing research at Purdue includes theoretical advances, theoretical improvements on applied problems, and algorithms with immediate potential for application. The group has made notable contributions on topics such as updating minimum spanning trees, shortest paths in planar graphs, computing approximate minimum spanning trees distributively, low-diameter P2P networks, parallel computational geometry, cascading divide and conquer, query indexing and velocity constrained indexing, external memory graph algorithms, compressed suffix arrays, and the analysis of Lempel-Ziv codes. Faculty involved in theory of computing and algorithms at Purdue include Mikhail Atallah (p. 15), Saugata Basu, Greg Frederickson, Susanne Hambrusch, and Wojciech Szpankowski. Publications Saugata Basu, Thierry Zell, “Polynomial hierarchy, Betti Numbers and a real analogue of Toda’s Theorem”, Foundations of Computational Mathematics, 10:429:454, 2010, (preliminary version appeared in Proceedings of the Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science (FOCS), 2009). Saugata Basu, “Combinatorial Complexity in O-minimal Geometry”, Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society (3) 100 (2010) 405-428, (preliminary version appeared in the Proceedings of ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC), 2007). Saugata Basu, “Computing the Top Betti Numbers of Semi-algebraic Sets Defined by Quadratic Inequalities in Polynomial Time”, Foundations of Computational Mathematics,8:45-80 (2008), (preliminary version appeared in the Proceedings of Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC), 2005).

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s m th Ethan Blant Blanton, Sonia Fahmy, and Greg N. Frederickson, “On the utility of inference mechanisms”, Proceedings 29th IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems, pp. 256-263, Proceeding 2009. Greg N. Frederickson Fre and Roberto Solis-Oba, “Efficient algorithms for robustness in resource allocation and scheduling problems”, Theoretical Computer Science, Volume 352, pp. 250-265, 2006.

Saugata Basu

Greg Frederickson

Greg N. Frederickson and Barry Wittman, “Approximation algorithms for the traveling repairman and speeding deliveryman problems”, Proceedings, APPROX and RANDOM 2007, LNCS 4627, pp. 119-133 , 2007. Mohamed Mokbel, Xiaopeng Xiong, Walid Aref, Susanne Hambrusch, Sunil Prabhakar, and Moustafa Hammad, “PLACE: A Query Processor for Handling Real-time Spatio-temporal Data Streams”, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Very Large Data Bases (VLDB), pp. 1377-1380, 2004.

Susanne Hambrusch

S.E. Hambrusch, C.-M. Liu, and S. Prabhakar, “Broadcasting and Querying Multi-dimensional Index Trees in a Multi-channel environment”, Information Systems, Vol. 31, pp 870-886, 2006. Sarvjeet Singh, Chris Mayfield, Sunil Prabhakar, Rahul Shah, Susanne E. Hambrusch, “Indexing Uncertain Categorical Data”, 23rd IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE 2007), 2007. G. Park, H-K. Hwang, P. Nicodeme, and W. Szpankowski. “Profile of Tries”, SIAM J. Computing, 38, 1821-1880, 2009 M. Drmota, Y. Reznik, and W. Szpankowski. “Tunstall Code, Khodak Variations, and Random Walks”, IEEE Trans. Information Theory, 56, 2928 - 2937, 2010

Wojciech Szpankowski

P. Jacquet, and W. Szpankowski. “Noisy Constrained Capacity for BSC Channels”, IEEE Trans. Information Theory, 56, 5412- 5423, 2010.

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h c r a ese

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Aliaga, Daniel Xiaohui Carol Song(pi), Jacob R Carlson(co-pi), Rao Govindaraju(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Devdutta Niyogi(co-pi), Indrajeet Chaubey(sr), and Daniel Aliaga(sr). INTEROP: A Community-based Drought Information Network for Multidisciplinary Applications. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $750,000. Daniel Aliaga(pi), and Mikhail J. Atallah(co-pi). RI: Small: A Computational Framework for Marking Physical Objects against Counterfeiting and Tampering. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $499,883. Daniel Aliaga. Digital Inspection and Virtual Restoration of 3D Objects. Indiana University School of Medicine. 2008-2009, $50,000. Aref, Walid Mourad Ouzzani(pi), and Walid Aref(co-pi). III-COR-Small: Collaborative Research: Preference-And Context-Aware Query Processing for Location-Based Database Servers. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $192,866. Aref Ghafoor(pi), Walid Aref(co-pi), and Ahmed K. Elmagarmid(co-pi). TC: Medium: Security and Privacy Preserving Data Mining and Management for Distributed National Science Foundation. 2010-2013, $1,192,870. Barry Wanner(pi), Walid Aref(co-pi), Daisuke Kihara(co-pi), Michael Gribskov(co-pi), and Xiang Zhang(co-pi). Development of the www.ecoli-community.org Information Resource. National Institutes of Health. 2006-2009, $3,161,201. Atallah, Mikhail J. Mikhail J. Atallah. Techniques for Secure and Reliable Computational Outsourcing. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. 2009-2012, $377,000. Daniel Aliaga(pi), and Mikhail J. Atallah(co-pi). RI: Small: A Computational Framework for Marking Physical Objects against Counterfeiting and Tampering. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $499,883. Mikhail J. Atallah. TC: Small: Collabortive Research: Privacy-Constrained Searching. National Science Foundation. 20092012, $267,816. Mikhail J. Atallah(pi), and Juline Mills(co-pi). CT-ISG: Improving the Privacy and Security of Online Survey Data Collection, Storage, and Processing. National Science Foundation. 2006-2009, $300,000. Bertino, Elisa Elisa Bertino(pi), Saurabh Bagchi(co-pi), Khalid Moidu(co-pi), and Lorenzo Martino(co-pi). IPS: Security Services for Healthcare Applications. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $450,000. Elisa Bertino(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). A Framework for Managing the Assured Information Sharing Lifecycle. University of Maryland Baltimore County. 2008-2013, $1,500,000.

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Elisa Bertino(pi), and Lorenzo Martino(co-pi). Secure Semantic Information Grid for NCES and Border Security Applications. University of Texas at Dallas. 2008-2012, $400,000. Elisa Bertino. REU Supplement: IPS: Security Services for Healthcare Application. National Science Foundation. 20082011, $6,000. Elisa Bertino. Secure Sensor Semantic Web and Information Fusion Applications. University of Texas at Dallas. 20092013, $200,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Bharat Bhargava(co-pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Sonia Fahmy(co-pi), and Richard P Mislan(co-pi). NGIT Cybersecurity Research Consortium. Northrop Grumman. 2009-2010, $500,000. Elisa Bertino. Systematic Control and Management of Data Integrity, Quality and Provenance for Command and Control Applications. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. 2006-2009, $299,999. Elisa Bertino(pi), and Christopher Clifton(co-pi). I3P:Assessable Identity and Privacy Protection. Dartmouth College. 20072009, $300,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). A Systematic Defensive Framework for Combating Botnets. Office of Naval Research. 2009-2010, $634,531. Bhargava, Bharat Eugene Spafford(pi), Bharat Bhargava(co-pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Sonia Fahmy(co-pi), and Richard P Mislan(co-pi). NGIT Cybersecurity Research Consortium. Northrop Grumman. 2009-2010, $500,000. Bharat Bhargava(pi), and Leszek Lilien(co-pi). Vulnerability Analysis and Threat Assessment Avoidance. National Science Foundation. 2003-2009, $212,472. Bharat Bhargava. Collaborative Attacks in Wireless Networks. Homeland Security. 2007-2009, $150,000. Bharat Bhargava. REU: Vulnerability Analysis and Threat Assessment/Avoidance. National Science Foundation. 20082009, $5,000. Clifton, Christopher Elisa Bertino(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). A Framework for Managing the Assured Information Sharing Lifecycle. University of Maryland Baltimore County. 2008-2013, $1,500,000. David Ebert(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), William Cleveland(co-pi), Timothy Collins(co-pi), Edward Delp(co-pi), Ahmed K. Elmagarmid(co-pi), and Mourad Ouzzani(co-pi). Purdue University Regional Visualization and Analytics Center. Battelle Memorial Institute. 2006-2009, $517,000. Elisa Bertino(pi), and Christopher Clifton(co-pi). I3P:Assessable Identity and Privacy Protection. Dartmouth College. 20072009, $300,000. Dunsmore, Buster Alka Harriger(pi), Buster Dunsmore(co-pi), and Kyle Lutes(co-pi). Surprising Possibilities Imagined & Realized Through Information Technology (SPIRIT) Comprehesive Project for Students and Teachers. National Science Foundation. 20082010, $1,195,829.

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Elmagarmid, Ahmed K. Mourad Ouzzani(pi), and Ahmed K. Elmagarmid(co-pi). III: Small:Commugrate-A Community-based Data Integration System. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $498,373. Aref Ghafoor(pi), Walid Aref(co-pi), and Ahmed K. Elmagarmid(co-pi). TC: Medium: Security and Privacy Preserving Data Mining and Management for Distributed National Science Foundation. 2010-2013, $1,192,870. David Ebert(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), William Cleveland(co-pi), Timothy Collins(co-pi), Edward Delp(co-pi), Ahmed K. Elmagarmid(co-pi), and Mourad Ouzzani(co-pi). Purdue University Regional Visualization and Analytics Center. Battelle Memorial Institute. 2006-2009, $517,000. Eugster, Patrick Patrick Eugster. CAREER: Pervasive Programming with Event Correlation. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $400,000. Patrick Eugster(pi), Xiangyu Zhang(co-pi). CSR-DMSS, SM: A Holistic Approach to Reliable Pervasive Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $400,000. Patrick Eugster. REU: CAREER: Pervasive Programming with Event Correlation. National Science Foundation. 20092010, $8,000. Patrick Eugster. CSR-PSCE, SM: Memory Management Innovations for Next-Generation SMP. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $300,000. Patrick Eugster. REU: CSR-PSCE, SM: Memory Management Innovations for Next-Generation SMP. National Science Foundation. 2009-2010, $8,000. Patrick Eugster. PRF: Xr Grant. Purdue Research Foundation. 2010-2011, $16,795. Sonia Fahmy Sonia Fahmy. Scalable, Extensible, & Safe Monitoring of GENI Clusters. BBN Technologies. 2009-2012, $520,000. Sonia Fahmy. CAREER: Exploiting Tomography in Network-Aware Protocols: Theory and Practice. National Science Foundation. 2003-2009, $437,085. Sonia Fahmy(pi), and Ness Shroff(co-pi). CT-T Collaborative Research: Protecting TCP Congestion Control: Tools for Design, Analysis, & Emulation. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $325,000. Sonia Fahmy. NeTS: Medium: Collaborative Research: A Comprehensive Approach for Data Quality and Provenance in Sensor Networks. National Science Foundation. 2010-2013, $300,000. Sonia Fahmy. NGIT Cybersecurity Research Consortium. Northrop Grumman. 2009-2011, $742,170.

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Sonia Fahmy. CT-ISG: Collaborative Research: Router Models & Downscaling Tools for Scalable Security Experiments. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $249,999. Sonia Fahmy. Hewlett Packard.2006-2035, $57,000. Sonia Fahmy. Multi-Sponsored Schlumberger Foundation. 2000-2035, $60,000. Gebremedhin, Assefaw Alex Pothen(pi), and Assefaw Gebremedhin(co-pi). Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations Institute. Department of Energy. 2008-2012, $1,455,629. Alex Pothen(pi), and Assefaw Gebremedhin(co-pi). Empowering Computational Science and Engineering via Automatic Differentiation. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $200,000. Grama, Ananth Y. Ananth Y. Grama. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework for Stress Corosion Cracking- Collaborative with USC. Department of Energy. 2006-2011, $399,999. Ananth Y. Grama. Biochemical Pathways Workbench. University of Califormia- San Diego. 2007-2010, $298,250. Jayathi Murthy(pi), Muhammad A Alam(co-pi), Anil Kumar Bajaj(co-pi), Weinong W Chen(co-pi), Ananth Y. Grama(copi), Dimitrios Peroulis(co-pi), and Alejandro H Strachan(co-pi). PRISM: Center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability of Microsystems. Department of Energy. 2008-2013, $17,000,000. Wojciech Szpankowski(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Daisuke Kihara(co-pi). Information Transfer in Biological Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2012, $480,000. Zhiyuan Li(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). CPA-CPL: Compiler and Software Solutions for the Memory Bottleneck on Multicore. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $300,000. Ananth Y. Grama. Collaborative Research: EMT/BSSE: Petascale Simulations of DNA Dynamics and Self-Assembly. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $150,000. Ananth Y. Grama. Collaborative Research: CDI- Type II: Hierarchical Modularity in Evolution and Function. National Science Foundation. 2008-2012, $480,000. Suresh Jagannathan(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). Eager Maps and Lazy Folds for Graph-Structured Applications. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $450,000. Ananth Y. Grama. ITR/ASE/SIM Collaborative Research: DeNovo Hierarchical Simulations of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Materials. National Science Foundation. 2004-2010, $361,140. Zhiyuan Li(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Ahmed Sameh(co-pi). AAD: Software Tools for Asynchronous-Algorithm Development. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $650,000. Ahmed Sameh(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). Collaborative Research: Developing a Robust Parallel Hybrid System Solver. National Science Foundation. 2006-2010, $308,902.

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Hambrusch, Susanne E. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), Mark P Haugan(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Tony Hosking(co-pi), and Sabre CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $446,000. Susanne E. Hambrusch. REU Supplement- CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $13,000. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), and Mark P Haugan(co-pi). RET:CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $25,000. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), James Lehman(co-pi), Aman Yadav(co-pi), John T. Korb(copi), and A. G. Rud(co-pi). Computer Science Pathways for Educators. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $799,958. Hoffmann, Christoph M. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), Mark P Haugan(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Tony Hosking(co-pi), and Sabre CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $446,000. Susanne E. Hambrusch. REU Supplement- CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $13,000. Xiaohui Carol Song(pi), Jacob R Carlson(co-pi), Rao Govindaraju(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Devdutta Niyogi(co-pi), Indrajeet Chaubey(sr), and Daniel Aliaga(sr). INTEROP: A Community-based Drought Information Network for Multidisciplinary Applications. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $750,000. William McCartney(pi), John Campbell(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Zhaohui Hong(co-pi), Ralph Robers(co- pi), and Douglas Sharp(co-pi). Northwest Indiana Computational Grid: A joint project at the University of Notre Dame, Purdue University-West Lafayette and Purdue University-Calumet. Department of Energy. 2008-2011, $4,910,057. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), and Mark P Haugan(co-pi). RET:CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $25,000. Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), James Lehman(co-pi), Aman Yadav(co-pi), John T. Korb(copi), and A. G. Rud(co-pi). Computer Science Pathways for Educators. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $799,958. Christoph M. Hoffmann. Northwest Indiana Computational Grid: A joint project at the University of Notre Dame, Purdue University-West Lafayette and Purdue University-Calumet. Department of Energy. 2006-2009, $2,970,001. Voicu Popescu(pi), and Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi). Cutting Edge Visualization for PLM. Purdue University. 2009-2010, $30,000.

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Hosking, Tony Susanne E. Hambrusch(pi), Mark P Haugan(co-pi), Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi), Tony Hosking(co-pi), and Sabre CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $446,000. Tony Hosking. Scalable Concurrent Compacting Garbage Collection for Commodity Multi-Core Processors. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $275,000. Jan Vitek(pi), and Tony Hosking(co-pi). CPA-CPL Certified Garbage Collection for Highly Responsive Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $390,000. Tony Hosking. ST-CRTS: Collaborative: Delivering on Atomic Actions: Unlocking Concurrency for Ordinary Programmers. National Science Foundation. 2006-2010, $279,999. Tony Hosking. Collaborative Research: REU: ST-CRTS: Delivering on Atomic Actions: Unlocking Concurrency for Ordinary Programmers. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $6,000. Tony Hosking. REU Supplement: ST-CRTS: Collaborative: Delivering on Atomic Actions: Unlocking Concurrency for Ordinary Programmer. National Science Foundation. 2008-2010, $6,000. Jagannathan, Suresh Suresh Jagannathan. Kala: An Efficient and Scalable Time Travel Infrastructure for Concurrent Systems. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $325,000. Jan Vitek(pi), and Suresh Jagannathan(co-pi). CPA-SEL-T: Collaborative Research: Unified Open Source Transactional Infrastructure. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $500,000. Suresh Jagannathan(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). Eager Maps and Lazy Folds for Graph-Structured Applications. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $450,000. Suresh Jagannathan(pi), and Jan Vitek(co-pi). CRI II-New: A Computational Infrastructure For Scalable Transactional Memory Abstraction in Managed Languages. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $556,300. Kihara, Daisuke Daisuke Kihara(pi), and Karthik Ramani(co-pi). Surface Shape Based Screening of Large Protein Databases PHS-NIH NAT INST of General Medical Science. National Institutes of Health. 2005-2010, $1,504,202. Daisuke Kihara. Template-Based Protein Structure Prediction Beyond Sequence Homology. National Science Foundation. 2008-2012, $716,001. Wojciech Szpankowski(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Daisuke Kihara(co-pi). Information Transfer in Biological Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2012, $480,000. Daisuke Kihara. Protein 3D Structure-based rational drug discovery. Purdue Research Foundation. 2009-2010, $16,750. Daisuke Kihara. III: Small: Quality Assessment of Computational Protein Models. National Science Foundation. 20092011, $327,606. Barry Wanner(pi), Michael Gribskov(co-pi), and Daisuke Kihara(co-pi). Comprehensive Mapping and Annotation of the E. coli Transcriptiome. National Institutes of Health. 2009-2011, $1,000,000.

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Barry Wanner(pi), Walid Aref(co-pi), Daisuke Kihara(co-pi), Michael Gribskov(co-pi), and Xiang Zhang(co-pi). Development of the www.ecoli-community.org Information Resource. National Institutes of Health. 2006-2009, $3,161,201. Daisuke Kihara. Bayesian Models and Monte Carlo Strategies in Identifying Protein or DNA Sequence Motifs. National Science Foundation. 2006-2009, $160,246. Daisuke Kihara. Computational Proteomics Approaches for Rational Drug Design. Purdue University. 2008-2009, $16,375. Kompella, Ramana Ramana Kompella. NECO: Architectural Support for Fault Management. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $225,000. Ramana Kompella. REU: NECO: Architectural Support for Fault Management. National Science Foundation. 2009-2010, $12,000. Li, Ninghui Ninghui Li. CAREER: Access Control Policy Verification Through Security Analysis and Insider Threat Assessment. National Science Foundation. 2005-2010, $400,000. Elisa Bertino(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). A Framework for Managing the Assured Information Sharing Lifecycle. University of Maryland Baltimore County. 2008-2013, $1,500,000. Ninghui Li. TC: Medium: Collaborative Research: Techniques to Retrofit Legacy Code. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $300,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). A Systematic Defensive Framework for Combating Botnets. Office of Naval Research. 2009-2010, $634,531. Li, Zhiyuan Zhiyuan Li(pi), Saurabh Bagchi(co-pi), and Yung-Hsiang Lu(co-pi). CT-ISG:Compiler-Enabled Adaptive Security Monitoring on Networked Embedded Systems. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $400,000. Zhiyuan Li. Parametric Compiler Optimization for Multi-Core Architectures. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $275,000. Zhiyuan Li(pi), Lila C Albin(co-pi), Saurabh Bagchi(co-pi), and Yung-Hsiang Lu(co-pi). CRI Planning- A Testbed for Compiler-Supported Scalable Error Monitoring and Diagnosis for Reliable and Secure Sensor Networks. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $48,930. Zhiyuan Li(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). CPA-CPL: Compiler and Software Solutions for the Memory Bottleneck on Multicore. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $300,000. Zhiyuan Li. CSR: Small: New Slicing Techniques for Program Parallelization. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $429,089.

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Greg Blaisdell(pi), Zhiyuan Li(co-pi), and Anastasios Lyrintzis(co-pi). Realistic Simulation of Jet Engine Noise Using Petaflop Computing. National Science Foundation. 2009-2014, $1,291,668. Zhiyuan Li(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Ahmed Sameh(co-pi). AAD: Software Tools for Asynchronous-Algorithm Development. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $650,000. Zhiyuan Li(pi), Saurabh Bagchi(co-pi), and Yung-Hsiang Lu(co-pi). CSR/EHS: Resource-Efficient Monitoring, Diagnosis, and Programming Support for Reliable Networked Embedded Systems. National Science Foundation. 2005-2010, $480,000. Mathur, Aditya P. Aditya P. Mathur. Computational Models to Study Auditory Processing & Learning Disorders in Children. National Science Foundation. 2008-2009, $103,000. Aditya P. Mathur(pi), and Luo Si(co-pi). Development, Deployment & Maintenance of the Indiana Database for University Research Expertise. Indiana Economic Development Corporation. 2008-2009, $105,634. Neville, Jennifer Jennifer Neville. Fusion and Analysis of Multi-Source Relational Data. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. 2008-2010, $499,877. William Cleveland(pi), Jennifer Neville(co-pi), and Bowei Xi(co-pi). Stochastic Control of Multi-Scale Networks: Modeling, Analysis, and Algorithms. Army Research Office. 2008-2013, $980,999. Jennifer Neville(pi), Stacey Connaughton(co-pi), and James Tyler(co-pi). Machine Learning Techniques to Model the Impact of Relational Communication on Distributed Team Effectiveness. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $409,881. Vishwanathan Swaminathan(pi), Sergey Kirshner(co-pi), and Jennifer Neville(co-pi). RI: Small: Algorithms for Sampling Similar Graphs Using Subgraph Signatures. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $494,538. Jennifer Neville. Learning Compositional Simulation Models. Dept of the Air Force - Air Force Research Laboratory. 20072011, $396,467. Nita-Rotaru, Cristina Cristina Nita-Rotaru. CAREER: Scalable, Robust and Secure Group-Oriented Services for Wireless Mesh Networks. National Science Foundation. 2006-2011, $400,000. Cristina Nita-Rotaru. REU supplement- Career. National Science Foundation. 2006-2009, $6,000. Cristina Nita-Rotaru(pi), and Sanjay G Rao(co-pi). CT-ISG: Towards Trustworthy Peer-to-Peer Overlay Networks. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $410,000. Cristina Nita-Rotaru. NeTS:Medium:Collaborative Research: Secure Networking Using Network Coding. National Science Foundation. 2009-2013, $250,000. Cristina Nita-Rotaru. TC:Small:Collaborative Research: Mathematics of Infection Diffusion in Wirelenss Networks. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $131,500. Cristina Nita-Rotaru. Double Take Network Security. Ball State University. 2009, $30,412.

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Park, Kihong Kihong Park. NeTS: Small: Toward High-performance WLANs: Bridging the Physical Layer Divide. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $335,448. Kihong Park. A Study for a Curriculum of Department of Information Security at Universities in Korea. Korea Institute of Information Security and Cryptology. 2010, $16,000. Popescu, Voicu Voicu Popescu(pi), and Christoph M. Hoffmann(co-pi). Cutting Edge Visualization for PLM. Purdue University. 2009-2010, $30,000. Pothen, Alex Alex Pothen(pi), and Assefaw Gebremedhin(co-pi). Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations Institute. Department of Energy. 2008-2012, $1,455,629. Alex Pothen(pi), and Assefaw Gebremedhin(co-pi). Empowering Computational Science and Engineering via Automatic Differentiation. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $200,000. Alex Pothen(co-pi) Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need. US Department of Education. 2009-2012, $653,280. Prabhakar, Sunil K. Sunil K. Prabhakar. Design and Development of a Data Management System for Uncertain Data. National Science Foundation. 2006-2011, $320,000. Sunil K. Prabhakar(pi), and Xiangyu Zhang(co-pi). III: Small: Towards Scalable and Comprehensive Uncertain Data Management. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $474,911. Bernie Eugel(pi), Rao Govindaraju(co-pi), Chad Jafvert(co-pi), Lan Zhao(co-pi), Sunil K. Prabhakar(co-pi), Matthew Huber(co-pi), Gilbert Rochon(co-pi), Xiaohui Carol Song(co-pi), David Ebert(co-pi), and Devdutta Niyogi(co-pi). Cyberinfrastructure for End-to-End Environmental Exploration. National Science Foundation. 2006-2009, $500,000. Sunil K. Prabhakar. REU Supplement - Design and Development of a Data Management System for Uncertain Data. National Science Foundation. 2009-2010, $16,000. Qi, Yuan Yuan Qi. RI:Small: Relational Learning and Inference for Network Models. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $358,543 Yuan Qi. CDI Type I: Collaborative Research: Integration of Relational Learning with ab-initio methods for prediction of material properties. National Science Foundation. 2010-2012, $324,600. Yuan Qi. Genome-wide Examination of Binding Sites for Transcription Factors Responsible for Prostate Cancer Prevention. The Showalter Trust. 2008-2010, $75,000.

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Yuan Qi. Integrating Imaging Phenotypes and Genotypes for Early Detection of AD. Indiana University School of Medicine. 2009-2010, $37,500. Yuan Qi. Integration of relational learning with abinitio methods for prediction of material propoerties. Purdue Research Foundation. 2009-2010, $16,750. Yuan Qi. Toward the Materials Genome: Accelerated Computational Materials Design for Energy Applications. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2009-2014, $782,526. Rego, Vernon Vernon Rego. CT-ISG: Dynamic Covert Channels: Generation and Detection of Hidden Messages. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $499,875. Sacks, Elisha P. Elisha P. Sacks. Robust computational geometry for design, manufacturing, and robotics. Purdue University. 2008-2009, $30,000. Elisha P. Sacks. AF: Medium: Collaborative Research: Approximate computational geometry via controlled linear perturbation. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $300,000. Sameh, Ahmed Jayathi Murthy(pi), Muhammad A Alam(co-pi), Anil Kumar Bajaj(co-pi), Weinong W Chen(co-pi), Ananth Y. Grama(copi), Dimitrios Peroulis(co-pi), and Alejandro H Strachan(co-pi). PRISM: Center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability of Microsystems. Department of Energy. 2008-2013, $17,000,000. Zhiyuan Li(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Ahmed Sameh(co-pi). AAD: Software Tools for Asynchronous-Algorithm Development. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $650,000. Ahmed Sameh(pi), and Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi). Collaborative Research: Developing a Robust Parallel Hybrid System Solver. National Science Foundation. 2006-2010, $308,902. Ahmed Sameh(pi), and Murat Manguoglu(co-pi). Towards an Adaptive Library for Solving Large Sparse Linear Systems. Intel Corporation. 2009-2010, $100,000. Si, Luo Luo Si. REU: CAREER: An Integrated and Utility-Centric Framework for Federated Text Search. National Science Foundation. 2008-2009, $12,000. Luo Si. CAREER: An Integrated and Utility Centric Framework for Federated Text Search. National Science Foundation. 2008-2013, $480,983. Yan Ping Xin(pi), and Luo Si(co-pi). R & D: Nurturing Multiplicative Reasoning in Students with Learning Disabilities in a Computerized Conceptual-Modeling Environment (NMRSD-CCME). National Science Foundation. 2008-2013, $2,969,894. Luo Si(pi), and Yan Ping Xin(co-pi). SGER III-CXT: Integrating Computer Science Techniques into Differentiated Instruction of Mathematical Word Problem Solving. National Science Foundation. 2007-2009, $100,000. Aditya P. Mathur(pi), and Luo Si(co-pi). Development, Deployment & Maintenance of the Indiana Database for University Research Expertise. Indiana Economic Development Corporation. 2008-2009, $105,634. Luo Si. Intelligent Information Extraction from Financial Documents. BarclaysGlobal Investors. 2009, $22,813.

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Skeel, Robert Robert Skeel(pi), and Carol Post(co-pi). Transition Pathways for Biomolecular Systems: Theory and Computation. National Institutes of Health. 2007-2011, $1,179,386. Robert Skeel. Collaborative Research: Laplacian-Centered Poisson Solvers and Multilevel Summation Algorithms. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $2,000. Robert Skeel. Collaborative Research: Scalable Algorithms for Generalized Poisson Equations with Point Charge Source Terms. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $193,809. Robert Skeel. IMA Thematic Year on Mathematics and Chemistry: Computational Methods. University of Minnesota. 2009, $30,000. Spafford, Eugene Eugene Spafford. SEED: Developing Instructional Laboratories for Computer Security Information. National Science Foundation. 2006-2010, $60,000. Eugene Spafford. Collaborative Research: Transparency and Legal Compliance in Software Systems. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $229,593. Elisa Bertino(pi), Christopher Clifton(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). A Framework for Managing the Assured Information Sharing Lifecycle. University of Maryland Baltimore County. 2008-2013, $1,500,000. Eugene Spafford. Completion of SFS Plan of Study. National Science Foundation. 2009-2011, $53,194. Eugene Spafford(pi), Bharat Bhargava(co-pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Sonia Fahmy(co-pi), and Richard P Mislan(co-pi). NGIT Cybersecurity Research Consortium. Northrop Grumman. 2009-2010, $500,000. Eugene Spafford. A Dual-Track Masters Degree Program for Infosec Specialists. National Science Foundation. 20012009, $3,320,314. Eugene Spafford. CT-ISG: Designing Next-Generation Reliable Internet Servers. National Science Foundation. 20052009, $473,787. Eugene Spafford. Cyber Security Collaboration and Information Sharing. The Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection (I3P) Research Fellowship. 2007-2009, $300,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Timothy Collins(co-pi), and Fariborz Farahmand(co-pi). Assessing Risk of Insider Threats to Information Systems. Dartmouth College. 2007-2009, $300,000. Dongyan Xu(pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). Process Coloring: An Information Flow-Preserving Approach to Malware Investigation. IARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory. 2007-2009, $416,631.

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Eugene Spafford(pi), Pascal Meunier(co-pi), and Keith Watson(co-pi). A High-Assurance, High Capacity Platform for Information Operations. Lockheed Martin. 2008-2010, $200,000. Dongyan Xu(pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). Process Coloring Collaboration for System Security. Southwest Research Institute. 2009-2010, $10,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). A Systematic Defensive Framework for Combating Botnets. Office of Naval Research. 2009-2010, $634,531. Eugene Spafford. Emerging Research in Responding to Cyber Attacks. Lockheed Martin. 2009, $100,000. Szpankowski, Wojciech Wojciech Szpankowski. Asymptotic Solutions To Some Functional Equations Arising in Computer Science. National Security Agency. 2008-2010, $68,358. Wojciech Szpankowski(pi), Ananth Y. Grama(co-pi), and Daisuke Kihara(co-pi). Information Transfer in Biological Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2012, $480,000. Wojciech Szpankowski. Collaborative Proposal: Information Theory of Data Structures. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $282,129. Wojciech Szpankowski. Crossroads of Information Theory and Computer Science: Analytic Algorithmics, Combinatorics, and Information Theory. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $243,862. Wojciech Szpankowski. Collaborative Research: Nonlinear Equations Arising in Information Theory & Computer Sciences. National Science Foundation. 2005-2009, $122,661. Vitek, Jan Jan Vitek(pi), and Tony Hosking(co-pi). CPA-CPL Certified Garbage Collection for Highly Responsive Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $390,000. Jan Vitek(pi), and Suresh Jagannathan(co-pi). CPA-SEL-T: Collaborative Research: Unified Open Source Transactional Infrastructure. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $500,000. Jan Vitek. SHF: Small: Collaborative Research: Verifying and Validating Safety Critical Java. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $250,000. Suresh Jagannathan(pi), and Jan Vitek(co-pi). CRI II-New: A Computational Infrastructure For Scalable Transactional Memory Abstraction in Managed Languages. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $556,300. Jan Vitek. REU; CPA-CPL Certified Garbage Collection For Highly Responsive Systems. National Science Foundation. 2010-2011, $16,000. Jan Vitek. REU; CPA-SEL-T: Collaborative Research: Unified Open Source Transactional. National Science Foundation. 2010-2011, $16,000. Jan Vitek. EHS: High-throughput Real-time Stream Processing in Java. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $210,000. Jan Vitek. A Computational Model for High-Assurance Dynamic Information Systems. Office of Naval Research. 2009, $200,000. Jan Vitek. REU; CSR-EHS: High throughout Real-TimeStream Processing in Java. National Science Foundation. 2010, $16,000.

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Vitek, Olga Olga Vitek. Taking quantitative LC-MS profiling of blood samples in cardiovascular disease to a clinically relevant scale a computational & statistical approach. Purdue University - Indiana Univeristy. 2007-2009, $25,000. Olga Vitek. A Hypthesis Testhing Approach to Identification and Assessment of Statistical Significance of Peptides and Proteins in Shotgun Proteomics. Purdue University - Indiana Univeristy. 2007-2009, $24,933. Olga Vitek. Interfacing Biological Knowledge and Statistical Analysis for Rapid Interpretation of Clinical Proteomics Experiements. Indiana University School of Medicine. 2008-2009, $25,000. Olga Vitek. Statistical Analysis of Serum Proteomics Profiles for Subjects with Osteosarcoma. Indiana University School of Medicine. 2008-2009, $10,000. Olga Vitek. CPATH CB: Computing Education in Science Context. National Science Foundation. 2007-2009, $459,000. Xu, Dongyan Dongyan Xu. CAREER: Towards Virtual Distributed Environments in a Shared Distributed Infrastructure. National Science Foundation. 2006-2012, $400,000. Dongyan Xu. CSR-EHS: Collaborative Research: H-Media: The Holistic-Multistream Environment for Distributed Immersive Applications. National Science Foundation. 2007-2012, $145,000. Dongyan Xu. CT: ISG: Collaborative Proposal: Enabling Detection of Elusive Malware by Going Out of the Box with Semanticaly Reconstructed View (OBSERV). National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $130,000. Michael McLennan(pi), Gerhard Klimeck(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). SDCI NMI Improvement: nanoHUB Middleware. National Science Foundation. 2007-2010, $1,350,000. Gerhard Klimeck(pi), Thomas Hacker(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). Accelerating Nano-Scale Transistor Innovation Through Petascale Simulation. National Science Foundation. 2007-2011, $850,000. Dongyan Xu. Collaborative Research: II-New: OpenVMI: A Software Instument for Virtual Machine Introspection. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $255,000. Dongyan Xu. Towards High Assurance Active Introspection. Air Force Research Laboratory. 2009-2010, $90,131. Dongyan Xu. Cybersecurity: On Client-Side honeyfarm. Microsoft Corporation. 2005, $5,000. Dongyan Xu. MICROSOFT: Virtualization-enabled Malware Defense. Microsoft Corporation. 2007, $5,000. Dongyan Xu(pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). Process Coloring: An Information Flow-Preserving Approach to Malware Investigation. IARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory. 2007-2009, $416,631.

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Dongyan Xu(pi), and Eugene Spafford(co-pi). Process Coloring Collaboration for System Security. Southwest Research Institute. 2009-2010, $10,000. Eugene Spafford(pi), Elisa Bertino(co-pi), Ninghui Li(co-pi), and Dongyan Xu(co-pi). A Systematic Defensive Framework for Combating Botnets. Office of Naval Research. 2009-2010, $634,531. Yau, David David Yau. Robust and Deeply Embedded Plume Detection, Identification, & Tracking Sensor-Cyber Networks. Purdue Research Foundation. 2007-2011, $16,375. David Yau. Robust Detection and Localization of Low-level Radiation Sources. Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 20102013, $426,000. David Yau. Collaborative Research: A Component-based Software Environment for Simulation, Emulation, and Synthesis of Network Protocols in Next Generation Networks. National Science Foundation. 2004-2009, $187,000. David Yau. System Support for Detection, Identification, and Tracking Tasks in Sensor-Cyber Networks. Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 2006-2009, $200,000. David Yau. Robust Multiple Radiation Source Localization. Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 2009-2010, $20,000. Zhang, Xiangyu Xiangyu Zhang. Collaborative Research: CRI: IAD An Advanced Infrastructure for Generation, Storage, and Analysis of Program Execution Traces. National Science Foundation. 2007-2009, $83,552. Patrick Eugster(pi), and Xiangyu Zhang(co-pi). CSR-DMSS, SM: A Holistic Approach to Reliable Pervasive Systems. National Science Foundation. 2008-2011, $400,000. Xiangyu Zhang. CAREER: Scalable Dynamic Program Reasoning. National Science Foundation. 2009-2014, $425,000. Sunil K. Prabhakar(pi), and Xiangyu Zhang(co-pi). III: Small: Towards Scalable and Comprehensive Uncertain Data Management. National Science Foundation. 2009-2012, $474,911. Xiangyu Zhang. CSR: Small: Automated Software Failure Causal Path Computation. National Science Foundation. 20092012, $493,298. Xiangyu Zhang. CSR-AES-RCS: Collaborative: Scalable and Efficient Dynamic Information Flow Tracking in Multithreaded Programs. National Science Foundation. 2007-2009, $100,000.

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Science of Information Classical information theory paved the way for the Internet, DVDs, and iPods. Now it will need to meet the new challenges posed by rapid advances in networking, biology, and quantum information processing. Researchers at Purdue are collaborating with institutions across the country to extend information theory into unprecedented territory. Purdue University has been awarded $25 million to create the first National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center in Indiana to take technology where we need it.

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The Science of Information Center aims to define principles underlying the next generation of information theory by integrating elements of space, time, structure, semantics, and context, validating these theories on diverse applications from economic modeling to analyses of biological systems.

Professor Wojciech Szpankowski is the

“The center brings together world-class scholars from top universities to collectively develop a comprehensive science related to how information is extracted, manipulated, and exchanged,” says Richard Buckius, Purdue’s vice president for research. “The team will attack these problems by rigorous theoretical studies driven by critical real-world problems in domains as diverse as biology, social networks, and computer communication networks. The outcomes promise to be transformative, just as development of reliable and affordable digital communication transformed 20th century life.”

project leader for Indiana’s first National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center.

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Wojciech Szpankowski, Purdue’s Saul Rosen Professor of Computer Science, has been appointed as project leader of the center. Along with fellow faculty members, he hopes to partner with industry representatives to develop long-term technological solutions and tools for analysis and modeling in life sciences, communications, finance, and consumer behavior.


“Classical information theory, with bits and bytes as the measure of information, revolutionized computing and communication,” he says. “We are reaching the limits of this foundation and need to extend it. A new theory of information that goes beyond bits and bytes will allow us to harness the knowledge available in the massive amounts of data we’ve collected but not yet been able to truly tap.” For example, information theory, established by Claude Shannon in 1948, finds the limits of compressing, reliably storing, and communicating data. While Shannon’s theory has led to efficient codes and electronic transmission of information, it needs to be extended to include space, time, structure, semantics, and context. “Information is different from data,” Szpankowski says. “A person is able to look at data and pull more information from it than what is presented on its face. We naturally take context into account and can tell instantly whether the word ‘bank’ refers to a river, a financial institution, or to count on something. We need to enable computers to evaluate information more like a person does.” A fellow investigator on the Science and Technology Center, Madhu Sudan of the Massachusetts Information of Technology says he is eager to continue the evolution of computing. “There is a prevailing commonplace belief that the science of computing is finished and that current-day computers can achieve all we would want to do,” he says. “Yet researchers at the forefront of the technology know that we have only explored the tip of the iceberg.” P.R. Kumar, a collaborator from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, says, “We envision a future consisting of wireless and wireline networks that may well be revolutionary by today’s standards. Instead of transporting just data, they may transport information.” Along with advancing the science of information, Szpankowski and his colleagues will establish scholarships and fellowships and create interdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate courses. Students will be able to access a cyberinfrastructure powered by HUBzero™ software, studying tutorials, publications, and simulations. They will also interact with top faculty from partner universities and leading private sector scientists. Of particular concern to researchers of information theory is creating a pathway for underrepresented students to enlighten the computing community with diverse ideas and methods. The Science and Technology Center will foster underrepresented students from Bryn Mawr College and Howard University to get involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) graduate programs at partner institutions. Through open houses, cross-institution visits, summer research experiences, seminars, and mentoring programs the Science and Technology Center will advance the knowledge of all the center’s resources to further the rise of their efforts.

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Cybersecurity Research Consortium: CERIAS partners with industry to address Nation’s cybersecurity concerns Purdue’s Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) has partnered with Northrop Grumman Corporation, Carnegie Mellon University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology to advance research and address the most pressing cyber threats in our nation. This consortium, now in the second year, continues to work to accelerate the transfer of technology from ideas to real-life application. “The Northrop Grumman Cybersecurity Research Consortium is a wonderful initiative for CERIAS,” said Eugene H. Spafford, Computer Science Professor and the Purdue center’s executive director. “For more than 15 years, Purdue has been the leading academic group in research and education in information security. Our mission has been to build collaborative relationships with industry, government and other academic entities to advance the state of cybersecurity through basic and applied research while serving as a resource to the global community.” Robert Brammer, chief technology officer for Northrop Grumman Information Systems, said Purdue was among the first institutions the corporation thought of when putting the consortium together. “Purdue’s CERIAS is the largest academic security center in the United States and has won many awards for research and educational excellence in cybersecurity,” Brammer said. “Purdue has produced about 25 percent of the PhD’s in cybersecurity in the past several years and has developed many successful security inventions.” A motivating factor in starting the consortium was to address some of the issues in President Obama’s Cyberspace Policy Review (May 2009) of the threats and the need to be in front of cybersecurity issues, Spafford said. CERIAS research was referenced four times in the President’s report. The Cyberspace Policy Review included a number of action items that built upon the National Security Council’s Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI). “CERIAS has long held the belief that too much of today’s information security research focuses on patching near-term problems at the expense of fixing long-term issues,” Spafford said. “The consortium enables four leading research institutions to focus on addressing the fundamental issues of information security, assurance and privacy.” The consortium launched in December 2009 and began addressing some of our leading cyber problems in the world by funding projects and providing graduate student fellowships while continuing to expand the portfolio of research to cover the many different aspects of cybersecurity. Members coordinated research projects, shared information and best practices, developed curricula, authored joint case studies and other publications, and provided a number of learning opportunities and applications for students and the defense community.

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Since the consortium launch, it has funded several CERIAS affiliated projects at Purdue. Computer Science Professor and Director of Research for CERIAS, Elisa Bertino has been funded for a second year. Her work focuses on embedding information into a digital signal and the origins of data streams for information attribution. Saurabh Bagchi, Electrical and Computer Engineering Associate Professor, is receiving funding for the 2010-11 academic year for his research examining Secure Configuration of Intrusion Detection Sensors for Enterprise Systems. Bharat Bhargava, Computer Science professor and CERIAS fellow, received one year of funding for his research into the detection and defense against attacks in cloudlike distributed systems. Computer Science Associate Professor, Sonia Fahmy is leading consortium funded research into decomposing Internet-scale models to accurately perform constrained experiments for a second year. Rick Mislan, Computer and Information Technology Assistant Professor, received one year of funding to lead research into fast forensics, improving the speed and fidelity of forensics in the field on cell phones, PDAs and similar devices. And Computer Science Associate Professor, Dongyan Xu, and Xiangyu Zhang, Computer Science Assistant Professor received funding for the 2010-11 academic year to lead research on the Binary-based Data Structure Reverse Engineering for Memory Forensics and Application Vulnerability Discovery. Each fall CERIAS requests that Purdue faculty submit research ideas that show promise of advancing the state of information security that will also help address the national growing cybersecurity concerns. CERIAS is the world’s largest multidisciplinary academic center addressing the issues of information security, assurance, privacy and cybercrime. The center involves more than 80 faculty and 100 graduate students from 17 academic departments across six colleges at Purdue. The center was spawned from the Computer Operations, Audit and Security Technology (COAST) lab that was started in 1991 within the Purdue Computer Science Department from research by Spafford and Samuel Wagstaff Jr., Computer Science Professor.

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The mission [of CERIAS] has been to build collaborative relationships with industry, government and other academic entities to advance the state of cybersecurity.

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- Professor Eugene Spafford

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Automated Software Debugging Debugging is an indispensable process for software dependability and productivity. It identifies the faults in software by diagnosing runtime failures. Ideally, software would not be prone to runtime failures, or programmers could identify faults statically before running the software. However, due to the limitations of the enabling techniques (e.g. formal verification, model checking, and static program analysis), and the fact that human error is ever-present, it is unlikely runtime failures will be prevented, and debugging will remain a key challenge. That is why half of the software development efforts are spent on testing and debugging. The common practice of debugging still follows a tedious process, and can sometimes become unmanageable for large software projects. Programmers will first observe the failure, set breakpoints, restart the execution, change values at breakpoints, and then inspect the result of the perturbation. This tiresome task has prompted an increase in the study of automated debugging, but at present such techniques still produce quite a task for the programmer. Automated debugging often produces a ranked list of statements that are fault candidates. The onus is on the programmer to understand the failure and correlate these fault candidates to the failure in order to decide which one is the real fault. Many of these techniques assume a large test suite, which may not be easily satisfied. These limitations diminish the application of these techniques, making automated debugging an open goal to fulfill. Xiangyu Zhang, Computer Science Assistant Professor, and his research group have focused on developing a debugging technique that automatically derives failure explanations which provide the inputs that cause the failures and the intended outputs. The debugging explanation is a minimal sequence of causally related, executed statements that starts from the root cause and leads to the observable faulty behavior. Such explanations capture both the faulty code and the behavior that encompasses how the faulty code interacts with the program to produce a faulty result. Zhang’s work can then greatly facilitate understanding of the fault, and also the correcting defects. The overarching design of the system involves automatically analyzing what is stored in memory at different times during the execution of a program. The contents of the memory are compared with an automatically generated execution that models what should be stored in memory at these specific times. The work-flow of the debugging system is presented in the following figure. The system Zhang and his colleagues use inputs the faulty program, the failure inducing input, and the expected output.

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This information then follows the reference execution composition to first patch the failing execution, i.e., the patched execution produces the expected output through a search algorithm. Then the failing and patched runs are both provided to the execution alignment component. This component is responsible for aligning the control flows and the memory states of the two executions. This is needed as the two executions may differ in their control flows as well as their memory

layouts so that comparison may be carried out at incomparable places if executions are not carefully aligned. The driver component takes the two aligned executions, traverses backwards, and conducts comparisons along the aligned points to isolate state differences. It retrieves two aligned points from the two respective executions at a time and passes them to the single step execution comparison component that compares the states. Not all state differences are relevant to the failure. Thus, the state differences are minimized and tested if they are causally related with the failure by the state difference minimization component. The minimal causally related state difference is reported as one step of the causal path. The process repeats until the whole causal path is computed. Evaluation of this technique achieves many design goals. The process generates concise and precise failure explanations, less than 20 source code lines. It scales to programs with complex control flow and heap memory structures such as the GCC compiler. It is highly automated, requiring only the faulty program, the input and the intended correct output. The technique has reasonable cost, most failure causal explanations can be computed within an hour. The process is also general and handles various kinds of runtime failures, ranging from simple memory errors to those originating from requirement level errors. Zhang’s research results have been published in prestigious venues such as the Programming Language Design Implementation Conference, Foundations of Software Engineering Symposium, International Conference on Software Engineering and the International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis. The work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Air Force Research Lab, and Northrop Grumman.

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Educators strive to give students as much individual attention as possible. But with so many students with vastly different needs, it is difficult for one teacher to give each student the personalized instruction they require. That is why Assistant Professor Luo Si and PhD students Suleyman Cetintas, Ahmet Bugdayci and Mariheida Cordova-Sanchez have worked to develop intelligent tutoring systems for teaching mathematics to students in elementary schools. The intelligent tutoring system provides students with unique instruction based on their interaction with the system as well as instant feedback on their progress. Si and his colleagues in Purdue’s Computer Science Department work with education experts Associate Professor Yan Ping Xin from Purdue and Professor Ron Tzur from of University of Colorado at Denver and their students to develop their intelligent tutoring system. This interdisciplinary project, supported by the National Science Foundation, focuses on developing and applying different formal machine learning, statistical learning, math education, and information retrieval techniques to make intelligent tutoring systems more effective and more efficient. Some challenges in this research project include: How to identify whether a student is focusing on the intelligent tutoring system, how to model a student’s knowledge level and success, how to acquire and analyze educational materials, and how to match educational materials to students according to their needs. To address challenges of intelligent tutoring, Si, Cetintas, Bugdayci and Cordova-Sanchez first developed an intelligent off-task detection module that automatically detects when a student turns his attention away from the tutoring system.

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Professor Luo Si heads the development of the intelligent tutoring system which provides unique instruction based on student interaction with the system as well as instant feedback on their progress.

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The module has a regularized learning framework that utilizes detailed information from a student’s interaction within the tutoring system such as his success level, the time he spent for the current task, and his mouse movement patterns. Second, they developed two novel performance-prediction techniques that track students’ success, and predict whether a student will be able to correctly answer a problem or not. These techniques only utilize the information from students’ interaction with the tutoring software, and are very easy to apply across different domains. By using the state-of-the-art technologies of temporal collaborative filtering and regularized learning frameworks, these techniques make it possible to provide individualized instruction for each student automatically. Third, Si and his students have developed several techniques to analyze educational contents to automatically detect their type, difficulty levels, and relevant or irrelevant information in the educational content. Furthermore, they propose a novel mixture model framework based on discriminative learning to automatically match the educational content to students according to their knowledge levels and interests. The intelligent tutoring system has been tested with students in three local elementary schools. The plan is to further develop the software for generating broader impact in real world applications.

(a)

(b)

Figure 1. A simple interactive teaching exercise in the Intelligent Math Tutor. In Figure (a), the tutoring software explains the exercise to students about the concept of “Equal Group”, and gives immediate feedback and explanation for students’ answers (as shown in Figure (b)).

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PhD Graduates December 2009 Hong Chen Analysis of Access Control Policies in Operating Systems Advisor: Ninghui Li Employer: unknown Jing Dong Secure and Robust Communication in Wireless Mesh Networks Advisor: Cristina Nita-Rotaru Employer: Knight Capital Group; Santa Clara, CA Hicham Elmongui Rank Aggregation Techniques for Context-Aware Database Management Systems Advisor: Walid G. Aref Employer: Amazon; Ashburn, VA Ziqing Mao Improving Real-World Access Control Systems by Indentifying the True Origins of a Request Advisor: Ninghui Li Employer: unknown Maxim Naumov Parallel Algorithms for Large Sparse Linear Systems Advisor: Ahmed H. Sameh Employer: unknown

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Yu Zhang Analysis of Port Scanning Attacks Advisor: Bharat Bhargava Employer: unknown May 2010 Yongwook Choi Structural Information in Strings and Graphs Advisor: Wojciech Szpankowski Employer: unknown Mohamed Eltabakh Database Server for Next-Generation Scientific Data Management Advisors: Walid G. Aref, and Ahmed K. Elmagarmid Employer: IBM; San Jose, CA Philip McGachey Transparent Distribution for Java Applications Advisor: Antony L. Hosking Employer: VMware; Boston, MA Qun Ni Privacy-aware Role Based Access Control Advisor: Elisa Bertino Employer: unknown Yi Xu Capturing Real-World Dynamic Objects Using Temporally-Coded Photography Advisor: Daniel Aliaga Employer: GE


Hao Yuan Security and Privacy Techniques for Outsourced and Distributed Databases Advisor: Mikhail J. Atallah Employer: City University of Hong Kong David Zage A Platform for Creating Efficient, Robust, and Resilient Peer-to-Peer Systems Advisor: Cristina Nita-Rotaru Employer: Sandia National Lab August 2010 Hasan Metin Aktulga Algorithmic and Numerical Techniques for Atomistic Modeling Advisor: Ananth Y. Grama Employer: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; Oakland, CA Jren-Chit Chin Efficient and Robust Solutions for Sensor Network Detection and Localization Advisor: David K. Y. Yau Employer: unknown Nwokedi Idika Characterizing and Aggregating Attach Graph-based Security Metrics Advisor: Bharat Bhargava Employer: unknown

Ian Molloy Automatic Inference of Access Control Policies and Migration to Role Based Access Control Advisor: Ninghui Li Employer: IBM; Hawthorne, NY Mummoorthy Murugesan Privacy through Deniable Search Advisor: Christopher W. Clifton Employer: Tera Data; Los Angeles, CA Prathima Rao EXAM: An Environment for XACML Policy Analysis and Management Advisor: Elisa Bertino Employer: unknown Paul Rosen Improved 3-D Scene Sampling by Camera Model Design Advisor: Christoph M. Hoffmann Employer: University of Utah, Scientific Computing Institute; Salt Lake City, UT Yasin Silva Similarity-aware Query Processing and Optimization Advisor: Walid G. Aref Employer: Arizona State University; Phoenix, AZ

Sael Lee Advisor: Daisuke Kihara Employer: Purdue University, Biological Sciences Tiancheng Li Privacy Preservation in Data Publishing and Sharing Advisor: Ninghui Li Employer: Google; Mountain View, CA

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Graduate Teaching Assistants Shehzad Afzal Nathan Robert Andrysco Pelin Angin Mehdi Azarmi Sahan Sajeewa Bamunavita Gamage Samer Samir Barakat Ethan Lee Blanton Ahmet Bugdayci Nguyen Duc Cao Suleyman Cetintas Yi-Liu Chao Jren-Chit Chin Meghana Vasant Chitale Youn Sun Cho Yong Wook Choi Wei-Chiu Chuang Jian Cui William John Culhane Chenyun Dai Abhinav Dangeti Amanda Grace Day Vasil Stefanov Denchev Mohamed Ahmed Yassin El Tabakh Hoda Mohamed Eldardiry Hicham Galal Elmongui Juan Manuel Esquivel Rodriguez Yi Fang Youhan Fang Mohamed Raouf Fouad Venkata Surya S. Gandikota Sriharsha Gangam Aditi Gupta Amit Gupta Dung Trung Hong

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Dunxu Hu Nwokedi Chimezie Idika Muhammad Immad Uddin Karthik Chandrashekar Iyer Rajul Jain Rohit Jain Julian James Stephen Chamikara Madhusanka Jayalath Sundararaman Jeyaraman Jayaram Kallapalayam Radha Karthik Shashank Kambatla Ardalan Kangarlou-Haghighi Mohammad Iqbaluddin Kazi Hitesh Khandelwal Michael Scott Kirkpatrick Sivaramakrishnan Krishnamoorthy Chandrasekaran Satish Kumar Eerpini Sagar Kumar Alvin Jon-Hang Law Dale Ting An Lee Kyu Hyung Lee Bin Li Christopher Scott Mayfield Fadi Raafat Rizk Edward Meawad Harrison Daniel Ford Metzger Scott David Miller Mohamed Yoosuf Mohamed Nabeel Julie Elizabeth Morris Karthik Swaminathan Nagaraj Syed Abbas Zilqurnain Naqvi Armand Navabi Ahmet Erhan Nergiz Venkatesan Padmanabhan Jayesh Pandey Shruti Pramod Pathak


Despoina Perouli Salman Pervez Filip Jerzy Pizlo Zachary Alan Plovanic Wahbeh Hanna Qardaji Yinian Qi Fang-Yu Rao Naresh Kumar Reddy Rapolu Jiayi Ren Gregor Richards Philip Carson Ritchey Paul Andrew Rosen Brent Gregory Roth Parantap Roy Jeffrey Cecil Seibert Santhosh Kumar Shanmugham Huanyu Shao Yasin Nilton Silva Jacqueline Lois Soenneker Srivatsan Sridharan Dinesh Sriram Dannie Michael Stanley William Nicholas Sumner Gnana Kiruba Surendra Kumar Ruby Tahboub Daniel Tang Jacques Daniel Thomas Siddharth Tiwary Serkan Uzunbaz Carlos Andres Vanegas John Ross Wallrabenstein Cheng Wang Dasarath Weeratunge Gregory Aaron Wilkin Matthew Allen Wolff Tyler Robert Riehle Wykoff Suli Xi Rongjing Xiang Di Xie Bin Xin Yu Hong Yeung Jin Yu

Hao Yuan Dan Zhang Lei Zhao Yunhui Zheng Yao Zhu Zhen Zhu Lukasz Ziarek Graduate Research Assistants Nesreen Kamel Ahmed Hasan Metin Aktulga S. M. Iftekharul Alam Eslam Ahmed Almorshdy Ahmed Moustafa Aly Balamurugan Anandan Nathan Robert Andrysco Pelin Angin Md. Ariful Azad Mehdi Azarmi Sahan Sajeewa Bamunavita Gamage Tao Bao Samer Samir Barakat Douglas Baumann Ethan Lee Blanton Ahmet Bugdayci Nabeel Farooq Butt Suleyman Cetintas Yi-Liu Chao Keith Godwin Chapman Haining Chen Hong Chen Jren-Chit Chin Meghana Vasant Chitale Youn Sun Cho Sunoh Choi Mariheida Cordova-Sanchez Eric Matthew Cox Jian Cui Chenyun Dai Ilke Demir Vasil Stefanov Denchev Zhui Deng

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Ziang Ding Jing Dong Amr Ebaid Mohamed Ahmed Yassin El Tabakh Hoda Mohamed Eldardiry Yi Fang Youhan Fang Mohamed Raouf Fouad Sriharsha Gangam Christopher Stanley Gates Robert Lawrence Gevers Zhongshu Gu Greg T. Hales Deaglan Halligan Deaglin O. Halligan Adnan Hassan Pei He Hwan Jo Heo Brandon Gregory Hill Kevin John Hoffman Dung Trung Hong Md. Endadul Hoque Min Huang Ahmed Mohamed Abd-Elhaffiez Hussein Nwokedi Chimezie Idika Rohit Jain Salman Javed Shriram Jayachandran Chamikara Madhusanka Jayalath Sundararaman Jeyaraman Indika Madawa Kahanda Jayaram Kallapalayam Radha Karthik Shashank Kambatla Ardalan Kangarlou-Haghighi Rajasekar Karthik

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Samuel Thomas Kerr Shahul Hameed Khajamohideen Md Ariful Hasan Khan Hitesh Khandelwal Ankur Khetrapal Ravish Khosla Dohyeong Kim Michael Scott Kirkpatrick Hou-jen Ko Sivaramakrishnan Krishnamoorthy Chandrasekaran Peter Kristof Sagar Kumar Timothy M. La Fond Alvin Jon-Hang Law Gil Jae Lee Kyu Hyung Lee Myungjin Lee Wonjun Lee Bin Li Tiancheng Li Zhiqiang Lin Mark A. Lohrum Amgad Magdy Ahmed Madkour Ziqing Mao Christopher Scott Mayfield Philip McGachey Fadi Raafat Rizk Edward Meawad Harrison Daniel Ford Metzger Scott David Miller Mohamed Yoosuf Mohamed Nabeel Shahin Mohammadi Ian Michael Molloy Mummoorthy Murugesan Karthik Swaminathan Nagaraj Maxim Naumov


Armand Navabi Ahmet Erhan Nergiz Andrew John Newell Long Van Nguyen Dinh Duc Chi Nguyen Qun Ni Johan Lars Henrik Ostlund Jayesh Pandey Srinivas Pasupuleti Despoina Perouli Salman Pervez Filip Jerzy Pizlo Zachary Alan Plovanic Rahul Potharaju Romila Pradhan Pawan Prakash Ethan Puchaty, M. Vijendra Singh Purohit Wahbeh Hanna Qardaji Yinian Qi Cal Francis Rabang Varun Ramachandran Rohit Ranchal Naresh Kumar Reddy Rapolu Elkindi Rezig Junghwan Rhee Gregor Richards Philip Carson Ritchey Paul Andrew Rosen Brent Gregory Roth AurElien Clovis Eloi Roy Baharak Saberidokht Bo Sang Jeffrey Cecil Seibert Blake Charles Self Santhosh Kumar Shanmugham Huanyu Shao Bin Shen Noopur C. Singh Yingchong Situ Ranjitkumar Sivakumar Naveen Somasundaram Dannie Michael Stanley

Kevin J. Steuer, Jr. Dong Su Salmin Sultana William Nicholas Sumner Yifei Sun Vinaitheerthan Sundaram Nilothpal Talukder Daniel Tang Mingjie Tang Jacques Daniel Thomas Siddharth Tiwary Carlos Andres Vanegas Subramanian Vasudevan John Ross Wallrabenstein Man Wang Qifan Wang Shumiao Wang Dasarath Weeratunge Matthew Allen Wolff Chao Wu Rongjing Xiang Bin Xin Chao Xu Cong Xu Yi Xu Mohamed Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed Yakout Feng Yan Wei-Min Yao Yu Hong Yeung Lian Yu Hao Yuan David John Zage Dan Zhang Ruoqiao Zhang Zhengyi Zhang Lei Zhao Pengxuan Zheng Yunhui Zheng Wenchang Zhou He Zhu Yao Zhu Zhen Zhu Lukasz Ziarek

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Fellows Pelin Angin Samer Samir Barakat Ethan Lee Blanton Nguyen Duc Cao Suleyman Cetintas Rylan Chong Brittany Michelle Coffey Mariheida Cordova-Sanchez Robert Steven Cutler Zhanibek Datbayev Bruce Eric Davis, II Amanda Grace Day Nan Ding Juan Manuel Esquivel Rodriguez Youhan Fang Sriharsha Gangam Ignacio Garcia Dorado Christopher Stanley Gates Pier Paolo Guillen Hernandez Aditi Gupta Adnan Hassan Philip L. Hayes, Jr. Pei He Kevin John Hoffman Dung Trung Hong Ardalan Kangarlou-Haghighi Solyda Kim Alicia Marie Klinvex Tiancheng Li Erick Martin del Campo Christopher Scott Mayfield Mohamed Yoosuf Mohamed Nabeel

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Sebastian Ignacio Moreno Araya Syed Abbas Zilqurnain Naqvi Long Van Nguyen Dinh Duc Chi Nguyen Duong Ngoc Nguyen Pedro J. Pastrana-Camacho Joseph John Pfeiffer, III Khang An Pham Yinian Qi Ryan Anthony Rossi Bin Shen Christine Marie Task Gregory Aaron Wilkin Rongjing Xiang Yi Xu Pinar Yanardag Delul He Zhu Zhen Zhu Lukasz Ziarek


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The Department of Computer Science is committed to diversity in our students, faculty, and staff, supporting both the participation and success of underrepresented minorities as well as addressing the underrepresentation of women in computer science. We have created computer science recruiting materials to emphasize the variety of career options available to CS graduates--career options that appeal to a diverse group of students. The department supports a number of events, programs, and other initiatives aimed at increasing the pipeline of women and underrepresented minorities. These initiatives reinforce the fact that successful companies depend on a variety of contributions from a diverse group of employees. Examples of current activities include middle school summer camps to expose underrepresented students to the excitement of computer science, an annual “Women in Computer Science Career Day”, and a student-led high school visitation program called “ROCS: Reaching Out for Computer Science”. We work closely with the Midwest Crossroads AGEP program office at Purdue, offer summer-bridge programs to incoming students, and participate in conferences aimed at recruiting underrepresented minorities. We also host GEM consortium fellows, Science Bound summer interns, and LSAMP research students. One of our faculty has created a student group, “AMIGOS: Association of Minorities in Graphics and Other Sciences”, to encourage minority participation in departmental events. We have an active presence at conferences including the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing and the CIC Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP). We visit minority serving institutions and high schools with high enrollment of underrepresented minorities and encourage students to join our program. The departmental Computer Science Women’s Network (CSWN) is an organization of students, faculty, and staff dedicated to helping all members succeed in computer science. Over the past several years we have been successful in hiring outstanding female faculty. As mentioned above, we hold an annual Women in Computer Science Career Day, targeting high school juniors. The career day event presents young women with fun lab activities that allow them to explore computer science as a career and Purdue Computer Science as a way to get there.

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Courtesy and Adjunct Faculty Shreeram Abhyankar, Mathematics David Anderson, Engineering Saurabh Bagchi, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2004) Alok Chaturvedi, Management (2004) William Cleveland, Statistics (2003) Stephen Cooper, Technology (2009) Melissa Dark, Technology (2005) David Ebert, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2003) Michael Gribskov, Biology (2004) Y. Charlie Hu, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2003) Sabre Kais, Chemistry (2005) Yung-Hsiang Lu, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2004) Victor Raskin, English (2008) Jeff Siskind, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2009) T N Vijaykumar, Electrical and Computer Engineering (2003) Jeff Vitter, The University of Kansas Emeritus Faculty Walter Gautschi Elias Houstis Robert Lynch John Rice John Steele

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Post Doc Research Associates Eric Cox Gabriel Ghinita Christian Hammer Tomas Kalibera Nicholas Kidd Giorgos Kollias Sylvain Lebresne Hyo-Sang Lim Murat Manguoglu Ales Plsek Qihua Wang Tao Wang Weiqiang Wang Zenglin Xu Hongtao Yu Ruijun Zhao Visiting Assistant Professors Min-Ho Kyung Visiting Scholars Young Joon Ahn LI Chen Ping Chen Eun-Ae Cho Jung Ju Choi Fatma Gharsalli Nan Guo Achim Guttmann Weili Han Chuan He Kalid Hilal Supawadee Hiranpongsin Jungho Huh Seong Dong Kim


Min-Ho Kyung Johannes Langguth Chung Lee Xin Li Jimei Li Dai Lin Zheyuan Liu Hongbin Luo Mohamed Sameh Mahmoud Martin Mulazzani Shanliang Pan Stefano Paris Mostofa Patwary Youli Qu Xiaoxi Ren Min Surp Rhee Veysel Harun Sahin Dae-Jong Seo Ayman Taha Robert Winkworth Lei Xu Tao You Qin Yu Suk Dea Yu Zhengtao Yu Shijie Zhou YongBin Zhou Liehuang Zhu Departmental Administration Aditya Mathur, Department Head Mikhail Atallah, Associate Head John T. (Tim) Korb, Assistant Head Nicole Piegza, Administrative Assistant

Office of Development Javier Magallanes, Director of Development Jean Jackson, Manager of Corporate Relations Pat Morgan, Secretary Facilities Brian Board, Hardware Ron Castongia, Facilities Manager Melanie Church, Windows Software Charles Fultz, UNIX Software Kip Granson, Windows Software Nick Hirschberg, Webmaster and DBA Mike Motuliak, Hardware Steve Plite, UNIX Software Dan Trinkle, Tech. System Administrator Candace Walters, Assistant Director, Facilities Graduate and Academic Services Office William J. Gorman, Assistant to the Head Amy Ingram, Graduate Secretary “in memoriam� Renate Mallus, Graduate Office Coordinator Support Staff William Crum, Instructor Mindy Hart, Outreach Coordinator Lorenzo Martino, Instructor Gary McFall, Instructor Patti Minniear, Copy Center Operator Paula Perkins, Department Secretary Gustavo Rodriguez-Rivera, Instructor Undergraduate Office Carol Paczolt, Advisor Karen Wiens, Advisor

Business Office Brittany Painter, Business Manager Linda Byfield, Account Clerk Robynne McCormick, Account Clerk Tammy Muthig, Account Clerk Patty Rigdon, Account Clerk

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2009 Computer Science Outstanding Alumni The Computer Science Department honored two alumni for their professional accomplishments and dedication to the department on September 25, 2009. Dr. David S. Dodson and Mr. Roberto Kohler were each named 2009 Outstanding Computer Science Alumni. They each recapped their professional journey in computer science amid CS faculty, staff, and students. During the award presentation, Department Head, Prof. Aditya Mathur presented Dodson and Kohler with an engraved award and announced the addition of their names to the Outstanding Alumni plaque to hang in Lawson. Dodson received his MS in Computer Science from Purdue in 1968 and his PhD in 1972. He is currently an adjunct instructor in mathematics at Tarrant County College. He has worked at TRW Space Technology Laboratories, Boeing, Convex Computer Corporation which was bought out by Hewlett-Packard, and the Africa Inland Mission International, a K-12 boarding school in Kenya. Kohler received his BS in Computer Science from Purdue in 1980, and his MS in 1986. He founded IntraNets, Inc. in 1996, and currently serves as CEO. IntraNets Inc. is an Application Service Provider with offices in the USA and in México. The company develops state of the art web enabled ERP applications for the Latin American market. Kohler has also worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories for 12 years. 2010 Computer Science Distinguished Alumnus The College of Science recognized Mr. Thomas “Curtis” Holmes Jr. as the 2010 Computer Science Distinguished Alumni recipient on Friday April 16, 2010. Holmes brings more than fifteen years of executive leadership experience in providing innovative software solutions to global enterprises. Holmes joined Texert as President and Chief Executive Officer in April 2008. Prior to Texert, Holmes served as President and Chief Executive Officer of MetaSolv Software from July 2003 to December 2006, prior to MetaSolv being acquired by Oracle Corporation. Previously, he served as President and Chief Operating Officer from 2001 to 2003. He led MetaSolv’s return to profitable growth through significant global expansion initiatives and key strategy-driven acquisitions, including acquiring operations support systems software assets from Nortel Networks early in 2002, and acquiring London-based Orchestream Holdings plc in 2003. Prior to joining MetaSolv in January 2001, Holmes was Vice President of the Intelligent Network Unit of Lucent Technologies. Under his direction, the Intelligent Network Unit achieved a major global expansion, market leadership position, and sustained revenue growth and profitability. Holmes earned an M.S. in Computer Science from Purdue University, and a B.S. in Computer Science from Southern University.

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K-12 Outreach The main purpose of the Department of Computer Science K-12 Outreach Program is to promote scientific literacy and stimulate interest in computer science among students in the K-12 school systems. Visits to K-12 schools include presentations, workshops, and teacher consultations. Additionally, bringing students and teachers to campus provide opportunities to create awareness of the discipline of computer science. A secondary goal of our program is to inspire educators by equipping them with the confidence they need so they may incorporate the use of technology and computer science concepts into their classrooms on a daily basis. This goal is achieved mainly through professional development seminars as well as statewide and national conference presentations. The Are You Smarter than YOUR 5th Grader program, which partners parents and their 4-6th grade daughters in learning computer science concepts alongside each other, continues to be well received. Additionally, the outreach coordinator sits on the national board of directors for the Computer Science Teachers Association. The organization’s main goal is to support and promote the teaching of computer science and provide opportunities for K-12 teachers and students to better understand the computing disciplines and to more successfully prepare themselves to teach and learn. Responding to the need to raise awareness of computer science as a discipline among high school students, a group called Reaching Out for Computer Science (ROCS) was established. ROCS is composed of current undergraduate and graduate students who have an interest in the K-12 outreach program and service-learning. These students are trained to conduct outreach activities or career presentations which they in turn take out the schools or events. The college students receive credit for their participation in this group. A mainstay of the Computer Science Outreach Program is the annual Summer Camp for Middle School students. These camps include a variety of educational and recreational activities for students in grades 6-8, from building and programming robots to authoring and animating 3-D worlds. This year, campers were engaged in a forensic themed scenario which required them to implement computer science tools and concepts to help solve a crime. Corporate Partners Program The Corporate Partners Program (CPP) was launched to foster close communication between the Department of Computer Science and private industry in the context of a mutually beneficial relationship. The department enjoys the benefit of financial contributions, nurturing experiences for our student, and faculty research collaboration with industry leaders. Members in our CPP reap the benefit of increased visibility, priority access to top students who may become future employees, and priority access to faculty who are experts in relevant technical fields. Companies participate through strategic, unrestricted donations at tier levels and are involved in many core activities of the department. Activities supported by Corporate Partners during the 2009-10 year have enabled CS students to participate in conferences and programing competitions and student organizations to mentor incoming students. Gifts of equipment are used by students in the classrooms and faculty for research. The Harris Corporation announced it is donating a 16-by-9 foot titled video wall for the Commons area of the Lawson Computer Science Building. The display will be used for a variety of purposes, including presentation of special campus events, workshop and colloquium speakers, research demonstrations, news and information, and classroom materials. In addition, Harris has pledged $250,000 to establish the Harris Corporation Embedded Systems Instructional Laboratory in the College of Electrical and Computer Engineering that will be housed in the Electrical Engineering Building.

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Company representatives take advantage of opportunities to speak in classes, sponsor student projects, and make significant contact with CS students and faculty. Members of the CPP include giants of the information technology industry; as well as companies, large and small, in a wide variety of sectors. Partner members represent Indiana-based companies and other outstanding firms nationwide. This diverse and dynamic membership provides CS students with exposure to a myriad of career opportunities across the United States. The Corporate Partners meet twice each year to provide input and feedback to departmental and college leadership. Recent contributions of the council include assistance in revising the undergraduate and graduate curricula, suggestions regarding recruiting, retention and enrollment issues, collaborative efforts with faculty and student research, as well as alerting the department to industry areas of concern.

Premier Corporate Partners Cisco Eli Lilly and Company Google, Inc. Harris Corporation Partners Allston Trading Amazon The Boeing Company Friends Aprimo, Inc. Arxan Technologies, Inc. Beckman Coulter Caterpillar Cerner Corporation Crowe Horwath, LLP

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IBM Intel Corporation Lockheed Martin

Microsoft Corporation Motorola Northrop Grumman

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. Indiana Economic Development Corporation Raytheon Technical Services Company

State Farm Insurances TechPoint

Extron Electronics ExxonMobil FactSet Research Systems, Inc. Freddie Mac Garmin International

HP Enterprise Services Ontario Systems, LLC Qualcomm, Inc. Siemens Yelp


Development of Private Support With support from its alumni and friends, Purdue Computer Science competes for the best faculty, recruits top students, provides scholarships, supports research, and funds new program initiatives. Th e department is deeply grateful to these donors who made contributions and pledges in the 2009-10 fiscal year. Donor Honor Roll - Individuals $10,000 - $99,999 Dr. Eric R. Dittert Mrs. Heddy H. Kurz Dr. Peng-Siu Mei and Mrs. Elaine Mei Mr. Michael E. Petersen and Mrs. Jerralie M. Petersen Dr. Stephen J. Tolopka and Mrs. Janet L. Tolopka Mr. R. Curtis Worsey and Mrs. Caroline M. Worsey $5,000 - $9,999 Dr. Alan R. Hevner and Mrs. Cynthia Y. Hevner Mr. Charles A. Richter and Ms. Dion Messer Dr. David C. Spellmeyer $1,000 - $4,999 Mr. Walter Blejde Mr. James T. Clamons and Mrs. Mary R. Clamons Mr. Lee A. Congdon and Ms. Katherine E. Bissell Dr. David S. Dodson and Mrs. Darla J. Dodson Dr. John A. Fitch III Mrs. Marilyn A. Forsythe Mr. William P. Hampel Mr. Michael K. Jones Mr. Mark A. Kepke and Mrs. Ann H. Kepke Mr. Aaron R. Kunze and Mrs. Morgan E. Kunze Mrs. Mary-Ann Neel Mr. William M. Newport Mr. Brian A. Redding Mr. Randolph J. Reece Mr. Arthur Sinensky and Ms. Debra Oremland Mr. Justin C. Walker Gary W. Winiger and Catherine J. Vonnegut Mr. Stephen J. Zimmerly and Mrs. Virginia A. Zimmerly $100 - $999 Mr. Paul M. Albitz and Mrs. Katherine Albitz Mrs. Mary E. Allendoerfer and Mr. William B. Allendoerfer

Mr. Frank C. Belz Ms. Sandra L. Bish Ms. Valerie Anne Bubb Fenwick Mr. Larry R. Bugal Mr. David J. Carlson Mr. Hao-Yung Chen Mr. W. Enoch Chuang Mr. William E. Clark Mr. James T. Connors and Mrs. Cynthia Connors Mr. James P. Czapla Mr. Vincent E. DeGiulio and Mrs. Jessica DeGiulio Mrs. Michelle R. Duncan and Mr. Scott D. Duncan Dr. Hubert E. Dunsmore and Mrs. Kerry P. Dunsmore Mr. James E. Durand Mrs. Elizabeth A. Dyer Mr. Paul A. Englund Mr. Jason M. Evans Mr. Joseph P. Fath Mr. William E. Feller and Mrs. Stacey Feller Mr. Phillip G. Findley Dr. Ajay K. Gupta and Mrs. Geeta Gupta Mr. Rodney G. Hannes and Mrs. Jean M. Hannes Mr. Robert J. Hemmig Mr. Neil T. Hentschel and Mrs. Kristin B. Hentschel Mr. Brent E. Hinkle and Mrs. R. Elaine Hinkle Mr. Peter W. Hogue and Mrs. Linda Hogue Mr. James W. Janik and Mrs. Linda L. Janik Dr. Kevin C. Kahn and Mrs. Suzanne L. Kahn Mr. Mark S. Kidder Mr. Joseph E. Knebel Mrs. Lisa K. Kohl and Mr. Bruce F. Kohl Mr. Roberto J. Kohler and Ms. Laura J. Velez-Kohler Mr. Kevin E. Kolis Mr. Ronald R. Krol and Mrs. Sheree S. Krol Dr. Benjamin A. Kuperman Ms. Nancy L. Laing Mr. Thomas M. Lang and Mrs. Gloria Lang

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Ms. Yue-Jinning Lian and Dr. Tunghsing Ku Mr. Marc D. Lipnick and Mrs. Deborah Lipnick Ms. Shaw-Yune Lu and Dr. Chuan-Hsing Chen Mr. Richard A. Marynowski Mr. Trevor D. Mason Mr. Ken Mazawa Dr. Robert L. Mead Jr. and Mrs. Sharon P. Mead Mr. Kenneth R. Mensik Mr. Darrell E. Miller Mr. Robert T. Mitchell Dr. William F. Mitchell Mr. Benjamin L. Nicholson Mr. Jeffrey S. Noone Dr. Arthur E. Oldehoeft and Mrs. Margie C. Oldehoeft Dr. Rodney R. Oldehoeft Mr. Joseph R. Poirier Dr. Sunil K. Prabhakar and Mrs. Hema Prabhakar Dr. Kenneth R. Rodemann and Mrs. Christine J. Rodemann Mr. Adam D. Rouns and Mrs. Jill M. Rouns Mr. David L. Russell Mr. John M. Sauer and Mrs. Mary Lou Sauer Mr. R. Michael Schafer and Mrs. Catherine Schafer Dr. David K. Schrader Miss Josephine H. Schwabel Mr. Matthew K. Shahnavaz and Mrs. Laurie L. Shahnavaz Dr. Michelle K. Shapiro Mr. Martin J. Shramo and Mrs. Jennifer A. Shramo Mr. Marc O. Sunga Mr. Paul J. Swanke and Ms. Joyce M. Harrison Mrs. Kuei-Hsiang A. Tang and Dr. Kwei Tang Mr. Edward W. Trischmann and Ms. Sandra R. Pakaski Mrs. Barbara S. Turnbull and Mr. Donald H. Turnbull Mr. Jerry C. VanWert Dr. Sheng-Yih Wang

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Mr. Luke R. Wellman and Mrs. Jill M. Wellman Mr. Bradley K. Wells Mr. Gregory H. Willmore Mr. Hong Kui Yuan and Mrs. Xiao-Li Liu Mrs. Janice M. Zdankus Dr. Stuart H. Zweben and Mrs. Rochelle Zweben $1 - $99 Mr. Ryan S. Adams Ms. Roshna Agarwal Mr. Richard E. Amick Ms. Loris L. Blanda and Mr. Paul J. Blanda Mr. Daniel J. Block and Mrs. Susan Block Mr. James M. Brining Ms. Beth A. Brophy Mrs. Joni L. Buyer and Rep. Stephen E. Buyer Mr. Daniel Conklin and Mrs. Suzanne Conklin Mr. Thad G. Craft and Mrs. Sarah C. Craft Dr. Ferdinand A. Doll Jr. Mr. Jason A. Faas Mr. James D. Feltis and Mrs. Colleen Feltis Mrs. Jill E. Fisher and Mr. Thomas R. Fisher Dr. Edward F. Gehringer and Mrs. Carol R. Gehringer Mrs. Lindsey L. Giddings Dr. James N. Griffioen and Mrs. Bonnie L. Griffioen Mr. Robert D. Jackson and Mrs. Lori L. Jackson Mrs. Holly R. Jett and Mr. Arthur V. Jett Jr. Mr. Paul F. Jurgens Mr. E. Mark Karlsberg and Mrs. Jane S. Karlsberg Mr. Wing Yee Lam Dr. Benjamin A. Legaspi Jr. and Dr. Jesusa C. Legaspi Ms. Gergana V. Markova Mr. Christopher A. Mathura and Mrs. Maressa L. Mathura Mr. Thomas W. McKeown Sr. and Mrs. Bridget McKeown Mrs. Mary A. Moore and Mr. Wayne E. Moore Mr. David D. Munn and Mrs. Roxanne Munn


Col. (Ret.) Michael John Ondrasek and Mrs. Karen Ondrasek Ms. Teresa L. Payne Ms. Karen J. Piegza Mrs. Carol Pilch and Dr. Paul F. Pilch Mrs. Irene M. Robins Mrs. Julie R. Schaber and Mr. Christopher R. Schaber Mr. Eric A. Shewmaker Ms. Kristine Simons Mr. Barry N. Sokolik and Mrs. Victoria S. Sokolik Mr. John P. Spurgeon and Ms. Zhiyue Sun Mr. James R. Stanfield and Mrs. Elizabeth A. Stanfield Mrs. Tara Unverzagt and Mr. Robert M. Unverzagt Mr. Marat Rinatovich Urmeev Dr. Kathleen M. VanderVliet Mr. James A. Wachter and Mrs. Marcia T. Wachter Ms. Karen L. Weedman and Mr. Mike Culbertson Ms. Ginger D. Wong Mr. Gary A. Wood and Mrs. Leah Wood Donor Honor Roll - Corporate $10,000 - $99,999 Cisco Systems, Inc. Microsoft Corporation $10,000 - $ 99,999 Allston Trading, LLC Amazon.com Boeing Company Booz Allen Hamilton Inc. Chiang Chen Industrial Charity Foundation Dell Inc. Google Inc. Harris Foundation IBM International Foundation* Intel Corporation Intel Foundation International Business Machines Corporation Korea Institute of Information Lockheed Martin Ministry of Education & Training Motorola Northrop Grumman State Farm Mutual Automobile Ins. Co.

$5,000 - $9,999 Eli Lilly & Co. Foundation, Inc. FactSet Research Systems Freddie Mac HP Enterprise Services Mozilla Corporation Qualcomm, Inc. Raytheon $1,000 - $4,999 Aprimo Inc. Arxan Technologies, Inc. Beckman Coulter Inc. Caterpillar Foundation Cerner Corporation Cisco Systems Foundation* Crowe Horwath LLP ExxonMobil Chemical Company Harris Corporation Lockheed Martin Foundation Siemens Corporation $100 - $999 Accenture Bank of NY Mellon Community Partnership* Boeing* Deloitte Foundation* H. B. Fuller Company Foundation* Oracle* Qualcomm* Sara Lee Foundation* SC Johnson Fund* Shell Oil Company Foundation* State Farm Companies Foundation Sun Microsystems Inc. Symantec Tellabs Inc. $1 - $99 Charles Schwab Corp. Foundation Dana Corporation Foundation United Way of the Columbia-Willamette * MGP Matching Gift Program

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S t s Gue DATE 08/27/2009

SPEAKER/AFFILIATION Peter Shier, PhD; Microsoft

09/09/2009 09/09/2009

Robert T-I. Shin, PhD; MIT Lincoln Laboratory Prof. David Hardy; Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana Tom Peterka, PhD; Argonne National Laboratory Alon Halevy, PhD; Google, Inc. Prof. Tayfun Tezduyar; Rice University Prof. Manuela Veloso; Carnegie Mellon University

10/07/2009 10/14/2009 10/19/2009 11/02/2009 11/05/2009

12/08/2009 01/15/2010

Prof. Roy Campbell; University of Ilinois, Urbana Champaign Prof. Shafi Goldwasser; Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Weizmann Institute Danny Dig; Universal Parallel Computing Research Center (UPCRC) Florian Kerschbaum; SAP Research; Karlsruhe, Germany Prof. Stephen Cooper; Purdue University, Computer Graphics Technology Prof. Peter Waddell; Purdue University, Biological Sciences Lt. Col. Michael Weir; United States Air Force Erika Poole; Georgia Institute of Technology

01/21/2010 01/25/2010 02/01/2010 02/11/2010

Chip Elliot, PhD; BBN Corporation Xin Chen, PhD; NAVTEQ Corporation, Chicago, IL Prof. Richard Cole; Courant Institute, NYU Prof. Eric Xing; Carnegie Mellon University

02/15/2010

Prof. Bruce Hajek; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Prof. Carla Brodley; Tufts University

11/09/2009 11/13/2009 11/16/2009 11/19/2009 11/30/2009

02/18/2010

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TALK TITLE Networked Connected Devices: Overview and Comparison of Protocols Choices, Choices, Choices (decisions, decisions, decisions) Multilevel Summation of Electrostatic Potentials Using GPUs Scalable Approaches to Analysis of Scientific Data Bringing (Web) Databases to the Masses Computer Modeling of the Orion Spacecraft Parachutes Planning, Execution, and Learning in Teams of Robots: A Fascinating Research Adventure Cloud Computing Testbed Program Obfuscation and One-Time Programs Deterministic Parallel Java Security Challenges in Supply Chain Management Problem solving with Alice: Past, present and future Phylogenomics of mammals and the computational challenges it brings Operational Considerations for Cyber Security Please Help! Everyday Expertise Sharing in Small and Large Scale Technical Communities GENI - Global Environment for Network Innovations Next Generation Map Making Viewing Market Price Discovery as an Algorithmic Process Time Varying Graphical Models: Reverse Engineering and Analyzing Evolving Genetic and Social Networks Analysis of Peer to Peer Communication in Networks Challenges in the Practical Application of Machine Learning


DATE 02/22/2010 03/08/2010 03/11/2010 03/15/2010 03/25/2010 04/01/2010 04/02/2010 04/05/2010 04/12/2010 04/15/2010 04/19/2010 04/19/2010 04/20/2010 04/22/2010 04/26/2010 05/06/2010 06/02/2010 06/03/2010 06/07/2010 06/09/2010 07/02/2010

SPEAKER/AFFILIATION Prof. Natasha Devroye; University of Illinois at Chicago Prof. Remzi Arpaci-Dusseau; University of Wisconsin, Madison Prof. Arif Masud; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mathias Ricken; Doctoral Candidate, Rice University David G. Stork; Ricoh Innovations Prof. Heng Yin; Syracuse University Srinivas Padmanabhuni, PhD; Infosys Technologies Limited Besma Smida; Purdue University Calumet, Hammond

TALK TITLE Fundamental Limits of Cognitive Networks Five Years of Reliability Research: Why Storage Systems are Broken and What We Can Do About It Stabilized Finite Element Methods and Turbulence Mint: A Multi-stage Extension of Java Lake Wobegon Dice Whole-System Dynamic Binary Analysis for Computer Security Software Engineering issues in Service Orientation: Current Research at Infosys Near Shannon Limit Low Peak to Average Power Ratio Turbo Block Coded OFDM Information Theory: Models, Algorithms, Analysis

Dr. Brigitte Vallee, PhD; National Center of Scientific Research (CNRS), UniversitÊ de Caen Basse-Normandie David Gleich, PhD; Sandia Nation Laboratories Models and Algorithms for PageRank Sensitivity Prof. Alex Aiken; Stanford University Sequoia: Programming the Memory Hierarchy Prof. Alon Orlitsky; University of California, San Diego Foreseeing the Unseen: Probability Estimation over Large Alphabets Aydin Buluç; University of California, Santa Barbara Scalable Parallel Primitives for Massive Graph Computation Prof. Chris Sweet; University of Notre Dame Coarse-Grained Protein Dynamics Via Fast Hessian Prof. Walter Gautschi; Purdue University Diagonalizations Lotfi Ben Othmane; Western Michigan University Protecting Privacy in Sensitive Data Dissemination with Active Bundles Prof. Lang Tong; Cornell University Detection of Information Flow and Anonymous Networking Per-Ake Larson, PhD; Microsoft Research MOCCa: Multiversion Optimistic Concurrency Control George Mihaila, PhD; IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Efficient Index Compression in DB2 Pradeep Padala, PhD; DOCOMO USA Labs LiteGreen: Saving Desktop Energy using Virtualization Tudor Dumitras; Carnegie Mellon University Improving the end-to-end dependability of distributed systems

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High school students working on a project for Women In Computer Science workshop.

CS students prepare to leave for the ACM programming competition.

CS Summer Camp attendees pose for a quick picture.

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Mr. Thomas “Curtis� Holmes Jr. receiving an award from College of Science Dean Dr. Jeffery Roberts. Holmes was the 2010 Computer Science Distinguished Alumnus.


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CS Facilities — General Overview The Computer Science Department is committed to providing high-quality computing facilities for use by computer science faculty, students, and administrative personnel. The facilities are operated by an excellent, customer-oriented technical staff who are not only responsible for the installation and maintenance of the systems, but who are also dedicated to assist faculty and students in the development of software systems for research projects. The staff periodically attends training courses and workshops to complete certifications and upgrade their skills. CS is also a certified warranty and repair center for Dell computers. The facilities staff includes a director, facilities manager, network engineer, hardware engineer, five system administrators, and several student assistants. General Facilities General computing facilities are available for both administrative activities (such as the preparation of research reports and technical publications) and research needs that are not supported by other dedicated equipment. The main server systems are multi-core multiprocessors with large main memories and large disk arrays for storage. Personal workstations and laptops from a variety of vendors are used by faculty, staff, and students throughout the department. Educational Facilities The Computer Science department operates eight instructional laboratories in two buildings. These labs are used for both undergraduate and graduate computer science courses and include over 200 Intel- and Sun SPARC-based workstations. Supported operating systems include Windows 7, Linux, Solaris x86, and Solaris SPARC. Two labs are collaboration team project labs dedicated to group learning with the assistance of interactive SMARTboard technology. A later section lists equipment owned and maintained by ITaP but used by computer science students. I/O Equipment The department operates both special-purpose output devices as well as general output equipment, including more than 70 laser printers, color printers, color scanners, multi-functional printer/scanner/copier/fax machines, video projectors, digital video recording and editing capabilities as well as phone conferencing and a variation of video conferencing equipment. The CS department provides video conferencing in dedicated locations as well as mobile video conferencing stations. Recently the CS department has added a new state of the art Cisco Telepresence video conference room. Networking Services The department is strongly committed to state-of-the-art networking technology to provide access to and communication among its systems, as well as to those elsewhere on campus and throughout the world. Our departmental infrastructure supports gigabit per second data rates to the desktop throughout our two buildings using over 65 Ethernet VLAN-capable switches from Force10, Cisco Systems, and Dell. Wiring in the new Lawson Computer Science Building is based on Panduit augmented CAT6 data cable and patch panels, capable of 10 gigabit per second speeds. This network infrastructure is biconnected to the campus backbone by two 1 gigabit per second redundant fiber links. The campus is connected to multiple high speed Internet backbones, including Abilene/Internet2 and I-Light. DSL, cable, and cellular data services are widely used for remote access. Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP) In addition to the facilities described above, students and faculty have access to computing systems owned and operated by ITaP. General instructional facilities operated by ITaP include large Sun SPARCservers and several Sun and Intel workstation laboratories. In addition, ITaP provides systems for use in courses taught by the CS Department. These systems include UNIX-based Sun SPARC stations for undergraduate computer science courses and Microsoft Windows-based Intel personal computers for use in an introductory course for non-majors (CS 110). Departmental research projects make use of other facilities provided by ITaP. These include a large IBM SP cluster and the Envision Center for Data Perceptualization.

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The cover image shows Professor Xiangyu Zhang’s architecture of the Comparison Based Automatic Debugging System. More information on Prof. Zhang’s research with automated software debugging is on page 44 of this report.


2009-10

annual report

Department of Computer Science 305 N. University Street West Lafayette, IN 47907-2107 (800) 320-6132 www.cs.purdue.edu

Purdue is an equal access/equal opportunity university Produced by Purdue Department of Computer Science Annual Report Design by Shawn Dildine and Nicole Piegza

Profile for Purdue University

Computer Science 2009-10 Annual Report  

The 2009-10 year included some signifi cant changes for the department. The faculty approved a new undergraduate curriculum based on a compa...

Computer Science 2009-10 Annual Report  

The 2009-10 year included some signifi cant changes for the department. The faculty approved a new undergraduate curriculum based on a compa...