Issuu on Google+


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
2


Intro:


We’ve
reached
our
6th
 Issue.

Damn
time’s
 flying
by.

We’ve
 already
hit
a
year.

 Music
seems
to
be
a
 big
influence
on
this
 issue.

We’re
 branching
out
some
 with
a
little
bit
of
 Metal/Metalcore
 (check
the
cover).

 We
definitely
won’t
 forget
the
bmxers.

 I’ve
been
shooting
 like
crazy
and
have
 tons
of
photos
for
the
 photo
section.

Unlike
 Issue
5,
this
one
will
 dive
a
little
deeper
 into
where
I’m
at
in
 my
life.

I’ve
gone
 through
a
lot
since
 the
beginning
of
the
 summer
and
honestly
 feel
I’ve
grown
as
a
person
because
of
it.

In
this
issue
I
hope
you
 see
I’m
more
passionate
about
riding,
music,
photography,
and
 everything
that
is
really
important
to
me.

I’ve
learned
that
 friendship
and
your
loved
ones
are
what
really
matters.

They’ll
 pick
you
up
when
you
hit
your
low
points
and
will
be
there
to
 help
you
enjoy
your
good
times.

I’m
dedicating
this
issue
to
 Audra.

Even
though
she
helps
me
with
it,
I
don’t
think
I
would
 have
made
it
through
this
summer
without
her.


 


In
this
issue
we
find
a
few
interviews
from
a
few
and
very
 different
bands,
some
article
I’ve
written
about
things
I’ve
noticed
 about
life,

plenty
of
photos
for
those
that
want
to
just
flip
 through,
an
interview
with
one
of
Indy’s
best
riders,
and
some
 other
random
shit.

Hope
you
enjoy
it.
 Alan



Issue
6
–
Pg.
3
 


Content:


Josh
Phillips
huge
table
air
at
Connersville
Photo:
Alan
Sternberg


Intro:
 
 
 
 
 Interview:
Josh
Phillips
 
 Fresh
Ink:
 
 
 
 Interview:
Consume
the
Eyes
 Interview:
Peacocks
 
 
 Pg.
15
 So
You
Think
You’re
Normal
 Interview:
The
Terribles
 
 Growing
Up
 
 
 
 Interview:
Grodees

 
 Burn
Your
Flag
 
 
 Photos:
 
 
 
 Reviews:
 
 
 



 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 


Pg.
2
 Pg.
5
 Pg.
8
 Pg.
11



 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 


Pg.
19
 Pg.
20
 Pg.
27
 Pg.
29
 Pg.
33
 Pg.
34
 Pg.
45


All
material
is
written
by,
edited
by,
or
is
submitted
to

 Punks
on
Bikes
Fanzine.
 


(©2007,
punksonbikes.com)
 


If
you
would
like
to
contribute,
contact
Punks
on
Bikes
at
 http://punksonbikes.com/contact.html
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
5


Josh
Phillips
Interview:













by:
Alan
Sternberg


PoB: First off: name, age, hometown, etc... Josh: Josh Phillips, Avon, IN PoB: How long have you been riding? Josh: Around 6 years. PoB: I've noticed you started riding brakeless, what prompted the switch from brakes to no brakes? Josh: Cause I’m trendy, no, I just got bored doing the same stuff so I was gonna take them off for a little bit. Then I learned brakeless fufs and whip tail taps so I decided to keep them off. PoB: You're one of those guys that seem to learn shit really fast and seem to be really motivated to learn new tricks. What helps you stay focused and motivated? Josh: I like being scared, so I push myself. PoB: Who influences you as a rider and who influences you as a person? Josh: Jeremiah Smith is incredible to watch and super cool. I try not to be influenced by others when it comes to my personality. PoB: Who do you ride with regularly? Josh: Mullen, he’s like my personal filmer. I have a line and call him up to shoot it. The Greencastle kids quite often as well. PoB: Favorite place to ride?


Issue
6
–
Pg.
6
 Josh: The Flow probably and the surrounding Ohio State Campus street spots.

PoB: Are you getting any support from any companies or do you push yourself for the love of it? Josh: Nope all me baby, i was on the UV bike team but that was just a buddy thing. It would be nice but I’m not too worried about it. PoB: Favorite pro and local rider to watch? Josh: Jeremiah. Nick Summerlot from Greencastle, style for miles. PoB: I know you do a lot of whip tricks. Are tailwhips your favorite trick? If not, what is? Josh: Whips are probably my constant favorite trick and I usually have one other that I will love for a while too. Right now it’s wallride to 180s on everything. PoB: What do you want to accomplish on a bike? Josh: Get rich. No, just have fun and not get too hurt. PoB: After riding, what do you see yourself doing? Josh: I have no idea. I’d like to be an engineer. PoB: Do you ride to music or do you like to talk to those you ride with? Josh: I like to ride to rap at parks but on street I just talk


Issue
6
–
Pg.
7
 


PoB: What kind of Music do you listen too? Josh: A little bit of everything: hardcore, pop, punk, rock, rap a lot actually. PoB: What's more important to you, style or tricks? Josh: Style, but I like tricks with style even more. PoB: What's the deal with the Indy tattoo? Is it a, know your roots thing? Josh: Yeah sort of, just gotta remember where you're from ya know. PoB: What's one message you'd like to tell people reading this? Josh: Thanks for taking the time to read my thoughts on riding. PoB: Thanks or last words? Josh: Go have fun on your bike.



 
 
 
 
 
 All
photos
 shot
by
Alan
 Sternberg
at
 Connersville
 skatepark
 
 
 
 
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
8


Fresh
Ink:
 


by:
Joel
Janiszyn


At
this
time
last
year
I
was
in
college
studying
to
become
a
graphic
designer.
 Fast
forward
a
year
from
then
to
the
present
and
here
I
am,
a
professional
 tattoo
artist
with
my
own
room
at
one
of
the
most
recognized
and
celebrated
 tattoo
studios
in
Indiana...what
happened!?

 


Let
me
start
off
and
give
some
personal
art
history.
I've
drawn
and
done
art
in
 general
since
before
I
could
read.
I've
always
loved
it,
it
just
seemed
to
happen
 naturally
for
me.
Give
me
a
pen
and
some
paper
and
I
could
draw
for
hours.

 


My
love
for
art
never
died
and
like
most
things
someone
decides
to
"stick
with"
 they
only
progress
and
get
better.

 


Anyways,
rather
than
giving
everyone
a
detailed
look
into
"how
my
drawing
 has
progressed
in
the
last
18
or
so
years"
I'll
make
this
basic
and
to
the
point.

 


I
took
advanced
art
classes
all
through
high
school
and
did
exceptionally
well
 (for
high
school
art
class
standards
anyway).
After
high
school
I
wasn't
sure
 what
I
wanted
to
do
so
I
took
a
year
or
two
off,
worked
as
a
pizza
guy,
and
 decided
to
go
back
to
school
to
become
a
graphic
designer.

 


Now,
this
is
where
I'd
like
to
explain
everything
with
a
little
more
detail.

 


Of
course
I
wanted
to
go
to
school
for
art,
but
didn't
have
the
desire
to
be
 cooped
up
in
a
dorm
room
or
shitty
apartment
for
the
next
4
years
while
taking
 art
classes
and
even
more
classes
for
things
I
had
no
desire
to
participate
in.
I
 decided
I'd
go
to
an
accelerated
business
college
in
Fort
Wayne
to
get
a
degree
 in
graphic
design
and
go




Issue
6
–
Pg.
9
 on
my
way
afterwards
doing
what
a
graphic
designer
does.
But,
like
so
many
 things
in
life,
it
turned
out
not
to
be
exactly
what
I
had
in
mind.
While
I
was
 aware
that
the
vast
majority
of
graphic
design
work
was
done
on
a
computer,
it
 really
lacked
the
drawing,
painting,
fine
art
feel
that
I
longed
for.
Anyways
to
 make
this
short,
a
couple
years
later
I
graduated
with
an
associate’s
degree
in
 graphic
design
and
was
on
the
job
hunt.
Hunting
for
a
job
where
i
could
do
 something
somewhat
creative,
designing
graphics
for
t‐shirts
and
etc.

 


I
should
also
make
a
point
that
it
was
at
the
beginning
of
my
college
career
that
 I
became
interested
in
tattoos.
With
all
my
extra
time
and
built
up
frustration
 for
not
being
able
to
draw
what
I
wanted,
I
would
draw
all
the
time,
many
of
 those
designs
I
drew
managing
to
become
tattooed
into
my
flesh.

 


At
the
beginning
of
my
tattoo
phase,
I
was
told
about
a
tattoo
studio
in
my
 hometown
(that
I
had
never
heard
of)
called
Life
Force
Studios
by
a
girl
from
 college
(now
my
girlfriend).
She
had
several
tattoos
and
recommended
them
 whole‐heartedly.
I
visited
the
studio
a
few
days
later
and
everything
was
what
I
 had
ever
wanted
in
a
tattoo
studio,
clean
friendly
personnel
(and
at
this
point
 in
time,
the
studio
was
run
by
only
the
two
owners,
Jak
and
Josh).
I
went
and
 got
my
first
tattoo
from
Life
Force
which
was
a
bicycle
chain
wrapping
around
 my
forearm.
I
hit
it
off
instantly
with
the
two
owners
and
became
good
friends
 with
them.
Before
I
knew
it,
I
was
in
the
studio
every
week,
if
not
getting
work
 then
just
hanging
out
and
joking
with
Jak
and
Josh.

 


Anyways
fast
forward
a
year
later.
I
now
pretty
much
had
a
sleeve
and
was
still
 having
work
done
regularly.
It
was
at
this
time
that
Life
Force
had
gone
and
 hired
an
artist
or
two,
some
counter
help,
and
an
apprentice,
none
of
which
 worked
out
and
it
was
back
to
Jak,
Josh,
and
their
permanent
counter
person.

 


They
had
been
looking
for
a
full
time
artist
for
a
few
months
by
this
time
and
 still
had
no
success
in
finding
some
one.
One
night
in
the
basement,
me
and
 Josh
were
talking
over
a
cigarette
and
he
jokingly
asked
"so
when
are
you
going
 to
start
doing
tattoos?"
I
had
some
smart
ass
reply
I'm
sure
and
went
home
 later
that
night.
But
what
he
said
really
drilled
itself
into
my
brain.
"Is
there
any
 way
I
could
possibly
become
a
tattoo
artist?
Do
I
have
what
it
takes?"
My
 girlfriend
and
best
friend
really
persuaded
me
into
having
a
meeting
with
Jak
 to
discuss
perhaps
becoming
an
apprentice.
After
talking
to
Jak,
I
was
surprised
 to
hear
him
finish
the
phone
call
with
"I
think
it
would
work
out
really
well,
I'll
 see
you
next
week".
I
felt
so
privileged
words
couldn't
describe.

 


So
there
I
was,
I
had
become
an
apprentice.
If
you
know
anything
about
a
tattoo
 apprenticeship,
you
know
that
getting
an
apprenticeship
in
the
first
place
is
 next
to
impossible.
You
really
have
to
be
at
the
right
place
at
the
right
time.
I
 was
thrilled
to
have
this
opportunity.

 


While
getting
an
apprenticeship
is
amazing,
it's
even
more
amazing
to
know
 that
one
day
you'll
be
doing
art
on
people’s
flesh,
a
job
that
many
people
dream
 about.
But
tattooing
was
a
long
way
down
the
road.
There's
a
lot
of
work
in
an
 apprenticeship
that
people
aren't
aware
of.




Issue
6
–
Pg.
10
 Before
you
ever
even
hold
a
tattoo
machine
in
your
hands,
you're
building
up
 "sweat
equity"
which
means
you're
working
for
free
in
exchange
for
their
 guidance
and
teaching.
I
was
painting
walls,
floors,
and
trim,
everything
that
 needed
a
new
coat
of
paint.
I
was
sweeping
floors,
washing
windows,
tracing
 flash,
cleaning
and
sterilizing
tools
daily.
It
sounds
kind
of
crummy
(and
it
was)
 but
what
you
don't
realize
at
the
time
is
that
everything
was
a
lesson.
Painting
 could
teach
you
to
be
patient
and
pay
close
 attention
to
detail,
tracing
drawings
taught
 "muscle
memory"
and
to
keep
lines
smooth
and
 flowing,
cleaning
tools
taught
me
everything
 that
it
takes
to
keep
equipment
clean
and
safe.
 After
months
and
months
of
cleaning
and
 painting
I
learned
things
geared
more
towards
 tattooing
itself.
I
learned
how
tattoo

 machines
worked,
I
learned
how
to
draw
flash
 and
what
designs
would
work
and
which
ones
 would
not.
I
tattooed
melons
for
a
month
or
so
 and
before
I
knew
it,
I
was
handed
a
new
 machine
and
was
asked
to
do
my
first
tattoo,
a
 hello
kitty
on
Jak's
hip!

 


Everything
has
only
progressed
from
there.
 Tattooing
is
an
art
(like
most
arts)
that
you
can
 never
have
completely
mastered.
There
are
 always
new
techniques,
and
ways
of
doing
things,
it's
a
never
ending
learning
 process
but
I
like
that.

 


The
thing
that
really
hooked
me
about
tattooing
was
that
it
was
so
different
 than
graphic
design.
Instead
of
arranging
text
in
a
newspaper,
I
am
drawing
 designs,
tattooing
designs,
and
am
connected
to
art
more
intensely
than
I
had
 ever
hoped.

 


I
am
honored
to
be
a
part
of
the
Life
Force
family
and
honored
to
be
considered
 a
professional
tattoo
artist.
I
couldn't
consider
doing
anything
different
now.

 


I'd
like
to
thank
Jak
and
Josh
for
giving
me
this
opportunity
to
begin
with
and
 helping
me
out
and
teaching
me
along
the
way,
Meagan
for
being
encouraging
 the
entire
time,
Meagan
and
Trevor
for
kicking
my
ass
into
actually
trying
to
 get
an
apprenticeship,
all
my
family
and
friends
who
have
supported
me
and
 encouraged
me,
and
all
the
people
who
have
helped
me
out
by
coming
and
 letting
me
tattoo
them,
that
means
a
lot.

 


Thanks
again
everyone
mentioned
and
everyone
who
I
will
have
the
chance
to
 meet
and
work
on
in
the
up‐coming
years.

 
 Life
Force
Studios

 (765)
662‐0511

 www.myspace.com/lifeforcestudios



Issue
6
–
Pg.
11


Consume
the
Eyes
Interview:



���by:
Audra
Beeman


PoB:
Will
you
please
introduce
yourselves.
 CtE:

We
are
Consume
the
Eyes.
Ryan
Townsend
(Vocals)
Jacob
 Harrison
(guitar)
Jared
Harrison
(Bass)
Kyle
Moon
(guitar)
and
 Zach
Livesay
(Drums)
 
 PoB:

Where
are
you
all
from?
 CtE:
Everyone
is
from
Anderson
except
Zach
which
is
from
 Pendleton.
 
 PoB:

How
did
you
come
up
with
the
name
“Consume
the
 Eyes”?
 CtE:


It
came
from
the
bible
verse
“Leviticus
26:16”
 
 PoB:

What
genre
would
you
classify
yourselves
as?
 CtE:
Metal
Hardcore
 
 PoB:
To
you,
what
is
the
difference
between
“Metal”,
 “Hardcore,”
and
“Screamo”?
 CtE:

Hardcore
is
overcoming
things
in
life,
Screamo
is
softer
but
 with
the
aggression
and
Metal
is
everything
that
is
Rebel.
 
 PoB:

What
do
each
of
you
bring
to
the
band?



Issue
6
–
Pg.
12
 CtE:

(Jared)
Maturity
and
experience.
(Jacob)
Positive
outlook
 unless
I
am
pissed
[haha]

 (Ryan)
laughs.
(Zach)
Comic
Relief.
(Kyle)
Drill
Sergeant
 [everyone
 laugh]

 
 PoB:
You
 have
had
a
 few
line
up
 changes,
 what
 makes
this
 one
work?
 CtE:

With
 the
new
 Drummer
 we
can
 reach
all
 the
music
 aspects
we
 want
 without
just
 sticking
to
 just
one
 thing.
We
 can
just
be
 ourselves
 and
get
 creative.
 Plus
it
was
 the
original
 line
up
anyway.
 


PoB:
To
me
at
least,
it
seems
you
got
your
name
out
there
 pretty
quick.
How
did
you
manage
that?

 CtE:

We
messaged
everybody
we
could.
We
just
forced
ourselves
 down
people
throats.
We
hopped
on
shows
at
the
last
min.
 without
permission
sometimes.
We
would
never
turn
down
 shows
no
matter
the
crowd.
One
time
we
played
for
6
kids,
didn’t
 get
paid
but
we
still
did
it.




Issue
6
–
Pg.
13
 PoB:

What
are
some
of
your
favorite
local
bands
to
play
 with?
 CtE:

Pay
Your
Dues,
Only
When
I
Burn
and
Amarna
Ragn
are
a
 few.
 
 PoB:

What
are
some
of
 your
influences
to
 write
your
lyrics?
 CtE:

(Ryan)
Struggles
in
 life
and
with
over
coming
 things.
We
want
to
help
 people
over
come
things
 they
might
have
 happening.
 
 PoB:
What
would
you
 say
sets
you
apart
from
 other
bands
that
you
 might
be
compared
to?
 CtE:

We
have
a
black
 singer
(laughs)
For
real
 though;
we
just
don’t
try
 to
sound
like
other
 bands.
We
try
to
write
 and
play
music
that
is
 true
and
people
can
 relate
to.
 
 PoB:

What
are
some
projects
that
you
have
lined
up
or
are
 working
on?
 CtE:

Currently
we
are
in
the
studio
working
on
a
6
song
CD
[Alan
 laughs
EP
you
mean]
It
will
be
called
“Doesn’t
Matter
Who
You
 Were”
 
 PoB:

Where
do
you
see
“Consume
The
Eyes”
in
a
year?
 CtE:

BROKE
[laughs]
hopefully
on
the
Road
touring.
 
 PoB:

Where
can
people
reach
you
at?
 CtE:

www.myspace.com/consumetheeyes



Issue
6
–
Pg.
14


PoB:

Thanks,
last
words
etc….
 CtE:

“I
am
trying
not
to
poop
(says
Ryan)
and
Thanks
for
 interviewing
us.
 
 PoB:
Lastly,
This
one
is
for
you
Ryan,
have
you
ever
“Pimped
 anyone’s
ride”?
 CtE:
[everyone
laughs]
I
tried
once
but
I
messed
it
up.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
15


Interview:
Simon
from
The
Peacock







by:
Audra
Beeman
 PoB: Will you please introduce yourselve(s)? Peacocks: We're The Peacocks from Switzerland. Me, Simon, is answering the questions. I play upright bass in the band. You can find our bio on http://www.thepeacocks.ch


Issue
6
–
Pg.
16
 PoB: Where are you from? Simon: Switzerland PoB: How did you get your start? Simon: We bought instruments and started to play. PoB: How did you get the name? Simon: There was a need for a name for the first show and that was a cool sounding one that came in our mind. We thought we can change the name later for a better one. But now it's too late, but it's not so bad anyway. PoB: What genre would you say you were? Simon: PunkRockabilly. Sometimes more Punk with upright bass, sometimes more Rockabilly. Some people call it Psychobilly. PoB: What sticks out in your mind as being a breaking moment for the band? Simon: The release of the second album. First shows with sold out venues and everybody was dancing. PoB: How many years have you been in a band together? Simon: 17 years PoB: Where is your favorite place to play? Simon: On a stage in a 200 cap. club PoB: What are you listening to right now? Simon: I'm on the computer right now, without music. PoB: Are you signed with a label if not do you plan to?


Issue
6
–
Pg.
18
 


Simon: We never signed with labels so far, even some labels made records for us (Asian Man Records, Household Name Records, Crazy Love Records,...). Now we’ll probably sign with People Like You Records. PoB: How has music changed your life? Simon: I quit University for the band. It's the only thing I wanna do. Now, I'm without education in a little band with no money. But I mostly like what I do. PoB: How many albums do you have out? Simon:: 4-6 PoB: How many shows would you say you have played? Simon: About 600 PoB: What is your favorite thing about being in a band? Simon: Making music that rocks PoB: What made you decide you wanted to be in a band? Peacocks: Making music that rocks. PoB: How did you meet your band members? Simon: The bandleader, Hasu, is my brother. The drummer, Jürg, asked us to join, when we needed a new drummer. PoB: Where do you see The Peacocks in 5 years? Simon: We're retired, because we have to go to work to earn some money for living. Maybe we play about 20 shows a year, but not much touring anymore. Maybe it's still the same, tough! PoB: I love the way you guys sound, how would you describe that sound to someone that has never heard you? Simon: It's Pop-punk with an upright bass, which gives a Rockabilly flair. PoB: What sets you apart from any other band? Simon: We have our own style and have good songs and are a fantastic live band .-) PoB: How can people reach you guys? Simon: via http://www.thepeacocks.ch or http://www.myspace.com/itstimeforthepeacocks Cheers....Simon


 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
19


And
You
Think
You’re
Normal:












Audra
Beeman
 Have
you
ever
wondered
why
being
“Different”
is
not
really
accepted
 in
today’s
society?
A
person
ranging
from
having
disabilities
to
being
 tatted
and
pierced
up
is
looked
at
as
not
being
“normal”.
What
is
 “normal”
Having
a
great
paying
job,
loving
family,
and
a
nice
car?
I
 have
come
across
many
families
that
fit
the
“story
book
family”
and
 their
dads
have
either
cheated
on
their
mom
or
they
are
getting
a
 divorce.
The
mom
is
working
so
many
hours
that
they
can
only
see
 their
kids
when
they
are
struggling
to
throw
a
dinner
together
last
 min.
How
can
you
look
at
someone
that
has
a
strong
passion
for
art
 and
wants
to
show
everybody
what
they
love
and
see
a
freak?
I
don’t
 know
how
many
times
I
have
gone
somewhere
with
my
jacket
on,
 my
jet
black
hair
done
up,
piercings
in,
black
eyeliner
covering
my
 eyes,
and
I
hand
someone
money
from
something
I
bought
and
 watch
their
eyes
move
to
my
tatted
wrist
and
just
stare
at
me
with
 dismay.
We
are
living
in
2007
and
people
still
look
at
Alan
and
me
 with
Culture
Shock.
They
almost
refuse
to
believe
that
people
have
 changed
from
being
poodle
skirt,
tie
wearing
goody
too
shoes.
We
 are
taught
that
it
doesn’t
matter
the
color
of
your
skin
or
the
clothes
 on
your
back.
Then
why
when
people
have
colorful
skin
and
 homemade
jackets
they
are
thought
to
be
drug
addicts,
thieves,
 junkies,
poor,
scum,
freaks
and
all
the
other
words
you
have
heard?

 Look
at
Elvis,
and
how
he
was
“Riske”
and
considered
sinful
because
 of
how
he
shook
his
hips.
Now
people
call
him
the
“King”
and
want
to
 impersonate
him.
In
all
reality
he
was
a
hooked
on
a
ton
of
drugs,
hit
 his
wife,
and
cheated
on
her,
hell
he
even
died
because
he
had
taken
 so
many
drugs
that
day.

Wow
that’s
someone
that
is
really
a
role
 model
huh?

Yet
someone
who
wants
to
carry
a
picture
of
their
dad
 or
something
that
means
a
lot
to
them
on
their
arm
is
living
in
sin.
I
 have
heard
people
say
that
God
wants
you
to
treat
your
body
as
a
 temple
therefore
that’s
why
tattoos
and
piercings
are
wrong.
I
don’t
 know
about
all
of
you
but
a
temple
is
somewhere
you
go
and
 worship
something
and
I
can
do
that
inside
my
body.
It
has
nothing
 to
do
with
your
outside
skin.
What
about
police
officers
and
firemen?
 They
get
put
their
“temple”
in
danger
almost
everyday
yet
they
are
 considered
heroes.

A
bullet
wound
scares
and
damages
the
skin
just
 like
a
tattoo
and
piercing.
Look
at
all
the
technology
we
have
today.
 The
world
is
booming
with
new
things
everyday.
People
are
getting
 smarter
and
more
creative
so
why
wouldn’t
you
expect
the
ideal
 appearance
to
change.




Issue
6
–
Pg.
20
 


The
Terribles
Interview:

 Sternberg













Alan


POB:
First
off,
tell
everyone
who
you
are,
how
old
you
are,
 hometown,
etc...
 Elliott:
I'm
the
Guitarist,
I'm
25
and
I'm
from
Philly
PA.
 Bon:
Well
I'm
Bon.
I'm
21
and
a
better
singer
than
Elliott.
I'm
also
from
 the
Philly
area.
 Tom:
I'm
The
Reverend
Terrible
Tom
Waste,
the
permanent
fill‐in
 bassist
and
vocalist
extraordinaire.
I'm
102
and
I
am
from
my
mother's
 womb.
However,
I
spent
time
in
the
ghetto's
of
daddy's
balls.
 
 POB:
Who
plays
what?
 Tom:
Bass
/
Vocals
/
Jaw
Harp
/
Guitar
/
Beer
/
Alcohol
/
Women
 Elliott:
Guitar
/
Vocals
/
Piano
/
Fiddle
/
Skin
Flute
/
Whiskey
/
My
wife
 Bon:
Drums
and
percussion
/
Vocals
/
Cowbell
/
Whiskey
/
Pirate
Lord
 /
Ultimate
Frisbee
/
Elliott's
Wife...
 Tom:
Oh
yea,
I
play
her
too.
 
 POB:
What's
the
scene
like
in
PA?
 Tom:
The
other
day
I
saw
a
fox
and
I
chased
after
it.
 Elliott:
I
think
the
scene
sucks
in
Philly.
That’s
why
we
travel.
 Bon:
Yea
sure,
what
they
said.
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
21
 POB:
I
personally
love
your
sound.
What
bands
have
influenced
 you
as
a
band?
 Tom:
The
Richless,
American
Waste,
should
I
name
them
all?
 Elliott:
Ya
know
what,
The
Richless
has
influenced
me!
 Tom:
Clint
Liquor,
DWI,
Vaginal
Discharge
aka
VD
 Elliott:
Johnny
Cash
 Tom:
Who?
 Elliott:
Jonathan
R
Cash.
 Tom:
CB4,
2gether
 Elliott:
98
Degrees
and
the
Backstreet
Boys.
Oh
and
Ricky
Martin.
But
 seriously...
 Tom:
Black
Flag,
Misfits,
Ramones,
look
up
rock
and
roll
101
and
you'll
find
 the
rest...
Motorhead.
 Bon:
Metallica,
Godsmack,
Rob
Zombie,
Motorhead,
Motley
Crue,
GN'R,
so
 on
and
yadda
yadda
 Elliott:
Umm..
Muddy
Waters,
Lead
Belly,
David
Allen
Coe,
Stevie
Ray
 Vaughn.
 Tom:
Biggest
influence
on
guitar
Ralph
Macchio
in
Cross
Roads.
 Elliott:
Mine
was
Daisy
Berkowitz
from
Marilyn
Manson.
 Bon:
My
biggest
influence
on
the
drums
was
Tommy
Stewart
of
Godsmack.
 


POB:
You're
obviously
a
punk
band.
In
your
opinion,
what
is
punk
 rock?
 Tom:
A
sub‐genre
of
music
 Elliott:
Rock
and
roll
without
the
talent
 Tom:
What
I
grew
up
on
 Bon:
The
type
of
music
I
couldn't
stand
seeing
the
other
bands
in
high
 school
play
 


POB:
You
just
released
a
debut
album.
What
was
the
inspiration
 behind
it?
 Elliott:
Well
since
I
wrote
most
of
it,
I'd
have
to
say
my
biggest
influence
 for
the
album
was
touring
for
a
solo
album
and
being
piss
drunk
in
 Detroit
sitting
in
a
$30
hotel
room
on
the
fabled
8‐mile.
 Tom:
My
influence
was
agreeing
to
fill
in
on
bass.
Possibly
the
worst
 mistake
I
ever
made.
 Bon:
A
broken
mood
ring
that
was
stuck
on
black.
Oh
and
the
girl
who
 wore
it
I
would
have
to
say.
 


POB:
How'd
the
Terribles
come
about?
 Elliott:
Well,
I
needed
a
backup
band
to
play
a
bunch
of
songs
I'd
written
 while
I
was
touring
for
my
last
solo
album.
I
was
looking
for
a
bass
 player
and
I
asked
the
bass
player
from
the
Richless
if
he
wanted
to
 jump
on,
but
he
said
no.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
22


Tom:
I
was
sitting
next
to
the
ex‐bass
player
and
so
I
jumped
in
on
the
 conversation
while
I
was
extremely
drunk
and
volunteered
to
do
it.
 Elliott:
I
said
okay,
and
so
I
stumbled
home
and
happened
upon
Bon
getting
 a
massage
from
my
brother.
 Bon:
First
of
all,
Elliott
you're
a
filthy
whore.
Secondly,
it
was
the
best
 massage
I've
ever
had.
He's
a
real
pro.
Anyway
that's
a
story
for
another
 time.
So
I'm
in
Elliott's
house
getting
said
massage
and
Elliott
comes
 stumbling
through
his
front
door
completely
smashed.
I
don't
even
know
 how
he
slurred
a
coherent
train
of
thought,
but
he
says
"Hey...
you
play
 drums!
I
wrote
album...
wanna
be
in
a
band?"
So
I
say
sure
and
stared
at
 him
blankly
for
the
next
hour
while
he
repeated
himself
again
and
again.
He
 went
upstairs,
passed
out,
and
I
finished
up
my
massage
and
went
home.
 No
happy
ending!
No
Tip!
haha
Anyway,
three
weeks
later
we're
in
my
 basement
working
on
our
first
songs
together.
Four
weeks
later
Tom
shows
 up...
drunk...
Very
drunk.

 POB:
I
think
the
acoustic
songs
on
Banned
For
Life
are
great
 because
it
shows
maturity.
Was
that
a
goal?
 Tom:
Personally
I
did
not
know
about
these
songs
until
I
was
asked
to
 sing
on
one
of
them.
 Elliott:
Bon
strong‐armed
himself
onto
Devil.
He
said
"I'm
singing
on
 this"
and
I
said
okay.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
23
 Bon:
Yep,
sounds
about
right.
Although
Elliott
didn't
do
it
the
way
I
 wanted
to
do
it
so
I
think
it
could
have
turned
out
better
if
of
course
it
 was
done
my
way.
lol
 Elliott:
The
acoustic
songs
were
just
kind
of
a
carry
over
from
the
solo
 stuff
and
they
just
became
part
of
our
presence
as
a
band.
 Tom:
Going
back
to
the
influences...
Vanilla
Ice.
Word
to
ya
mutha'.
 Bon:
Like
Elliott
said,
he
had
his
solo
acoustic
songs
from
his
solo
 projects
and
I
liked
some
of
them.
From
there
we
agreed
to
transpose
 some
of
those
into
"Terribles
songs"
and
in
turn
left
some
as
straight
 acoustic
tunes
and
put
them
on
the
album.
In
fact
you
may
or
may
not
 hear
one
or
two
acoustic
tracks
on
the
next
album.
 


POB:
What
do
you
think
of
pop
cultures'
take
on
punk
rock
and
the
 whole
indie
scene?
 Tom:
Where's
my
money?!
 Bon:
Oh
boy
you've
opened
up
a
whole
can
or
worms
on
this
one.
I've
 never
been
a
fan
of
pop
culture's
punk.
Most
of
it
just
annoys
the
living
 crap
out
of
me.
The
guys
apparently
need
to
have
the
tight
jeans
that
 they
stole
from
their
younger
sister
in
order
to
play
music.
I
see
it
this
 way.
When
music
can
be
the
worst
sounding
dieing
cat
thing
you've
 ever
experienced
and
yet
it
will
gain
recognition
and
a
solid
following
 because
a
band
calls
themselves
a
punk
band
and
because
they
spend
 more
money
on
one
ridiculous
looking
outfit
(to
be
worn
over
and
over
 every
day
of
the
week)
than
any
person
would
spend
on
a
brand
new
 car,
I
think
there
is
a
serious
problem
there.
It's
definitely
ass
 backwards
when
that
is
what
determines
a
real
punk
rocker.
The
music
 should
be
the
determining
factor
of
what's
punk,
not
the
fashion.
 Elliott:
I'm
not
particularly
a
big
fan
of
it.
I
think
anybody
who
buys
a
 pair
of
jeans
with
holes
in
them
at
double
the
price
when
I
can
buy
a
 whole
pair
of
jeans
for
half
the
price
and
when
mohawks
and
lip
rings
 are
on
three
year
olds,
it's
out
of
hand.
This
shit
just
makes
me
sick.
 Tom:
I'm
too
poor
to
afford
to
LOOK
punk
rock.

 


POB:
Are
you
planning
a
tour
to
promote
the
new
album?
 Elliott:
YES!
Book
us!
We'll
play
anywhere,
anytime,
just
pay
us
and
feed
 us
beer.
 Bon:
Elliott
you're
a
whore.
 Tom:
I
agree
with
them
both.
 


POB:
I've
heard
you
have
a
really
good
live
how.
Are
the
Terribles
 best
live?
 Elliott:
Absolutely
 Bon:
So
I've
been
told.
 Tom:
I've
never
seen
us
live.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
24
 Bon:
That's
cause
he's
been
too
obliterated
to
play
half
the
songs,
let
 alone
remember
the
show.
 Tom:
Only
the
ones
I
wrote.
 Elliott:
And
the
ones
that
we've
practiced
the
most.
 Tom:
So
what's
your
point?
Grab
me
a
beer.
 [Elliott
hands
Tom
a
beer]
[Bon
shakes
his
head...
then
takes
one
as
well]


POB:
What's
your
hope
for
the
future
of
the
band?
 Tom:
Hip
Hop
 Elliott:
Do
it
as
a
job.
I'm
not
saying
be
famous.
Just
pay
my
mortgage.
 Tom:
My
hope
is
to
be
alive
in
the
future
to
be
able
to
play
in
the
future.
 Bon:
I
just
don't
want
to
have
a
day
job
that
I
actually
need
anymore.
If
I
 can
play
music
and
live
off
of
that,
I'll
have
no
complaints
with
it.
 


POB:
Where's
the
best
place
you've
ever
played?
 Tom:
Whoever,
wherever
you
are
insert
generic
town
name
here.
Book
 us!
Or
is
it
whomever?
Hmm.
 Elliott:
Full
Moon
Saloon
in
Baltimore.
One
of
the
greatest
nights
of
my
 life.
 Bon:
That
place
that
we
played
way
back
at
that
one
time.
Remember?
 Elliott:
Oh
Yeah!
 Bon:
Yeah
the
place
with
the
people
who
were
doing
all
that
stuff
and
 saying
those
words.
Yeah,
that
was
a
good
night
when
the
things
 happened
and
everybody
ended
up
chanting
"Terribles!"
and
made
us
 come
out
and
do
an
encore.
Yeah...
Good
times!
Good
times.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
26
 


POB:
How
can
people
get
a
hold
of
the
band?
 Tom:
With
their
hands.
 Elliott:
We
have
websites.
In
fact:
 http://www/theterribles.net
 http://www.myspace.com/theterribles
 Bon:
I
like
Tom's
idea;
Grab
me.
 *Disclaimer*
Ladies
only.
 *Disclaimer
Disclaimer*
Please
don't,
my
girlfriend
would
kill
you...
and
 me.
 *Disclaimer
Disclaimer
Disclaimer*
Or
just
make
sure
she
doesn't
find
 out.
 *Disclaimer
Disclaimer
Disclaimer
Disclaimer*
I'm
just
kidding
baby.
 This
was
for
you.
Please
don't
hurt
me,
haha!
*Wink*


POB:
Thanks
or
last
words?
 Elliott:
Visit
theterribles.net
and
buy
our
album.
Thats
not
asking
for
too
 much
is
it?
 Bon:
So
Tom...
How
was
your
sammich?
 Tom:
It
was
fucking
incredible.
How
was
yours?
 Bon:
Mine
was
amazing.
Hey
Elliott
how
was
your
food?
 Elliott:
Fuck
you
guys!
 Tom:
P.S...
To
answer
the
quesion:
Zygote.



Issue
6
–
Pg.
27
 


Growing
Up:













Alan


Sternberg


It’s
funny
how
things
change
 when
you
grow
up.

One
day
 you’ve
got
everything
and
you
 do
what
you
think
you
want
 and
the
next,
you’re
working
 all
the
time
just
to
get
by.

You
 try
to
do
what’s
best
but
you
 miss
out
on
all
the
things
you
 want
to
do.

In
the
past
two
 months,
I’ve
missed
out
on
a
 ton
of
things
that
I’ve
wanted
 to
do
so
bad.

I’ve
grown
away
 from
my
friends
and
family
 but
wish
desperately
to
get
 back
to
where
I
once
was.

I
 just
realized
I
haven’t
been
to
 a
punk
show
in
seven
months.

 There
was
a
period
where
I
 only
was
riding
my
bike
once
 or
twice
a
month.

So
what’s
really
changed?

School
takes
up
less
 time
than
it
did
in
High
School.

I
work
a
lot
but
it’s
seasonal
(thus
 I’m
poor
6
months
out
of
the
year).

So
when
I
don’t
have
school
 and
I
don’t
have
work,
what’s
keeping
me
from
having
fun?

 Maturity
is
the
only
thing
I
can
think
of.

I
decided
not
to
go
to
 Washington
(even
though
I
already
had
a
plain
ticket)
because
I
 knew
I
couldn’t
pay
bills
after
I
got
back.

I
fucking
hate
it.

I
hate
 that
I
can’t
be
care
free
anymore.

I’m
pissed
I
can’t
ride
my
bike
 like
I
want
to.

I’ve
missed
a
hundred
good
shows
because
I
can’t
 bring
myself
to
ask
off
a
day
of
work.

So
where
does
that
leave
 me
now?

I’m
20
years
old
but
I
feel
like
I’m
40.

I
enjoy
my
job
(as
 a
sauté
cook)
but
I
can’t
wait
to
get
out
of
school.

I
can’t
wait
to
 get
paid
to
do
what
I
do
in
my
free
time
(taking
photos).

I
guess
 it’s
not
all
bad
though.

I
still
get
to
ride,
take
pictures,
have
money
 (most
of
the
time),
and
have
an
awesome
girlfriend
that’s
really
 been
there
for
me
when
I
need
it.

Sure
there
are
tons
of
things
I
 want
to
do
still
and
hopefully
I’ll
have
a
chance
to
fulfill
a
lot
of
 those
dreams.






Issue
6
–
Pg.
29
 


Grodees
Interview:





by:
Audra
Beeman


PoB: Will you please introduce yourselves? Grodees: Ryan, Gregg, Billy, Chris, Dan PoB: Where are you guys from? Grodees: Rushville, IN PoB: How did you get the name? Grodees: Gregg has been called Grody for as long as I can remember. Where that came from, I don't know, but we all know him as that. Hence the name. PoB: What genre would you say you were? Grodees: Whatever you want to call it. Punk, Junk Rock, Rock 'n' Roll, or whatever. PoB: What sticks out in your mind as being a breaking moment for the band? Grodees: When we knew it was coming together and made it through The Battle of The Bands in Hickville (Rushville). PoB: How long have you been in a band together? Grodees: I have to count on my fingers for the years. It would be about 4 months.


 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
30
 


PoB: Where is your favorite place to play? Grodees: Anywhere. PoB: What are you listening to right now? Grodees: Eerie Von.

PoB: Are you signed with a label if not do you plan to? Grodees: No, we are not signed. If we do, that would be cool, but most of us have family commitments. PoB: How has music changed your life? Grodees: That's what we live for. We have listened to hardcore, punk, metal, thrash, death, pop, and everything else. PoB: How many albums do you have out? Grodees: Zero. We just started playing in February. PoB: How many shows would you say you have played? Grodees: Two so far, with more scheduled. PoB: What’s the craziest thing you have experienced being in a band. Grodees: A band member being threatened to get their ass kicked while on stage. Drunk chicks who don't remember what they said the next day or what they were gonna do that night.


Issue
6
–
Pg.
31
 


PoB: What is your favorite thing about being in a band? Grodees: Having fun. Putting smiles on people's faces that wanna slam in the pit. PoB: What made you decide you wanted to be in a band? Grodees: We all love music. PoB: How did you meet your band members? Grodees: I have known Chris and Gregg since high school and they all asked me to join this band. Then once I joined the band, I met Dan and Billy. They are the coolest, down to earth guys you would ever want to know. PoB: Where do you see The Grodees in 5 years? Grodees: Having fun, drinking beer, and taking care of the things that matter. Being friends, like always. PoB: I love the way you guys sound, how would you describe that sound to someone that has never heard you? Grodees: Be ready for a surprise, punk, fun, and just let it go. PoB: What sets you apart from any other band? Grodees: I think we have more fun than anybody out there because we enjoy it and love seeing people having fun listening to our music. PoB: How can people reach you guys? Grodees: MySpace, The Grodees. PoB: Anything else you would like to say? Grodees: If you're not having fun, it's not worth it. Listen to The Grodees.



 
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
33


Burn
Your
Flag:
 






by:
Alan
Sternberg


This
is
becoming
somewhat
of
a
growing
concern
for
me.

Did
you
 know
that
in
Indiana,
it
is
illegal
to
burn
a
flag?

However,
 according
to
the
US
Bill
of
Rights,
flag
burning
is
protected
under
 the
First
Amendment.

So
why
does
this
happen?

How
and
why
 can
a
state
create
a
law
that
impedes
on
your
Constitutional
 rights?

There
are
people
in
this
country
that
treat
the
flag
as
if
it’s
 a
religious
symbol.

People
are
willing
to
die
for
it
and
treat
it
 better
then
they
treat
some
people.

So
what’s
the
point?

The
 point
it
there
are
legislators
that
are
trying
to
pass
a
 constitutional
amendment
prohibiting
the
burning
of
flags.

So
 maybe
you’re
against
flag
burning.

It
doesn’t
matter,
once
the
 government
starts
to
take
away
your
rights,
it’s
a
slippery
slope.

 The
Patriot
Act
already
takes
away
your
rights
to
Due
Process.

So
 does
a
grand
jury.

This
should
alarm
you.

Now
back
to
the
point
 at
hand.

The
way
an
amendment
is
passed,
¾
of
the
states
have
to
 ratify
it.

Another
one
of
my
main
concerns
is
that
even
if
the
flag
 is
treated
as
a
religious
symbol,
the
government
is
supposed
to
be
 separate
from
religion.

The
shear
thought
is
appalling
to
me.

So
 what
are
we
going
to
do
about
it.

The
government
doesn’t
have
 our
best
interests
at
heart.

Legislators
have
the
lobbyist’s
best
 interest
at
heart.

They
 only
care
enough
 about
John
Doe
 enough
to
get
a
vote.

I
 think
it’s
funny
that
 Americans
will
get
 behind
a
clear
 violation
of
their
 rights
when
it
deals
 with
flag
burning
but
 the
idea
of
universal
 health
coverage
is
 shot
down
by
officials
 saying
it’s
a
Communist
idea.

So
they
won’t
touch
free
trade
(yet)
 but
free
speech,
probably
the
single
most
important
right
that
we
 have,
is
just
being
tossed
aside.

So
I
dear
you,
burn
your
flags.

 Fight
the
system
and
get
state
laws
changed.

Protect
your
rights
 while
you
still
have
them!



Issue
6
–
Pg.
34
 


Photos:


David
Grant
quick
hop
to
hop

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg


Alan
Sternberg
bank
whip

Photo:
David
Grant



 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
35


Nick
Carunchia
10
set
360
in
New
Castle

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg



Issue
6
–
Pg.
37
 


Alan
Sternberg
invert
at
Joel’s
house

Photo:
Audra
Beeman
 



 Kole
Grove
dipped
360
in
Greenwood

Photo:
David
Grant



Issue
6
–
Pg.
38
 


Muncie
Mike
floats
a
table
at
the
Greenway
Trails

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg
 


David
Grant
rail
feeble
180

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg
 



Issue
6
–
Pg.
39
 


Alan
Sternberg
wall
ride
to
table
in
Marion

Photo:
David
Grant



Issue
6
–
Pg.
40
 


David
Grant
huge
ledge
ride
to
rail
hop
at
the
RCA
Dome

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg



Issue
6
–
Pg.
41
 


Pat
Anderson
turndown
at
the
Greenway
Trails

Photo:
David
Grant



Issue
6
–
Pg.
42


Junar
Gwinn
ledge
manual
in
Anderson

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg



Issue
6
–
Pg.
43
 


Alan
Sternberg
long
up
feeble

Photo:
David
Grant



Issue
6
–
Pg.
44


Nick
Carunchia
big
hop
to
barspin
in
Muncie

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg



Issue
6
–
Pg.
45
 


Reviews:


Sly
singing
for
the
Mediocres
during
their
last
show

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg


American
Hardcore
(Movie)









































by:
Alan
Sternberg
 This
movie
was
awesome.

I've
been
waiting
a
long
time
to
see
it.

I
can't
 say
the
film
was
as
good
as
the
book
but
with
lots
of
mini‐interviews
 and
lots
of
live
clips,
this
film
doesn't
disappoint.

The
only
real
negative
 thing
I
could
say
was
it
doesn't
touch
any
on
the
Dead
Kennedys.

DK
 was
such
a
major
part
of
the
scene
that
I
couldn't
believe
a
band
like
 that
wouldn't
get
any
real
mention.

That
aside,
the
film
does
seem
to
hit
 most
of
the
major
bases
and
really
helps
to
define
the
 movement.

Watch
the
movie
and
read
the
book.

Both
are
amazing.
 9/10
 



Brain
Dead:
Cheap
Beer
Will
Make
Us
Go
Away
(DVD)


 by:
Alan
Sternberg
 Brain
Dead
is
a
skinhead
band
from
South
Bend.

This
DVD
chronicles
 the
bands
2005
Midwest
tour.

It
was
obviously
cheaply
produced
but
 something
about
local
bands
producing
DVD’s
makes
since
to
me.

This
 DVD
is
%100
DYI
and
shows
the
band
at
its
best
(live).

I
don’t
know
if
 you
can
get
this
DVD
anymore
since
the
band
has
changed
names
 (Whiskey
Riot)
but
I’m
a
huge
fan
of
Brain
Dead.

Lots
of
energy
and
 somewhat
catchy
songs
leave
a
lasting
impression.


 7/10



Issue
6
–
Pg.
46
 Another
State
of
Mind
(Movie)


































by:
Alan
Sternberg
 Another
State
of
Mind
chronicles
the
82
Youth
Brigade
and
Social
 Distortion
tour.

The
trip
took
them
from
SoCal
all
over
the
US
and
 Canada.

The
tour
really
ends
when
they
break
down
in
DC
and
all
of
 Social
Distortion
but
Mike
Ness
jumped
ship.

Even
though
the
film's
 more
about
Youth
Brigade,
the
title
comes
from
Mike
Ness
writing
the
 song
"Another
State
of
Mind"
during
the
course
of
the
movie.

I
thought
 it
was
a
really
good
interpretation
of
the
scene
and
was
amazed
 something
like
this
came
out
of
that
time
period.

 9/10
 


Mediocres
Last
Show
/
CD
Release
(Show)

















by:
Alan
 Sternberg
 If
you
know
the
Mediocres,
you
know
they’re
full
of
energy
and
fun.

I
 can’t
believe
I
won’t
see
them
again.

They
were
a
local
band
for
a
long
 time
in
Anderson
but
after
the
scene
fell
apart,
they
retreated
to
their
 hometown
of
Marion.

The
show
was
at
a
Mancinos
Pizza.

$5
to
get
in
 and
food,
not
to
mention
the
six
bands
that
played
the
show.

All
of
the
 bands
were
amazing.

The
Mediocres
played
a
blistering
long,
but
good,
 set
that
was
a
real
treat
(seeing
as
it
was
there
last
show).

Tons
of
good
 music,
good
friends,
a
positive
attitude,
and
just
old
fashioned
fun
made
 it
an
amazing
show.

Also,
if
you’ve
never
seen
The
Wombat,
go
see
 them.

They’ll
blow
your
mind.
 10/10


Mike
sings
during
what
can
only
be
described
as
a
Wombat
Party

Photo:
Alan
Sternberg




PoB Issue 6th