Page 1

THE ART OF

TYPOGRAPHY

2018


Table of Contents

14

4 logo

6 intro

8

16 18

typo graphical terms

picto graphs

sketch book

2 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


20

36 pop!

Museum logos

22 Museum poster

24 ubiquitous type

26 historical report

54 58

redesign: news letters

fonts used


logo 4 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


intro

Stephani de Los An artist a designi manuall designs, Her p herself, want design in

6 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


ie Santiago is a first year graphic esign student attending FIDM in ngeles. Her passion started as an at an early age hand drawing and ing a variety of works. She would ly design banners, t-shirts, tattoo and even do sculpture artworks. passion for creating, not only for , but for others is what made her t to become a graphic designer to n a different perspective and on a much bigger platform.


No one knows why ‘A’ is the first letter of our alphabet.

the letter a

Some think it’s because this letter represents one of the most common vowel sounds in ancient languages of the western hemisphere. Other sources

argue

against

this theory because there were no vowel sounds in the Phoenician language. (The Phoenician alphabet is generally thought to be the basis of the one we use today.) No one also knows why the ‘A’ looks the way it does, but we can construct a fairly logical chain of events. Some say the Phoenicians chose the head of an ox to represent the ‘A’ sound (for the Phoenicians, this was actually a glottal stop). The ox was a common, important animal to the Phoenicians. It was their main power source for heavy work. Oxen plowed the fields, harvested crops, and hauled food to market. Some sources also claim that the ox was often the main course at meals. A symbol for the ox would have been an important communication tool for the Phoenicians. It somewhat naturally follows that an ox symbol would be the first letter of the alphabet.

8 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


uh a B

s u a To say that the whole graphic design industry owes its life to the Bauhaus movement would be a serious understatement. The Bauhaus typography is especially credited for the development of modern day graphic and industrial design. There have been numerous articles and studies on the effects of the German school on today’s art world, but today, we are choosing to focus on the Bauhaus typography and bring you the best of the best of this category. But first, let’s look back on what Bauhaus is, and why is it so important.


the letter f

In its earliest years, the letter that evolved into our F was an Egyptian hieroglyph that literally was a picture of a snake. This was around 3,000 B.C. Through the process of simplification over many years, the F began to lose its snakelike character, and by the time it emerged as an Egyptian hieratic form it wasn’t much more than a vertical stroke capped by a small crossbar. With a slight stretch of the imagination, it could be said to look like a nail.

This may be why the Phoenicians called the letter “waw,” a word meaning nail or hook, when they adapted the symbol for their alphabet. In its job as a waw, the charactertrepresented a semiconsonant sound, roughly pronounced as the W in the word “know.” However, at various times the waw also represented the ‘v’ and sometimes even the ‘u’ sound. When the Greeks assimilated the Phoenician alphabet, they handled the confusing waw with typically Greek logic: they split it into two characters. One represented the semi-consonant W and the other became the forerunner of our V. (The ‘w’ sound became the Greek digamma, or double gamma, and was constructed by placing one gamma on top of another.)

10 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


textura

The name textura refers to the fabric-like quality of a page set in the script; “textura” literally means “an even effect in weaving.” Textura is often said to bear a stylistic similarity to this new style of art and architecture. Together with Gothic art and architecture, Textura spread across Europe, taking hold everywhere except Italy, which did not show much appreciation for the Gothic. Two types of textura flourished simultaneously: Textura Quadrata, which features diamond-shaped heads and feet; and Textura Prescisus, which is characterized by the absence of feet and an even baseline.


The Question Mark

The basic form of the question mark was developed much later, in sixteenth-century England. Most typographic historians contend that the design for the question mark was derived from an abbreviation of the Latin word quaestio, which simply means “what.” At first this symbol consisted of a capital Q atop a lowercase ‘o’. Over time this early logotype was simplified to the mark we use today. The question mark [ ? ] (also known as interrogation point, query, or eroteme in journalism) is a punctuation mark that indicates an interrogative clause or phrase in many languages. The question mark is not used for indirect questions. The question mark glyph is also often used in place of missing or unknown data.

12 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


Elephant

Elephant is an ultra-bold serif typeface intended for display use, designed as a digital font by British font designer Matthew Carter. Elephant is a ‘fat face’ design, inspired by fonts intended for use for posters developed by Vincent Figgins in London in the early nineteenth century.


distre

irregular contours appeara

typo graphical terms cursive

any style of penmanship in which some characters are written joined together in a flowing manner

calligraphy

design and execution of lettering with a broad tip instrument, brush, or other writing instruments.

t r a c k i n g a consistent degree of increase (or sometimes decrease) of space between letters to affect density in a line or block of text.

obliq

grotesque

used as a synonym for sans serif fonts in general. Refers to the set of sans serif fonts produced around 1815.

a form of type that slan right, used for the sa italic ty

â—?bul

is a typographical sym to introduce ite

blackletter

ser

was the culminating artistic expression of the middle ages, occurring roughly from 1200—1500.

a small line attached stroke in a letter

transitional

they represent the initial departurfrom centuries of Old Style tradition and immediately predate the Modern period.

D

a typographical flouris an exaggerat

rop cap is a letter at the beginning of a word, a chapter, or a paragraph that is larger than the rest of the text.

Slab Serif

14

swas

typeface is a type of serif typeface characterized by thick, block-like serifs.

S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


hairline rule a line with a stroke of .25

essed wood type

and weathered ance

large letters carved out in wood to print

que

ligature

nts slightly to the ame purposes as ype

llet

mbol or glyph used ems in a list.

rif

d to the end of a r or symbol.

sh

sh on a glyph, like ted serif.

occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph.

12 pt. rule a line with a stroke of 12

Reversed Process of printing light colored or white text on a dark or black background, used for emphasis or producing a visual impact.

kern in g

the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result

g∠γΡh

an individual character. It might be a letter, an accented letter, a ligature, a punctuation mark, a dingbat, etc.

the art of drawing letters

✯♥✈☛❋

dingbat an ornament, character, or spacer used in typesetting, often employed for the creation of box frames.

DISPLAY

a typeface that is intended for use at large sizes for headings, rather than for extended passages of body text.


picto graphs 16 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


sketch book

18 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


Museum logos 20 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


musueum of modern typography

musueum of modern typography

museum

of

modern

typography


Museum poster 22 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


Museum of Modern Typography Presents

Maximiliano Sproviero August 21 October 18, 2018 Showcasing designs from Maximiliano Sproviero Born in Buenos Ares, Argentina, 1987. Graduated as a Graphic Designer from Universidad de Buenos Ares in 2010. He specializes in calligraphy and type design. His creations have been used and awarded around the world.

MUSEUM OF MODERN TYPOGRAPHY

221 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90012 www.museumofmoderntypography.com


ubiquitous type THE PRESENCE OF TYPOGRAPHY BOTH GOOD AND BAD CAN BE SEEN EVERYWHERE

T

24

ypography makes at least two kinds of sense, if it makes any sense at all. It makes visual sense and historical sense. The visual side of typography is always on display, and materials for the study of its visual form are many and widespread. The history of letter- forms and their usage is visible too, to those with access to manuscripts, inscriptions and old books, but from others it is largely hidden. This book has therefore grown into some-thing more than a short manual of typographic etiquette. It is the fruit of a lot of long walks in the wilderness of letters: in part a pocket field guide to the living wonders that are found there, and in part a meditation on the ecological principles, survival techniques, and ethics that apply. The principles of typography as I understand them are not a set of dead conventions but the tribal customs of the magic forest, where ancient voices speak from all directions and new ones move to unremembered forms. One question, nevertheless, has

commandments, suggestions, and instructions? Surely typographers, like others, ought to be at liberty to follow or to blaze the trails they choose. Typography thrives as a shared concern - and there are no paths at all where there are no shared desires and directions. A typographer determined to forge new routes must move, like other solitary travellers, through uninhabited country and against the grain of the land, crossing common thoroughfares in the silence before dawn. The subject of this book is not typographic solitude, but the old, well travelled roads at the core of the tradition: paths that each of us is free to follow or not, and to enter and leave when we choose - if only we know the paths are there and have a sense of where they lead.That freedom is denied us if the tradition is concealed or left for dead. Originality is everywhere, but much originality is blocked if the way back to earlier discoveries is cut or overgrown. If you use this to become more different still, how can book as a guide, by all means leave the one honestly write a rulebook? What road when you wish. That is pre- cisely reason and authority exist for these the use of a road: to reach individually been often in my mind. When all rightthinking human beings are struggling to remember that other men and women are free to be different, and free

S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


“Typography is the craft of endowing human language with a durable visual form, and thus with an independent existence.” chosen points of departure. By all means break the rules, and break them beautifully, deliberately, and well. That is one of the ends for which they exist. Letterforms change constantly, yet differ very little, because they are alive. The principles of typographic clarity have also scarcely altered since the second half of the fifteenth century, when the first books were printed in roman type. Indeed, most of the principles of legibility and design explored in this book were known and used by Egyptian scribes writing hieratic script with reed pens on papyrus in 1000 B.C. Samples of their work sit now in museums in Cairo, London and New York, still lively, subtle, and perfectly legible thirty centuries after they were made. Writing systems vary, but a good page is not hard to learn to recognize, whether it comes from Tang Dynasty China, The Egyptian New Kingdom typographers set for themselves than with the mutable or Renaissance Italy. The principles that unite these distant schools of design are

based on the structure and scale of the human body the eye, the hand, and the forearm in particular - and on the invisible but no less real, no less demanding, no less sensuous anatomy of the human mind. I don’t like to call these principles universals, because they are largely unique to our species. Dogs and ants, for example, read and write by more chemical means. But the underlying principles of typography are, at any rate, stable enough to weather any number of human fashions and fads. Typography is the craft of endowing human language with a durable visual form, and thus with an independent existence. It is true that typographer’s tools are presently changing with considerable force and speed, but this is not a manual in the use of any particular typesetting system or medium. I suppose that most readers of this book will set most of their type in digital form, using computers, but I have no preconceptions about which brands of computers, or which versions of which proprietary software, they use.


historical report

26 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


ood reat you can do a

ad without good typography but you can’t do a

ad without good

typography

-Herb Lubalin


Intro: 28 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


Herb Lubalin(1918-1981) was a brilliant, innovative, New York designer that worked across many fields including posters, advertising, signage, postage stamps, typeface, and editorial design. His work incorporated tight letterspacing, extreme kerning, and overall handling of type in an illustrative and expressive way employing it as graphic elements. These were typographic capabilities that were never done before and influenced many designers around the globe.


1976 paperback book cover for the reprint Beards: Their Social Standing, Religious Involvements, Decorative Possibilities, and Value in Offence and Defence Through the Ages (1949) by Reginald Reynolds

Herb

Lubalin was a celebrated twentieth century American graphic designer. He is recognized for his collaboration with Ralph Ginzburg on three of Ginzburg’s magazines. The magazines showcased his artistic skills as he brought out the creative visual beauty of these publications. ITC Avant Garde typeface is one of his creations and it is mostly known for being a revision of art-deco. On March 17, 1918, Herbert F. Lubalin was born in New York, United States. At the age of seventeen, he was enrolled in a privately funded college located in the East Village, Cooper Union. An array of possibilities offered by the field of typography as a communicative implement fascinated him. Lubalin learned about the fundamentals of typography and was awestruck by the impact a typeface can have if traded with another and how it affects the whole text’s interpretation. Upon receiving his graduation degree in 1939, he had a rough time searching a suitable job.

He was able to get a job at a display firm, though he got sacked after requesting a two dollar raise on his weekly salary. Soon after, Lubalin found work at Reiss Advertising and eventually he was landed a job at Sudler & Hennessey. At S & H he became a practitioner of a wide range of skills. In fact, it was he who attracted talent from multidiscipline, such as design, typography and photography, to the firm. While working there he made associates with George Lois, John Pistilli and Art Kane. He stayed with Sudler & Hennessey for two long decades before he decided to establish his own design firm, Herb Lubalin, Inc in 1964. With the foundation of his private studio he enjoyed the liberty of taking on a variety of art projects. He excelled in a number of projects including poster designing, magazine designing and packaging and identity solutions. Lubalin’s talent was best manifested when he designed Ralph Ginzburg’s succession of magazines; Eros, Fact and Avant Garde.

30 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


32 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y Avant Garde (January 1968 to issue 14 summer 1971) provided Lubalin with a large format of wide typographic experimentation; the page format was an almost square 11.25 by 10.75 inches bound in a carboard cover, a physical quality that, coupled with Lubalin’s layouts, caught the attention of many in the New York design scene.


“Mother & Child” was a magazine that has never been published. It was designed by Herb Lubalin and Tom Carnase in 1965. Families was designed in 1980 and marriage was designed in 1965.

AD 1958 - Sudler, Hennessey & Lubalin

released in 1965, went on to be one of the most successful movies of all time.”

After 10 years working at Sudler & Hennessey as an art director, Herb was elevated to the role of vice-president and creative director of a design division which now included his name in its title.

In 1968, Lubalin, Smith, Carnase, Inc., was approached by the Port Authority of New York to create a visual identity for the World Trade Center. Lubalin created an equally modern, geometric logo which references the towers’ iconic shape and their ‘twinning’.

After two decades of working at Sudler & Hennessey, Lubalin left to found Herb Lubalin, Inc. He was quoted saying:

“You have account executives, agency presidents, copywriters, marketing experts, media and production people. If there’s a choice between going with a good ad or changing it, an account executive will change it. Since I know better than anyone else what I’m doing, the only way I can function is to deal directly with the client’…and that’s precisely what Herb Lubalin, Inc, set out to do.”


Collaborations of Herb Lubalin Ralph Ginzburg

34 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


g Eros

The first of Ginzburg and Lubalin’s three productions, Eros was a quarterly hardbound publication filled with articles and photo-essays relating to the topics of love and sex. During the radical 1960s the publication was received with both positive and negative reviews and Ginzburg was indicted under federal obscenity laws for the publication of the fourth issue. The combination of the high cost of the hardbound publication and the legal fees incurred during Ginzburg’s court case cause the magazine to close down.

Fact

Fact magazine was a similar venture by the two that was equally controversial, although it shifted the subject matter from sex to culture and politics. The magazine was sued by presidential candidate Barry Goldwater for their publication of an article that said Goldwater was psychologically unfit to be president of the United States. The punitive damages of the case caused the magazine to cease publication.

Avant Garde

The most notable of the three, Avant Garde was reminiscent of Eros in its hardbound format and controversial content. The magazine combined aspects of both Fact and Eros and published articles and imagery that were often sexual, critical of the American government and radically different than traditional publications. While there was no direct legal actions brought against Avant Garde it was forced to shut down when Ginzburg went to prison for the Eros scandal. The recognizable typographic logo for Avant Garde led to the design and production of an entire Avant Garde typeface.


pop!

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!

pop

visual project issue one volume eleven

in

:

sue

is this

Kanye West Frank Ocean Frida Kahlo Picasso Marilyn Monroe


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frank ocean kanye west frida kahlo marylin monroe

picasso

pop! in this issue: volume eleven issue one visual project


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p p! o

picasso kanyewest frida kahlo frankocean maryn ilmonroe in this issue: volume eleven issue one

v i s u a l

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in this issue: f f m k p pop!

rank ocean

rida kahlo arylin monroe

anye west

icasso

issue one volume eleven visual project


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STEPHANIE SANTIAGO


pop!

picasso frank ocean kanye west frida kahlo marylin monroe

in this issue: volume eleven issue one visual project


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STEPHANIE SANTIAGO


pop!

issue one volume eleven

visual project


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STEPHANIE SANTIAGO


pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! volume eleven pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! issue one pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! tpop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! visual projec pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop! pop!

in this issue: picasso frida kahlo kanyewest frankocean maryn il monroe


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p

in this issue:

picasso

frank ocean

marylin monroe kanye west

frida kahlo

p!

volume eleven visual project issue one


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redesign: news letters

54 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


April 23 - MAy 4 Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

DIY Air Plants

We’re celebrating Earth Month! Add more greenery to your apartment by decorating your own plant pottery to take home with you. Supplies will be provided.

Tuesday, April 24 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Student Lounge Patio

The Industry Club Welcomes:

Celebrity Fashion Designer

Intrested in being a fashion designer and entreprenuer? Hear from celebrity designer, Walter Mendez, whose creations have been featured on celebrities like Beyonce, Britney Spears, Selena Gomez, Mel B, Jennifer Lopez, Camila Cabello and more.

Denim Day Wear denim with a purpose, support survivors, and educate yourself and others about sexual assualt and rape! Sign our pledge to support survivors. #endrapeculture

Wednesday, April 25 All Day

Tuesday, April 24 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425 FIDM MODETM Magazine Hosts:

A Look Behind the Magazine

Interested in learning what it takes to put a magazine together? Join FIDM MODETM Magazine for our first photoshoot of the quarter, a make-over!

Thursday. April 26 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

The Industry Club Hosts:

Phi Theta Kappa Social:

Self Defense Class Join PTK for this safety workshop led by Peace Over Violence. Empowerment selfdefense is a set of awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies, and physical techniques. These enable one to successfully prevent, escape, resist, and survive violent assaults. Sign up in Room 425.

Friday, April 27 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 500

Student Council Hosts:

Confidence Pinkies Up: An email ettiquette Workshop workshop Lost for words when you have to send a professional email? No worries, we got you! Join us for tea time and learn the unwritten rules of email etiquette to make the best impressions.

Tuesday, May 1 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425

You got what it takes, you just haven’t realized it yet. Learn impactful ways to let your confidence speak for you. Whether your’e asking someone out on a date, going to an interview, networking or asking for a raise, confidence is key.

Wednesday, May 2 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

Girl Power Day Ladies! Let’s have a serious (and fun) chat about our bodies. Remove the stigma that comes with being a woman. Embrace your femininity and feel empowered with PTK. Who runs the world?!

Tuesday, May 1 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

FIDM MODE™ Magazine:

FIDM Tote Bag Challenge! Looking for a way to get involved in MODE™ Magazine? Here’s your chance to showcase your talent. MODE is looking for fun and creative designed FIDM Tote Bags to feature in their upcoming issue. Take the classic FIDM Tote and transform it with fabric, paint, patches, beads, rhinestones or anything that inspires you. 10 lucky winning designs will get chosen! Stop by Student Activities, Room 425 for more details to apply.

Sketches are due May 3. Contest ends May 25.


April 23 - May 4

Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

DIY AIR PLANTS

We’re celebrating Earth Month! Add more greenery to your apartment by decorating your own plant pottery to take home with you. Supplies will be provided.

Tuesday, April 24 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Student Lounge Patio

The Industry Club Welcomes:

Celebrity Fashion DENIM DAY Designer Intrested in being a fashion designer and entreprenuer? Hear from celebrity designer, Walter Mendez, whose creations have been featured on celebrities like Beyonce, Britney Spears, Selena Gomez, Mel B, Jennifer Lopez, Camila Cabello and more.

Wear denim with a purpose, support survivors, and educate yourself and others about sexual assualt and rape! Sign our pledge to support survivors. #endrapeculture

Wednesday, April 25 All Day

Tuesday, April 24 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425 FIDM MODETM Magazine Hosts:

A Look Behind the Magazine

Interested in learning what it takes to put a magazine together? Join FIDM MODETM Magazine for our first photoshoot of the quarter, a make-over!

Thursday. April 26 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

The Industry Club Hosts:

Phi Theta Kappa Social:

Self Defense Class Join PTK for this safety workshop led by Peace Over Violence. Empowerment selfdefense is a set of awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies, and physical techniques. These enable one to successfully prevent, escape, resist, and survive violent assaults. Sign up in Room 425.

Friday, April 27 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 500

Student Council Hosts:

Confidence Pinkies Up: An email ettiquette Workshop workshop Lost for words when you have to send a professional email? No worries, we got you! Join us for tea time and learn the unwritten rules of email etiquette to make the best impressions.

Tuesday, May 1 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425

You got what it takes, you just haven’t realized it yet. Learn impactful ways to let your confidence speak for you. Whether your’e asking someone out on a date, going to an interview, networking or asking for a raise, confidence is key.

Wednesday, May 2 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

Girl Power Day Ladies! Let’s have a serious (and fun) chat about our bodies. Remove the stigma that comes with being a woman. Embrace your femininity and feel empowered with PTK. Who runs the world?!

Tuesday, May 1 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

FIDM MODE™ Magazine:

FIDM Tote Bag Challenge! Looking for a way to get involved in MODE™ Magazine? Here’s your chance to showcase your talent. MODE is looking for fun and creative designed FIDM Tote Bags to feature in their upcoming issue. Take the classic FIDM Tote and transform it with fabric, paint, patches, beads, rhinestones or anything that inspires you. 10 lucky winning designs will get chosen! Stop by Student Activities, Room 425 for more details to apply.

Sketches are due May 3. Contest ends May 25.

S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


April 23 - May 4 Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

The Industry Club Welcomes:

DIY AIR PLANTS Celebrity Fashion Designer

We’re celebrating Earth Month! Add more greenery to your apartment by decorating your own plant pottery to take home with you. Intrested in being a fashion designer and Supplies will be provided. entreprenuer? Hear from celebrity designer, Walter Mendez, whose creations have been Tuesday, April 24 featured on celebrities like Beyonce, Britney 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Spears, Selena Gomez, Mel B, Jennifer Lopez, Student Lounge Patio Camila Cabello and more.

DENIM DAY Wear denim with a purpose, support survivors, and educate yourself and others about sexual assualt and rape! Sign our pledge to support survivors. #endrapeculture

Wednesday, April 25 All Day

Tuesday, April 24 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425

FIDM MODETM Magazine Hosts:

A Look Behind the Magazine

Interested in learning what it takes to put a magazine together? Join FIDM MODETM Magazine for our first photoshoot of the quarter, a make-over!

Thursday. April 26 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

The Industry Club Hosts:

Phi Theta Kappa Social:

Self Defense Class Join PTK for this safety workshop led by Peace Over Violence. Empowerment selfdefense is a set of awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies, and physical techniques. These enable one to successfully prevent, escape, resist, and survive violent assaults. Sign up in Room 425.

Tuesday, May 1 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425

Girl Power Day Ladies! Let’s have a serious (and fun) chat about our bodies. Remove the stigma that comes with being a woman. Embrace your femininity and feel empowered with PTK. Who runs the world?!

Tuesday, May 1 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

Friday, April 27 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 500

Student Council Hosts:

Confidence Pinkies Up: An email ettiquette Workshop workshop Lost for words when you have to send a professional email? No worries, we got you! Join us for tea time and learn the unwritten rules of email etiquette to make the best impressions.

Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

You got what it takes, you just haven’t realized it yet. Learn impactful ways to let your confidence speak for you. Whether your’e asking someone out on a date, going to an interview, networking or asking for a raise, confidence is key.

Wednesday, May 2 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

FIDM MODE™ Magazine:

FIDM Tote Bag Challenge! Looking for a way to get involved in MODE™ Magazine? Here’s your chance to showcase your talent. MODE is looking for fun and creative designed FIDM Tote Bags to feature in their upcoming issue. Take the classic FIDM Tote and transform it with fabric, paint, patches, beads, rhinestones or anything that inspires you. 10 lucky winning designs will get chosen! Stop by Student Activities, Room 425 for more details to apply.

Sketches are due May 3. Contest ends May 25.


fonts used

Avenir Next Condensed Helvetica Neue Imprint MT Shadow L & C Hairline Pistilli Minion Pro Courier Bodoni 72 Oldstyle Firenze Porter Baskerville Lubalin Graph Elephant Adequate

58 S T E P H A N I E S A N T I A G O P O R T F O L I O T Y P O G R A P H Y


Zapfino

Textura American Typewriter Bauhaus Bodoni 72 Smallcaps

Stephanie santiago pages  
Stephanie santiago pages  
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