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The New Generation of Artists

Richard Avedon

photographer UNIQUE STYLE

Lo Chan Peng Egon Schiele EROTIC PAINTINGS

Infinite

ART SUMMER 2015


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Letter From The Editor

Perfect Food/Culture/Travel

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The List of Product

Lo Chan Peng Oil Painting of Hunting Muse

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Richard Avedon A Portrait of an Artist

Egon Schiele Visually Stunning and Unnerving

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CONTENTS Infinite

SUMMER 2015


EXPERIENCE THE PASSION OF ART

Infinite, the magazine on art, photography, sculpture, culture, artists and techniques. Your guide to techniques that inspire the creative process, Infinite magazine is your tool to the trade.

www.infinitemagazine.com

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Letter from the Editor Dear reader Pass through trying and observing a variety of techniques inspires more creative possibilities. The Canvas magazine is the most direct and accessible sharing platform of art. Even if no enough money and time, audiences also can receive the state-of-the-art information. Audience will pick up the Canvas magazine to enhance their artistic and creative accomplishment and enjoying under the cultivation of art. Monthly publication with contents focused on art, photograph, sculpture, culture, artists and techniques. Form of art is unlimited, artistic creation is infinite, and experiencing artistic passion of art is eternal. The vital audience is the most creative ages from 20 to 35 of men and women. Meng Chun Chien

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Perfect

Food.Culture.Travel

Dessert Rose Found on bakedbyanintrovert.com

When sweet is not enough Typical cake ingredients are flour, sugar, eggs, and butter or oil, with some recipes also requiring additional liquid (for example milk or water) and leavening agents (such as yeast or baking powder). Common additional flavourings include dried, candied or fresh fruit, nuts, cocoa or extracts, and numerous substitutions for the primary ingredients are possible. Cakes can also be filled with fruit preserves or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders, or candied fruit.ateur cook

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Perfect

Food.Culture.Travel

window

dressing

The exhibition covers four contients Ebay is my Westfield, my diary, my time-killer, my downfall, and it’s 20 years old today. I first signed up when I was 16 years old, I had to verify using my dad’s credit card, hence every parcel I receive today still being addressed to Malcolm. I started small, with a pair of tortoiseshell cat-eye sunglasses. I still remember the way it felt when they arrived, the handwritten Jiffy bag, the pennies they cost, the sense that, if I went deep enough into this brand-new internet, somewhere around the world somebody was waiting to sell me a perfect life, only lightly soiled.

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Written by Eva Wiseman Photographed by Meng Chun Chien


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Perfect

Food.Culture.Travel

On The Road Nature Always Take The Scenic Route. Typical cake ingredients are flour, sugar, eggs, and butter or oil, with some recipes also requiring additional liquid (for example milk or water) and leavening agents (such as yeast or baking powder). Common additional flavourings include dried, candied or fresh fruit, nuts, cocoa or extracts, and numerous substitutions for the primary ingredients are possible. Cakes can also be filled with fruit preserves or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders, or candied fruit.

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Photographed by Meng Chun Chien By Robert Reid 26 September 2012


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Pure-Bristle Brushes In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art; however, some theories restrict the concept of “artistic works” to modern Western societies.[9] One early sense of

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the definition of art is closely related to the older Latin meaning, which roughly translates to “skill” or “craft,” .

THE LIST

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Carving Tools In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art; however, some theories restrict the concept of “artistic works” to modern Western societies.

Palette In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art; however, some theories re-

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strict the concept of “artistic works” to modern Western societies.

Harris Decking Roller In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art.

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Paint Bucket In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long

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as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art.

Canon Camera In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art.

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Çopic Marker In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art to contemporary art.

Pastel In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind: from early pre-historic art its etymology.

Bristle Brushes

In the perspective of the history of art, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind:.

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“It’s just a beginning, not an end.” ---- Chan-Peng Lo

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Lo Chan Peng Taiwanese 1983

Lo Chan Peng’s Oil Paintings of Haunting Muses Article by AKI Gallert When viewing Taiwanese artist Lo Chan Peng’s body of work, the artist’s devotion to his specific subjects becomes immediately apparent. Lo will do numerous iterations of the same work, almost like multiple photo takes for a fashion editorial, rendering the same model from various angles and exploring the visual richness of her often-elaborate costume. Except these renditions are not quick sketches, but fully-fledged oil-on-canvas paintings that often span one, if not two, meters in each direction. Lo’s work straddles the boundary between beauty and disgust. His doe-eyed vixens dazzle with pop star good looks, but upon closer inspection, their blue veins, visible wounds and glazed-over eyes reveal the work’s disturbing dimension. Take a look at Lo Chan Peng’s recent oil paintings below.

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HOW TO TREAT PAINTING AS NATURAL AS DRINKING WATER The artist alters between two paralleled threads balance the strength to feed the other.

A native of Jia Yi, Lo Chan-peng is best known for his incredible portrait paintings of disfigured and mutilated females that made the viewer question the uncomfortable subject matter while feeling enticed to look closer. After receiving his master degree at the National Taiwan Normal Unviersity in Fine Arts, he became an artist-in-residence at ESMoA’s art laboratory in Berlin, Germany, in 2011 and then in Los Angeles, US, in 2013. During his illustrious career, Lo Chan-peng has participated in a number of solo and joint exhibitions including the 2012 Tokyo exhibition: “Mancy’s Art Night.” He has also participated in a number of international shows which have taken Lo Chanpeng and his works around the world from Bonn, Germany to Ithaca, New York.

What is most spectacular about his paintings is the way in which he renders so detailed his figure and does so repetitively not unlike a photographer’s film roll after a fashion shoot. The similarities end there, however, as with iteration, the figure does not get closer to the glamour shot desired but is instead transposed further into an area of uncomfortable existence. As described by Nastia Voynovskaya: “Lo’s work straddles the boundary between beauty and disgust. His doe-eyed vixens dazzle with pop star good looks, but upon closer inspection, their blue veins, visible wounds and glazed-over eyes reveal the work’s disturbing dimension.”

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Solo Exhibition 01

The Edge of Darkness

Born in Jia Yi, Lo Chan Peng received master degree with National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Fine Arts. He was granted Kaohsiung Awards in 2008 and The Chi-Mei Art Cultivation Awards in 2007. Solo exhibitions: ART HK 2010; 2009 “Strawberry Generation Studio”, Aki Gallery, Taipei. Selected group exhibitions: 2010 “YES TAIWAN: 2010 Taiwan Biennial”, National Taiwan museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan; 2010 “Post-Adolescence”, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung and Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei; 2009 “Small World”, E105 Gallery, Bonn, Germany; 2005 “National Art Exhibition of the Republic of China traveling exhibition”, Taichung, Taipei, Kaohsiung.

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Preparation The rise of the most talented and popular artist Lo Chan-Peng is not an accident but a beautiful legend as he was awarded by Union Culture & Art foundation Young Artist Award, The Chi-Mei Art Cultivation Awards, and the first prize of Kaohsiung Awards, and also invited to join many international art fairs later on. In 2009, his first solo exhibition at Aki gallery exposed his works to the world, and his extreme realistic skill, scary content, uncomfortable pose

of models immediately caused a huge affect in art industry at the time. After four years, his new series “Ashen face” gets rid of the exaggeration of color and dress, and the pale skin points out the deepest inside emotion of young generation. This change amazes whole art industry, and causes a long waiting list of his works. In the meantime, Lo was invited by ESMOA(El Segundo Museum of Art to exhibit with art master such as Pablo Picasso Anselm Kiefer this May, and he was the only Asian artist among them. The owner of ESMOA, Mr. Sweeney said “Lo’s works are like film! The creating process combines professionals from different fields. His works are like stage, we see vibrant and live creations. He invents a unique Taiwan style. You will never see another Lo Chan-Peng” After couple years, Lo pushes his works and himself to a extremely high level.

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Solo Exhibition 02

The so-called “Ink Art”has already transcend the traditional concept of manipulating certain skills and ink on paper reflex in various forms. Artists digest and convert their comprehension of traditional ink art to present a modern appearance. This June, July and August, lead by Taiwanese ink art to bring out China and Japan’s ink art conversation. AKI Gallery gathers Taiwan, China and Japan’s contemporary ink art, trying to explore different aspects of “ink art”. First artist unveils the curtain is the notable Chan-Peng Lo who’s been the focus of Taiwanese contemporary art. This time he uses ink along with acrylic color and his realistic skills to forge an original genre of portrait works.

The Spiritual Portrait 21

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“By painting, I try to conceal my spirit on the canvas.” ---- Chan-Peng Lo Preparation Chan-Peng Lo who has been noted for depicting photorealistic oil painting, capturing people’s spirit and character with dripping ink and acrylic color. Seemingly casual flows and splashes of ink and water marks, conceal artist’s precise control capabilities. Delicate textures are hidden under wild spills, creating a turbulent but sensitive monologue atmosphere. “Berlin Calling” series created in Berlin 2011 consists of bold strokes and color blocks. While the series created in 2013 LA, enhances details contrast and more calligraphy techniques. He’s been thinking how to treat painting as natural as drinking water. It takes the hand, the brain and the canvas to be no barrier between each

other. However, the experience in Berlin and LA changed his ethereal way of painting and made him start everything from nothing. If we say that his seamless oil painting conceals his soul and energy, as he said “without any premises or purpose, I begin an investigating journey of unknown”, rather spare and open series of ink can be considered as a spiritual inspection. In the process, the soul is liberated freely to search for more possibilities. The artist alters between two paralleled threads balance the strength to feed the other. Like inhaling and exhaling, this is the way the artist survives. “It’s just a beginning, not an end.” Chan-Peng Lo will keep forward probing and devote effort to establish exclusive uncommon works. Nearly 30 works from 2011 to 2013 will be shown at Aki Gallery. It is pre

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RICHARD AVEDON A Portrait of an Artist By Kely Smith

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hat do Jean Genet, Jimmy Durante, Brigitte Bardot, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jacques Cousteau, Andy Warhol, and Lena Horne have in com-

mon? They were a few of the many personalities caught on film by photographer Richard Avedon. For more than fifty years, Richard Avedon’s portraits have filled the pages of the country’s finest magazines. His stark imagery and brilliant insight into his subjects’ characters has made him one of the premier American portrait photographers. Born in New York in 1923, Richard Avedon dropped out of high school and joined the Merchant Marine’s photographic section. Upon his return in 1944, he found a job as a photographer in a department store. Within two years he had been “found” by an art director at Harper’s Bazaar and was producing work for them as well as Vogue, Look, and a number of other magazines. During the early years, Avedon made his living primarily through work in advertising. His real passion, however, was the portrait and its ability to express the essence of its subject.

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“A l l p h o t o g r a p h s a r e a c c u r a t e . None of them is the truth.”

As Avedon’s notoriety grew, so did the opportunities to meet and photograph celebrities from a broad range of disciplines. Avedon’s ability to present personal views of public figures, who were otherwise distant and inaccessible, was immediately recognized by the public and the celebrities themselves. Many sought out Avedon for their most public images. His artistic style brought a sense of sophistication and authority to the portraits. More than anything, it is Avedon’s ability to set his subjects at ease that helps him create true, intimate, and lasting photographs.

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Throughout his career Avedon maintained a unique style all his own.

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Famous for their minimalism, Avedon portraits are often well lit and in front of white backdrops. When printed, the images regularly contain the dark outline of the film in which the image was framed. Within the minimalism of his empty studio, Avedon’s subjects move freely, and it is this movement which brings a sense of spontaneity to the images. Often containing only a portion of the person being photographed, the images seem intimate in their imperfection. While many photographers are interested in either catching a moment in time or preparing a formal image, Avedon has found a way to do both.

Beyond his work in the magazine industry, Avedon has collaborated on a number of books of portraits. In 1959 he worked with Truman Capote on a book that documented some of the most famous and important people of the century. Observations included images of Buster Keaton, Gloria Vanderbilt, Pablo Picasso, Dr. J. Rob-

ert Oppenheimer, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mae West. Around this same time he began a series of images of patients in mental hospitals. Replacing the controlled environment of the studio with that of the hospital he was able to recreate the genius of his other portraits with non-celebrities.

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The brutal reality of the lives of the insane was a bold contrast to his other work. Years later he would again drift from his celebrity portraits with a series of studio images of drifters, carnival workers, and working class Americans. Throughout the 1960s Avedon continued to work for Harper’s Bazaar and in 1974 he collaborated with James Baldwin on the book Nothing Personal. Having met in New York in 1943, Baldwin and Avedon were friends and collaborators for more than thirty years. For all of the 1970s and 1980s Avedon continued working for Vogue magazine, where he would take some of the most famous portraits of the decades. In 1992 he became the first staff photographer for The New Yorker, and two years later the Whitney Museum brought together fifty years of his work in the retrospective, “Richard Avedon: Evidence”. He was voted one of the ten greatest photographers in the world by Popular Photography magazine, and in 1989 received an honorary doctorate from the Royal College of Art in London. Today, his pictures continue to bring us a closer, more intimate view of the great and the famous. Avedon died on October 1st, 2004.

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June 12 marks the artist’s 125th birthday. Here are some things you need to know about one of the leading figures behind Austrian Expressionism.

EGON SCHIELE Article by Christie Chu, Friday June 12, 2015

Known for his erotic paintings as well as his anguished self-portraits, Egon Schiele has remained a controversial figure in art history. Despite his infamy, Gustav Klimt became one of Schiele’s biggest supporters as well as his mentor; the elder Secessionist artist introduced Schiele to the Wiener Werkstätte, the fine arts society founded by Secessionists Josef Hoffmann and Koloman Moser. June 12 marks the artist’s 125th birthday. Here are some things you need to know about one of the leading figures behind Austrian Expressionism, who once wrote in his diary, “I do not deny that I have made drawings and watercolors of an erotic nature. But they are always works of art. Are there no artists who have done erotic pictures?”

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“At present, I

am mainly ob-

serving the

physical motion of mountains,

water, trees and

flowers. One is

everywhere re-

minded of similar movements

in the human

body, of simi-

lar impulses of

joy and suffer-

ing in plants.� E. Schiele

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Austria’s position within the maelstrom of twentieth-century cultural and political history is extremely ambiguous: at once central and off the beaten track. The small nation that came into being after 1918, almost wholly devoid of international presence, was easily subsumed into Hitler’s Reich in 1938. On the losing side in both world wars, Austria was further obscured by a tendency to write history from the perspective of the victor nations. In art, this meant that the trajectory of modernism was traced from prewar France to postwar America, with an overriding emphasis on formalist innovations. Germany’s more figural Expressionism was grudgingly acknowledged but never embraced. Austrian modernism - which combined Expressionist elements with traces of Symbolism and Art Nouveau - was for many years wholly ignored in the West.

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A GREAT INNOVATOR OF MODERN FIGURE PAINTING.

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Austria's position within the maelstrom of twentieth-century cultural and political history is extremely ambiguous: at once central and off the beaten track. The small nation that came into being after 1918, almost wholly devoid of international presence, was easily subsumed into Hitler's Reich in 1938. On the losing side in both world wars, Austria was further obscured by a tendency to write history from the perspective of the victor nations. In art, this meant that the trajectory of modernism was traced from prewar France to postwar America, with an overriding emphasis on formalist innovations. Germany's more figural Expressionism was grudgingly acknowledged but never embraced. Austrian modernism - which combined Expressionist elements with traces of Symbolism and Art Nouveau - was for many years wholly ignored in the West.

Visually Stunning and Unnerving

This began to change gradually in the 1970s, as American and British scholars woke up to the bizarre concentration of multifaceted talents who had occupied the Viennese capital in the first two decades of last century. Fin-de-siecle Vienna has since acquired legendary status in interdisciplinary cultural studies. Histories of modern Austrian art generally begin with the architectural boom that swept Vienna in the second half of the nineteenth century. During this period of strong economic growth, the Emperor Franz Josef constructed a necklace of public edifices along the broad Ringstrasse that encircles Vienna's inner city, prompting artists to flock to the

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Egon Schiele Portraits By Neue Galerie

cofounder and first president of the Vienna Secession, Klimt remained the most successful artist of his day. Nonetheless, being exiled from the public to the private sector rankled him for the rest of his life.

o earned his reputation executing commissions on the interior walls of structures such as theaters and museums. The favored style combined a sort of blowsy eroticism with a firm grip on classical and historical allegory. Klimt gradually moved away from the accepted formula, however, evolving a personal symbolism that was less conventionally readable as well as more overtly sexual. This combination proved devastating so far as the tasted of staid Vienna were concerned: Klimt was banished from the ranks of public muralists, and henceforth had to seek support solely from well-heeled private patrons. As

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Egon Schiele was born into this peculiar atmosphere on June 12, 1890. With public patronage on the wane and the commercial gallery system still in its infancy, Klimt and his colleagues had cobbled together a fairly impressive network of private patronage, capable of financing not only the Secession's magnificent exhibition hall, but the efforts of the notoriously inefficient Vienna Workshop, a design collective that endeavored to unite the fine and the applied arts. The Secession's showings of foreign art introduced to Vienna a rather skewed view of modernism, one that placed more emphasis on international Symbolism than on the French Impressionism which

had such a decisive influence almost everywhere else in Europe. Edvard Munch and Vincent van Gogh, rather than Manet and Claude Monet, became the dominant role models. This caused Austrian art to grow ever more brooding and introspective just at the moment when its financial


support system was in a state of extreme flux. All his life, Schiele yearned to create the sort of grand allegorical murals that Klimt had once painted,

but there was no public outlet for such works and private clients rarely bought them. Unlike Klimt's society portraits, those painted by Schiele and his Expressionist colleagues were unflattering, and few patrons were eager for sittings. Thus a huge void developed between Schiele's artistic desire and his realistic prospects - a gap that was to haunt his entire brief career. Schiele's family environment was not particularly encouraging for a fledgling painter. Adolf Schiele, the artist's father, was the stationmaster in the small town of Tulln, about eighteen miles west of Vienna, and it was expected that his firstborn son would follow him into railroad service. Little Egon's obsession with drawing trains which supposedly began at the age of one-and -a-half-led Adolf to hope that his son might become an engineer. Certainly he never

dreamed the boy would instead want to be an artist, or, for that matter, considered this a fitting career. Education being fundamental to a bourgeois profession, Schiele was sent off at the age of eleven to attend a Realgymnasium in the town of Krems, some twenty-five miles distant from Tulln. The boy's loneliness and general lack of interest in academic subjects, however, made of him a poor student. Private tutors and a different Gymnasium did nothing to reverse the situation. Indeed, by the time Egon was fourteen or fifteen, he had been left back several times and was some two or three years older than most of his classmates. Matters were hardly helped by the death in 1904 of Adolf from syphilis, which he had contracted around the time of his marriage. The circumstances of Adolf Schiele's illness precipitated a drastic drop from the family's previously middle-class station. Several years of increasing madness and supposedly the loss of all his savings preceded the father's death. Marie Schiele, his widow, was forced to turn to wealthier

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NEVER END We believe in what we do and we hope that you do too.

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Mchien summer15