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The Art of Typography

PORT PORT FOLIO FOLIO spring 2018 NB Natalia Baston


table of

contents

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- Portfolio Pagination - Introduction - Personal Logo - Typographical Terms - Character Studies - Sketch Book - Ubiquitous Type - Logo Designs - Museum Logo Designs - FIDM Newsletter Designs - Newsletter - Historical Typography Project - POP! Designs


4 The Art of Typography

PORT PORT FOLIO FOLIO spring 2018 NB 1 Natalia Baston

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portfolio pagination

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introduction

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Let me introduce myself... My name is Natalia Baston, I am from Mexico City and I am a Graphic Designer. This is my Typography Portfolio in which everyone will be able to see everything I did in ten weeks. I´ve did a lot of things, I created my logo, a MoMT (Museum of Modern Typography) logo, a newspaper layout, some character studies, learned how to organize elements, and Art Deco presentation, I even did a new version of the FIDM weekly newspaper, I did and learned a lot of things and everything appears in the portfolio! Hope you enjoy all the work that I did and that you can notice the hard work on every piece of work.


personal

logo

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NB NATA L I A B A S T O N

GRAPHIC DESIGN


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A

Recognizable by its dramatic thin and thick strokes, and the elaborate swirls on the serifs.

Calligraphy

Blackletter

Distressed

A

Hairline Rule

A

Also called rough or grunge styletext looks as if it has been weathered, eroded, crumpled up, torn, smudged, overly copied, or in some other way physically stressed or aged.

The lightest font family weight name; can refer to thinnest stroke of a letter.

Typefaces used for large type like banners and headlines

Display

A

Handlettering

Typographical symbol or glyph used to introduce items in a list.

Bullet

It uses the sames principles of thick downstrokes and light upstrokes, but is written with a pen of some kind rather than a nib and ink

Small stroke at the beginning or end of main strokes of a letter.

Serif The horizonal spacing between two consecutive characters.

A

Reversed

Kerning Exaggerated decorative serif, terminal or tail.

Swash

Design and execution of lettering with a broad tip instrument, brush, or other writing instruments.

Grotesque

Process of printing light colored or white text on a dark or black background used for emphais or producing visual impact.

Used as a synonym for sans serif fonts in general. More specifically, it refers to the set of sans serif fonts produced around 1815.


typogrphical terms

Cursive

e

s f

Drop Cap

A

Wood Type

.

n

Handwriting with joined-up letters. Can be used to describe an italic font which is similar to handwriting.

A large initial letter that drops below the first line of a paragraph, usually used at the beginning of a section or chapter. Heavy thick-stroked typeface with rounded serifs. The absence of sharp corners made it very well sutied to wood type.

Slab Serif

Pt.

12

12. pt rule

Glyph

Tracking

Two or more letters that are connected to form one character, primarily decorative.

Oblique

Ligature

A

Dingbat

Lesser contraste betweeen thick and thin strokes with serifs that are as thick as the strokes and squared off at the ends.

A

Transitional

Points are the measurment most commonly used in print to indicate the size of type, as well as the space between lines, referred to as line spacing or leading.

Ornament, character or spacer used in typesetting, sometimes more formally known as a printerÂŤs ornament or printerÂŤs character.

A glyph is an individual character. It might be a letter, an accented letter, a ligature, a punctuation mark, a dingbat, etc. Spacing added to or removed from groups of letters outside the original spacing and kerning specified within a font file. Slanted versions of their roman companion with no major design differences, other than their angle. They are most often found in sans serif typeface families. A greater contrast between thick and thin strokes. Wider, bracketed serifs with flat bases.


character

studies

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A A

F ??


a

CHARACTER STUDIES

N

o one knows why ‘A’ is the first letter of our alphabet. Some think it’s because this letter represents one of the most common vowel

sounds in ancient languages of the western hemisphere. Other sources argue against this theory because there were no vowel sounds in the Phoenician language. (The Phoenician alphabet is generally thought to be the basis of the one we use today.) Some say the Phoenicians chose the head of an ox to represent the ‘A’ sound (for the Phoenicians, this was actually a glottal stop). The ox was a common, important animal to the Phoenicians. It was their main power source for heavy work. Oxen plowed the fields, harvested crops, and hauled food to market. Some sources also claim that the ox was often the main course at meals. A symbol for the ox would have been an important communication tool for the Phoenicians. It somewhat naturally follows that an ox symbol would be the first letter of the alphabet.


THE FONT DIDOT The first Modern typeface is attributed to Frenchman Firmin Didot (son of Franรงois-Ambroise Didot), and first graced the printed page in 1784. His types were soon followed by the archetypal Didone from Bodoni. The Italian type designer, punchcutter and printer Giambattista Bodoni (what a great name! [1740-1813]) drew his influence from the Romains du Roi (with its flat, unbracketed serifs) and the types of John Baskerville (high contrast), for whom he showed great admiration.


F

CHARACTER STUDIES

I

n its earliest years the letter that evolved into our F was an Egyptian hieroglyph that literally was a picture of a snake. This was around 3,000 B.C. Through the process of simplification over many

years, the F began to lose its snakelike character and by the time it emerged as an Egyptian hieratic form it wasn´t much more than a vertical stroke capped by a small crossbar. With a slight stretch of the imagination, it could be said to look like a snail. This may be why the Phoenicians called the letter “waw”, a word meaning nail or hook, when they adapted the symbol for their alphabet. In its job as a waw, the character represented a semi-consonant sound, roughly pronounced as the W in the word “know”. However at various times the waw also represented the ´v´and sometimes even the ´u´ sound. While the chracter was eventually dopped from the Greek alphabet, it was able to find work in the Etruscan language. Here it did yeoman´s service until the Romans adopted it as a symbol for the softened ´v´or double ´v´sound. Even today the German language uses the V as and F in words like “vater”, which menas father and is pronounced “fahter”.


F THE FONT ALEXANDER QUILL Alexander Quill was originally desigend in the early 1980´s to be cut in 14 point for casting into foundry type for the setting and printing of limited edition books at Pie Tree Press, Jim Rimmer´s private sanctum. This alphabet exhibits traditional calligraphic tension, which helps

its simple, somewhat octagonal forms play well together for an easy read. Its setting expresses a dramatic sense of history or fantasy.It comes with plenty of built-in-alternates,a gyphset of over 410 characters, and the supports the majority of the Latin-based languages.


?

CHARACTER STUDIES

W

hile to us it may seem that Dexter’s disregard for proper punctuation was one of his idiosyncrasies, this ca-

sual approach is absolutely in keeping with the heritage of our written language. The earliest hieroglyphic and alphabetic inscriptions had no punctuation symbols at all: no commas to indicate pauses, no periods between sentences. In fact, there weren’t even spaces between words.

It wasn’t till later, in formal inscriptions, that word divisions

were indicated by a dot centered between words. Still later, spaces were used in place of the dots, and by the seventh century the convention was quite common. In some early medieval manuscripts, two vertically aligned dots represented a full stop at the end of a sentence. Eventually one of the dots was dropped, and the remaining dot served as a period, colon or comma, depending on whether it was aligned with the top, middle, or base of the lowercase letters.

The basic form of the question mark was developed much

later, in sixteenth-century England. Most typographic historians contend that the design for the question mark was derived from an abbreviation of the Latin word quaestio, which simply means “what.” At first this symbol consisted of a capital Q atop a lowercase ‘o’. Over time this early logotype was simplified to the mark we use today.


THE TYPEFACE OPTIMA

German typeface designer Hermann Zapf, who also created Palatino, designed Optima between 1952-1955. His intent was to create a classic roman without serifs. The typeface was commercially released in 1958 and became an instant success. Over the years many foundries released look-alike fonts.

In 2002 Hermann Zapf and Akira Kobayashia redesigned the font family. This new version is called Optima Nova.


sketch

book

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ubiquitous type “Typography is the craft of endowing human language with a durable visual form, and thus with an independent existence.�


logo

designs

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logo designs


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logo designs


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logo designs


logo designs


museum logo

designs

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museum logo

designs

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FIDM

newspaper designs

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newsletter


historical

typography project

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ART DECO Cool, jazzy, a little world-weary


T

he strong and elegant style that was first coined as Art Deco in Paris back in 1925 derived from the Art DÊcoratifs, a French Government sponsored international exhibition of decorative arts. Art Deco´s bold lines, geometric shapes, and modern aesthetic is a representational view into the vision of the future during the wartime and post-wartime era.


A

fter WWI, Art Deco design started to shift from the Art Nouveau essence of design that consisted of flowing, floral illustration to bold, geometric graphic design. The aesthetics of Art Deco typography reflected much of the cultural transitions between the 1920’s and 1940’s, when metalworking machinery and freight trains started changing the world and how it worked and even physically looked. The strong vertical lines and aerodynamic forms in Art Deco typography mirrored the skyscrapers, cars, art, furniture, jewelry, fashion, and even the music at the time.


O

ne of the most successful designers of the time was Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, who won first prize at the Exposition in Paris in 1925 for a poster entitled Bรปcheron, and who continued to create striking posters throughout the period. Born in Ukraine in 1901 to French parents, he moved to Paris to study art in 1915 and had aspirations to be a painter.


I

nitially turning to graphic design as a quick fix financially, he surprisingly grew to prefer the poster as an art form as it “gave the painter the golden opportunity to communicate with the large public.� His work continues to be appreciated and mimicked throughout the world, and he interestingly designed one of the most famous icons; the Yves Saint Laurent monogram in 1963.


C

assandre’s designs greatly influenced advertising art in the first half of the 20th century. He believed that “Designing a poster means solving a technical and commercial problem.... in a language that can be understood by the common man.� In 1926, Cassandre co-founded the advertising agency Alliance Graphique. His agency created many of the classic designs of the 20th century and evoked a particularly French style.


C

assandre designed several classic art deco typefaces: Bifur (1929), Acier Noir (1935) and Piegnot (1937). He only used capitals in his designs as he believed that they were more legible, especially when seen on a large scale. The way Cassandre links his typography with his images is one of the hallmarks of his design. Type is not a separate element but is integrated with the image to create the unified concept of the design.


pop! week one

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pop! week two

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pop! week three

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pop! week four

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Natalia Baston Graphic Design

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week eight

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fonts

used

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Raconteur NF Mr Eaves XL Mod OT Objektiv Mk 1 Madre Script HWT Mardell Helvetica Neue Park Lane NF Shorthalt Thin Didot

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